WorldWideScience

Sample records for multiparticle photonuclear reactions

  1. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyshev, S. S. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Dzhilavyan, L. Z. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, A. A., E-mail: kuznets@depni.sinp.msu.ru; Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  2. Photonuclear reactions with zinc : A case for clinical linacs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boztosun, I.; Dapo, H.; Karakoc, M.; Ozmen, S. F.; Cecen, Y.; Coban, A.; Caner, T.; Bayram, E.; Saito, T. R.; Akdogan, T.; Bozkurt, V.; Kucuk, Y.; Kaya, D.; Harakeh, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    The use of bremsstrahlung photons produced by a linac to induce photonuclear reactions is wide spread. However, using a clinical linac to produce the photons is a new concept. We aimed to induce photonuclear reactions on zinc isotopes and measure the subsequent transition energies and half-lives. Fo

  3. Bibliographic index to photonuclear reaction data (1955--1992)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asami, Tetsuo [Data Engineering, Inc., Yokohama (Japan); Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Reactor Engineering

    1993-10-01

    Japanese Nuclear Data Committee (JNDC) has a plan to compile the evaluated data library for photon-induced nuclear reaction cross sections, and the work on the data evaluation is in progress at the present. In the evaluations for these data a bibliographic index for neutron nuclear data is required. As the bibliographic index to photonuclear reactions, several excellent compilations have been done at some research institutes in the world, and have contributed to various basic and applied researches on the photonuclear reactions. For example, there are the abstract sheets published by US National Bureau of Standards and the data index published regularly in Russia. On the other hand, the four-center network on nuclear data (US National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven, Russian Nuclear Data Center at Obninsk, NEA Data Bank at Paris and IAEA Nuclear Data Section at Vienna) compiles and exchanges the numerical data on photonuclear reactions as well as on neutron-induced ones, in the EXFOR format. Those numerical data are available for users. There is, however, no bibliographic index to photonuclear reactions, available for general users. Therefore, the present work to make a photonuclear reaction data index has been done urgently to contribute to the above-mentioned data evaluation. Although these data might be still incomplete and have some defects, we have decided to serve this as the first edition of our photonuclear reaction index.

  4. Photonuclear reactions with Zinc: A case for clinical linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Boztosun, I; Karakoç, M; Özmen, S F; Çeçen, Y; Çoban, A; Caner, T; Bayram, E; Saito, T R; Akdoğan, T; Bozkurt, V; Kuçuk, Y; Kaya, D; Harakeh, M N

    2015-01-01

    The use of bremsstrahlung photons produced by a linac to induce photonuclear reactions is wide spread. However, using a clinical linac to produce the photons is a new concept. We aimed to induce photonuclear reactions on zinc isotopes and measure the subsequent transition energies and half-lives. For this purpose, a bremsstrahlung photon beam of 18 MeV endpoint energy produced by the Philips SLI-25 linac has been used. The subsequent decay has been measured with a well-shielded single HPGe detector. The results obtained for transition energies are in good agreement with the literature data and in many cases surpass these in accuracy. For the half-lives, we are in agreement with the literature data, but do not achieve their precision. The obtained accuracy for the transition energies show what is achievable in an experiment such as ours. We demonstrate the usefulness and benefits of employing clinical linacs for nuclear physics experiments.

  5. Development of the Experimental Photo-Nuclear Reaction Database in Hokkaido University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinaga, A.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear databases are important tools to apply nuclear phenomena to various fields of nuclear engineering. It is now recognized that the databases must be further developed for photo-nuclear reaction data for nuclear security, safety and nonproliferation applications. Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Centre (JCPRG) has contributed to the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Library (EXFOR) which is developed by the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres under coordination by IAEA. We report here on the recent compilation of the nuclear data files for the photonuclear reaction.

  6. Hyperon production in photonuclear reactions on protons and deuterons : The Kappa(0)Sigma(+) channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohner, H; Bacelar, J; Castelijns, R; Messchendorp, J; Shende, S; Maeda, K; Tamura, H; Nakamura, SN; Hashimoto, O

    2004-01-01

    With the combined setup of the Crystal Barrel and TAPS photonspectrometers at ELSA in Bonn we have studied photonuclear reactions on protons and deuterons. From the series of experiments on single and multiple neutral meson emission we concentrate here on the hyperon production off protons and deute

  7. Photonuclear reactions in astrophysical p-process: Theoretical calculations and experiment simulation based on ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Luo, Wen; Balabanski, Dimiter; Goriely, Stephane; Matei, Catalin; Tesileanu, Ovidiu

    2017-09-01

    The astrophysical p-process is an important way of nucleosynthesis to produce the stable and proton-rich nuclei beyond Fe which can not be reached by the s- and r-processes. In the present study, the astrophysical reaction rates of (γ,n), (γ,p), and (γ,α) reactions are computed within the modern reaction code TALYS for about 3000 stable and proton-rich nuclei with 12 reaction rates are very sensitive to the nuclear potential, and the better determination of nuclear potential would be important to reduce the uncertainties of reaction rates. Meanwhile, the Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility is being developed, which will provide the great opportunity to experimentally study the photonuclear reactions in p-process. Simulations of the experimental setup for the measurements of the photonuclear reactions 96Ru(γ,p) and 96Ru(γ,α) are performed. It is shown that the experiments of photonuclear reactions in p-process based on ELI-NP are quite promising.

  8. Experimental approaches for determining in-medium properties of hadrons from photo-nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Metag, Volker; Berghäuser, Henning; Friedrich, Stefan; Lemmer, Boris; Mosel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Properties of hadrons and their modification within strongly interacting matter provide a link between experimental observables and Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) in the non-perturbative sector. The sensitivity of various observables to in-medium modifications of mesons is discussed. The transparency ratio, comparing the meson yield per nucleon within a nucleus relative to that on a free nucleon, is related to the in-medium width of the meson. While the transparency ratio can be determined for any meson lifetime the meson line shape only contains information on in-medium properties if the meson is so short-lived that it decays in the medium after production in a nuclear reaction. Light vector mesons are thus particularly suited for these investigations. The momentum distribution of mesons produced in a photo-nuclear reaction as well as the excitation function also show some sensitivity to different in-medium modification scenarios. As an example, high statistics data taken at MAMI-C on the photoproduction of \\o...

  9. Cu-67 Photonuclear Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starovoitova, Valeriia; Foote, Davy; Harris, Jason; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Segebade, Christian R.; Sinha, Vaibhav; Wells, Douglas P.

    2011-06-01

    Cu-67 is considered as one of the most promising radioisotopes for cancer therapy with monoclonal antibodies. Current production schemes using high-flux reactors and cyclotrons do not meet potential market need. In this paper we discuss Cu-67 photonuclear production through the reaction Zn-68(γ,p)Cu-67. Computer simulations were done together with experiments to study and optimize Cu-67 yield in natural Zn target. The data confirms that the photonuclear method has potential to produce large quantities of the isotope with sufficient purity to be used in medical field.

  10. Production of Medical Radioisotopes with High Specific Activity in Photonuclear Reactions with $\\gamma$ Beams of High Intensity and Large Brilliance

    CERN Document Server

    Habs, D

    2010-01-01

    We study the production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine in $(\\gamma,x{\\rm n}+y{\\rm p})$ photonuclear reactions or ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) photoexcitation reactions with high flux [($10^{13}-10^{15}$)$\\gamma$/s], small diameter $\\sim (100 \\, \\mu$m$)^2$ and small band width ($\\Delta E/E \\approx 10^{-3}-10^{-4}$) $\\gamma$ beams produced by Compton back-scattering of laser light from relativistic brilliant electron beams. We compare them to (ion,$x$n$ + y$p) reactions with (ion=p,d,$\\alpha$) from particle accelerators like cyclotrons and (n,$\\gamma$) or (n,f) reactions from nuclear reactors. For photonuclear reactions with a narrow $\\gamma$ beam the energy deposition in the target can be managed by using a stack of thin target foils or wires, hence avoiding direct stopping of the Compton and pair electrons (positrons). $(\\gamma,\\gamma')$ isomer production via specially selected $\\gamma$ cascades allows to produce high specific activity in multiple excitations, where no back-pumping of the isomer to the ground st...

  11. A convenient method for experimental determination of yields and isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions measured by the activation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, D.; Dobreva, E.; Nenov, N.; Todorov, V.

    1995-02-01

    A generalized exact formula is derived for a determination of the experimental isomeric ratio in any incident particle activation. For the particular case, when the activity of the ground state results from the simultaneous decay of both states and can be conveniently measured, the appropriate modification of this formula is evaluated and applied to six photonuclear reactions induced by 43 MeV bremsstrahlung. The experimental isomeric yield ratios of (γ, 3n) 110m,gIn; (γ, p) (γ, pn), (γ, 2n2p) 117m,gIn; (γ, n) 164m,gHo and (γ, 3n) 162m,gHo are deduced.

  12. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janek, S [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, R [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Jonsson, C [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Brahme, A [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-11-21

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O but also {sup 13}N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery

  13. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, S.; Svensson, R.; Jonsson, C.; Brahme, A.

    2006-11-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11C and 15O but also 13N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12C, 16O and 14N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12C, 16O and 14N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  14. Isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions of molybdenum isotopes induced by bremsstrahlung in the giant dipole resonance region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiep, Tran Duc; An, Truong Thi; Cuong, Phan Viet; Vinh, Nguyen The; Hue, Bui Minh; Belov, A. G.; Maslov, O. D.; Mishinsky, G. V.; Zhemenik, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    We have determined the isomeric ratios of isomeric pairs 97m,gNb, 95m,gNb and 91m,gMo produced in 98Mo(γ, p)97m,gNb, 96Mo(γ, p)95m,gNb and 92Mo(γ, n)91m,gMo photonuclear reactions in the giant dipole resonance (GDR) region by the activation method. The results were analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar data from literature to examine the role of excitation energy, neutron configuration, channel effect and direct and pre-equilibrium processes in (γ, p) photonuclear reactions. In this work the isomeric ratios for 97m,gNb from 14 to 19 MeV, for 195m,gNb from14 to 24 MeV except 20 and 23.5 MeV and for 91m,gMo at 14 and 15 MeV are the first time measurements.

  15. Transmutation of nuclear wastes using photonuclear reactions triggered by Compton backscattering photons at the Shanghai laser electrongamma source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jin-Gen; YUAN Ren-Yong; XU Jia-Qiang; YAN Zhe; FAN Gong-Tao; SHEN Wen-Qing; XU Wang; WANG Hong-Wei; GUO Wei; MA Yu-Gang; CAI Xiang-Zhou; LU Guang-Cheng; XU Yi; PAN Qiang-Yan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the facility of the Shanghai Laser Electron Gamma Source (SLEGS),the transmutation for nuclear wastes such as 137Cs and 129I is investigated.It is found that nuclear waste can be transmuted efficiently via photonuclear reaction triggered by gamma photons generated from Compton backscattering between CO2 laser photons and 3.5 GeV electrons.The nuclear activities of 137Cs and 129I are evaluated and compared with the results of transmutation triggered by bremsstrahlung gamma photons driven by ultra intense laser.Due to the better character of gamma photon spectrum as well as the high brightness of gamma photons,the transmutation rate of Compton backscattering method is much higher than that of the bremsstrahlung method.

  16. A convenient method for experimental determination of yields and isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions measured by the activation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, D. [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Dept. of Physics; Dobreva, E. [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Dept. of Physics; Nenov, N. [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Dept. of Physics; Todorov, V. [A Higher Institute of Medicine, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-03-15

    A generalized exact formula is derived for a determination of the experimental isomeric ratio in any incident particle activation. For the particular case, when the activity of the ground state results from the simultaneous decay of both states and can be conveniently measured, the appropriate modification of this formula is evaluated and applied to six photonuclear reactions induced by 43 MeV bremsstrahlung. The experimental isomeric yield ratios of ({gamma}, 3n) {sup 110m,g}In; ({gamma}, p) ({gamma}, pn), ({gamma}, 2n2p) {sup 117m,g}In; ({gamma}, n) {sup 164m,g}Ho and ({gamma}, 3n) {sup 162m,g}Ho are deduced. ((orig.)).

  17. Calculation of absorbed dose and biological effectiveness from photonuclear reactions in a bremsstrahlung beam of end point 50 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowska, I; Brahme, A; Andreo, P; Gudowski, W; Kierkegaard, J

    1999-09-01

    The absorbed dose due to photonuclear reactions in soft tissue, lung, breast, adipose tissue and cortical bone has been evaluated for a scanned bremsstrahlung beam of end point 50 MeV from a racetrack accelerator. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4B was used to determine the photon source spectrum from the bremsstrahlung target and to simulate the transport of photons through the treatment head and the patient. Photonuclear particle production in tissue was calculated numerically using the energy distributions of photons derived from the Monte Carlo simulations. The transport of photoneutrons in the patient and the photoneutron absorbed dose to tissue were determined using MCNP4B; the absorbed dose due to charged photonuclear particles was calculated numerically assuming total energy absorption in tissue voxels of 1 cm3. The photonuclear absorbed dose to soft tissue, lung, breast and adipose tissue is about (0.11-0.12)+/-0.05% of the maximum photon dose at a depth of 5.5 cm. The absorbed dose to cortical bone is about 45% larger than that to soft tissue. If the contributions from all photoparticles (n, p, 3He and 4He particles and recoils of the residual nuclei) produced in the soft tissue and the accelerator, and from positron radiation and gammas due to induced radioactivity and excited states of the nuclei, are taken into account the total photonuclear absorbed dose delivered to soft tissue is about 0.15+/-0.08% of the maximum photon dose. It has been estimated that the RBE of the photon beam of 50 MV acceleration potential is approximately 2% higher than that of conventional 60Co radiation.

  18. Broadening of {rho}({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) meson produced coherently in the photonuclear reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Swapan [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Nuclear Physics Division, Mumbai (India)

    2013-10-15

    The e{sup +}e{sup -} invariant mass distribution spectra are calculated to estimate the hadron parameters of the {rho} meson produced coherently in the photonuclear reaction. The elementary reaction occurring in the nucleus is considered to proceed as {gamma}N {yields} {rho} {sup 0} N; {rho} {sup 0} {yields} e e{sup +}e{sup -}. We describe the elementary {rho} meson photoproduction by the experimentally determined reaction amplitude f{sub {gamma}N} {sub {yields}{rho}{sup 0}} {sub N}. The {rho} meson propagator is presented by the eikonal form, and the {rho} meson nucleus optical potential V{sub O{rho}} appearing in it is estimated using the ''t {rho}'' approximation. The {rho} meson nucleon scattering amplitude f{sub {rho}N} extracted from the measurements is used to generate this potential. The calculated e{sup +}e{sup -} invariant mass distribution spectra are compared with those measured at Jefferson Laboratory. The calculated results for the transparency ratio are also presented. (orig.)

  19. Production of medical radioisotopes with high specific activity in photonuclear reactions with γ-beams of high intensity and large brilliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habs, D.; Köster, U.

    2011-05-01

    We study the production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine in ( γ, xn+ yp) photonuclear reactions or ( γ, γ') photoexcitation reactions with high-flux [(1013-1015) γ/s], small diameter ˜(100 μm)2 and small bandwidth (Δ E/ E≈10-3-10-4) γ beams produced by Compton back-scattering of laser light from relativistic brilliant electron beams. We compare them to (ion, xn+ yp) reactions with (ion = p,d, α) from particle accelerators like cyclotrons and (n, γ) or (n,f) reactions from nuclear reactors. For photonuclear reactions with a narrow γ-beam the energy deposition in the target can be managed by using a stack of thin target foils or wires, hence avoiding direct stopping of the Compton and pair electrons (positrons). However, for ions with a strong atomic stopping only a fraction of less than 10-2 leads to nuclear reactions resulting in a target heating, which is at least 105 times larger per produced radioactive ion and often limits the achievable activity. In photonuclear reactions the well defined initial excitation energy of the compound nucleus leads to a small number of reaction channels and enables new combinations of target isotope and final radioisotope. The narrow bandwidth γ excitation may make use of the fine structure of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) or fluctuations in γ-width leading to increased cross sections. Within a rather short period compared to the isotopic half-life, a target area of the order of (100 μm)2 can be highly transmuted, resulting in a very high specific activity. ( γ, γ') isomer production via specially selected γ cascades allows to produce high specific activity in multiple excitations, where no back-pumping of the isomer to the ground state occurs. We discuss in detail many specific radioisotopes for diagnostics and therapy applications. Photonuclear reactions with γ-beams allow to produce certain radioisotopes, e.g. 47Sc, 44Ti, 67Cu, 103Pd, 117 m Sn, 169Er, 195 m Pt or 225Ac, with higher specific activity

  20. Photonuclear reaction based high-energy x-ray spectrometer to cover from 2 MeV to 20 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, S; Arikawa, Y; Kojima, S; Ikenouchi, T; Nagai, T; Abe, Y; Inoue, H; Morace, A; Utsugi, M; Kato, R; Nishimura, H; Nakai, M; Shiraga, H; Fujioka, S; Azechi, H

    2014-11-01

    A photonuclear-reaction-based hard x-ray spectrometer is developed to measure the number and energy spectrum of fast electrons generated by interactions between plasma and intense laser light. In this spectrometer, x-rays are converted to neutrons through photonuclear reactions, and the neutrons are counted with a bubble detector that is insensitive to x-rays. The spectrometer consists of a bundle of hard x-ray detectors that respond to different photon-energy ranges. Proof-of-principle experiment was performed on a linear accelerator facility. A quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch (Ne = 1.0 × 10(-6) C, Ee = 16 ± 0.32 MeV) was injected into a 5-mm-thick lead plate. Bremsstrahlung x-rays, which emanate from the lead plate, were measured with the spectrometer. The measured spectral shape and intensity agree fairly well with those computed with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The result shows that high-energy x-rays can be measured absolutely with a photon-counting accuracy of 50%-70% in the energy range from 2 MeV to 20 MeV with a spectral resolution (Δhν/hν) of about 15%. Quantum efficiency of this spectrometer was designed to be 10(-7), 10(-4), 10(-5), respectively, for 2-10, 11-15, and 15-25 MeV of photon energy ranges.

  1. Photonuclear reaction based high-energy x-ray spectrometer to cover from 2 MeV to 20 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, S., E-mail: sakata-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Arikawa, Y.; Kojima, S.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Inoue, H.; Morace, A.; Utsugi, M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Kato, R. [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki 565-0047 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A photonuclear-reaction-based hard x-ray spectrometer is developed to measure the number and energy spectrum of fast electrons generated by interactions between plasma and intense laser light. In this spectrometer, x-rays are converted to neutrons through photonuclear reactions, and the neutrons are counted with a bubble detector that is insensitive to x-rays. The spectrometer consists of a bundle of hard x-ray detectors that respond to different photon-energy ranges. Proof-of-principle experiment was performed on a linear accelerator facility. A quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch (N{sub e} = 1.0 × 10{sup −6} C, E{sub e} = 16 ± 0.32 MeV) was injected into a 5-mm-thick lead plate. Bremsstrahlung x-rays, which emanate from the lead plate, were measured with the spectrometer. The measured spectral shape and intensity agree fairly well with those computed with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The result shows that high-energy x-rays can be measured absolutely with a photon-counting accuracy of 50%–70% in the energy range from 2 MeV to 20 MeV with a spectral resolution (Δhν/hν) of about 15%. Quantum efficiency of this spectrometer was designed to be 10{sup −7}, 10{sup −4}, 10{sup −5}, respectively, for 2–10, 11–15, and 15–25 MeV of photon energy ranges.

  2. KAERI photonuclear library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jong Hwa; Lee, Young Ouk; Han, Yin Iu

    2000-03-01

    This report contains summary information and figures depicting the KAERI photonuclear data library that extends up to 140 MeV of incident photon. The library consists of 143 isotopes from C-12 to Bi-209, providing the photoabsorption cross section and the emission spectra for neutron, proton, deuteron, triton, alpha particles, and all residual nuclides in ENDF6 format. The contents of this report and ENDF-6 format data library are available at http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/.

  3. The role of angular-momentum removal in photonuclear reactions as deduced from the isomeric ratios for ? and ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, D.; Ernst, J.

    1998-03-01

    A model interpretation of isomeric ratios for 0954-3899/24/3/010/img7 and 0954-3899/24/3/010/img8 produced in the reactions 0954-3899/24/3/010/img9, 0954-3899/24/3/010/img10, 0954-3899/24/3/010/img11, 0954-3899/24/3/010/img12, 0954-3899/24/3/010/img13 and 0954-3899/24/3/010/img14 is presented. The experimental isomeric ratios were obtained using bremsstrahlung radiation with end-point energies of 18 and 43 MeV. The calculations were performed by means of the well known code STAPRE and the new code COMPLET. Angular-momentum removal in pre-equilibrium emission was found to be much more important for the observed isomeric ratios than subsequent compound-nucleus evaporation.

  4. A complete kinematics approach to study multi-particle final state reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcorta, M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, Madrid E-28006 (Spain)], E-mail: alcorta@iem.cfmac.csic.es; Kirsebom, O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Borge, M.J.G. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Fynbo, H.O.U.; Riisager, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, Madrid E-28006 (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Detection in complete kinematics using highly segmented detectors can provide detailed information on the structure of excited nuclear states and their decay mechanisms. The detection of final states consisting of several particles gives rise to many challenges. We present here new techniques that allow for the extraction of physics from the many open channels. In particular this complete kinematic analysis technique has been applied to data from low-energy, high Q-value, light-ion reactions {sup 10}B({sup 3}He,p{alpha}{alpha}{alpha}), {sup 11}B({sup 3}He,d{alpha}{alpha}{alpha}), and {sup 7}Li({sup 3}He,p{alpha}{alpha})n, all of them performed at the CMAM tandem accelerator in Madrid.

  5. Photonuclear activation of pure isotopic mediums.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grohman, Mark A.; Lukosi, Eric Daniel

    2010-06-01

    This work simulated the response of idealized isotopic U-235, U-238, Th-232, and Pu-239 mediums to photonuclear activation with various photon energies. These simulations were conducted using MCNPX version 2.6.0. It was found that photon energies between 14-16 MeV produce the highest response with respect to neutron production rates from all photonuclear reactions. In all cases, Pu-239 responds the highest, followed by U-238. Th-232 produces more overall neutrons at lower photon energies then U-235 when material thickness is above 3.943 centimeters. The time it takes each isotopic material to reach stable neutron production rates in time is directly proportional to the material thickness and stopping power of the medium, where thicker mediums take longer to reach stable neutron production rates and thinner media display a neutron production plateau effect, due to the lack of significant attenuation of the activating photons in the isotopic mediums. At this time, no neutron sensor system has time resolutions capable of verifying these simulations, but various indirect methods are possible and should be explored for verification of these results.

  6. Photonuclear Contributions to SNS Pulse Shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClanahan, Tucker C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Iverson, Erik B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gallmeier, Franz X. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Short-pulsed sources like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and ISIS produce bursts of neutron pulses at rates of 10-60 Hz, with sub-microsecond proton pulses impacting on high-Z target materials. Moderators are grouped around the target to receive the fast neutrons generated from spallation reactions to moderate them effciently to thermal and sub-thermal energies and to feed narrow neutron pulses to neutron scattering instruments. The scattering instruments use the neutrons as a probe for material investigations, and make use of time-of-flight (TOF) methods for resolving the neutron energy. The energy resolution of scattering instruments depends on the narrow time-structure of the neutron pulses, while neutrons in the long tail of the emission time distributions can degrade the instrument performance and add undesired background to measurements. The SNS neutronics team is investigating a possible source term impacting the background at short-pulsed spallation sources. The ISIS TS2 project claims to have significantly reduced neutron scattering instrument background levels by the elimination or reduction of iron shielding in the target-moderator-reflector assembly. An alternative hypothesis, also proposed by ISIS, suggests that this apparent reduction arises from moving beamline shielding away from the neutron guide channels, reducing albedo down the beamlines. In both hypotheses, the background neutrons in question are believed to be generated by photonuclear reactions. If the background neutrons are indeed generated via photonuclear channels, then they are generated in a time-dependent fashion, since most of the high-energy photons capable of inducing photonuclear production are gone within a few microseconds following the proton pulse. To evaluate this e ect, we have enabled photonuclear reactions in a series of studies for the SNS first target station (FTS) taking advantage of its Monte Carlo model. Using a mixture of ENDF/B VII.0 and TENDL-2014 photonuclear

  7. Stellar 30-keV neutron capture in 94, 96Zr and the Zr90(γ,nZr89 photonuclear reaction with a high-power liquid-lithium target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tessler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A high-power Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT was used for the first time for neutron production via the thick-target Li7(p,nBe7 reaction and quantitative determination of neutron capture cross sections. Bombarded with a 1–2 mA proton beam at 1.92 MeV from the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF, the setup yields a 30-keV quasi-Maxwellian neutron spectrum with an intensity of 3–5×1010 n/s, more than one order of magnitude larger than present near-threshold Li7(p,n neutron sources. The setup was used here to determine the 30-keV Maxwellian averaged cross section (MACS of 94Zr and 96Zr as 28.0±0.6 mb and 12.4±0.5 mb respectively, based on activation measurements. The precision of the cross section determinations results both from the high neutron yield and from detailed simulations of the entire experimental setup. We plan to extend our experimental studies to low-abundance and radioactive targets. In addition, we show here that the setup yields intense high-energy (17.6 and 14.6 MeV prompt capture γ rays from the Li7(p,γBe8 reaction with yields of ∼3×108γs−1mA−1 and ∼4×108γs−1mA−1, respectively, evidenced by the Zr90(γ,nZr89 photonuclear reaction.

  8. Perspectives for photonuclear research at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipescu, D.; Balabanski, D.L.; Constantin, P.; Gales, S.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C.A.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N.V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Anzalone, A.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C. [INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Belyshev, S.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Camera, F. [Departement of Physics, University of Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN section of Milano, Milano (Italy); Csige, L.; Krasznahorkay, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki), Institute of Nuclear Research, Post Office Box 51, Debrecen (Hungary); Cuong, P.V. [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Mazzocchi, C. [University of Warsaw, Warszawa (Poland); Derya, V.; Zilges, A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne (Germany); Gai, M. [University of Connecticut, LNS at Avery Point, Connecticut, Groton (United States); Gheorghe, I. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ishkhanov, B.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, A.A.; Orlin, V.N.; Stopani, K.A.; Varlamov, V.V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pietralla, N. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Institut fur Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Sin, M. [University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Utsunomiya, H. [Konan University, Department of Physics, Kobe (Japan); University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Saitama (Japan); Weller, H.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, North Carolina, Durham (United States); Duke University, Department of Physics, North Carolina, Durham (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The perspectives for photonuclear experiments at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the need to accumulate novel and more precise nuclear data. The parameters of the ELI-NP gamma beam system are presented. The emerging experimental program, which will be realized at ELI-NP, is presented. Examples of day-one experiments with the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique, photonuclear reaction measurements, photofission experiments and studies of nuclear collective excitation modes and competition between various decay channels are discussed. The advantages which ELI-NP provides for all these experiments compared to the existing facilities are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Recommended evaluation procedure for photonuclear cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Chang, Jonghwa; Fukahori, Tokio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In order to generate photonuclear cross section library for the necessary applications, data evaluation is combined with theoretical evaluation, since photonuclear cross sections measured cannot provide all necessary data. This report recommends a procedure consisting of four steps: (1) analysis of experimental data, (2) data evaluation, (3) theoretical evaluation and, if necessary, (4) modification of results. In the stage of analysis, data obtained by different measurements are reprocessed through the analysis of their discrepancies to a representative data set. In the data evaluation, photonuclear absorption cross sections are evaluated via giant dipole resonance and quasi-deutron mechanism. With photoabsorption cross sections from the data evaluation, theoretical evaluation is applied to determine various decay channel cross sections and emission spectra using equilibrium and preequilibrium mechanism. After this, the calculated results are compared with measured data, and in some cases the results are modified to better describe measurements. (author)

  10. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Borghini; P M Dinh; J-Y Ollitrault

    2003-04-01

    First observations of elliptic flow in Au–Au collisions at RHIC have been interpreted as evidence that the colliding system reaches thermal equilibrium. We discuss some of the arguments leading to this conclusion and show that a more accurate analysis is needed, which the standard flow analysis may not provide. We then present a new method of flow analysis, based on a systematic study of multiparticle azimuthal correlations. This method allows one to test quantitatively the collective behaviour of the interacting system. It has recently been applied by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC.

  11. Multiparticle Generalization of Teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chui-Ping; GUO Guang-Can

    2000-01-01

    A scheme for teleporting an unknown quantum state of many particles is proposed. The scheme operates es sentially by prearranging the sharing of an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-correlated pair of particles every time. We show that after performing a series of Bell-state measurements and single-particle unitary transformations, the unknown state of many particles, which was destroyed at one place, can be reconstructed at another place. Our scheme is actually obtained by generalizing an earlier scheme of Bennett et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70 (1993) 1895; 76 (1996) 722] known as quantum teleportation to the multiparticle case.

  12. On factorization of multiparticle pentagons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Belitsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We address the near-collinear expansion of multiparticle NMHV amplitudes, namely, the heptagon and octagons in the dual language of null polygonal super Wilson loops. In particular, we verify multiparticle factorization of charged pentagon transitions in terms of pentagons for single flux-tube excitations within the framework of refined operator product expansion. We find a perfect agreement with available tree and one-loop data.

  13. Photonuclear data index, 1973-1981, supplement 2 to NBS (National Bureau of Standards) special publication 380

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, E. G.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1983-08-01

    This index, a supplement to NBS Special Publication 380, Photonuclear Reaction Data, 1973, primarily covers data published in the period from January 1973 through December 1981. It supersedes the first supplement to Special Publication 380 issued in August 1978. Organized by element and isotope, each entry in the index is for a specific reaction reported in a given reference. Information is given on the type of measurement, excitation energies studied, source type and energies, detector type and angular ranges covered in the measurement. Also included is an index to the more than 1200 data sets currently available in the Photonuclear Data Group's digital data library.

  14. Separability criteria for genuine multiparticle entanglement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guehne, O.; Seevinck, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to derive separability criteria for different classes of multiparticle entanglement, especially genuine multiparticle entanglement. The resulting criteria are necessary and sufficient for certain families of states. This, for example, completely solves the problem of classifying

  15. Multiparticle Bose-Einstein Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    1998-01-01

    Multiparticle symmetrization effects are contributions to the spectra of Bose-symmetrized states which are not the product of pairwise correlations. Usually they are neglected in particle interferometric calculations which aim at determining the geometry of the boson emitting source from the measured momentum distributions. Based on a method introduced by Zajc and Pratt, we give a calculation of all multiparticle symmetrization effects to the one- and two-particle momentum spectra for a Gaussian phase space distribution of emission points. Our starting point is an ensemble of N-particle Bose-symmetrized wavefunctions with specified phase space localization. In scenarios typical for relativistic heavy ion collisions, multiparticle effects steepen the slope of the one-particle spectrum for realistic particle phase space densities by up to 20 MeV, and they broaden the relative momentum dependence of the two-particle correlations. We discuss these modifications and their consequences in quantitative detail. Also,...

  16. Accessible quantification of multiparticle entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Cianciaruso, Marco; Adesso, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Entanglement is a key ingredient for quantum technologies and a fundamental signature of quantumness in a broad range of phenomena encompassing many-body physics, thermodynamics, cosmology, and life sciences. For arbitrary multiparticle systems, the quantification of entanglement typically involves hard optimisation problems, and requires demanding tomographical techniques. In this paper we show that such difficulties can be overcome by developing an experimentally friendly method to evaluate measures of multiparticle entanglement via a geometric approach. The method provides exact analytical results for a relevant class of mixed states of $N$ qubits, and computable lower bounds to entanglement for any general state. For practical purposes, the entanglement determination requires local measurements in just three settings for any $N$. We demonstrate the power of our approach to quantify multiparticle entanglement in $N$-qubit bound entangled states and other states recently engineered in laboratory using quant...

  17. Differential magnetometry with multiparticle singlets

    CERN Document Server

    Urizar-Lanz, Inigo; Egusquiza, Inigo; Mitchell, Morgan W; Toth, Geza

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the magnetic field gradient with singlets realized with spin-1/2 particles. While the singlet state does not change under the influence of homogenous magnetic fields, the variance of the collective spin components start to grow under a field gradient. We compute the dynamics of this variance analytically for a chain of spins and also for an ensemble of particles with a given density distribution. We calculate an upper bound on how exactly the field gradient can be estimated from the measured data. The proposal is relevant for cold atomic ensembles where multiparticle singlet states can be prepared by spin squeezing and the differential magnetometry can be carried out.

  18. Multi-particle dynamical systems and polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, Maria V.; Kudryashov, Nikolai A.

    2016-05-01

    Polynomial dynamical systems describing interacting particles in the plane are studied. A method replacing integration of a polynomial multi-particle dynamical system by finding polynomial solutions of partial differential equations is introduced. The method enables one to integrate a wide class of polynomial multi-particle dynamical systems. The general solutions of certain dynamical systems related to linear second-order partial differential equations are found. As a by-product of our results, new families of orthogonal polynomials are derived.

  19. [Evaluating photonuclear activation for clearance of decommissioned medical linear accelerators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Koichi; Isobe, Tomonori; Takada, Kenta; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Tadano, Kiichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Seki, Masashi; Yokota, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji

    2011-01-01

    In a linear accelerator (linac) that operates at greater than an accelerating energy of 10 MV, neutrons are generated by a photonuclear reaction and the head section of the linac becomes radioactive. The purpose of this research is to obtain data for ensuring the safety of linac decommissioning and upgrading. The decommissioned linac investigated in this study was a Clinac 2100 C/D (Varian) installed in April 1999. Its total time of use was 2757.7 h (equivalent to 496,386 Gy). The dosage for its last three months of use was 7213.67 Gy. After being allowed to sit for a 7-day cooling period, the apparatus was disassembled and the parts of the gantry head portion were removed. The ambient dose equivalent rates, H*(10), (microSv/h) from the removed parts were measured in air, at a location with low background, by using a gamma ray scintillation survey meter. The target was also analyzed with an HP-Ge semiconductor detector, in order to identify the nuclides responsible for the observed radiation. On day 7 after the last use of the linac, the ambient dose equivalent rates, H*(10), (microSv/h) in air at the surface of all parts, except the target and the beryllium window, were within the limit of normal background radiation. The measured value (microSv/h) for the beryllium window decreased to within the background limit on day 10. The measured value (microSv/h) of the target decreased to about 1.5 times the background on day 19. At a distance of 10 cm, all the parts were within the background limit after the initial 7-day cooling period. In the analysis of the target with the HP-Ge semiconductor detector, peaks at 125, 333, 352, 356, 426, 511, 583, 609, 689, 811, 835, 911, 969, 1091, 1099, 1120, 1173, 1238, 1292, 1333, 1461 and 1764keV were detected on day 23. Seven months after the linac was last used, peaks were detected at 352, 511, 583, 609, 835, 911, 969, 1120, 1173, 1238, 1333, 1461 and 1764 keV. From these results, the natural radioactive nuclides can be assigned

  20. The role of angular-momentum removal in photonuclear reactions as deduced from the isomeric ratios for {sup 120m,g}Sb and {sup 117m,g}In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, D. [Department of Atomic Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia, 5, James Bourchier Blvd, BG 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Ernst, J. [Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, University of Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    1998-03-01

    A model interpretation of isomeric ratios for {sup 117m,g}In and {sup 120m,g}Sb produced in the reactions {sup 118}Sn({gamma},p), {sup 119}Sn({gamma},np), {sup 121}Sb({gamma},{alpha}), {sup nat}Sb({gamma},{alpha}2n), {sup 121}Sb({gamma},n) and {sup nat}Sb({gamma},3n) is presented. The experimental isomeric ratios were obtained using bremsstrahlung radiation with end-point energies of 18 and 43 MeV. The calculations were performed by means of the well known code STAPRE and the new code COMPLET. Angular-momentum removal in pre-equilibrium emission was found to be much more important for the observed isomeric ratios than subsequent compound-nucleus evaporation. (author)

  1. Stellar 30-keV neutron capture in 94,96Zr and the 90Zr(gamma,n)89Zr photonuclear reaction with a high-power liquid-lithium target

    CERN Document Server

    Tessler, M; Arenshtam, A; Feinberg, G; Friedman, M; Halfon, S; Kijel, D; Weissman, L; Aviv, O; Berkovits, D; Eisen, Y; Eliyahu, I; Haquin, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Yungrais, Z

    2015-01-01

    A high-power Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was used for the first time for neutron production via the thick-target 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and quantitative determination of neutron capture cross sections. Bombarded with a 1-2 mA proton beam at 1.92 MeV from the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), the setup yields a 30-keV quasi-Maxwellian neutron spectrum with an intensity of 3-5e10 n/s, more than one order of magnitude larger than present near-threshold 7Li(p,n) neutron sources. The setup was used here to determine the 30-keV Maxwellian averaged cross section (MACS) of 94Zr and 96Zr as 28.0+-0.6 mb and 12.4+-0.5 mb respectively, based on activation measurements. The precision of the cross section determinations results both from the high neutron yield and from detailed simulations of the entire experimental setup. We plan to extend our experimental studies to low-abundance and radioactive targets. In addition, we show here that the setup yields intense high-energy (17.6 and 14.6 MeV) prompt cap...

  2. Development And Implementation Of Photonuclear Cross-section Data For Mutually Coupled Neutron-photon Transport Calculations In The Monte Carlo N-particle (mcnp) Radiation Transport Code

    CERN Document Server

    White, M C

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron tran...

  3. Multiparticle entanglement under the influence of decoherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gühne, O.; Bodoky, F.; Blaauboer, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present a method to determine the decay of multiparticle quantum correlations as quantified by the geometric measure of entanglement under the influence of decoherence. With this, we compare the robustness of entanglement in Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ), cluster, W, and Dicke states of four

  4. Multiparticle entanglement under the influence of decoherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gühne, O.; Bodoky, F.; Blaauboer, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present a method to determine the decay of multiparticle quantum correlations as quantified by the geometric measure of entanglement under the influence of decoherence. With this, we compare the robustness of entanglement in Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ), cluster, W, and Dicke states of four

  5. Perfect Biparticle Teleportation by Using Multi-particle Quantum Channel with Joint Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yan-Qing; NIE Jing; REN Zhong-Zhou; LI Chong; CHEN Yu-Qing; YI Xue-Xi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we reinvestigate the faithful quantum teleportation of an arbitrary two-qubit state by a multi-particle channel with multi-particle joint measurements. The relationship between multi-particle quantum channel and the multi-particle joint measurement bases has been found. In addition, we show how to construct the multi-particle joint measurement bases.

