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Sample records for multiforme efficacy toxicity

  1. Investigation of Monnose-Binding Lectin gene Polymorphism in Patients with Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome

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    Sevil Toka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Monnose-Binding lectin (MBL appears to play an important role in the immune system. The genetic polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene can result in a reduction of serum levels, leading to a predisposition to recurrent infection. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of a polymorphism in codon 54 of the MBL2 gene on the susceptibility to Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome (EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. Material and Methods: Our study included 64 patients who were clinically and/or histopathologically diagnosed with EM, SJS, and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome and 66 healthy control subjects who were genotyped for the MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism using the PCR-RFLP method. For all statistical analyses, the level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: The prevalence of the B allele was 18% in the EM, SJS and SJS/TEN patient groups and 13% in the control group. No significant differences in allele frequencies of any polymorphism were observed between the patient and control groups, although the B allele was more frequent in the patient groups (p=0.328.Conclusion: Our results provide no evidence of a relationship between MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism and the susceptibility to EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. However, these findings should be confirmed in studies with a larger sample size.

  2. Gut microbiota modulation of chemotherapy efficacy and toxicity

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    Alexander, James L.; Wilson, Ian D.; Teare, Julian; Marchesi, Julian Roberto; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Kinross, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence is growing that the gut microbiota modulates the host response to chemotherapeutic drugs, with three main clinical outcomes: facilitation of drug efficacy; abrogation and compromise of anticancer effects; and mediation of toxicity. The implication is that gut microbiota are critical to the development of personalized cancer treatment strategies and, therefore, a greater insight into prokaryotic co-metabolism of chemotherapeutic drugs is now required. This thinking is based on evidenc...

  3. Gut microbiota modulation of chemotherapy efficacy and toxicity.

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    Alexander, James L; Wilson, Ian D; Teare, Julian; Marchesi, Julian R; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Kinross, James M

    2017-06-01

    Evidence is growing that the gut microbiota modulates the host response to chemotherapeutic drugs, with three main clinical outcomes: facilitation of drug efficacy; abrogation and compromise of anticancer effects; and mediation of toxicity. The implication is that gut microbiota are critical to the development of personalized cancer treatment strategies and, therefore, a greater insight into prokaryotic co-metabolism of chemotherapeutic drugs is now required. This thinking is based on evidence from human, animal and in vitro studies that gut bacteria are intimately linked to the pharmacological effects of chemotherapies (5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, gemcitabine, methotrexate) and novel targeted immunotherapies such as anti-PD-L1 and anti-CLTA-4 therapies. The gut microbiota modulate these agents through key mechanisms, structured as the 'TIMER' mechanistic framework: Translocation, Immunomodulation, Metabolism, Enzymatic degradation, and Reduced diversity and ecological variation. The gut microbiota can now, therefore, be targeted to improve efficacy and reduce the toxicity of current chemotherapy agents. In this Review, we outline the implications of pharmacomicrobiomics in cancer therapeutics and define how the microbiota might be modified in clinical practice to improve efficacy and reduce the toxic burden of these compounds.

  4. Factors affecting toxicity and efficacy of polymeric nanomedicines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Eiki

    2008-01-01

    Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to medicine. The purpose of this article is to review common characteristics of polymeric nanomedicines with respect to passive targeting. We consider several biodegradable polymeric nanomedicines that are between 1 and 100 nm in size, and discuss the impact of this technology on efficacy, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and targeting. The degree of toxicity of polymeric nanomedicines is strongly influenced by the biological conditions of the local environment, which influence the rate of degradation or release of polymeric nanomedicines. The dissemination of polymeric nanomedicines in vivo depends on the capillary network, which can provide differential access to normal and tumor cells. The accumulation of nanomedicines in the microlymphatics depends upon retention time in the blood and extracellular compartments, as well as the type of capillary endothelium surrounding specific tissues. Finally, the toxicity or efficacy of intact nanomedicines is also dependent upon tissue type, i.e., non-endocrine or endocrine tissue, spleen, or lymphatics, as well as tumor type

  5. Efficacy and toxicity of postoperative temozolomide radiochemotherapy in malignant glioma

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    Kocher, M.; Kunze, S.; Eich, H.T.; Semrau, R.; Mueller, R.P. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of daily temozolomide concurrent with postoperative radiotherapy in malignant glioma. Patients and methods: from 11/1999 to 03/2003, n = 81 patients aged 15-72 years (median 52 years, karnofsky score 80-100% in 83%) suffering from primary glioblastoma (n = 47), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 6), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (n = 16), and recurrent glioma (n = 12) were treated. Patients with primary gliomas received a combination of postoperative radiotherapy (60 Gy/1.8- to 2.0-Gy fractions) and daily oral temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) at all irradiation days (30-33 doses), while recurrent tumors were treated with 45-60 Gy and temozolomide. Initially, 6/81 patients had daily temozolomide doses of 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: in total, 70/81 patients (86%) completed both radio- and chemotherapy. Grade 1 nausea/vomiting was seen in 28%, grade 2 in 11%, grade 3 in 1%. Antiemetics were applied in 41%. Hematologic toxicities were observed as follows: leukopenia grade 3/4 1%, lymphopenia grade 3/4 46%, thrombopenia grade 3/4 1%. Two patients under dexamethasone suffered herpes encephalitis after one and 16 doses of temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}). Median survival was 15 months for glioblastoma. In oligodendroglioma patients, a 4-year survival rate of 78% was observed. Conclusion: postoperative radiochemotherapy with 30-33 daily doses of temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) is safe in patients with malignant glioma. The combined schedule is effective in oligodendroglioma patients and may prolong survival in glioblastoma. Effort should be taken to minimize corticosteroid doses, since both steroids and temozolomide lead to immunosuppression. (orig.)

  6. Glioblastoma Multiforme and Lipid Nanocapsules: A Review.

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    Aparicio-Blanco, Juan; Torres-Suárez, Ana-Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiological data on central nervous system disorders call for a focus on the major hindrance to brain drug delivery, blood-central nervous system barriers. Otherwise, there is little chance of improving the short-term survival of patients with diseases such as glioblastoma multiforme, which is one of the brain disorders associated with many years of life lost. Targetable nanocarriers for treating malignant gliomas are a unique way to overcome low chemotherapeutic levels at target sites devoid of systemic toxicity. This review describes the currently available targetable nanocarriers, focusing particularly on one of the newest nanocarriers, lipid nanocapsules. All of the strategies that are likely to be exploited by lipid nanocapsules to bypass blood-central nervous system barriers, including the most recent targeting approaches (mesenchymal cells), and novel administration routes (convection enhanced delivery) are discussed, together with their most remarkable achievements in glioma-implanted animal models. Although these systems are promising, much research remains to be done in this field.

  7. Lagrangian multiforms and multidimensional consistency

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    Lobb, Sarah; Nijhoff, Frank [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-30

    We show that well-chosen Lagrangians for a class of two-dimensional integrable lattice equations obey a closure relation when embedded in a higher dimensional lattice. On the basis of this property we formulate a Lagrangian description for such systems in terms of Lagrangian multiforms. We discuss the connection of this formalism with the notion of multidimensional consistency, and the role of the lattice from the point of view of the relevant variational principle.

  8. The efficacy of Pistacia Terebinthus soap in the treatment of cetuximab-induced skin toxicity.

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    Tastekin, Didem; Tambas, Makbule; Kilic, Kemal; Erturk, Kayhan; Arslan, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    This open-labeled phase II, efficacy-finding study evaluated the efficiency and safety of Pistacia terebinthus soap in metastatic colorectal cancer patients who developed cetuximab induced skin toxicity. Patients who received cetuximab plus chemotherapy and developed Grade 2 or 3 skin toxicity were treated twice daily with a soap made of oil extracted from Pistacia terebinthus. During treatment, no topical or oral antibiotics, corticosteroids or other moisturizers were used. Patients were examined 1 week later and their photographs were taken. Fifteen mCRC patients who developed skin toxicity while receiving first-line CTX in combination with chemotherapy were included into the study. Eight patients were male and the median age was 58 (25-70). Sixty percent of the patients (n:9) had Grade 3 skin toxicity. Complete response rates in patients with Grade 2 and Grade 3 skin toxicities were 100 and 33%, respectively. In the remaining patients with Grade 3 toxicity the skin toxicity regressed to Grade 1. The objective response rate was 100%, and no delay, dose reduction or discontinuation of CTX treatment due to skin toxicity was necessary. Skin toxicity reoccurred in all patients when patients stopped administering the soap and therefore they used it throughout the cetuximab treatment. Pistacia terebinthus soap seemed to be used safely and effectively in the treatment of skin toxicity induced by Cetuximab.

  9. Encapsulation of temozolomide in a tumor-targeting nanocomplex enhances anti-cancer efficacy and reduces toxicity in a mouse model of glioblastoma.

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    Kim, Sang-Soo; Rait, Antonina; Kim, Eric; DeMarco, James; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Chang, Esther H

    2015-12-01

    Although temozolomide (TMZ) is the current first-line chemotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), most patients either do not respond or ultimately fail TMZ treatment. Both intrinsic tumor resistance and limited access of TMZ to brain tumors as a result of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) contribute to poor response and ultimately to poor prognosis for GBM patients. We have developed a "dual-targeting" nanomedicine that both actively crosses the BBB and actively targets cancer cells once in the brain parenchyma. This nanomedicine (termed scL-TMZ) is sized ~40 nm and comprised of a cationic liposome (DOTAP:DOPE) encapsulating TMZ. The surface of liposome is decorated with anti-transferrin receptor single-chain antibody fragments to facilitate the crossing of the BBB by the scL-TMZ in addition to targeting GBM in the brain. This novel formulation was found to be markedly more effective than standard TMZ in both TMZ-resistant and TMZ-sensitive GBM. Encapsulation of TMZ also markedly enhanced its efficacy in killing a variety of non-GBM tumor cells. The scL-TMZ nanocomplex was shown to target cancer stem cells, which have been linked to both drug resistance and recurrence in GBM. Most significantly, systemically administered scL-TMZ significantly prolonged survival in mice bearing intracranial GBM tumors. The improved efficacy of scL-TMZ compared to standard TMZ was accompanied by reduced toxicity, so we conclude that the scL-TMZ nanomedicine holds great promise as a more effective therapy for GBM and other tumor types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prospective study evaluating the radiosensitizing effect of reduced doses of temozolomide in the treatment of Egyptian patients with glioblastoma multiforme

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    Gaber M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available May Gaber, Hanan Selim, Tamer El-NahasDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Cairo University, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: In view of the documented toxicity of continuous daily radiosensitizer doses of temozolomide concomitant with radiation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, we aimed to compare it with a different schedule of abbreviated radiosensitizer dosing.Patients and methods: This was a randomized prospective study comparing toxicity and survival in 60 Egyptian patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Patients in arm I received temozolomide at a dose of 75 mg/m2 daily with radiotherapy for 42 days, starting 4 weeks after surgery and reaching to a total radiation dose of 60 Gy/30 Fractions/6 weeks, while patients in arm II received temozolomide at a dose of 75 mg/m2 concomitantly with the same radiotherapy schedule daily in the first and last weeks of the same radiotherapy program.Results: Common grade 1–2 adverse events were malaise in 28 patients (46.7%, followed by alopecia (40% and nausea (26.7%. Grade 3–4 convulsion and decreased level of consciousness was seen in only four patients who were all from arm I. The median progression-free survival (PFS for the entire study population was 10.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.3–14, and PFS at 12 months was 32%. The median PFS in arm I was 8.8 months (95% CI 5.9–11.7 and in arm II 11.5 months (95% CI 8.9–14.2, and PFS at 12 months for both arms was 32% and 30% respectively (P=0.571. The median overall survival (OS of the whole group of patients was 14.2 months (95% CI 13–15.5, and OS was 70% at 12 months and 25% at 18 months. The median OS for patients in arm I was 12.3 months (95% CI 7.7–16.9, whereas in arm II it was 14.3 months (95% CI 14–14.7 (P=0.83.Conclusion: Reduced radiosensitizer dosing of temozolomide concomitant with radiotherapy in glioblastoma multiforme exhibited comparable efficacy with a classic continuous daily schedule, though with better tolerability

  11. Efficacy and toxicity of iodine disinfection of Atlantic salmon eggs

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    Chalupnicki, M.A.; Ketola, H.G.; Starliper, C.E.; Gallagher, D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent interest in the restoration of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in the Great Lakes has given rise to new culture techniques and management programs designed to reduce pathogen transmission while stabilizing and enhancing wild populations. We examined the toxicity of iodine to Atlantic salmon eggs and its effectiveness as a disinfectant against bacteria on egg surfaces. We spawned and fertilized eight gravid Atlantic salmon from Cayuga Lake, New York, and exposed their eggs to 10 concentrations of iodine (5, 10, 50, 75, 100, 500, 750, 1,000, 5,000, and 7,500 mg/L) for 30 min during water hardening. An additional subsample of unfertilized eggs was also exposed to some of the same concentrations of iodine (5, 10, 50, 75, and 100 mg/L) to determine the efficiency of disinfection. Viable eggs were only obtained from four females. Survival of eggs to the eyed stage and hatch tended to be reduced at iodine concentrations of 50 and 75 mg/L and was significantly reduced at concentrations of 100 mg/L iodine or more. We calculated the concentrations of iodine that killed 50% of the Atlantic salmon eggs at eye-up and hatch to be 175 and 85 mg/L, respectively. Aeromonas veronii, A. schubertii, A. hydrophila, A. caviae, Plesiomonas shiggeloides, and Citrobacter spp. were the predominant bacteria present on the surface of green eggs and were significantly reduced by an iodine immersion. The use of iodine as a disinfectant on Atlantic salmon eggs was effective at low concentrations (50–75 mg/L), for which toxicity to Atlantic salmon was minimal.

  12. Toxicity and efficacy of lomustine and bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma patients

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    Jakobsen, J N; Urup, T; Grunnet, K

    2018-01-01

    The combination of lomustine and bevacizumab is a commonly used salvage treatment for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We investigated the toxicity and efficacy of lomustine plus bevacizumab (lom-bev) in a community-based patient cohort and made a comparison to another frequently used combination...... therapy consisting of irinotecan plus bevacizumab (iri-bev). Seventy patients with recurrent GBM were treated with lomustine 90 mg/m2 every 6 weeks and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Toxicity was registered and compared to the toxicity observed in 219 recurrent GBM patients who had previously been......-bev is a well-tolerated treatment for recurrent GBM, although hematological toxicity may be a dose limiting factor. No significant differences between lom-bev and iri-bev were observed with regard to PFS or OS. The differences in toxicity profiles between lom-bev and iri-bev could guide treatment decision...

  13. Genetic tests for predicting the toxicity and efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy.

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    Mladosievicova, B; Carter, A; Kristova, V

    2007-01-01

    The standard anticancer therapy based "on one size fits all" modality has been determined to be ineffective or to be the cause of adverse drug reactions in many oncologic patients. Most pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic studies so far have been focused on toxicity of anticancer drugs such as 6-mercaptopurine, thioguanine, irinotecan, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Variation in genes are known to influence not only toxicity, but also efficacy of chemotherapeutics such as platinum analogues, 5-FU and irinotecan. The majority of current pharmacogenetic studies focus on single enzyme deficiencies as predictors of drug effects; however effects of most anticancer drugs are determined by the interplay of several gene products. These effects are polygenic in nature. This review briefly describes genetic variations that may impact efficacy and toxicity of drugs used in cancer chemotherapy.

  14. Radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: Long-term efficacy and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erridge, Sara C.; Conkey, David S.; Stockton, Diane; Strachan, Mark W.J.; Statham, Patrick F.X.; Whittle, Ian R.; Grant, Robin; Kerr, Gillian R.; Gregor, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas is an effective treatment but remains controversial due to toxicity concerns. Materials and methods: A retrospective audit of patients referred for radiotherapy during 1974-2003 was conducted, the case records were examined and data linkage to cancer registry and hospital discharge records was performed to assess the overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and late effects (hormone deficiency, reduced vision, second cancer and stroke). Results: Three hundred and eighty-five patients had radiotherapy (median 45 Gy). The OS was 74% and 49%, PFS was 97% and 96%, at 10 and 20 years, respectively. No specific factors influenced local control. Additional hormone deficiencies occurred in 19% (ACTH) and 26% (TSH). Actuarial rate optic neuropathy at 10 years was 0.8%. Seventy-eight patients had a stroke, a RR for a matched Scottish population of 1.45 (CI 1.05-1.18, p = 0.03) men and 2.22 (1.56-3.08, p < 0.01) women. Four intra-cranial tumours were identified; 20-year actuarial risk 1.9% (CI 0-2.6%), a RR of 5.65 (0.53-20.77, p = 0.10) men and 9.94 (0.94-36.56, p = 0.04) women. Conclusions: This treatment is effective with good local control rates at 20 years. A significant proportion developed hypo-pituitarism. The risk of optic neuropathy was low but risk of stroke increased, particularly in women who had slight increased risk of intra-cranial tumours.

  15. A study of concurrent radiochemotherapy with paclitaxel in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julka, P.K.; Awasthy, B.S.; Rath, G.K.; Agarwal, S.; Varna, T.; Mahapatra, A.K.; Singh, R.

    2000-01-01

    Despite advances in neurosurgery and radiotherapy, the prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme remains poor. Reports in the literature about the radiosensitizing properties of paclitaxel stimulated the authors to conduct a study using paclitaxel concurrently with radiation in a group of 18 patients who had residual disease postoperatively. Paclitaxel was delivered weekly as an intravenous infusion in a dose of 60 mg/m 2 along with radiation to the primary lesion. A total of 108 cycles of paclitaxel was given. All the patients tolerated the treatment well. The main side effects were haematological, and neuropathy which was self-limiting. The overall 1-year survival rate was 70%, with 12 patients alive at 13 months. The median survival has not yet been reached although it is more than 13 months. Thus, paclitaxel can be safely delivered concomitantly with radiation in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Larger, randomized trials are required to establish the comparative efficacy of paclitaxel as a radiosensitizer in glioblastoma multiforme. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Efficacy and toxicity of self-polishing biocide-free antifouling paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeschau, Margit; Kraetke, Renate

    2005-01-01

    The ban on harmful substances in antifouling paints requires the development of new antifouling strategies. Alternatives should be as effective as conventional paints but of lower toxicity. In the present study two commercially available, self-polishing antifouling paints were examined in order to get information on their antifouling properties and toxicological potential. Efficacy was shown in settlement assays with the marine barnacle species Balanus amphitrite, however, efficacy was related to toxic effects observed on target and non-target organisms. Toxicity of the paint extracts was concentration-dependent and differed according to the paint and the species investigated. Toxicity could at least partially be attributed to zinc leached from the paints. Effects of a water-soluble paint were more pronounced in larvae of B. amphitrite, Artemia salina and in the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta. Embryos of the freshwater species Danio rerio and Vibrio fisheri were more affected by a paint based on organic solvents. - For alternative antifouling paints efficacy as well as adverse effects on non-target organisms and the aquatic environment should be carefully assessed

  17. TSPO Imaging in Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Jensen, Per; Feng, Ling; Law, Ian

    2015-01-01

    -CLINDE is superior to (18)F-FET in predicting progression of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at follow-up. METHODS: Three patients with World Health Organization grade IV GBM were scanned with (123)I-CLINDE SPECT, (18)F-FET PET, and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Molecular imaging data were compared with follow......-CLINDE (15%-30%). In contrast, VOIs of increased contrast enhancement at follow-up compared with baseline overlapped to a greater extent with baseline (123)I-CLINDE VOIs than (18)F-FET VOIs (21% vs. 8% and 72% vs. 55%). CONCLUSION: Our preliminary results suggest that TSPO brain imaging in GBM may...... be a useful tool for predicting tumor progression at follow-up and may be less susceptible to changes in blood-brain barrier permeability than (18)F-FET. Larger studies are warranted to test the clinical potential of TSPO imaging in GBM, including presurgical planning and radiotherapy....

  18. Relative oral efficacy and acute toxicity of hydroxypyridin-4-one iron chelators in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.B.; Morgan, J.; Hoyes, K.P.; Burke, L.C.; Huehns, E.R.; Hider, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the oral efficacy and the acute toxicity of hydroxypyridin-4-one iron chelators has been investigated to clarify structure-function relationships of these compounds in vivo and to identify compounds with the maximum therapeutic safety margin. By comparing 59Fe excretion following oral or intraperitoneal administration of increasing doses of each chelator to iron-overloaded mice, the most effective compounds have been identified. These have partition coefficients (Kpart) above 0.3 in the iron-free form with a trend of increasing oral efficacy with increasing Kpart values (r = .6). However, this is achieved at a cost of increasing acute toxicity, as shown by a linear correlation between 59Fe excretion increase per unit dose and 1/LD50 (r = .83). A sharp increase in the LD50 values is observed for compounds with Kpart values above 1.0, suggesting that such compounds are unlikely to possess a sufficient therapeutic safety margin. Below a Kpart of 1.0, acute toxicity is relatively independent of lipid solubility. All the compounds are less toxic by the oral route than by the intraperitoneal route, although iron excretion is not significantly different by these two routes. At least five compounds (CP51, CP94, CP93, CP96, and CP21) are more effective orally than the same dose of intraperitoneal desferrioxamine (DFO) (P less than or equal to .02) or orally administered L1(CP20) (P less than or equal to .02)

  19. Erythema multiforme associated with gemfibrozil monotherapy.

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    Yaçsar, Hamiyet Yilmaz; Ertuğrul, Ozden; Deniz, Coçskun

    2010-01-01

    A case of erythema multiforme associated with gemfibrozil monotherapy. A 46-year-old man with hyperlipidemia was treated with 600 mg gemfibrozil twice a day. On the fifth day of treatment, skin lesions consistent with erythema multiforme appeared. With the discontinuation of the treatment and start of a topical steroid treatment, the lesions recovered after 4 weeks. After 6 months, when gemfibrozil therapy was restarted, lesions reappeared on the fourth day of therapy. Lesions recovered again following the previous treatment strategies after 4 weeks. An objective casualty assessment suggests that erythema multiforme was probably related to gemfibrozil monotherapy. Patients starting gemfibrozil therapy should be warned about the occurrence of erythema multiforme in addition to previous reported and established side effects.

  20. Efficacy and Toxicity of Intrathecal Liposomal Cytarabine in First-line Therapy of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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    Levinsen, Mette; Harila-Saari, Arja; Grell, Kathrine

    2016-01-01

    We investigated efficacy and toxicity of replacing conventional triple (cytarabine, methotrexate, and hydrocortisone) intrathecal therapy (TIT) with liposomal cytarabine during maintenance therapy among 40 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Twenty-eight of 29 patients in the TIT arm received...

  1. Correlation between paclitaxel Tc > 0.05 and its therapeutic efficacy and severe toxicities in ovarian cancer patients

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    Shuyao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicated that the PTX Tc > 0.05 correlated with therapeutic efficacy and drug toxicity. Therefore, monitoring the PTX Tc > 0.05 other than blood concentration of PTX is necessary to optimize individual treatment.