  6. Implementation of the n-body Monte-Carlo event generator into the Geant4 toolkit for photonuclear studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen; Lan, Hao-yang; Xu, Yi; Balabanski, Dimiter L.

    2017-03-01

    A data-based Monte Carlo simulation algorithm, Geant4-GENBOD, was developed by coupling the n-body Monte-Carlo event generator to the Geant4 toolkit, aiming at accurate simulations of specific photonuclear reactions for diverse photonuclear physics studies. Good comparisons of Geant4-GENBOD calculations with reported measurements of photo-neutron production cross-sections and yields, and with reported energy spectra of the 6Li(n,α)t reaction were performed. Good agreements between the calculations and experimental data were found and the validation of the developed program was verified consequently. Furthermore, simulations for the 92Mo(γ,p) reaction of astrophysics relevance and photo-neutron production of 99Mo/99mTc and 225Ra/225Ac radioisotopes were investigated, which demonstrate the applicability of this program. We conclude that the Geant4-GENBOD is a reliable tool for study of the emerging experiment programs at high-intensity γ-beam laboratories, such as the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility and the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source at Duke University.

  7. Multiparticle collision dynamics in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Matyka, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    We adopt the multiparticle collision dynamics method to simulate fluid flows in porous media. For this, the particle-level drag force is introduced into the original algorithm. The force hinder the flow resulting in global resistance and decrease of permeability. The extended algorithm is validated in the flow through fully porous channel with analytical solution. Basic properties of the solver are investigated including its dependency of permeability on model parameters.

  8. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second

  9. Integral correlation measures for multiparticle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, H C; Carruthers, Peter A; Buschbeck, Brigitte

    1993-01-01

    We report on a considerable improvement in the technique of measuring multiparticle correlations via integrals over correlation functions. A modification of measures used in the characterization of chaotic dynamical sytems permits fast and flexible calculation of factorial moments and cumulants as well as their differential versions. Higher order correlation integral measurements even of large multiplicity events such as encountered in heavy ion collisons are now feasible. The change from ``ordinary'' to ``factorial'' powers may have important consequences in other fields such as the study of galaxy correlations and Bose-Einstein interferometry.

  10. MCNPX-CINDER'90 Simulation of Photonuclear Mo-99 Production Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chemerizov, Sergey D. [Argonne National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harvey, James T. [NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes; Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Laboratory; Vandegrift, George R III [Argonne National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    The MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes were used to support design of experiments investigating Mo-99 production with a 20-MeV electron beam. Bremsstrahlung photons produced by the electron beam interacting with the target drive the desired Mo-100({gamma},n)Mo-99 reaction, as well as many undesired reactions important to accurate prediction of radiation hazards. MCNPX is a radiation transport code and CINDER'90 is a transmutation code. They are routinely used together for accelerator activation calculations. Low energy neutron fluxes and production rates for nonneutron and high energy neutron induced reactions computed using MCNPX are inputs to CINDER'90. CINDER'90 presently has only a neutron reaction cross section library up to 25 MeV and normally the other reaction rates come from MCNPX physics models. For this work MCNPX photon flux tallies modified by energy response functions prepared from evaluated photonuclear cross section data were used to tally the reaction rates for CINDER'90 input. The cross section evaluations do not provide isomer to ground state yield ratios so a spin based approximation was used. Post irradiation dose rates were calculated using MCNPX with CINDER'90 produced decay photon spectra. The sensitivity of radionuclide activities and dose rates to beam parameters including energy, position, and profile, as well as underlying isomer assumptions, was investigated. Three experimental production targets were irradiated, two natural Mo and one Mo-100 enriched. Natural Mo foils upstream of the targets were used to analyze beam position and profile by exposing Gafchromic film to the foils after each irradiation. Activation and dose rate calculations were rerun after the experiments using measured beam parameters for comparison with measured Mo-99 activities and dose rates.

  11. Detection of Multiparticle Entanglement: Quantifying the Search for Symmetric Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Christandl, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    We provide quantitative bounds on the characterization of multiparticle separable states by states that have locally symmetric extensions. The bounds are derived from two-particle bounds and relate to recent studies on quantum versions of de Finetti’s theorem. We discuss algorithmic applications of our results, in particular a quasipolynomial-time algorithm to decide whether a multiparticle quantum state is separable or entangled (for constant number of particles and constant error in the norm induced by one-way local operations and classical communication, or in the Frobenius norm). Our results provide a theoretical justification for the use of the search for symmetric extensions as a test for multiparticle entanglement.

  12. Detection of Multiparticle Entanglement: Quantifying the Search for Symmetric Extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Brandao, Fernando G S L

    2011-01-01

    We provide quantitative bounds on the characterisation of multiparticle separable states by states that have locally symmetric extensions. The bounds are derived from two-particle bounds and relate to recent studies on quantum versions of de Finetti's theorem. We discuss algorithmic applications of our results, in particular a quasipolynomial-time algorithm to decide whether a multiparticle quantum state is separable or entangled (for constant number of particles and constant error in the LOCC or Frobenius norm). Our results provide a theoretical justification for the use of the Search for Symmetric Extensions as a practical test for multiparticle entanglement.

  13. Searching for hidden sectors in multiparticle production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel; Moreno-Picot, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of a hidden sector beyond the Standard Model, e.g. a Hidden Valley model, on factorial moments and cumulants of multiplicity distributions in multiparticle production with a special emphasis on the prospects for LHC results.

  14. Multiparticle extension of the higher-spin algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Vasiliev, M A

    2012-01-01

    Multiparticle extension of a higher-spin algebra $l$ is introduced as the Lie superalgebra associated with the universal enveloping algebra $U(l)$. While conventional higher-spin symmetry does not mix $n$-particle states with different $n$, multiparticle symmetries do so. Quotients of multiparticle algebras are considered, that act on the space of $n$-particle states with $0\\leq n\\leq k$ analogous to the space of first $k$ Regge trajectories of String Theory. Original higher-spin algebra is reproduced at $k=1$. Full multiparticle algebras are conjectured to describe vacuum symmetries of string-like extensions of higher-spin gauge theories. The central charge parameter, to be related to the parameter $N$ in $AdS/CFT$ correspondence, enters via the definition of supertrace. Extension to higher $p$-brane-like symmetries is introduced inductively.

  15. Anderson Localization for a Multi-Particle Quantum Graph

    OpenAIRE

    Sabri, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    We study a multi-particle quantum graph with random potential. Taking the approach of multiscale analysis we prove exponential and strong dynamical localization of any order in the Hilbert-Schmidt norm near the spectral edge. Apart from the results on multi-particle systems, we also prove Lifshitz-type asymptotics for single-particle systems. This shows in particular that localization for single-particle quantum graphs holds under a weaker assumption on the random potential than previously kn...

  16. Multiparticle excitations in sup 1 sup 9 sup 4 Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Kaci, M; Deloncle, I; Aiche, M; Azaiez, F; Bastin, G; Beausang, C W; Bourgeois, C; Clark, R M; Duffait, R; Duprat, J; Gall, B J P; Hannachi, F; Hauschild, K; Joyce, M J; Korichi, A; Le Coz, Y L; Meyer, M; Paul, E S; Perrin, N; Poffé, N; Redon, N; Schueck, C; Sergolle, H; Sharpey-Schafer, J F; Simpson, J; Smith, A G; Wadsworth, R

    2002-01-01

    High-spin states of sup 1 sup 9 sup 4 Pb have been populated by the reaction sup 1 sup 8 sup 4 W( sup 1 sup 6 O, 6n) at 113 MeV beam energy and studied using the EUROGAM-1 array. The level scheme has been extended up to spin of 33 Planck constant and excitation energy of 11.1 MeV. The high-spin part of the level scheme is dominated by bands of dipole transitions. New dipole bands have been observed and the configurations of their band heads are discussed. Besides the well-known coupling of the K suppi=11 sup - two-proton state to several nu i sub 1 sub 3 sub / sub 2 rotation-aligned neutron states, the K suppi=8 sup + two-proton state is also involved. Such a coupling is identified for the first time in a lead isotope. Moreover, the K suppi=11 sup - two-proton state is coupled to the rotation-aligned proton pair (pi h sub 1 sub 1 sub / sub 2) sup 2. Thus many multiparticle configurations involving all the high-j subshells located around the proton and neutron Fermi levels, pi h sub 1 sub 1 sub / sub 2 , pi h ...

  17. Measurement of entropy of a multiparticle system a do-list

    CERN Document Server

    Bialas, A

    2000-01-01

    An algorithm for measurement of entropy in multiparticle systems, based onrecently published proposal of the present authors, is given. Dependence ondiscretization of the system and effects of multiparticle correlations arediscussed in some detail.

  18. Searching for a hidden sector in multiparticle production at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchis-Lozano Miguel-Angel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A hidden sector beyond the Standard Model can show up in multiparticle production altering inclusive correlations and factorial cumulants of multiplicity distributions. In this report such a study is advocated with a special emphasis on the searches at LHC.

  19. Searching for hidden sector in multiparticle production at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel-Angel Sanchis-Lozano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the impact of a hidden sector beyond the Standard Model, e.g. a Hidden Valley model, on factorial moments and cumulants of multiplicity distributions in multiparticle production with a special emphasis on the prospects for LHC results.

  20. Scaling laws for density correlations and fluctuations in multiparticle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, E.A. de [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Physics]|[Interuniversity Inst. for High Energies, Brussels (Belgium); Dremin, I.M. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Fizicheskij Inst.; Kittel, W. [Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica (NIKHEF), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    1996-05-01

    Experimental data on particle correlations and fluctuations in various high-energy multiparticle collisions are presented, with special emphasis on evidence for scaling-law evolution in small phase-space domains. The notions of intermittency and fractality as related to the above findings are described. Phenomenological and theoretical work on the subject is reviewed. (orig.).

  1. Photo-nuclear dijet production in ultra-peripheral Pb+Pb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-peripheral heavy ion collisions provide a unique opportunity to study the parton distributions in the colliding nuclei via the measurement of photo-nuclear dijet production. An analysis of dijet production in ultra-peripheral $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5.02$ TeV Pb+Pb collisions performed using data collected in 2015 is described. The data set corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 0.38 nb−1. The ultra-peripheral collisions are selected using a combination of trigger, zero degree calorimeter, and gap requirements. The jets are reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm. The results of the measurement include cross-sections for photo-nuclear dijet production as a function of different dijet kinematic variables.

  2. Photonuclear and Radiation Effects Testing with a Refurbished 20 MeV Medical Electron Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Timothy; Beezhold, Wendland; De Veaux, Linda C; Harmon, Frank; Petrisko, Jill E; Spaulding, Randy

    2005-01-01

    An S-band 20 MeV electron linear accelerator formerly used for medical applications has been recommissioned to provide a wide range of photonuclear activation studies as well as various radiation effects on biological and microelectronic systems. Four radiation effect applications involving the electron/photon beams are described. Photonuclear activation of a stable isotope of oxygen provides an active means of characterizing polymer degradation. Biological irradiations of microorganisms including bacteria were used to study total dose and dose rate effects on survivability and the adaptation of these organisms to repeated exposures. Microelectronic devices including bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and diodes were irradiated to study photocurrent from these devices as a function of peak dose rate with comparisons to computer modeling results. In addition, the 20 MeV linac may easily be converted to a medium energy neutron source which has been used to study neutron damage effects on transistors.

  3. Multiparticle dynamics in the E-phi tracking code ESME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. MacLachlan

    2002-06-21

    ESME has developed over a twenty year period from its origins as a program for modeling rf gymnastics to a rather general facility for that fraction of beam dynamics of synchrotrons and storage rings which can be properly treated in the two dimensional longitudinal phase space. The features of this program which serve particularly for multiparticle calculations are described, some underling principles are noted, and illustrative results are given.

  4. The entanglement purification for entangled multi-particle states

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Liu; Guo Guang Can

    2002-01-01

    We present two purification schemes for nonmaximally entangled states. We first show that two parties, Alice and Bob, start with shared less-entangled three-particle states to probabilistically produce a three-particle Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state by Bell state measurements and positive operator valued measure (POVM) or a unitary transformation. Then, by a straightforward generalization of the schemes, the purification of a multi-particle entangled state can be realized. 25 Refs. --- 35 --- AN

  5. Study of Photo-Nuclear Interaction of muons in rock with the MACRO experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, G

    1998-01-01

    We present first results about the measurement of the characteristics of charged hadrons production by atmospheric muons in the rock above MACRO. Selection criteria which allow to discriminate hadron cascades from e.m. showers generated by muons are described. A comparison between the measured rate with that expected from a Monte Carlo simulation which treats the process as dominated by photo-nuclear interaction is presented. These data can be used to validate such models aiming to the evaluation of hadron background from cosmic muons in different experimental environments.

  6. Multi-particle Emission from ${^{31}}$Ar at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Marroquin, I; Ciemny, A A; de Witte, H; Fraile, L M; Fynbo, H O U; Garzón-Camacho, A; Howard, A; Johansson, H; Jonson, B; Kirsebom, O S; Koldste, G T; Lica, R; Lund, M V; Madurga, M; Mazzocchi, C; Mihai, C; Munch, M; Nae, S A; Nacher, E; Negret, A; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Refsgaard, J; Riisager, K; Rapisarda, E; Sotty, C; Stanoiu, M; Tengblad, O; Turturica, A E; Vedia, M V

    2016-01-01

    A multi-particle decay experiment was successfully performed at the ISOLDE Decay Station. In this new permanent station, devoted to\\break $\\beta$-decay studies, the novel MAGISOL Si-Plugin Chamber was installed to study the exotic decay modes of the proton drip-line nucleus ${^{31}}$Ar. The motivation was to search for $\\beta3p$ and $\\beta3p\\gamma$ channels, as well as to provide information on resonances in ${^{30}}$S and ${^{29}}$P relevant for the astrophysical\\break rp-process. Description of the experimental set-up and preliminary results are presented.

  7. Quantum Dense Coding in Multiparticle Entangled States via Local Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建兰; 匡乐满

    2004-01-01

    We study quantum dense coding between two arbitrarily fixed particles in a (N + 2)-particle maximally-entangled states through introducing an auxiliary qubit and carrying out local measurements. It is shown that the transmitted classical information amount through such an entangled quantum channel is usually less than two classical bits. However, the information amount may reach two classical bits of information, and the classical information capacity is independent of the number of the entangled particles under certain conditions. The results offer deeper insight into quantum dense coding via quantum channels of multi-particle entangled states.

  8. Probabilistic teleportation of multi-particle partially entangled state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xiu-Bo; Du Jian-Zhong; Wen Qiao-Yan; Zhu Fu-Chen

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing the generalized measurement described by positive operator-valued measure, this paper comes up with a protocol for teleportation of an unknown multi-particle entangled (GHZ) state with a certain probability. The feature of the present protocol is to weaken requirement for the quantum channel initially shared by sender and receiver. All unitary transformations performed by receiver are summarized into a formula. On the other hand, this paper explicitlyconstructs the efficient quantum circuits for implementing the proposed teleportation by means of universal quantum logic operations in quantum computation.

  9. N=4 Multi-Particle Mechanics, WDVV Equation and Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Lechtenfeld

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the relation of N=4 superconformal multi-particle models on the real line to the WDVV equation and an associated linear equation for two prepotentials, F and U. The superspace treatment gives another variant of the integrability problem, which we also reformulate as a search for closed flat Yang-Mills connections. Three- and four-particle solutions are presented. The covector ansatz turns the WDVV equation into an algebraic condition, for which we give a formulation in terms of partial isometries. Three ideas for classifying WDVV solutions are developed: ortho-polytopes, hypergraphs, and matroids. Various examples and counterexamples are displayed.

  10. Efficient Measurement of Multiparticle Entanglement with Embedding Quantum Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Cheng; Wu, Dian; Su, Zu-En; Cai, Xin-Dong; Wang, Xi-Lin; Yang, Tao; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-02-19

    The quantum measurement of entanglement is a demanding task in the field of quantum information. Here, we report the direct and scalable measurement of multiparticle entanglement with embedding photonic quantum simulators. In this embedding framework [R. Di Candia et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240502 (2013)], the N-qubit entanglement, which does not associate with a physical observable directly, can be efficiently measured with only two (for even N) and six (for odd N) local measurement settings. Our experiment uses multiphoton quantum simulators to mimic dynamical concurrence and three-tangle entangled systems and to track their entanglement evolutions.

  11. Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) Technique: CY 04 Year-end Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L. Jones; W.Y. Yoon; K.J. Haskell; D.R. Norman; J.M. Zabriskie; J.W. Sterbentz; S.M. Watson; J.T. Johnson; B.D. Bennett; R.W. Watson; K. L. Folkman

    2005-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), along with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), are developing an electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technology for the detection of smuggled nuclear material within air-, rail-, and especially, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This CY04 report describes the latest developments and progress with the development of the Pulsed, Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) nuclear material inspection ystem, such as: (1) the identification of an optimal range of electron beam energies for interrogation applications, (2) the development of a new “cabinet safe” electron accelerator (i.e., Varitron II) to assess “cabinet safe-type” operations, (3) the numerical and experimental validation responses of nuclear materials placed within selected cargo configurations, 4) the fabrication and utilization of Calibration Pallets for inspection technology performance verification, 5) the initial technology integration of basic radiographic “imaging/mapping” with induced neutron and gamma-ray detection, 6) the characterization of electron beam-generated photon sources for optimal performance, 7) the development of experimentallydetermined Receiver-Operator-Characterization curves, and 8) several other system component assessments. This project is supported by the Department of Homeland Security and is a technology component of the Science & Technology Active Interrogation Portfolio entitled “Photofission-based Nuclear Material Detection and Characterization.”

  12. A Photonuclear Reaction Model Based on IQMD in Intermediate-Energy Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo-Song; Ma, Yu-Gang

    2017-07-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 11421505 and 11220101005, the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant No 2014CB845401, and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences under Grant No XDB16.

  13. A Study of Thick-Target X-Ray Spectra Using Photonuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    bremsstrahlung beams of this study was a Sagittaire/ Therac 40 electron linear accelerator manufactured by CGR-MeV of France belonging to the Radiation...isocenter can be chosen for both the bremsstrahlung and electron beams: .5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 10 Gy per min. The Sagittaire/ Therac 40 linac is shown...Specifications THERAC 40/Sagittaire Medical Linear Accelerator, No. GS 3100 (1975). 95. Karzmark C.J. and Pering N.C.: Phys. Med. Biol. 18, 321-354 (1973

  14. Measurements of photo-nuclear jet production in Pb+Pb collisions with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Angerami, Aaron; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-peripheral heavy ion collisions provide a unique opportunity to study the parton distributions in the colliding nuclei via the measurement of photo-nuclear jet production. An analysis of jet production in ultra-peripheral Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV performed using data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2015 is described. The data set corresponds to a total Pb+Pb integrated luminosity of 0.38 $\\mathrm{nb}^{-1}$. The ultra-peripheral collisions are selected using a combination of forward neutron and rapidity gap requirements. The cross-sections, not unfolded for detector response, are compared to results from Pythia Monte Carlo simulations re-weighted to match a photon spectrum obtained from the STARlight model.

  15. Induced photonuclear interaction by Rhodotron-TT200 10 MeV electron beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farshid Tabbakh; Mojtaba Mostajab Aldaavati; Mahdieh Hoseyni; Khadijeh Rezaee Ebrahim Saraee

    2012-02-01

    In this paper the photonuclear interaction induced by 10 MeV electron beam generating high-intensity neutrons is studied. Since the results depend on the target material, the calculations are performed for Pb, Ta and W targets which have high , in a simple geometry. MCNPX code has been used to simulate the whole process. Also, the results of photon generation has been compared with the experimental results to evaluate the reliability of the calculation. The results show that the obtained neutron flux can reach up to 1012 n/cm2 /s with average energies of 0.9 MeV, 0.4 MeV and 0.9 MeV for these three elements respectively with the maximum heat deposited as 3000 W/c3,4500 W/c3 and 6000 W/c3.

  16. Photonuclear processes in the treatment room and patient during radiation therapy with 50 MV photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowska, Irena [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1997-10-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the level of photoneutron radiation around the MM50 Racetrack Microtron at Karolinska Hospital, operating in different modes and to evaluate the photonuclear absorbed dose to the treated volume during therapy with a 50 MV photon beam. The photoneutron radiation has been studied both using a {sup 235}U fission chamber and by computer simulation. The estimated neutron equivalent dose due to accelerator produced neutrons delivered to the tissues inside and outside the treatment volume do not exceed the recommended values. However, there is a potential risk that the sensitive tissues (lens of the eye and gonads), outside the treatment volume, can receive a dose of about 300-500 mSv per photon treatment course of 60 Gy with a slight increase for secondary malignancies. 47 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs.

  17. JIMWLK evolution for multi-particle production with rapidity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iancu, E., E-mail: edmond.iancu@cea.fr [Institut de Physique Théorique de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Triantafyllopoulos, D.N., E-mail: trianta@ectstar.eu [European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT) and Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Strada delle Tabarelle 286, I-38123 Villazzano (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    We study multi-particle production with rapidity correlations in proton–nucleus collisions at high energy in the Color Glass Condensate framework. The high-energy evolution responsible for such correlations is governed by a generalization of the JIMWLK equation describing the simultaneous evolution of the strong nuclear color fields in the direct amplitude and the complex conjugate amplitude. This functional equation can be used to derive ordinary evolution equations for the cross-sections for particle production, but the ensuing equations appear to be too complicated to be useful in practice, including in the limit of a large number of colors N{sub c}. We propose an alternative formulation based on a Langevin process, which is valid for generic N{sub c} and is better suited for numerical implementations. For illustration, we present the stochastic equations which govern two gluon production with arbitrary rapidity separation.

  18. Hydrodynamics in adaptive resolution particle simulations: Multiparticle collision dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseeva, Uliana, E-mail: Alekseeva@itc.rwth-aachen.de [Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC), Institute for Advanced Simulation (IAS), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); German Research School for Simulation Sciences (GRS), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Winkler, Roland G., E-mail: r.winkler@fz-juelich.de [Theoretical Soft Matter and Biophysics, Institute for Advanced Simulation (IAS), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Sutmann, Godehard, E-mail: g.sutmann@fz-juelich.de [Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC), Institute for Advanced Simulation (IAS), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); ICAMS, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-06-01

    A new adaptive resolution technique for particle-based multi-level simulations of fluids is presented. In the approach, the representation of fluid and solvent particles is changed on the fly between an atomistic and a coarse-grained description. The present approach is based on a hybrid coupling of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method and molecular dynamics (MD), thereby coupling stochastic and deterministic particle-based methods. Hydrodynamics is examined by calculating velocity and current correlation functions for various mixed and coupled systems. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic properties of the mixed fluid are conserved by a suitable coupling of the two particle methods, and that the simulation results agree well with theoretical expectations.

  19. Study of multiparticle production by gluon dominance model (Part II)

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolov, P F; Kuraev, E A; Kutov, A V; Nikitin, V A; Pankov, A A; Roufanov, I A; Zhidkov, N K

    2005-01-01

    The gluon dominance model presents a description of multiparticle production in proton-proton collisions and proton-antiproton annihilation. The collective behavior of secondary particles in $pp$-interactions at 70 GeV/c and higher is studied in the project {\\bf "Thermalization"}. The obtained neutral and charged multiplicity distribution parameters explain some RHIC-data. The gluon dominance model is modified by the inclusion of intermediate quark topology for the multiplicity distribution description in the pure $p\\bar p$-annihilation at few tens GeV/c and explains behavior of the second correlative moment. This article proposes a mechanism of the soft photon production as a sign of hadronization. Excess of soft photons allows one to estimate the emission region size.

  20. Entanglement and nonlocality in multi-particle systems

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, M D; Drummond, P D

    2011-01-01

    Entanglement, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox and Bell's failure of local-hidden-variable (LHV) theories are three historically famous forms of "quantum nonlocality". We give experimental criteria for these three forms of nonlocality in multi-particle systems, with the aim of better understanding the transition from microscopic to macroscopic nonlocality. We examine the nonlocality of N separated spin J systems. First, we obtain multipartite Bell inequalities that address the correlation between spin values measured at each site, and then we review spin squeezing inequalities that address the degree of reduction in the variance of collective spins. The latter have been particularly useful as a tool for investigating entanglement in Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC). We present solutions for two topical quantum states: multi-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states, and the ground state of a two-well BEC.

  1. Entanglement polytopes: multiparticle entanglement from single-particle information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Michael; Doran, Brent; Gross, David; Christandl, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    Entangled many-body states are an essential resource for quantum computing and interferometry. Determining the type of entanglement present in a system usually requires access to an exponential number of parameters. We show that in the case of pure, multiparticle quantum states, features of the global entanglement can already be extracted from local information alone. This is achieved by associating any given class of entanglement with an entanglement polytope-a geometric object that characterizes the single-particle states compatible with that class. Our results, applicable to systems of arbitrary size and statistics, give rise to local witnesses for global pure-state entanglement and can be generalized to states affected by low levels of noise.

  2. Simulating strongly correlated multiparticle systems in a truncated Hilbert space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Thomas; Hallwood, David W.; Gulliksen, Jake; Brand, Joachim [New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study and Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, Massey University, Private Bag 102904, North Shore, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand); Meyer, Hans-Dieter [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Representing a strongly interacting multiparticle wave function in a finite product basis leads to errors. Simple rescaling of the contact interaction can preserve the low-lying energy spectrum and long-wavelength structure of wave functions in one-dimensional systems and thus correct for the basis set truncation error. The analytic form of the rescaling is found for a two-particle system where the rescaling is exact. A detailed comparison between finite Hilbert space calculations and exact results for up to five particles show that rescaling can significantly improve the accuracy of numerical calculations in various external potentials. In addition to ground-state energies, the low-lying excitation spectrum, density profile, and correlation functions are studied. The results give a promising outlook for numerical simulations of trapped ultracold atoms.

  3. UPC photo-nuclear dijet production in 5.02 TeV 
Pb+Pb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Angerami, Aaron; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-peripheral heavy ion collisions provide a unique opportunity to study the parton distributions in the colliding nuclei via the measurement of photo-nuclear dijet production. An analysis of dijet production in ultra-peripheral $\\sqrt{s}_{\\mathrm{NN}}$=5.02 TeV Pb+Pb collisions performed using data collected in 2015 is described. The data set corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 0.38 $\\mathrm{nb}^{−1}$. The ultra-peripheral collisions are selected using a combination of trigger, zero degree calorimeter, and gap requirements. The jets are reconstructed using the anti-$k_t$ algorithm. The results of the measurement include cross-sections for photo-nuclear dijet production as a function of different dijet kinematic variables.

  4. Multi-Particle States in Deformed Special Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Hossenfelder, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the properties of multi-particle states in Deformed Special Relativity (DSR). Starting from the Lagrangian formalism with an energy dependent metric, the conserved Noether current is derived and is found to be additive in the usual way. This quantity had previously been discarded because it was correctly realized that it does no longer obey the DSR transformations. We identify the reason for this mismatch in the fact that DSR depends only on the extensive quantity of total four-momentum instead of the energy-momentum densities as would be appropriate for a field theory. We argue that the reason for the failure of DSR to reproduce the standard transformation behavior in the well established limits is due to the missing sensitivity to the volume inside which energy is accumulated. We show that the soccer-ball problem is absent if one formulates DSR instead for the field densities. As a consequence, estimates for predicted effects have to be corrected by many orders of magnitude. Further, we deriv...

  5. Ab-initio calculation of the photonuclear cross section of $^{10}$B

    CERN Document Server

    Kruse, M K G; Johnson, C W

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first-time the photonuclear cross section of $^{10}$B calculated within the ab-initio No Core Shell Model framework. Realistic two-nucleon (NN) chiral forces up to next-to-next-to-next-order (N3LO), which have been softened by the similarity renormalization group method (SRG) to $\\lambda=2.02$ fm$^{-1}$, were utilized. The electric-dipole response function is calculated using the Lanczos method. The effects of the continuum were accounted for by including neutron escape widths derived from R-matrix theory. The calculated cross section agrees well with experimental data in terms of structure as well as in absolute peak height, $\\sigma_{\\rm max}=4.85~{\\rm mb}$ at photon energy $\\omega=23.61~{\\rm MeV}$, and integrated cross section $85.36\\, {\\rm MeV \\cdotp mb}$. We test the Brink hypothesis by calculating the electric-dipole response for the first five positive-parity states in $^{10}$B and verify that dipole excitations built upon the ground- and excited states have similar characteristics.

  6. Understanding and simulating the material behavior during multi-particle irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Anamul H.; Toulemonde, M.; Jegou, C.; Miro, S.; Serruys, Y.; Bouffard, S.; Peuget, S.

    2016-07-01

    A number of studies have suggested that the irradiation behavior and damage processes occurring during sequential and simultaneous particle irradiations can significantly differ. Currently, there is no definite answer as to why and when such differences are seen. Additionally, the conventional multi-particle irradiation facilities cannot correctly reproduce the complex irradiation scenarios experienced in a number of environments like space and nuclear reactors. Therefore, a better understanding of multi-particle irradiation problems and possible alternatives are needed. This study shows ionization induced thermal spike and defect recovery during sequential and simultaneous ion irradiation of amorphous silica. The simultaneous irradiation scenario is shown to be equivalent to multiple small sequential irradiation scenarios containing latent damage formation and recovery mechanisms. The results highlight the absence of any new damage mechanism and time-space correlation between various damage events during simultaneous irradiation of amorphous silica. This offers a new and convenient way to simulate and understand complex multi-particle irradiation problems.

  7. Scheme for probabilistic remotely preparing a multi-particle entangled GHZ state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Peng-Cheng; Zhan You-Bang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a scheme for probabilistic remote preparation of a three-particle entangled GreenbergerHorne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state via three-particle orthonormal basis projective measurement,and then directly generalize the scheme to multi-particle case.It is shown that by using N pairs of bipartite non-maximally entangled states as the quantum channel and N-particle orthonormal basis projective measurement,the multi-particle remote preparation can be successfully realized with a certain probability.

  8. Bremsstrahlung versus Monoenergetic Photon Dose and Photonuclear Stimulation Comparisons At Long Standoff Distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Jones; J.W. Sterbentz; W.Y. Yoon

    2009-06-01

    Energetic photon sources with energies greater than 6 MeV continue to be recognized as viable source for various types of inspection applications, especially those related to nuclear and/or explosive material detection. These energetic photons can be produced as a continuum of energies (i.e., bremsstrahlung distribution) or as a set of one or more discrete photon energies (i.e., monoenergetic distribution). This paper will provide a follow-on extension of the photon dose comparison presented at the 9th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques (June 2008). The latter paper showed the comparative advantages and disadvantages of the photon doses provided by these two energetic interrogation sources and highlighted the higher energy advantage of the bremsstrahlung source, especially at long standoff distances (i.e., distance from source to the inspected object). Specifically, this paper will pursue this higher energy photon inspection advantage (up to 100 MeV) by providing dose and stimulated photonuclear interaction predictions for air and an infinitely dilute interrogated material (used for comparative interaction rate assessments since it excludes material self-shielding) as the interrogation object positioned forward on the inspection beam axis at increasing standoff distances. In addition to the direct energetic photon-induced stimulation, the predictions will identify the importance of any secondary downscattered/attenuated source-term effects arising from the photon transport in the intervening atmosphere. *Supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office under Contract Number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  9. Probabilistic Teleportation of Multi-particle d-Level Quantum State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Min; ZHU Shi-Qun

    2005-01-01

    The general scheme for teleportation of a multi-particle d-level quantum state is presented when m pairs of partially entangled particles are utilized as quantum channels. The probabilistic teleportation can be achieved with a successful probability of d-1∏N=0(CN0)2/dM,which is determined by the smallest coefficients of each entangled channels.

  10. SU-E-T-612: Photonuclear Activation of Prosthetic Hips in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keehan, S; Taylor, M; Franich, R [RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Smith, R; Millar, J; Esser, M [William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Kron, T [Peter MacCallum Cancer Instit., Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the neutron induced activation of a prosthetic hip when exposed to an 18 MV radiotherapy linac beam to assess the potential dose to patients. Methods: A prosthetic hip (Thackray, UK) was placed in a water phantom and irradiated (both in-field and out-of-field) with an 18 MV linac beam. Gamma spectroscopy was used to identify the radioisotopes produced. Following the in-field irradiation where the induced activity is higher, high sensitivity lithium fluoride Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLD-100H) (Harshaw, USA) were placed on the surface to measure the dose which would be deposited to nearby tissue resulting from the induced radioactivity. Results: The radioisotopes produced in the hip prosthesis have been identified as {sup 5{sup 2}}V, {sup 5{sup 3}}Fe, and {sup 56}Mn which have half-lives of 3.74, 8.51 and minutes respectively. The 378 and 511 keV characteristic peaks of {sup 5{sup 3}}Fe do not appear in the spectra collected from hips irradiated in the out-of-field region. This isotope is produced by photonuclear interactions within the hip itself. {sup 52}V and {sup 56}Mn appear in spectra collected from hips irradiated either within the photon beam or in the nearby out-of-field region, implying that they are produced by incident neutron radiation produced in components of the linear accelerator.The integrated dose which would be deposited in the tissue immediately surrounding the hip after four hours (1.5 half-lives of the longest lived product) was measured as approximately 100 µGy, following a 10,000 MU irradiation of the prosthesis. A highly accurate measurement of the dose is challenging because of the irregular shape of the prosthesis. Conclusion: The cumulative dose measured at the surface of the hip is 0.0001% of the in-field dose, and is therefore negligible compared with the doses the patient receives as a consequence of their treatment.

  11. Several teleportation schemes of an arbitrary unknown multi-particle state via different quantum channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Jia-Yin; Mo Zhi-Wen

    2013-01-01

    We first provide four new schemes for two-party quantum teleportation of an arbitrary unknown multi-particle state by using three-,four-,and five-particle states as the quantum channel,respectively.The successful probability and fidelity of the four schemes reach 1.In the first two schemes,the receiver can only apply one of the unitary transformations to reconstruct the original state,making it easier for these two schemes to be directly realized.In the third and fourth schemes,the sender can preform Bell-state measurements instead of multipartite entanglement measurements of the existing similar schemes,which makes real experiments more suitable.It is found that the last three schemes may become tripartite controlled teleportation schemes of teleporting an arbitrary multi-particle state after a simple modification.Finally,we present a new scheme for three-party sharing an arbitrary unknown multi-particle state.In this scheme,the sender first shares three three-particle GHZ states with two agents.After setting up the secure quantum channel,an arbitrary unknown multi-particle state can be perfectly teleported if the sender performs three Bell-state measurements,and either of two receivers operates an appropriate unitary transformation to obtain the original state with the help of other receiver's three single-particle measurements.The successful probability and fidelity of this scheme also reach 1.It is demonstrated that this scheme can be generalized easily to the case of sharing an arbitrary unknown multi-particle state among several agents.

  12. Anderson localization in the multi-particle tight-binding model at low energies or with weak interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ekanga, Trésor

    2012-01-01

    We consider the multi-particle lattice Anderson model with an i.i.d. random external potential and a short-range interaction. Using the multi-particle multiscale analysis (MPMSA) developed by Chulaevsky and Suhov (2009), we prove spectral localization for such Hamiltonians at low energies under the assumption of log-H\\"{o}lder continuity of the marginal probability distribution of the random potential. Under a stronger assumption of H\\"older continuity, Anderson localization for such systems at low energies was established earlier by Aizenman and Warzel (2009) with the help of the multi-particle Fractional-Moment Method.

  13. Aspects of electromagnetic radiation reaction in strong fields

    CERN Document Server

    Burton, D A

    2014-01-01

    With the recent advances in laser technology, experimental investigation of radiation reaction phenomena is at last becoming a realistic prospect. A pedagogical introduction to electromagnetic radiation reaction is given with the emphasis on matter driven by ultra-intense lasers. Single-particle, multi-particle, classical and quantum aspects are all addressed.

  14. Analysis of Multi-particle Production at RHIC by Two-source Statistical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The data of multi-particle production in s1/2 =130 AGeV Au+Au collisions (RHIC) are analyzed by two-source statistical model which was successfully applied in analyzing the data of multi-particle production in 158 AGeV Pb+Pb collisions (SPS). It is found that sources in RHIC are different from that in SPS which has a small and hot inner source surrounded by a larger and cooler outer source. The two sources in RHIC are identical. They have the same temperature, volume, particle density and other thermodynamic quantities. Besides, the results of two-source model are identical with that of single-source model (the total volume of the two sources equals the volume of single source). The

  15. Investigation of Electromagnetic Properties of Multiparticle Systems in the Optical and Microwave Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Wendy

    The goal of this work is to examine the electromagnetic properties of multiple particles ensembles in optical and microwave regions. Electromagnetic scattering problems of multi-particles systems appear in many research areas, including biomedical research problems. When a particle system becomes dense, multiple scattering between the particles need to be included in order to fully describe the response of the system to an EM wave. The generalized multiparticle Mie (GMM) solution is used to rigorously solve the Maxwell's equations for multi-particles systems. The algorithm accounts for multiple scattering effects by transforming the waves scattered by an individual particle to the incident waves of other spheres in the ensemble. In the optical region, light scattering from biological tissues can reveal structural changes in the tissues which can be a mean for disease diagnosis. A new Monte Carlo simulation method is introduced to study the effect of tissue structure on signals from two diagnostic probes, the polarization gating probe and low coherence enhanced back scattering probe (LEBS). In the microwave region, the study of electromagnetic properties with metallic nanoparticles can determine their potential as effective heating agents in microwave hyperthermia therapy. The investigation aims to study the dielectric properties of metallic nanoparticles and quantify the relationship between the characteristics of metallic nanoparticles and the heating effect. The finding should help optimize the design and use of metallic nanoparticles in hyperthermia treatment. In addition, the metallic nanoparticles are studied for their potential to be contrast agents for biological tissue in the microwave region.

  16. Electromagnetic Reactions and Few-Nucleon Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bacca, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    We present an update on recent theoretical studies of electromagnetic reactions obtained by using the Lorentz integral transform method. The 4He nucleus will be the main focus of this report: results for the photo-disintegration and the electro-disintegration processes will be shown, as well as a recent calculation of polarizability effects in muonic atoms. We also discuss the exciting possibility to investigate inelastic reactions for medium-mass nuclei in coupled-cluster theory, highlighted by the recent application to the 16O photo-nuclear cross section.

  17. , 0, reaction on a nucleus in the GeV region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swapan Das

    2006-05-01

    0 invariant mass distribution spectrum has been calculated for the (, 0 ) reaction on 12C nucleus at 2.5 GeV beam energy. These 0 and are assumed to originate due to the decay of vector mesons produced in the photonuclear reaction. The nuclear medium effect on vector mesons and the effect of 0 rescattering on the 0 invariant mass spectrum have been investigated.

  18. Hermes III endpoint energy calculation from photonuclear activation of 197Au and 58Ni foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzyck, Christopher Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A new process has been developed to characterize the endpoint energy of HERMES III on a shot-to-shot basis using standard dosimetry tools from the Sandia Radiation Measurements Laboratory. Photonuclear activation readings from nickel and gold foils are used in conjunction with calcium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters to derive estimated electron endpoint energies for a series of HERMES shots. The results are reasonably consistent with the expected endpoint voltages on those shots.

  19. Some limitations of detailed balance for inverse reaction calculations in the astrophysical p-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1990-12-05

    p-Process modeling of some rare but stable proton-rich nuclei requires knowledge of a variety of neutron, charged particle, and photonuclear reaction rates at temperatures of 2 to 3 {times} 10{sup 9} {degrees}K. Detailed balance is usually invoked to obtain the stellar photonuclear rates, in spite of a number of well-known constraints. In this work we attempt to calculate directly the stellar rates for ({gamma},n) and ({gamma},{alpha}) reactions on {sup 151}Eu. These are compared with stellar rates obtained from detailed balance, using the same input parameters for the stellar (n,{gamma}) and ({alpha},{gamma}) reactions on {sup 150}Eu and {sup 147}Pm, respectively. The two methods yielded somewhat different results, which will be discussed along with some sensitivity studies. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Wave function perturbations propagation in multi-particle systems, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox and entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Shnaid, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    If a one-particle or multi-particle non-relativistic quantum system is initially in a stationary state, and its wave function field is locally perturbed, then according to classical Schr\\"odinger equation, the perturbation instantaneously affects all infinite region because, according to the equation, speed of the wave function perturbations propagation is infinite. This feature strongly influences all theoretical predictions for time evolution of the system and contradicts the natural limitation of the perturbations propagation speed by speed of light. We develop finite propagation speed concept for multi-particle non-relativistic quantum systems. It consists of (a) eikonal type equation for the wave function perturbation traveltime describing finite speed perturbation waves in hyperspace including coordinates of all paricles in the system; (b) modified multi-particle Schr\\"odinger equation with finite speed of the wave function perturbations propagation; and (c) hypothesis that speed of the wave function pe...

  1. A Symplectic Multi-Particle Tracking Model for Self-Consistent Space-Charge Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Symplectic tracking is important in accelerator beam dynamics simulation. So far, to the best of our knowledge, there is no self-consistent symplectic space-charge tracking model available in the accelerator community. In this paper, we present a two-dimensional and a three-dimensional symplectic multi-particle spectral model for space-charge tracking simulation. This model includes both the effect from external fields and the effect of self-consistent space-charge fields using a split-operator method. Such a model preserves the phase space structure and shows much less numerical emittance growth than the particle-in-cell model in the illustrative examples.

  2. Some Aspects of Multi-Particle Productions in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ayaz Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made for the study of multiparticle production due to the collisions of 28Si and 12C projectiles with nuclear emulsion nuclei (target at an energy of 4.5A GeV/c. Here we have studied the integral multiplicity distribution; total multiplicity charged distributions and our findings had been found in good agreement with the other works in the field of experimental high energy physics. Moreover, finally, we discussed the multiplicity correlations in terms of on Charge/Projectile (Q/Zbeam.

  3. Multi-particle long-range rapidity correlations from fluctuation of the fireball longitudinal shape

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the genuine long-range multi-particle rapidity correlation functions, $C_{n}(y_1,...,y_n)$ for $n=3,4,5,6$, originating from fluctuations of the fireball longitudinal shape. In these correlation functions any contribution from the short-range two-particle correlations, and in general up to $(n-1)$-particle in $C_n$, is suppressed. The information about the fluctuating fireball shape in rapidity is encoded in the cumulants of coefficients of the orthogonal polynomial expansion of particle distributions in rapidity.

  4. Controlled Probabilistic Teleportation of an Unknown Multi-Particle High-Dimensional Entangled State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jin; ZHAN You-Bang

    2009-01-01

    We propose a protocol for controlled probabilistic teleportation of an unknown tripartite qutrit entangled state with two partial tripartite qutrit entangled states as the quantum channel. It is found that teleportation associ-ated with the generalized qutrit Bell-basis measurement, the generalized qutrit π-state measurement and the generalized Hadamard operator in three-dimensional Hilbert space. We generalize the protocol for controlled probabilistic telepor-ration of an unknown k-particle qudit entangled state with a multi-particle qudit entangled state and a tripartite qudit entangled state as the quantum channel. We also calculate the classical communication cost required in both cases.

  5. One-Step Generation of Scalable Multiparticle Entanglement for Hot Ions Driven by a Standing-Wave Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文星; 陈爱喜

    2011-01-01

    An alternative scheme is proposed for one-step generation of multiparticle cluster state with trapped ions in thermal motion. In this scheme, the ions are simultaneously illuminated by a standing-wave laser tuned to the carrier. During the operations, the vibrational mode is virtually excited, thus the quantum operations are insensitive to the heating. It is shown that the high fidelity multiparticle entanglement could be generated in just one step even including the small fluctuations of parameters. In addition, the ion does not need to be exactly positioned at the node of the standing wave, which is also important from the viewpoint of experiment.

  6. Two- and Multi-particle Azimuthal Correlations in Small Collision Systems with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Trzupek, Adam; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The recent ATLAS results on two- and multi-particle azimuthal correlations of charged particles are presented for $\\sqrt{s}$=~5.02 TeV and 13 TeV $pp$, $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}}$= 5.02 TeV $p$+Pb and $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}}$= 2.76 TeV low-multiplicity Pb+Pb collisions. To remove the "non-flow" contribution from the correlations, that arises predominantly from hard-scattering processes, a template fitting procedure is used in the two-particle correlations (2PC) measurements, while for multi-particle correlations the cumulant method is applied. The correlations are expressed in the form of Fourier harmonics $\\mathrm{v}_n (n=2,3,4)$ measuring the global azimuthal anisotropy. The measurements presented hereafter confirm the evidence for collective phenomena in $p$+Pb and low-multiplicity Pb+Pb collisions. For $pp$ collisions the results on four-particle cumulants do not demonstrate a similar collective behaviour.

  7. Self-consistent approach to the description of relaxation processes in classical multiparticle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokshin, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    The concept of time correlation functions is a very convenient theoretical tool in describing relaxation processes in multiparticle systems because, on one hand, correlation functions are directly related to experimentally measured quantities (for example, intensities in spectroscopic studies and kinetic coefficients via the Kubo-Green relation) and, on the other hand, the concept is also applicable beyond the equilibrium case. We show that the formalism of memory functions and the method of recurrence relations allow formulating a self-consistent approach for describing relaxation processes in classical multiparticle systems without needing a priori approximations of time correlation functions by model dependences and with the satisfaction of sum rules and other physical conditions guaranteed. We also demonstrate that the approach can be used to treat the simplest relaxation scenarios and to develop microscopic theories of transport phenomena in liquids, the propagation of density fluctuations in equilibrium simple liquids, and structure relaxation in supercooled liquids. This approach generalizes the mode-coupling approximation in the Götze-Leutheusser realization and the Yulmetyev-Shurygin correlation approximations.

  8. On the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final states of $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, F; Liu, L

    1999-01-01

    The scaling property of factorial moments in the multiparticle final- states of e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions is studied in both the laboratory and the thrust-axis coordinate systems by using the Jetset generator. It turns out that in both of the two cases, the 3- dimensional lnF/sub 2/~lnM are approximately straight lines when the phase space are divided isotropically in different directions, showing that the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final- state of e/sup +/e/sup $/collisions are approximately isotropic. In the lab system, the three gamma parameters obtained by fitting F/sub 2/~M of p/sub x/, p/sub y/, p/sub z/ to Ochs formula respectively are approximately equal. In the thrust system, the three gamma values obtained by fitting F/sub 2/(y)~M, F/sub 2/(p/sub t/)~M and F/sub 2/( phi )~M are also close to each other provided the starting point in fitting F/sub 2/( phi )~M is chosen appropriately. All of these provide further evidence for the above assertion. Our results show that the essential ...

  9. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations in p -Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371577810; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371578248; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355079615; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070139032; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411885812; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A R; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411888056; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Rooij, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315888644; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372618715; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355502488; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of multiparticle azimuthal correlations (cumulants) for charged particles in p-Pb at sNN=5.02 TeV and Pb-Pb at sNN=2.76 TeV collisions are presented. They help address the question of whether there is evidence for global, flowlike, azimuthal correlations in the p-Pb system. Comparisons

  10. Study of the peculiarities of multiparticle production via event-by-event analysis in asymmetric nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosimova, Anastasiya; Gaitinov, Adigam; Grushevskaya, Ekaterina; Lebedev, Igor

    2017-06-01

    In this work the study on the peculiarities of multiparticle production in interactions of asymmetric nuclei to search for unusual features of such interactions, is performed. A research of long-range and short-range multiparticle correlations in the pseudorapidity distribution of secondary particles on the basis of analysis of individual interactions of nuclei of 197 Au at energy 10.7 AGeV with photoemulsion nuclei, is carried out. Events with long-range multiparticle correlations (LC), short-range multiparticle correlations (SC) and mixed type (MT) in pseudorapidity distribution of secondary particles, are selected by the Hurst method in accordance with Hurst curve behavior. These types have significantly different characteristics. At first, they have different fragmentation parameters. Events of LC type are processes of full destruction of the projectile nucleus, in which multicharge fragments are absent. In events of mixed type several multicharge fragments of projectile nucleus are discovered. Secondly, these two types have significantly different multiplicity distribution. The mean multiplicity of LC type events is significantly more than in mixed type events. On the basis of research of the dependence of multiplicity versus target-nuclei fragments number for events of various types it is revealed, that the most considerable multiparticle correlations are observed in interactions of the mixed type, which correspond to the central collisions of gold nuclei and nuclei of CNO-group, i.e. nuclei with strongly asymmetric volume, nuclear mass, charge, etc. Such events are characterised by full destruction of the target-nucleus and the disintegration of the projectile-nucleus on several multi-charged fragments.

  11. Multi-Particle Quantum Szilard Engine with Optimal Cycles Assisted by a Maxwell's Demon

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, C Y; Sun, C P

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete-quantum description of multi-particle Szilard engine which consists of a working substance and a Maxwell's demon. The demon is modeled as a multi-level quantum system with specific quantum control and the working substance consists of identical particles obeying Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac statistics. In this description, a reversible scheme to erase the demon's memory by a lower temperature heat bath is used. We demonstrate that (1) the quantum control of the demon can be optimized for single-particle Szilard engine so that the efficiency of the demon-assisted thermodynamic cycle could reach the Carnot cycle's efficiency; (2) the low-temperature behavior of the working substance is very sensitive to the quantum statistics of the particles and the insertion position of the partition.

  12. Multiparticle quantum Szilard engine with optimal cycles assisted by a Maxwell's demon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, C. Y.; Dong, H.; Sun, C. P.

    2012-03-01

    We present a complete-quantum description of a multiparticle Szilard engine that consists of a working substance and a Maxwell's demon. The demon is modeled as a multilevel quantum system with specific quantum control, and the working substance consists of identical particles obeying Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac statistics. In this description, a reversible scheme to erase the demon's memory by a lower-temperature heat bath is used. We demonstrate that (1) the quantum control of the demon can be optimized for a single-particle Szilard engine so that the efficiency of the demon-assisted thermodynamic cycle could reach the Carnot cycle's efficiency and (2) the low-temperature behavior of the working substance is very sensitive to the quantum statistics of the particles and the insertion position of the partition.

  13. Variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method applied to pairing correlations in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Pillet, N; Caurier, E

    2008-01-01

    Applying a variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method whose purpose is to include correlations beyond the mean field in a unified way without particle number and Pauli principle violations, we investigate pairing-like correlations in the ground states of $ ^{116}$Sn,$ ^{106}$Sn and $ ^{100}$Sn. The same effective nucleon-nucleon interaction namely, the D1S parameterization of the Gogny force is used to derive both the mean field and correlation components of nuclear wave functions. Calculations are performed using an axially symetric representation. The structure of correlated wave functions, their convergence with respect to the number of particle-hole excitations and the influence of correlations on single-particle level spectra and occupation probabilities are analyzed and compared with results obtained with the same two-body effective interaction from BCS, Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and particle number projected after variation BCS approaches. Calculations of nuclear radii and the first ...

  14. The effect of particle rotation in multi-particle flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowski, Adam; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    In multi-particle flow simulations, particle rotation is difficult to calculate and is often imprecisely accounted for or ignored altogether. We examine the effect of these procedures on the overall flow characteristics through large systems of particles when the particle center is fixed and either allowed or not to rotate. We use a newly developed GPU-centric implementation of the Physalis method for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of finite-size spheres. We investigate periodic systems of more than 100 randomly-distributed particles at Reynolds numbers up to 100. By considering flow characteristics such as mean velocity and pressure drop, we shed light on the importance of including particle rotation effects in large particle-flow simulations. Study supported by NSF grant CBET 1258398.

  15. New Statistical Multiparticle Approach to the Acceleration of Electrons by the Ion Field in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Oks

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of the acceleration of the (perturbing electrons by the ion field (AEIF significantly reduces Stark widths and shifts in plasmas of relatively high densities and/or relatively low temperature. Our previous analytical calculations of the AEIF were based on the dynamical treatment: the starting point was the ion-microfield-caused changes of the trajectories and velocities of individual perturbing electrons. In the current paper, we employ a statistical approach: the starting point is the electron velocity distribution function modified by the ion microfield. The latter had been calculated by Romanovsky and Ebeling in the multiparticle description of the ion microfield. The result shows again the reduction of the electron Stark broadening. Thus two totally different analytical approaches (dynamical and statistical agree with each other and therefore disprove the corresponding recent fully-numerical simulations by Stambulchik et al. that claimed an increase of the electron Stark broadening.

  16. Quantifying Compressibility and Slip in Multiparticle Collision (MPC Flow Through a Local Constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmina Akhter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of a compressible fluid with slip through a cylinder with an asymmetric local constriction has been considered both numerically, as well as analytically. For the numerical work, a particle-based method whose dynamics is governed by the multiparticle collision (MPC rule has been used together with a generalized boundary condition that allows for slip at the wall. Since it is well known that an MPC system corresponds to an ideal gas and behaves like a compressible, viscous flow on average, an approximate analytical solution has been derived from the compressible Navier–Stokes equations of motion coupled to an ideal gas equation of state using the Karman–Pohlhausen method. The constriction is assumed to have a polynomial form, and the location of maximum constriction is varied throughout the constricted portion of the cylinder. Results for centerline densities and centerline velocities have been compared for various Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, wall slip values and flow geometries.

  17. Scheme for Robust Storage of Multi-particle Entanglement with a Cavity QED System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-Yong; LI Shao-Hua; GAO Ke-Lin

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for robustly storing multi-atom entangled states involving Bell states, three-particle W-state, n-particle W-like-states, generalized multi-particle W-states, n-particle GHZ-states, and partially entangled states in cavity QED. Our scheme can preserve the internal structure of the entangled states above, with only generation of a global phase corresponding to each of entangled states during the storage of them. One single-mode cavity and n identical two-level atoms are required. Our scheme may be realized in the present technology. The idea may be also utilized to store multi-trapped-ion entangled states in linear ion trap.

  18. Anomalous dynamical scaling in anharmonic chains and plasma models with multi-particle collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco; Bufferand, Hugo; Ciraolo, Guido; Lepri, Stefano; Straka, Mika J

    2015-01-01

    We study the anomalous dynamical scaling of equilibrium correlations in one dimensional systems. Two different models are compared: the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain with cubic and quartic nonlinearity and a gas of point particles interacting stochastically through the Multi-Particle Collision dynamics. For both models -that admit three conservation laws- by means of detailed numerical simulations we verify the predictions of Nonlinear Fluctuating Hydrodynamics for the structure factors of density and energy fluctuations at equilibrium. Despite of this, violations of the expected scaling in the currents correlation are found in some regimes, hindering the observation of the asymptotic scaling predicted by the theory. In the case of the gas model this crossover is clearly demonstrated upon changing the coupling constant.

  19. The self-consistent multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing. Motivations, state of the art and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, N.; Robin, C.; Dupuis, M.; Hupin, G.; Berger, J.-F.

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of this paper is to review the state of the art of the multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing approach which was proposed and implemented using the Gogny interaction ˜ 10 years ago. Various theoretical aspects are re-analyzed when a Hamiltonian description is chosen: the link with exact many-body theories, the impact of truncations in the multiconfigurational space, the importance of defining single-particle orbitals which are consistent with the correlations introduced in the many-body wave function, the role of the self-consistency, and more practically the numerical convergence algorithm. Several applications done with the phenomenological effective Gogny interaction are discussed. Finally, future directions to extend and generalize the method are discussed.

  20. Densification simulation of compacted Al powders using multi-particle finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyung-Hun LEE; Jung-Min LEE; Byung-Min KIM

    2009-01-01

    The powder compaction simulations were performed to demonstrate deformation behavior of particles and estimate the effect of different punch speeds and particle diameters on the relative density of powder by a multi-particle finite element model(MPFEM). Individual particle discretized with a finite element mesh allows for a full description of the contact mechanics. In order to verify the reliability of compaction simulation by MPFEM, the compaction tests of porous aluminum with average particle size of 20 μm and 3 μm were performed at different ram speeds of 5, 15, 30 and 60 mm/min by MTS servo-hydraulic tester. The results show that the slow ram speed is of great advantage for powder densification in low compaction force due to sufficient particle rearrangement and compaction force increases with decrease in average particle size of aluminum.

  1. Remarks to the problem of the isomeric state production in (gamma, gamma') reactions in the giant dipole resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Demekhina, N A; Karapetyan, G S

    2001-01-01

    The population of the isomeric states is considered in nuclei sup 1 sup 1 sup 5 In and sup 1 sup 8 sup 0 Hf in photonuclear (gamma, gamma') reactions at giant dipole resonance energies. The comparison with the earlier published experimental and theoretical data is made. The behavior of the excitation function gives an evidence for possible increase of the high-spin state population in the giant resonance range

  2. Chaoticity in multiparticle production in Si-emulsion collisions at 14.6 A GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, R; Haq, M Mohib-ul; Islam, Saiful [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India)

    2002-12-01

    Fluctuations in the spatial patterns of the final states of Si-emulsion collisions at 14.6 A GeV are studied. The values of the entropy index that quantifies these fluctuations are obtained for our data and compared with the values of the entropy index calculated for the generated events. Our results indicate that the multiparticle production in Si-emulsion collisions at 14.6 A GeV exhibits chaotic behaviour.

  3. Average cross section measurement for 162Er (γ, n) reaction compared with theoretical calculations using TALYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagena, E.; Stoulos, S.

    2017-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beam delivered by a linear electron accelerator has been used to experimentally determine the near threshold photonuclear cross section data of nuclides. For the first time, (γ, n) cross section data was obtained for the astrophysical important nucleus 162Er. Moreover, theoretical calculations have been applied using the TALYS 1.6 code. The effect of the gamma ray strength function on the cross section calculations has been studied. A satisfactorily reproduction of the available experimental data of photonuclear cross section at the energy region below 20 MeV could be achieved. The photon flux was monitored by measuring the photons yield from seven well known (γ, n) reactions from the threshold energy of each reaction up to the end-point energy of the photon beam used. An integrated cross-section 87 ± 14 mb is calculated for the photonuclear reaction 162Er (γ, n) at the energy 9.2-14 MeV. The effective cross section estimated using the TALYS code range between 89 and 96 mb depending on the γ-strength function used. To validate the method for the estimation of the average cross-section data of 162Er (γ, n) reaction, the same procedure has been performed to calculate the average cross-section data of 197Au (γ, n) and 55Mn (γ, n) reactions. In this case, the photons yield from the rest well known (γ, n) reactions was used in order to monitoring the photon flux. The results for 162Er (γ, n), 197Au (γ, n) and 55Mn (γ, n) are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values obtained by TALYS 1.6. So, the present indirect process could be a valuable tool to estimate the effective cross section of (γ, n) reaction for various isotopes using bremsstrahlung beams.

  4. Influence of the photonuclear effect on electron-neutrino-induced electromagnetic cascades under the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal regime in standard rock

    CERN Document Server

    Tartare, Mathieu; Montanet, François; 10.1103/PhysRevD.86.033005

    2012-01-01

    The observation of earth skimming neutrinos has been proposed as a rather sensitive method to detect ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic neutrinos. Energetic cosmic neutrinos can interact inside the rock and produce leptons via a charged current interaction. In the case of an incoming electron neutrino undergoing a charged current interaction, the produced UHE electron will induce an underground electromagnetic shower. At high energy (above 7.7 TeV in standard rock), such showers are subject to LPM (Landau, Pomeranchuk and Migdal) suppression of the radiative processes cross sections (bremsstrahlung and pair production). The consequence of this suppression is that showers are elongated. This effect will increase the detection probability of such events allowing deeper showers to emerge with detectable energies. On the other hand, the photonuclear processes which are usually neglected in electromagnetic showers with respect to radiative processes, turn out to become dominant in the LPM regime and will reduce the sh...

  5. Semiclassical modeling of quantum-mechanical multiparticle systems using parallel particle-in-cell methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauger, Dean Edward

    2001-08-01

    We are successful in building a code that models many particle dynamic quantum systems by combining a semiclassical approximation of Feynman path integrals with parallel computing techniques (particle-in-cell) and numerical methods developed for simulating plasmas, establishing this approach as a viable technique for multiparticle time-dependent quantum mechanics. Run on high-performance parallel computers, this code applies semiclassical methods to simulate the time evolution of wavefunctions of many particles. We describe the analytical derivation and computational implementation of these techniques in detail. We present a study to thoroughly demonstrate the code's fidelity to quantum mechanics, resulting in innovative visualization and analysis techniques. We introduce and exhibit a method to address fermion particle statistics. We present studies of two quantum-mechanical problems: a two-electron, one- dimensional atom, resulting in high-quality extractions of one- and two-electron eigenstates, and electrostatic quasi-modes due to quantum effects in a hot electron plasma, relevant for predictions about stellar evolution. We supply discussions of alternative derivations, alternative implementations of the derivations, and an exploration of their consequences. Source code is shown throughout this dissertation. Finally, we present an extensive discussion of applications and extrapolations of this work, with suggestions for future direction.

  6. A Time-Domain Structural Damage Detection Method Based on Improved Multiparticle Swarm Coevolution Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Fei Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization techniques have been applied to structural health monitoring and damage detection of civil infrastructures for two decades. The standard particle swarm optimization (PSO is easy to fall into the local optimum and such deficiency also exists in the multiparticle swarm coevolution optimization (MPSCO. This paper presents an improved MPSCO algorithm (IMPSCO firstly and then integrates it with Newmark’s algorithm to localize and quantify the structural damage by using the damage threshold proposed. To validate the proposed method, a numerical simulation and an experimental study of a seven-story steel frame were employed finally, and a comparison was made between the proposed method and the genetic algorithm (GA. The results show threefold: (1 the proposed method not only is capable of localization and quantification of damage, but also has good noise-tolerance; (2 the damage location can be accurately detected using the damage threshold proposed in this paper; and (3 compared with the GA, the IMPSCO algorithm is more efficient and accurate for damage detection problems in general. This implies that the proposed method is applicable and effective in the community of damage detection and structural health monitoring.

  7. Measurements of multi-particle correlations and collective flow with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bold, Tomasz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of flow harmonics of charged particles from v_2 to v_7 in Pb+Pb collisions in the wide range of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity provides not only a way to study the initial state of the nuclear collisions and soft particle collective dynamics, but also provides insight into jet quenching via the measurement of flow harmonics at high transverse momenta. The longitudinal fluctuations of the v_n and event-plane angles Psi_n are also presented. The longitudinal flow decorrelations have contributions from v_n-magnitude fluctuations and event plane twist. A four-particle correlator is used to separate these two effects. Results show both effects have a linear dependence on pseudorapidity separation from v_2 to v_5, and show a small but measurable variation with collision energy. While collectivity is well established in collisions involving heavy nuclei, its evidence in pp collisions is less clear. In order to assess the collective nature of multi-particle production, the correlation measurem...

  8. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Virid, Sparisoma

    2015-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of alti...

  9. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Purqon, Acep; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of altitude also meets atmosphere's hydrostatic theory.

  10. Beta-Delayed Multiparticle Emission Studies at ISOL-type Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borge, M.J.G. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Bergmann, U.C. [Institut for fysik og astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); EP Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boutami, R. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Cederkaell, J. [EP Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dendooven, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaaeskylae, FIN-40351 Jyvaaeskylae (Finland); Fraile, L.M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Fynbo, H.O.U. [Institut for fysik og astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Huang, W.X. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaaeskylae, FIN-40351 Jyvaaeskylae (Finland); Huikari, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaaeskylae, FIN-40351 Jyvaaeskylae (Finland); Jading, Y. [EP Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Jeppesen, H. [Institut for fysik og astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Jokinen, A. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaaeskylae, FIN-40351 Jyvaaeskylae (Finland); Jonson, B. [Experimentell Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Martel, I. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Meister, M. [Experimentell Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, T. [Experimentell Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Nyman, G. [Experimentell Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Prezado, Y. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Riisager, K. [Institut for fysik og astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)] [and others

    2004-12-27

    We report here on the recent {beta}-decay studies made at ISOL-type Facilities to determine the multiparticle breakup mechanism of excited states in light nuclei by studying them in full kinematics. In particular the results obtained for the A = 9 isobars and the breakup of the 12.7 MeV state in {sup 12}C of unnatural parity are discussed. The breakup of the latter has been debated since more than a decade. Mirror beta transitions in the A=9 chain are compared and a large asymmetry factor is deduced for the transitions to high excitation energy in {sup 9}Be (11.8 MeV) and {sup 9}B (12.2 MeV) fed in the {beta}-decay of {sup 9}Li and {sup 9}C respectively. It is shown that the asymmetry is not due to experimental problems or differences in the mechanisms of breakup or in the spin of the states. As no asymmetry is found in the gs to gs transition it must be due to the particular structure of these excited states. The controversy on the breakup mechanism of the 12.7 MeV state is resolved.

  11. Measurement of multi-particle azimuthal correlations with the subevent cumulant method with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Mingliang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of four-particle cumulant and anisotropic elliptic flow coefficient for the second harmonic, $c_{2}\\{4\\}$ and $v_{2}\\{4\\}$, are presented using $pp$ data at $\\sqrt{s}=5.02$ and $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV, and $p+$Pb data at $\\sqrt{s_{\\text{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV. These measurements aim to assess collective nature of multi-particle production. While collectivity is well established in $p$+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions, because of larger non-flow contributions, its evidence in $pp$ collisions is contested. The values of $c_{2}\\{4\\}$ are calculated using the standard cumulant method and recently proposed two and three subevent methods, which can further suppress the non-flow contributions in small systems. In these collisions systems, the three subevent method gives a negative $c_{2}\\{4\\}$, and thus a well-defined $v_{2}\\{4\\}$. The magnitude of $c_{2}\\{4\\}$ is found to be nearly independent of $\\langle N_{\\text{ch}} \\rangle$ and third harmonic $c_{3}\\{4\\}$ is consistent with 0. $v_{2}\\{4\\}$ is found to be smaller than...

  12. Searching for low-lying multi-particle thresholds in lattice spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Mahbub, M Selim; Leinweber, Derek B; Williams, Anthony G

    2013-01-01

    We explore the Euclidean-time tails of odd-parity nucleon correlation functions in a search for the S-wave pion-nucleon scattering-state threshold contribution. The analysis is performed using 2+1 flavor 32^3 x 64 PACS-CS gauge configurations available via the ILDG. Correlation matrices composed with various levels of fermion source/sink smearing are used to project low-lying states. The consideration of 25,600 fermion propagators reveals the presence of more than one state in what would normally be regarded as an eigenstate-projected correlation function. This observation is in accord with the scenario where the eigenstates contain a strong mixing of single and multi-particle states but only the single particle component has a strong coupling to the interpolating field. Employing a two-exponential fit to the eigenvector-projected correlation function, we are able to confirm the presence of two eigenstates. The lower-lying eigenstate is consistent with a N-pi scattering threshold and has a relatively small co...

  13. Measurements of multi-particle correlations and collective flow with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bold, Tomasz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of flow harmonics of charged particles from $v_2$ to $v_7$ in Pb+Pb collisions in the wide range of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity provides not only a way to study the initial state of the nuclear collisions and soft particle collective dynamics, but also provides insight into jet quenching via the measurement of flow harmonics at high transverse momenta. The longitudinal fluctuations of the $v_n$ and event-plane angles $\\Psi_n$ are also presented. The longitudinal flow decorrelations have contributions from $v_n$-magnitude fluctuations and event plane twist. A four-particle correlator is used to separate these two effects. Results show both effects have a linear dependence on pseudorapidity separation from $v_2$ to $v_5$, and show a small but measurable variation with collision energy. While collectivity is well established in collisions involving heavy nuclei, its evidence in pp collisions is less clear. In order to assess the collective nature of multi-particle production, the corre...

  14. Multi-Particle Anderson Localisation: Induction on the Number of Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a follow-up of our recent papers \\cite{CS08} and \\cite{CS09} covering the two-particle Anderson model. Here we establish the phenomenon of Anderson localisation for a quantum $N$-particle system on a lattice $\\Z^d$ with short-range interaction and in presence of an IID external potential with sufficiently regular marginal cumulative distribution function (CDF). Our main method is an adaptation of the multi-scale analysis (MSA; cf. \\cite{FS}, \\cite{FMSS}, \\cite{DK}) to multi-particle systems, in combination with an induction on the number of particles, as was proposed in our earlier manuscript \\cite{CS07}. Similar results have been recently obtained in an independent work by Aizenman and Warzel \\cite{AW08}: they proposed an extension of the Fractional-Moment Method (FMM) developed earlier for single-particle models in \\cite{AM93} and \\cite{ASFH01} (see also references therein) which is also combined with an induction on the number of particles. An important role in our proof is played by a varian...

  15. Mixing model with multi-particle interactions for Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the numerical study of the mixing volume model (MVM) for molecular diffusion in Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing problems. The MVM is based on the multi-particle interaction in a finite volume (mixing volume). A priori test of the MVM, based on the direct numerical simulations of planar jets, is conducted in the turbulent region and the interfacial layer between the turbulent and non-turbulent fluids. The results show that the MVM predicts well the mean effects of the molecular diffusion under various numerical and flow parameters. The number of the mixing particles should be large for predicting a value of the molecular diffusion term positively correlated to the exact value. The size of the mixing volume relative to the Kolmogorov scale η is important in the performance of the MVM. The scalar transfer across the turbulent/non-turbulent interface is well captured by the MVM especially with the small mixing volume. Furthermore, the MVM with multiple mixing particles is tested in the hybrid implicit large-eddy-simulation/Lagrangian-particle-simulation (LES-LPS) of the planar jet with the characteristic length of the mixing volume of O(100η). Despite the large mixing volume, the MVM works well and decays the scalar variance in a rate close to the reference LES. The statistics in the LPS are very robust to the number of the particles used in the simulations and the computational grid size of the LES. Both in the turbulent core region and the intermittent region, the LPS predicts a scalar field well correlated to the LES.

  16. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  17. Group-theoretical construction of finite-momentum and multi-particle operators for lattice hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Justina; Jhang, You-Cyuan; Juge, Keisuke J.; Lenkner, David; Morningstar, Colin; Wong, Chik Him

    2012-01-01

    Determining the spectrum of hadronic excitations from Monte Carlo simulations requires the use of interpolating operators that couple to multi-particle states. Recent algorithmic advances have made the inclusion of multi-hadron operators in spectroscopy calculations a practical reality. In this talk, a procedure for constructing a set of multi-hadron interpolators that project onto the states of interest is described. To aid in the interpretation of simulation data, operators are designed to transform irreducibly under the lattice symmetry group. The identification of a set of optimal single-hadron interpolators for states with non-zero momenta is an essential intermediate step in this analysis.

  18. Impacts of Limestone Multi-particle Size on Production Performance, Egg Shell Quality, and Egg Quality in Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Y. Guo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of single or multi-particle size limestone on the egg shell quality, egg production, egg quality and feed intake in laying hens. A total of 280 laying hens (ISA brown were used in this 10-wk trial. Laying hens were randomly assigned to 4 treatments with 14 replications per treatment and 5 adjacent cages as a replication (hens were caged individually. The experimental treatments were: i L, basal diet+10% large particle limestone; ii LS1, basal diet+8% large particle limestone+2% small particle limestone; iii LS2, basal diet+6% large particle limestone+4% small particle limestone; iv S, basal diet+10% small particle limestone. The egg production was unaffected by dietary treatments. The egg weight in S treatment was lighter than other treatments (p<0.05. The egg specific gravity in S treatment was lower than other treatments (p<0.05. The eggshell strength and eggshell thickness in S treatment were decreased when compared with other dietary treatments (p<0.05. The laying hens in LS1 and LS2 treatment had a higher average feed intake than the other two treatments (p<0.05. Collectively, the dietary multi-particle size limestone supplementation could be as efficient as large particle size limestone.

  19. Diffusion and reaction in crowded environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EcheverIa, Carlos [Laboratorio de Fisica Aplicada y Computacional, Departamento de Matematica y Fisica, Universidad Nacional Experimental del Tachira, San Cristobal 5001 (Venezuela); Tucci, Kay [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Kapral, Raymond [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2007-02-14

    The effects of molecular crowding on small molecule diffusion and chemical reaction rate coefficients are investigated. The systems considered comprise a random distribution of stationary spherical obstacles occupying a volume fraction {phi} of the system and a large number of small molecules whose dynamics are followed. Chemical reactions are studied in such crowded systems where, in addition to the obstacles, a large reactive sphere C is present that catalyses the reaction A+C {yields} B+C. Using a mesoscopic description of the dynamics employing multiparticle collisions among the small molecules, the {phi} dependence of the diffusion and reaction rate coefficients is computed. Both the diffusion and reaction rate coefficients decrease with increase of the obstacle volume fraction as expected but variations of these quantities with {phi} are not predicted by simple models of the dynamics.

  20. Erraticity analysis of multiparticle production in {pi}{sup +}p and K{sup +}p collisions at 250 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atayan, M.R.; Bai, Yuting; De Wolf, E.A.; Endler, A.M.F.; Fu, Jinghua; Gulkanyan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Kittel, W.; Liu Lianshou; Metreveli, Z.V.; Smirnova, L.N.; Tikhonova, L.A.; Tomaradze, A.G.; Verbeure, F.; Wu Yuanfang; Zotkin, S.A

    2003-04-10

    The erraticity behavior of multiparticle production is analyzed in {pi}{sup +}p and K{sup +}p collisions at 250 GeV/c. It is demonstrated that, for these low-multiplicity final states, the erraticity measure based on event-to-event fluctuation of factorial moments is dominated by statistical fluctuations.

  1. On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Salgado, Carlos W

    2013-01-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons...

  2. Fluctuation induced symmetry breaking and the equality of multi-particle eccentricities for four or more particles

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam; McLerran, Larry

    2013-01-01

    We discuss eccentricities (ellipticity and triangularity) generated in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions. We define multi-particle eccentricities $\\epsilon_n\\{m\\}$ which are associated with the $n'th$ angular multipole moment for $m$ particles. We show that in the limit of fluctuation dominance all of the $\\epsilon_n\\{m\\}$'s are approximately equal for $m \\ge 4$. For dynamics linearly responding to these eccentricities such as hydrodynamics or proposed in this paper weakly interacting field theory, these relations among eccentricities are translated into relations among flow moments $v_n\\{m\\}$. We argue that these eccentricities are generated by a two dimension Gaussian integral distribution whose width controls the magnitude of fluctuations and whose center gives $\\epsilon_n\\{m\\}$ for $m \\ge 4$. This center value breaks the rotational symmetry for an underlying random distribution.

  3. Development of a photonuclear activation file and measurement of delayed neutron spectra; Creation d'une bibliotheque d'activation photonucleaire et mesures de spectres d'emission de neutrons retardes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacri-Mauborgne, M.L

    2005-11-15

    This thesis work consists in two parts. The first part is the description of the creation of a photonuclear activation file which will be used to calculated photonuclear activation. To build this file we have used different data sources: evaluations but also calculations done using several cross sections codes (HMS-ALICE, GNASH, ABLA). This file contains photonuclear activation cross sections for more than 600 nuclides and fission fragments distributions for 30 actinides at tree different Bremsstrahlung energies and the delay neutron spectrum associated. These spectra are not in good agreement with experimental data. That is why we decided to launch measurement of delayed neutrons spectra from photofission. The second part of this thesis consists in demonstrating the possibility to do such measurements at the ELSA accelerator facility. To that purpose, we have developed the detection, the acquisition system and the analysis method of such spectra. These were tested for the measurement of the delayed neutron spectrum of uranium-238 after irradiation in a 2 MeV neutron flux. Finally, we have measured the delayed neutron spectrum of uranium-238 after irradiation in a 15 MeV Bremsstrahlung flux. We compare our results with experimental data. The experiment has allowed us to improve the value of {nu}{sub p}-bar with an absolute uncertainty below 7%, we propose {nu}{sub p}-bar = (3.03 {+-} 0.02) n/100 fissions, and to correct the Nikotin's parameters for the six group representation. Particularly, we have improved the data concerning the sixth group by taking into account results from different irradiation times.

  4. Proceedings of the 38th international symposium on multiparticle dynamics ISMD08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, Jochen [Hamburg Univ. (Germany); Borras, Kerstin; Jung, Hannes; Kutak, Krzysztof; Levonian, Sergey; Mnich, Joachim (eds.) [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gustafson, Goesta [Hamburg Univ. (Germany); Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    2009-01-15

    The following topics are dealt with: Multiple production in particle production, high-energy heavy ion reactions, QCD calculations, search for new physics at the LHC, recent theoretical developments. (HSI)

  5. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  6. Measurement of multi-particle azimuthal correlations in $pp$, $p$+Pb and low-multiplicity Pb+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abidi, Syed Haider; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albicocco, Pietro; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahrasemani, Sina; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela

    2017-06-26

    Multi-particle cumulants and corresponding Fourier harmonics are measured for azimuthal angle distributions of charged particles in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 5.02 and 13 TeV and in $p$+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV, and compared to the results obtained for low-multiplicity Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. These measurements aim to assess the collective nature of particle production. The measurements of multi-particle cumulants confirm the evidence for collective phenomena in $p$+Pb and low-multiplicity Pb+Pb collisions. On the other hand, the $pp$ results for four-particle cumulants do not demonstrate collective behaviour, indicating that they may be biased by contributions from non-flow correlations. A comparison of multi-particle cumulants and derived Fourier harmonics across different collision systems is presented as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity. For a given multiplicity, the measured Fourier harmonics are largest in Pb+Pb, smaller in $p$+Pb and smal...