  2. Comparative toxicity and efficacy of engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants with broad anti-tumor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Diane E.; Hoover, Benjamin; Cloud, Loretta Grey; Liu, Shihui; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously designed and characterized versions of anthrax lethal toxin that are selectively cytotoxic in the tumor microenvironment and which display broad and potent anti-tumor activities in vivo. Here, we have performed the first direct comparison of the safety and efficacy of three engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants requiring activation by either matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or co-localized MMP/uPA activities. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with six doses of engineered toxins via intraperitoneal (I.P.) or intravenous (I.V.) dose routes to determine the maximum tolerated dose for six administrations (MTD6) and dose-limiting toxicities. Efficacy was evaluated using the B16-BL6 syngraft model of melanoma; mice bearing established tumors were treated with six I.P. doses of toxin and tumor measurements and immunohistochemistry, paired with terminal blood work, were used to elaborate upon the anti-tumor mechanism and relative efficacy of each variant. We found that MMP-, uPA- and dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxins exhibited the same dose-limiting toxicity; dose-dependent GI toxicity. In terms of efficacy, all three toxins significantly reduced primary B16-BL6 tumor burden, ranging from 32% to 87% reduction, and they also delayed disease progression as evidenced by dose-dependent normalization of blood work values. While target organ toxicity and effective doses were similar amongst the variants, the dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin exhibited the highest I.P. MTD6 and was 1.5–3-fold better tolerated than the single MMP- and uPA-activated toxins. Overall, we demonstrate that this dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin can be administered safely and is highly effective in a preclinical model of melanoma. This modified bacterial cytotoxin is thus a promising candidate for further clinical development and evaluation for use in treating human cancers. - Highlights: • Toxicity and anti

  3. Comparative toxicity and efficacy of engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants with broad anti-tumor activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Diane E. [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Program of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Hoover, Benjamin [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cloud, Loretta Grey [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Liu, Shihui [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Molinolo, Alfredo A. [Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Leppla, Stephen H. [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bugge, Thomas H., E-mail: thomas.bugge@nih.go [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We have previously designed and characterized versions of anthrax lethal toxin that are selectively cytotoxic in the tumor microenvironment and which display broad and potent anti-tumor activities in vivo. Here, we have performed the first direct comparison of the safety and efficacy of three engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants requiring activation by either matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or co-localized MMP/uPA activities. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with six doses of engineered toxins via intraperitoneal (I.P.) or intravenous (I.V.) dose routes to determine the maximum tolerated dose for six administrations (MTD6) and dose-limiting toxicities. Efficacy was evaluated using the B16-BL6 syngraft model of melanoma; mice bearing established tumors were treated with six I.P. doses of toxin and tumor measurements and immunohistochemistry, paired with terminal blood work, were used to elaborate upon the anti-tumor mechanism and relative efficacy of each variant. We found that MMP-, uPA- and dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxins exhibited the same dose-limiting toxicity; dose-dependent GI toxicity. In terms of efficacy, all three toxins significantly reduced primary B16-BL6 tumor burden, ranging from 32% to 87% reduction, and they also delayed disease progression as evidenced by dose-dependent normalization of blood work values. While target organ toxicity and effective doses were similar amongst the variants, the dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin exhibited the highest I.P. MTD6 and was 1.5–3-fold better tolerated than the single MMP- and uPA-activated toxins. Overall, we demonstrate that this dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin can be administered safely and is highly effective in a preclinical model of melanoma. This modified bacterial cytotoxin is thus a promising candidate for further clinical development and evaluation for use in treating human cancers. - Highlights: • Toxicity and anti

  4. Efficacy and toxicity of (chemo)radiotherapy for primary subglottic cancer

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    Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Odagiri, K.; Minagawa, Y.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Taguchi, T.; Nishimura, G.; Takahashi, M.; Komatsu, M.; Sano, D. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology

    2013-01-15

    Background and purpose: Primary subglottic cancer is a rare malignancy. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy for subglottic cancer. Patients and methods: Nineteen patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis received radiotherapy, 14 of whom also underwent chemotherapy. Of the 19 patients, 15 received definitive radiotherapy to the gross tumors with total doses of 70-70.2 Gy in 35-39 fractions, and 4 underwent preoperative radiotherapy with total doses of 37.8-55.8 Gy in 21-31 fractions, followed by total laryngectomy. Results: Of the 19 patients, 5 developed local progression and 2 developed distant metastasis at the median follow-up period of 5 years. The 5-year local control and disease-free rates were 74 and 63%, respectively. Three patients died of tumor progression, and the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 80 and 63%, respectively. Regarding acute toxicities, transient mucositis and dermatitis of grade 3 or lower were observed in all patients, but there were no late toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis. The use of chemotherapy together with radiotherapy may enhance treatment efficacy and contribute to larynx preservation through good local control. (orig.)

  5. Decontamination Efficacy and Skin Toxicity of Two Decontaminants against Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad W Stratilo

    Full Text Available Decontamination of bacterial endospores such as Bacillus anthracis has traditionally required the use of harsh or caustic chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a chlorine dioxide decontaminant in killing Bacillus anthracis spores in solution and on a human skin simulant (porcine cadaver skin, compared to that of commonly used sodium hypochlorite or soapy water decontamination procedures. In addition, the relative toxicities of these decontaminants were compared in human skin keratinocyte primary cultures. The chlorine dioxide decontaminant was similarly effective to sodium hypochlorite in reducing spore numbers of Bacillus anthracis Ames in liquid suspension after a 10 minute exposure. After five minutes, the chlorine dioxide product was significantly more efficacious. Decontamination of isolated swine skin contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Sterne with the chlorine dioxide product resulted in no viable spores sampled. The toxicity of the chlorine dioxide decontaminant was up to two orders of magnitude less than that of sodium hypochlorite in human skin keratinocyte cultures. In summary, the chlorine dioxide based decontaminant efficiently killed Bacillus anthracis spores in liquid suspension, as well as on isolated swine skin, and was less toxic than sodium hypochlorite in cultures of human skin keratinocytes.

  6. Comparative toxicity and efficacy of engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants with broad anti-tumor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Diane E; Hoover, Benjamin; Cloud, Loretta Grey; Liu, Shihui; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Leppla, Stephen H; Bugge, Thomas H

    2014-09-01

    We have previously designed and characterized versions of anthrax lethal toxin that are selectively cytotoxic in the tumor microenvironment and which display broad and potent anti-tumor activities in vivo. Here, we have performed the first direct comparison of the safety and efficacy of three engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants requiring activation by either matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or co-localized MMP/uPA activities. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with six doses of engineered toxins via intraperitoneal (I.P.) or intravenous (I.V.) dose routes to determine the maximum tolerated dose for six administrations (MTD6) and dose-limiting toxicities. Efficacy was evaluated using the B16-BL6 syngraft model of melanoma; mice bearing established tumors were treated with six I.P. doses of toxin and tumor measurements and immunohistochemistry, paired with terminal blood work, were used to elaborate upon the anti-tumor mechanism and relative efficacy of each variant. We found that MMP-, uPA- and dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxins exhibited the same dose-limiting toxicity; dose-dependent GI toxicity. In terms of efficacy, all three toxins significantly reduced primary B16-BL6 tumor burden, ranging from 32% to 87% reduction, and they also delayed disease progression as evidenced by dose-dependent normalization of blood work values. While target organ toxicity and effective doses were similar amongst the variants, the dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin exhibited the highest I.P. MTD6 and was 1.5-3-fold better tolerated than the single MMP- and uPA-activated toxins. Overall, we demonstrate that this dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin can be administered safely and is highly effective in a preclinical model of melanoma. This modified bacterial cytotoxin is thus a promising candidate for further clinical development and evaluation for use in treating human cancers. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The PEP-3-KLH (CDX-110) vaccine in glioblastoma multiforme patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimberger, Amy B.; Sampson, John H

    2009-01-01

    Conventional therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) fail to target tumor cells exclusively resulting in non-specific toxicity. Immune targeting of tumor-specific mutations may allow for more precise eradication of neoplastic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a tumor-specific mutation that is widely expressed on GBM and other neoplasms and its expression enhances tumorigenicity. This in-frame deletion mutation splits a codon resulting in a novel glycine at the fusion junction producing a tumor-specific epitope target for cellular or humoral immunotherapy. We have previously shown that vaccination with a peptide that spans the EGFRvIII fusion junction (PEPvIII-KLH/CDX-110) is an efficacious immunotherapy in syngeneic murine models. In this review, we summarize our results in GBM patients targeting this mutation in multiple, multi-institutional Phase II immunotherapy trials. These trials demonstrated that a selected population of GBM patients who received the vaccines targeting EGFRvIII had an unexpectedly long survival time. Further therapeutic strategies and potential pitfalls using this approach are discussed. PMID:19591631

  8. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy with or without carbogen and nicotinamide in inoperable biopsy-proven glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Jean-Marc; Noeel, Georges; Chiras, Jacques; Khe, H.-X.; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Baillet, Francois; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Background: Nicotinamide and carbogen have been shown to enhance the radiation effect in tumour models. Purpose: Prospective evaluation of the toxicity and efficacy of carbogen and nicotinamide with external beam radiotherapy in the management of inoperable glioblastoma. Patients and methods: From April 1995 to December 1997, 33 patients with inoperable biopsy-proven glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were enrolled in a phase II trial, to undergo radiotherapy (59.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy/fraction), intra-arterial cerebral chemotherapy (ACNU 100 mg/m 2 , three cycles), carbogen breathing (15 l/min), and nicotinamide (85 mg/kg). This experimental group was compared to a control group of 38 patients with inoperable GBM treated with radiotherapy and three cycles of nitrosourea-based chemotherapy from January 1990 to March 1995, in our institution. Results: In the experimental group, carbogen breathing was well tolerated, but only 51.5% of patients completed daily nicotinamide over the 6.5-week treatment period. Nausea and vomiting were the most frequent side effects of nicotinamide. No significant difference in overall survival was observed among the two treatment groups: median survival times were 36.7 and 35.3 weeks for patients treated with carbogen and nicotinamide, and for those treated in the control group, respectively. Conclusion: The association of carbogen and nicotinamide with radiotherapy is feasible, but tolerable only in 51.5% of patients with GBM. Carbogen and nicotinamide did not appear to modify the evolution of glioblastoma

  9. Chronomodulation of topotecan or X-radiation treatment increases treatment efficacy without enhancing acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, Dana; Proulx, Denise; Saoudi, A.; Ng, Cheng E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Topotecan (TPT), a camptothecin analog, is currently used to treat human ovarian and small-cell lung cancer and is in clinical trials for other tumor sites. However, it is unknown whether chronomodulation of TPT treatment is beneficial. We examined the effects of administering TPT or X-radiation (XR) alone at different times of the day or night. Methods: We treated mice bearing human colorectal tumor xenografts at four different times representing the early rest period (9 AM or 3 HALO [hours after light onset]), late rest period (3 PM or 9 HALO), early active period (9 PM or 15 HALO), and late active period (3 AM or 21 HALO) of the mice. We gave either TPT (12 mg/kg, injected i.p.) or XR (4 Gy, directed to the tumor) twice weekly on Days 0, 4, 7, 10 within 2 weeks. Results: Treatment with either TPT or XR at 3 AM demonstrated the greatest efficacy (measured by a tumor regrowth assay) without significantly increasing acute toxicity (assessed by a decrease in leukocyte counts or body weight). Conversely, treatment at 3 PM, in particular, showed increased toxicity without any enhanced efficacy. Conclusions: Our study provided the first evidence that chronomodulation of TPT treatments, consistent with the findings of other camptothecin analogs, is potentially clinically beneficial. Additionally, our findings suggest that chronomodulation of fractionated XR treatments is also potentially clinically beneficial

  10. Chronomodulation of topotecan or X-radiation treatment increases treatment efficacy without enhancing acute toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Dana; Proulx, Denise; Saoudi, A; Ng, Cheng E

    2005-05-01

    Topotecan (TPT), a camptothecin analog, is currently used to treat human ovarian and small-cell lung cancer and is in clinical trials for other tumor sites. However, it is unknown whether chronomodulation of TPT treatment is beneficial. We examined the effects of administering TPT or X-radiation (XR) alone at different times of the day or night. We treated mice bearing human colorectal tumor xenografts at four different times representing the early rest period (9 am or 3 HALO [hours after light onset]), late rest period (3 pm or 9 HALO), early active period (9 pm or 15 HALO), and late active period (3 am or 21 HALO) of the mice. We gave either TPT (12 mg/kg, injected i.p.) or XR (4 Gy, directed to the tumor) twice weekly on Days 0, 4, 7, 10 within 2 weeks. Treatment with either TPT or XR at 3 am demonstrated the greatest efficacy (measured by a tumor regrowth assay) without significantly increasing acute toxicity (assessed by a decrease in leukocyte counts or body weight). Conversely, treatment at 3 pm, in particular, showed increased toxicity without any enhanced efficacy. Our study provided the first evidence that chronomodulation of TPT treatments, consistent with the findings of other camptothecin analogs, is potentially clinically beneficial. Additionally, our findings suggest that chronomodulation of fractionated XR treatments is also potentially clinically beneficial.

  11. Second-line chemotherapy with dacarbazine and fotemustine in nitrosourea-pretreated patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeny-Dörner, Barbara; Veitl, Mario; Wenzel, Catharina; Piribauer, Maria; Rössler, Karl; Dieckmann, Karin; Ungersböck, Karl; Marosi, Christine

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of a combination of dacarbazine (D) and fotemustine (F) administered to a homogenous group of patients with recurrent or progressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Thirty-one patients with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan evidence of recurrent or progressive GBM after first-line chemotherapy with nitrosoureas as well as radiation therapy were given a combination of D (200 mg/m2) and F (100 mg/m2). At 30 min after termination of D administration, F was given over 60 min. Treatment was performed in an outpatient setting every 21 days. A total of 140 cycles (range 1-12 cycles; median 4 cycles) was administered. One partial response (3%) lasting for 11 weeks was observed. Sixteen (52%) patients reached stable disease lasting between 7 and 94 weeks. Median survival from start of the D/F combination was 45 (range 10-150) weeks. Median time to progression was 17 (3-101) weeks for all patients. Major toxicity was myelosuppression resulting in exclusion from study in seven (23%) patients [due to thrombocytopenia common toxicity criteria (CTC) grade 2 persisting longer than 3 weeks in three patients, due to thrombocytopenia CTC grade >/=3 in three and due to leukopenia CTC grade 3 in one patient]. No other toxicity than alopecia occurred. We conclude that the D/F combination is a well-tolerated second-line regimen and can be administered in a complete outpatient setting. D/F shows efficacy even in nitrosourea-pretreated patients and justifies further investigation.

  12. Efficacy and toxicity profile of carfilzomib based regimens for treatment of multiple myeloma: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Adeela; Kapoor, Vikas; Latif, Azka; Iftikhar, Ahmad; Zahid, Umar; McBride, Ali; Abraham, Ivo; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Anwer, Faiz

    2018-05-01

    Standard induction therapy for multiple myeloma is three-drug combination based on following classes of drugs: proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulators and steroids. Despite its notable efficacy, bortezomib has side effects like peripheral neuropathy (PNP) with reported incidence of grade ≥3 PNP between 2%-23% Schlafer et al., 2017. Carfilzomib (CFZ) has high selectivity and minimal off-target adverse effects including lower rates of PNP. CFZ is already approved for treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) as single agent as well as in combination with lenalidomide and/or dexamethasone. Extensive literature search identified a total of 1839 articles. Twenty-six articles (n = 5980) met the inclusion criteria, 15 in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) and 11 in RRMM group. CFZ demonstrates comparable or even better efficacy to bortezomib with much favorable AE profile. Deep, rapid and sustainable response using KRd with safer toxicity profile supports extension of KRd therapy to frontline therapy for all risk categories of MM. High incidence of grade ≥3 HTN underscores the importance of serial BP monitoring. In RRMM, CFZ has documented efficacy with standard 20-27mg/m2 dose. Further large-scale trials are needed to study benefit-to-risk profile of 20-56 and 20-70 mg/m2 dose of CFZ vs standard 20-27 mg/m2 dose in NDMM and RRMM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical and Plant-Based Insect Repellents: Efficacy, Safety, and Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2016-03-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases today are arthropod-borne and cannot be prevented by vaccinations. Because insect repellents offer important topical barriers of personal protection from arthropod-borne infectious diseases, the main objectives of this article were to describe the growing threats to public health from emerging arthropod-borne infectious diseases, to define the differences between insect repellents and insecticides, and to compare the efficacies and toxicities of chemical and plant-derived insect repellents. Internet search engines were queried with key words to identify scientific articles on the efficacy, safety, and toxicity of chemical and plant-derived topical insect repellants and insecticides to meet these objectives. Data sources reviewed included case reports; case series; observational, longitudinal, and surveillance studies; and entomological and toxicological studies. Descriptive analysis of the data sources identified the most effective application of insect repellents as a combination of topical chemical repellents, either N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (formerly N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide, or DEET) or picaridin, and permethrin-impregnated or other pyrethroid-impregnated clothing over topically treated skin. The insecticide-treated clothing would provide contact-level insecticidal effects and provide better, longer lasting protection against malaria-transmitting mosquitoes and ticks than topical DEET or picaridin alone. In special cases, where environmental exposures to disease-transmitting ticks, biting midges, sandflies, or blackflies are anticipated, topical insect repellents containing IR3535, picaridin, or oil of lemon eucalyptus (p-menthane-3, 8-diol or PMD) would offer better topical protection than topical DEET alone. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimizing cancer radiotheraphy with 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Dose escalation studies in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Gupta, J.P. [Dharmshila Cancer Hospital, New Delhi (India); Banerji, A.K. [Vidyasagar Inst. of Mental Health and Neurosciences, New Delhi (India); Dwarakanath, B.S.; Tripathi, R.P.; Mathew, T.L.; Ravindranath, T. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India); Jain, V. [Wright State University, Dayton, OH (United States). Kettering Medical Center

    2005-08-01

    Background and purpose: Higher rates of glucose utilization and glycolysis generally correlate with poor prognosis in several types of malignant tumors. Own earlier studies on model systems demonstrated that the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) could enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy in a dose-dependent manner by selectively sensitizing cancer cells while protecting normal cells. Phase I/II clinical trials indicated that the combination of 2-DG, at an oral dose of 200 mg/kg body weight (BW), with large fractions of {gamma}-radiation was well tolerated in cerebral glioma patients. Since higher 2-DG doses are expected to improve the therapeutic gain, present studies were undertaken to examine the tolerance and safety of escalating 2-DG dose during combined treatment (2-DG + radiotherapy) in glioblastoma multiforme patients. Patients and methods: Untreated patients with histologically proven glioblastoma multiforme (WHO criteria) were included in the study. Seven weekly fractions of {sup 60}C {gamma}-rays (5 Gy/fraction) were delivered to the tumor volume (presurgical CT/MRI evaluation) plus 3 cm margin. Escalating 2-DG doses (200-250-300 mg/kg BW) were administered orally 30 min before irradiation after overnight fasting. Acute toxicity and tolerance were studied by monitoring the vital parameters and side effects. Late radiation damage and treatment responses were studied radiologically and clinically in surviving patients. Results: Transient side effects similar to hypoglycemia were observed in most of the patients. Tolerance and patient compliance to the combined treatment were very good up to a 2-DG dose of 250 mg/kg BW. However, at the higher dose of 300 mg/kg BW, two out of six patients were very restless and could not complete treatment, though significant changes in the vital parameters were not observed even at this dose. No significant damage to the normal brain tissue was observed during follow-up in seven out of ten patients who

  15. Glioblastoma multiforme after radiotherapy for acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piatt, J.H. Jr.; Blue, J.M.; Schold, S.C. Jr.; Burger, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    A case of glioblastoma multiforme that occurred 14 years after radiotherapy for acromegaly is presented. The striking correspondence between the anatomy of the tumor and the geometry of the radiation ports is suggestive of a causal relationship. Previously reported cases of radiation-associated glioma are reviewed, and a brief appraisal of the evidence for induction of these lesions by radiation is presented. The differentiation of radiation-associated neoplasms from radionecrosis is also discussed.

  16. Glioblastoma multiforme after radiotherapy for acromegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piatt, J.H. Jr.; Blue, J.M.; Schold, S.C. Jr.; Burger, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    A case of glioblastoma multiforme that occurred 14 years after radiotherapy for acromegaly is presented. The striking correspondence between the anatomy of the tumor and the geometry of the radiation ports is suggestive of a causal relationship. Previously reported cases of radiation-associated glioma are reviewed, and a brief appraisal of the evidence for induction of these lesions by radiation is presented. The differentiation of radiation-associated neoplasms from radionecrosis is also discussed

  17. Nanoparticle delivery of chemosensitizers improve chemotherapy efficacy without incurring additional toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Joseph M.; Sethi, Manish; Kowalczyk, Sonya; Wang, Edina; Tian, Xi; Nabeel Hyder, Sayed; Wagner, Kyle T.; Zhang, Ying-Ao; Kapadia, Chintan; Man Au, Kin; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2015-01-01

    Chemosensitizers can improve the therapeutic index of chemotherapy and overcome treatment resistance. Successful translation of chemosensitizers depends on the development of strategies that can preferentially deliver chemosensitizers to tumors while avoiding normal tissue. We hypothesized that nanoparticle (NP) formulation of chemosensitizers can improve their delivery to tumors which can in turn improve their therapeutic index. To demonstrate the proof of principle of this approach, we engineered NP formulations of two chemosensitizers, the PI3-kindase inhibitor wortmanin (Wtmn) and the PARP inhibitor olaparib. NP Wtmn and NP olaparib were evaluated as chemosensitizers using lung cancer cells and breast cancer cells respectively. We found Wtmn to be an efficient chemosensitizer in all tested lung-cancer cell lines reducing tumor cell growth between 20 and 60% compared to drug alone. NP formulation did not decrease its efficacy in vitro. Olaparib showed less consistent chemosensitization as a free drug or in NP formulation. NP Wtmn was further evaluated as a chemosensitizer using mouse models of lung cancer. We found that NP Wtmn is an effective chemosensitizer and more effective than free Wtmn showing a 32% reduction in tumor growth compared to free Wtmn when given with etoposide. Importantly, NP Wtmn was able to sensitize the multi-drug resistant H69AR cells to etoposide. Additionally, the combination of NP Wtmn and etoposide chemotherapy did not significantly increase toxicity. The present study demonstrates the proof of principle of using NP formulation of chemosensitizing drugs to improve the therapeutic index of chemotherapy.

  18. Human glioblastoma multiforme: p53 reactivation by a novel MDM2 inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Costa

    Full Text Available Cancer development and chemo-resistance are often due to impaired functioning of the p53 tumor suppressor through genetic mutation or sequestration by other proteins. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, p53 availability is frequently reduced because it binds to the Murine Double Minute-2 (MDM2 oncoprotein, which accumulates at high concentrations in tumor cells. The use of MDM2 inhibitors that interfere with the binding of p53 and MDM2 has become a valid approach to inhibit cell growth in a number of cancers; however little is known about the efficacy of these inhibitors in GBM. We report that a new small-molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with a spirooxoindolepyrrolidine core structure, named ISA27, effectively reactivated p53 function and inhibited human GBM cell growth in vitro by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In immunoincompetent BALB/c nude mice bearing a human GBM xenograft, the administration of ISA27 in vivo activated p53, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in tumor tissue. Significantly, ISA27 was non-toxic in an in vitro normal human cell model and an in vivo mouse model. ISA27 administration in combination with temozolomide (TMZ produced a synergistic inhibitory effect on GBM cell viability in vitro, suggesting the possibility of lowering the dose of TMZ used in the treatment of GBM. In conclusion, our data show that ISA27 releases the powerful antitumor capacities of p53 in GBM cells. The use of this MDM2 inhibitor could become a novel therapy for the treatment of GBM patients.

  19. Phase I/II Trial of Hyperfractionated Concomitant Boost Proton Radiotherapy for Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Igaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Takano, Shingo; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Hashii, Haruko; Kanemoto, Ayae; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Matsumura, Akira; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of postoperative hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy with nimustine hydrochloride for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial GBM met the following criteria: (1) a Karnofsky performance status of ≥60; (2) the diameter of the enhanced area before radiotherapy was ≤40 cm; and (3) the enhanced area did not extend to the brain stem, hypothalamus, or thalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T 2 -weighted high area (clinical tumor volume 3 [CTV3]) was treated by x-ray radiotherapy in the morning (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). More than 6 hours later, 250 MeV proton beams were delivered to the enhanced area plus a 10-mm margin (CTV2) in the first half of the protocol (23.1 GyE in 14 fractions) and to the enhanced volume (CTV1) in the latter half (23.1 GyE in 14 fraction). The total dose to the CTV1 was 96.6 GyE. Nimustine hydrochloride (80 mg/m2) was administered during the first and fourth weeks. Results: Acute toxicity was mainly hematologic and was controllable. Late radiation necrosis and leukoencephalopathy were each seen in one patient. The overall survival rates after 1 and 2 years were 71.1% and 45.3%, respectively. The median survival period was 21.6 months. The 1- and 2-year progression-free survival rates were 45.0% and 15.5%, respectively. The median MRI change-free survival was 11.2 months. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy (96.6 GyE in 56 fractions) for GBM was tolerable and beneficial if the target size was well considered. Further studies are warranted to pursue the possibility of controlling border region recurrences.

  20. Erythema multiforme due to contact with laurel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiadis, G I; Pfab, F; Klein, A; Braun-Falco, M; Ring, J; Ollert, M

    2007-08-01

    Erythema multiforme is a relatively common skin disorder. The best known cause is herpes simplex virus infection. We report the first case of erythema multiforme due to contact with laurel oil. The diagnosis was confirmed by the positive patch test to laurel oil, the histopathological studies of the lesions and the histopathological studies of the positive patch test to laurel oil.