  7. Measurement of multi-particle azimuthal correlations in pp, p + Pb and low-multiplicity Pb + Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albicocco, P.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Piqueras, D. Álvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Coutinho, Y. Amaral; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Santos, S. P. Amor Dos; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Ferraz, V. Araujo; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Navarro, L. Barranco; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Noccioli, E. Benhar; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bylund, O. Bessidskaia; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolz, A. E.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Sola, J. D. Bossio; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Madden, W. D. Breaden; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Briglin, D. L.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.

    2017-06-26

    Multi-particle cumulants and corresponding Fourier harmonics are measured for azimuthal angle distributions of charged particles in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 5.02 and 13 TeV and in p + Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$$_ {NN}$ = 5.02 TeV, and compared to the results obtained for low-multiplicity Pb + Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$$_ {NN}$ = 2.76 TeV. These measurements aim to assess the collective nature of particle production. The measurements of multi-particle cumulants confirm the evidence for collective phenomena in p + Pb and low-multiplicity Pb + Pb collisions. On the other hand, the pp results for four-particle cumulants do not demonstrate collective behaviour, indicating that they may be biased by contributions from non-flow correlations. A comparison of multi-particle cumulants and derived Fourier harmonics across different collision systems is presented as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity. For a given multiplicity, the measured Fourier harmonics are largest in Pb + Pb, smaller in p + Pb and smallest in pp collisions. Finally, the pp results show no dependence on the collision energy, nor on the multiplicity.

  8. Analysis of Multiparticle Bose-Einstein Correlations for QGP Hadronization%QGP强子化的多粒子玻色-爱因斯坦关联分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张卫宁; 唐圭新; 张盛; 陈相君; 霍雷; 刘亦铭

    2001-01-01

    The multiparticle Bose-Einstein correlations of pions and kaons produced by a surface hadronization of the quark-gluon plasma droplets are calculated. For finite initial baryon density, the multiparticle correlations of K+ are weaker than those of π, and the average multiparticle correlation intensities of K- decrease rapidly with the increase of the number of the droplets Nd. For zero initial baryon density the differences between the correlation intensities of K+ and π become obvious with Nd increase.%计算了由夸克-胶子等离子体(QGP)颗粒表面强子化所产生的π介子和K介子的多粒子玻色-爱因斯坦关联. 对有限初始重子数密度的情况,K+介子的多粒子关联比π介子的多粒子关联弱,K-介子的平均多粒子关联强度随QGP颗粒数目Nd的增加而快速下降. 在零初始重子数密度情况下,K+和π介子的平均多粒子关联强度的差别随Nd的增加而变得明显.

  9. On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Carlos W. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weygand, Dennis P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  10. Preparation of W class states of multiparticle by adiabatic passage%多粒子W态的绝热制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓东; 费振乐; 郭建友

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel technique for preparing the multiparticle W class states, which are based on adiabatic passage induced a suitably crafted time-dependent external field. We have derived the interaction Hamiltonian, and the adiabatic and diabatic evolution conditions of driving the system of n-spin-1/2 particles from initial unentangled state to the W class state. In addition, we show the diagram of the energies evolution and the populations of target state of transferring the system of three spin-1/2 particles from initial unentangled state to target entangled state of W-type.%通过利用时间依赖的外磁场,提出了绝热制备多粒子W态的新方法.同时给出了驱动n个自旋1/2粒子从未纠缠态到W态的相互作用哈密顿量以及绝热和非绝热演化条件,展示了能量和靶态布据随时间的演化图.

  11. A Total Measure of Multi-Particle Quantum Correlations in Atomic Schrödinger Cat States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Ram Narayan

    2017-04-01

    We propose a total measure of multi-particle quantum correlation in a system of N two-level atoms (N qubits). We construct a parameter that encompasses all possible quantum correlations among N two-level atoms in arbitrary symmetric pure states and define its numerical value to be the total measure of the net atom-atom correlations. We use that parameter to quantify the total quantum correlations in atomic Schrödinger cat states, which are generated by the dispersive interaction in a cavity. We study the variation of the net amount of quantum correlation as we vary the number of atoms from N=2 to N=100 and obtain some interesting results. We also study the variation of the net correlation, for fixed interaction time, as we increase the number of atoms in the excited state of the initial system, and notice some interesting features. We also observe the behaviour of the net quantum correlation as we continuously increase the interaction time, for the general state of N two-level atoms in a dispersive cavity.

  12. Recent Results on Multi-Particle Azimuthal Correlations in High-Multiplicity pp and pPb Collisions in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardes, Cesar Augusto

    2017-01-01

    In nucleus-nucleus collisions, the Quark-Gluon Plasma behaves like a perfect fluid and the azimuthal anisotropy of the observed particle final-state distributions reflects its properties. This anisotropic flow, arising mainly from initial-state geometry and its fluctuations, highlights the collective behavior of the particles produced in the collision. It is well-described by hydrodynamics and explains the long-range near-side correlations, known as the ridge, observed experimentally in AA collisions and, more recently, in small systems such as pp or pA collisions. The CMS experiment has studied this correlation in details by extracting the momenta of the Fourier decomposition of azimuthal particle-distribution in the final state ($v_{\\mathrm{n}}$, n = 2 - 4). The $v_{\\mathrm{n}}$ are extracted using di-hadron correlation and multi-particle cumulant methods in both pp and pPb collisions. In this talk, results from CMS on the ridge in small systems are shown and compared with those in PbPb collisions, demonstr...

  13. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty Bezverkhny; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agostinelli, Andrea; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Berger, Martin Emanuel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubskiy, Mikhail; Boehmer, Felix Valentin; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile Ioan; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dang, Ruina; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; De Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dorheim, Sverre; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutt Mazumder, Abhee Kanti; Hilden, Timo Eero; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Esposito, Marco; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigory; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floratos, Emmanouil; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gumbo, Mervyn; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Khan, Kamal; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kadyshevskiy, Vladimir; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskikh, Artem; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Okatan, Ali; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Sahoo, Pragati; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palmeri, Armando; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitry; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Pohjoisaho, Esko Heikki Oskari; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Rauf, Aamer Wali; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Sharma, Rohni; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sanchez Rodriguez, Fernando Javier; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Segato, Gianfranco; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wagner, Vladimir; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yang, Shiming; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yi, Jungyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zyzak, Maksym

    2014-11-03

    Measurements of multi-particle azimuthal correlations (cumulants) for charged particles in p-Pb at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02$ TeV and Pb-Pb at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 2.76$ TeV collisions are presented. They help address a question if there is evidence for global, flow-like, azimuthal correlations in the p-Pb system. Comparisons are made to measurements from the larger Pb-Pb system, where such evidence is established. In particular, the second harmonic two-particle cumulants are found to decrease with multiplicity, characteristic of a dominance of few-particle correlations in p-Pb collisions. However, when a $|\\Delta \\eta|$ gap is placed to suppress such correlations, the two-particle cumulants begin to rise at high-multiplicity, indicating the presence of global azimuthal correlations. The Pb-Pb values are higher than the p-Pb values at similar multiplicities. In both systems, the second harmonic four-particle cumulants exhibit a transition from positive to negative values when the multiplicity increases. The n...

  14. Multiparticle production in pi- p collisions at 100 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.L.; /Chicago U., EFI

    1970-06-01

    The authors propose an experiment to examine in some detail the multiple production of pions in {pi}-p collisions at 100 GeV. In the experiment they identify and measure the proton recoiling from the collision and then measure the multiplicity and the momentum distribution of the accompanying mesonic shower. They propose to measure: (1) the elastic {pi}p cross-section over a wide range of momentum transfer 0.1 {le} -t {le} 15 GeV{sup 2} or until the cross-section d{sigma}/dt drops below 10{sup -33} cm{sup 2}/GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}; (2) using proton recoil measurements above, the mesonic missing mass cross-sections over a wide range of possible mass and momentum transfer; (3) the multiplicity and momentum distribution of the charged and neutral particles in the mesonic shower over a wide range of mass and momentum transfer, they should be able to identify completely a large class of such events; (4) reactions of the type {pi} + p {yields} (2n+1) {pi} + p have a particular interest, imasmuch as such combinations of an odd number of pions might represent Regge recurrences of the pion which could be produced by a coherent diffraction process with substantial cross-section at 100 GeV.

  15. Measurement of multi-particle azimuthal correlations in pp, p+Pb and low-multiplicity Pb+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Multi-particle correlations in azimuthal angles of produced charged particles are measured by ATLAS in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 5.02 and 13 TeV $pp$ collisions, in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV $p$+Pb collisions, and in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=2.76 TeV low-multiplicity Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. The correlations are expressed in terms of cumulants $c_n$, directly related to the $n^{th}$-order Fourier harmonics $\\mathrm{v}_n$, measuring the global azimuthal anisotropy of particle production. These measurements aim to assess collective nature of particle production. %While collectivity is well established in collisions involving heavy nuclei, its evidence in $pp$ collisions is less clear. The measurements of multi-particle cumulants confirm the evidence for collective phenomena in $p$+Pb and low-multiplicity Pb+Pb collisions. The same interpretation holds for \\pp collisions on the basis of the second-order two-particle cumulants when determined with the requirement of pseudorapidity separation, $|\\Delta\\eta|>2$, b...

  16. Measurement of multi-particle azimuthal correlations with the subevent cumulant method in $pp$ and $p$+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abidi, Syed Haider; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Afik, Yoav; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akilli, Ece; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albicocco, Pietro; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Alderweireldt, Sara; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahmani, Marzieh; Bahrasemani, Sina; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Bakker, Pepijn Johannes; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Bandyopadhyay, Anjishnu; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barkeloo, Jason Tyler Colt; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Beck, Helge Christoph; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Betti, Alessandra; Bevan, Adrian John; Beyer, Julien-christopher; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin

    2017-01-01

    A detailed study of multi-particle azimuthal correlations is presented using $pp$ data at $\\sqrt{s}=5.02$ and 13 TeV, and $p$+Pb data at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV, recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The azimuthal correlations are probed using four-particle cumulants $c_{n}\\{4\\}$ and flow coefficients $v_n\\{4\\}=(-c_{n}\\{4\\})^{1/4}$ for $n=2$ and 3, with the goal of extracting long-range multi-particle azimuthal correlation signals and suppressing the short-range correlations. The values of $c_{n}\\{4\\}$ are obtained as a function of the average number of charged particles per event, $\\left\\langle N_{\\rm{ch}} \\right\\rangle$, using the recently proposed two-subevent and three-subevent cumulant methods, and compared with results obtained with the standard cumulant method. The three-subevent method is found to be least sensitive to short-range correlations, which originate mostly from jets with a positive contribution to $c_{n}\\{4\\}$. The three-subevent method gives a negative $c_{2}\\{4\\}$, and theref...

  17. Correlations in multiparticle production

    CERN Document Server

    Troshin, S M

    2011-01-01

    We discuss correlations in the hadron production in the $pp$-collision with emphasize on the ridge-like structure origin in the two-particle correlation function. We suggest that this structure can appear due to a rotating nature of the transient state of matter generated in the intermidiate stage of proton collison.

  18. Isomeric and ground state energy level measurements of natural tellurium isotopes via (γ,n) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamkas, M.; Akcali, O.; Durusoy, A.

    2015-04-01

    We have planned to measure isomeric and ground state energy levels in 120Te(γ,n)119m,gTe, 122Te(γ,n)121m,gTe, 128Te(γ,n)127m,gTe, 130Te(γ,n)129m,gTe photonuclear reactions of natural tellurium induced by bremsstrahlung photons with end-point energy at 18 MeV. The sample was irradiated in the clinical linear electron accelerator (Philips SLi-25) at Akdeniz University Hospital. The gamma spectrum of the tellurium sample was measured using HP(Ge) semiconductor detector (ORTEC) and multi channel analyzer. We used both MAESTRO (ORTEC) and home made root based gui program (Theia) for data analyzing. The obtained experimental data values are compared with NUDAT energy values.

  19. Measurement of multi-particle azimuthal correlations in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 5.02 and 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Multi-particle correlations in azimuthal angles of produced charged particles are measured by the ATLAS Collaboration in sqrt(s) = 5.02 and 13 TeV pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. The correlations are expressed in terms of cumulants c_2, directly related to the second-order Fourier harmonic v_2, measuring the global azimuthal anisotropy of particle production. These measurements aim to assess the collective nature of particle production in pp collisions. While collectivity is well established in collisions involving heavy nuclei, the issue in pp collisions is less clear. The measurements of four-particle cumulants are performed with two analysis methods, which differ in their sensitivity to event-by-event multiplicity fluctuations. The results are found to depend on the analysis method used.

  20. Open Effective Field Theories from Deeply Inelastic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, Hans-Werner; Lepage, G. Peter

    2017-01-01

    Effective field theories have often been applied to systems with inelastic reactions that produce particles with large momenta outside the domain of validity of the effective theory. The effects of the deeply inelastic reactions have been taken into account in previous work by adding local anti-Hermitian terms to the effective Hamiltonian density. We show that an additional modification is required in equations governing the density matrix when multi-particle states are considered. We define an effective density matrix by tracing out states containing high-momentum particles, and show that it satisfies a Lindblad equation, with Lindblad operators determined by the anti-Hermitian terms in the effective Hamiltonian density. This research was supported in part by the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Simons Foundation.

  1. Open Effective Field Theories from Deeply Inelastic Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Braaten, Eric; Lepage, G Peter

    2016-01-01

    Effective field theories have often been applied to systems with deeply inelastic reactions that produce particles with large momenta outside the domain of validity of the effective theory. The effects of the deeply inelastic reactions have been taken into account in previous work by adding local anti-Hermitian terms to the effective Hamiltonian. Here we show that when multi-particle systems are considered, an additional modification is required in equations governing the density matrix. We define an effective density matrix by tracing over the states containing high-momentum particles, and show that it satisfies a Lindblad equation, with local Lindblad operators determined by the anti-Hermitian terms in the effective Hamiltonian density.

  2. Systematics of photopion reaction yields at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1996-03-01

    Our development in radiochemical measurements of photopion yields from complex nuclei ranging from {sup 7}Li to {sup 209}Bi at intermediate energies is reviewed. It has been found from systematized yields with respect to photon-energies, types of photopion reaction and target masses that (1) photons responsible for the ({gamma}, {pi}{sup +}), ({gamma}, {pi}{sup -}) and ({gamma}, {pi}{sup -}xn) reactions upto x=9 are mostly of energies lower than 400 MeV but higher than 140 MeV (pion rest mass), (2) ({gamma}, {pi}{sup +}) and ({gamma}, {pi}{sup -}) yields are independent of target mass (A{sub t}) heavier than A{sub t}{approx}30, and the yield ratio of Y({gamma}, {pi}{sup -})/Y({gamma}, {pi}{sup +}) is 5-6 irrespective of photon energies concerned, and (3) the yield variations of ({gamma}, {pi}{sup -}xn) reactions are well expressed as functions of (N/Z) of targets and neutron multiplicity. These findings appear to imply requirements of new concepts on neutron density distributions and photonuclear processes in complex nuclei. (author)

  3. Measurement of yields for the {sup 197}Au(γ,xn){sup 197-x}Au reactions induced by 2.5 GeV Bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, Nguyen Thi; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shahid, Muhammad; Zaman, Muhammah; Nadeem, Muhammad [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Khue, Pham Duc; Thanh, Kim Tien; Do, Nguyen Van [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2015-05-15

    Studies of high-energy nuclear reactions are of great important. It may help in deeper understanding of the reaction mechanisms and in extending of various fields of applications such as astrophysics, radiation physics, intense neutron source production and nuclear waste transmutation. The aim of the present work is to investigate the multineutron photonuclear on {sup 197}Au bombarded by 2.5 GeV Bremsstrahlung. Most of the photodisintegration products of gold with half-lives sufficient for the activity measurement. In this work, the necessary corrections were made in order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results The obtained experimental results are in good agreement with the calculated values. The yields for the {sup 197}Au(γ,xn){sup 197}-xAu reactions depend not only on the excitation energies but also on the number of neutrons ejected.

  4. Study of two- and multi-particle correlations in 12C+24Mg and 12C+208Pb reactions at E=35 AMeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quattrocchi L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two and multi particle correlations from the decay of sources produced in 12C+24Mg and 12C+208Pb collisions at E=35 AMeV have been studied by using the forward part (1° < θlab < 30° of the CHIMERA multi-detector. Correlations and invariant mass spectroscopy are used to explore simultaneous and sequential decays of resonances in light isotopes with Z∼3-6, produced in peripheral collisions via the break-up of excited quasi-projectiles. Among them we mention 5Li, 6Li, 6Be, 8Be and the astrophysically important state in 12C decaying into three alpha particles. Results and future perspectives at the INFN-LNS will be presented.

  5. Contribution to the modelling of gas-solid reactions and reactors; Contribution a la modelisation des reactions et des reacteurs gaz-solide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patisson, F

    2005-09-15

    Gas-solid reactions control a great number of major industrial processes involving matter transformation. This dissertation aims at showing that mathematical modelling is a useful tool for both understanding phenomena and optimising processes. First, the physical processes associated with a gas-solid reaction are presented in detail for a single particle, together with the corresponding available kinetic grain models. A second part is devoted to the modelling of multiparticle reactors. Different approaches, notably for coupling grain models and reactor models, are illustrated through various case studies: coal pyrolysis in a rotary kiln, production of uranium tetrafluoride in a moving bed furnace, on-grate incineration of municipal solid wastes, thermogravimetric apparatus, nuclear fuel making, steel-making electric arc furnace. (author)

  6. Multiparticle Correlations in Pb–Pb Collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Mlynarz, Jocelyn

    Quantum Chromodynamics, which describes the interactions of quarks and gluons, has been found not to violate global parity symmetry. However, the possibility of local parity violations due to quark interactions with topologically non-trivial gluonic fields is not excluded. The effects of these parity violations could be measured in the hot and dense medium created in the ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions experiment conducted at the Large Hadron Collider, called a Quark-Gluon Plasma, in which the quarks that compose most of ordinary matter are deconfined. In the strong magnetic fields which permeate the QGP in non-central collisions, parity violation would express itself as a charge asymmetry with respect to the reaction plane, a phenomenon called the Chiral Magnetic Effect. The measurements of the charge-dependent correlations in a heavy- ion collisions allow to experimentally probe effects of the CME. These measurements are conducted via the use of the second harmonic two-particle correlator with respec...

  7. Multiparticle Production Process in $pp$ Interaction with High Multiplicity at E_p=70 GeV. Proposal "Termalization"

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeichikov, V V; Balandin, V P; Vasendina, V A; Zhidkov, N K; Zolin, L S; Zulkarneev, R Ya; Kireev, V I; Kosarev, I G; Kuzmin, N A; Kuraev, E A; Mandjavidze, I D; Nikitin, V A; Petukhov, Yu P; Peshekhonov, V D; Rufanov, I A; Susakian, A N; Yukaev, A I; Basiladze, Sergei G; Volkov, V Yu; Ermolov, P F; Kramarenko, V A; Kubarovskii, A V; Leflat, A K; Merkin, M M; Popov, V V; Tikhonova, L A; Anikeev, A N; Vasilchenko, V G; Vorobev, A P; Lapshin, V G; Maiorov, S V; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Ryadovikov, V N; Kholodenko, A G; Tsyupa, Yu P; Chikilev, O G; Yakutin, A E; Dremin, I M; Kokoulina, E S; Pankov, A A; Kuvshinov, V I

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the proposed experiment is the investigation of the collective behaviour of particles in the process of multiple hadron production in the $pp$ interaction $pp\\to n_\\pi\\pi+2N$ at the beam energy $E_{\\rm lab}=70$ GeV. The domain of high multiplicity $n_\\pi=20{-}35$ or $z=n/\\bar n=3{-}5$ will be studied. Near the threshold of the reaction $n_\\pi\\to 69$, all particles get a small relative momentum. As a consequence of the multiboson interference a number of collective effects may occur. In particular, drastic increase of the partial cross section $\\sigma(n)$ of the $n$ identical particles production, as compared with commonly accepted extrapolation, and increase of the rate of direct photons are expected. The experiment is carried out on the modernized installation SVD, a spectrometer with a vertex detector which is supplied with a trigger system for registration of rare events with high multiplicity, on extracted proton beam of the IHEP (Protvino) 70 GeV accelerator. Required beam intensity is $\\sim ...

  8. Double emission of {lambda} hyperons in the K{sup -} of 6 GeV/c interactions with nucleus of photonuclear emulsion; Doble emision de hiperones {lambda} en las interacciones de K{sup -} de 6 GeV/c con nucleos de emulsion fotonuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejerina Garcia, A. F.

    1970-07-01

    In this memory one analyse the interactions with three or more centers, produced by K{sup -} of 6 GeV/c with nucleus of photonuclear emulsion. the analysis of one event with three centers has been consistent with the formation and decay of double hyperfragment {lambda}{lambda}{sup c}11, being the binding energy of the two {lambda} hyperons to the nuclear core of double hyperfragment: B{sub {lambda}}{lambda}= 20.2{+-}1.1. MeV and the {lambda}{lambda} interaction contribution to B{sub {lambda}}{lambda}, B{sub {lambda}}{lambda}=3.2{+-}1.1.MeV. (Author) 11 refs.

  9. Study of photo-proton reactions driven by bremsstrahlung radiation of high-intensity laser generated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohr, K. M.; Shaw, M.; Galster, W.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Robson, L.; Yang, J. M.; McKenna, P.; McCanny, T.; Melone, J. J.; Amthor, K.-U.; Ewald, F.; Liesfeld, B.; Schwoerer, H.; Sauerbrey, R.

    2008-04-01

    Photo-nuclear reactions were investigated using a high power table-top laser. The laser system at the University of Jena (I ~ 3-5×1019 W cm-2) produced hard bremsstrahlung photons (kT~2.9 MeV) via a laser-gas interaction which served to induce (γ, p) and (γ, n) reactions in Mg, Ti, Zn and Mo isotopes. Several (γ, p) decay channels were identified using nuclear activation analysis to determine their integral reaction yields. As the laser-generated bremsstrahlung spectra stretches over the energy regime dominated by the giant dipole resonance (GDR), these yield measurements were used in conjunction with theoretical estimates of the resonance energies Eres and their widths Γres to derive the integral reaction cross-section σint(γ,p) for 25Mn, 48, 49Ti, 68Zn and 97, 98Mo isotopes for the first time. This study enabled the determination of the previously unknown \\frac{{\\sigma}^int(\\gamma,n)}{{\\sigma}^int(\\gamma,p)} cross-section ratios for these isotopes. The experiments were supported by extensive model calculations (Empire) and the results were compared to the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) dipole sum rule as well as to the experimental data in neighboring isotopes and good agreement was observed. The Coulomb barrier and the neutron excess strongly influence the \\frac{{\\sigma}^int(\\gamma,n)}{{\\sigma}^int(\\gamma,p)} ratios for increasing target proton and neutron numbers.

  10. Lagrangian multi-particle statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthi, Beat; Berg, Jacob; Ott, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Combined measurements of the Lagrangian evolution of particle constellations and the coarse-grained velocity derivative tensor. partial derivative(u) over tilde (i) /partial derivative x(j) are presented. The data are obtained from three-dimensional particle tracking measurements in a quasi isotr...

  11. Reaction Graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅育熙

    1998-01-01

    The paper proposes reaction graphs as graphical representations of computational objects.A reaction graph is a directed graph with all its arrows and some of its nodes labeled.Computations are modled by graph rewriting of a simple nature.The basic rewriting rules embody the essence of both the communications among processes and cut-eliminations in proofs.Calculi of graphs are ideentified to give a formal and algebraic account of reaction graphs in the spirit of process algebra.With the help of the calculi,it is demonstrated that reaction graphs capture many interesting aspects of computations.

  12. A study on nuclear specific material detection technique using nuclear resonance reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. K.; Ha, J. H.; Cho, Y. S.; Choi, B. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    The non-destructive nuclear material detection technique is one of the novel methods under somewhat dangerous environments, for example, high level radiation or landmine areas. Specially, the detection of a landmine is a hot issue on the peaceful use of nuclear technology for human welfare. Generally, the explosives contain specific elements such as {sup 14}N or {sup 35}Cl. The photo-nuclear resonance gamma-rays are produced by nuclear reaction {sup 13}C(p , {gamma}){sup 14}N or {sup 34}S(p, {gamma}){sup 35}Cl in which target is bombarded by about 2MeV proton beam extracted from the proton accelerator. To avoid other neighboring resonant gamma-rays, we selected a higher resonant energy above 5MeV. The resonance gamma rays produced are absorbed or scattered when they react with {sup 14}N or {sup 35}Cl included in the mines and explosive. We can determine existence and position of mines or explosives by detecting the absorption and scattering gamma-ray signals.

  13. Capture reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endt, P.M.

    1956-01-01

    Capture reactions will be considered here from the viewpoint of the nuclear spectroscopist. Especially important to him are the capture of neutrons, protons, and alpha particles, which may proceed through narrow resonances, offering a well defined initial state for the subsequent deexcitation proces

  14. Allergic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... round, they may be caused by exposure to indoor allergens such as dust mites, indoor molds or pets. Urticaria, or hives, is characterized ... home. Video: What is an allergic reaction? » Utility navigation Donate Annual meeting Browse your conditions Check pollen ...

  15. Measurement of flow harmonics with multi-particle cumulants in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy in lead--lead collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$ TeV are shown using a dataset of approximately 7 $\\mu$b$^{-1}$ collected at the LHC in 2010. The measurements are performed for charged particles with transverse momenta $0.5multi-particle cumulants calculated with the generating function method. Results on the transverse momentum, pseudorapidity and centrality dependence of the $\\mathrm{v}_n$ coefficients are presented. The elliptic flow, $\\mathrm{v}_2$, is obtained from the two-, four-, six- and eight-particle cumulants while higher-order coefficients, $\\mathrm{v}_3$ and $\\mathrm{v}_4$, are determined with two- and four-particle cumulants. Flow harmonics $\\mathrm{v}_n$ measured with four-p...

  16. Multiparticle excitations in the {sup 149} Gd superdeformed nucleus. Signature of new C{sub 4} nucleus symmetry; Excitations multiparticules dans le noyau superdeforme {sup 149}Gd. Signature d`une symetrie nouvelle C{sub 4} du noyau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of 8 {pi} and EUROGAM phase I multi-detectors for the study of high spin states of {sup 149} Gd nucleus has revealed unexpected new phenomenons about the superdeformation in this nucleus. The new excited bands confirm the omnipresence of twin bands phenomenon. A new multi-particle excitation (two protons and one neutron) has been discovered. Thanks to the second generation EUROGAM detector, unexpected discoveries such as C{sub 4} symmetry, level interactions, complete backbending were obtained for the second potential well. The knowledge of interacting levels gives informations about the nucleon-nucleon residual interaction and could allow the determination of SD bands excitation energy. The complex processing and analysis of high multiplicity events has led to the development of new computing tools. An automatic band research program has been written for the discovery of new excited bands, and an exact method for the elimination of uncorrected events has been developed. The improvements of multi-detector performances should allow the discovery of more exceptional phenomenons and new anomalies in the SD bands. (J.S.). 222 refs., 86 figs., 38 tabs.

  17. Spallation reactions; Reactions de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugon, J.

    1996-12-31

    Spallation reactions dominate the interactions of hadrons with nuclei in the GeV range (from {approx} 0.1 to {approx} 10 GeV). They correspond to a sometimes important ejection of light particles leaving most of the time a residue of mass commensurate with the target mass. The main features of the experimental data are briefly reviewed. The most successful theoretical model, namely the intranuclear cascade + evaporation model, is presented. Its physical content, results and possible improvements are critically discussed. Alternative approaches are shortly reviewed. (author). 84 refs.

  18. Description of nuclear systems with a self-consistent configuration-mixing approach. II. Application to structure and reactions in even-even s d -shell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, C.; Pillet, N.; Dupuis, M.; Le Bloas, J.; Peña Arteaga, D.; Berger, J.-F.

    2017-04-01

    Background: The variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing approach to nuclei has been proposed about a decade ago. While the first applications followed rapidly, the implementation of the full formalism of this method has only been recently completed and applied in C. Robin, N. Pillet, D. Peña Arteaga, and J.-F. Berger, [Phys. Rev. C 93, 024302 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.93.024302 to 12C as a test-case. Purpose: The main objective of the present paper is to carry on the study that was initiated in that reference, in order to put the variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method to more stringent tests. To that aim we perform a systematic study of even-even s d -shell nuclei. Method: The wave function of these nuclei is taken as a configuration mixing built on orbitals of the s d -shell, and both the mixing coefficients of the nuclear state and the single-particle wave functions are determined consistently from the same variational principle. As in the previous works, the calculations are done using the D1S Gogny force. Results: Various ground-state properties are analyzed. In particular, the correlation content and composition of the wave function as well as the single-particle orbitals and energies are examined. Binding energies and charge radii are also calculated and compared to experiment. The description of the first excited state is also examined and the corresponding transition densities are used as input for the calculation of reaction processes such as inelastic electron and proton scattering. Special attention is paid to the effect of the optimization of the single-particle states consistently with the correlations of the system. Conclusions: The variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing approach is systematically applied to the description of even-even s d -shell nuclei. Globally, the results are satisfying and encouraging. In particular, charge radii and excitation energies are nicely reproduced. However

  19. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  20. [Allergic reactions to transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergon, E; Paitre, M L; Coeffic, B; Piard, N; Bidet, J M

    1987-04-01

    Frequent allergic reactions following transfusion are observed. Usually, they are benign but sometimes we observe severe allergic reactions. Adverse reactions may be brought about by least two mechanisms. First, immediate-type hypersensibility reactions due to IgE. Secondly, anaphylactic-type reactions due to interaction between transfused IgA and class specific anti IgA in the recipient's plasma. They are characterized by their severest form (anaphylactic shock). The frequency of severe reactions following the transfusion blood plasma is very low. These transfusion reactions are complement-mediated and kinins-mediated. Prevention of allergic reactions is necessary among blood donors and recipients.

  1. SHARAQ spectrometer for high-resolution studies for RI-induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michimasa, S., E-mail: mitimasa@cns.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Takaki, M.; Sasamoto, Y. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dozono, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nishi, T. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ota, S. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Baba, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Baba, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Fujii, T.; Go, S.; Kawase, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kisamori, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, C.S. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Matsubara, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Miki, K. [RCNP, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Miya, H. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Report on recent achievement of the SHARAQ spectrometer. • Demonstration of two ion optics modes for high-resolution spectroscopy. • Discussion on measured transport matrix elements by comparison with designed values. • Demonstration of event-by-event momentum tagging by the achromatic transport. • Achievement of momentum resolution of 1/8100 by the dispersion-matching transport. -- Abstract: The SHARAQ spectrometer and High-Resolution Beamline, which began operation in March 2009, have been put into use for six experiments using charge exchange reactions with radioactive isotope beams. For experiments at SHARAQ, detector developments and ion optics studies continue to improve performance in high-resolution nuclear spectroscopy. We have introduced improved timing resolution with CVD diamond detectors, high count-rate beamline tracking detectors and development of multi-particle detection by cathode-readout drift chambers. Ion-optics studies for the high-resolution achromatic (HA) and dispersion-matching (DM) transport modes are also reported here. Momentum tagging in the HA mode demonstrated an improvement in spectroscopic resolution with respect to the momentum spread of the radioactive beam. For the DM transportation mode, a momentum resolution of 1/8100 (FWHM) was achieved by taking into account the positions and angles of the beam at the third focal plane of BigRIPS.

  2. Recoil properties of radionuclides formed in photospallation reactions on complex nuclei at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Hiromitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Sakamoto, Koh; Matsumura, Hiroshi [Kanazawa Univ., Faculty of Science, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Oura, Yasuji [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Department of Chemistry, Tokyo (Japan); Shibata, Seiichi [Kyoto Univ., Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Furukawa, Michiaki [Yokkaichi Univ., Faculty of Environmental and Information Sciences, Yokkaichi, Mie (Japan); Fujiwara, Ichiro [Otemon-Gakuin Univ., Faculty of Economics, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    A short review is given on our studies of recoil properties of radionuclides formed in photospallation reactions induced by bremsstrahlung of end-point energies (E{sub 0}) from 600 to 1100 MeV, in which the thick-target thick-catcher method was employed. The measurements have been successful on 14, 24, 26, 31, 21 and 20 nuclides from {sup nat}V, {sup nat}Cu, {sup 93}Nb, {sup nat}Ag, {sup nat}Ta, and {sup 197}Au, respectively. Reflecting the resonance character in a photonuclear reaction, the mean ranges FW and BW in the forward and backward directions, respectively, are E{sub 0}-independent at the studied energies and classified into two groups accounting for the ({gamma}, xn) (x {>=} 1) and ({gamma}, xnyp) (x, y {>=} 1) processes. The forward-to-backward ratios (F/B) are independent of the mass difference ({delta}A) between a product (A{sub p}) and a target (A{sub t}) and also of A{sub t}. The kinematic properties of the product nuclei were analyzed by the two-step vector velocity model. The forward velocity {nu} after the first step of photon-reaction is quite different from that of proton-reaction at proton energies of E{sub p} {<=} 3 GeV, though the difference disappears at higher energies. On the other hand, the mean kinetic energy T of the residual nucleus in the second step is almost equal to that of proton-reaction irrespective of E{sub p}. A comparison with T values calculated by the PICA (Photon-Induced Intranuclear Cascade Analysis) code at E{sub 0}=400 MeV was also performed. It was found that although the code well reproduces the experimental results of {sup nat}V and {sup nat}Cu, the same calculation for heavier targets gives T values lower than the experimental results, indicating some nuclear-structure effect, such as a medium effect notably at A{sub t} {>=} 100. An average kinetic energy carried off by the emitted particles {epsilon}{sub s}=T/({delta}A/A{sub t}) of both photon- and proton-reactions seem to increase with an increase of A{sub t} up

  3. Study of the Particle Production in $^{12}$C Induced Heavy Ion Reactions at 86 MeV/N

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study various characteristics of light and heavy particle production in |1|2C induced reactions if possible over the whole unexplored energy region 50-86~MeV/N. In particular we want to investigate how the correlations in the multiparticle events can help us to distinguish bet existing models. \\\\ \\\\ Two-proton large-angle correlations and correlations between two heavier (Z~=~1 or 2) particles are studied with scintillator +~NaI and range telescopes, complemented with a 24 telescope scintillator wall for projectile fragments. Thereby we receive information about the reaction plane and the impact parameter in coincidence with the two-particle correlation spectra. Small @Dp correlations can also be studied. The inclusive @p|+ and @p|- production has been followed far below the nucleon-nucleon threshold. Pions are thereby identified from @DE-E correlations and the @p|+ decay in plastic range telescopes. These results are now followed up by @p-projectile fragment and @p-p correlat...

  4. FLUKA: A Multi-Particle Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.R.; /CERN /INFN, Milan; Fasso, A.; /SLAC; Ranft, J.; /Siegen U.

    2005-12-14

    This report describes the 2005 version of the Fluka particle transport code. The first part introduces the basic notions, describes the modular structure of the system, and contains an installation and beginner's guide. The second part complements this initial information with details about the various components of Fluka and how to use them. It concludes with a detailed history and bibliography.

  5. Deformed Coherent State for Multiparticle Production Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. Y.; Leong, Q.; Ng, W. K.; Dewanto, A.; Chan, A. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2014-04-01

    The deformation structure function describing the Generalised Multiplicities Distribution (GMD), Negative Binomial Distribution (NBD), Furry-Yule Distribution (FYD), and their corresponding deformed coherent states and second order correlation function g(2) are derived. A superposition model of the GMD and NBD states is then proposed as a general description of the mechanism that gives rise to the double NBD model first proposed by Giovannini. The model is applied to LHC multiplicity data at |η| ≤ 2.4 and 0.9, 2.36 and 7 TeV, from the CMS collaboration at CERN, and the second order correlation g(2) of the model is then compared with the normalised second factorial moment {F_2}/F_1^2 of the multiplicity.

  6. Silicon Array for Multi-particle Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Xin-xing; LIN; Cheng-jian; SUN; Li-jie; BAO; Peng-fei; YANG; Lei; YANG; Feng; ZHANG; Huan-qiao; LIU; Zu-hua; JIA; Hui-ming; MA; Nan-ru

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress in the study of two-proton emission has been made in recent years.One of the next destinations is the realization of high-precision direct measurements of decay-energy and emission-angle correlations inβ-delayed two-proton(β2p)emission.We have studiedβ2p correlated emission of the ground state of 26P at the proton drip line with the direct measurement at the National

  7. Efficient Multiparticle Entanglement via Asymmetric Rydberg Blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Mølmer, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    We present an efficient method for producing N particle entangled states using Rydberg blockade interactions. Optical excitation of Rydberg states that interact weakly, yet have a strong coupling to a second control state is used to achieve state dependent qubit rotations in small ensembles....... On the basis of quantitative calculations, we predict that an entangled quantum superposition state of eight atoms can be produced with a fidelity of 84% in cold Rb atoms....

  8. Discrete wavelet analysis for multiparticle production experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Georgopoulos, G; Vassiliou, Maria

    2000-01-01

    In high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions (SPS, RHIC, LHC) and in cosmic ray interactions, many particles are produced in the available phase space. We make an attempt to apply the wavelets technique in order to classify such events according to the event pattern and also to locate the so-called "clustering" in a distribution. After describing the method, we demonstrate its power (a) to a single event, produced by a pion condensation theoretical model, (b) to a sample of Pb-Pb simulated data at 158 GeV/c per nucleon taking into account all the experimental uncertainties. (15 refs).

  9. Detecting Multiparticle Entanglement of Dicke States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lücke, Bernd; Peise, Jan; Vitagliano, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    of entangled states, including Dicke states. Experimentally, we produce a Dicke-like state using spin dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. Our criterion proves that it contains at least genuine 28-particle entanglement. We infer a generalized squeezing parameter of −11.4(5)  dB....