  1. Toxicity and efficacy of carbon nanotubes and graphene: the utility of carbon-based nanoparticles in nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongbin; Petibone, Dayton; Xu, Yang; Mahmood, Meena; Karmakar, Alokita; Casciano, Dan; Ali, Syed; Biris, Alexandru S

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials have attracted great interest in biomedical applications such as advanced imaging, tissue regeneration, and drug or gene delivery. The toxicity of the carbon nanotubes and graphene remains a debated issue although many toxicological studies have been reported in the scientific community. In this review, we summarize the biological effects of carbon nanotubes and graphene in terms of in vitro and in vivo toxicity, genotoxicity and toxicokinetics. The dose, shape, surface chemistry, exposure route and purity play important roles in the metabolism of carbon-based nanomaterials resulting in differential toxicity. Careful examination of the physico-chemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials is considered a basic approach to correlate the toxicological response with the unique properties of the carbon nanomaterials. The reactive oxygen species-mediated toxic mechanism of carbon nanotubes has been extensively discussed and strategies, such as surface modification, have been proposed to reduce the toxicity of these materials. Carbon-based nanomaterials used in photothermal therapy, drug delivery and tissue regeneration are also discussed in this review. The toxicokinetics, toxicity and efficacy of carbon-based nanotubes and graphene still need to be investigated further to pave a way for biomedical applications and a better understanding of their potential applications to humans.

  2. Biological efficacy and toxic effect of emergency water disinfection process based on advanced oxidation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yiping; Yuan, Xiaoli; Xu, Shujing; Li, Rihong; Zhou, Xinying; Zhang, Zhitao

    2015-12-01

    An innovative and removable water treatment system consisted of strong electric field discharge and hydrodynamic cavitation based on advanced oxidation technologies was developed for reactive free radicals producing and waterborne pathogens eliminating in the present study. The biological efficacy and toxic effects of this advanced oxidation system were evaluated during water disinfection treatments. Bench tests were carried out with synthetic microbial-contaminated water, as well as source water in rainy season from a reservoir of Dalian city (Liaoning Province, China). Results showed that high inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli (>5 log) could be obtained for synthetic contaminated water at a low concentration (0.5-0.7 mg L(-1)) of total oxidants in 3-10 s. The numbers of wild total bacteria (108 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) and total coliforms (260 × 10(2) MPN 100 mL(-1)) in source water greatly reduced to 50 and 0 CFU mL(-1) respectively after treated by the advanced oxidation system, which meet the microbiological standards of drinking water, and especially that the inactivation efficiency of total coliforms could reach 100%. Meanwhile, source water qualities were greatly improved during the disinfection processes. The values of UV254 in particular were significantly reduced (60-80%) by reactive free radicals. Moreover, the concentrations of possible disinfection by-products (formaldehyde and bromide) in treated water were lower than detection limits, indicating that there was no harmful effect on water after the treatments. These investigations are helpful for the ecotoxicological studies of advanced oxidation system in the treatments of chemical polluted water or waste water. The findings of this work suggest that the developed water treatment system is ideal in the acute phases of emergencies, which also could offer additional advantages over a wide range of applications in water pollution control.

  3. Eritema multiforme mayor desencadenado por antimicrobianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo de Carvalho Raimundo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available El eritema multiforme, aparece como una enfermedad sistémica con la participación de la piel y las membranas mucosas en relación con varios factores como las infecciones bacterianas o virales, y en particular la administración de drogas, analgésicos y antibióticos en general. Se presenta un paciente masculino de 29 años de edad con eritema multiforme mayor desencadenado por antimicrobianos con la aparición de lesiones vesiculares-bulloso-ulcerosas en las regiones de los labios, encías, la lengua y la mucosa genital en tratamiento de una infección del tracto urinario con norfloxacino 400 mg por una semana. Fue realizado un tratamiento de soporte con el uso de colutorios para la higienización bucal y pomada a base de corticoide para protección de las úlceras, antihistamínicos y orientación nutricional de dieta líquida hipercalórica e hiperproteica. Este síndrome está caracterizado como un proceso eruptivo buloso agudo que compromete la calidad de vida del paciente y no hay pruebas de laboratorio específicas por lo que su diagnóstico debe estar basado en la revisión minuciosa de la anamnesis y en los hallazgos clínicos.

  4. Enhanced antitumor efficacy and reduced systemic toxicity of sulfatide-containing nanoliposomal doxorubicin in a xenograft model of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Lin

    Full Text Available Sulfatide is a glycosphingolipid known to interact with several extracellular matrix proteins, such as tenascin-C which is overexpressed in many types of cancer including that of the colon. In view of the limited success of chemotherapy in colorectal cancer and high toxicity of doxorubicin (DOX, a sulfatide-containing liposome (SCL encapsulation approach was taken to overcome these barriers. This study assessed the in vitro cytotoxicity, biodistribution, therapeutic efficacy and systemic toxicity in vivo of sulfatide-containing liposomal doxorubicin (SCL-DOX using human colonic adenocarcinoma HT-29 xenograft as the experimental model. In vitro, SCL-DOX was shown to be delivered into the nuclei and displayed prolonged retention compared with the free DOX. The use of this nanodrug delivery system to deliver DOX for treatment of tumor-bearing mice produced a much improved therapeutic efficacy in terms of tumor growth suppression and extended survival in contrast to the free drug. Furthermore, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with SCL-DOX resulted in a lower DOX uptake in the principal sites of toxicity of the free drug, namely the heart and skin, as well as reduced myelosuppression and diminished cardiotoxicity. Such natural lipid-guided nanodrug delivery systems may represent a new strategy for the development of effective anticancer chemotherapeutics targeting the tumor microenvironment for both primary tumor and micrometastases.

  5. miR-124 and miR-137 inhibit proliferation of glioblastoma multiforme cells and induce differentiation of brain tumor stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello Joseph F

    2008-06-01

    oligodendroglioma-derived stem cells and human glioblastoma multiforme-derived stem cells and induce glioblastoma multiforme cell cycle arrest. These results suggest that targeted delivery of microRNA-124 and/or microRNA-137 to glioblastoma multiforme tumor cells may be therapeutically efficacious for the treatment of this disease.

  6. Radiotherapy Results of Brain Astrocytoma and Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Doo Ho; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Chi, Je Geun

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 49 patients with astrocytoma of glioblastoma multiforme of brain who received postoperative radiotherapy in the period between February 1979 and December 1985. Fourteen patients had grade I astrocytoma, 11 patients grade II, 14 patients grade III, and 10 patients glioblastoma multiforme. Three year actuarial survival rates were 85.7%, 44.6% and 23.1% for grade I, II, and III astrocytomas, respectively. One and 2 year actuarial survival rates for patients with glioblastoma multiforme were 54.5% and 27.3%, respectively. Histologic grade, age, extent of operation and tumor location were revealed to be prognosticators

  7. Prospective evaluation of angiogenic, hypoxic and EGFR-related biomarkers in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme treated with cetuximab, bevacizumab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Broholm, Helle

    2010-01-01

    , hypoxia and mediators of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway were investigated. Tumor tissue was obtained from a previous phase II study, treating recurrent primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab in combination with bevacizumab and irinotecan...... of cetuximab. There is still an urgent need for one or more reliable and reproducible biomarkers able to predict the efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapy....

  8. Statin use and survival following glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Hallas, Jesper; Friis, Søren

    2014-01-01

    with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). METHODS: We identified 1562 patients diagnosed with GBM during 2000-2009 from the Danish Cancer Registry and linked this cohort to Danish nationwide demographic and health registries. Within the GBM cohort, each patient recorded as using statins prior to diagnosis (defined as ≥2......-cause death associated with prediagnostic statin use. RESULTS: A total of 339 GBM patients were included in the analyses. Of these, 325 died during median follow-up of 6.9 months (interquartile range: 3.8-13.4 months). Prediagnostic statin use was associated with a reduced HR of death (0.79; 95% CI: 0......: 0.63-1.01). CONCLUSION: Long-term prediagnostic statin use may improve survival following GBM....

  9. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-associated erythema multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsaku Imashuku

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a well-known correlation between Herpes simplex (HSV infection and erythema multiforme (EM. More recently, in Japan, it was found that Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cp may promote the development of EM. All cases of Cp infection-associated EM that had been diagnosed in our clinic over the past two years (from 2011 to 2012 were analyzed. Cp infection was diagnosed on the basis of a significant increase (>2.00 in anti-Cp IgM titers, as measured by the HITAZYME-ELISA test. There were 7 cases of Cp-EM, one male and 6 females. Median age was 13 years (range 3-29 years. It is recommended that the possible involvement of Cp infection, besides HSV or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections, should be considered in all cases of EM.

  10. Glioblastoma Multiforme Presenting as Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

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    Cagatay Ozdol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors with concomitant intracerebral hemorrhage are rarely encountered. Hemorrhage as the initial presentation of a brain tumour may pose some diagnostic problems, especially if the tumour is small or the hemorrhage is abundant. We present a 47-year-old man who admitted to the emergency department with sudden onset headache, right blurred vision and gait disturbance. A non-contrast cranial computerized tomography scan performed immediately after his admission revealed a well circumscribed right occipitoparietal haematoma with intense peripheral edema causing compression of the ipsilateral ventricles. On 6th hour of his admission the patient%u2019s neurological status deteriorated and he subsequently underwent emergent craniotomy and microsurgical evacuation of the haematoma. The histopathological examination of the mass was consistent with a glioblastoma multiforme. Neoplasms may be hidden behind each case of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Histological sampling and investigation is mandatory in the presence of preoperative radiological features suggesting a neoplasm.

  11. TCGA Workshop: Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) - TCGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) held a workshop entitled, “Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM),” to review the initial GBM data from the TCGA pilot project.

  12. A Pilot Safety Study of Lenalidomide and Radiotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drappatz, Jan; Wong, Eric T.; Schiff, David; Kesari, Santosh; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Doherty, Lisa; LaFrankie, Debra Conrad; Ramakrishna, Naren; Weiss, Stephanie; Smith, Sharon T.; Ciampa, Abigail; Zimmerman, Jennifer; Ostrowsky, Louis; David, Karly; Norden, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of lenalidomide, an analogue of thalidomide with enhanced immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic properties and a more favorable toxicity profile, in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) when given concurrently with radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients with newly diagnosed GBM received radiotherapy concurrently with lenalidomide given for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week rest period and continued lenalidomide until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity. Dose escalation occurred in groups of 6. Determination of the MTD was based on toxicities during the first 12 weeks of therapy. The primary endpoint was toxicity. Results: Twenty-three patients were enrolled, of whom 20 were treated and evaluable for both toxicity and tumor response and 2 were evaluable for toxicity only. Common toxicities included venous thromboembolic disease, fatigue, and nausea. Dose-limiting toxicities were eosinophilic pneumonitis and transaminase elevations. The MTD for lenalidomide was determined to be 15 mg/m 2 /d. Conclusion: The recommended dose for lenalidomide with radiotherapy is 15 mg/m 2 /d for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week rest period. Venous thromboembolic complications occurred in 4 patients, and prophylactic anticoagulation should be considered

  13. Biodistribution, toxicity and efficacy of a boronated porphyrin for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Michiko; Micca, P.; Fairchild, R.; Slatkin, D.; Gabel, D.

    1992-01-01

    Boron-containing porphyrins may be useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of brain tumors. Porphyrins have been shown to accumulate in tumor tissue and to be essentially excluded from normal brain. However, problems of toxicity may prevent some boron-containing porphyrins from being considered for BNCT. The authors have synthesized the boronated porphyrin 2,4-bis-vinyl-o-nidocarboranyl-deuteroporphyrin IX (VCDP). Preliminary studies in tumor-bearing mice showed considerable uptake of boron at a total dose of 150 μg/gbw with low mortality. They now report that a total dose to mice of ∼ 275 μg VCDP/gbw administered in multiple intraperitoneal (ip) injections can provide 40-50μg B per gram of tumor with acceptable toxicity. Toxicity experiments and a preliminary trial of BNCT in mice given such doses are also reported

  14. TC > 0.05 as a Pharmacokinetic Parameter of Paclitaxel for Therapeutic Efficacy and Toxicity in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, D S; Zhou, L; Li, C Z; Zhang, S Q; Huang, H Q; Qiu, G D; Lin, L F; She, Y Q; Zheng, J T; Chen, C; Fang, L; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Zhang, S Y

    2018-03-05

    Paclitaxel (PTX) has remarkable anti-tumor activity, but it causes severe toxicities. There is an urgent need to seek an appropriate pharmacokinetic parameter of PTX to improve treatment efficacy and reduce adverse effects. To evaluate the association of pharmacokinetic parameter TC>0.05 of paclitaxel (PTX) and its therapeutic efficacy and toxicity in patients with solid tumors. A total of 295 patients with ovarian cancer, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who were admitted to the Tumor Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, China, were recruited for this study. Patients received 3 weeks of PTX chemotherapy. The plasma concentrations of PTX were examined using the MyPaclitaxelTM kit. The patients' PTX TC>0.05 (the time during which PTX plasma concentration exceed 0.05 μmol/L) were calculated based on pharmacokinetic analysis. The results showed that: (1) the concentrations of PTX in these 295 patients ranged from 0.0358-0.127 μmol/L; (2) the PTX TC> 0.05 ranged from 14 to 38 h with a median time of 27 h; (3) among all treatment cycles, there was a statistically significant difference in the PTX TC>0.05 between CR+PR and SD+PD; (4) with the increasing value of TC>0.05, level of leukopenia and leukopenic fever increased; (5) high PTX TC>0.05 led to the occurrence of neutropenia, neutropenic fever, severe anemia, and severe peripheral neurotoxicity. Taken together, our results indicated that the pharmacokinetic parameter PTX TC>0.05 was an effective measure of treatment efficacy and toxicity in patients with solid tumors. Maintaining PTX TC>0.05 at 26 to 30 h could improve its efficacy and reduce the incidence of leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia, and peripheral neurotoxicity in these patients. PTX TC>0.05 is a key pharmacokinetic parameter of PTX which should be monitored to optimize individual treatment in patients with solid tumors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of bolus application of chemotherapy protocol in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šišić, Ibrahim; Pojskić, Belma; Mekić Abazović, Alma; Kovčin, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    To compare efficacy and toxicity of bolus application of chemotherapy protocol, oxaliplatin, fluorouracil (bolus), leucovorin (folfox) between two groups of patients in the therapy of metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC). A total of 63 patients were treated for mCRC in the period January 2009 - January 2010 at the Department of Oncology of the Cantonal Hospital Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina (first group, 30 patients) and at the Department of Oncology of the Clinical Hospital Centre Bežanijska kosa in Belgrade, Serbia, in the period January 2005 - January 2006 (second group, 33 patients). The patients were treated according the same protocol, i.v. bolus infusion, but in different day intervals (D), 1, 8, 15/28 days or D1-D5/28 days, respectively. In all patients the following factors were analyzed: tumor response, overall survival (OS), progression free survival, hematological and non-hematological toxicity . Colon was the primary localization in almost two thirds of patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups according to the age, hematological and non-hematological toxicity, as well as in achieved OS. Progression free survival expressed in months was in average 5 months though with a large range between minimal and maximal survival time. Both groups have shown equivalent efficacy to applied chemotherapy protocols. Overall survival in the two groups matched data from the literature. Further research should confirm success of the combination of chemotherapy protocols and their combination with the biological therapy. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  16. Therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of bolus application of chemotherapy protocol in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Šišić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To compare efficacy and toxicity of bolus application of chemotherapy protocol, oxaliplatin, fluorouracil (bolus, leucovorin (folfox between two groups of patients in the therapy of metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC. Methods A total of 63 patients were treated for mCRC in the period January 2009 – January 2010 at the Department of Oncology of the Cantonal Hospital Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina (first group, 30 patients and at the Department of Oncology of the Clinical Hospital Centre Bežanijska kosa in Belgrade, Serbia, in the period January 2005 – January 2006 (second group, 33 patients. The patients were treated according the same protocol, i.v. bolus infusion, but in different day intervals (D, 1, 8, 15/28 days or D1-D5/28 days, respectively. In all patients the following factors were analyzed: tumor response, overall survival (OS, progression free survival, hematological and non-hematological toxicity. Results Colon was the primary localization in almost two thirds of patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups according to the age, hematological and non-hematological toxicity, as well as in achieved OS. Progression free survival expressed in months was in average 5 months though with a large range between minimal and maximal survival time. Conclusion Both groups have shown equivalent efficacy to applied chemotherapy protocols. Overall survival in the two groups matched data from the literature. Further research should confirm success of the combination of chemotherapy protocols and their combination with the biological therapy.

  17. Efficacy and toxicity management of CAR-T-cell immunotherapy: a matter of responsiveness control or tumour-specificity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Álvarez-Méndez, Ana; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T-cells have demonstrated potent clinical efficacy in patients with haematological malignancies. However, the use of CAR-T-cells targeting solid tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) has been limited by organ toxicities related to activation of T-cell effector functions through the CAR. Most existing CARs recognize TAAs, which are also found in normal tissues. CAR-T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissues constitutes a major roadblock to CAR-T-cell therapy, and must be avoided or mitigated. There is a broad range of strategies for modulating antigen responsiveness of CAR-T-cells, with varying degrees of complexity. Some of them might ameliorate the acute and chronic toxicities associated with current CAR constructs. However, further embellishments to CAR therapy may complicate clinical implementation and possibly create new immunogenicity issues. In contrast, the development of CARs targeting truly tumour-specific antigens might circumvent on-target/off-tumour toxicities without adding additional complexity to CAR-T-cell therapies, but these antigens have been elusive and may require novel selection strategies for their discovery. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  18. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Ankita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/day with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat.

  19. Ternary copper(II) complex: NCI60 screening, toxicity studies, and evaluation of efficacy in xenograft models of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tai-Lin; Abdul Aziz, Norazlin; Mohd Kornain, Noor-Kaslina; Samiulla, D. S.; Lo, Kwok-Wai; Ng, Chew-Hee

    2018-01-01

    Copper(II) ternary complex, [Cu(phen)(C-dmg)(H2O)]NO3 was evaluated against a panel of cell lines, tested for in vivo efficacy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenograft models as well as for toxicity in NOD scid gamma mice. The Cu(II) complex displayed broad spectrum cytotoxicity against multiple cancer types, including lung, colon, central nervous system, melanoma, ovarian, and prostate cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 panel. The Cu(II) complex did not cause significant induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A and 1A enzymes but moderately inhibited CYP isoforms 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2B6, 2C8 and 3A4. The complex significantly inhibited tumor growth in nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenograft bearing mice models at doses which were well tolerated without causing significant or permanent toxic side effects. However, higher doses which resulted in better inhibition of tumor growth also resulted in toxicity. PMID:29329342

  20. Treatment efficacy and methotrexate-related toxicity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving methotrexate in combination with adalimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, Gerd R; Kaeley, Gurjit S; Kavanaugh, Arthur F; Gabay, Cem; MacCarter, Daryl K; Nash, Peter; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Goss, Sandra L; Rodila, Ramona; Chen, Kun; Kupper, Hartmut; Kalabic, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with a combination of methotrexate (MTX)+adalimumab (ADA) is more effective than ADA monotherapy. We assessed the toxicity of different doses of MTX and treatment efficacy of ADA+MTX in two trials. Data originated from CONCERTO, in patients with early RA initiating ADA+ 2.5, 5, 10 or 20 mg/week MTX for 26 weeks; and MUSICA, in patients with an inadequate response to MTX initiating ADA+ 7.5 or 20 mg/week MTX for 24 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by the American College of Rheumatology 50 (ACR50). Patient-reported MTX-related toxicity information was collected at each visit on 18 prespecified MTX-related adverse events (AE) in the MTX label. In CONCERTO, ACR50 rates increased over time, ranging from 54% to 68% at week 26, while AE rates remained steady, ranging from 2.4% to 17.8% at week 26. Of 395 patients, 113 (28.6%) reported 345 MTX-related AEs, including one serious AE (SAE, excessive fatigue and/or malaise); 10 AEs (in two patients) led to study discontinuation. In MUSICA, ACR50 rates increased over time, and were 32.3% and 37.5% at week 24, while MTX-related AE rates remained steady and were 6.5% at week 24. Of 309 patients, 71 (23%) reported 185 MTX-related AEs, including 5 SAEs (four infections and one fever/chills); six AEs (in four patients) led to study discontinuation. In patients with RA initiating ADA+MTX combination, treatment efficacy was achieved and increased throughout both trials, while rates of MTX-related AEs remained steady. MTX-related AEs were observed in up to 30% of patients and most were mild. MTX was discontinued by 0.5%-1.3% of patients. MUSICA (NCT01185288), CONCERTO (NCT01185301), Post results.

  1. Eritema multiforme mayor desencadenado por antimicrobianos Big multiform erythema triggered by antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo de Carvalho Raimundo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available El eritema multiforme, aparece como una enfermedad sistémica con la participación de la piel y las membranas mucosas en relación con varios factores como las infecciones bacterianas o virales, y en particular la administración de drogas, analgésicos y antibióticos en general. Se presenta un paciente masculino de 29 años de edad con eritema multiforme mayor desencadenado por antimicrobianos con la aparición de lesiones vesiculares-bulloso-ulcerosas en las regiones de los labios, encías, la lengua y la mucosa genital en tratamiento de una infección del tracto urinario con norfloxacino 400 mg por una semana. Fue realizado un tratamiento de soporte con el uso de colutorios para la higienización bucal y pomada a base de corticoide para protección de las úlceras, antihistamínicos y orientación nutricional de dieta líquida hipercalórica e hiperproteica. Este síndrome está caracterizado como un proceso eruptivo buloso agudo que compromete la calidad de vida del paciente y no hay pruebas de laboratorio específicas por lo que su diagnóstico debe estar basado en la revisión minuciosa de la anamnesis y en los hallazgos clínicos.The multiform erythema appears as a systemic disease where skin and the mucous membranes have participation in relation to some factors such as bacterial or viral infections and in particular the drugs administration, analgesics and antibiotics in general. The aim of present paper was the presentation of case of big multiform erythema triggering by antimicrobials. Authors present the case of a male patient aged 29 with appearance of ulcerous bullous-vesicular lesions in lips, gums, tongue and genital mucosa under treatment with 400 mg norfloxacin due to urinary tract infection for a week. We made support treatment using mouthwashes for oral hygiene and corticoids ointment for ulcer protection, antihistaminics and nutritional guiding of a hypercaloric and hyperprotein liquid diet. This syndrome is characterized

  2. Efficacy of free and nanoencapsulated Eucalyptus citriodora essential oils on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes and toxicity for mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, J C; Ribeiro, W L C; Camurça-Vasconcelos, A L F; Macedo, I T F; Santos, J M L; Paula, H C B; Araújo Filho, J V; Magalhães, R D; Bevilaqua, C M L

    2014-08-29

    Herbal medicines with anthelmintic effects are alternatives for the sustainable control and prevention of disease caused by gastrointestinal parasites. The nanoencapsulation of essential oils has been proposed to enhance the absorption of their constituents and improve their efficacy. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of free and nanoencapsulated Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil (EcEO) on the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants in vitro and in vivo. Chitosan was used as a matrix for the formulation of a nanoemulsion. Chromatographic and physico-chemical analyses of EcEO were performed. Egg hatch (EHT) and larval development (LDT) tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of nanoencapsulated and free EcEO on the eggs and larvae of Haemonchus contortus. Acute toxicity of free and nanoencapsulated EcEO was evaluated using mice. Finally, nanoencapsulated EcEO efficacy on the control of gastrointestinal nematodes was calculated by fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) treating 30 sheep naturally infected with 250 mg/kg of free and nanoencapsulated EcEO. In vitro tests were analyzed by an analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by comparison with the Tukey test. The efficacy of FECRT was calculated by the BootStreet program through arithmetic average, using the formula 100 (1-XT/XC). To compare the differences between epg, the data were transformed to log(x+1) and subjected to an ANOVA to compare the significant differences between groups by Tukey's. The level of significance was P<0.05. The free (4 mg/ml concentration) and nanoencapsulated (2mg/ml concentration) EcEO inhibited larvae hatching by 97.2% and 92.8%, respectively. Free and nanoencapsulated EcEO at 8 mg/ml inhibited larval development by 99.8% and 98.1%, respectively. In the acute toxicity test, the LD10 and LD50 of free EcEO was 1999 and 2653 mg/kg, respectively, while the LD10 and LD50 of nanoencapsulated EcEO was 1121 and 1681 mg/kg, respectively

  3. Using Acetaminophen's Toxicity Mechanism to Enhance Cisplatin Efficacy in Hepatocarcinoma and Hepatoblastoma Cell Lines

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    Alexander J. Neuwelt

    2009-10-01

    Conclusions: Our results suggest that a chemotherapeutic regimen containing both AAP and CDDP with delayed NAC rescue has the potential to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy while decreasing adverse effects. This would be a promising approach particularly for hepatoblastomas regardless of cellular CYP2E1 protein level but could also be beneficial in other malignancies.