  10. Detecting Multiparticle Entanglement of Dicke States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lücke, Bernd; Peise, Jan; Vitagliano, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments demonstrate the production of many thousands of neutral atoms entangled in their spin degrees of freedom. We present a criterion for estimating the amount of entanglement based on a measurement of the global spin. It outperforms previous criteria and applies to a wider class...

  11. Detecting multiparticle entanglement of Dicke states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke, Bernd; Peise, Jan; Vitagliano, Giuseppe; Arlt, Jan; Santos, Luis; Tóth, Géza; Klempt, Carsten

    2014-04-18

    Recent experiments demonstrate the production of many thousands of neutral atoms entangled in their spin degrees of freedom. We present a criterion for estimating the amount of entanglement based on a measurement of the global spin. It outperforms previous criteria and applies to a wider class of entangled states, including Dicke states. Experimentally, we produce a Dicke-like state using spin dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. Our criterion proves that it contains at least genuine 28-particle entanglement. We infer a generalized squeezing parameter of -11.4(5)  dB.

  12. Simulation of $^{67}$Cu photo-nuclear production in nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorchenko, D V; Rudychev, Y V

    2016-01-01

    The process of $^{67}$Cu nuclide photoproduction in the zinc dioxide nanoparticles immersed in the water media was simulated. We calculated the escape fractions of $^{67}$Cu nuclei and corresponding ranges in water for nanoparticle sizes from 40 nm to 80 nm and incident photons energies from 12 MeV to 30 MeV. Usage of capturing nanoparticles for accumulation of the escaped $^{67}$Cu nuclei is also discussed.

  13. Double Pion Production Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Cano, F; Hernández, E; Kamalov, S S; Nacher, J C; Tejedor, J A G

    1999-01-01

    We report on reactions producing two pions induced by real and virtual photons or nucleons. The role of different resonances in these reactions is emphasized. Novel results on coherent two pion photoproduction in nuclei are also reported.

  14. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  15. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  16. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  17. Reaction systems with precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rogalski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes expanding Reaction Systems of Ehrenfeucht and Rozenberg by incorporating precipitation reactions into it. This improves the computing power of Reaction Systems by allowing us to implement a stack. This addition enables us to implement a Deterministic Pushdown Automaton.

  18. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sobrado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  19. Reaction kinetics of polybutylene terephthalate polycondensation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darda, P. J.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.; Souren, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the forward polycondensation reaction of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PBT - prepolymer with an initial degree of polymerization of 5.5 was used as starting material. The PBT prepolymer was prepared from dimethyl tereph

  20. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of allergic transfusion reactions that do not cause hemolysis. ... transfusion, the transfusion must be stopped right away. Blood samples from the recipient (person getting the transfusion) and ...

  1. Desosamine in multicomponent reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achatz, Sepp; Dömling, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Desosamine occurring ubiquitously in natural products is introduced into isocyanide based multicomponent reaction chemistry. Corresponding products are of potential interest for the design of novel antibiotics. © 2006.

  2. Metal-mullite reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tomsia, A.P. [Pask Research and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Mullite was reacted with pure Al and with Ti or Zr dissolved in Ag-Cu eutectic alloys at 1100 C in Ar. Analysis of the Ti and Zr-containing specimens showed reaction zones with compositions of Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 3O}O{sub 20} and ZrO{sub 2}, respectively. The Al-mullite specimen showed much more extensive penetration into the ceramic and a more diffuse reaction zone than the other two systems. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Si were the main reaction products for Al-mullite reaction.

  3. Reactions at Solid Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ertl, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Expanding on the ideas first presented in Gerhard Ertl's acclaimed Baker Lectures at Cornell University, Reactions at Solid Surfaces comprises an authoritative, self-contained, book-length introduction to surface reactions for both professional chemists and students alike. Outlining our present understanding of the fundamental processes underlying reactions at solid surfaces, the book provides the reader with a complete view of how chemistry works at surfaces, and how to understand and probe the dynamics of surface reactions. Comparing traditional surface probes with more modern ones, and brin

  4. Desosamine in multicomponent reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achatz, Sepp; Dömling, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Desosamine occurring ubiquitously in natural products is introduced into isocyanide based multicomponent reaction chemistry. Corresponding products are of potential interest for the design of novel antibiotics. © 2006.

  5. Fluorogenic organocatalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeisolsadati Oskouei, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, we introduce fluorescence spectroscopy as a new tool to gain insight into the interactions between the substrates and catalyst during organocatalytic reactions. The ultimate goal is to resolve the kinetics of the binding and reaction steps and obtain detailed understanding of the

  6. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ...

  7. Reactions to Attitudinal Deviancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, John M.; Allen, Vernon L.

    This paper presents a critical review of empirical and theoretical treatments of group reaction to attitudinal deviancy. Inspired by Festinger's (1950) ideas on resolution of attitudinal discrepancies in groups, Schachter (1951) conducted an experiment that has greatly influenced subsequent research and theory concerning reaction to attitudinal…

  8. Allergic reactions to vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    Anaphylactic reactions to vaccines are rare but do occur, and have been reported for nearly every vaccine. And while the reaction rate per each dose of vaccine is low, this is a common clinical question due in large part to the enormous numbers of vaccines administered. Reactions are most often due to vaccine constituents rather than the microbial components of the vaccine, but in many instances, the specific ingredient triggering the reaction cannot be definitively identified. Evaluation of patients with suspected vaccine reactions should begin by determining whether the symptoms and timing of the reaction were consistent with a true allergic reaction, followed by an assessment to determine whether the patient needs further doses of the vaccine in question, or similar vaccines, in the future. Skin and serologic testing to vaccines and vaccine constituents can then be performed to further assess the potential cause of the reaction and to develop a plan for future immunizations. Specific guidelines for the administration of influenza vaccines to egg allergic patients have been revised to allow virtually all patients to receive this vaccine in a straightforward manner. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Chemical reaction and separation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.C.; Kapteijn, F.; Strous, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The invention is directed to process for performing a chemical reaction in a reaction mixture, which reaction produces water as by-product, wherein the reaction mixture is in contact with a hydroxy sodalite membrane, through which water produced during the reaction is removed from the reaction mixtu

  10. The Reaction Wheel Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Daniel J; Spong, Mark W

    2007-01-01

    This monograph describes the Reaction Wheel Pendulum, the newest inverted-pendulum-like device for control education and research. We discuss the history and background of the reaction wheel pendulum and other similar experimental devices. We develop mathematical models of the reaction wheel pendulum in depth, including linear and nonlinear models, and models of the sensors and actuators that are used for feedback control. We treat various aspects of the control problem, from linear control of themotor, to stabilization of the pendulum about an equilibrium configuration using linear control, t

  11. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  12. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    Nozzle reaction and hose tension are analyzed using conservation of fluid momentum and assuming steady, inviscid flow and a flexible hose in frictionless contact with the ground. An expression that is independent of the bend angle is derived for the hose tension. If this tension is exceeded owing...... to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  13. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food, food additives, drugs, oral hygiene products, and dental materials. Q: Are there any specific foods that are ... dental treatment trigger a hypersensitivity reaction? A: Some dental materials used by the dentist can cause a hypersensitivity ...

  14. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle.

  15. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons.

  16. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  17. Ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Babu Ramineni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ofloxacin is a commonly used antimicrobial agent to combat various infections. The adverse profile of quinolones includes gastrointestinal symptoms, which are the most frequent, neuropsychiatric symptoms, hematologic abnormalities are less common. We report a rare case of ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction in a 57 year old female patient with complaints of rashes over the axilla, upper limb and back, abdomen, thorax associated with exfoliation of skin all over the axilla associated with severe itching. Based on history and clinical examination patient was diagnosed as ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction and was successfully treated with antihistamines and corticosteroids. Pharmacovigilance should be a part of patient care in order to reduce occurrence of adverse drug reaction and also encourage practitioners in reporting so as to gather more and more data regarding adverse drug reactions. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(1.000: 349-351

  18. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  19. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  20. Allergic reactions in anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigaard, M; Garvey, L H; Menné, T;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this retrospective survey of possible allergic reactions during anaesthesia was to investigate whether the cause suspected by anaesthetists involved corresponded with the cause found on subsequent investigation in the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre (DAAC). METHODS: Case...... notes and anaesthetic charts from 111 reactions in 107 patients investigated in the DAAC were scrutinized for either suspicions of or warnings against specific substances stated to be the cause of the supposed allergic reaction. RESULTS: In 67 cases, one or more substances were suspected. In 49...... match, the right substance being suspected, but investigations showed an additional allergen or several substances, including the right substance being suspected. CONCLUSIONS: An informed guess is not a reliable way of determining the cause of a supposed allergic reaction during anaesthesia and may put...

  1. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  2. Meson production in + reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Machner; M Betigeri; J Bojowald; A Budzanowski; A Chatterjee; J Ernst; L Freindl; D Frekers; W Garske; K Grewer; A Hamacher; J Ilieva; L Jarczyk; K Kilian; S Kliczewski; W Klimala; D Kolev; T Kutsarova; J Lieb; H Machner; A Magiera; H Nann; L Pentchev; H S Plendl; D Protić; B Razen; P Von Rossen; B J Roy; R Siudak; J Smyrski; R V Srikantiah; A Strzałkowski; R Tsenov; K Zwoll

    2001-08-01

    Total and differential cross sections for the reactions $p+d → 3He + 0 with = ; and + → 3H + + were measured with the GEM detector at COSY for beam momenta between threshold and the maximum of the corresponding baryon resonance. For both reactions a strong forward–backward asymmetry was found. The data were compared with model calculations. The aspect of isospin symmetry breaking is studied.

  3. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, William H; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be su...

  4. Nuclear structures near and beyond the neutron drip line studied by breakup reactions at SAMURAI at RIBF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-10-01

    Some of the first results from kinematically complete measurements of breakup reactions on neutron-rich boron to oxygen isotopes, along and beyond the neutron drip line, are presented and discussed. These experiments were performed at the recently-commissioned large-acceptance multi-purpose spectrometer SAMURAI (Superconducting Analyser for MUlti-particles from Radio-Isotope Beam) at the new-generation RI beam facility, RIBF, at RIKEN. The experiments aimed at probing the two-neutron Borromean halo nuclei, 19B and 22C, and at exploring the heavy oxygen isotopes, 25,26O, which are beyond the neutron drip line. The study of 19B and 22C has been made primarily by the Coulomb breakup, which is sensitive to the halo states and associated two-neutron correlations. 22C has drawn much attention due to the possibility that it has the largest halo known. In addition, 22C may also exhibit features consistent with the new magic number N=16, as was recently suggested by our inclusive measurement of the momentum distribution of 20C following breakup on a C target. 25O and 26O have drawn much attention since these unbound nuclei may have keys to understand why the neutron drip line ends anomalously closer to the stability for oxygen isotopes. 25O and 26O have been produced by the proton removal reactions on 26F,27Ne, and 27F,28Ne, respectively, at 220-250 MeV/nucleon. Preliminary data are shown and discussed. Finally, some perspectives on future projects using the SAMURAI facility are presented.

  5. Immediate reaction to clarithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangemi, S; Ricciardi, L; Fedele, R; Isola, S; Purello-D'Ambrosio, F

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin had during a drug challenge test. Personal allergic history was negative for respiratory allergies and positive for adverse drug reactions to general and regional anesthesia and to ceftriaxone. After the administration of 1/4 of therapeutic dose of clarithromycin the patient showed dyspnea, cough and bronchospasm in all the lung fields. The positivity of the test was confirmed by the negativity to the administration of placebo. The quickness and the clinical characteristic of the adverse reaction suggest a pathogenic mechanism of immediate-type hypersensitivity. On reviewing the literature we have found no reports of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin. Macrolides are a class of antibiotics mainly used in the last years in place of beta-lactams because of a broad spectrum of action and a low allergic power. In fact, there are few reports on allergic reactions to these molecules. Clarithromycin is one of the latest macrolides, characterised by the presence of a 14-carbon-atom lactone ring as erythromycin, active on a wide spectrum of pathogens.

  6. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  7. Reaction Qualifications Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    of merit. Specifically, it preserves symmetry between negative evaluations of antimeritocratic bases of selection and negative evaluations of qualifications rooted in comparable antimeritocratic reactions. So if employers should not select among applicants on the basis of their (the employers') racial...... preferences, recipients should not respond to the applicant actually hired on the basis of their (the recipients') racial preferences. My account decomposes the meritocratic ideal into four separate norms, one of which applies to recipients rather than to selectors. Finally, it defends the view that reaction...... reaction-qualifications are entirely irrelevant from the point of view of merit, the view expounded here implies that the ideal of meritocracy and the norm of non-discrimination are less closely tied than theorists like Andrew Mason and David Miller believe.  ...

  8. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  9. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Sigeki [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sugiura, Hideshi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Iwata, Hisashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  10. Hipersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbegal, L; DeLeon, F J; Silvestre, J F

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used drugs in the clinical practice, especially by topic application in dermatology. These substances may act as allergens and produce immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most frequent presentation of corticosteroid allergy and it should be studied by patch testing in specific units. The corticosteroids included in the Spanish standard battery are good markers but not ideal. Therefore, if those makers are positive, it is useful to apply a specific battery of corticosteroids and the drugs provided by patients. Immediate reactions are relatively rare but potentially severe, and it is important to confirm the sensitization profile and to guide the use of alternative corticosteroids, because they are often necessary in several diseases. In this article we review the main concepts regarding these two types of hypersensitivity reactions in corticosteroid allergy, as well as their approach in the clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  11. Adverse reactions to cosmetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra A

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Adverse reaction to cosmetics constitute a small but significant number of cases of contact dermatitis with varied appearances. These can present as contact allergic dermatitis, photodermatitis, contact irritant dermatitis, contact urticaria, hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentotion or depigmentation, hair and nail breakage. Fifty patients were included for the study to assess the role of commonly used cosmetics in causing adverse reactions. It was found that hair dyes, lipsticks and surprisingly shaving creams caused more reaction as compared to other cosmetics. Overall incidence of contact allergic dermatitis seen was 3.3% with patients own cosmetics. Patch testing was also done with the basic ingredients and showed positive results in few cases where casual link could be established. It is recommended that labeling of the cosmetics should be done to help the dermatologists and the patients to identify the causative allergen in cosmetic preparation.

  12. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D. [Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  13. Enantioselective Vinylogous Organocascade Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Dell'Amico, Luca; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Cascade reactions are powerful tools for rapidly assembling complex molecular architectures from readily available starting materials in a single synthetic operation. Their marriage with asymmetric organocatalysis has led to the development of novel techniques, which are now recognized as reliable strategies for the one-pot enantioselective synthesis of stereochemically dense molecules. In recent years, even more complex synthetic challenges have been addressed by applying the principle of vinylogy to the realm of organocascade catalysis. The key to the success of vinylogous organocascade reactions is the unique ability of the chiral organocatalyst to transfer reactivity to a distal position without losing control on the stereo-determining events. This approach has greatly expanded the synthetic horizons of the field by providing the possibility of forging multiple stereocenters in remote positions from the catalyst's point of action with high selectivity, while simultaneously constructing multiple new bonds. This article critically describes the developments achieved in the field of enantioselective vinylogous organocascade reactions, charting the ideas, the conceptual advances, and the milestone reactions that have been essential for reaching highly practical levels of synthetic efficiency.

  14. Explaining competitive reaction effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    Changes in promotional expenditure decisions for a brand, as in other marketing decisions, should be based on the expected impact on purchase and consumption behavior as well as on the likely reactions by competitors. Purchase behavior may be predicted from estimated demand functions. Competitive

  15. Reaction product imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  16. Cluster knockout reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun K Jain; B N Joshi

    2014-04-01

    Cluster knockout reactions are expected to reveal the amount of clustering (such as that of , d and even of heavier clusters such as 12C, 16O etc.) in the target nucleus. In simple terms, incident medium high-energy nuclear projectile interacts strongly with the cluster (present in the target nucleus) as if it were existing as a free entity. Theoretically, the relatively softer interactions of the two outgoing particles with the residual nucleus lead to optical distortions and are treated in terms of distorted wave (DW) formalism. The long-range projectile–cluster interaction is accounted for, in terms of the finite range (FR) direct reaction formalism, as against the more commonly adopted zero-range (ZR) distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA) formalism. Comparison of the DWIA calculations with the observed data provide information about the momentum distribution and the clustering spectroscopic factor of the target nucleus. Interesting results and some recent advancements in the area of (, 2) reactions and heavy cluster knockout reactions are discussed. Importance of the finite-range vertex and the final-state interactions are brought out.

  17. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  18. Explaining competitive reaction effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in promotional expenditure decisions for a brand, as in other marketing decisions, should be based on the expected impact on purchase and consumption behavior as well as on the likely reactions by competitors. Purchase behavior may be predicted from estimated demand functions. Competitive re

  19. HF Chain Reaction Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    reaction can develop uni2ormly in a subsonic flow with snall teemperatiu-e rise over a distance much longer than the time for mixing, thus tendiný to isolate...upper level population, moreover, the observed effects of H2, Tabla 3, appear to be predicted reasonably well by the model. In the calcula- tions 112

  20. Reactions of Negative Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-17

    2 + H2 SO 4 + HS04 (HNO 3 ) 2 + HNO 3 1.1 0.6 * defined as 1 The most important results from an atmospheric viewpoint are the reactions of H SO with NO...constant HS04 >4.5 bracketing 22 0 C1 , 1.95 * 0.25 bracketlng 32 -4 __.. . .___,_=____,,_______... . . . -- . . . . One particularly interesting aspect of

  1. The Gewald multicomponent reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Yijun; Doemling, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Gewald reaction of sulfur, cyanoacetic acid derivatives, and oxo-component (G-3CR) yielding highly substituted 2-aminothiophene derivatives has seen diverse applications in combinatorial and medicinal chemistry. Its products are of great use in pharmaceutical industry mainly as small molecular w

  2. EXERCISE AND REACTION TIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Physical exercise provides multiple benefits to an individual. It is known that exercising regularly can prevent coronary heart disease, hypertension and obesity and improve flexibility. The effect of exercise on visual reaction time needs to be studied, a s the existing data on the benefit of aerobic exercise on psychomotor functions is insufficient. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Online Visual reaction time is measured before and after exercise. Subjects were instructed to run on the spot with a springy step in ex aggerated motion for 50 to 60 counts at 2 counts per second, maintaining a constant rhythm. RESULTS: We observed that reaction time was significantly lower after performance of exercise. Individuals reported improved mental alertness, feel good factor, bet ter mood and increase circulation. CONCLUSION: Improving reaction times in sports can help the athlete to optimize his performance in making decisions and increasing attention span for example getting off the starting blocks sooner or successfully making c ontact with the ball. In addition this study shows that use of physical exercise helps improve cognitive function. Exercise proves to be a cheap non pharmacological alternative to improve cognitive performance.

  3. The human acrosome reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.W.G.Baker; D.Y.Liu; C.Garrett; M.Martic

    2000-01-01

    We developed tests of sperm-oocyte interaction: sperm-zona binding, zona-induced acrosome reaction, spermzona penetration and sperm-oolemma binding, using oocytes which failed to fertilise in clinical in vitro fertilization (IVF). Although oocyte defects contribute to failure of sperm oocyte interaction, rarely are all oocytes from one woman affected. Low or zero fertilization in standard IVFwas usually caused by sperm abnormalities. Poor sperm-zona pellucida binding was frequently associated with failure of standard IVF and obvious defects of sperm motility or morphology. The size and shape of the acrosome is particularly important for sperm binding to the oocyte. The proportion of acrosome intact sperm in the insemination medium was related to the IVF rate. Inducing the acrosome reaction with a calcium ionophore reduced sperm-zona binding. Blocking acrosome dispersal with an acrosin inhibitor prevented spermzona penetration. Sperm-zona penetration was even more highly related to IVF rates than was sperm-zona binding. Some patients had low or zero fertilization rates with standard IVF but normal sperm by conventional tests and normal sperm-zona binding. Few of their sperm underwent the acrosome reaction on the surface of the zona and none penetrated the zona. In contrast, fertilization and pregnancy rates were high with intracytoplasmic sperm injection. We call thiscondition defective zona pellucida induced acrosome reaction. Discovery of the nature of the abnormalities in the signal transduction and effector pathways of the human zona pellucida induced acrosome reaction should result in simpler tests and treatments for the patients and also provide new leads for contraceptive development.

  4. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  5. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  6. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  7. Photooxidative reactions of psoralens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potapenko, A.Ya.; Sukhorukov, V.L. (Vtoroj Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Meditsinskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-08-31

    The mechanism and biological significance of photooxidative reactions of psoralens are reviewed. Skin-photosensitizing activities of bifunctional and monofunctional psoralens are compared. Antioxidants tocopherols and butilated hydroxytoluene inhibit photochemical reactions of psoralens responsible for induction of erythema. The same antioxidants do not inhibit PUVA-therapy of psriasis. Though psoralens can generate singlet oxygen under UVA-irradiation (315 - 400 nm), nevertheless singlet oxygen does not play a significant role in 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) sensitized photooxidation of tocopherol or dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). SH-compounds enhance the rate of 8-MOP sensitized photooxidation of DOPA by a factor of four, simultaneously the rate of oxidation of SH-groups is enhanced many fold in the presence of DOPA. Under UVA-irradiation in organic solvents psoralens are photooxidized. Dimeric photooxidized psoralens are easily destructed in water medium, their destruction induce oxidation of unsaturated lipids and DOPA.

  8. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  9. Well sealing via thermite reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, William Edward; Dunn, Sandra Dalvit

    2016-11-15

    A platform is formed in a well below a target plug zone by lowering a thermite reaction charge into the well and igniting it, whereby the products of the reaction are allowed to cool and expand to form a platform or support in the well. A main thermite reaction charge is placed above the platform and ignited to form a main sealing plug for the well. In some embodiments an upper plug is formed by igniting an upper thermite reaction charge above the main thermite reaction charge. The upper plug confines the products of ignition of the main thermite reaction charge.

  10. Insect bite reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some

  11. Organocatalytic Enantioselective Henry Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel P. Herrera

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A large number of interesting organocatalytic enantioselective protocols have been explored and successfully applied in the last decade. Among them, the Henry (nitroaldol reaction represents a powerful carbon-carbon bond-forming procedure for the preparation of valuable synthetic intermediates, such as enantioenriched nitro alcohols, which can be further transformed in a number of important nitrogen and oxygen-containing compounds. This area of research is still in expansion and a more complex version of this useful process has recently emerged, the domino Michael/Henry protocol, affording highly functionalized cycles with multiple stereogenic centers.

  12. Multispecies pair annihilation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloubrière, Olivier; Hilhorst, Henk J; Täuber, Uwe C

    2002-12-16

    We consider diffusion-limited reactions A(i)+A(j)--> (12 and d> or =2, we argue that the asymptotic density decay for such mutual annihilation processes with equal rates and initial densities is the same as for single-species pair annihilation A+A-->. In d=1, however, particle segregation occurs for all q< infinity. The total density decays according to a q dependent power law, rho(t) approximately t(-alpha(q)). Within a simplified version of the model alpha(q)=(q-1)/2q can be determined exactly. Our findings are supported through Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  14. Organic chemistry: Reactions triggered electrically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Limin; Tao, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule experiments have revealed that chemical reactions can be controlled using electric fields -- and that the reaction rate is sensitive to both the direction and the strength of the applied field. See Letter p.88

  15. Theoretical Studies of Reaction Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Similar levels of agreement are being found in studies of water clusters12 , the Menshutkin reaction 13 (ion separation reaction ), a prototypical SN2 ...of both reactants and products. These analyses reveal that Bery pseudorotation occurs repeatedly during the side attack, whereas the SN2 reaction H...31 Aug 97 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS AASERT93 THEORETICAL STUDIES OF REACTION SURFACES F49620-93-1-0556 3484/XS 6. AUTHOR(S) 61103D DR

  16. Orbital Energy-Based Reaction Analysis of SN2 Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Tsuneda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An orbital energy-based reaction analysis theory is presented as an extension of the orbital-based conceptual density functional theory. In the orbital energy-based theory, the orbitals contributing to reactions are interpreted to be valence orbitals giving the largest orbital energy variation from reactants to products. Reactions are taken to be electron transfer-driven when they provide small variations for the gaps between the contributing occupied and unoccupied orbital energies on the intrinsic reaction coordinates in the initial processes. The orbital energy-based theory is then applied to the calculations of several S N2 reactions. Using a reaction path search method, the Cl− + CH3I → ClCH3 + I− reaction, for which another reaction path called “roundabout path” is proposed, is found to have a precursor process similar to the roundabout path just before this SN2 reaction process. The orbital energy-based theory indicates that this precursor process is obviously driven by structural change, while the successor SN2 reaction proceeds through electron transfer between the contributing orbitals. Comparing the calculated results of the SN2 reactions in gas phase and in aqueous solution shows that the contributing orbitals significantly depend on solvent effects and these orbitals can be correctly determined by this theory.

  17. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  18. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  19. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W.; Holliday, Gemma L.; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Extracting chemical features like Atom–Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. Availability and implementation: This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder Contact: asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com PMID:27153692

  20. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W; Holliday, Gemma L; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-07-01

    Extracting chemical features like Atom-Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder : asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. The Glaser–Hay reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Mie Højer; Jensen, Jonas; Tortzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    . This unfavorable change in reaction profile could be avoided by adding molecular sieves to the reaction mixture, thereby removing the water that is accumulated from the air and produced in the reaction in which dioxygen acts as the oxidizing agent. Not unexpectedly, the stirring rate, and hence uptake of air (O2...... on the scope of this reaction by using both 13C NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. The former method was used to study the kinetics of the coupling of aryl-substituted alkynes as the aryl carbon resonances of the reactants and products have similar NOEs and relaxation times. The reaction was found...

  2. Nuclear reactions an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown – mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos – to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.   The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no ...

  3. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang, Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-01

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 1019W/cm2. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that μCi of 62Cu can be generated via the (γ,n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 1019Wcm-2.

  4. Eikonal reaction theory

    CERN Document Server

    Yahiro, Masanobu; Minomo, Kosho

    2011-01-01

    We present an accurate method of treating the one-neutron removal reaction at intermediate incident energies induced by both nuclear and Coulomb interactions. In the method, the nuclear and Coulomb breakup processes are consistently treated by the method of continuum discretized coupled channels without making the adiabatic approximation to the Coulomb interaction, so that the removal cross section calculated never diverges. This method is applied to recently measured one-neutron removal cross section for $^{31}$Ne+$^{12}$C scattering at 230 MeV/nucleon and $^{31}$Ne+$^{208}$Pb scattering at 234 MeV/nucleon. The spectroscopic factor and the asymptotic normalization coefficient of the last neutron in $^{31}$Ne are evaluated.

  5. Hypersensitivity reaction with deferasirox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemias comprise a group of hereditary blood disorders. Thalassemia major presents with anemia within the first 2 years of life requiring frequent blood transfusions for sustaining life. Regular blood transfusions lead to iron overload-related complications. Prognosis of thalassemia has improved because of the availability of iron-chelating agents. Oral iron chelators are the mainstay of chelation therapy. Deferasirox is a new-generation oral iron chelator for once daily usage. We herein describe a patient of beta thalassemia major who developed an allergic manifestation in the form of erythematous pruritic skin rashes to the oral iron chelator deferasirox. This is a rare adverse reaction reported with deferasirox that led to a therapeutic dilemma in this particular case.

  6. Hypersensitivity reaction with deferasirox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Atul; Arora, Ekta; Singh, Harmanjit

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemias comprise a group of hereditary blood disorders. Thalassemia major presents with anemia within the first 2 years of life requiring frequent blood transfusions for sustaining life. Regular blood transfusions lead to iron overload-related complications. Prognosis of thalassemia has improved because of the availability of iron-chelating agents. Oral iron chelators are the mainstay of chelation therapy. Deferasirox is a new-generation oral iron chelator for once daily usage. We herein describe a patient of beta thalassemia major who developed an allergic manifestation in the form of erythematous pruritic skin rashes to the oral iron chelator deferasirox. This is a rare adverse reaction reported with deferasirox that led to a therapeutic dilemma in this particular case.

  7. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M.; Rayet, M. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (BE))

    1990-06-01

    At all times and at all astrophysical scales, nuclear reactions have played and continue to play a key role. This concerns the energetics as well as the production of nuclides (nucleosynthesis). After a brief review of the observed composition of various objects in the universe, and especially of the solar system, the basic ingredients that are required in order to build up models for the chemical evolution of galaxies are sketched. Special attention is paid to the evaluation of the stellar yields through an overview of the important burning episodes and nucleosynthetic processes that can develop in non-exploding or exploding stars. Emphasis is put on the remaining astrophysical and nuclear physics uncertainties that hamper a clear understanding of the observed characteristics, and especially compositions, of a large variety of astrophysical objects.

  8. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions....... The models can be used in mass balances for design of processes under process conditions not yet studied experimentally. The value of the predictive kinetic model depends on the quality of the experimental data on which the model is based, and well-founded kinetic models for enzyme reactions have...... a considerable predictive power. This is also true for cell reaction models, when the model is used in its proper context. The chapter first discusses the kinetics for enzymatically catalyzed reactions (“enzyme reactions”). The kinetics can be derived from a mechanistic model. Then, the chapter derives empirical...

  9. Resonance Reaction in Diffusion-Influenced Bimolecular Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolb, Jakob J; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influence of a stochastically fluctuating step-barrier potential on bimolecular reaction rates by exact analytical theory and stochastic simulations. We demonstrate that the system exhibits a new resonant reaction behavior with rate enhancement if an appropriately defined fluctuation decay length is of the order of the system size. Importantly, we find that in the proximity of resonance the standard reciprocal additivity law for diffusion and surface reaction rates is violated due to the dynamical coupling of multiple kinetic processes. Together, these findings may have important repercussions on the correct interpretation of various kinetic reaction problems in complex systems, as, e.g., in biomolecular association or catalysis.

  10. Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Mehmet Azık

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fatal hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs is approximately 1:200000 per unit. Acute HTRs occur during or within 24 h after administration of a blood product. Transfusion of incompatible red blood cells (RBCs, and, more rarely, of a large volume of incompatible plasma usually are the causative agents. Delayed HTRs are caused by a secondary immune response to an antigen on the donor’s RBCs. Different mechanisms lead to intra- and extravascular hemolysis, such as complete complement activation, phagocytosis of RBCs covered with C3b by macrophages after incomplete complement activation, or destruction of RBCs covered only with IgG by direct cell to cell contact with K cells. The clinical consequences of HTRs are triggered via several pathophysiological pathways. Formation of anaphylatoxins, release of cytokines causing a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, activation of the kinin system, the intrinsic clotting cascade and fibrinolysis result in hypotension, disseminated intravascular coagulation, diffuse bleeding, and disruption of microcirculation leading to renal failure and shock. In this review, the symptoms of HTR are introduced, laboratory investigations and treatment are described, and some recommendations for prevention are given. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2011; 9: 127-32

  11. NIF Gamma Reaction History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; McEvoy, A. M.; Hoffman, N. M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Lee, A.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Miller, E. K.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.

    2010-11-01

    The primary objective of the NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics is to provide bang time and burn width information based upon measurement of fusion gamma-rays. This is accomplished with energy-thresholded Gas Cherenkov detectors that convert MeV gamma-rays into UV/visible photons for high-bandwidth optical detection. In addition, the GRH detectors can perform γ-ray spectroscopy to explore other nuclear processes from which additional significant implosion parameters may be inferred (e.g., plastic ablator areal density). Implementation is occurring in 2 phases: 1) four PMT-based channels mounted to the outside of the NIF target chamber at ˜6 m from TCC (GRH-6m) for the 3e13-3e16 DT neutron yield range expected during the early ignition-tuning campaigns; and 2) several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at ˜15 m from TCC (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the wall into well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs for the 1e16-1e20 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign. This suite of diagnostics will allow exploration of interesting γ-ray physics well beyond the ignition campaign. Recent data from OMEGA and NIF will be shown.

  12. The Progression of Sequential Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack McGeachy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequential reactions consist of linked reactions in which the product of the first reaction becomes the substrate of a second reaction. Sequential reactions occur in industrially important processes, such as the chlorination of methane. A generalized series of three sequential reactions was analyzed in order to determine the times at which each chemical species reaches its maximum. To determine the concentration of each species as a function of time, the differential rate laws for each species were solved. The solution of each gave the concentration curve of the chemical species. The concentration curves of species A1 and A2 possessed discreet maxima, which were determined through slope-analysis. The concentration curve of the final product, A3, did not possess a discreet maximum, but rather approached a finite limit.

  13. Microwave-Accelerated Organic Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; TaJung

    2001-01-01

    The use of microwave technology in accelerating organic reactions has received intense attention leading to immense growth recently. Accordingly, we have been interested in improving the efficacy of organic processes by microwave irradiation. Here we report our results on the microwave assisted 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of nitrile oxides with allylic alcohols, the cleavage reaction of 1,3-diketones under alkaline conditions, and the formation of carbamates from isocyanates with alcohols. The reactions carried out under microwave irradiation, in general, required considerably less reaction time and afforded the desired products in higher yields than those under classical conditions. In all the cases we have studied, the procedures are simplified, the purity of the products are higher, and the cost of reaction is greatly reduced employing microwave.  ……

  14. Microwave-Accelerated Organic Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU TaJung

    2001-01-01

    @@ The use of microwave technology in accelerating organic reactions has received intense attention leading to immense growth recently. Accordingly, we have been interested in improving the efficacy of organic processes by microwave irradiation. Here we report our results on the microwave assisted 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of nitrile oxides with allylic alcohols, the cleavage reaction of 1,3-diketones under alkaline conditions, and the formation of carbamates from isocyanates with alcohols. The reactions carried out under microwave irradiation, in general, required considerably less reaction time and afforded the desired products in higher yields than those under classical conditions. In all the cases we have studied, the procedures are simplified, the purity of the products are higher, and the cost of reaction is greatly reduced employing microwave.

  15. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing

    CERN Document Server

    Lacasta, A M; Sancho, J M; Lindenberg, K

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate (t to the power -1/2) to very close to the perfect mixing rate, (t to the power -1).

  16. Radiation reaction in fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, R D; Mahajan, S M

    2004-10-01

    The effects of a radiation reaction on thermal electrons in a magnetically confined plasma, with parameters typical of planned burning plasma experiments, are studied. A fully relativistic kinetic equation that includes the radiation reaction is derived. The associated rate of phase-space contraction is computed and the relative importance of the radiation reaction in phase space is estimated. A consideration of the moments of the radiation reaction force show that its effects are typically small in reactor-grade confined plasmas, but not necessarily insignificant.

  17. [Situational reactions in suicidologic practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrumova, A G; Vrono, E M

    1985-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the description of suicidal manifestations in mentally normal adolescents among typical behavioural disorders characteristic of situational reactions of this age. Three types of suicido-dangerous situational responses of adolescents were specified with regard to their age and auto-and heteaggressiveness ratio: reaction of deprivation, explosive reaction and reaction of auto-elimination. Suicidogenic conflicts were analyzed and spheres of age-specific suicidal conflicts were defined. It is advisable that outpatient management of mentally normal adolescents with a history of a suicidal attempt be conducted in a special room of presentive suicidological service.

  18. Kinematically complete chemical reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippel, S.; Stei, M.; Otto, R.; Hlavenka, P.; Mikosch, J.; Eichhorn, C.; Lourderaj, U.; Zhang, J. X.; Hase, W. L.; Weidemüller, M.; Wester, R.

    2009-11-01

    Kinematically complete studies of molecular reactions offer an unprecedented level of insight into the dynamics and the different mechanisms by which chemical reactions occur. We have developed a scheme to study ion-molecule reactions by velocity map imaging at very low collision energies. Results for the elementary nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- are presented and compared to high-level direct dynamics trajectory calculations. Furthermore, an improved design of the crossed-beam imaging spectrometer with full three-dimensional measurement capabilities is discussed and characterization measurements using photoionization of NH3 and photodissociation of CH3I are presented.

  19. Pathophysiology of hemolytic transfusion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Robertson D

    2005-07-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) are systemic reactions provoked by immunologic red blood cell (RBC) incompatibility. Clinical and experimental observations of such reactions indicate that they proceed through phases of humoral immune reaction, activation of phagocytes, productions of cytokine mediators, and wide-ranging cellular responses. HTR have many features in common with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms in HTR suggest that newer biological agents that target complement intermediates or proinflammatory cytokines may be effective agents in the treatment of severe HTRs.

  20. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  1. Progress in microscopic direct reaction modeling of nucleon induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.; Hilaire, S.; Lechaftois, F.; Peru, S.; Pillet, N.; Robin, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2015-12-15

    A microscopic nuclear reaction model is applied to neutron elastic and direct inelastic scatterings, and pre-equilibrium reaction. The JLM folding model is used with nuclear structure information calculated within the quasi-particle random phase approximation implemented with the Gogny D1S interaction. The folding model for direct inelastic scattering is extended to include rearrangement corrections stemming from both isoscalar and isovector density variations occurring during a transition. The quality of the predicted (n,n), (n,n{sup '}), (n,xn) and (n,n{sup '}γ) cross sections, as well as the generality of the present microscopic approach, shows that it is a powerful tool that can help improving nuclear reactions data quality. Short- and long-term perspectives are drawn to extend the present approach to more systems, to include missing reactions mechanisms, and to consistently treat both structure and reaction problems. (orig.)

  2. Microscopic effective reaction theory for deuteron-induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Neoh, Yuen Sim; Minomo, Kosho; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic effective reaction theory is applied to deuteron-induced reactions. A reaction model-space characterized by a $p+n+{\\rm A}$ three-body model is adopted, where A is the target nucleus, and the nucleon-target potential is described by a microscopic folding model based on an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear medium and a one-body nuclear density of A. The three-body scattering wave function in the model space is obtained with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC), and the eikonal reaction theory (ERT), an extension of CDCC, is applied to the calculation of neutron removal cross sections. Elastic scattering cross sections of deuteron on $^{58}$Ni and $^{208}$Pb target nuclei at several energies are compared with experimental data. The total reaction cross sections and the neutron removal cross sections at 56 MeV on 14 target nuclei are calculated and compared with experimental values.

  3. Microscopic effective reaction theory for deuteron-induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neoh, Yuen Sim; Yoshida, Kazuki; Minomo, Kosho; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-10-01

    The microscopic effective reaction theory is applied to deuteron-induced reactions. A reaction model space characterized by a p +n +A three-body model is adopted, where A is the target nucleus, and the nucleon-target potential is described by a microscopic folding model based on an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear medium and a one-body nuclear density of A . The three-body scattering wave function in the model space is obtained with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) method, and the eikonal reaction theory (ERT), an extension of CDCC, is applied to the calculation of neutron removal cross sections. Elastic scattering cross sections of deuteron on 58Ni and 208Pb target nuclei at several energies are compared with experimental data. The total reaction cross sections and the neutron removal cross sections at 56 MeV on 14 target nuclei are calculated and compared with experimental values.

  4. Dicarbonyl Intermediates in the Maillard Reaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    THORNALLEY, PAUL J

    2005-01-01

    A bstract : The complexity of the Maillard reaction arises partly from multiple fragmentation reactions of the sugar moiety, constituting branch points in the reaction progress and establishing many parallel reaction pathways...

  5. "Greening up" the Suzuki Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Chan, Elton; Edward, Amanda R.; Jarosz, Isabel; Lee, Vicki; Mui, Leo; Thatipamala, Sonya S.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rapid, green synthesis of a biaryl compound (4-phenylphenol) via a Pd(0)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction in water. Mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity makes this experiment especially amenable to both mid- and upper-level undergraduates. The methodology exposes students to purely aqueous…

  6. Limits for Stochastic Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappelletti, Daniele

    Reaction systems have been introduced in the 70s to model biochemical systems. Nowadays their range of applications has increased and they are fruitfully used in dierent elds. The concept is simple: some chemical species react, the set of chemical reactions form a graph and a rate function is ass...

  7. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  8. Allergic reactions to insect secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecquet, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Some products derived from insects can induce allergic reactions. The main characteristics of some products from honeybees, cochineal and silkworms are summarised here. We review allergic reactions from honey-derived products (propolis, wax, royal jelly), from cochineal products (shellac and carmine) and from silk : clinical features, allergological investigations and allergens if they are known.

  9. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  10. Limits for Stochastic Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappelletti, Daniele

    at a certain time are stochastically modelled by means of a continuous-time Markov chain. Our work concerns primarily stochastic reaction systems, and their asymptotic properties. In Paper I, we consider a reaction system with intermediate species, i.e. species that are produced and fast degraded along a path...... of the stochastic reaction systems. Specically, we build a theory for stochastic reaction systems that is parallel to the deciency zero theory for deterministic systems, which dates back to the 70s. A deciency theory for stochastic reaction systems was missing, and few results connecting deciency and stochastic....... Such species, in the deterministic modelling regime, assume always the same value at any positive steady state. In the stochastic setting, we prove that, if the initial condition is a point in the basin of attraction of a positive steady state of the corresponding deterministic model and tends to innity...

  11. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive.

  12. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  13. [Skin reactions to tattoo ink].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Hermanns, J-F; Piérard, G E

    2011-01-01

    Ritual and artistic tattoos rely on the use of numerous pigments which are not all entirely inert once placed in the dermis. The compositions of some tattoo inks are identified. However, new but less well identified compounds appear on the market. Allergic reactions can be present under different aspects. They may correspond to allergic contact dermatitis or to photodermatitis. Other reactions include allergic hypersensitivity reactions as well as lichenoid, granulomatous or pseudolymphoma reactions. Pulsed light and laser are typically used for regular tattoo removal. These procedures are not indicated in inflamed tattoos. Indeed, the pigment dispersed during photolysis may perpetuate the reaction. Pseudotattoos due to the stratum corneum staining are frequently responsible for photoeczema.

  14. Reaction rates for reaction-diffusion kinetics on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2017-02-01

    The reaction-diffusion master equation is a stochastic model often utilized in the study of biochemical reaction networks in living cells. It is applied when the spatial distribution of molecules is important to the dynamics of the system. A viable approach to resolve the complex geometry of cells accurately is to discretize space with an unstructured mesh. Diffusion is modeled as discrete jumps between nodes on the mesh, and the diffusion jump rates can be obtained through a discretization of the diffusion equation on the mesh. Reactions can occur when molecules occupy the same voxel. In this paper, we develop a method for computing accurate reaction rates between molecules occupying the same voxel in an unstructured mesh. For large voxels, these rates are known to be well approximated by the reaction rates derived by Collins and Kimball, but as the mesh is refined, no analytical expression for the rates exists. We reduce the problem of computing accurate reaction rates to a pure preprocessing step, depending only on the mesh and not on the model parameters, and we devise an efficient numerical scheme to estimate them to high accuracy. We show in several numerical examples that as we refine the mesh, the results obtained with the reaction-diffusion master equation approach those of a more fine-grained Smoluchowski particle-tracking model.

  15. Eikonal reaction theory for two-neutron removal reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Minomo, K; Egashira, K; Ogata, K; Yahiro, M

    2014-01-01

    The eikonal reaction theory (ERT) proposed lately is a method of calculating one-neutron removal reactions at intermediate incident energies in which Coulomb breakup is treated accurately with the continuum discretized coupled-channels method. ERT is extended to two-neutron removal reactions. ERT reproduces measured one- and two-neutron removal cross sections for 6He scattering on 12C and 208Pb targets at 240 MeV/nucleon and also on a 28Si target at 52 MeV/nucleon. For the heavier target in which Coulomb breakup is important, ERT yields much better agreement with the measured cross sections than the Glauber model.

  16. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  17. Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Radhey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant αs is large enough (~ 0.3 - 0.5 to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss the application of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  18. [Arthropod bite reactions and pyodermias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengge, U R

    2008-08-01

    Tourists in the tropics often develop reactions to bites or stings of mosquitoes, fleas, mites, ants, bedbugs, beetles, larva, millipedes, spiders and scorpions. In addition, they may have fresh or salt water exposure to sponges, corals, jellyfish and sea urchins with resultant injury and inflammation. Bacterial skin infections (pyodermias) can follow bites or stings as well as mechanical trauma. The most common bacteria involved in skin infections are staphylococci and streptococci. For tourists, bacterial infections are often complicating a pruritic bite reaction and scratching. It is important to know the cause of the bite reaction and pyoderma in order to take appropriate therapeutic measures.

  19. On the Reaction Path Hamiltonian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙家钟; 李泽生

    1994-01-01

    A vector-fiber bundle structure of the reaction path Hamiltonian, which has been introduced by Miller, Handy and Adams, is explored with respect to molecular vibrations orthogonal to the reaction path. The symmetry of the fiber bundle is characterized by the real orthogonal group O(3N- 7) for the dynamical system with N atoms. Under the action of group O(3N- 7). the kinetic energy of the reaction path Hamiltonian is left invariant. Furthermore , the invariant behaviour of the Hamiltonian vector fields is investigated.

  20. Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, Árpád

    2013-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference brings together all significant issues of practical importance for interested readers in one single volume. While covering homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, the text is unique in focusing on such important aspects as using different reaction media, microwave techniques or catalyst recycling. It also provides a comprehensive treatment of modern-day coupling reactions and emphasizes those topics that show potential for future development, such as continuous flow systems, water as a reaction medium, and catalyst immobilization, among others. With i

  1. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Reactions with light exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenthäler, R.; Faria, P.N. de; Pires, K.C.C.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Mendes Junior, D.R.; Assuncao, M.; Barioni, A.; Morcelle, V.; Morais, M.C.; Camargo Junior, O.; Alcantara Nuñez, J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Moro, A.M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Arazi, A. [Laboratorio Tandar, Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rodriguez-Gallardo, M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Experimental cross sections for the {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn are analysed. Elastic scattering angular distributions and alpha particle production cross sections have been measured and are compared with the total reaction cross sections. (author)

  3. Legendre Analysis of Hadronic Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Azimov, Ya I

    2016-01-01

    Expansions over Legendre functions are suggested as a model-independent way of compact presentation of modern precise and high-statistics data for two-hadron reactions. Some properties of the expansions are described.

  4. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek V Ranade

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. A homogeneous or heterogeneous catalyst which provides an alternative route of reaction with lower activation energy and better control on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  5. The Paterno-Buchi reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Yding; Schalk, Oliver; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.

    2012-01-01

    The Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction between an excited carbonyl compound and an alkene has been widely studied, but so far little is known about the excited-state dynamics of the reaction. In this investigation, we used a compound in which a formyl and a vinyl group are attached to a [2.2]paracycloph......The Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction between an excited carbonyl compound and an alkene has been widely studied, but so far little is known about the excited-state dynamics of the reaction. In this investigation, we used a compound in which a formyl and a vinyl group are attached to a [2...

  6. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  7. Reactions with light exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lichtenthäler R.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental cross sections for the 6He+120Sn are analysed. Elastic scattering angular distributions and alpha particle production cross sections have been measured and are compared with the total reaction cross sections.

  8. Color Changes Mark Polymer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, James H.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how polydiacetylenes can be used as educational aids. These polymers have conjugated backbones, which cause changes in color when the polydiacetylenes undergo various chemical and physical processes. Diagrams summarize all chemical reactions and their associated color changes. (CS)

  9. Violation of Locality Beyond Bell's Theorem for Multiparticle Perfect Correlations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Li; ZHENG Tai-Yu; WU Zhao-Yan; WAN Fan

    2005-01-01

    We present the analogous inequalities of Bell's inequality for N-qubit system predicted respectively by realistic theory, quantum mechanics, local theory, local realistic theory, and local quantum theory on the same Belltype joint experiment. It is shown that quantum mechanics can be interpreted by hidden-variable theories while being incompatible to any local theory. A necessary condition for the separability of N-qubit system is derived.

  10. On Partial Charge Transfer Processes in Multiparticle Systems on Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Chulaevsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We assess the probability of resonances between sufficiently distant states of an N-particle disordered quantum system in a combinatorial graph Z. In the N-particle configuration space, there are arbitrarily distant pairs of configurations giving rise to pairs of local (random Hamiltonians which are strongly coupled, so that the eigenvalue concentration (EVC bounds are difficult to obtain. We extend to any number of particles the efficient EVC bounds, obtained earlier for the 2-particle systems.

  11. Centrality and multiparticle production in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozhzhova, T. A.; Kovalenko, V. N.; Seryakov, A. Yu.; Feofilov, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    A critical analysis of methods for selecting central events in high-energy proton-nucleus ( pA) and nucleus-nucleus ( AA) collisions is presented. A sample of event classes in which background fluctuations associated with the dispersion of the impact parameter of each event or the number of participant nucleons are minimal is examined. At the SPS and LHC energies, the numbers of nucleon-nucleon collisions are estimated with the aid of the Monte Carlo event generators HIJING and AMPT, which take into account energy-momentum conservation, and on the basis of a non-Glauber model involving string fusion and a modified Glauber model. The results obtained in this way demonstrate the need for revising the extensively used application of the Glauber model in normalizing multiplicity yields in experimental data on pA and AA collisions in the soft region of the spectrum.

  12. WHIZARD. Simulating multi-particle processes at LHC and ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, Wolfgang [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Theoretische Physik I; Ohl, Thorsten [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik; Reuter, Juergen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics; Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

    2011-11-15

    We describe the universal Monte-Carlo (parton-level) event generator WHIZARD, version 2. The program automatically computes complete tree-level matrix elements, integrates them over phase space, evaluates distributions of observables, and generates unweighted partonic event samples. These are showered and hadronized by calling external codes, either automatically from within the program or via standard interfaces. There is no conceptual limit on the process complexity; using current hardware, the program has successfully been applied to hard scattering processes with up to eight particles in the final state. Matrix elements are computed as helicity amplitudes, so spin and color correlations are retained. For event generation, processes can be concatenated with full spin correlation, so factorized approximations to cascade decays are possible when complete matrix elements are not desired. The Standard Model, the MSSM, and many alternative models such as Little Higgs, anomalous couplings, or effects of extra dimensions or noncommutative SM extensions have been implemented. Using standard interfaces to parton shower and hadronization programs, WHIZARD covers physics at hadron, lepton, and photon colliders. (orig.)

  13. Imaging Multi-Particle Atomic and Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, Allen [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2016-02-12

    Final Report for Grant Number: DE- FG02-10ER16146 This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms and molecules with photons and electrons. The duration of the grant was the 5 year period from 4/1/2010 – 10/31/2015. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 20 peer reviewed publications over these 5 years with 2 of the publications in Physical Review Letters and 1 in Nature; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B ...).

  14. Searching for hidden sectors in multiparticle production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel

    2016-01-01

    Most signatures of new physics in colliders have been studied so far on the transverse plane with respect to the beam direction. In this work however we study the impact of a hidden sector beyond the Standard Model (SM) on inclusive (pseudo)rapidity correlations and moments of the multiplicity distributions, with special emphasis in the LHC results.

  15. Saturation scale fluctuations and multi-particle rapidity correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of intrinsic fluctuations of the proton saturation momentum scale on event-by-event rapidity distributions. Saturation scale fluctuations generate an asymmetry in the single particle rapidity distribution in each event resulting in genuine n-particle correlations having a component linear in the rapidities of the produced particles, $y_1\\cdots y_n$. We introduce a color domain model that naturally explains the centrality dependence of the two-particle rapidity correlations recently measured by ATLAS while constraining the probability distribution of saturation scale fluctuations in the proton. Predictions for n = 4, 6 and 8 particle correlations find that the four and eight-particle cumulant change sign at an intermediate multiplicity, a signature which could be tested experimentally.

  16. Multi-particle correlations in transverse momenta from statistical clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bialas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate n-particle (n=2,3,4,5 transverse momentum correlations for pions and kaons following from the decay of statistical clusters. These correlation functions could provide strong constraints on a possible existence of thermal clusters in the process of particle production.

  17. Nonmonotonic quantum-to-classical transition in multiparticle interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ra, Young-Sik; Tichy, Malte; Lim, Hyang-Tag

    2013-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical wave–particle duality implies that probability distributions for granular detection events exhibit wave-like interference. On the single-particle level, this leads to self-interference—e.g., on transit across a double slit—for photons as well as for large, massive particles...... that interference fades away monotonically with increasing distinguishability—in accord with available experimental evidence on the single- and on the many-particle level. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that such monotonicity of the quantum-to-classical transition is the exception rather than...... the rule whenever more than two particles interfere. As the distinguishability of the particles is continuously increased, different numbers of particles effectively interfere, which leads to interference signals that are, in general, nonmonotonic functions of the distinguishability of the particles...

  18. β-delayed Multi-particle Emission From 31Ar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. A. Ciemny; J. Du´enas-Daz; V. Dunin; J. M. Espino; A. Estrade; F. Farinon; A. Fomichev; H. Geisse; A. Gorshkov; G. Kami´nski; O. Kiselev; C. Mazzocchi; R. Kn¨obe; S. Krupko; M. Kuich; Yu. A. Litvinov; G. Marquinez-Dur´an; I. Martel; I. Mukha; C. Nociforo; A. K. Ord´uz; S. Pietri; W. Dominik; A. Prochazka; A. M. S´anchez-Ben´ıtez; H. Simon; B. Sitar; R. Slepnev; M. Stanoiu; P. Strmen; I. Szarka; M. Takechi; Y. Tanaka; Z. Janas; H. Weick; J. S. Winfield; M. Pf¨utzner; M. Pomorski; L. Acosta; S. Baraeva; E. Casarejos

    2016-01-01

    The β+ decay of 31Ar was investigated in an experiment at the GSI-FRS spectrometer. The ions of interest have been produced in the fragmentation of a 36Ar beam at 880 MeV/nucleon and implanted in a time projection chamber with optical readout. In addition to β-delayed one and two proton emission, for the first time the emission ofβ-delayed 3 protons has been observed. The branching ratio for this decay mode is found to be (0.07 ± 0.02)%.

  19. Multi-Particle States in the Finite Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doring, Michael; Agadjanov, Dimitri; Mai, Maxim; Meissner, Ulf-G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2017-01-01

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the Lüscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel Lüscher formalism. Moreover, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles. Supported by the National Science Foundation (CAREER Grant No. 1452055, PIF Grant No. 1415459) and U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-SC0014133, contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  20. Multi-particle emission in the decay of $^{31}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Koldste, G T; Borge, M.J.G.; Briz, J.A.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Fraile, L.M.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grann, B.D.; Johansen, J.G.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Kurturkian-Nieto, T.; Kusk, J.H.; Nilsson, T.; Perea, A.; Pesudo, V.; Picado, E.; Riisager, K.; Saastamoinen, A.; Tengblad, O.; Thomas, J.C.; Van de Walle, J.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-hit capacity setup was used to study the decay of the dripline nucleus 31Ar, produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. A spectroscopic analysis of the beta-delayed three-proton decay of 31Ar is presented for the first time together with a quantitative analysis of the beta-delayed two-proton-gamma-decay. A new method for determination of the spin of low-lying levels in the beta-proton-daughter 30S using proton-proton angular correlations is presented and used for the level at 5.2 MeV, which is found to be either a 3+ or 4+ level, with the data pointing towards the 3+. The half-life of 31Ar is found to be 15.1(3) ms. An improved analysis of the Fermi beta-strength gives a total measured branching for the beta-3p-decay of 3.60(44) %, which is lower than the theoretical value found to be 4.24(43) %. Finally the strongest gamma-transitions in the decay of 33Ar are shown including a line at 4734(3) keV associated to the decay of the IAS, which has not previously been identified.

  1. Bound state techniques to solve the multiparticle scattering problem

    CERN Document Server

    Carbonell, J; Fonseca, A C; Lazauskas, R

    2013-01-01

    Solution of the scattering problem turns to be very difficult task both from the formal as well as from the computational point of view. If the last two decades have witnessed decisive progress in ab initio bound state calculations, rigorous solution of the scattering problem remains limited to A$\\leq$4 case. Therefore there is a rising interest to apply bound-state-like methods to handle non-relativistic scattering problems. In this article the latest theoretical developments in this field are reviewed. Five fully rigorous methods will be discussed, which address the problem of nuclear collisions in full extent (including the break-up problem) at the same time avoiding treatment of the complicate boundary conditions or integral kernel singularities. These new developments allows to use modern bound-state techniques to advance significantly rigorous solution of the scattering problem.

  2. Can multiparticle correlations be described by present analytical QCD calculations?

    CERN Document Server

    Buschbeck, Brigitte

    2000-01-01

    Previous experimental studies of various correlation functions in angular intervals and their comparison with QCD calculations are summarized. A good description is only obtained for a globally normalized function (r). The hypothesis of local parton hadron duality (LPHD) seems to be well fulfilled in this case. For all differentially normalized functions, however, several disagreements are observed and the validity of LPHD is in question. It is argued (using Monte Carlo calculations) that LPHD could still be valid also in this case - after improving the perturbative QCD calculations. Only after the inclusion of full energy-momentum conservation in the calculations one will have a better handle to estimate, how far non- perturbative effects are spoiling the agreement with the data. (14 refs).

  3. Application of the wavelets in multiparticle production experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Georgopoulos, G; Vassiliou, Maria

    2000-01-01

    In high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions (SPS, RHIC, LHC) and in cosmic rays interactions, many particles are produced in the available phase space. We make an attempt to apply the wavelets technique in order to classify such events according to the event pattern and also to locate the so-called `clustering' in a distribution. After describing the method, we demonstrate its power: (a) to a single event, produced by a pion condensation theoretical model; (b) to a sample of Pb-Pb experimental data at 158 GeV/c per nucleon; (c) to simulated events taking into account all the experimental uncertainties. (6 refs).

  4. Cell resolved, multiparticle model of plastic tissue deformations and morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirok, Andras; Isai, Dona Greta

    2015-02-01

    We propose a three-dimensional mechanical model of embryonic tissue dynamics. Mechanically coupled adherent cells are represented as particles interconnected with elastic beams which can exert non-central forces and torques. Tissue plasticity is modeled by a stochastic process consisting of a connectivity change (addition or removal of a single link) followed by a complete relaxation to mechanical equilibrium. In particular, we assume that (i) two non-connected, but adjacent particles can form a new link; and (ii) the lifetime of links is reduced by tensile forces. We demonstrate that the proposed model yields a realistic macroscopic elasto-plastic behavior and we establish how microscopic model parameters determine material properties at the macroscopic scale. Based on these results, microscopic parameter values can be inferred from tissue thickness, macroscopic elastic modulus and the magnitude and dynamics of intercellular adhesion forces. In addition to their mechanical role, model particles can also act as simulation agents and actively modulate their connectivity according to specific rules. As an example, anisotropic link insertion and removal probabilities can give rise to local cell intercalation and large scale convergent extension movements. The proposed stochastic simulation of cell activities yields fluctuating tissue movements which exhibit the same autocorrelation properties as empirical data from avian embryos.

  5. Cell resolved, multiparticle model of plastic tissue deformations and morphogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Czirok, Andras

    2014-01-01

    We propose a three dimensional mechanical model of embryonic tissue dynamics. Mechanically coupled adherent cells are represented as particles interconnected with elastic beams which can exert non-central forces and torques. Tissue plasticity is modeled by a stochastic process consisting of a connectivity change (addition or removal of a single link) followed by a complete relaxation to mechanical equilibrium. In particular, we assume that (i) two non-connected, but adjacent particles can form a new link; and (ii) the lifetime of links is reduced by tensile forces. We demonstrate that the proposed model yields a realistic macroscopic elasto-plastic behavior and we establish how microscopic model parameters affect the material properties at the macroscopic scale. Based on these results, microscopic parameter values can be inferred from tissue thickness, macroscopic elastic modulus and the magnitude and dynamics of intercellular adhesion forces. In addition to their mechanical role, model particles can also act...

  6. Nonmonotonic quantum-to-classical transition in multiparticle interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ra, Young-Sik; Tichy, Malte; Lim, Hyang-Tag

    2013-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical wave–particle duality implies that probability distributions for granular detection events exhibit wave-like interference. On the single-particle level, this leads to self-interference—e.g., on transit across a double slit—for photons as well as for large, massive particles...... that interference fades away monotonically with increasing distinguishability—in accord with available experimental evidence on the single- and on the many-particle level. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that such monotonicity of the quantum-to-classical transition is the exception rather than...

  7. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Fischer

    Full Text Available Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  8. Reaction screening using a microreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naef, Olivier; Roch, Mathieu; Chappuis, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the screening of chemical reactions using a microreactor equipped with infrared spectroscopy as online analytics. An esterification reaction has been optimized in continuous mode with the proposed setup. The esterification did not work well due to the material of the microreactor (stainless-steel 316Ti) that catalyzed the decomposition of formic acid. However, despite the occurrence of decomposition, an optimization could be achieved with this system.

  9. Small Satellite Reaction Wheel Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Michaelis, Ted

    1990-01-01

    The very "smallness" of small satellites mandates mass minimization. This paper addresses minimization of overall reaction wheel mass, including the incremental mass of the power subsystem needed to support the reaction wheel. The results are applicable to a wide range of wheel sizes and are suitable for optimization at the configuration level. For an average momentum and torque operating point, the minimization process yields wheel radius and angular velocity, as well as, the masses associat...

  10. Urticarial Reaction Caused by Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinobu Nakagawa

    2006-01-01

    Discussion: Only acetic acid, a metabolite of alcohol, induced a positive prick test in the patient with alcohol-induced urticaria. This result was not observed in normal volunteers. An oral challenge test with diluted-alcohol or Shochu showed a positive wheal reaction in a dose dependent-manner which suggests that urticaria seen in this patient might be induced by alcohol-intolerance. However possible allergic reaction to acetaldehyde could not be excluded.

  11. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  12. A Calibration Reaction For NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Kolk, B.; Chen, Y.; Deboer, R. J.; Gilardy, G.; Liu, Q.; Lyons, S.; Manukyan, K.; Moran, M.; Seymour, C.; Stech, E.; Strauss, S.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) can produce a temperature range imitating that which occurs in a star during its hydrogen burning phase. The 10B(p, α)7Be reaction has been selected as a way to determine the temperatures created at NIF. The advantage of this calibration reaction is the product: Be-7 has a half-life of 53.2 days, sufficient for gathering and studying the abundance created while also decaying within several months. A 10 keV resonance exists which dominates the 10B(p, α)7Be reaction as well as 10B(p, γ)11C, another reaction channel of 10B+p. Additionally, another resonance exists for both reactions at 600 keV. There is not reliable extrapolation to the low energies corresponding to those of NIF due to the two mentioned resonances interfering, with a shared spin-parity 5/2+. Measurements were performed and will be presented for the cross-sections of the 10B(p, α)7Be and 10B(p, γ)11C reactions to more confidently extrapolate to lower energies. Research supported by NSF PHY-1419765 and JINA-CEE PHY-1430152.

  13. Late reaction, persistent reaction and doubtful allergic reaction: The problems of interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Nilendu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard method of patch test reading is to read the test site for any positive allergy at 48hr and then again at 72/96 hr. A late reading on the seventh day is also advised to exclude the irritant reaction (IR and to notice some delayed development of allergic reaction. However, multiple visits are often difficult for the patient; therefore, this late reading is sometimes omitted. Here a case of plantar hyperkeratosis, due to allergic contact dermatitis, is reported with some insight into interpretation of the patch test. The patient showed delayed patch test reaction to formaldehyde and colophony, which has never been reported before.

  14. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  15. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  16. Concordant chemical reaction networks and the Species-Reaction Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinar, Guy; Feinberg, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper it was shown that, for chemical reaction networks possessing a subtle structural property called concordance, dynamical behavior of a very circumscribed (and largely stable) kind is enforced, so long as the kinetics lies within the very broad and natural weakly monotonic class. In particular, multiple equilibria are precluded, as are degenerate positive equilibria. Moreover, under certain circumstances, also related to concordance, all real eigenvalues associated with a positive equilibrium are negative. Although concordance of a reaction network can be decided by readily available computational means, we show here that, when a nondegenerate network's Species-Reaction Graph satisfies certain mild conditions, concordance and its dynamical consequences are ensured. These conditions are weaker than earlier ones invoked to establish kinetic system injectivity, which, in turn, is just one ramification of network concordance. Because the Species-Reaction Graph resembles pathway depictions often drawn by biochemists, results here expand the possibility of inferring significant dynamical information directly from standard biochemical reaction diagrams.

  17. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  18. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  19. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  20. General time-independent theory of ionization and breakup reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Leonard [Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)], E-mail: lr1@nyu.edu

    2008-08-14

    A rigorous formulation of non-relativistic time-dependent multiparticle collision theory was developed some time ago, in which the effect of long-range Coulomb forces was accounted for by a modification of the standard wave operator that appears in treatments of neutral-particle scattering. This theory is here converted to a time-independent form, with the wave-operator modification replaced by the use of Coulomb-modified plane waves in the construction of the wave packets that appear in the theory. This provides a convenient basis for the development of approximation techniques in configuration space, including the use of variational methods of calculation, based on integral identities for the transition amplitudes. In many cases oscillatory divergences appear in the integrals representing the ionization or breakup amplitudes. A method for removing such divergences by an averaging of the integrand at great distances is defined.

  1. A comprehensive survey of nuclear reactions; Panorama des reactions nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugnon, J. [Liege Univ., IFPA, AGO Dept. (Belgium)

    2007-07-01

    The various mechanisms of nuclear reactions are surveyed and classified in different regimes, based on the notions of coherent mechanisms and hard versus soft processes. The emphasis is put on the concepts at the basis of the understanding of these regimes and on the elements of nuclear structure which are involved in these different regimes, as well as the on the possibility of extracting this information. Due to lack of space and for pedagogical reasons, the discussion is limited to nucleon-induced and light-ion-induced reactions. However, a few remarks are given concerning some specific probes, such as weakly bound projectiles or neutron-rich nuclei. (author)

  2. Carbonitriding reactions of diatomaceous earth: phase evolution and reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANKO MATOVIC

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using diatomaceous earth as Si precursor for low temperature synthesis of non-oxide powders by carbothermal reduction-nitridation was studied. It was found that carbonitriding reactions produce phases of the Si–Al–O–N system. Already at 1300 °C, nanosized, non-oxide powders were obtained. The comparatively low reaction temperatures is attributred to the nano-porous nature of the raw material. The evolution of crystalline phases proceeded via many intermediate stages. The powders were characterized by X-ray and SEM investigations. The results showed that diatomaceous earth can be a very effective source for obtaining non-oxide powders.

  3. Acute anaphylactic reaction to expired chlorpheniramine injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    Chlorpheniramine is a widely used drug for management of allergic reaction.The serious adverse reaction to this drug is extremely rare.In this report, the authors present a case of acute anaphylactic reaction to expired chlorpheniramine injection.

  4. Acute anaphylactic reaction to expired chlorpheniramine injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beuy Joob

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorpheniramine is a widely used drug for management of allergic reaction. The serious adverse reaction to this drug is extremely rare. In this report, the authors present a case of acute anaphylactic reaction to expired chlorpheniramine injection.

  5. Reaction of Nitrosonium (NO+) with Schiff Bases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lu ZHOU; Cong De HUO; Shu MIAO; Long Min WU

    2004-01-01

    The reaction of nitrosonium (NO+) with Schiff bases produced diazonium salts and aldehydes in good yield. The reaction is assumed to be an electrophilic reaction of nitrosonium with imines via a four-member ring intermediate.

  6. Enzymatic Reactions in Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristenpart, W. D.; Wan, J.; Stone, H. A.

    2008-11-01

    We establish simple scaling laws for enzymatic reactions in microfluidic devices, and we demonstrate that kinetic parameters obtained conventionally using multiple stop-flow experiments may instead be extracted from a single microfluidic experiment. Introduction of an enzyme and substrate species in different arms of a Y-shaped channel allows the two species to diffuse across the parallel streamlines and to begin reacting. Measurements of the product concentration versus distance down the channel provide information about the kinetics of the reaction. In the limit where the enzyme is much larger (and thus less diffusive) than the substrate, we show that near the entrance the total amount of product (P) formed varies as a power law in the distance x down the channel. For reactions that follow standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the power law takes the form P˜(Vmax/Km) x^5/2, where Vmax and Km are the maximum reaction rate and Michaelis constant respectively. If a large excess of substrate is used, then Km is identified by measuring Vmax far downstream where the different species are completely mixed by diffusion. Numerical simulations and experiments using the bioluminescent reaction between luciferase and ATP as a model system are both shown to accord with the model. We discuss the implications for significant savings in the amount of time and enzyme required for determination of kinetic parameters.

  7. Quantifying mixing using equilibrium reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, Philip M.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2009-03-01

    A method of quantifying equilibrium reactions in a microchannel using a fluorometric reaction of Fluo-4 and Ca2+ ions is presented. Under the proper conditions, equilibrium reactions can be used to quantify fluid mixing without the challenges associated with constituent mixing measures such as limited imaging spatial resolution and viewing angle coupled with three-dimensional structure. Quantitative measurements of CaCl and calcium-indicating fluorescent dye Fluo-4 mixing are measured in Y-shaped microchannels. Reactant and product concentration distributions are modeled using Green's function solutions and a numerical solution to the advection-diffusion equation. Equilibrium reactions provide for an unambiguous, quantitative measure of mixing when the reactant concentrations are greater than 100 times their dissociation constant and the diffusivities are equal. At lower concentrations and for dissimilar diffusivities, the area averaged fluorescence signal reaches a maximum before the species have interdiffused, suggesting that reactant concentrations and diffusivities must be carefully selected to provide unambiguous, quantitative mixing measures. Fluorometric equilibrium reactions work over a wide range of pH and background concentrations such that they can be used for a wide variety of fluid mixing measures including industrial or microscale flows.

  8. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  9. [Mechanisms of cutaneous drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, L

    2000-06-15

    Two main mechanisms, pharmacologic and immunoallergic, are responsible for cutaneous reactions to drugs. Pharmacologic mechanisms can be predictable (overdosage, cumulative or delayed toxicity, adverse effects) or unpredictable (idiosyncratic, intolerance, or anaphylactic reaction). Immunoallergic mechanisms can be mediated by IgE (some types of urticaria and anaphylactic shock), due to circulating immune complexes (leukocytoclastic vasculitis, serum sickness-type reactions) or mediated by lymphocytes (exanthema, Lyell's syndrome, fixed pigmented erythema, photosensitization). The diagnostic work-up varies according to the causative mechanism. When the reaction is predictable, the responsible drug can be identified according to the data in the present bibliography. When the reaction is immunologic, only the chronologic sequence of events can identify the responsible drug. The risk of recurrence with an identical or related molecule also varies according to the causative mechanism. For urticaria, diagnosis and the risk of recurrence differ according to whether the cause is allergic (mediated by IgE or urticarial vasculitis) or is pharmacologic (urticaria due to aspirin or to conversion enzyme inhibitors).

  10. Thermal reactions of brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, M; Gbureck, U

    2008-02-01

    The thermal reactions of a brushite cement made of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), and an aqueous solution were followed in situ with an isothermal calorimeter at 37 degrees C. The investigated parameters were the beta-TCP/MCPM weight ratio, the liquid-to-powder ratio, the synthesis route and milling duration of the beta-TCP powder, as well as the presence of sulfate, citrate, and pyrophosphate ions in the mixing liquid. The thermograms were complex, particularly for mixtures containing an excess of MCPM or additives in the mixing solution. Results suggested that the endothermic MCPM dissolution and the highly exothermic beta-TCP dissolution occurred simultaneously, thereby leading to the formation of a large exothermic peak at early reaction time. Both reactions were followed by the exothermic crystallization of brushite and in the presence of an excess of MCPM by the endothermic crystallization of monetite. Additives generally widened the main exothermic reaction peak, or in some cases with pyrophosphate ions postponed the main exothermic peak at late reaction time. Generally, the results could be well explained and understood based on thermodynamic and solubility data.

  11. Mechanisms of severe transfusion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopko, P M; Holland, P V

    2001-06-01

    Serious adverse effects of transfusion may be immunologically or non-immunologically mediated. Currently, bacterial contamination of blood products, particularly platelets, is one of the most significant causes of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Septic transfusion reactions can present with clinical symptoms similar to immune-mediated hemolytic transfusion reactions and transfusion-related acute lung injury. Extremely high fever and/or gastrointestinal symptoms, in a transfusion recipient, may be indicative of sepsis. The diagnosis is based upon culturing the same organism from both the patient and the transfused blood component. Numerous organisms have been implicated as the cause of septic transfusion reactions. Due to different storage conditions, gram negative organisms are more often isolated from red blood cell components; gram positive organisms are more often isolated from platelets. Prevention of septic transfusion reactions is primarily dependent on an adequate donor history and meticulous preparation of the donor phlebotomy site. Visual inspection of blood components prior to transfusion is also vital to preventing these reactions. Several methods of detection of bacterial contamination and inactivation of pathogens are currently under active investigation.

  12. Electrocardiographic changes in lepra reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, P B; Chawhan, R N; Swami, R M

    1983-04-01

    The electrocardiographic (E.C.G.) changes were evaluated in 54 patients of lepra reaction. Abnormalities of the E.C.G. observed were in the form of prolongation of QTc in 24 (44.44%), ST-T changes in a (16.66%), bundle branch block and ventricular extrasystoles in 2 each (3.70%). The mean QTc interval in 64 normal adults was 0.41 second (S.D. +/- 0.03, range 0.36 to 0.44 second). It was 0.44 second (S.D. +/- 0.05, range 0.38 to 0.52 second) in patients of lepra reaction. The difference in the QTc values in the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.01). The E.C.G. abnormalities in patients of lepra reaction appears to be due to myocardial involvement.

  13. Radiation reaction in various dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Galtsov, D V

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the radiation reaction problem for an electric charge moving in flat space-time of arbitrary dimensions. It is shown that four is the unique dimension where a local differential equation exists accounting for the radiation reaction and admitting a consistent mass-renormalization (the Dirac-Lorentz equation). In odd dimensions the Huygens principle does not hold; as a result, the radiation reaction force depends on the whole past history of a charge (radiative tail). We show that the divergence in the tail integral can be removed by the mass renormalization only in the 2+1 theory. In even dimensions higher than four, divergences can not be removed by a renormalization.

  14. Radiation reaction in various dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal'Tsov, Dmitri V.

    2002-07-01

    We discuss the radiation reaction problem for an electric charge moving in flat space-time of arbitrary dimensions. It is shown that four is the unique dimension where a local differential equation exists accounting for the radiation reaction and admitting a consistent mass renormalization (the Lorentz-Dirac equation). In odd dimensions Huygens's principle does not hold, and, as a result, the radiation reaction force depends on the whole past history of a charge (radiative tail). We show that the divergence in the tail integral can be removed by the mass renormalization only in the 2+1 theory. In even dimensions higher than four, divergences cannot be removed by the mass renormalization.

  15. Back Reaction of Cosmological Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenberger, R H

    2000-01-01

    The presence of cosmological perturbations affects the background metric and matter configuration in which the perturbations propagate. This effect, studied a long time ago for gravitational waves, also is operational for scalar gravitational fluctuations, inhomogeneities which are believed to be more important in inflationary cosmology. The back-reaction of fluctuations can be described by an effective energy-momentum tensor. The issue of coordinate invariance makes the analysis more complicated for scalar fluctuations than for gravitational waves. We show that the back-reaction of fluctuations can be described in a diffeomorphism-invariant way. In an inflationary cosmology, the back-reaction is dominated by infrared modes. We show that these modes give a contribution to the effective energy-momentum tensor of the form of a negative cosmological constant whose absolute value grows in time. We speculate that this may lead to a self-regulating dynamical relaxation mechanism for the cosmological constant. This ...

  16. Light in elementary biological reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Villy

    2000-09-01

    Light plays an important role in biology. In this review we discuss several processes and systems where light triggers a biological response, i.e. photosynthesis, vision, photoreceptors. For these functions Nature has chosen simple elementary chemical reactions, which occur in highly specialized and organized structures. The high efficiency and specificity of these reactions make them interesting for applications in light energy conversion and opto-electronics. In order to emphasize the synergism in studies of natural and synthetic systems we will discuss a few of each kind, with similar functions. In all cases light triggers a rapid sequence of events, which makes ultrafast spectroscopy an ideal tool to disentangle reaction mechanisms and dynamics.

  17. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion.

  18. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  19. Microscopic effective reaction theory for direct nuclear reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogata Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some recent activities with the microscopic effective reaction theory (MERT on elastic, inelastic, breakup, transfer, and knockout processes are reviewed briefly. As a possible alternative to MERT, a description of elastic and inelastic scattering with the continuum particle-vibration coupling (cPVC method is also discussed.

  20. Miniaturized continuous flow reaction vessels: influence on chemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brivio, M.; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    This review offers an overview of the relatively young research area of continuous flow lab-on-a-chip for synthetic applications. A short introduction on the basic aspects of lab-on-a-chip is given in the first part. Subsequently, the effects of downscaling reaction vessels as well as the advantages

  1. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klipstein, David H. [Reaction Design, San Diego, CA (United States); Robinson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  2. A photoinduced, benzyne click reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, Adam W; Amoroso, Jon W; Einck, Vincent J; Rice, Walter P; Chambers, James J; Schnarr, Nathan A

    2014-04-04

    The [3 + 2] cycloaddition of azides and alkynes has proven invaluable across numerous scientific disciplines for imaging, cross-linking, and site-specific labeling among many other applications. We have developed a photoinitiated, benzyne-based [3 + 2] cycloaddition that is tolerant of a variety of functional groups as well as polar, protic solvents. The reaction is complete on the minute time scale using a single equivalent of partner azide, and the benzyne photoprecursor is stable for months under ambient light at room tempurature. Herein we report the optimization and scope of the photoinitiated reaction as well as characterization of the cycloaddition products.