  4. Efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, C M; Nielsen, D; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elderly patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC) are less frequently treated with adjuvant chemotherapy than younger patients due to concerns regarding toxicity and efficiency. We investigated how age, performance status (PS) and comorbidity influence treatment outcomes. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: A retrospective single-centre study of 529 patients with stages II-III CRC treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/capecitabine+/÷oxaliplatin) from 2001 to 2011 at Herlev Hospital, Denmark. Baseline characteristics, chemotherapy and outcome were analysed with respect to age after......-dependent difference in 3-year disease-free survival (DFS; HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.47, p=0.59), in grade 3-5 toxicity (29% vs 28%, p=0.86) or in 10-year CRC mortality (28%, HR 1.07, p=0.71). In elderly patients, a reduction in chemotherapy dose intensity compared with full dose had no impact on DFS or CRC mortality...

  5. Ceriodaphnia and Chironomus in situ toxicity tests assessing the wastewater treatment efficacy of constructed wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjaktarovic, L.; Nix, P.; Gulley, J.

    1995-01-01

    In situ toxicity tests were designed for Ceriodaphnia dubia and Chironomus tentans as part of a larger study designed to assess the effectiveness of constructed wetlands for the treatment of wastewater produced by oil production at Suncor OSG. The artificial wetlands were 50m long by 3m wide, with three replicates of the control and the treatment. Each wetland had four sample sites equidistant along its length, creating a gradient of treatment from site A being the most toxic to site D being the least toxic. Each test was conducted twice during the summer of 1994. Both the Ceriodaphnia and Chironomus test cages were a flow through design to allow for maximal exposure to the water within the wetlands. Mortality and reproduction were used as endpoints for Ceriodaphnia, whereas mortality and growth were used as endpoints for the Chironomus test. Test durations were fifteen and ten days respectively. Chironomus had very high mortality along the entire wetlands whereas Ceriodaphnia survival and fecundity increased along the length of the treatment wetlands. Both organisms had low mortality and high growth/fecundity in the control wetlands

  6. Saponin 1 Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses NF-κB-Mediated Survival Signaling in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi; Li, Bo; Wang, Yuangang; Gao, Zhenhui; Luo, Peng; Yin, Anan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Guang; Fei, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Saponin 1 is a triterpeniod saponin extracted from Anemone taipaiensis, a traditional Chinese medicine against rheumatism and phlebitis. It has also been shown to exhibit significant anti-tumor activity against human leukemia (HL-60 cells) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep-G2 cells). Herein we investigated the effect of saponin 1 in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) U251MG and U87MG cells. Saponin 1 induced significant growth inhibition in both glioblastoma cell lines, with a 50% inhibitory concentration at 24 h of 7.4 µg/ml in U251MG cells and 8.6 µg/ml in U87MG cells, respectively. Nuclear fluorescent staining and electron microscopy showed that saponin 1 caused characteristic apoptotic morphological changes in the GBM cell lines. Saponin 1-induced apoptosis was also verified by DNA ladder electrophoresis and flow cytometry. Additionally, immunocytochemistry and western blotting analyses revealed a time-dependent decrease in the expression and nuclear location of NF-κB following saponin 1 treatment. Western blotting data indicated a significant decreased expression of inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) family members,(e.g., survivin and XIAP) by saponin 1. Moreover, saponin 1 caused a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and initiated apoptosis by activating caspase-9 and caspase-3 in the GBM cell lines. These findings indicate that saponin 1 inhibits cell growth of GBM cells at least partially by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting survival signaling mediated by NF-κB. In addition, in vivo study also demonstrated an obvious inhibition of saponin 1 treatment on the tumor growth of U251MG and U87MG cells-produced xenograft tumors in nude mice. Given the minimal toxicities of saponin 1 in non-neoplastic astrocytes, our results suggest that saponin 1 exhibits significant in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor efficacy and merits further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for GBM. PMID:24278406

  7. Saponin 1 induces apoptosis and suppresses NF-κB-mediated survival signaling in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Saponin 1 is a triterpeniod saponin extracted from Anemone taipaiensis, a traditional Chinese medicine against rheumatism and phlebitis. It has also been shown to exhibit significant anti-tumor activity against human leukemia (HL-60 cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep-G2 cells. Herein we investigated the effect of saponin 1 in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM U251MG and U87MG cells. Saponin 1 induced significant growth inhibition in both glioblastoma cell lines, with a 50% inhibitory concentration at 24 h of 7.4 µg/ml in U251MG cells and 8.6 µg/ml in U87MG cells, respectively. Nuclear fluorescent staining and electron microscopy showed that saponin 1 caused characteristic apoptotic morphological changes in the GBM cell lines. Saponin 1-induced apoptosis was also verified by DNA ladder electrophoresis and flow cytometry. Additionally, immunocytochemistry and western blotting analyses revealed a time-dependent decrease in the expression and nuclear location of NF-κB following saponin 1 treatment. Western blotting data indicated a significant decreased expression of inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP family members,(e.g., survivin and XIAP by saponin 1. Moreover, saponin 1 caused a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and initiated apoptosis by activating caspase-9 and caspase-3 in the GBM cell lines. These findings indicate that saponin 1 inhibits cell growth of GBM cells at least partially by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting survival signaling mediated by NF-κB. In addition, in vivo study also demonstrated an obvious inhibition of saponin 1 treatment on the tumor growth of U251MG and U87MG cells-produced xenograft tumors in nude mice. Given the minimal toxicities of saponin 1 in non-neoplastic astrocytes, our results suggest that saponin 1 exhibits significant in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor efficacy and merits further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for GBM.

  8. Hemolytic anemia in two patients with glioblastoma multiforme: A possible interaction between vorinostat and dapsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jennifer A; Petty, William J; Harmon, Michele; Peacock, James E; Valente, Kari; Owen, John; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lesser, Glenn J

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for glioblastoma multiforme are routinely placed on prophylactic treatment for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia because of significant therapy-induced lymphopenia. In patients with sulfa allergies, dapsone prophylaxis is often used due to its efficacy, long half-life, cost effectiveness, and general safety at low doses. However, dapsone may uncommonly induce a hemolytic anemia, particularly in patients deficient of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This hemolysis is thought to be a result of oxidative stress on red blood cells induced by dapsone metabolites which produce reactive oxygen species that disrupt the red blood cell membrane and promote splenic sequestration. A single case report of dapsone-induced hemolytic anemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme has been reported. We present two patients with glioblastoma multiforme who developed severe hemolytic anemia shortly after initiating therapy with vorinostat, a pan-active histone deacetylase inhibitor, while on prophylactic dapsone. There are several potential mechanisms by which histone deacetylase inhibition may alter dapsone metabolism including changes in hepatic acetylation or N-glucuronidation leading to an increase in the bioavailability of dapsone's hematotoxic metabolites. In addition, vorinostat may lead to increased hemolysis through inhibition of heat shock protein-90, a chaperone protein that maintains the integrity of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton. The potential interaction between dapsone and vorinostat may have important clinical implications as more than 10 clinical trials evaluating drug combinations with vorinostat in patients with malignant glioma are either ongoing or planned in North America. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Light-activated phenalen-1-one bactericides: efficacy, toxicity and mechanism compared with benzalkonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehler, Denise; Sommer, Kerstin; Wennige, Sara; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Cieplik, Fabian; Maisch, Tim; Späth, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Five photoactive compounds with variable elongated alkyl-substituents in a phenalen-1-one structure were examined in view of structural similarity to the antimicrobial agent benzalkonium chloride (BAC). All phenalen-1-ones and BAC were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and for their eukaryotic toxicity against normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) cells to narrow down the BAC-like effect and the photodynamic effect depending on the chemical structure. All compounds were investigated for effective concentration ranges, where a bacterial reduction of 5 log 10 is achieved, while an NHEK survival of 80% is ensured. Effective concentration ranges were found for four out of five photoactive compounds, but not for BAC and the compound with BAC-like alkyl chain length. Chain length size and polar area of the respective head-groups of phenalen-1-one compounds or BAC showed an influence on the incorporation inside lipid membranes and thus, head-groups may have an impact on the toxicity of antimicrobials.

  10. Toxicity and residual efficacy of chlorantraniliprole, spinetoram, and emamectin benzoate to obliquebanded leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, Ashfaq A; Brunner, Jay F

    2010-08-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the residual toxicity of spinetoram, chlorantraniliprole, and emamectin benzoate to obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Larvae were exposed to apple (Malus spp.) foliage collected at different intervals after an airblast sprayer application at the manufacturer-recommended field rate and half the field rate. A mortality of 100% was recorded at field rate applications of spinetoram, chlorantraniliprole, and emamectin benzoate through 59, 38, and 10 d after treatment (DAT), respectively. Significantly less foliage was consumed by C. rosaceana larvae surviving in the emamectin, chlorantraniliprole, and spinetoram treatments compared with those exposed to untreated foliage. Third-instar C. rosaceana exposed to fresh residues on terminal foliage showed 100% mortality after 5-d exposure to spinetoram residues and after 10-d exposure to chlorantraniliprole and emamectin benzoate. The effects of larval movement from foliage with fresh residues was examined by transferring neonate larvae from foliage treated with spinetoram, chlorantraniliprole, or emamectin benzoate to untreated foliage after various exposure intervals. An exposure of 1, 3, and 6 d was required for spinetoram, chlorantraniliprole, and emamectin benzoate to cause 100% mortality at the field rate, respectively. The higher the concentration of chlorantraniliprole and emamectin benzoate, the less exposure time was necessary to cause high levels of mortality in C. rosaceana neonates. Our results indicate that these novel insecticides are highly toxic to C. rosaceana larvae. Implications of these results for C. rosaceana management programs are discussed.

  11. Brown coal derived humate inhibits contact hypersensitivity; An efficacy, toxicity and teratogenicity study in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rensburg, C.E.J.; Snyman, J.R.; Mokoele, T.; Cromarty, A.D. [University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa). Faculty of Health Science

    2007-10-15

    The effects of two humate products were compared to that of prednisolone on a contact hypersensitivity rat model. Rats, sensitized with dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB), were placed on a daily oral treatment of 61 mg/kg BW of humate derived from either leonardite or bituminous coal or on prednisolone at one mg/kg BW and challenged 6 days later with a topical application of DNFB to the right ear. The inflamed ears were measured daily. In a toxicity study rats were exposed to daily oral treatment of leonardite humate at 1,000 mg/kg BW for 1 month. A teratogenicity study was done where pregnant rats were treated with 500 mg/kg BW on days 5 to 17 of pregnancy. Only the leonardite humate compared favourably with prednisolone in suppressing contact hypersensitivity. No signs of toxicity were observed and weight gain was normal during the 6-day and 1 month treatments and during the teratogenicity study with the leonardite humate. However, the rats on the other two products experienced slower weight gain. The identification of a naturally occurring nontoxic compound with anti-inflammatory activity is exciting and merits further evaluation in the treatment of patients suffering from inflammatory conditions.

  12. Phase I trial of erlotinib with radiation therapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Results of North Central Cancer Treatment Group protocol N0177

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Sunil; Brown, Paul D.; Ballman, Karla V.; Fiveash, John B.; Uhm, Joon H.; Giannini, Caterina; Jaeckle, Kurt A.; Geoffroy, Francois J.; Nabors, L. Burt; Buckner, Jan C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of erlotinib plus radiation therapy (RT) in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a multicenter phase I trial. Methods and Materials: Patients were stratified on the basis of the use of enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (EIACs). After resection or biopsy, patients were treated with erlotinib for 1 week before concurrent erlotinib and 6 weeks (60 Gy) of RT and maintained on erlotinib until progression. The erlotinib dose was escalated in cohorts of 3 starting at 100 mg/day. Results: Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 were evaluable for the MTD and efficacy endpoints. Of these patients, 14 were males and 5 were females, with a median age of 54 years. Seven had undergone biopsy only, 5 had subtotal resections, and 7 had gross total resections. The highest dose level was 150 mg/day erlotinib for patients not on EIACs (Group 1) and 200 mg/day for patients on EIACs (Group 2). MTD was not reached in either group. In Group 1 at 100 mg (n = 6) and at 150 mg (n = 4), only 1 dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) occurred (stomatitis at 100 mg). No DLTs have occurred in Group 2 at 100 mg (n = 3), 150 mg (n = 3), and 200 mg (n = 3). With a median follow-up of 52 weeks, progression was documented in 16 patients and 13 deaths occurred. Median time to progression was 26 weeks, and median survival was 55 weeks. Conclusion: Toxicity is acceptable at the current doses of erlotinib plus RT. The study was modified to include concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide, and accrual is in progress

  13. Acute toxicity and efficacy of postoperative combined modality therapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Brian J.; Raben, Adam; Casper, Ephraim; Minsky, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the acute toxicity and outcome in patients (pts) treated with combined modality therapy following resection of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 2/88 to 2/96, 34 pts (M:20, F:14) received postoperative combined modality therapy following a pancreatic resection. Tumor location included; head only: 28, head and ampulla: 1, ampulla only: 1, body and tail: 2, and tail only: 2. Postoperative stages included: stage I: 7 (21%) and stage III: 27 (79%). Pts were referred for combined modality therapy based on surgeon preference. In general, pts were treated who had one or more adverse prognostic factors. These included positive local/regional lymph nodes (79%), positive margins (50%) or disease invasive into adjacent structures (85 %). Radiation fields included the original primary tumor bed (based on preoperative CT scans) and peri-pancreatic and para-aortic lymph nodes adjacent to vertebral bodies T10 through L3. No attempt was made to include the entire pancreas in the radiation field. Patients received 5040 cGy at 180 cGy/day using a 3 or 4 field technique and CT-based treatment planning. Concurrent bolus 5-FU (375-500 mg/m 2 ) was delivered on the first three and last three days of radiation. Post-radiation maintenance bolus 5-FU was given to 7 patients for a median of 6 cycles. A toxicity assessment using the NCI toxicity criteria was performed at each weekly visit and 4 weeks following the completion of combined modality therapy. The median follow-up was 13 months (range: 2-36 months). Patterns of failure as a component of failure were assessed by radiographic criteria and, in 2 pts, by intraoperative evaluation for symptomatic progression of disease. Local/regional failure was defined as recurrence within the radiation field. Distant failure included liver, peritoneal seeding, and extra-abdominal sites. Actuarial survival was calculated from the time of surgery using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: The only grade 3

  14. Hydroxyurea for the Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease: Efficacy, Barriers, Toxicity, and Management in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, John J.; Heeney, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is the only approved medication in the United States for the treatment of sickle cell anemia (HbSS) and is widely used in children despite an indication limited to adults. We review the evidence of efficacy and safety in children with reference to pivotal adult studies. This evidence and expert opinion form the basis for recommended guidelines for the use of hydroxyurea in children including indications, dosing, therapeutic and safety monitoring, and interventions to improve adherence. However, there are substantial gaps in our knowledge to be addressed by on-going and planned studies in children. PMID:22517797

  15. Novel multiform morphologies of hydroxyapatite: Synthesis and growth mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary, I. Reeta [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Department of Physics, Government Arts College, Coimbatore 641018 (India); Sonia, S.; Viji, S.; Mangalaraj, D.; Viswanathan, C. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Ponpandian, N., E-mail: ponpandian@buc.edu.in [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel multiform morphologies of hydroxyapatite from nanoscale building blocks. • Facile hydro/solvothermal method under mild reaction conditions without the necessity of post-annealing treatment. • Growth mechanism by Ostwald ripening and self-assembly processes. - Abstract: Morphological evolution of materials becomes a prodigious challenge due to their key role in defining their functional properties and desired applications. Herein, we report the synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HAp) microstructures with multiform morphologies, such as spheres, cubes, hexagonal rods and nested bundles constructed from their respective nanoscale building blocks via a simple cost effective hydro/solvothermal method. A possible formation mechanism of diverse morphologies of HAp has been presented. Structural analysis based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirms the purity of the HAp microstructures. The multiform morphologies of HAp were corroborated by using Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM).

  16. Haematolohical profile of subacute oral toxicity of molybdenum and ameliorative efficacy of copper salt in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusum; Raina, R; Verma, P K; Pankaj, N K; Kant, V; Kumar, J; Srivastava, A K

    2010-07-01

    Molybdenum toxicity produces a state of secondary hypocuprosis, resulting into alterations in normal hematological profile. In the present study, ammonium molybdate alone and with copper sulfate (II) pentahydrate (ameliorative agent) was administered orally for 30 consecutive days in healthy goats of group 1 and 2, respectively, to access the effect on the hematological profile on different predetermined days of dosing. Administration of ammonium molybdate alone produced significant decline in the mean values of hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), total leukocyte count (TLC), total erythrocyte count (TEC), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), with a significant increase in neutrophil level and mean corpuscular volume (MCV). However, values of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and differential leukocyte count were not significantly altered. On comparing observations of ameliorative group with the group 1 goats, it is concluded that the ameliorative copper salt has beneficial effects in alleviating the alterations in the values of Hb, PCV, TLC, TEC, MCV, MCHC, and neutrophils.

  17. Hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy (HCRT) for primary and metastatic lung cancers with small dimension. Efficacy and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirri, Maria Alessandra; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Pinzi, Valentina; Benassi, Marcello; D'Angelo, Annelisa; Strigari, Lidia; Caterino, Mauro; Rinaldi, Massimo; Ceribelli, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to report on the clinical outcome of hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy (HCRT) for medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) or limited pulmonary metastases ≤ 5 cm in diameter. Patients and methods: from June 2003 to March 2007, 40 patients (42 lesions) underwent HCRT consisting of 40 Gy in five fractions over 2.5 weeks received by at least 95% of planning target volume. All patients underwent CT simulation and treatment under free shallow breathing. To evaluate target displacement under respiratory activity, two additional CT scans were performed with breath-holding during the expiratory and inspiratory phases. Of all patients enrolled, those with a follow-up ≥ 4 months were considered suitable for analysis. Local response was evaluated with CT imaging 4 months after the end of HCRT and every 3 months thereafter. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: local response to the treatment was complete response, partial response, no change, and progressive disease as seen in 29%, 43%, 14%, and 7% of tumors, respectively. LRFS at 1 year and 3 years was 76% and 63%, respectively. Lung toxicities ≥ grade 2 were observed in 4/40 patients, but no grade 4. Pericardial effusion occurred in one patient. In stage I NSCLC patients (n = 15) with a median follow-up of 25 months, the 1-year LRFS and OS rates were 88% and 81%, respectively, and the 3-year rates 72% and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: HCRT is an effective and low-toxic treatment for medically inoperable early-stage lung cancers and pulmonary metastases for all clinicians lacking the aid of a dedicated stereotactic system. (orig.)

  18. Micro RNAs as molecular markers of glioblastoma multiform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, M G [Department Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Finocchiaro, G [Istituto Neurologico Besta, Milan (Italy); Ricci Vitiani, L [Department of Hematology, Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this project was to unravel the role that miR-221 and miR-222, of which we had already demonstrated the specific differential expression in glioblastoma multiforme compared to normal brain, play in the control of cell proliferation, with the ultimate goal to provide new insights in the molecular basis of cancer. The results of our research allowed to identify an important molecular target for miRNA-221 and miR-222, highly expressed in glioblastoma multiforme tissues and cell lines, and to precisely recognize the mRNA regions responsible for this regulation.

  19. Micro RNAs as molecular markers of glioblastoma multiform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, M.G.; Finocchiaro, G.; Ricci Vitiani, L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this project was to unravel the role that miR-221 and miR-222, of which we had already demonstrated the specific differential expression in glioblastoma multiforme compared to normal brain, play in the control of cell proliferation, with the ultimate goal to provide new insights in the molecular basis of cancer. The results of our research allowed to identify an important molecular target for miRNA-221 and miR-222, highly expressed in glioblastoma multiforme tissues and cell lines, and to precisely recognize the mRNA regions responsible for this regulation

  20. QIAD assay for quantitating a compound’s efficacy in elimination of toxic Aβ oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Oleksandr; Dunkelmann, Tina; Gremer, Lothar; van Groen, Thomas; Mirecka, Ewa A.; Kadish, Inga; Willuweit, Antje; Kutzsche, Janine; Jürgens, Dagmar; Rudolph, Stephan; Tusche, Markus; Bongen, Patrick; Pietruszka, Jörg; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Langen, Karl-Josef; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Janssen, Arnold; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Funke, Susanne A.; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Willbold, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for a central role of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. We have developed a fast, reliable and robust in vitro assay, termed QIAD, to quantify the effect of any compound on the Aβ aggregate size distribution. Applying QIAD, we studied the effect of homotaurine, scyllo-inositol, EGCG, the benzofuran derivative KMS88009, ZAβ3W, the D-enantiomeric peptide D3 and its tandem version D3D3 on Aβ aggregation. The predictive power of the assay for in vivo efficacy is demonstrated by comparing the oligomer elimination efficiency of D3 and D3D3 with their treatment effects in animal models of Alzheimer´s disease. PMID:26394756

  1. Efficacy of Silybum Marianum Seeds in Ameliorating the Toxic Effects of Aflatoxin B1 in Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Fani Makki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of silybum marianum seeds (SMSs on blood biochemical profile of broiler chickens contaminated with Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1. Methods: Combinations of three levels of AFB1 (0, 250 and 500 ppb with three levels of SMSs (0, 0.5, and 1.0 % were incorporated into the basal diet (corn and soybean meal. The effect of nine experimental treatments was assessed using 216 One-d-old Ross 308 male broiler chicks in a complete randomized design based on factorial design with 4 replicates of six birds. The individual effects of dietary AFB1 and SMSs on serum biochemistry factors and liver enzymes were evaluated at 35 days of age. Statistical package SAS (9.1 was used to perform the analysis. Results: The main effects of uric acid, glucose, total bilirubin and liver enzymes (such as; aspartate amino-transferase (AST, alanine amino-transaminase (ALT and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT in groups received different levels of AFB1 significantly increased (P<0.01. In contrast, albumin, direct bilirubin, calcium, and phosphorus significantly decreased (P<0.05. However, the SMSs supplemented diets significantly decreased uric acid, glucose, AST and GGT enzymes compare to control group (P<0.01. Conclusion: SMSs might prevent the adverse effects of AFB1 in contaminated food and improve safety and quality of poultry products for human use.

  2. Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Candace Elise

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most fatal malignant brain tumor, is highly infiltrative and incurable. Although improved prognosis has been demonstrated by surgically resecting the bulk tumor, a lack of clear borders at the tumor margins complicates the selection decision during surgery. This dissertation investigates the potential of Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing between normal and malignant brain tissue and sets the groundwork for a surgical diagnostic guide for resection of gross malignant gliomas. These studies revealed that Raman spectroscopy was capable of discriminating between normal scid mouse brain tissue and human xenograft tumors induced in those mice. The spectra of normal and malignant tissue were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1440 cm -1. Spectral differences include the shape of the broad peaks near 1440 cm-1 and 1660 cm-1 and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1264 cm-1, 1287 cm-1, 1297 cm-1, 1556 cm -1, 1586 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, and 1683 cm-1. From these studies emerged questions regarding how to objectively normalize and compare spectra for future automation. Some differences in the Raman spectra were shown to be inherent in the disease states of the cells themselves via differences in the Raman spectra of normal human astrocytes in culture and cultured cells derived from GBM tumors. The spectra of astrocytes and glioma cells were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1450 cm-1. The differences between the Raman spectra of normal and transformed cells include the ratio of the 1450 cm-1/1650 cm-1 peaks and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1181 cm-1, 1191 cm-1, 1225 cm-1, 1263 cm -1, 1300 cm-1, 1336 cm-1, 1477 cm-1, 1494 cm-1, and 1695 cm -1. Previous Raman spectroscopic studies of biological cells have shown that the magnitude of the Raman signal decreases over time, indicating sample damage. Cells exposed to laser excitation at similar power

  3. Efficacy and toxicity of whole brain radiotherapy in patients with multiple cerebral metastases from malignant melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauswald Henrik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To retrospectively access outcome and toxicity of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT in patients with multiple brain metastases (BM from malignant melanoma (MM. Patients and methods Results of 87 patients (median age 58 years; 35 female, 52 male treated by WBRT for BM of MM between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed. Total dose applied was either 30 Gy in 10 fractions (n = 56 or 40 Gy in 20 fractions (n = 31. All but 9 patients suffered from extra-cerebral metastases. Prior surgical resection of BM was performed in 18 patients, salvage stereotactic radiosurgery in 13 patients. Results Mean follow-up was 8 months (range, 0–57 months, the 6- and 12-months overall-(OS survival rates were 29.2% and 16.5%, respectively. The median OS was 3.5 months. In cerebral follow-up imaging 6 (11 patients showed a complete (partial remission, while 11 (17 patients had stable disease (intra-cerebral tumor progression. In comparison of total dose, the group treated with 40 Gy in 20 fractions achieved a significant longer OS (p = 0.003, median 3.1 vs. 5.6 months. Furthermore, DS-GPA score (p  Conclusion Treatment of BM from MM with WBRT is tolerated well and some remissions of BM could be achieved. An advantage for higher treatment total doses was seen. However, outcome is non-satisfying, and further improvements in treatment of BM from MM are warranted.