  3. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  4. Fundamentals of chemical reaction engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate for a one-semester undergraduate or first-year graduate course, this text introduces the quantitative treatment of chemical reaction engineering. It covers both homogeneous and heterogeneous reacting systems and examines chemical reaction engineering as well as chemical reactor engineering. The authors take a chemical approach, helping students develop an intuitive feeling for concepts, rather than an engineering approach, which tends to overlook the inner workings of systems and objects.Each chapter contains numerous worked-out problems and real-world vignettes involving commercia

  5. Incomplete reactions in nanothermite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Rohit J.; Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L.; Overdeep, Kyle R.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2017-02-01

    Exothermic reactions between oxophilic metals and transition/post transition metal-oxides have been well documented owing to their fast reaction time scales (≈10 μs). This article examines the extent of the reaction in nano-aluminum based thermite systems through a forensic inspection of the products formed during reaction. Three nanothermite systems (Al/CuO, Al/Bi2O3, and Al/WO3) were selected owing to their diverse combustion characteristics, thereby providing sufficient generality and breadth to the analysis. Microgram quantities of the sample were coated onto a fine platinum wire, which was resistively heated at high heating rates (≈105 K/s) to ignite the sample. The subsequent products were captured/quenched very rapidly (≈500 μs) in order to preserve the chemistry/morphology during initiation and subsequent reaction and were quantitatively analyzed using electron microscopy and focused ion beam cross-sectioning followed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Elemental examination of the cross-section of the quenched particles shows that oxygen is predominantly localized in the regions containing aluminum, implying the occurrence of the redox reaction. The Al/CuO system, which has simultaneous gaseous oxygen release and ignition (TIgnition ≈ TOxygen Release), shows a substantially lower oxygen content within the product particles as opposed to Al/Bi2O3 and Al/WO3 thermites, which are postulated to undergo a condensed phase reaction (TIgnition ≪ TOxygen Release). An effective Al:O composition for the interior section was obtained for all the mixtures, with the smaller particles generally showing a higher oxygen content than the larger ones. The observed results were further corroborated with the reaction temperature, obtained using a high-speed spectro-pyrometer, and bomb calorimetry conducted on larger samples (≈15 mg). The results suggest that thermites that produce sufficient amounts of gaseous products generate smaller product particles and

  6. Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

      My concern is to understand augmentation as an emergent modality - among many others in ‘the expanding digital field' (Søndergaard M. , Transformative Creativity in the Expanded Digital Field, 2009)' - attributed to the production of contemporary art and the ‘archive of knowledge' in the (art......) museum. Augmentation, in this expanding digital field, is part of a production of new public spaces, as well as a new reality that affects and traverses art and institutions immanently and througout. The expanding digital field is transforming art and the art museum in a number of fundamental ways, a few...... that ties together ... (Robert J.K. Jacob, 2008) I suggest that a negotiation between reality-based interaction and a digital dialectic (Lunenfeld, 1999)(Søndergaard M. o., 2008) is becoming still more evident, on two levels: 1) As an investigation into (the visuality of) a digital reality under...

  7. Reaction to a Campus Confrontation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Yakov M.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Students' reactions to the occupation of a university building were surveyed on the first and last day of the occupation as well as several weeks following the end of the occupation. Results of the survey show that the conflict tended to polarize attitudes about radicals against them and increase attitudes favorable to conventional political…

  8. Palladium-Catalysed Coupling Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Johannes G.; Beller, M; Blaser, HU

    2012-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed coupling reactions have gained importance as a tool for the production of pharmaceutical intermediates and to a lesser extent also for the production of agrochemicals, flavours and fragrances, and monomers for polymers. In this review only these cases are discussed where it seems

  9. INTERFACE REACTION IN MAGNETIC MULTILAYERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.H. Yu; M.H. Li; F.W. Zhu; X.F. Cui; J.L. Jin

    2001-01-01

    Ta/NiO/NiFe/Ta multilayers were prepared by rf reactive and dc magnetron sputter-ing. The exchange coupling field (Hex) between NiO and NiFe reached 120Oe. Thecomposition and chemical states at the interface region of NiO/NiFe were studied us-ing the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and peak decomposition technique. Theresults show that there are two thermodynamically favorable reactions at NiO/NiFeinterface: NiO+Fe = Ni+FeO and 3NiO+2Fe 3Ni+Fe2 O3. The thickness of thechemical reaction as estimated by angle-resolved XPS was about 1-1.5nm. These in-terrace reaction products are magnetic defects, and we believe that the Hex and thecoereivity (He) of NiO/NiFe ave affected by these defects. Moreover, the results alsoshow that there is an "intermixing layer" at the Ta/NiO (and NiO/Ta) interface dueto a thermodynamically favorable reaction: 2Ta+5NiO=5Ni+Ta2O5. This interfacereaction has an effect on the exchange coupling as well. The thickness of the "inter-mixing layer" as estimated by XPS depth-profiles was about 8-10nm.

  10. HADES results in elementary reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramstein B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  11. Electrochemical reactions of organosilicon compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouikov, Vyacheslav V.

    1997-06-01

    Data on the processes of electrochemical reduction and oxidation of organosilicon compounds of various classes as well as on the interaction of these compounds with electrically generated reagents are generalised and surveyed systematically. The electrochemical reactivity of organic derivatives of silicon is considered taking into account their structures and reaction conditions. The bibliography includes 245 references.

  12. HADES results in elementary reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstein, B.; Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Arnold, O.; Atomssa, E. T.; Behnke, C.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Biernat, J.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Chernenko, S.; Deveaux, C.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gill, K.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kardan, K.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krebs, E.; Kuc, H.; Kugler, A.; Kunz, T.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Petousis, V.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Rehnisch, L.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schuldes, H.; Sellheim, P.; Siebenson, J.; Silva, L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Wendisch, C.; Wirth, J.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zumbruch, P.

    2014-11-01

    Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  13. Teachers' Reactions to Children's Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesdale, Drew; Pickering, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers' reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N=90) each read…

  14. Humanism and science: a reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2012-12-01

    Authors in this section have noted that humanism is intrinsic to psychotherapy, although disagreements remain. One of the disagreements is about the role of science in humanism. In this reaction, I contend that humanism, as discussed in these articles, is a legitimate theory to be subjected to scientific scrutiny. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  16. Severe immediate reaction to nabumetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Garijo, M A; Cordobés-Duran, C; Lamilla-Yerga, A M; Moreno-Gastón, I

    2007-01-01

    Nabumetone is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory (NSAID) prodrug that inhibits cyclooxygenase-2. It has been recommended as a safe alternative in most patients with hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs. Systemic reactions caused by nabumetone are not frequent. We report 2 cases of immediate systemic reactions due to nabumetone. The first case involved a 68-year-old woman who developed immediate generalized pruritus, erythema, morbilliform eruption, swollen tongue sensation, diarrhea, and hypotension after the ingestion of a single dose of nabumetone. In the second case, a 77-year-old woman developed generalized pruritus, palm erythema, colic abdominal pain, diarrhea, dizziness, tightness of the chest, dyspnea, and hypotension immediately after oral intake of nabumetone. Both patients had previously tolerated this drug. Since these episodes, they have avoided nabumetone. Skin prick tests with nabumetone (10 and 100 mg/mL) were negative. Oral challenge tests with other NSAIDs, even of the same group as nabumetone, were negative in both patients. The mechanisms responsible for the reaction were not established.

  17. Anaphylactic reactions to tolperisone (Mydocalm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribi, Camillo; Vermeulen, Christophe; Hauser, Conrad

    2003-06-28

    Four patients with anaphylaxis attributed to the intake of the centrally acting muscle relaxant tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm) were observed at the Emergency Department of the Geneva University Hospital between November 2001 and March 2003. All patients were middle-aged women who took tolperisone for chronic muscular pain. All reactions occurred within an hour after oral intake of this drug frequently prescribed in Switzerland. The severity of anaphylaxis ranged from urticarial reactions to shock with arterial hypotension. Prick-to-prick skin testing performed in one patient with a tablet of tolperisone diluted in water was negative. Its globally restricted commercialisation may explain the lack of reports on such adverse effects in the MedLine database. Anaphylactic reactions to this drug, however, are mentioned in other sources such as the Swiss Drug Compendium and the WHO drug reaction database. Together, these findings suggest that anaphylaxis to tolperisone is not uncommon and should be known to physicians in countries where this drug is available.

  18. The Pitfalls of Precipitation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Peter W.; Rayner-Canham, Geoffrey W.

    1990-01-01

    Described are some of the difficulties presented in these reactions by competing equilibria that are usually ignored. Situations involving acid-base equilibria, solubility product calculations, the use of ammonia as a complexing agent, and semiquantitative comparisons of solubility product values are discussed. (CW)

  19. Surface science of heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J M

    1982-10-29

    Some of the present and future directions for surface science as a growing and naturally interdisciplinary subject are reviewed. Particular attention is given to surface reaction chemistry as it is related to heterogenous catalysis, a subject area where there are abundant opportunities for detailed measurements of structure and dynamics at the molecular level.

  20. Reactions of ethanol on Ru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Liu, Feng; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption and reactions of ethanol on Ru(0001) were studied with temperatureprogrammed desorption (TPD) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Ethanol was found to adsorb intact onto Ru(0001) below 100 K. Heating to 250 K resulted in formation of ethoxy groups, which undergo

  1. Reactions of arsine with hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Brailsford, C.; Carter, D.E. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-02-09

    The mechanism of arsine (AsH{sub 3}) induced hemolysis was studied in vitro using isolated red blood cells (RBCs) from the rat or dog. AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis of dog red blood cells was completely blocked by carbon monoxide (CO) preincubation and was reduced by pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) compared to incubations in air. Since CO and O{sub 2} bind to heme and also reduced hemolysis, these results suggested a reaction between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin in the hemeligand binding pocket or with the heme iron. Further, sodium nitrite induction of methemoglobin (metHb) to 85% and 34% of total Hb in otherwise intact RBCs resulted in 56% and 16% decreases in hemolysis, respectively, after incubation for 4 h. This provided additional evidence for the involvement of hemoglobin in the AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis mechanism. Reactions between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin were studied in solutions of purified dog hemoglobin. Spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of AsH{sub 3} with various purified hemoglobin species revealed that AsH{sub 3} reacted with HbO{sub 2} to produce metHb and, eventually, degraded Hb characterized by gross precipitation of the protein. AsH{sub 3} did not alter the spectrum of deoxyHb and did not cause degradation of metHb in oxygen, but bound to and reduced metHb in the absence of oxygen. These data indicate that a reaction of AsH{sub 3} with oxygenated hemoglobin, HbO{sub 2}, may lead to hemolysis, but there are reactions between AsH{sub 3} and metHb that may not be directly involved in the hemolytic process. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Nucleosynthesis by photon-induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, P. E-mail: mohr@ikpAu-darmstadt.de; Babilon, M.; Galaviz, D.; Sonnabend, K.; Vogt, K.; Zilges, A

    2003-05-19

    Similar to the well-known Gamow window for charged particle induced reactions, there exists an effective energy window for photon-induced reactions. Properties of this window are discussed in detail for ({gamma}, n) and ({gamma}, {alpha}) reactions. These reactions are important for the nucleosynthesis of rare neutron-deficient p nuclei.

  3. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  4. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  5. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  6. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  7. Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, Raúl A; Luu, Thomas C

    2014-01-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low- energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path ...

  8. Synchrotron radiation with radiation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Wasserman, Ira

    1991-04-01

    A rigorous discussion is presented of the classical motion of a relativistic electron in a magnetic field and the resulting electromagnetic radiation when radiation reaction is important. In particular, for an electron injected with initial energy gamma(0), a systematic perturbative solution to the Lorentz-Dirac equation of motion is developed for field strengths satisfying gamma(0) B much less than 6 x 10 to the 15th G. A particularly accurate solution to the electron orbital motion in this regime is found and it is demonstrated how lowest-order corrections can be calculated. It is shown that the total energy-loss rate corresponds to what would be found using the exact Larmor power formula without including radiation reaction. Provided that the particle energy and field strength satisfy the same contraint, it is explicitly demonstrated that the intuitive prescription for calculating the time-integrated radiation spectrum described above is correct.

  9. Late reaction to ustekinumab infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Resener Morais

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that directly affects the quality of life. Biologics are prescribed for patients unresponsive to conventional treatments and with severe forms of the disease. Ustekinumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against the p40 subunit of interleukins 12/23 that is being used with satisfactory responses, achieving an improvement in the baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index of approximately 75% after 12 weeks of treatment. It has few side effects, including grater susceptibility to infections and development of reactions to the drug. Our report discusses a case of a cutaneous reaction to the use of ustekinumab in a 27 year-old male patient after the third dose of the medication. No similar case has been reported in the literature.

  10. Radiation Reaction on Brownian Motions

    CERN Document Server

    Seto, Keita

    2016-01-01

    Tracking the real trajectory of a quantum particle is one of the interpretation problem and it is expressed by the Brownian (stochastic) motion suggested by E. Nelson. Especially the dynamics of a radiating electron, namely, radiation reaction which requires us to track its trajectory becomes important in the high-intensity physics by PW-class lasers at present. It has been normally treated by the Furry picture in non-linear QED, but it is difficult to draw the real trajectory of a quantum particle. For the improvement of this, I propose the representation of a stochastic particle interacting with fields and show the way to describe radiation reaction on its Brownian motion.

  11. Nuclear reaction studies: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaler, R.M.

    1986-11-19

    A principal focus of recent research has been the three-body problem. A great deal of effort has been devoted to the creation of a computer program to calculate physical observables in the three body problem below 1 GeV. Successful results have been obtained for the triton. Additional work concerns scattering of K/sup +/ mesons from nuclei, antinucleon physics, relativistic nuclear physics and inclusive reactions. (DWL)

  12. Reactions to threatening health messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ten Hoor Gill A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. Methods We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93. Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72. Results Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal.

  13. Statistical theory of breakup reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A., E-mail: carlos.bertulani@tamuc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX (United States); Descouvemont, Pierre, E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels (Belgium); Hussein, Mahir S., E-mail: hussein@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Estudos Avancados

    2014-07-01

    We propose an alternative for Coupled-Channels calculations with loosely bound exotic nuclei (CDCC), based on the the Random Matrix Model of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The coupled channels equations are divided into two sets. The first set, described by the CDCC, and the other set treated with RMT. The resulting theory is a Statistical CDCC (CDCC{sub s}), able in principle to take into account many pseudo channels. (author)

  14. Statistical Theory of Breakup Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertulani Carlos A.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose an alternative for Coupled-Channels calculations with looselybound exotic nuclei(CDCC, based on the the Random Matrix Model of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The coupled channels equations are divided into two sets. The first set, described by the CDCC, and the other set treated with RMT. The resulting theory is a Statistical CDCC (CDCCs, able in principle to take into account many pseudo channels.

  15. Strangeness exchange reactions and hypernuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Recent progress in the spectroscopy of ..lambda.. and ..sigma.. hypernuclei is reviewed. Prospects for the production of doubly strange hypernuclei at a future kaon factory are assessed. It is suggested that the (K/sup -/,K/sup +/) reaction on a nuclear target may afford an optimal way of producing the H dibaryon, a stable six quark object with J/sup ..pi../ = O/sup +/, S = -2.

  16. Statistical Theory of Breakup Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bertulani, Carlos A; Hussein, Mahir S

    2014-01-01

    We propose alternatives to coupled-channels calculations with loosely-bound exotic nuclei (CDCC), based on the the random matrix (RMT) and the optical background (OPM) models for the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The coupled channels equations are divided into two sets. The first set, described by the CDCC, and the other set treated with RMT. The resulting theory is a Statistical CDCC (CDCC$_S$), able in principle to take into account many pseudo channels.

  17. Statistical Theory of Breakup Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Descouvemont, Pierre; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2014-04-01

    We propose an alternative for Coupled-Channels calculations with looselybound exotic nuclei(CDCC), based on the the Random Matrix Model of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The coupled channels equations are divided into two sets. The first set, described by the CDCC, and the other set treated with RMT. The resulting theory is a Statistical CDCC (CDCCs), able in principle to take into account many pseudo channels.

  18. Anaphylactic reaction to intravenous diclofenac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranju Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diclofenac sodium is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug widely used as an opioid sparing agent for postoperative analgesia. Anaphylaxis due to intravenous diclofenac sodium is very rare. We report a case of anaphylactic reaction to IV diclofenac sodium, occurring postoperatively in a 25-year-old primigravida, the clinical features of which mimicked pulmonary embolism. The rarity, clinical importance and the diagnostic dilemma associated prompted us to report this case.

  19. Gold-catalyzed domino reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Gold-catalyzed reactions have appeared to be highly attractive tools for chemists to promote novel transformations to prepare elaborated structures from simple starting materials. This chapter presents selected and original examples of domino processes in the presence of gold catalysts, highlighting reports implying hydration, hydroxylation, and hydroamination as key starting point for cascade transformations. Domino processes implying 1,n-enynes, asymmetric domino transformations, and applications of all the presented processes in total synthesis are presented.

  20. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however, ...... to the high momentum tail of the initial vibrational state of nitrogen, allowing for amplitude to cross over the barrier. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. Study of the Photonuclear interaction of muons in rock with the MACRO experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Scapparone, E.; Collaboration, for the MACRO

    1999-01-01

    We present first results about the measurement of the charged hadrons production by atmopsheric muons in the rock above MACRO. A comparison between the measurerate with the Monte Carlo expectation is presented.

  2. Photonuclear dose calculations for high-energy photon beams from Siemens and Varian linacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibani, Omar; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie

    2003-08-01

    The dose from photon-induced nuclear particles (neutrons, protons, and alpha particles) generated by high-energy photon beams from medical linacs is investigated. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNPX code are performed for three different photon beams from two different machines: Siemens 18 MV, Varian 15 MV, and Varian 18 MV. The linac head components are simulated in detail. The dose distributions from photons, neutrons, protons, and alpha particles are calculated in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Neutrons are generated in both the linac head and the phantom. This study includes (a) field size effects, (b) off-axis dose profiles, (c) neutron contribution from the linac head, (d) dose contribution from capture gamma rays, (e) phantom heterogeneity effects, and (f) effects of primary electron energy shift. Results are presented in terms of absolute dose distributions and also in terms of DER (dose equivalent ratio). The DER is the maximum dose from the particle (neutron, proton, or alpha) divided by the maximum photon dose, multiplied by the particle quality factor and the modulation scaling factor. The total DER including neutrons, protons, and alphas is about 0.66 cSv/Gy for the Siemens 18 MV beam (10 cm x 10 cm). The neutron DER decreases with decreasing field size while the proton (or alpha) DER does not vary significantly except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field. Both Varian beams (15 and 18 MV) produce more neutrons, protons, and alphas particles than the Siemens 18 MV beam. This is mainly due to their higher primary electron energies: 15 and 18.3 MeV, respectively, vs 14 MeV for the Siemens 18 MV beam. For all beams, neutrons contribute more than 75% of the total DER, except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field (approximately 50%). The total DER is 1.52 and 2.86 cSv/Gy for the 15 and 18 MV Varian beams (10 cm x 10 cm), respectively. Media with relatively high-Z elements like bone may increase the dose from heavy charged particles by a factor 4. The total DER is sensitive to primary electron energy shift. A Siemens 18 MV beam with 15 MeV (instead of 14 MeV) primary electrons would increase by 40% the neutron DER and by 210% the proton + alpha DER. Comparisons with measurements (neutron yields from different materials and neutron dose equivalent) are also presented. Using the NCRP risk assessment method, we found that the dose equivalent from leakage neutrons (at 50-cm off-axis distance) represent 1.1, 1.1, and 2.0% likelihood of fatal secondary cancer for a 70 Gy treatment delivered by the Siemens 18 MV, Varian 15 MV, and Varian 18 MV beams, respectively.

  3. Force approach to radiation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Gustavo V., E-mail: gulopez@udgserv.cencar.udg.mx

    2016-02-15

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  4. Force approach to radiation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Gustavo V.

    2016-02-01

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  5. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  6. CHLORINATION OF AMINO ACIDS: REACTION PATHWAYS AND REACTION RATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Zuo Tong; Linge, Kathryn; Busetti, Francesco; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-03-15

    Chlorination of amino acids can result in the formation of organic monochloramines or organic dichloramines, depending on the chlorine to amino acid ratio (Cl:AA). After formation, organic chloramines degrade into aldehydes, nitriles and N-chloraldimines. In this paper, the formation of organic chloramines from chlorination of lysine, tyrosine and valine were investigated. Chlorination of tyrosine and lysine demonstrated that the presence of a reactive secondary group can increase the Cl:AA ratio required for the formation of N,N-dichloramines, and potentially alter the reaction pathways between chlorine and amino acids, resulting in the formation of unexpected by-products. In a detailed investigation, we report rate constants for all reactions in the chlorination of valine, for the first time, using experimental results and modelling. At Cl:AA = 2.8, the chlorine was found to first react quickly with valine (5.4x104 M-1 s-1) to form N-monochlorovaline, with a slower subsequent reaction with N-monochlorovaline to form N,N-dichlorovaline (4.9x102 M-1 s-1), although some N-monochlorovaline degraded into isobutyraldehyde (1.0x10-4 s-1). The N,N-dichlorovaline then competitively degraded into isobutyronitrile (1.3x10-4 s-1) and N-chloroisobutyraldimine (1.2x10-4 s-1). In conventional drinking water disinfection, N-chloroisobutyraldimine can potentially be formed in concentrations higher than its odour threshold concentration, resulting in aesthetic challenges and an unknown health risk.

  7. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Segler, Marwin H S

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows Organic Chemists to solve synthetic problems and to invent novel transformations. Here, we propose a model which mimics chemical reasoning and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outperforms a rule-based expert system in the reaction prediction task for 180,000 randomly selected binary reactions. We show that our data-driven model generalises even beyond known reaction types, and is thus capable of effectively (re-) discovering novel transformations (even including transition-metal catalysed reactions). Our model enables computers to infer hypotheses about reactivity and reactions by only considering the intrinsic local structure of the graph, and because each single reaction prediction is typically ac...

  8. Reaction Kinetics of Nanostructured Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Kendra; Zerda, T. W.

    2006-10-01

    Nanostructured silicon carbide (SiC) is of interest particularly for use in nanocomposites that demonstrate high hardness as well as for use in semiconductor applications. Reaction kinetics studies of solid-solid reactions are relatively recent and present a method of determining the reaction mechanism and activation energy by measuring reaction rates. We have used induction heating to heat quickly, thus reducing the error in reaction time measurements. Data will be presented for reactions using silicon nanopowder (melting point of silicon. Using the well-known Avrami-Erofeev model, a two-parameter chi- square fit of the data provided a rate constant (k) and parameter (n), related to the reaction mechanism, for each temperature. From these data, an activation energy of 138 kJ/mol was calculated. In addition, the parameter n suggests the reaction mechanism, which will also be discussed. Experiments are continuing at higher temperatures to consider the liquid- solid reaction as well.

  9. Reaction path synthesis methodology for waste minimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; Shanying; LI; Mingheng; LI; Yourun; SHEN; Jingzhu; LIU

    2004-01-01

    It is a key step for reducing waste generation in chemical processes to design optimal reaction paths. In this paper, methods of waste minimization for reaction path synthesis problems are proposed to realize eco-industrial production mode with minimum waste emission. A new conception of simple stoichiometric reaction is presented for reaction path synthesis problem. All simple stoichiometric reactions can be obtained by mathematical transformation for atom matrix of a reaction system. Based on the conception, a two-tier optimization method for complex reaction path synthesis problems is addressed. The first step is to determine the economic optimal overall reactions, and the second step to decompose each overall reaction into several sub-reactions and find out the best thermodynamic feasible reaction path. Further, a method of reaction path synthesis with waste closed-cycle is proposed based on simple stoichiometric reactions for achieving zero waste emission to poly-generation problem of multi-products. Case studies show that the proposed methods can efficiently solve practical reaction path synthesis problems.

  10. RMPCDMD: Simulations of colloids with coarse-grained hydrodynamics, chemical reactions and external fields

    CERN Document Server

    de Buyl, Pierre; Deprez, Laurens

    2016-01-01

    The RMPCDMD software package performs hybrid Molecular Dynamics simulations, coupling Multiparticle Collision Dynamics to model the solvent and Molecular Dynamics to model suspended colloids, including hydrodynamics, thermal fluctuations, and chemically active solvent particles and catalytic colloids. The main usage of RMPCDMD is the simulation of chemically powered nanomotors, but other setups are considered: colloids in the presence of a thermal gradients or forced flows. RMPCDMD is developed in Fortran 2008 with OpenMP for multithreaded operation and uses the HDF5-based H5MD file format for storing data. RMPCDMD comes with documentation and a tutorial for the simulation of chemically powered nanomotors.

  11. The molecular dynamics of atmospheric reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanyi, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed information about the chemistry of the upper atmosphere took the form of quantitative data concerning the rate of reaction into specified states of product vibration, rotation and translation for exothermic reaction, as well as concerning the rate of reaction from specified states of reagent vibration, rotation and translation for endothermic reaction. The techniques used were variants on the infrared chemiluminescence method. Emphasis was placed on reactions that formed, and that removed, vibrationally-excited hydroxyl radicals. Fundamental studies were also performed on exothermic reactions involving hydrogen halides.

  12. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  13. Metal-catalyzed asymmetric aldol reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Luiz C.; Lucca Junior, Emilio C. de; Ferreira, Marco A. B.; Polo, Ellen C., E-mail: ldias@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-12-15

    The aldol reaction is one of the most powerful and versatile methods for the construction of C-C bonds. Traditionally, this reaction was developed in a stoichiometric version; however, great efforts in the development of chiral catalysts for aldol reactions were performed in recent years. Thus, in this review article, the development of metal-mediated chiral catalysts in Mukaiyama-type aldol reaction, reductive aldol reaction and direct aldol reaction are discussed. Moreover, the application of these catalysts in the total synthesis of complex molecules is discussed. (author)

  14. Reaction cross-section predictions for nucleon induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nobre, G P A; Escher, J E; Dietrich, F S

    2010-01-01

    A microscopic calculation of the optical potential for nucleon-nucleus scattering has been performed by explicitly coupling the elastic channel to all the particle-hole (p-h) excitation states in the target and to all relevant pickup channels. These p-h states may be regarded as doorway states through which the flux flows to more complicated configurations, and to long-lived compound nucleus resonances. We calculated the reaction cross sections for the nucleon induced reactions on the targets $^{40,48}$Ca, $^{58}$Ni, $^{90}$Zr and $^{144}$Sm using the QRPA description of target excitations, coupling to all inelastic open channels, and coupling to all transfer channels corresponding to the formation of a deuteron. The results of such calculations were compared to predictions of a well-established optical potential and with experimental data, reaching very good agreement. The inclusion of couplings to pickup channels were an important contribution to the absorption. For the first time, calculations of excitatio...

  15. Effect of Pozzolanic Reaction Products on Alkali-silica Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Fengyan; LAN Xianghui; LV Yinong; XU Zhongzi

    2006-01-01

    The effect of fly ash on controlling alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in simulated alkali solution was studied. The expansion of mortar bars and the content of Ca(OH)2 in cement paste cured at 80 ℃ for 91 d were measured. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were employed to study the microstructure of C-S-H. TEM/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was then used to determine the composition of C-S-H. The pore structure of the paste was analyzed by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). The results show that the contents of fly ash of 30% and 45% can well inhibit ASR. And the content of Ca(OH)2 decreases with the increase of fly ash. That fly ash reacted with Ca(OH)2 to produce C-S-H with a low Ca/Si molar ratio could bind more Na+ and K+ ions, and produce a reduction in the amount of soluble alkali available for ASR. At the same time, the C-S-H produced by pozzolanic reaction converted large pores to smaller ones (gel pores smaller than 10 nm) to densify the pore structure. Perhaps that could inhibit alkali transport to aggregate for ASR.

  16. Forgiveness, retaliation and paranoid reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R C

    1978-04-01

    It has been suggested that clinical states from grudgingness and habitual bitterness through to delusions of persecution are best resolved by forgiving. The process of forgiving requires that previously unacknowledged impulses, particularly aggressive ones, are accepted in oneself and others. If the therapist is aware of this, he can, in the transference, reinforce the patient's good introjects by providing a non-judgemental, acceptant model for the patient and thereby facilitate the adoption of the forgiving attitude. Sometimes habitual forgiving can occur as a reaction formation, and should be dealt with as such.

  17. Allergic reactions in red tattoos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutton Carlsen, K; Køcks, M; Sepehri, M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy as a screening technique for chemical characterisation of tattoo pigments in pathologic reacting tattoos and tattoo ink stock products to depict unsafe pigments and metabolites of pigments. MATERIALS/METHODS: Twelve...... to be feasible for chemical analysis of red pigments in allergic reactions. Raman spectroscopy has a major potential for fingerprint screening of problematic tattoo pigments in situ in skin, ex vivo in skin biopsies and in tattoo ink stock products, thus, to eliminate unsafe ink products from markets....

  18. Photo nuclear reactions by QMD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Niita, Koji; Chiba, Satoshi; Maruyama, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-05-01

    QMD (Quantum Molecular Dynamics) was applied to photo nuclear reaction. Advantages of QMD were explained. The cross section of (Cr, pX) at 375 MeV/c was simulated. The results showed three peaks, the peak in the lowest momentum indicated contribution of statistics decay and the middle one, the largest peak, was contribution of quasi-free process (QF) which consisted of two-step process. Then, the total cross section of {pi} photoproduction for three target nuclei (C, Al and Cu) was simulated by QMD. The obtained values were larger than the experimental values, so that the present QMD calculation showed small {pi} adsorption. (S.Y.)

  19. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  20. Chemical reactions at aqueous interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecitis, Chad David

    2009-12-01

    Interfaces or phase boundaries are a unique chemical environment relative to individual gas, liquid, or solid phases. Interfacial reaction mechanisms and kinetics are often at variance with homogeneous chemistry due to mass transfer, molecular orientation, and catalytic effects. Aqueous interfaces are a common subject of environmental science and engineering research, and three environmentally relevant aqueous interfaces are investigated in this thesis: 1) fluorochemical sonochemistry (bubble-water), 2) aqueous aerosol ozonation (gas-water droplet), and 3) electrolytic hydrogen production and simultaneous organic oxidation (water-metal/semiconductor). Direct interfacial analysis under environmentally relevant conditions is difficult, since most surface-specific techniques require relatively `extreme' conditions. Thus, the experimental investigations here focus on the development of chemical reactors and analytical techniques for the completion of time/concentration-dependent measurements of reactants and their products. Kinetic modeling, estimations, and/or correlations were used to extract information on interfacially relevant processes. We found that interfacial chemistry was determined to be the rate-limiting step to a subsequent series of relatively fast homogeneous reactions, for example: 1) Pyrolytic cleavage of the ionic headgroup of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorbed to cavitating bubble-water interfaces during sonolysis was the rate-determining step in transformation to their inorganic constituents carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and fluoride; 2) ozone oxidation of aqueous iodide to hypoiodous acid at the aerosol-gas interface is the rate-determining step in the oxidation of bromide and chloride to dihalogens; 3) Electrolytic oxidation of anodic titanol surface groups is rate-limiting for the overall oxidation of organics by the dichloride radical. We also found chemistry unique to the interface, for example: 1

  1. Control Electronics For Reaction Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Bidirectional operation achieved with single-polarity main power supply. Control circuitry generates pulse-width-modulated 800-Hz waveforms to drive two-phase ac motor and reaction wheel. Operates partly in response to digital magnitude-and-direction torque command generated by external control subsystem and partly in response to tachometric feedback in form of two once-per-revolution sinusoids with amplitudes proportional to speed. Operation in either of two modes called "normal" and "safehold." In normal mode, drive pulses timed so that, on average over one or few cycles, motor applies commanded torque. In safehold mode, pulses timed to keep motor running at set speed in one direction.

  2. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms. Progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979. [Brown Univ. , 11/1/78-10/31/79

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    Brief administrative-type summaries are given of work in the following areas: the nuclear Compton amplitude, dispersion relations, model calculations, electroexcitation sum rules, effects of nucleon size on photonuclear transitions and internal nuclear excitations, wave function formalisms in the channel coupling array theory, new n-particle scattering theory, atomic and molecular bound-state calculations, test of bound-state approximations in many-body scattering theories, quantum theory for nonhermitian operators, and variational principles for particles and fields in Heisenberg matrix mechanics.

  3. Catalyst Initiation in the Oscillatory Carbonylation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Novakovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium(II iodide is used as a catalyst in the phenylacetylene oxidative carbonylation reaction that has demonstrated oscillatory behaviour in both pH and heat of reaction. In an attempt to extract the reaction network responsible for the oscillatory nature of this reaction, the system was divided into smaller parts and they were studied. This paper focuses on understanding the reaction network responsible for the initial reactions of palladium(II iodide within this oscillatory reaction. The species researched include methanol, palladium(II iodide, potassium iodide, and carbon monoxide. Several chemical reactions were considered and applied in a modelling study. The study revealed the significant role played by traces of water contained in the standard HPLC grade methanol used.

  4. Effective radii of deuteron induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Shintaro; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Minomo, Kosho; Chiba, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) for exclusive reactions and the eikonal reaction theory (ERT) as an extension of CDCC to inclusive reactions are applied to deuteron induced reactions. The CDCC result reproduces experimental data on the reaction cross section for $d+^{58}$Ni scattering at 200 MeV/nucleon and ERT does data on the neutron-stripping cross section for inclusive $^7$Li$(d,n)$ reaction at 40 MeV. For deuteron induced reactions at 200 MeV/nucleon, target-dependence of the reaction, elastic-breakup, nucleon-stripping, nucleon-removal, complete- and incomplete-fusion cross sections is clearly explained by simple formulae. Accuracy of the Glauber model is also investigated.

  5. Organic chemistry - Fast reactions 'on water'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, JE; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    Efficient reactions in aqueous organic chemistry do not require soluble reactants, as had been thought. A newly developed ‘on-water’ protocol is characterized by short reaction times, and the products are easy to isolate.

  6. The mechanism of the modified Ullmann reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperotto, Elena; Klink, Gerard P.M. van; Koten, Gerard van; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2010-01-01

    The copper-mediated aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions developed by Fritz Ullmann and Irma Goldberg required stoichiometric amounts of copper and very high reaction temperatures. Recently, it was found that addition of relatively cheap ligands (diamines, aminoalcohols, diketones, diols) ma

  7. Reaction Wheel with Embedded MEMS IMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is to embed a MEMS IMU Sensor Chip into a reaction wheel to measure its spin rate as well as wheel attitude rate. We propose to use a reaction wheel...

  8. Recent Developments in Electron Transfer Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Rudolph A.

    1987-01-01

    Earlier results and more recent developments in electron transfer reactions are reviewed. The more recent results include inverted behavior, electronic orientation effects on reaction rates, solvent dynamics, early steps in photosynthesis, and light emission from metal electrodes.

  9. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  10. Physical chemistry: The fingerprints of reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Claire

    2017-06-01

    Small changes to molecular structures can transform how reactions occur, but studying reaction mechanisms directly is difficult. An imaging technique that provides direct insights into competing mechanisms might improve matters.

  11. Common Parent Reactions to the NICU

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Common Parent Reactions to the NICU Page Content Article ... their NICU stay. Anger Anger is also a common reaction to the initial NICU experience. Many parents ...

  12. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-02-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three-nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between LQCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from LQCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  13. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with endovascular devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honari, Golara; Ellis, Stephen G; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Aronica, Mark A; Svensson, Lars G; Taylor, James S

    2008-07-01

    Allergic reactions to endoprostheses are uncommon and reported in association with orthopaedic, dental, endovascular and other implanted devices. Hypersensitivity reactions to the biomaterials used in endovascular prostheses are among the infrequent reactions that may lead to local or systemic complications following cardiovascular therapeutic interventions. This article reviews potential immunotoxic effects of commonly used biomaterials. Reports of putative hypersensitivity reactions to endovascular devices, including coronary stents, perforated foramen occluders, pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators are also reviewed.

  14. Efficient path sampling on multiple reaction channels

    OpenAIRE

    van Erp, Titus S.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the time scale problem, rare events are not accessible by straight forward molecular dynamics. The presence of multiple reaction channels complicates the problem even further. The feasibility of the standard free energy based methods relies strongly on the success in finding a proper reaction coordinate. This can be very difficult task in high-dimensional complex systems and even more if several distinct reaction channels exist. Moreover, even if a proper reaction coordinate can be fou...

  15. Test Reactions to Study Efficiency of

    OpenAIRE

    Jasińska Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Effects of mixing on the course of fast chemical reactions are relatively well understood, especially in homogeneous systems. This enables to design and operate chemical reactors with the goal to achieve a high yield of a desired product and use systems of complex reactions as a chemical probe (chemical test reactions) to identify progress of mixing and quality of mixture. Recently, a number of studies have focused on the application of chemical test reactions to identify energy efficiency of...

  16. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  17. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  18. Severe photosensitivity reaction induced by topical diclofenac

    OpenAIRE

    Akat, Pramod B.

    2013-01-01

    Albeit uncommon, photosensitivity reaction induced by diclofenac can be an unfortunate adverse reaction complicating its use as a topical analgesic. We here present a case of a patient who suffered such a reaction as a result of exposure to diclofenac, employed as a topical analgesic for low backache. The lesions healed with conservative management without extensive scarring or other complications.

  19. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  20. Allergic reactions seen in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Görücü Coşkuner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergy can be defined as inappropriate and harmful response to harmless and ordinary materials. Allergic reactions, like in other fields of dentistry, can also be seen in the field of orthodontics. The reactions that occur against orthodontic materials can be seen as irritant or hypersensitivity reactions. The main reason of the irritant reactions is friction between soft tissues and orthodontic appliances. However, the reason of the hypersensitivity reactions is usually the antigenicity of the materials. Hypersensitivity reactions are usually seen as allergic contact dermatitis on face and neck; the occurrence of mucosal-gingival reactions and dermal and systemic reactions are rare. Latex, metal and acrylic resins are the most common allergens in orthodontics. Apart from these materials, allergic reactions can occur against bonding materials, extraoral appliances, disinfectants and antimicrobial agents. The reactions that occur against extraoral appliances usually result from metallic and elastic parts of the appliances or the appliance parts that are in contact with skin. Orthodontists should be aware of the allergic reactions to protect their patients’ health. The aim of this review was to evaluate the allergic reactions seen in orthodontic patients and discuss the cautions that orthodontists can take.