  4. Evaluation of Efficacy and Toxicity of Exfoliated Silicate Nanoclays as a Feed Additive for Fumonisin Detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chiao-Wei; Huang, Jie-Ting; Chen, Ching-Chin; Tang, Pin-Chi; Huang, Jenn-Wen; Lin, Jiang-Jen; Huang, San-Yuan; Chen, Shuen-Ei

    2017-08-09

    The efficacy of nanosilicate clay platelets (NSCP), exfoliated silicates from natural montmorillonites, as a feed additive for ameliorating fumonisin B1 (FB1) toxicosis was evaluated. Toxicological mechanisms by NSCP were examined through proteomic and biochemical analyses. Dietary supplementation with NSCP at a low level of 40 mg/kg of feed improved growth performances in chickens with respect to FB1 toxicosis. Other issues of ameliorated symptoms including serum and/or hepatic aspartate aminotransferase activity, oxidative stress indicators, and sphinganine/sphingosine ratio, a hallmark of FB1 toxicosis, were considered. Chickens with NSCP inclusion alone at 1000 mg/kg of feed exhibited no changes in hepatic histology, oxidative status, and serum parameters and even had a higher feed intake. Proteomic analysis with liver tissues identified 45 distinct proteins differentially affected by FB1 and/or NSCP, in which proteins involved in thiol metabolism and redox regulation, glycolysis, carcinogenesis, and detoxification by glutathione S-transferase were promoted by FB1, whereas NSCP caused differential changes of protein abundances related to methionine/cysteine and choline/glycine interconversion for glutathione synthesis, redox regulation by peroxiredoxin, toxin/metabolite delivery by albumin, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, and chaperon escort for endoplasmic reticulum stress relief. Functional analyses confirmed the enhancement of hepatic metabolic processes for ATP and NAD(P)H production to meet the need for detoxification, antioxidative defense, and toxin/metabolite clearance by FB1 or NSCP ingestion. On the basis of the amelioration of FB1 toxicosis, global profile of hepatic protein expressions, and validated toxicological mechanisms, NSCP were concluded as a safe and effective agent for FB1 detoxification.

  5. Investigation of platinum nanoparticle properties against U87 glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Slawomir

    2017-01-01

    a harmful influence on viability of U87 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells, but also showed genotoxic properties as well as a pro-apoptotic effect on cancer cells. It was found that NP-Pt decreased the weight and volume of U87 GBM tumor tissue and caused pathomorphological changes in the ultrastructure...

  6. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Wierzbicki, Mateusz

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chrioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubati...

  7. Neoadjuvant bevacizumab and irinotecan versus bevacizumab and temozolomide followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofland, Kenneth F; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Sorensen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgery followed by radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide is standard therapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Bevacizumab combined with irinotecan produces impressive response rates in recurrent GBM. In a randomized phase II study, we investigated...... from febrile neutropenia whereas non-hematological toxicity was manageable. CONCLUSIONS: Only the Bev-Tem arm met the pre-specified level of activity of interest. Our results did not indicate any benefit from Bev-Iri in first-line therapy as opposed to Bev-Tem in terms of response and PFS....

  8. Erythema multiforme as the result of taking carbamazepine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maharani Laillyza Apriasari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Erythema multiforme is an acute mucocutaneus disease which is caused by the hypersensitivity reaction. It is characterized by target lesions on the skin or ulcerative oral lesion. Etiology of the disease is unknown, it is currently considered as immunologic disease. The triggering factors is the use of certain type of drugs like antibiotics, anticonvulsant, and NSAID. Most of the dentists do not know about it is mechanism, so a lot of people consider it as a malpractice. Purpose: This paper reported a case of a man, 46 years old which had ulcerative oral mucous, peeled and pain lips after taking carbamazepine drugs. Case: The clinical diagnosis of this case was erythema multiforme because of the hypersensitivity reaction as the result of taking carbamazepine. Case management: The final diagnosis based on anamnesis history of taking systemic drugs and clinical manifestation of erythema multiforme in the oral cavity. The drugs therapy that had been given were antihistamine, oral corticosteroid, gargle liquid contained of topical anesthetic, corticosteroid, and antibiotic. Conclusion: In this case, it can be concluded that erythema multiforme appeared was triggered by taking carbamazepine as the drug of choice for trigeminal neuralgia therapy. These drugs can cause type III hypersensitivity reaction. The final diagnosis based on anamnesis history of taking carbamazepine before lesions erupted and the characterized clinical manifestation.Latar belakang: Erythema multiforme adalah penyakit mukokutaneus akut yang menyerang kulit dan mukosa sebagai akibat dari reaksi hipersensitivitas. Secara karakteristik ditandai oleh lesi target pada kulit atau lesi ulserasi pada mukosa rongga mulut. Etiologi penyakit ini belum jelas, diduga karena adanya reaksi imunologi. Pencetusnya dikarenakan adanya pemakaian obat-obatan tertentu seperti antibiotik, antikonvulsan dan NSAID. Banyak dokter gigi kurang memahami mekanisme timbulnya penyakit ini, sehingga

  9. Preventive efficacy and safety of rebamipide in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced mucosal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Soo-Heon; Cho, Chul-Soo; Lee, Soo Teik; Yoo, Wan-Hee; Kim, Sung Kook; Kang, Young Mo; Rew, Jong Sun; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Yong Chan; Park, Won; Lee, Don-Haeng

    2014-07-01

    The use of proton pump inhibitors or misoprostol is known to prevent the gastrointestinal complications of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rebamipide is known to increase the mucosal generation of prostaglandins and to eliminate free oxygen radicals, thus enhancing the protective function of the gastric mucosa. However, it is unknown whether rebamipide plays a role in preventing NSAID-induced gastropathy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of rebamipide compared to misoprostol in preventing NSAID-induced gastrointestinal complications in patients requiring continuous NSAID treatment. We studied 479 patients who required continuous NSAID treatment. The patients were randomly assigned to groups that received 100 mg of rebamipide three times per day or 200 μg of misoprostol three times per day for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint of the analysis was the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers, as determined by endoscopy after 12 weeks of therapy. Of the 479 patients in the study, 242 received rebamipide, and 237 received misoprostol. Ultimately, 44 patients (18.6%) withdrew from the misoprostol group and 25 patients (10.3%) withdrew from the rebamipide group. There was a significant difference in withdrawal rate between the two groups (p=0.0103). The per protocol analysis set was not valid because of the dropout rate of the misoprostol group; thus, the intention to treat (ITT) analysis set is the main set for the efficacy analysis in this study. After 12 weeks, the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (20.3% vs 21.9%, p=0.6497) according to ITT analysis. In addition, the therapeutic failure rate was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (13.6% vs 13.1%, p=0.8580). The total severity score of the gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly lower in the rebamipide group than in the misoprostol group (p=0.0002). The amount of antacid used was significantly lower in the rebamipide

  10. First clinical results of a personalized immunotherapeutic vaccine against recurrent, incompletely resected, treatment-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors, based on combined allo- and auto-immune tumor reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Pretto, Chrystel; Devillers, Laurent; Pierre, Denis; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Mespouille, Pascal; Hantos, Peter; Glorieux, Philippe; Bota, Daniela A; Stathopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-05-28

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients have a poor prognosis. After tumor recurrence statistics suggest an imminent death within 1-4.5 months. Supportive preclinical data, from a rat model, provided the rational for a prototype clinical vaccine preparation, named Gliovac (or ERC 1671) composed of autologous antigens, derived from the patient's surgically removed tumor tissue, which is administered together with allogeneic antigens from glioma tissue resected from other GBM patients. We now report the first results of the Gliovac treatment for treatment-resistant GBM patients. Nine (9) recurrent GBM patients, after standard of care treatment, including surgery radio- and chemotherapy temozolomide, and for US patients, also bevacizumab (Avastin™), were treated under a compassionate use/hospital exemption protocol. Gliovac was given intradermally, together with human GM-CSF (Leukine(®)), and preceded by a regimen of regulatory T cell-depleting, low-dose cyclophosphamide. Gliovac administration in patients that have failed standard of care therapies showed minimal toxicity and enhanced overall survival (OS). Six-month (26 weeks) survival for the nine Gliovac patients was 100% versus 33% in control group. At week 40, the published overall survival was 10% if recurrent, reoperated patients were not treated. In the Gliovac treated group, the survival at 40 weeks was 77%. Our data suggest that Gliovac has low toxicity and a promising efficacy. A phase II trial has recently been initiated in recurrent, bevacizumab naïve GBM patients (NCT01903330). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Phase II Radiation therapy oncology group trial of weekly paclitaxel and conventional external beam radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.; Ruffer, James; Rhodes, Harker; Paulus, Rebecca; Murray, Kevin; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± carmustine (BCNU) is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but survival results remain poor. Preclinical studies indicate synergy between RT and paclitaxel (TAX) in astrocytoma cell lines. Phase I studies in GBM have demonstrated a maximum tolerated dose for TAX of 225 mg/m 2 /3 h/week x 6, during EBRT, with no exacerbation of typical RT-induced toxicities. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) therefore mounted a Phase II study to determine the feasibility and efficacy of conventional EBRT and concurrent weekly TAX at its MTD. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with histologic diagnosis of GBM were enrolled from 8/16/96 through 3/21/97 in a multi-institutional Phase II trial of EBRT and TAX 225 mg/m 2 /3 h (1-3 h before EBRT), administered the first treatment day of each RT week. Total EBRT dose was 60 Gy (200 cGy/fraction), 5 days per week. A smaller treatment field, to include gross disease plus a margin only, was used after 46 Gy. Results: Sixty-one patients (98%) were evaluable. Median age was 55 years (range, 28-78). Seventy-four percent were ≥50 years. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Classes III, IV, V, VI included 10 (17%), 21 (34%), 25 (41%), and 5 (8%) patients, respectively. Gross total resection was performed in only 16%. There was no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Hypersensitivity reactions precluding further use of TAX occurred in 4 patients. There were 2 instances of late neurotoxicity (4% Grade 3 or 4). Ninety-one percent of patients received treatment per protocol. Seventy-seven percent completed prescribed treatment (6 weeks). Of 35 patients with measurable disease, CR/PR was observed in 23%, MR in 17%, and SD in 43%. Seventeen percent demonstrated progression at first follow-up. Median potential follow-up time is 20 months. Median survival is 9.7 months, with median survivals for RPA classes III, IV, V, and VI of 16.3, 10

  12. Irinotecan-loaded double-reversible thermogel with improved antitumor efficacy without initial burst effect and toxicity for intramuscular administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Fakhar Ud; Kim, Dong Wuk; Choi, Ju Yeon; Thapa, Raj Kumar; Mustapha, Omer; Kim, Dong Shik; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Ku, Sae Kwang; Youn, Yu Seok; Oh, Kyung Taek; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2017-05-01

    Intramuscularly administered, anti-tumour drugs induce severe side effects due to their direct contact with body tissues and initial burst effect. In this study, to solve this problem, a novel double-reversible thermogel system (DRTG) for the intramuscular administration of irinotecan was developed. This irinotecan-loaded DRTG was prepared by dispersing the irinotecan-loaded thermoreversible solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) in the thermoreversible hydrogel. In DRTG, the former was solid at 25°C but converted to liquid at 36.5°C; in contrast, the latter existed in a liquid form but transformed to gel state in the body. The DRTG was easily administered intramuscularly. Its particle size and drug content were not noticeably changeable, resulting that it was stable at 40°C for at least 6months. Compared to the irinotecan-loaded solution and conventional hydrogel, the DRTG significantly delayed drug release, leading to a reduced burst effect. Moreover, it showed decreased C max and maintained the sustained plasma concentrations at a relatively low level for the long period of 60h in rats, resulting in ameliorated side effects of the anti-tumour drug. Furthermore, it gave significantly improved anti-tumour efficacy in tumour-bearing mice compared to the hydrogel but, unlike the conventional hydrogel, induced no body weight loss and local damage to the muscle. Thus, this DRTG with improved antitumor efficacy without initial burst effect and toxicity could provide a potential pharmaceutical system for the intramuscular administration of irinotecan. Intramuscularly administered, anti-tumour drugs induce severe side effects due to their direct contact with body tissues and initial burst effect. To solve this problem, we developed a novel double-reversible thermogel system (DRTG) for the intramuscular administration of irinotecan. Unlike the conventional hydrogel, the DRTG is a dispersion of the irinotecan-loaded thermoreversible solid lipid nanoparticles in the

  13. Vinorelbine/carboplatin vs gemcitabine/carboplatin in advanced NSCLC shows similar efficacy, but different impact of toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, N; Sundstrøm, S H; Aasebø, U

    2007-01-01

    This randomised phase III study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients was conducted to compare vinorelbine/carboplatin (VC) and gemcitabine/carboplatin (GC) regarding efficacy, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and toxicity. Chemonaive patients with NSCLC stage IIIB....../IV and WHO performance status 0-2 were eligible. No upper age limit was defined. Patients received vinorelbine 25 mg m(-2) or gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) on days 1 and 8 and carboplatin AUC4 on day 1 and three courses with 3-week cycles. HRQOL questionnaires were completed at baseline, before chemotherapy...... and every 8 weeks until 49 weeks. During 14 months, 432 patients were included (VC, n=218; GC, n=214). Median survival was 7.3 vs 6.4 months, 1-year survival 28 vs 30% and 2-year survival 7 vs 7% in the VC and GC arm, respectively (P=0.89). HRQOL, represented by global QOL, nausea/vomiting, dyspnoea...

  14. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Judith M.; Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide

  15. The Protective Efficacy Of Extract Of Hibiscus Sabdariffa (Karkade) Calyces Against Alcohol Toxicity In Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, E.A.; Ali, E.A.; Shahen, E.M.; El Madawy, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS), Malvacea family, is a medicinal plant with a worldwide fame. Its benefit effect on some physiological parameters as blood picture, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, liver and kidney functions, electrolytes and antioxidant capacity is mentioned in several recent studies. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of this plant in protecting from alcohol toxicity in rats. Thirty two adult male albino rats were divided into four equal groups: group 1 received water orally for 30 days, group 2 received ethanol (5 ml/kg/day) for 30 days, both group 3 and group 4 received Hibiscus sabdariffa (100 mg/kg/day) orally for 30 days and then group 4 received ethanol (5 ml/kg/day) orally for another 30 days. Serum hepatic markers (aspartate and alanine minotransferases; AST and ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) were increased significantly by alcohol abuse with no observed improvement in treatment with HS. Significant reduction in total protein and albumin was observed in alcohol abuse which improved with HS treatment and showed significant increase as compared with both control and alcohol treated groups. Serum kidney markers (urea, creatinine and uric acid) were increased in alcohol abuse and only creatinine and uric acid nearly returned to normal levels with HS treatment while urea level remains high. Serum glucose was increased significantly in alcohol abuse and significantly decreased in group 3 (HS treated) and group 4 (HS + ethanol). Serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and atherogenic index were increased significantly while HDL-C was significantly reduced in alcohol abuse. HS treatment resulted in significant increase in HDL-C and therefore decreased atherogenic index in both group 3 and group 4 which indicated protective effect of HS for coronary heart diseases. These results lead to the

  16. Evaluation of the efficacy and toxicity of protocol cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin compared to protocol fluorouracil, doxorubicin and mitomycin C in locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrić Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Still there is no consensus on the choice of the most efficient and the least toxic chemotherapy regimen in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. Nowadays few therapy protocols are available for treating this disease. Objective. Study was conducted to compare the efficacy and toxicity of FAM (flurouracil, doxorubicin, mitomycin C with CDDP and FU/FA (cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin protocols in patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. Methods. This randomized study involved a group of 50 patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer, who had not previously undergone chemotherapy treatment. Progression free survival, overall survival and drug toxicity were evaluated. For statistical analysis chi-square test, Kaplan-Meier curve and the log rank test were used. Results. The overall response rate was 20% in the group treated with FAM and 24% in the group treated with CDDP, FU/FA (4% of patients from each group had complete response, but without significant statistical difference. Median survival was 10.9 months in the FAM group and 11.8 months in CDDP, FU/FA group, with no statistically significant difference. Non-haematological and haematological toxicities of CDDP, FU/FA were considerably less frequent than of FAM, and there was no treatment related deaths in any of the groups. Conclusion. Both investigated regimens demonstrated moderate efficacy. The study shows in favour of justified application of both protocols, while in regard to toxicity CDDP and FU/FA can be recommended as preferable treatment for locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. New strategies should be considered for better efficacy in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. New strategies are necessary with the goal to achieve a better therapeutic effect.

  17. New synthetic peptide with efficacy for heparin reversal and low toxicity and immunogenicity in comparison to protamine sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tong; Meng, Zhiyun; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Gan, Hui; Gu, Ruolan; Wu, Zhuona; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Liu, Taoyun; Han, Peng; Han, Su; Dou, Guifang, E-mail: douguifang@vip.sina.com

    2015-11-20

    Protamine sulfate (PS), the only clinically approved antidote to unfractionated heparin (UFH), is widely used for cardiopulmonary surgery or other extracorporeal circulation situations. However, the applications of PS have accompanied various severe side-effects. In this study, we presented a novel synthesized peptide compound (RRRRR-RRRRR-RRRRR-sulfate, R15S) served as a safer UFH antidote. Comparison studies were conducted between PS and R15S on efficacy and safety, aided by heparin neutralization studies, drug toxicity studies and anaphylactic analysis. Our research demonstrated that R15S contained comparable UFH neutralization activity in vitro and in rats in vivo as to active partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and anti-FXa assays. There was no cytotoxicity for R15S at 60 μg mg{sup −1} or below and the median lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) of R15S in mice was 35.4 mg kg{sup −1}, both of which were similar to that of PS. Furthermore, R15S exhibited no immunogenicity while it was obvious in guinea pigs immunized with PS. The level of cross-reactivity to anti-PS antibodies of R15S was about 30%. Both of which indicated much safer properties of R15S than PS. In conclusion, we presented a promising candidate R15S for UFH reversal, which is effective in neutralizing UFH and potentially safer in use. - Highlights: • R15 sulfate has a comparable unfractionated heparin neutralization activity to PS. • R15 sulfate avoided severe anaphylactic responses which happened to PS in clinical use. • R15 sulfate could provide a stricter quality control compared to PS which may vary with different batches.

  18. Efficacy of adsorbents (bentonite and diatomaceous earth) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) in alleviating the toxic effects of aflatoxin in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Anjos, F R; Ledoux, D R; Rottinghaus, G E; Chimonyo, M

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of bentonite clay (BC), diatomaceous earth (DE) and turmeric powder (TUM) in alleviating the toxic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). A total of 250 Ross-308 d-old male broiler chicks were assigned to 10 dietary treatments (5 replicates of 5 chicks) from hatch to d 21. Dietary treatments were: basal diet; basal diet plus AFB1 (2 mg) or BC (0.75%), or DE (0.75%), or TUM (200 mg/kg curcuminoids) and different combinations of AFB1, BC, DE and TUM. Feed intake (FI), body weight gain (BWG) and feed gain (FG) of the birds fed on BC or DE separately were not different from control birds. Birds fed on TUM only had similar FI and FG but lower BWG than control chicks. Aflatoxin B1 reduced FI, BWG and serum concentrations of glucose, albumin, total protein calcium, but increased FG and relative liver and kidney weights. Chicks fed on the combination of AFB1 and BC had similar FI and FG to control chicks. Chicks fed on the combination of DE and AFB1 had lower FI (23.1%) and BWG (28.6%) compared with control chicks. Chicks fed on the combination of TUM and AFB1 also had decreased FI (26.2 %) and BWG (31%) compared with control chicks. Chicks fed on the combination of AFB1, BC and TUM consumed significantly higher amounts of feed compared with chicks fed on only AF, but gained less when compared with control diet chicks. Chicks fed on the combination of AFB1, DE and TUM diet had poorer growth performance than those fed on AFB1 alone. None of the combination diets reduced the severity of liver lesions.

  19. Advanced case of glioblastoma multiforme and pregnancy. An ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rasheedy, Intisar M; Al-Hameed, Fahad M

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of the glial tumors. Advanced and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy for many reasons. Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy carries unique challenges to the patient, baby, family, and health care providers. We describe an unusual case of advanced GBM that was treated with maximum doses of chemotherapy and radiations, and she became pregnant and presented at eighteenth weeks of gestation. Her medical management was associated with a significant ethical dilemma. We managed to deliver the baby safely through cesarean section at week 28 despite the critical condition of the mother. Unfortunately, the mother died 2 weeks post delivery. We concluded that although recurrent and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy and carries dismal prognosis, but if it occurs, it can still be carried, and a multidisciplinary team work is the key for successful outcome.

  20. A prospective PET study of patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Preben B.; Blinkenberg, M; Lassen, U

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the post-surgical metabolic and structural cerebral changes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined ten patients prospectively with newly diagnosed GBM. All patients were primarily treated with surgery, followed by chemotherapy...... compared with structural imaging in the prospective evaluation of GBM. We found a difference in metabolic increase and tumor growth between the two treatment regimens, although this finding has limited relevance due to the design of the study....

  1. Survival benefit of surgery in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudry, Usama Khalid; Khan, Saad Akhtar; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-12-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding role of surgery for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Older literature hinted at only modest survival benefits with surgery and a high rate of morbidity. However, more recent literature suggests better survival that may be attributed to better surgical techniques and better options in adjuvant treatment. Herein the authors review recent literature with regards to the possible role of surgery in recurrent GBM and also look into the key factors impacting second surgery. .

  2. Metabolic management of glioblastoma multiforme using standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servadei Franco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM has been difficult using standard therapy (radiation with temozolomide chemotherapy. The ketogenic diet is used commonly to treat refractory epilepsy in children and, when administered in restricted amounts, can also target energy metabolism in brain tumors. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with progressive memory loss, chronic headaches, nausea, and a right hemisphere multi-centric tumor seen with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Following incomplete surgical resection, the patient was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme expressing hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter. Methods Prior to initiation of the standard therapy, the patient conducted water-only therapeutic fasting and a restricted 4:1 (fat: carbohydrate + protein ketogenic diet that delivered about 600 kcal/day. The patient also received the restricted ketogenic diet concomitantly during the standard treatment period. The diet was supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Steroid medication (dexamethasone was removed during the course of the treatment. The patient was followed using MRI and positron emission tomography with fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET. Results After two months treatment, the patient's body weight was reduced by about 20% and no discernable brain tumor tissue was detected using either FDG-PET or MRI imaging. Biomarker changes showed reduced levels of blood glucose and elevated levels of urinary ketones. MRI evidence of tumor recurrence was found 10 weeks after suspension of strict diet therapy. Conclusion This is the first report of confirmed GBM treated with standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet. As rapid regression of GBM is rare in older patients following incomplete surgical resection and standard therapy alone, the response observed in this case could result in part from the action of the calorie restricted ketogenic diet. Further studies are needed

  3. Evaluation of preclinical single and multiple dose toxicity and efficacy of 213 Bi-labeled plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 for breast and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, S.; Li, Y.; Allen, B.; Littlejohn, T.; Ranson, M.; Links, M.; Irving, D.; Andrews, J.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the single and multiple dose toxicity (maximum tolerated dose or MTD) regimes for 213 Bi-labeled PAI2. Dose range of 2-8 mCi/kg was used for the single dose toxicity studies. It was found that end point (20% weight loss and/or distressed behaviour) was not reached for the highest dose either with single or multiple dose injections. For multiple dose toxicity studies, the dose levels ranged between 0.4 - 2 mCi/kg, and were administered daily for 5 days. The highest level tested (2mCi/kg/day x 5) was the maximum tolerated dose as 3/6 mice succumbed to the endpoints. However, histological examination of major organs showed no adverse morphological changes. From these toxicity studies, we concluded that either a dose of 1.6mCi/kg of 213 Bi-PAI2 per day for 5 days or a single injection of 8 mCi/kg can be administered without reaching the endpoints. These dose levels were used for efficacy trials. The efficacy studies were conducted to examine if the 1.6mCi/kgday x 5 multiple dose schedule (sub-maximum tolerated dose) showed efficacy against established and early stage human breast and prostate tumours in mice. Statistical analyses of the data indicate a significant tumour growth rate delay and increased time to reach tumour size endpoint for alpha-PAI2 treatment compared to control tumours, in both pre-tumour stage and established tumour models

  4. Irinotecan and bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése

    2011-01-01

    treatment with BVZ and irinotecan provides impressive response rates (RR), it is still uncertain if this treatment translates into improved clinical benefit in GBM patients. AREAS COVERED: This review discusses the clinical efficacy, safety and difficulties regarding response evaluation when treating...... with BVZ and CPT-11 in recurrent GBM. Particular attention is placed on the literature and a discussion on whether treatment with BVZ and CPT-11 improves clinical outcome. Antiangiogenic treatment has led to difficulties when evaluating objective response by the conventional MacDonald criteria....... In the present paper the authors discuss selected key aspects of this treatment modality. A literature search was performed using PubMed in February 2011. EXPERT OPINION: BVZ + irinotecan leads to high RR and to an increased 6-month progression-free survival. However, no improvement in median overall survival...

  5. Prolonged survival when temozolomide is added to accelerated radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Mayer, Mario; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Buttmann, Mathias [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Vince, Giles H. [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2011-09-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate accelerated radiotherapy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective analysis evaluated 86 patients with histologically proven GBM who were treated with accelerated radiotherapy of 1.8 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54 Gy within 3 weeks. Median age was 62 years and median Karnofsky index was 90. A total of 41 patients received radiotherapy only from 2002-2005 and 45 patients were treated with TMZ concomitantly and after radiotherapy from 2005-2007. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.5 months and 2-year OS was 15.4%. Patient characteristics were well balanced between the two groups except for better performance status (p = 0.05) and higher frequency of retreatment for the first recurrence (p = 0.02) in the TMZ group. Age at diagnosis (HR 2.83) and treatment with TMZ (HR 0.60) were correlated with OS in the multivariate analysis: treatment with and without TMZ resulted in median OS of 16 months and 11.3 months, respectively. Hematological toxicity grade > II was observed in 2/45 patients and 5/37 patients during simultaneous radiochemotherapy and adjuvant TMZ. TMZ added to accelerated radiotherapy for GBM resulted in prolonged overall survival with low rates of severe hematological toxicity. (orig.)

  6. Prolonged survival when temozolomide is added to accelerated radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Mayer, Mario; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael; Buttmann, Mathias; Vince, Giles H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate accelerated radiotherapy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective analysis evaluated 86 patients with histologically proven GBM who were treated with accelerated radiotherapy of 1.8 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54 Gy within 3 weeks. Median age was 62 years and median Karnofsky index was 90. A total of 41 patients received radiotherapy only from 2002-2005 and 45 patients were treated with TMZ concomitantly and after radiotherapy from 2005-2007. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.5 months and 2-year OS was 15.4%. Patient characteristics were well balanced between the two groups except for better performance status (p = 0.05) and higher frequency of retreatment for the first recurrence (p = 0.02) in the TMZ group. Age at diagnosis (HR 2.83) and treatment with TMZ (HR 0.60) were correlated with OS in the multivariate analysis: treatment with and without TMZ resulted in median OS of 16 months and 11.3 months, respectively. Hematological toxicity grade > II was observed in 2/45 patients and 5/37 patients during simultaneous radiochemotherapy and adjuvant TMZ. TMZ added to accelerated radiotherapy for GBM resulted in prolonged overall survival with low rates of severe hematological toxicity. (orig.)

  7. Prognostic value of plasma transforming growth factor-beta in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, M. C.; Sminia, P.; Barten-van Rijbroek, A. D.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether the postoperative concentration of circulating transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) yields prognostic value in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (gbm). Blood was collected from 20 healthy volunteers and in 28 patients with mainly glioblastoma multiforme (gbm), both

  8. Erythema multiforme and persistent erythema as early cutaneous manifestations of Lyme disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttelaar, M L; Laeijendecker, R; Heinhuis, R J; Van Joost, T

    1997-01-01

    We report two cases of borreliosis (Lyme disease) with unusual cutaneous manifestations, erythema multiforme, and persistent erythema. The lesions in both of our patients had distinctive histopathologic features. To our knowledge, this is the first report of erythema multiforme and persistent

  9. Recidiverende erythema multiforme udløst af herpes simplex-virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård Grejsen, Dorthe; Henningsen, Emil

    2012-01-01

    We describe two cases of recurrent erythema multiforme, both associated to infection with herpes simplex virus. The importance of subclinical herpes is illustrated. Antiviral and additional treatment is described.......We describe two cases of recurrent erythema multiforme, both associated to infection with herpes simplex virus. The importance of subclinical herpes is illustrated. Antiviral and additional treatment is described....

  10. The Efficacy and Toxicity of Gefitinib in Treating Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-analysis of 19 Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wo, Hongmei; He, Jing; Zhao, Yang; Yu, Hao; Chen, Feng; Yi, Honggang

    2018-01-01

    Background: This meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of gefitinib with other commonly used drugs in different treatment settings and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status. Methods: Nineteen randomize clinical trials (RCTs) of 6,554 patients with NSCLC were pooled in this meta-analysis by random-effects or fixed-effects model, whichever is proper. Results: In first-line therapy, gefitinib showed higher odds than chemotherapy (OR = 2.19, 95% CI: 1.20-4.01), but less than other targeted therapies (OR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.38-0.88). As non-first-line therapy, the overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were similar between gefitinib and controls (HR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.93-1.08; HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.72-1.15), respectively. With the regard to toxicity, the incidences of dry skin, rash and pruritus were higher in gefitinib compared with controls, while gefitinib significantly reduced the incidence of hematologic toxicity. Conclusion: Gefitinib might be more efficient than chemotherapy, but less efficient than other targeted therapies in ORR, especially in EGFR mutation-positive patients. Gefitinib can decrease the odds of hematologic toxicity compared to controls. Future studies, especially those with EGFR mutation-positive patients, will be needed to confirm our findings. PMID:29721056

  11. Hair-dye induced erythema multiforme like allergic contact dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Gupta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Erythema multiforme (EM is an acute, self limited skin disease characterized by the sudden eruption of symmetrical lesions in typical targetoid fashion usually confined to face and extremities. The most commonly implicated factors include infections like herpes simplex, mycoplasma, drugs like antibiotics and anticonvulsants and vaccinations. Contact dermatitis induced EM is a rarely reported entity. Herein we present a case of a 40 year old female who presented with EM due to contact sensitivity to p-Paraphenylenediamine (PPD, a common coloring agent in hair-dyes and a potent sensitizer. Till date, there have been only a few case reports of PPD induced EM.

  12. Glioblastoma multiforme of the pineal region: case report Glioblastoma multiforme de região pineal: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Leandro Gasparetto

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: pineal region tumors are uncommon, and comprise more frequently three categories: germ cell, parenchymal cell and glial tumors. Most pineal gliomas are low-grade astrocytomas. Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive and common brain tumor, is extremely rare at this location with only few cases reported. CASE DESCRIPTION: a 29-year-old woman with a two month history of headache, nuchal pain, fever, nausea and seizures and physical examination showing nuchal rigidity, generalized hypotony, hypotrophy and hyper-reflexia, Babinski sign and left VI cranial par palsy. CT scan examination revealed a ill-defined hypodense lesion at the pineal region with heterogeneous contrast enhancement. MRI showed a lesion at the pineal region infiltrating the right thalamic region. The patient underwent a right craniotomy with partial resection of the mass. The histological examination of paraffin-embedded material defined the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme. Post-operative radiotherapy was indicated but the patient refused the treatment and died two months afterwards. CONCLUSION: in spite of its rarity at this location, glioblastoma multiforme should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aggressive lesions at the pineal region.OBJETIVO: Os tumores da região pineal são incomuns e podem ser divididos em três categorias de acordo com a sua origem: células germinativas, células do parênquima e células gliais. Em sua maioria, os gliomas de pineal são astrocitomas de baixo grau, sendo que o seu correspondente maligno, glioblastoma multiforme, é o mais comum e agressivo tumor encefálico e é extremamente raro nesta localização, com apenas alguns casos relatados na literatura. CASO: Mulher com 29 anos apresentando há 2 meses cefaléia, nucalgia, febre, náuseas e crises convulsivas. O exame físico mostrou rigidez de nuca, hipotonia, hipotrofia e hiperreflexia generalizadas, sinal de Babinski e paralisia do VI nervo craniano. A

  13. Influence of polymorphisms within the methotrexate pathway genes on the toxicity and efficacy of methotrexate in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Naruto, Takuya; Hara, Takuma; Kikuchi, Masako; Hara, Ryoki; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Morita, Satoshi; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokota, Shumpei

    2011-02-01

    We investigated whether several polymorphisms within the methotrexate (MTX) pathway genes were related to the toxicity and efficacy of MTX in 92 Japanese patients with articular-type juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Eight gene polymorphisms within the MTX pathway genes, namely, RFC, BCRP, MTHFR (two), FPGS, γ-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH; two) and ATIC, were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Liver dysfunction was defined as an increase in alanine transaminase to five times the normal upper limit. Non-responders to MTX were defined as patients refractory to MTX and were therefore treated with biologics. The non-TT genotype at GGH T16C was associated with a high risk of liver dysfunction (P=0.028, odds ratio=6.90, 95% confidence interval 1.38-34.5), even after adjustment for the duration of MTX treatment. A longer interval from disease onset to treatment (8.5 and 21.3 months, P=0.029) and rheumatoid factor positivity (P=0.026, odds ratio=2.87, 95% confidence interval 1.11-7.39) were associated with lower efficacy of MTX. The non-TT genotype at GGH T16C was associated with a high risk of liver dysfunction, presumably because the C allele of GGH C16T may reduce the activity of GGH. The time interval before MTX treatment and rheumatoid factor positivity were associated with the efficacy of MTX treatment. The pharmacogenetics of the MTX pathway genes affects the toxicity and efficacy of MTX in Japanese JIA patients. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Analysis of association between polymorphisms of MTHFR, MTHFD1 and RFC1 genes and efficacy and toxicity of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vejnovic Dubravka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A folate analogue methotrexate (MTX is the most commonly used disease-modifying drug in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. However, the clinical response of RA patients treated with MTX shows interindividual differences and 30% of patients discontinue therapy due to the side effects. In a group of 184 RA patients treated with MTX we have investigated whether polymorphisms in MTHFR (rs1801133, rs1801131, MTHFD1 (rs2236225 and RFC1 (rs144320551 genes may have impact on MTX efficacy and/or adverse drugs effects (ADEs. The efficacy of the MTX therapy has been estimated using the disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28-ESR based on EULAR criteria and relative DAS28 values (rDAS28 and all adverse drug events were recorded. Patients were genotyped for selected polymorphism by PCR-RFLP method. According to the EULAR response criteria after 6 months of MTX therapy 146 (79.3% patients were classified as responders, (17 patients (11.6% were good and 129 patients (88.4% were moderate responders and 38 patients (20.7% as non-responders. ADEs were observed in 53 (28.8% patients. The majority of ADEs were mild (36 (19.56% patients to moderate (12 (6.25% patients. Five patients (2.7% had serious ADEs. Association studies have been conducted between obtained genotypes and the efficacy and toxicity of MTX. We have observed no association between polymorphisms and efficacy or toxicity of MTX in RA patients. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175091

  15. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Raffa, Vittoria; Menciassi, Arianna; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2008-11-25

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of (10)B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  16. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciofani Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  17. Impact of gender on efficacy and acute toxicity of alkylating agent -based chemotherapy in Ewing sarcoma: secondary analysis of the Euro-Ewing99-R1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Henk; Paulussen, Michael; Le Teuff, Gwénaël; Judson, Ian; Gelderblom, Hans; Dirksen, Uta; Brennan, Bernadette; Whelan, Jeremy; Ladenstein, Ruth Lydia; Marec-Berard, Perrine; Kruseova, Jarmila; Hjorth, Lars; Kühne, Thomas; Brichard, Benedicte; Wheatley, Keith; Craft, Alan; Juergens, Heribert; Gaspar, Nathalie; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Based on the randomised Euro-EWING99-R1 trial, vincristine, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide (VAC) may be able to replace vincristine, adriamycin, ifosfamide (VAI) in the treatment of standard-risk Ewing sarcoma. However some heterogeneity of treatment effect by gender was observed. The current exploratory study aimed at investigating the influence of gender on treatment efficacy and acute toxicity. Impact of gender on event-free survival (EFS), acute toxicity by course, switches between treatment arms and cumulative dose of alkylating agents was evaluated in multivariable models adjusted for age including terms to test for heterogeneity of treatment effect by gender. The analysis of the EFS was performed on the intention-to-treat population. EFS did not significantly differ between the 509 males and 347 females (p=0.33), but an interaction in terms of efficacy was suspected between treatment and gender (p=0.058): VAC was associated with poorer EFS than VAI in males, hazard ratio (HR) (VAC/VAI)=1.37 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.98-1.90], contrasting with HR=0.81 [95%CI, 0.53-1.24] in females. Severe toxicity was more frequent in females, whatever the toxicity type. Thirty patients switched from VAI to VAC (9/251 males, 4%, and 21/174 females, 12%) mostly due to renal toxicity, and three from VAC to VAI (2/258 males, 0.8%, and 1/173 females, 0.6%). A reduction of alkylating agent cumulative dose >20% was more frequent in females (15% versus 9%, p=0.005), with no major difference between VAC and VAI (10% versus 13%, p=0.15). Differences of acute toxicity rate and cumulative doses of alkylating agents could not explain the marginal interaction observed in the Euro-EWING99-R1 trial data. Effects of gender-dependent polymorphism/activity of metabolic enzymes (e.g. known for CYP2B6) of ifosfamide versus cyclophosphamide should be explored. External data are required to further evaluate whether there is heterogeneity of alkylating agent effect by gender. NCT00987636 and

  18. Study of efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy 17 gray in 2 fractions for palliation in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arif, S.; Rasul, S.; Haider, N.; Mahmood, A.; Syed, A.S.; Nadeem, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy 17 Gray (Gy) in 2 fractions for palliation in advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Study design: A quasi-experimental study. Place and duration of study: Oncology department, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from 4th July 2008 to 4th Nov 2009. Material and Methods: Fifty four patients with histologically and/or cytologically confirmed unresectable stages III and IV non small cell lung cancer, with performance status 2 or 3 and expected survival > 2 months were treated with megavoltage radiation therapy 17 Gy in 2 fractions one week apart, with symptoms due to intrathoracic disease (cough, dyspnea and hemoptysis) and toxicity due to radiation therapy (dysphagia secondary to esophagitis) assessed as per common toxicity criteria adverse event version 3.0 on day 0 before treatment and day 30 after start of treatment. Results: Grades of cough, hemoptysis and dyspnea showed significant improvement after treatment (p<0.001). A total of 42.68% patients showed an improvement in grade of cough (23 out of 54 patients), 85.7% of patients showed improvement in grade of hemoptysis (36 out of 42 patients) and 55.65% patients showed improvement in grade of dyspnea (30 out of 54 patients). Twenty two point two percent patients (12 out of 54) showed increase in grade of dysphagia. Although, there was a statistically significant increase in grade of dysphagia after treatment but it was limited to grade 1 and 2 only. Considering that no patient had grade 3 or 4 dysphagia, this toxicity was acceptable. Conclusion: Based on our results hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy, 17 Gy in 2 fractions, is effective with acceptable toxicity in palliation in advanced non small cell lung cancer and is recommended as it will result in shorter duration of hospital stay and low hospital stay charges. (author)

  19. Exploratory analysis of the copy number alterations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Pablo; Vilela, Marco; Deus, Helena; Kim, Yong-Wan; Koul, Dimpy; Colman, Howard; Aldape, Kenneth D; Bogler, Oliver; Yung, W K Alfred; Coombes, Kevin; Mills, Gordon B; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Almeida, Jonas S

    2008-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project (TCGA) has initiated the analysis of multiple samples of a variety of tumor types, starting with glioblastoma multiforme. The analytical methods encompass genomic and transcriptomic information, as well as demographic and clinical data about the sample donors. The data create the opportunity for a systematic screening of the components of the molecular machinery for features that may be associated with tumor formation. The wealth of existing mechanistic information about cancer cell biology provides a natural reference for the exploratory exercise. Glioblastoma multiforme DNA copy number data was generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas project for 167 patients using 227 aCGH experiments, and was analyzed to build a catalog of aberrant regions. Genome screening was performed using an information theory approach in order to quantify aberration as a deviation from a centrality without the bias of untested assumptions about its parametric nature. A novel Cancer Genome Browser software application was developed and is made public to provide a user-friendly graphical interface in which the reported results can be reproduced. The application source code and stand alone executable are available at (http://code.google.com/p/cancergenome) and (http://bioinformaticstation.org), respectively. The most important known copy number alterations for glioblastoma were correctly recovered using entropy as a measure of aberration. Additional alterations were identified in different pathways, such as cell proliferation, cell junctions and neural development. Moreover, novel candidates for oncogenes and tumor suppressors were also detected. A detailed map of aberrant regions is provided.

  20. Nestin expression in the cell lines derived from glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselska, Renata; Kuglik, Petr; Cejpek, Pavel; Svachova, Hana; Neradil, Jakub; Loja, Tomas; Relichova, Jirina

    2006-01-01

    Nestin is a protein belonging to class VI of intermediate filaments that is produced in stem/progenitor cells in the mammalian CNS during development and is consecutively replaced by other intermediate filament proteins (neurofilaments, GFAP). Down-regulated nestin may be re-expressed in the adult organism under certain pathological conditions (brain injury, ischemia, inflammation, neoplastic transformation). Our work focused on a detailed study of the nestin cytoskeleton in cell lines derived from glioblastoma multiforme, because re-expression of nestin together with down-regulation of GFAP has been previously reported in this type of brain tumor. Two cell lines were derived from the tumor tissue of patients treated for glioblastoma multiforme. Nestin and other cytoskeletal proteins were visualized using imunocytochemical methods: indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold-labelling. Using epifluorescence and confocal microscopy, we described the morphology of nestin-positive intermediate filaments in glioblastoma cells of both primary cultures and the derived cell lines, as well as the reorganization of nestin during mitosis. Our most important result came through transmission electron microscopy and provided clear evidence that nestin is present in the cell nucleus. Detailed information concerning the pattern of the nestin cytoskeleton in glioblastoma cell lines and especially the demonstration of nestin in the nucleus represent an important background for further studies of nestin re-expression in relationship to tumor malignancy and invasive potential

  1. Cyclophilin B supports Myc and mutant p53-dependent survival of glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Won; Schroeder, Mark A; Sarkaria, Jann N; Bram, Richard J

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, treatment-refractory type of brain tumor for which effective therapeutic targets remain important to identify. Here, we report that cyclophilin B (CypB), a prolyl isomerase residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), provides an essential survival signal in glioblastoma multiforme cells. Analysis of gene expression databases revealed that CypB is upregulated in many cases of malignant glioma. We found that suppression of CypB reduced cell proliferation and survival in human glioblastoma multiforme cells in vitro and in vivo. We also found that treatment with small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilins, including the approved drug cyclosporine, greatly reduced the viability of glioblastoma multiforme cells. Mechanistically, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CypB caused hyperactivation of the oncogenic RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, induction of cellular senescence signals, and death resulting from loss of MYC, mutant p53, Chk1, and Janus-activated kinase/STAT3 signaling. Elevated reactive oxygen species, ER expansion, and abnormal unfolded protein responses in CypB-depleted glioblastoma multiforme cells indicated that CypB alleviates oxidative and ER stresses and coordinates stress adaptation responses. Enhanced cell survival and sustained expression of multiple oncogenic proteins downstream of CypB may thus contribute to the poor outcome of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. Our findings link chaperone-mediated protein folding in the ER to mechanisms underlying oncogenic transformation, and they make CypB an attractive and immediately targetable molecule for glioblastoma multiforme therapy.

  2. Impact of therapy on quality of life, neurocognitive function and their correlates in glioblastoma multiforme: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksson, Roger; Asklund, Thomas; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of quality of life (QoL) in patients with high-grade glioma is an important endpoint during treatment, particularly in those with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) given its dismal prognosis despite limited advances in standard therapy. It has proven difficult to identify new therapies...... that extend survival in patients with recurrent GBM, so one of the primary aims of new therapies is to reduce morbidity, restore or preserve neurologic functions, and the capacity to perform daily activities. Apart from temozolomide, cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents do not appear to significantly impact...... response or survival, but produce toxicity that is likely to negatively impact QoL. New biological agents, such as bevacizumab, can induce a clinically meaningful proportion of durable responses among patients with recurrent GBM with an acceptable safety profile. Emerging evidence suggests that bevacizumab...

  3. Phase II study of imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, David A; Egorin, Merrill J; Quinn, Jennifer A; Rich, Jeremy N; Rich, Jeremy N; Gururangan, Sridharan; Gururangan, Idharan; Vredenburgh, James J; Desjardins, Annick; Sathornsumetee, Sith; Provenzale, James M; Herndon, James E; Dowell, Jeannette M; Badruddoja, Michael A; McLendon, Roger E; Lagattuta, Theodore F; Kicielinski, Kimberly P; Dresemann, Gregor; Sampson, John H; Friedman, Allan H; Salvado, August J; Friedman, Henry S

    2005-12-20

    We performed a phase II study to evaluate the combination of imatinib mesylate, an adenosine triphosphate mimetic, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, plus hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Patients with GBM at any recurrence received imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea (500 mg twice a day) orally on a continuous, daily schedule. The imatinib mesylate dose was 500 mg twice a day for patients on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and 400 mg once a day for those not on EIAEDs. Assessments were performed every 28 days. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Thirty-three patients enrolled with progressive disease after prior radiotherapy and at least temozolomide-based chemotherapy. With a median follow-up of 58 weeks, 27% of patients were progression-free at 6 months, and the median PFS was 14.4 weeks. Three patients (9%) achieved radiographic response, and 14 (42%) achieved stable disease. Cox regression analysis identified concurrent EIAED use and no more than one prior progression as independent positive prognostic factors of PFS. The most common toxicities included grade 3 neutropenia (16%), thrombocytopenia (6%), and edema (6%). There were no grade 4 or 5 events. Concurrent EIAED use lowered imatinib mesylate exposure. Imatinib mesylate clearance was decreased at day 28 compared with day 1 in all patients, suggesting an effect of hydroxyurea. Imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea is well tolerated and associated with durable antitumor activity in some patients with recurrent GBM.