  1. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  2. Severe photosensitivity reaction induced by topical diclofenac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod B Akat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Albeit uncommon, photosensitivity reaction induced by diclofenac can be an unfortunate adverse reaction complicating its use as a topical analgesic. We here present a case of a patient who suffered such a reaction as a result of exposure to diclofenac, employed as a topical analgesic for low backache. The lesions healed with conservative management without extensive scarring or other complications.

  3. The Catalytic Asymmetric Intramolecular Stetter Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alaniz, Javier Read; Rovis, Tomislav

    2009-05-01

    This account chronicles our efforts at the development of a catalytic asymmetric Stetter reaction using chiral triazolium salts as small molecule organic catalysts. Advances in the mechanistically related azolium-catalyzed asymmetric benzoin reaction are discussed, particularly as they apply to catalyst design. A chronological treatise of reaction discovery, catalyst optimization and reactivity extension follows.

  4. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  5. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, John G.; Ramirez, Maria G.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems. (LSP)

  6. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems. (LSP)

  7. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  8. Electromagnetic effects on explosive reaction and plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mace, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pemberton, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Richard J [INDIAN HEAD DIVISION

    2010-01-01

    A number of studies have reported that electric fields can have quantifiable effects on the initiation and growth of detonation, yet the mechanisms of these effects are not clear. Candidates include Joule heating of the reaction zone, perturbations to the activation energy for chemical reaction, reduction of the Peierls energy barrier that facilitates dislocation motion, and acceleration of plasma projected from the reaction zone. In this study the possible role of plasma in the initiation and growth of explosive reaction is investigated. The effects of magnetic and electric field effects on reaction growth will be reviewed and recent experiments reported.

  9. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  10. Scratching the surface of allergic transfusion reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, William J; Tobian, Aaron A R; Savage, Jessica H; Wood, Robert A; Schroeder, John T; Ness, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    Allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions that are the most common adverse reaction to platelets and plasma, occurring in up to 2% of transfusions. Despite the ubiquity of these reactions, little is known about their mechanism. In a small subset of severe reactions, specific antibody has been implicated as causal, although this mechanism does not explain all ATRs. Evidence suggests that donor, product, and recipient factors are involved, and it is possible that many ATRs are multifactorial. Further understanding of the mechanisms of ATRs is necessary so that rationally designed and cost-effective prevention measures can be developed.

  11. A reversible nanoconfined chemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Thomas K; Bösenberg, Ulrike; Gosalawit, Rapee; Dornheim, Martin; Cerenius, Yngve; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2010-07-27

    Hydrogen is recognized as a potential, extremely interesting energy carrier system, which can facilitate efficient utilization of unevenly distributed renewable energy. A major challenge in a future "hydrogen economy" is the development of a safe, compact, robust, and efficient means of hydrogen storage, in particular, for mobile applications. Here we report on a new concept for hydrogen storage using nanoconfined reversible chemical reactions. LiBH4 and MgH2 nanoparticles are embedded in a nanoporous carbon aerogel scaffold with pore size Dmax approximately 21 nm and react during release of hydrogen and form MgB2. The hydrogen desorption kinetics is significantly improved compared to bulk conditions, and the nanoconfined system has a high degree of reversibility and stability and possibly also improved thermodynamic properties. This new scheme of nanoconfined chemistry may have a wide range of interesting applications in the future, for example, within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy.

  12. Radiation reaction of multipole moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2007-08-01

    A Poincaré-invariant description is proposed for the effective dynamics of a localized system of charged particles in classical electrodynamics in terms of the intrinsic multipole moments of the system. A relativistic-invariant definition for the intrinsic multipole moments of a system of charged particles is given. A new generally covariant action functional for a relativistic perfect fluid is proposed. In the case of relativistic charged dust, it is proven that the description of the problem of radiation reaction of multipole moments by the model of particles is equivalent to the description of this problem by a hydrodynamic model. An effective model is obtained for a pointlike neutral system of charged particles that possesses an intrinsic dipole moment, and the free dynamics of this system is described. The bound momentum of a point dipole is found.

  13. Radiation reaction for multipole moments

    CERN Document Server

    Kazinski, P O

    2006-01-01

    We propose a Poincare-invariant description for the effective dynamics of systems of charged particles by means of intrinsic multipole moments. To achieve this goal we study the effective dynamics of such systems within two frameworks -- the particle itself and hydrodynamical one. We give a relativistic-invariant definition for the intrinsic multipole moments both pointlike and extended relativistic objects. Within the hydrodynamical framework we suggest a covariant action functional for a perfect fluid with pressure. In the case of a relativistic charged dust we prove the equivalence of the particle approach to the hydrodynamical one to the problem of radiation reaction for multipoles. As the particular example of a general procedure we obtain the effective model for a neutral system of charged particles with dipole moment.

  14. [Paranoid syndrome, paranoid reaction, paranoia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovský, P

    2006-01-01

    The term paranoid is derived from the Greek word paranoia meaning nadnese. It does not only mean self-reference, but there are various personality features as they are hostility, a tendency towards aggressiveness, irritability, a lack of sense of humour, feelings of overestimation of one-self and a tendency towards accusations. These features may appear also within normal psychology and they becomeclinically important after thein increase of intensity and conspicuousness (los sof hearing, long-term abuse of alcohol and psychostimulants) and organic disorders of the brain may contribute to the development of paranoidity. A mechanism of projection is considered as a decivise factor from the point of view of dynamic psychiatry. Clinically unimportant sign sof paranoidity can be observed due to unusual situations. If a paranoid reaction becomes more serious, formation of a paranoid delusion should be taken to account. In our koncept the term paranoid and paranoidity should be used only as a psychopathological term.

  15. Reaction mechanisms of DNA photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettel, Klaus; Byrdin, Martin

    2010-12-01

    DNA photolyase uses visible light and a fully reduced flavin cofactor FADH(-) to repair major UV-induced lesions in DNA, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Electron transfer from photoexcited FADH(-) to CPD, splitting of the two intradimer bonds, and back electron transfer to the transiently formed flavin radical FADH° occur in overall 1ns. Whereas the kinetics of FADH° was resolved, the DNA-based intermediates escaped unambiguous detection yet. Another light reaction, named photoactivation, reduces catalytically inactive FADH° to FADH(-) without implication of DNA. It involves electron hopping along a chain of three tryptophan residues in 30ps, as elucidated in detail by transient absorption spectroscopy. The same triple tryptophan chain is found in cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors and may be involved in their primary photoreaction.

  16. A Networks Approach to Modeling Enzymatic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, P

    2016-01-01

    Modeling enzymatic reactions is a demanding task due to the complexity of the system, the many degrees of freedom involved and the complex, chemical, and conformational transitions associated with the reaction. Consequently, enzymatic reactions are not determined by precisely one reaction pathway. Hence, it is beneficial to obtain a comprehensive picture of possible reaction paths and competing mechanisms. By combining individually generated intermediate states and chemical transition steps a network of such pathways can be constructed. Transition networks are a discretized representation of a potential energy landscape consisting of a multitude of reaction pathways connecting the end states of the reaction. The graph structure of the network allows an easy identification of the energetically most favorable pathways as well as a number of alternative routes.

  17. Heuristics-Guided Exploration of Reaction Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeler, Maike; Proppe, Jonny; Reiher, Markus

    2015-01-01

    For the investigation of chemical reaction networks, the efficient and accurate determination of all relevant intermediates and elementary reactions is inevitable. The complexity of such a network may grow rapidly, in particular if reactive species are involved that might cause a myriad of side reactions. Without automation, a complete investigation of complex reaction mechanisms is tedious and possibly unfeasible. Therefore, only the expected dominant reaction paths of a chemical reaction network (e.g., a catalytic cycle or an enzymatic cascade) are usually explored in practice. Here, we present a computational protocol that constructs such networks in a parallelized and automated manner. Molecular structures of reactive complexes are generated based on heuristic rules and subsequently optimized by electronic-structure methods. Pairs of reactive complexes related by an elementary reaction are then automatically detected and subjected to an automated search for the connecting transition state. The results are...

  18. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  19. Explorations into Chemical Reactions and Biochemical Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-12-01

    A brief overview of the work in the research group of the present author on extracting knowledge from chemical reaction data is presented. Methods have been developed to calculate physicochemical effects at the reaction site. It is shown that these physicochemical effects can quite favourably be used to derive equations for the calculation of data on gas phase reactions and on reactions in solution such as aqueous acidity of alcohols or carboxylic acids or the hydrolysis of amides. Furthermore, it is shown that these physicochemical effects are quite effective for assigning reactions into reaction classes that correspond to chemical knowledge. Biochemical reactions constitute a particularly interesting and challenging task for increasing our understanding of living species. The BioPath.Database is a rich source of information on biochemical reactions and has been used for a variety of applications of chemical, biological, or medicinal interests. Thus, it was shown that biochemical reactions can be assigned by the physicochemical effects into classes that correspond to the classification of enzymes by the EC numbers. Furthermore, 3D models of reaction intermediates can be used for searching for novel enzyme inhibitors. It was shown in a combined application of chemoinformatics and bioinformatics that essential pathways of diseases can be uncovered. Furthermore, a study showed that bacterial flavor-forming pathways can be discovered.

  20. ReactionPredictor: prediction of complex chemical reactions at the mechanistic level using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-10-22

    Proposing reasonable mechanisms and predicting the course of chemical reactions is important to the practice of organic chemistry. Approaches to reaction prediction have historically used obfuscating representations and manually encoded patterns or rules. Here we present ReactionPredictor, a machine learning approach to reaction prediction that models elementary, mechanistic reactions as interactions between approximate molecular orbitals (MOs). A training data set of productive reactions known to occur at reasonable rates and yields and verified by inclusion in the literature or textbooks is derived from an existing rule-based system and expanded upon with manual curation from graduate level textbooks. Using this training data set of complex polar, hypervalent, radical, and pericyclic reactions, a two-stage machine learning prediction framework is trained and validated. In the first stage, filtering models trained at the level of individual MOs are used to reduce the space of possible reactions to consider. In the second stage, ranking models over the filtered space of possible reactions are used to order the reactions such that the productive reactions are the top ranked. The resulting model, ReactionPredictor, perfectly ranks polar reactions 78.1% of the time and recovers all productive reactions 95.7% of the time when allowing for small numbers of errors. Pericyclic and radical reactions are perfectly ranked 85.8% and 77.0% of the time, respectively, rising to >93% recovery for both reaction types with a small number of allowed errors. Decisions about which of the polar, pericyclic, or radical reaction type ranking models to use can be made with >99% accuracy. Finally, for multistep reaction pathways, we implement the first mechanistic pathway predictor using constrained tree-search to discover a set of reasonable mechanistic steps from given reactants to given products. Webserver implementations of both the single step and pathway versions of Reaction

  1. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  2. Anaphylactic reaction to lupine flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecke, Sabine; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Lepp, Ute; Jappe, Uta

    2007-09-01

    Roasted lupine seeds have been used as snack food in Mediterranean countries for years. Since the 1990s, lupine flour has been used as a substitute for or additive to other flours in countries of the European Union; usually the amount is so low that no declaration is required. Since 1994, a number of cases of immediate-type allergy to lupine flour-containing products have been published. A 52-year-old woman developed facial and mucosal edema, followed by dizziness and shortness of breath a few minutes after ingestion of a nut croissant containing lupine flour; she required emergency care. Allergy diagnostic tests revealed a total IgE of 116 kU/l, a highly elevated concentration of IgE specific for lupine seed (42.9 kU/l) and birch pollen IgE of 2.57 kU/l. Skin prick test with native lupine flour was strongly positive. Allergy against lupine seeds may develop de novo or via cross-reactivity to legumes, particularly peanuts, the latter being detectable in up to 88% of cases, founded on a strong sequence similarity between lupine and peanut allergens. In our patient, no cross-reactivity could be detected via immunoblotting, indicating a rare monovalent sensitization to lupine flour. Treatment consists of avoidance of lupine flour-containing products. Patients with proven peanut allergy should also avoid lupine flour because of the major risk of cross-reaction.

  3. 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cynthia M. Friend

    2006-03-14

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Ventura Beach Marriott, Ventura California from February 13, 2005 through February 18, 2005. The Conference was well-attended with 124 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  4. Interfacial reactions in lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Rachid; Ma, Zi-Feng; Amine, Khalil

    2017-08-01

    The lithium-ion battery was first commercially introduced by Sony Corporation in 1991 using LiCoO2 as the cathode material and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs) as the anode material. After continuous research and development for 25 years, lithium-ion batteries have been the dominant energy storage device for modern portable electronics, as well as for emerging applications for electric vehicles and smart grids. It is clear that the success of lithium-ion technologies is rooted to the existence of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that kinetically suppresses parasitic reactions between the lithiated graphitic anodes and the carbonate-based non-aqueous electrolytes. Recently, major attention has been paid to the importance of a similar passivation/protection layer on the surface of cathode materials, aiming for a rational design of high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries with extended cycle/calendar life. In this article, the physical model of the SEI, as well as recent research efforts to understand the nature and role of the SEI are summarized, and future perspectives on this important research field will also be presented.

  5. Piezonuclear reactions - do they exist?

    CERN Document Server

    Ericsson, G; Sjöstrand, H; Traneus, E

    2009-01-01

    In a number of recent articles in this journal F. Cardone and collaborators have claimed the observation of several striking nuclear phenomena which they attribute to "piezonuclear reactions". One such claim [Phys. Lett. A 373 (2009) 1956] is that subjecting a solution of 228Th to cavitation leads to a "transformation" of thorium nuclei that is 104 times faster than the normal nuclear decay for this isotope. In a "Comment" [Phys. Lett. A 373 (2009) 3795] to the thorium work, we have criticized the evidence provided for this claim. In a "Reply" [Phys. Lett. A 373 (2009) 3797] Cardone et al. answer only some minor points but avoid addressing the real issue. The information provided in their Reply displays a worrying lack of control of their experimental situation and the data they put forward as evidence for their claims. We point out several shortcomings and errors in the described experimental preparations, set-up and reporting, as well as in the data analysis. We conclude that the evidence presented by Cardo...

  6. Reaction between mullite and polytitanocarbosilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Y.; Matsura, T. [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Appl. Chem.; Shibuya, M. [Ube Industries Ltd., Tyranno Fiber Development Project (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Infiltration and subsequent pyrolysis of inorganic polymer in the spaces of long fibers / mullite powder systems may be a successful processing method to reduce the damage of fibers and to decrease the shrinkage of the matrix during heating. This paper describes the chemical reaction between polytitanocarbosilane and mullite as a first step in the processing of mullite matrix composites. A mullite powder of 30 vol% was mixed with a polytitanocarbosilane (50 wt%) / xylene (50 wt%) solution for 24 h, and the suspension was formed into thick films by doctor blade. The green sheets were hot-pressed at 1400-1600 C in a N{sub 2} atmosphere. The composites consisted of mullite, sialon with a composition of Si{sub 2}Al{sub 3}O{sub 7}N or Si{sub 12}Al{sub 18}O{sub 39}N{sub 8}, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {beta}-SiC and TiN. The formation of these phases were thermodynamically discussed in the system of mullite - C (supplied from polytitianocarbosilane) - N{sub 2}. (orig.) 11 refs.

  7. Reaction time and psychophysiological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sersen, E A; Clausen, J; Lidsky, A

    1982-04-01

    Disjunctive reaction times (RT) involving two interstimulus intervals were obtained from 10 subjects during 4 sessions while recording heart period, skin conductance, and EEG. Multiple regression analysis indicated complex relationships between RT and skin conductance and heart period which varied with session level. The relationship of RT and skin conductance was predominantly linear but positive when level of skin conductance was low and negative when high. Heart period showed a predominantly curvilinear trend which also varied with level during the session. Fastest RTs tended to occur with long heart periods in short heart period sessions and vice versa. Fast RTs were also accompanied by relatively low EEG power before and after stimulation and by higher EEG frequency after the stimulus. The pattern of findings did not fully accord with the expectations of activation theory, and the proportion of RT variance accounted for was small. It is suggested that activation may vary to maintain a constant level of motor performance. Faster RT may occur under relaxed conditions and high arousal, and concentrated attentiveness may be an attempt to compensate for boredom or distraction.

  8. Disulfiram-like reaction with ornidazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Many drugs are implicated in causation of disulfiram-like reaction. The disulfiram-like reaction can vary in severity and can occasionally be fatal. The reaction is believed to result from inhibition of metabolism of acetaldehyde to acetate by inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase. The increase in serum acetaldehyde results in unpleasant clinical manifestations. Metronidazole is known to cause disulfiram-like reaction. Although no previous report has implicated ornidazole in causation of disulfiram-like reaction, caution has been advised with the use of all imidazoles. We report the case of a 48-year-old male, who was taking ornidazole and developed features of disulfiram-like reaction after taking alcohol. The patient was managed with supportive measures and improved. The report highlights the need for clinicians to advise patients to restrict intake of alcohol if they are being prescribed imidazole derivatives.

  9. Surface reactions in microelectronics process technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitin, Galit; Hess, Dennis W

    2011-01-01

    Current integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing consists of more than 800 process steps, nearly all of which involve reactions at surfaces that significantly impact device yield and performance. From initial surface preparation through film deposition, patterning, etching, residue removal, and metallization, an understanding of surface reactions and interactions is critical to the successful continuous scaling, yield, and reliability of electronic devices. In this review, some of the most important surface reactions that drive the development of microelectronic device fabrication are described. The reactions discussed do not constitute comprehensive coverage of this topic in IC manufacture but have been selected to demonstrate the importance of surface/interface reactions and interactions in the development of new materials, processing sequences, and process integration challenges. Specifically, the review focuses on surface reactions related to surface cleaning/preparation, semiconductor film growth, dielectric film growth, metallization, and etching (dry and wet).

  10. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  11. Test Reactions to Study Efficiency of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasińska Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of mixing on the course of fast chemical reactions are relatively well understood, especially in homogeneous systems. This enables to design and operate chemical reactors with the goal to achieve a high yield of a desired product and use systems of complex reactions as a chemical probe (chemical test reactions to identify progress of mixing and quality of mixture. Recently, a number of studies have focused on the application of chemical test reactions to identify energy efficiency of mixing, being a convenient way of comparing mixers and reactors in terms of their mixing efficiency. This review offers a presentation of chemical test reactions available in the literature and methods of applications of test reactions to identify the energy efficiency of mixing. Also methods to assess the extent of micromixing by measuring product distribution or segregation index, and to determine the time constant for mixing are presented for single phase homogeneous systems and two-phase liquid-liquid systems.

  12. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  13. Controlling chemical reactions of a single particle

    CERN Document Server

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The control of chemical reactions is a recurring theme in physics and chemistry. Traditionally, chemical reactions have been investigated by tuning thermodynamic parameters, such as temperature or pressure. More recently, physical methods such as laser or magnetic field control have emerged to provide completely new experimental possibilities, in particular in the realm of cold collisions. The control of reaction pathways is also a critical component to implement molecular quantum information processing. For these undertakings, single particles provide a clean and well-controlled experimental system. Here, we report on the experimental tuning of the exchange reaction rates of a single trapped ion with ultracold neutral atoms by exerting control over both their quantum states. We observe the influence of the hyperfine interaction on chemical reaction rates and branching ratios, and monitor the kinematics of the reaction products. These investigations advance chemistry with single trapped particles towards achi...

  14. Triple click reaction strategy for macromolecular diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Umit

    2013-01-11

    This Feature Article focuses on the rapidly emerging concept of the "triple click reactions" towards the design and synthesis of macromolecules with well-defined topology and chemical composition, and also precise molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution. The term "triple click reaction" used in this feature article is based on the utilization of three chemically and mechanistically different click reactions for polymer-polymer conjugation and post-modification of the polymers. Three sequential click reactions of which two are identical should not be considered to be triple click reactions. The triple click reaction strategy for polymer conjugation and post-modification of polymers is classified in this article based on the resultant architectures: linear and non-linear structures. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Catalytic Reactions in Heavy-ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomeitsev, E E

    2011-01-01

    We discuss a new type of reactions of a phi meson production on hyperons, pi Y--> phi Y and anti-kaons bar-K N --> phi Y. These reactions are not suppressed according to Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule and can be a new efficient source of phi mesons in a nucleus-nucleus collision. We discuss how these reactions can affect the centrality dependence and the rapidity distributions of the phi yield.

  16. Catalytic reactions in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Tomášik, B.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss a new type of reactions of a ϕ-meson production on hyperons, πY → ϕY and antikaons -KN → ϕY. These reactions are not suppressed according to Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule and can be a new efficient source of ϕ mesons in a nucleus-nucleus collision. We discuss how these reactions can affect the centrality dependence and the rapidity distributions of the ϕ yield.

  17. [Rare, severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsholm, Anne Sofie; Ebbehøj, Eva; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2014-07-07

    The literature reports a large variety of adverse reactions to potassium iodide. A severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide in a 51-year-old woman with Graves' thyrotoxicosis is described. Following administration the patient developed sialadenitis, conjunctivitis, stomatitis and acneiform iododerma that responded dramatically to withdrawal of the potassium iodide and administration with corticosteroids. Awareness of these adverse reactions may prevent prolonged hospitalization and unnecessary tests and treatments.

  18. Kinetics of Model Reactions for Interfacial Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Hall

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To model the rates of interfacial polycondensations, the rates of reaction of benzoyl chloride and methyl chloroformate with various aliphatic monoamines in acetonitrile were determined at 25 °C. Buffering with picric acid slowed these extremely fast reactions so the rate constants could be determined from the rate of disappearance of picrate ion. The rates of the amine reactions correlated linearly with their Swain-Scott nucleophilicities.

  19. Negative Temperature Coefficient in Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenson, I. A.; Sergeev, Gleb B.

    1984-05-01

    A systematic analysis of reactions whose rate decreases with increase of temperature is presented. The possibility of a negative temperature coefficient in the elementary reactions is examined from the standpoint of the transition state theory and of collision theory. The mechanisms of complex reactions in which the temperature dependence of the rate is anomalous are discussed, and possible reasons for the anomaly are examined. The bibliography contains 175 references.

  20. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Segler, Marwin H. S.; Waller, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows Organic Chemists to solve synthetic problems and to invent novel transformations. Here, we propose a model which mimics chemical reasoning and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outpe...

  1. The mechanism of the modified Ullmann reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Sperotto, Elena; Klink, Gerard P.M. van; van Koten, Gerard; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2010-01-01

    The copper-mediated aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions developed by Fritz Ullmann and Irma Goldberg required stoichiometric amounts of copper and very high reaction temperatures. Recently, it was found that addition of relatively cheap ligands (diamines, aminoalcohols, diketones, diols) made these reactions truly catalytic, with catalyst amounts as low as 1 mol% or even lower. Since these catalysts are homogeneous, it has opened up the possibility to investigate the mechanism of the...

  2. A Unified Theory of Chemical Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aubry, S

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new and general formalism for elementary chemical reactions where quantum electronic variables are used as reaction coordinates. This formalism is in principle applicable to all kinds of chemical reactions ionic or covalent. Our theory reveals the existence of an intermediate situation between ionic and covalent which may be almost barrierless and isoenegetic and which should be of high interest for understanding biochemistry.

  3. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith...dominate the metal’s cathodic behavior. Within an alkaline environment, we expect the following reduction reactions to be catalyzed on the oxide

  4. Reaction torque minimization techniques for articulated payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Kevin; Aleman, Roberto M.

    1988-01-01

    Articulated payloads on spacecraft, such as antenna telemetry systems and robotic elements, impart reaction torques back into the vehicle which can significantly affect the performance of other payloads. This paper discusses ways to minimize the reaction torques of articulated payloads through command-shaping algorithms and unique control implementations. The effects of reaction torques encountered on Landsat are presented and compared with simulated and measured data of prototype systems employing these improvements.

  5. Chemical-reaction model for Mexican wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    We present a chemical-reaction model to describe the Mexican wave ( La Ola) in football stadia. The spectator's action is described in terms of chemical reactions. The model is governed by three reaction rates k 1, k 2, and k3. We study the nonlinear waves on one- and two-dimensional lattices. The Mexican wave is formulated as a clockwise forwardly propagating wave. Waves are growing or disappear, depending on the values of reaction rates. In the specific case of k1= k2= k3=1, the nonlinear-wave equation produces a propagating pulse like soliton.

  6. Screened Thermonuclear Reaction Rates on Magnetar Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-Lin; LUO Zhi-Quan; LIU Jing-Jing; LAI Xiang-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Improving Salpeter's method, we discuss the effect of superstrong magnetic fields (such as those of magnetars) on thermonuclear reaction rates. These most interesting reactions, including the hydrogen burning by the CNO cycle and the helium burning by the triple alpha reaction, are investigated as examples on the magnetar surfaces. The obtained result shows that the superstrong magnetic fields can increase the thermonuclear reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. The enhancement may have significant influence for further study research of the magnetars, especially for the x-ray luminosity observation and the evolution of magnetars.

  7. Chemical reactions in low-g

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Facemire, B. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Apollo-Soyuz flight experiment, 'Chemical Foams' demonstrated that foams and air/liquid dispersions are much more stable in low-gravity than on the ground. It thus should be possible to conduct unique chemical reactions in space foams. The low-g results and subsequent ground work on the formaldehyde clock reaction indicate that the reaction is strongly influenced by (1) dissociated and undissociated solution species being adsorbed at solid/liquid and gas/liquid surfaces and (2) chemical reaction rates apparently being affected by long-range forces determined by the liquid mass and the extent and nature of all surface interfaces.

  8. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  9. Carbon-Fixing Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/7/tpc.116.tt0716/FIG1F1fig1Photosynthesis in plants converts the energy of sunlight into chemical energy. Although photosynthesis involves many proteins and catalytic processes, it often is described as two sets of reactions, the light-dependent reactions and the carbon-fixing reactions. This lesson introduces the core biochemistry of the carbon-fixing reactions of photosynthesis, as well as its variations, C4 and CAM. Finally, it addresses how and why plants are affected by rising atmospheric CO2 levels, and research efforts to increase photosynthetic efficiency in current and future conditions. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute anaphylactoid reactions during hemodialysis in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forêt, M; Kuentz, F; Meftahi, H; Milongo, R; Hachache, T; Elsener, M; Dechelette, E; Cordonnier, D

    1987-04-01

    A retrospective survey of anaphylactoid reactions during dialysis in France was conducted. In 52 of 112 hemodialysis units surveyed 111 patients who had suffered one or more anaphylactoid reactions during dialysis were identified. According to the Hamilton/Adkinson classification, in 31 patients reactions were minor, in 54 patients moderate, and in 26 patients severe. Four patients died of their reactions. A preponderance of reactions (75 and 11%) occurred with cuprammonium cellulose hollow-fiber and plate dialyzers, respectively. Severe dialyzer reactions were found to occur more frequently after the long (weekend) interdialytic interval. In an in vitro study, six brands of cuprammonium cellulose hollow-fiber dialyzers were rinsed with water and the eluates analyzed by size exclusion chromatography for contaminant particles. Substantial variation in the amount of extractable material was found between dialyzers of different brands, despite the fact that all dialyzers used membranes from the same manufacturer. Previous data by others has suggested that this extractable material is a derivative of cellulose. Results of our epidemiologic survey in France are similar to those previously reported in the United States and suggest an increased incidence of dialyzer reactions with ethylene oxide-sterilized cuprammonium cellulose dialyzers. The presence of cellulose-derived particles in the rinsing fluid of such dialyzers and the possible increased incidence of reactions after the long (weekend) interdialytic interval suggest that allergy to cellulose-derived particles eluted from cellulosic dialyzers may contribute to dialyzer hypersensitivity reactions.

  11. A study on sodium-concrete reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Heum; Min, Byong Hun [Suwon University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    A small sodium-concrete reaction facility was designed, manufactured and installed. this facility has been operated under inert gas(N{sub 2}) with different experimental variables such as sodium injection temperature, injection amount of sodium, aging period of concrete, sodium reservoir temperature. As a result, it was found that sodium injection temperature and injected amount of sodium has little effect on sodium-concrete reaction. However, sodium reservoir temperature and aging period of concrete has relatively high impact on sodium-concrete reaction. Sodium-concrete reaction model has also been developed and compared with experimental results. (Author) 51 refs., 16 tabs., 64 figs.

  12. Time scale in quasifission reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, B.B.; Paul, P.; Nestler, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The quasifission process arises from the hindrance of the complete fusion process when heavy-ion beams are used. The strong dissipation in the system tends to prevent fusion and lead the system towards reseparation into two final products of similar mass reminiscent of a fission process. This dissipation slows down the mass transfer and shape transformation and allows for the emission of high energy {gamma}-rays during the process, albeit with a low probability. Giant Dipole {gamma} rays emitted during this time have a characteristic spectral shape and may thus be discerned in the presence of a background of {gamma} rays emitted from the final fission-like fragments. Since the rate of GDR {gamma} emission is very well established, the strength of this component may therefore be used to measure the timescale of the quasifission process. In this experiment we studied the reaction between 368-MeV {sup 58}Ni and a {sup 165}Ho target, where deep inelastic scattering and quasifission processes are dominant. Coincidences between fission fragments (detected in four position-sensitive avalanche detectors) and high energy {gamma} rays (measured in a 10{close_quotes} x 10{close_quotes} actively shielded NaI detector) were registered. Beams were provided by the Stony Brook Superconducting Linac. The {gamma}-ray spectrum associated with deep inelastic scattering events is well reproduced by statistical cooling of projectile and target-like fragments with close to equal initial excitation energy sharing. The y spectrum associated with quasifission events is well described by statistical emission from the fission fragments alone, with only weak evidence for GDR emission from the mono-nucleus. A 1{sigma} limit of t{sub ss} < 11 x 10{sup -21} s is obtained for the mono-nucleus lifetime, which is consistent with the lifetime obtained from quasifission fragment angular distributions. A manuscript was accepted for publication.

  13. Combined online spectroscopic, calorimetric, and chemometric analysis: reaction enthalpy determinations in single and parallel reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjahjono, Martin; Widjaja, Effendi; Garland, Marc

    2009-06-02

    Calorimetry and signal processing: Vibrational spectroscopies, heat-flow microcalorimetry, and multivariate analysis are combined to decouple the reaction enthalpies of parallel reactions [picture: see text]. This methodology allows the evaluation of reaction enthalpy from complex systems without recourse to conventional kinetic modeling. Simultaneous in situ/online spectroscopy and heat-flow measurements as well as multivariate analyses are performed, apparently for the first time, to determine heats of reaction for single and parallel reactions. Two different vibrational spectroscopy techniques, namely Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, are used in conjunction with flow-through TAM III microcalorimetry. With respect to the spectroscopic analysis, the reaction spectra are first analyzed to determine the pure-component spectra and the corresponding concentrations without recourse to external calibration. With respect to the calorimetric analysis, a soft modeling approach is employed to determine the heats of reaction without recourse to any conventional kinetic models. This combined approach is implemented to determine the extents of reaction as well as the corresponding heats of reaction at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa for a) the hydrolysis of acetic anhydride (single reaction) and b) the hydrolysis of methyl paraben and ethyl paraben in alkaline solution (both single and parallel reactions). In the latter case, the heat-flow contributions from the two simultaneous reactions are successfully decoupled. Taken together, these results demonstrate proof of concept for the present approach. The newly developed methodology appears to be quite general and particularly useful for investigating complex reaction systems. This is particularly true for multiple simultaneous reactions and reactions where the detailed kinetic expressions are not available, or cannot be easily determined. The use of extents of reaction is also very helpful where there is high variability in reaction rates

  14. Quantum chromodynamics in hadron collider experiments: towards automated one-loop calculations for multi-particle processes. Application to the production of 2 photons and 1 jet; Chromodynamique quantique aux collisionneurs hadroniques: vers une automatisation du calcul des processus multi-particules a l'ordre d'une boucle. Application a la production de deux photons et un jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, F

    2004-06-01

    The future CERN collider (LHC) has a fantastic potential of discovery, provided quantum chromodynamics can be quantitatively predicted. To do so, it is necessary to work at NLO approximation in order to reduce the dependence of the -cross-section on- the non-physical scales. To obtain results in this approximation, one has to calculate the cross-sections of the partonic subprocesses contributing to the studied reaction at the lowest order, and also the virtual corrections (loop corrections) and the real corrections. The calculation of the virtual corrections remains very complicated if the number of external particles is greater than four or if the external (internal) particles are massive. in this thesis, an automatic method which enables to calculate one loop diagrams with five external legs and which can be generalized to the case of massive particles is presented. In a first part, we describe different tools and methods necessary to such calculations. We then apply -them to the calculation of the gg {yields}{gamma}{gamma} g reaction, which interests the ATLAS and CMS experimentalists as the background for the Higgs boson search. We also give the explicit result for this amplitude for each helicity configuration in a compact form and a clearly gauge invariant representation. We finally present a phenomenological study of this reaction. (author)

  15. First trial postural reactions to unexpected balance disturbances: a comparison with the acoustic startle reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Nijhuis, Lars B; Allum, John H J; Valls-Solé, Josep; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2010-11-01

    Unexpected support-surface movements delivered during stance elicit "first trial" postural reactions, which are larger and cause greater instability compared with habituated responses. The nature of this first trial reaction remains unknown. We hypothesized that first trial postural reactions consist of a generalized startle reaction, with a similar muscle synergy as the acoustic startle response, combined with an automatic postural reaction. Therefore we compared acoustic startle responses to first trial postural reactions. Eight healthy subjects stood on a support surface that unexpectedly rotated backwards 10 times, followed by 10 startling acoustic stimuli, or vice versa. Outcome measures included full body kinematics and surface EMG from muscles involved in startle reactions or postural control. Postural perturbations and startling acoustic stimuli both elicited a clear first trial reaction, as reflected by larger kinematic and EMG responses. The ensuing habituation rate to repeated identical stimuli was comparable for neck and trunk muscles in both conditions. Onset latencies in neck muscles occurred significantly later for first trial perturbations compared with startle responses, but earlier in trunk muscles. Our results show that platform tilting initially induces reactions larger than needed to maintain equilibrium. For neck and trunk muscles, these first trial postural reactions resembled acoustic startle reflexes. First trial postural reactions may be triggered by interaction of afferent volleys formed by somatosensory and vestibular inputs. Acoustic startle reactions may also be partially triggered by vestibular inputs. Similar muscle activation driven by vestibular inputs may be the common element of first trial postural responses and acoustic startle reactions.

  16. Evaluation of induced radioactivity in 10 MeV-electron irradiated spices, (1); [gamma]-ray measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Katayama, Tadashi; Ito, Norio; Mizohata, Akira; Matsunami, Tadao; Shibata, Setsuko; Toratani, Hirokazu (Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Research Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology); Takeda, Atsuhiko

    1994-02-01

    Black pepper, white pepper, red pepper, ginger and turmeric were irradiated with 10 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator to a dose of 100 kGy and radioactivity was measured in order to estimate induced radioactivity in the irradiated foods. Induced radioactivity could not be detected significantly by [gamma]-ray spectrometry in the irradiated samples except for spiked samples which contain some photonuclear target nuclides in the list of photonuclear reactions which could produce radioactivity below 10 MeV. From the amount of observed radioactivities of short-lived photonuclear products in the spiked samples and calculation of H[sub 50] according to ICRP Publication 30, it was concluded that the induced radioactivity and its biological effects in the 10 MeV electron-irradiated natural samples were negligible in comparison with natural radioactivity from [sup 40]K contained in the samples. (author).

  17. Preparation and Reactions of Octasilsesquioxanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Ling-Kang

    2004-01-01

    Because of the length scales involved, nanocomposite materials incorporate extensive interracial interactions that can result in non-linear changes in the composite property. Chemists often start from polymerizable inorganic and organic constituents in the molecule to build organic/inorganic hybrids that combine advantageous properties of disparate components.Silsesquioxanes (RSiO1.5)n, derived from e.g. RSiCl3 or RSi(OEt)3 by hydrolysis/condensation in a sol-gel process, are a class of silicate framework where each Si-atom is linked covalently to an organic radical R that chemically modifies the silicates. In addition to incompletely condensed silsesquioxanes is the completely condensed octasilsesquioxane. These octameric silsesquioxanes are in transition between small molecules and macroscopic materials with skeletal frameworks found in crystalline forms of silica and zeolites. SisO12(CH=CH2)8 1 has a cubic silica like core and 8 olefin functionalities as known for a long time yet with very few reactivity reports. The acidic hydrolytic polycondensation of (vinyl)Si(OEt)3 in the literature, leading to only less than 20% of 1,also suggests a large room for improvement. We have found that the H NMR spectra of mixtures containing 1 and either the Schrock's catalyst or the Grubbs' catalyst never exhibit vinylic 1H peaks attributable to the formation of products from self-metathesis. With a Pt/C catalyst, the H-Si bond of HSiMe2Cl adds to the vinylic double bond of 1, forming 2 that reacts with sufficient CH2=CHCH2OH to give 3. Upon treatment of the Grubbs' catalyst, a ring-closing metathesis occurs on the surface of the cubic Si8O12 framework. The results exhibit a strong proximity effect with which 3 transforms itself to 4. Alternatively 5 has been prepared.The Gmbbs' catalyst allows 5 to isomerize from Z- to E-configuration to produce 4 independentiy, thus demonstrating the ring-closing metathesis reactions of densely populated terminal olefins on Si8O12 surface.

  18. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  19. Resonances and the thermonuclear reaction rate

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, M S; Sargeant, A J; Pato, M P

    2003-01-01

    We present an approximate analytic expression for thermonuclear reaction rate of charged particles when the cross section contains a single narrow or wide resonance described by a Breit-Wigner shape. The resulting expression is uniformly valid as the effective energy and resonance energy coalesce. We use our expressions to calculate the reaction rate for $^{12}$C(p,$\\gamma$)$^{13}$N.

  20. Solvent effect in the Walden inversion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaume, J.; Lluch, J. M.; Oliva, A.; Bertrán, J.

    1984-04-01

    The solvent effect on the fluoride exchange reaction has been studied by means of ab initio calculations using the 3-21G basis set. It is shown that the motion of the solvent molecules is an important part of the reaction coordinate.