  4. The development of glioblastoma multiforme reactive monoclonal antibodies and their use in drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaich, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop monoclonal antibodies reactive with the tumor glioblastoma multiforme and to use them to study and develop new treatment modalities for this disease. A tumor antigen enriched immunogen, prepared by immunoaffinity chromatography, was compared to a whole tumor homogenate immunogen with the difference in the yield of tumor reactive, normal brain unreactive monoclonal antibodies proving to be significant. Monoclonal antibody A7, reactive with tumor tissue but unreactive with normal tissue, was isotyped to be an IgG2a immunoglobulin and could be purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by using serum-free culture conditions and protein A sepharose chromatography. Monoclonal antibody A7 is noncytotoxic as measured by the 3 H-nicotinamide release assay and binds to a 138 kd membrane antigen which is not internalized. Localization studies using 14 C-labeled monoclonal antibody A7 and the U-87 MG nude mouse xenograft model resulted in a tumor:serum ratio of 1.25:1.0 as compared to 0.29:1.0 for the negative control. A monoclonal antibody A7-doxorubicin immunoconjugate proved to be more cytotoxic than free doxorubicin in vitro while lethality studies using Swiss mice demonstrated the lack of toxicity of the immunoconjugate as compared to free doxorubicin. In vivo chemotherapy studies using the U-87 MG nude mouse xenograft failed to demonstrate any immunoconjugate anti-tumor activity which may be attributable to the route of administration

  5. Hypofractionated High-Dose Irradiation with Positron Emission Tomography Data for the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Miwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper presents clinical outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose irradiation by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (Hypo-IMRT with 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET data for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. A total of 45 patients with GBM were treated with Hypo-IMRT after surgery. Gross tumor volume (GTV was defined as the area of enhanced lesion on MRI, including MET-PET avid region; clinical target volume (CTV was the area with 5 mm margin surrounding the GTV; planning target volume (PTV was the area with 15 mm margin surrounding the CTV, including MET-PET moderate region. Hypo-IMRT was performed in 8 fractions; planning the dose for GTV was escalated to 68 Gy and that for CTV was escalated to 56 Gy, while keeping the dose delivered to the PTV at 40 Gy. Concomitant and adjuvant TMZ chemotherapy was administered. At a median follow-up of 18.7 months, median overall survival (OS was 20.0 months, and median progression-free survival was 13.0 months. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 71.2% and 26.3%, respectively. Adjuvant TMZ chemotherapy was significantly predictive of OS on multivariate analysis. Late toxicity included 7 cases of Grade 3-4 radiation necrosis. Hypo-IMRT with MET-PET data appeared to result in favorable survival outcomes for patients with GBM.

  6. Fostering efficacy and toxicity evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine and natural products: Chick embryo as a high throughput model bridging in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tong; Yu, Gui-Yuan; Xiao, Jia; Yan, Chang; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Li, Yi-Fang; So, Kwok-Fai; He, Rong-Rong

    2018-04-19

    Efficacy and safety assessments are essential thresholds for drug candidates from preclinical to clinical research. Conventional mammalian in vivo models cannot offer rapid pharmacological and toxicological screening, whereas cell-based or cell-free in vitro systems often lead to inaccurate results because of the lack of physiological environment. Within the avian species, gallus gallus is the first bird to have its genome sequencing. Meantime, chick embryo is an easily operating, relatively transparent and extensively accessible model, whose physiological and pathological alterations can be visualized by egg candler, staining and image technologies. These features facilitate chick embryo as a high-throughput screening platform bridging in vivo and in vitro gaps in the pharmaceutical research. Due to the complicated ingredients and multiple-targets natures of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), testing the efficacy and safety of TCM by in vitro methods are laborious and inaccurate, while testing in mammalian models consume massive cost and time. As such, the productive living organism chick embryo serves as an ideal biological system for pharmacodynamics studies of TCM. Herein, we comprehensively update recent progresses on the specialty of chick embryo in evaluation of efficacy and toxicity of drugs, with special concerns of TCM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Common Species of Florida Landscaping Plants on the Efficacy of Attractive Toxic Sugar Baits Against Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Kelly E; Scott, Jodi M; Muller, Gunter C; Qualls, Whitney A; Xue, Rui-De

    2017-06-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) was applied to 5 different types of commonly found plants in landscaping of northeastern Florida. The ATSB applications were assessed for possible plant effects and preference against Aedes albopictus in semifield evaluations. Positive and negative controls consisted of plants sprayed with attractive sugar bait (no toxicant) and plants with nothing applied. Bioassays were conducted on stems with leaf clippings and on full plants to assess any difference in mosquito mortality on the different plants. Plants utilized in these evaluations were Indian hawthorne, Yaupon holly, Japanese privet, Loropetalum ruby, and podocarpus. In both assays, no significant difference was observed in the effect of ATSBs on adult female mosquitoes based on the type of plant. ATSB could be applied to common landscape plants for adult Ae. albopictus control.

  8. Copper-64 Dichloride as Theranostic Agent for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Preclinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival time less than one year. To date, there are only a limited number of effective agents available for GBM therapy and this does not seem to add much survival advantage over the conventional approach based on surgery and radiotherapy. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutic approaches to GBM is essential and those based on radionuclide therapy could be of significant clinical impact. Experimental evidence has clearly demonstrated that cancer cells have a particularly high fractional content of copper inside the nucleus compared to normal cells. This behavior can be conveniently exploited both for diagnosis and for delivering therapeutic payloads (theranostic of the radionuclide copper-64 into the nucleus of cancerous cells by intravenous administration of its simplest chemical form as dichloride salt [64Cu]CuCl2. To evaluate the potential theranostic role of [64Cu]CuCl2 in GBM, the present work reports results from a preclinical study carried out in a xenografted GBM tumor mouse model. Biodistribution data of this new agent were collected using a small-animal PET tomograph. Subsequently, groups of tumor implanted nude mice were treated with [64Cu]CuCl2 to simulate single- and multiple-dose therapy protocols, and results were analyzed to estimate therapeutic efficacy.

  9. Short course of radiation therapy in elderly patients with multiform glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idbaih, A.; Taillibert, S.; Simon, J.M.; Lopez, S.; Lang, P.; Toubiana, T.; Feuvret, L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Idbaih, A.; Taillibert, S.; Psimaras, D.; Delattre, J.Y.; Schneble, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal schedule of irradiation in elderly patients suffering from glioblastoma multiform (G.B.M.) is unsettled. Materials and methods: This study reviewed the charts of 28 consecutive G.B.M. patients aged 70 years or more with a Karnofsky Performance Status (K.P.S.) greater than or equal to 70 who received a short course of radiotherapy (40 grays in 15 fractions over three weeks). Results: The median age at surgery was 74.6 years (range, 70.1 - 85.7). No patient received prior or concomitant chemotherapy. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 21.6 weeks (95% CI, 17.0 - 39.9) and 50.6 weeks (95% CI, 26.3 - 62.0), respectively. Even within a narrow range (< 90 or = 90), K.P.S. remained a prognostic factor (p = 0.03). Tolerance appeared acceptable in terms of K.P.S. changes and corticosteroid use during radiation therapy. Conclusion: These results support the efficacy of short schedule radiotherapy for G.B.M. in elderly patients with a good K.P.S.. (authors)

  10. Efficacy of Pistacia khinjuk Fruits on Viability of Hydatid Cyst Protoscoleces and Its Acute Toxicity in Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein MAHMOUDVAND

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: This investigation aimed to evaluate the in vitro scolicidal effects of Pistacia khinjuk methanolic extract against protoscoleces of hydatid cysts and its acute toxicity in mice NMRI model.Methods: Protoscoleces were aseptically extracted from sheep livers having hydatid cysts. Various concentrations of the essential oil (12.5- 100 mg/mL were used for 10 to 60 min. Viability of protoscoleces was confirmed using eosin exclusion test (0.1% eosin staining. Twenty-four male NMRI mice were used to assess the acute toxicity of P. khinjuk.Results: P. khinjuk extract at the concentrations of 100 mg/mL after 10 min of exposure killed 100% of protoscoleces. Similarly, the mean of mortality rate of protoscoleces after 20 min of exposure to the concentration of 50 mg/mL was 100%. The LD50 of the intraperitoneal injection of the P. khinjuk methanolic extract was 2.8 g/kg and the maximum non-fatal dose was 1.7 g/kg.Conclusion: The findings demonstrated effective scolicidal effects of P. khinjuk extract with no considerable toxicity that might be a natural source for the producing of new scolicidal agent.

  11. Glioblastoma multiforme of the cerebellum: description of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luccarelli, G

    1980-01-01

    Only 43 cases of glioblastoma multiforme of the cerebellum have been reported in the literature. This report is based on the findings of 3 cerebellar glioblastomas in a review of 1,206 consecutive confirmed cases of glioblastoma operated on between 1947 and 1977 at the Istituto Neurologico of Milan, giving an incidence of 0.24%. Clinical features are similar to those of any other fast-growing subtentorial tumour. Neuroradiological studies, including CAT, are of little help in predicting the exact nature of these tumours before surgery. A correct diagnosis can be reached only by microscopic examination. Histological patterns appear in no way to differ from those of cerebral glioblastoma. The biological behaviour of these tumours is in all respects identical to that of glioblastoma of cerebral hemispheres.

  12. Cellular and subcellular distribution of BSH in human glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, M.; Gabel, D.

    2000-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular distribution of mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) in seven glioblastoma multiforme tissue sections of six patients having received BSH prior to surgery was investigated by light, fluorescence and electron microscopy. With use of specific antibodies against BSH its localization could be found in tissue sections predominantly (approx. 90%) in the cytoplasm of GFAP-positive cells of all but one patient. The latter was significantly younger (33 years in contrast of 46-71 (mean 60) years). In none of the tissue sections BSH could be found to a significant amount in the cell nuclei. In contrast, electron microscopy studies show BSH as well associated with the cell membrane as with the chromatin in the nucleus. (author)

  13. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

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    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  14. Multiform structures of SnO2 nanobelts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Junhong; Gong Jiangfeng; Huang Hongbo; Zhao Xiaoning; Cheng Guangxu; Yu Zhongzhen; Yang Shaoguang

    2007-01-01

    Multiform SnO 2 microstructures were synthesized by a facile thermal evaporation of tin grains. The product was characterized with a variety of techniques to obtain the structural and optical information. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed a large percentage of acute angle zigzag nanobelts with perfectly periodic morphology. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns revealed that the zigzag nanobelts were single crystalline and their zone axis was along the [010] crystal direction. The growth mechanism of zigzag nanobelts was proposed based on TEM characterization and thermodynamic analysis. The zigzag nanobelts were deduced to be formed by changing the growth direction from [101-bar] to [101] or vice versa. The photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy of the nanobelts showed a broad and strong luminescence emission centred at 550 nm

  15. Pediatric glioblastoma multiforme: A single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mansour; Nasrolahi, Hamid; Kani, Amir-Abbas; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common astrocytoma in adults and has a poor prognosis, with a median survival of about 12 months. But, it is rare in children. We report our experience on the pediatric population (20 years or younger) with GBM. Twenty-three patients with GBM who were treated at our hospital during 1990-2008 were evaluated. The mean age was 15.2 years, and the majority of them (14/23) were male. All had received radiotherapy and some had also received chemotherapy. The mean survival was 16.0 months. Two cases survived more than 5 years. Age, radiation dose and performance status were significantly related to survival. GBM in pediatric patients were not very common in our center, and prognosis was unfavorable.

  16. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

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    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  17. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Monjazeb, Arta M., E-mail: arta.monjazeb@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [U.C. Davis School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Case, L. Douglas [Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lesser, Glen J. [Hematology Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4-5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  18. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monjazeb, Arta M.; Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney; Case, L. Douglas; Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Lesser, Glen J.; Shaw, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4–5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  19. Exploratory analysis of the copy number alterations in glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Pablo Freire

    Full Text Available The Cancer Genome Atlas project (TCGA has initiated the analysis of multiple samples of a variety of tumor types, starting with glioblastoma multiforme. The analytical methods encompass genomic and transcriptomic information, as well as demographic and clinical data about the sample donors. The data create the opportunity for a systematic screening of the components of the molecular machinery for features that may be associated with tumor formation. The wealth of existing mechanistic information about cancer cell biology provides a natural reference for the exploratory exercise.Glioblastoma multiforme DNA copy number data was generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas project for 167 patients using 227 aCGH experiments, and was analyzed to build a catalog of aberrant regions. Genome screening was performed using an information theory approach in order to quantify aberration as a deviation from a centrality without the bias of untested assumptions about its parametric nature. A novel Cancer Genome Browser software application was developed and is made public to provide a user-friendly graphical interface in which the reported results can be reproduced. The application source code and stand alone executable are available at (http://code.google.com/p/cancergenome and (http://bioinformaticstation.org, respectively.The most important known copy number alterations for glioblastoma were correctly recovered using entropy as a measure of aberration. Additional alterations were identified in different pathways, such as cell proliferation, cell junctions and neural development. Moreover, novel candidates for oncogenes and tumor suppressors were also detected. A detailed map of aberrant regions is provided.

  20. The management of oral erythema multiforme in juvenile patient

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    Diah Savitri Ernawati

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Erythema multiforme is an acute inflammatory disease of the skin and mucous membranes that causes a variety of the skin lesionhence the name ‘multiforme’.The oral mucosa looks severely inflamed, but the feature are non specific and usually a biopsy is required in order to confirm the diagnosis. Cracked, bleeding, Crusted, swollen and ulcers of the lips is very characteristic of erythema multiforme, and lip involvement may cause significant morbidity. EM is assumed as an immune complex disorder which rises as a result of an immune response to an external agent such as herpes simplex virus or various drugs. We reported: 14-year girl, complained she suffered from painful oral ulceration for one week. One weeks advance the patient received a treatment of paracetamol and paramex for febris, headache and cough. Clinical examination of the skin showed no signs of cutaneous involvement. Other site such as the conjunctival, and genital were also free of lesions. The patients had several red-based superficial erosions on the upper and lower lips accompanied by crusting and bleeding. Intra oral findings showed multiple irregular erosions, ulcers and intense erythematous areas, mainly on the labial mucosa. The clinical diagnosis of EM was concluded by anamnesis and clinical appearance, with differential diagnosis of secondary herpes infection (herpes labialis and pemphigus vulgaris. Systemic and topical corticosteroid therapy is frequently used to treat EM Although it may partially suppress the disease. Objective: This report explains and describes the management of patients with EM which may help dentists to determine an accurate diagnosis to avoid further complication and to give medical intervention to the disease. Conclusion: Early recognition of this disease may prevent delayed diagnosis and incorrect treatment.

  1. Histological vis-a-vis biochemical assessment on the toxic level and antineoplastic efficacy of a synthetic drug Pt-ATP on experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Shipra; Sadhu, Arpita Sengupta; Patra, Swarup; Mukherjea, Kalyan K

    2008-11-12

    Cisplatin, a platinum based anticancer drug has played a vital role in the treatment of cancers by chemical agents, but in view of the serious toxicity including nephrotoxicity of cisplatin, various other platinum based drugs have been synthesized and screened to overcome its toxicity. A Pt-ATP compound was prepared in our laboratory hoping to have reduced or no toxicity along with the potentiality of reducing neoplasm growth. A Pt-ATP compound was prepared. It was first screened for its antineoplastic efficacy. Confirming that, subsequent experiments were carried on to test its toxicity on animals, viz. Albino Swiss mice. The animals were randomly divided into four sets--Set I: Erhlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) challenged mice; Set II: Normal mice; Set III: Drug treated mice, Set IVA Cisplatin (CDDP) treated mice, Set IV B EAC challenged Cisplatin treated mice. Set I was used to test antineoplasticity of the drug, Set II and Set III for studying drug toxicity and Set IV was treated with CDDP. Set II was used as a control. Animals were sacrificed after 5 days, 10 days 15 days and 20 days of drug administration on the 6th, 11th, 16th and 21st days respectively for Set I, II and III. Set IVA was sacrificed only on the 16th day and Set IV B on 6th and 11th days. For Set I only tumor cell count and packed cell volume (PCV) of tumor cells were recorded. For Set II and III, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) assays were done using serum while blood creatinine and creatine were assayed from blood filtrate. For cytotoxicity assessment liver, spleen and kidney tissues were collected and subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after extensive treatment. Set IV A was only studied for the biochemical parameters viz. aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) assays were done using serum while blood creatinine and creatine were assayed from blood filtrate. Set IV B was studied for tumor cell count after treatment with

  2. Autopsy findings in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiforme. Case report

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    Yamada, Shozo; Endo, Yuzo; Takada, Koji; Usui, Masaaki; Hara, Mitsuru [Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hirose, Takanori

    1998-02-01

    Autopsy detected no tumor tissues in a patient who died 6.5 years after the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme. A 54-year-old male developed left hemiparesis one month prior to admission. Computed tomography demonstrated a cystic lesion in the right frontal region with irregular ring-like enhancement. The tumor was extensively removed together with the surrounding tissues followed by irradiation (whole brain 32.4 Gy, local 28.8 Gy), and intravenous administration of interferon-{beta}. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiform. He died of accidental head trauma 6.5 years after surgery. Autopsy of the brain detected no evidence of glioblastoma multiform. The only findings were cerebral edema and hematoma caused by head trauma, as well as histological changes due to radiation damage. This case apparently confirms the histological disappearance of tumor tissue in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiform. (author)

  3. Autopsy findings in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiforme. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shozo; Endo, Yuzo; Takada, Koji; Usui, Masaaki; Hara, Mitsuru; Hirose, Takanori.

    1998-01-01

    Autopsy detected no tumor tissues in a patient who died 6.5 years after the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme. A 54-year-old male developed left hemiparesis one month prior to admission. Computed tomography demonstrated a cystic lesion in the right frontal region with irregular ring-like enhancement. The tumor was extensively removed together with the surrounding tissues followed by irradiation (whole brain 32.4 Gy, local 28.8 Gy), and intravenous administration of interferon-β. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiform. He died of accidental head trauma 6.5 years after surgery. Autopsy of the brain detected no evidence of glioblastoma multiform. The only findings were cerebral edema and hematoma caused by head trauma, as well as histological changes due to radiation damage. This case apparently confirms the histological disappearance of tumor tissue in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiform. (author)

  4. Acute Oral Mammalian Toxicity and Effect of Solvents on Efficacy of Maerua edulis (Gilg. & Ben. De Wolf against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus decoloratus Koch, 1844 (Acarina: Ixodidae, Tick Larvae

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    Emmanuel T. Nyahangare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy and toxicity of aqueous and organic solvents extracts of Maerua edulis against ticks and mice, respectively, were determined. Ground leaves were extracted separately using cold water, cold water plus surfactant (1% v/v liquid soap, hot water plus surfactant, hexane, or methanol to make 25% w/v stock solutions from which serial dilutions of 5, 10, 20, and 25% were made. For each concentration, 20 Rhipicephalus decoloratus tick larvae were put in filter papers impregnated with extracts and incubated for 48 h at 27°C and 85–90% RH for mortality observation after 24 h and 48 h. In the toxicity experiment, hot water plus surfactant treatments of 5, 10, 20, and 25% (w/v M. edulis were administered in suspension per os to sexually mature Balb/C mice and observed for clinical signs and mortality for 72 h. Larvae mortality was highest (>98% in methanol-extracted M. edulis treatments (20 and 25%, which was not different from the amitraz-based control (Tickbuster®. Mortality was also higher in the hot water than in cold water plus surfactant treatments (P<0.05. No postadministration adverse health effects were observed in the mice. These results suggest that M. edulis is an effective tick remedy best extracted using methanol or hot water plus surfactant.

  5. Protective efficacy of various carbonyl compounds and their metabolites, and nutrients against acute toxicity of some cyanogens in rats: biochemical and physiological studies

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    Bhattacharya Rahul

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanogens are widely used in industries and their toxicity is mainly due to cyanogenesis. The antidotes for cyanide are usually instituted for the management of cyanogen poisoning. The present study reports the protective efficacy of 14 carbonyl compounds and their metabolites, and nutrients (1.0 g/kg; oral; +5 min against acute oral toxicity of acetonitrile (ATCN, acrylonitrile (ACN, malononitrile (MCN, propionitrile (PCN, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, succinonitrile (SCN, and potassium ferricyanide (PFCN in rats. Maximum protection index was observed for alpha-ketoglutarate (A-KG against MCN and PCN (5.60, followed by dihydroxyacetone (DHA against MCN (2.79. Further, MCN (0.75 LD50 caused significant increase in cyanide concentration in brain, liver and kidney and inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase activity in brain and liver, which favorably responded to A-KG and DHA treatment. Up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase by MCN, PCN and SNP, and uncoupling protein by PCN and SNP observed in the brain was abolished by A-KG administration. However, no DNA damage was detected in the brain. MCN and SNP significantly decreased the mean arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and neuromuscular transmission, which were resolved by A-KG. The study suggests a beneficial effect of A-KG in the treatment of acute cyanogen poisoning.

  6. Metabolomics and its application to the evaluation of the efficacy and toxicity of traditional Chinese herb medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian; Cao, Bei; Wang, Xin-Wen; Aa, Ji-Ye; Duan, Jin-Ao; Zhu, Xuan-Xuan; Wang, Guang-Ji; Liu, Chang-Xiao

    2016-07-15

    Traditional Chinese herb medicines (TCHMs) have been used in the treatment of a variety of diseases for thousands of years in Asian countries. The active components of TCHMs usually exert combined synergistic therapeutic effects on multiple targets, but with less potential therapeutic effect based on routine indices than Western drugs. These complex effects make the assessment of the efficacy of TCHMs and the clarification of their underlying mechanisms very challenging, and therefore hinder their wider application and acceptance. Metabolomics is a crucial part of systems biology. It allows the quantitative measurement of large numbers of the low-molecular endogenous metabolites involved in metabolic pathways, and thus reflects the fundamental metabolism status of the body. Recently, dozens of metabolomic studies have been devoted to prove the efficacy/safety, explore the underlying mechanisms, and identify the potential biomarkers to access the action targets of TCHMs, with fruitful results. This article presents an overview of these studies, focusing on the progress made in exploring the pharmacology and toxicology of various herbal medicines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in combination with radiation therapy in an orthotopic mouse prostate cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, Svend O.; Paielli, Dell; Wing, Mark; Rogulski, Ken; Brown, Steve; Kolozsvary, Andy; Seely, John; Barton, Ken; Dragovic, Alek; Kim, Jae Ho

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in an adjuvant setting with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in an experimental prostate cancer model in preparation for a Phase I clinical study in humans. Methods: For efficacy studies, i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumors were established in immune-deficient mice. Tumors were injected with the lytic, replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus containing a cytosine deaminase (CD)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) fusion gene. Two days later, mice were administered 1 week of 5-fluorocytosine + ganciclovir (GCV) prodrug therapy and fractionated doses of EBRT (trimodal therapy). Tumor control rate of trimodal therapy was compared to that of EBRT alone. For toxicology studies, immune-competent male mice received a single intraprostatic injection (10 10 vp) of the replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus. Two days later, mice were administered 4 weeks of 5-fluorocytosine + GCV prodrug therapy and 56 Gy EBRT to the pelvic region. The toxicity of trimodal therapy was assessed by histopathologic analysis of major organs and clinical chemistries. Results: In both the i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumor models, trimodal therapy significantly improved primary tumor control beyond that of EBRT alone. In the DU145 model, trimodal therapy resulted in a tumor growth delay (70 days) that was more than twice that (32 days) of EBRT alone. Whereas EBRT failed to eradicate DU145 tumors, trimodal therapy resulted in 25% tumor cure. In the LNCaP C4-2 tumor model, EBRT slowed the growth of intraprostatic tumors, but resulted in no tumor cures, and 57% of the mice developed retroperitoneal lymph node metastases at 3 months. By contrast, trimodal therapy resulted in 44% tumor cure and reduced significantly the percentage (13%) of lymph node metastases relative to EBRT alone. Overall

  8. Liposomal n-butylidenephthalide protects the drug from oxidation and enhances its antitumor effects in glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin YL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Ling Lin,1,2,* Kai-Fu Chang,3,* Xiao-Fan Huang,3 Che-Lun Hung,4 Shyh-Chang Chen,5 Wan-Ru Chao,6,7 Kuang-Wen Liao,1,8 Nu-Man Tsai3,9 1College of Biological Science and Technology, 2Center for Bioinformatics Research, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 3School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, 4Department of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, Providence University, 5Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 6Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, 7Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University and Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, 8Institute of Molecular Medicine and Bioengineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 9Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The natural compound n-butylidenephthalide (BP can pass through the blood–brain barrier to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. However, BP has an unstable structure that reduces its antitumor activity and half-life in vivo.Objective: The aim of this study is to design a drug delivery system to encapsulate BP to enhance its efficacy by improving its protection and delivery.Methods: To protect its structural stability against protein-rich and peroxide solutions, BP was encapsulated into a lipo-PEG-PEI complex (LPPC. Then, the cytotoxicity of BP/LPPC following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions was analyzed by MTT. Cell uptake of BP/LPPC was also measured by confocal microscopy. The therapeutic effects of BP/LPPC were analyzed in xenograft mice following intratumoral and intravenous injections.Results: When BP was encapsulated in LPPC, its cytotoxicity was maintained following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions. The cytotoxic activity of encapsulated BP was higher than

  9. A novel M1 PAM VU0486846 exerts efficacy in cognition models without displaying agonist activity or cholinergic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Jerri M; Bertron, Jeanette L; Cho, Hyekyung P; Garcia-Barrantes, Pedro M; Moran, Sean P; Maksymetz, James T; Nance, Kellie D; Dickerson, Jonathan W; Remke, Daniel H; Chang, Sichen; Harp, Joel; Blobaum, Anna L; Niswender, Colleen M; Jones, Carrie K; Stauffer, Shaun R; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2018-04-27

    Selective activation of the M1 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, via positive allosteric modulation (PAM), is an exciting strategy to improve cognition in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease patients. However, highly potent M1 ago-PAMs, such as MK-7622, PF-06764427, and PF-06827443, can engender excessive activation of M1, leading to agonist actions in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that impairs cognitive function, induces behavioral convulsions, and results in other classic cholinergic adverse events (AEs). Here, we report a fundamentally new and highly selective M1 PAM, VU0486846. VU0486846 possesses only weak agonist activity in M1-expressing cell lines with high receptor reserve and is devoid of agonist actions in the PFC, unlike previously reported ago-PAMs MK-7622, PF-06764427 and PF-06827443. Moreover, VU0486846 shows no interaction with antagonist binding at the orthosteric acetylcholine (ACh) site (e.g., neither bitopic nor displaying negative cooperativity with [3H]-NMS binding at theorthosteric site), no seizure liability at high brain exposures, and no cholinergic AEs. However, as opposed to ago-PAMs, VU0486846 produces robust efficacy in the novel object recognition model of cognitive function. Importantly, we show for the first time that an M1 PAM can reverse the cognitive deficits induced by atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone. These findings further strengthen the argument that compounds with modest in vitro M1 PAM activity (EC50s > 100 nM) and pure-PAM activity in native tissues display robust pro-cognitive efficacy without AEs mediated by excessive activation of M1. Overall, the combination of compound assessment with recombinant in vitro assays (mindful of receptor reserve), native tissue systems (PFC), and phenotypic screens (behavioral convulsions) is essential to fully understand and evaluate lead compounds and enhance success in clinical development.

  10. Evaluation of the toxicity and efficacy of hydrogen peroxide treatments on eggs of warm and cool water fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rach, J.J.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Howe, G.E.; Schreier, Theresa M.

    1998-01-01

    The use of hydrogen peroxide in aquaculture is growing and there is a need to develop fundamental guidelines to effectively treat diseased fish. The safety (toxicity) of hydrogen peroxide treatments was determined on eggs of representative warm- and coolwater fish species. Eggs of northern pike (Esox lucius), walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), yellow perch (Pel ca flavescens), white sucker (Catostomus commersoni), lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were cultured in egg jars or aquaria. Treatments were initiated with non-eyed eggs and continued until all viable eggs had hatched. Eggs were treated daily for 15 min Monday through Friday with either 0, 500, 1000, 3000, or 6000 mu l l(-1) of hydrogen peroxide. For all species, the mean percent hatch was greater in eggs treated with 1000 mu l l(-1) hydrogen peroxide for 15 min than in the untreated controls. Common carp, lake sturgeon, and paddlefish were the least sensitive to hydrogen peroxide with percent hatch ranging from 40 to 48% in the 6000 mu l l(-1) hydrogen peroxide treatment. Fungal infections reduced or eliminated the hatch in most controls whereas nearly all treated eggs remained free of infection; hydrogen peroxide inhibited fungal infections on fish eggs. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical evaluation comparing the efficacy of aquacel Ag with vaseline gauze versus 1% silver sulfadiazine cream in toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Lin, Cen-Hung; Chang, Kao-Ping; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lin, Sin-Daw; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Ou, Su-Fei; Lee, Su-Shin

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether using Aquacel Ag (ConvaTec, Skillman, New Jersey) with Vaseline (Unilever, London, England) gauze instead of silver sulfadiazine cream (SSD) as the wound care protocol to treat toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) can improve wound healing, pain control, and reduction of labor costs. A retrospective chart review. A burn center with 2 plastic surgeons and 11 nursing staff. A pathologist diagnosed TEN in 35 patients admitted to the burn center from 1995 to 2009. Parameters included the patient's profile, dressing choice, severity-of-illness score for TEN, time to 95% re-epithelialization, visual analog scale pain scores before second dressing change, and labor cost. The exclusion criterion was wound care with neither Aquacel Ag with Vaseline nor SSD exclusively. Twenty patients were enrolled in this study. In the group using Aquacel Ag with Vaseline gauze, the visual analog scale score was significantly less than that of the SSD group (P = .02). Labor costs were significantly lower in the Aquacel Ag with Vaseline gauze group (P < .01). Commencement of specific dressing to 95% re-epithelialization (P = .09) and time spent in the second dressing change (P = .05) had no statistical significance between the 2 groups. This study showed that Aquacel Ag with Vaseline gauze decreased pain and labor costs but did not shorten wound healing time. Thus, Aquacel Ag with Vaseline gauze can be an efficient method for treating TEN wounds.

  12. Efficacy and Toxicity of Chemoradiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Unknown Primary of Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Norris, Charles M.; Posner, Marshall R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: No single standard treatment paradigm is available for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma of an unknown primary (HNCUP). Bilateral neck radiotherapy with mucosal axis irradiation is widely used, with or without chemotherapy and/or surgical resection. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a highly conformal method for delivering radiation that is becoming the standard of care and might reduce the long-term treatment-related sequelae. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for HNCUP. Patients and Materials: A retrospective study of all patients treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for HNCUP with IMRT between August 2004 and January 2009. The primary endpoint was overall survival; the secondary endpoints were locoregional and distant control, and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: A total of 24 patients with HNCUP were included. Of these patients, 22 had Stage N2 disease or greater. All patients underwent neck computed tomography, positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and examination under anesthesia with directed biopsies. Of the 24 patients, 22 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 7 (29%) also underwent induction chemotherapy. The median involved nodal dose was 70 Gy, and the median mucosal dose was 60 Gy. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years, the 2-year actuarial overall survival and locoregional control rate was 92% and 100%, respectively. Only 25% of the patients had Grade 2 xerostomia, although 11 patients (46%) required esophageal dilation for stricture. Conclusion: In a single-institution series, IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for HNCUP was associated with superb overall survival and locoregional control. The xerostomia rates were promising, but the aggressive therapy was associated with significant rates of esophageal stenosis.

  13. Hydroxychloroquine binding to cytoplasmic domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes: Novel mechanistic insights into drug structure, efficacy and toxicity.

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    Nakagawa, Mizuki; Sugawara, Kotomi; Goto, Tatsufumi; Wakui, Hideki; Nunomura, Wataru

    2016-05-13

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is a widely used drug in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. It has also been prescribed for the treatment of malaria owing to its lower toxicity compared to its closely related compound chloroquine (CQ). However, the mechanisms of action of HCQ in erythrocytes (which bind preferentially this drug) have not been documented and the reasons underlying the lower side effects of HCQ compared to CQ remain unclear. Here we show that, although the activity of erythrocyte lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but not GAPDH, was inhibited by both HCQ and CQ in vitro, LDH activity in erythrocytes incubated with 20 mM HCQ was not significantly reduced within 5 h in contrast to CQ did. Using HCQ coupled Sepharose chromatography (HCQ-Sepharose), we identified Band 3, spectrin, ankyrin, protein 4.1R and protein 4.2 as HCQ binding proteins in human erythrocyte plasma membrane. Recombinant cytoplasmic N-terminal 43 kDa domain of Band 3 bound to HCQ-Sepharose and was eluted with 40 mM (but not 20 mM) HCQ. Band 3 transport activity was reduced by only 23% in the presence of 20 mM HCQ. Taken together, these data demonstrate that HCQ binds to the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes but does not inhibit dramatically its transport activity. We hypothesize that the trapping of HCQ on Band 3 contributes to the lower side effects of the drug on energy production in erythrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Immune phenotypes predict survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

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    Haouraa Mostafa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, a common primary malignant brain tumor, rarely disseminates beyond the central nervous system and has a very bad prognosis. The current study aimed at the analysis of immunological control in individual patients with GBM. Methods Immune phenotypes and plasma biomarkers of GBM patients were determined at the time of diagnosis using flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results Using descriptive statistics, we found that immune anomalies were distinct in individual patients. Defined marker profiles proved highly relevant for survival. A remarkable relation between activated NK cells and improved survival in GBM patients was in contrast to increased CD39 and IL-10 in patients with a detrimental course and very short survival. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA and Cox proportional hazards models substantiated the relevance of absolute numbers of CD8 cells and low numbers of CD39 cells for better survival. Conclusions Defined alterations of the immune system may guide the course of disease in patients with GBM and may be prognostically valuable for longitudinal studies or can be applied for immune intervention.

  15. A comprehensive characterization of mitochondrial DNA mutations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidone, Michele; Clima, Rosanna; Santorsola, Mariangela; Calabrese, Claudia; Girolimetti, Giulia; Kurelac, Ivana; Amato, Laura Benedetta; Iommarini, Luisa; Trevisan, Elisa; Leone, Marco; Soffietti, Riccardo; Morra, Isabella; Faccani, Giuliano; Attimonelli, Marcella; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain cancer in adults, with a poor prognosis, whose molecular stratification still represents a challenge in pathology and clinics. On the other hand, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors as modifiers of the bioenergetics state, albeit in GBM a characterization of the mtDNA status is lacking to date. Here, a characterization of the burden of mtDNA mutations in GBM samples was performed. First, investigation of tumor-specific vs. non tumor-specific mutations was carried out with the MToolBox bioinformatics pipeline by analyzing 45 matched tumor/blood samples, from whole genome or whole exome sequencing datasets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. Additionally, the entire mtDNA sequence was obtained in a dataset of 104 fresh-frozen GBM samples. Mitochondrial mutations with potential pathogenic interest were prioritized based on heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. A preliminary biochemical analysis of the activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes was also performed on fresh-frozen GBM samples. Although a high number of mutations was detected, we report that the large majority of them does not pass the prioritization filters. Therefore, a relatively limited burden of pathogenic mutations is indeed carried by GBM, which did not appear to determine a general impairment of the respiratory chain. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

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    Grodzik M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Marta Grodzik1, Ewa Sawosz1, Mateusz Wierzbicki1, Piotr Orlowski1, Anna Hotowy2, Tomasz Niemiec1, Maciej Szmidt3, Katarzyna Mitura4, André Chwalibog21Division of Biotechnology and Biochemistry of Nutrition, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Division of Histology and Embryology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Koszalin University of Technology, Koszalin, PolandAbstract: The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubation, were treated with carbon nanoparticles administered in ovo to the tumor. Both types of nanoparticles significantly decreased tumor mass and volume, and vessel area. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed downregulated fibroblast growth factor-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at the messenger ribonucleic acid level. The present results demonstrate antiangiogenic activity of carbon nanoparticles, making them potential factors for anticancer therapy.Keywords: cancer, nanoparticle, embryo, angiogenesis, FGF-2, VEGF

  17. Altered expression of polycomb group genes in glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Gang Li

    Full Text Available The Polycomb group (PcG proteins play a critical role in histone mediated epigenetics which has been implicated in the malignant evolution of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. By systematically interrogating The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, we discovered widespread aberrant expression of the PcG members in GBM samples compared to normal brain. The most striking differences were upregulation of EZH2, PHF19, CBX8 and PHC2 and downregulation of CBX7, CBX6, EZH1 and RYBP. Interestingly, changes in EZH2, PHF19, CBX7, CBX6 and EZH1 occurred progressively as astrocytoma grade increased. We validated the aberrant expression of CBX6, CBX7, CBX8 and EZH2 in GBM cell lines by Western blotting and qRT-PCR, and further the aberrant expression of CBX6 in GBM tissue samples by immunohistochemical staining. To determine if there was functional significance to the diminished CBX6 levels in GBM, CBX6 was overexpressed in GBM cells resulting in decreased proliferative capacity. In conclusion, aberrant expression of PcG proteins in GBMs may play a role in the development or maintenance of the malignancy.

  18. Molecular Characteristics in MRI-classified Group 1 Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    William E Haskins

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous brain tumor. Previous study of MRI-classified GBM has revealed a spatial relationship between Group 1 GBM (GBM1 and the subventricular zone (SVZ. The SVZ is an adult neural stem cell niche and is also suspected to be the origin of a subtype of brain tumor. The intimate contact between GBM1 and the SVZ raises the possibility that tumor cells in GBM1 may be most related to SVZ cells. In support of this notion, we found that neural stem cell and neuroblast markers are highly expressed in GBM1. Additionally, we identified molecular characteristics in this type of GBM that include up-regulation of metabolic enzymes, ribosomal proteins, heat shock proteins, and c-Myc oncoprotein. As GBM1 often recurs at great distances from the initial lesion, the rewiring of metabolism and ribosomal biogenesis may facilitate cancer cells’ growth and survival during tumor migration. Taken together, combined our findings and MRI-based classification of GBM1 would offer better prediction and treatment for this multifocal GBM.

  19. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-del-Mar Inda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  20. Glioblastoma multiforme: a look inside its heterogeneous nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Maria-Del-Mar; Bonavia, Rudy; Seoane, Joan

    2014-01-27

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  1. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inda, Maria-del-Mar; Bonavia, Rudy; Seoane, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape

  2. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inda, Maria-del-Mar, E-mail: mminda@vhio.net; Bonavia, Rudy [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Seoane, Joan [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Catalan Institution of Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Barcelona 08035 (Spain)

    2014-01-27

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  3. Variegated colors of pediatric glioblastoma multiforme: what to expect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Immanuel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas account for 35-45% of primary brain tumors; among these glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common adult brain tumor constituting approximately 85%. Its incidence is quite less in the pediatric population and treatment of these patients is particularly challenging. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only environmental factor found to have any significant association with GBM. Several genetic alterations associated with GBM in adults have been well documented such as epidermal growth factor receptor amplification, overexpression of mouse double minute 2 homolog also known as E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, Phosphatase and tensin homolog gene mutation, loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 10p and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 mutation. However, data on genetic mutations in pediatric GBM is still lacking. Exophytic brain stem gliomas are rare tumors and are usually associated with a poor prognosis. The most effective treatment in achieving long-term survival in such patients, is surgical excision of the tumor and then chemoradiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy by temozolomide. This schedule is the standard treatment for GBM patients. In view of the rarity of pediatric GBM, we report here a case of pontine GBM in a 5-year-old girl.

  4. Erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) are thought to be hypersensitivity syndromes with various causes, and radiotherapy might be one of the causes of these syndromes. We herein report two cases of EM/SJS following radiotherapy. The first case was a 63-year-old woman with breast cancer. At the end of postoperative radiotherapy with 60 Gy, severe pruritic erythema appeared in the irradiated area and spread over the whole body. She was diagnosed with EM by a skin biopsy. The second case was a 77-year-old woman with uterine cervical cancer who underwent postoperative radiotherapy. At a dose of 30.6 Gy, pruritic redness appeared in the irradiated area and the precordial region, and it became widespread rapidly with polymorphic transformation. Although without any histological confirmation, SJS was strongly suspected because of her pruritic conjunctivitis. Because both patients were given medicines during irradiation, radiotherapy may not be the only cause of EM/SJS. However, it should be noted that radiotherapy might trigger EM/SJS. (author)

  5. The histopathological comparison of L-carnitine with amifostine for protective efficacy on radiation-induced acute small intestinal toxicity

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    Murat Caloglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to compare the protective efficacy of l-carnitine (LC to amifostine on radiation-induced acute small intestine damage. Materials and Methods: Thirty, 4-week-old Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to four groups - Group 1: control (CONT, n = 6, Group 2: irradiation alone (RT, n = 8, Group 3: amifostine plus irradiation (AMI+RT, n = 8, and Group 4: l-Carnitine plus irradiation (LC+RT, n = 8. The rats in all groups were irradiated individually with a single dose of 20 Gy to the total abdomen, except those in CONT. LC (300 mg/kg or amifostine (200 mg/kg was used 30 min before irradiation. Histopathological analysis of small intestine was carried out after euthanasia. Results: Pretreatment with amifostine reduced the radiation-induced acute degenerative damage (P = 0.009 compared to the RT group. Pretreatment with LC did not obtain any significant difference compared to the RT group. The vascular damage significantly reduced in both of the AMI+RT (P = 0.003 and LC+RT group (P = 0.029 compared to the RT group. The overall damage score was significantly lower in the AMI+RT group than the RT group (P = 0.009. There was not any significant difference between the LC+RT and RT group. Conclusions: Amifostine has a marked radioprotective effect against all histopathological changes on small intestinal tissue while LC has limited effects which are mainly on vascular structure.

  6. Multicentre trial on the efficacy and toxicity of single-dose samarium-153-ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate as a palliative treatment for painful skeletal metastases in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jia-he; Zhang Jin-ming; He Yi-jie; Hou Qing-tian; Oyang Qiao-hong; Wang Jian-min; Chuan Ling

    1999-01-01

    A multicentre trial was organized in China as part of an international coordinated research project to study the efficacy and toxicity of single-dose samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate (EDTMP) as a palliative treatment for painful skeletal metastases. One hundred and five patients with painful bone metastases from various primaries were treated with 153 Sm-EDTMP at a dose of 37 MBq/kg(group I) or 18.5 MBq/kg (group II). The effects were evaluated according to change in daily analgesic consumption, pain score, sum of effect product (SEP), Physician's Global Assessment (PGA), blood counts, and organ function tests conducted regularly for 16 weeks. Fifty-eight of 70 patients in group I and 30 of 35 in group II had a positive response, with SEPs of 22.29±14.47 and 20.13±13.90 respectively. Of 72 patients who had been receiving analgesics, 63 reduced their consumption. PGA showed that the Karnofsky score (KS) increased from 58.54±25.90 to 71.67±26.53, indicating improved general condition, but the difference was not significant. Among subgroups of patients, only those with breast cancer showed a significant change in the Karnofsky score after treatment. Inter-group differences were found for net change in KS between patients with lung and patients with breast cancer, and between patients with lung and patients with oesophageal cancer. Seventeen patients showed no response. No serious side-effects were noted, except for falls in the white blood cell (nadir 1.5 x 10 9 /l) and platelet (nadir 6.0 x 10 10 /l) counts in 44/105 and 34/105 cases, respectively. Ten patients had an abnormal liver function test. Response and side-effects were both independent of dose. In conclusion, 153 Sm-EDTMP provided effective palliation in 83.8% of patients with painful bone metastases; the major toxicity was temporary myelosuppression. Further studies are needed to identify better ways of determining the appropriate dose in the individual case and the efficacy of

  7. Stevens-Johnson syndrome progressing to toxic epidermal necrolysis with haloperidol and carbamazepine combination

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    Ajay Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbamazepine and other anticonvulsants are commoner cause of severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions such as erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS. We report a case of SJS rapidly progressing to TEN with a combination of haloperidol and carbamazepine in a patient with bipolar affective disorder. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying this reaction is discussed.

  8. Investigating the heterogeneity of alkylating agents' efficacy and toxicity between sexes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide (MAIAGE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, Brice; Hackshaw, A; Hawkins, D S; Paulussen, M; Anderson, J R; Judson, I; Litière, S; Dirksen, U; Lewis, I; van den Berg, H; Gaspar, N; Gelderblom, H; Whelan, J; Boddy, A V; Wheatley, K; Pignon, J P; De Vathaire, F; Le Deley, M C; Le Teuff, G

    2017-08-01

    A marginal interaction between sex and the type of alkylating agent was observed for event-free survival in the Euro-EWING99-R1 randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in Ewing sarcoma. To further evaluate this interaction, we performed an individual patient data meta-analysis of RCTs assessing cyclophosphamide versus ifosfamide in any type of cancer. A literature search produced two more eligible RCTs (EICESS92 and IRS-IV). The endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS, main endpoint) and overall survival (OS). The hazard ratios (HRs) of the treatment-by-sex interaction and their 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were assessed using stratified multivariable Cox models. Heterogeneity of the interaction across age categories and trials was explored. We also assessed this interaction for severe acute toxicity using logistic models. The meta-analysis comprised 1,528 pediatric and young adult sarcoma patients from three RCTs: Euro-EWING99-R1 (n = 856), EICESS92 (n = 155), and IRS-IV (n = 517). There were 224 PFS events in Euro-EWING99-R1 and 200 in the validation set (EICESS92 + IRS-IV), and 171 and 154 deaths in each dataset, respectively. The estimated treatment-by-sex interaction for PFS in Euro-EWING99-R1 (HR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.00-3.00) was not replicated in the validation set (HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.55-1.72), without heterogeneity across trials (P = 0.62). In the pooled analysis, the treatment-by-sex interaction was not significant (HR = 1.31, 95% CI = 0.89-1.95, P = 0.17), without heterogeneity across age categories (P = 0.88) and trials (P = 0.36). Similar results were observed for OS. No significant treatment-by-sex interaction was observed for leucopenia/neutropenia (P = 0.45), infection (P = 0.64), or renal toxicity (P = 0.20). Our meta-analysis did not confirm the hypothesis of a treatment-by-sex interaction on efficacy or toxicity outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation of high-grade glioma in a phase I dose- and volume escalation trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Costa, Junia

    2017-01-01

    .1-3.5) and the median overall survival was 7.0 months (95%CI: 3.5-10.5). Early side effects were mild and included headache and fatigue. Seven patients were progression-free beyond 10 weeks and were evaluable for late toxicity. Among these patients, three (43%) suffered late adverse events which included radionecrosis......INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PET and MRI guided re-irradiation of recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG) and to assess the impact of radiotherapy dose, fractionation and irradiated volume. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with localized, recurrent HGG...... (grades III-IV) and no other treatment options were eligible for a prospective phase I trial. Gross tumor volumes for radiotherapy were defined using T1-contrast enhanced MRI and (18)F-fluoro-ethyl tyrosine PET. Radiotherapy was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy with a 2-mm margin. The dose...

  10. Prognostic relevance of cytochrome C oxidase in primary glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Corinne E Griguer

    Full Text Available Patients with primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM have one of the lowest overall survival rates among cancer patients, and reliable biomarkers are necessary to predict patient outcome. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO promotes the switch from glycolytic to OXPHOS metabolism, and increased CcO activity in tumors has been associated with tumor progression after chemotherapy failure. Thus, we investigated the relationship between tumor CcO activity and the survival of patients diagnosed with primary GBM. A total of 84 patients with grade IV glioma were evaluated in this retrospective cohort study. Cumulative survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed by the log-rank test, and univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox regression model. Mitochondrial CcO activity was determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the oxidation of cytochrome c. High CcO activity was detected in a subset of glioma tumors (∼30%, and was an independent prognostic factor for shorter progression-free survival and overall survival [P = 0.0087 by the log-rank test, hazard ratio = 3.57 for progression-free survival; P<0.001 by the log-rank test, hazard ratio = 10.75 for overall survival]. The median survival time for patients with low tumor CcO activity was 14.3 months, compared with 6.3 months for patients with high tumor CcO activity. High CcO activity occurs in a significant subset of high-grade glioma patients and is an independent predictor of poor outcome. Thus, CcO activity may serve as a useful molecular marker for the categorization and targeted therapy of GBMs.

  11. Evaluation of early imaging response criteria in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladwish, Adam; Koh, Eng-Siew; Hoisak, Jeremy; Lockwood, Gina; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Mason, Warren; Yu, Eugene; Laperriere, Normand J; Ménard, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Early and accurate prediction of response to cancer treatment through imaging criteria is particularly important in rapidly progressive malignancies such as Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). We sought to assess the predictive value of structural imaging response criteria one month after concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with GBM. Thirty patients were enrolled from 2005 to 2007 (median follow-up 22 months). Tumor volumes were delineated at the boundary of abnormal contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images prior to and 1 month after RT. Clinical Progression [CP] occurred when clinical and/or radiological events led to a change in chemotherapy management. Early Radiologic Progression [ERP] was defined as the qualitative interpretation of radiological progression one month post-RT. Patients with ERP were determined pseudoprogressors if clinically stable for ≥6 months. Receiver-operator characteristics were calculated for RECIST and MacDonald criteria, along with alternative thresholds against 1 year CP-free survival and 2 year overall survival (OS). 13 patients (52%) were found to have ERP, of whom 5 (38.5%) were pseudoprogressors. Patients with ERP had a lower median OS (11.2 mo) than those without (not reached) (p < 0.001). True progressors fared worse than pseudoprogressors (median survival 7.2 mo vs. 19.0 mo, p < 0.001). Volume thresholds performed slightly better compared to area and diameter thresholds in ROC analysis. Responses of > 25% in volume or > 15% in area were most predictive of OS. We show that while a subjective interpretation of early radiological progression from baseline is generally associated with poor outcome, true progressors cannot be distinguished from pseudoprogressors. In contrast, the magnitude of early imaging volumetric response may be a predictive and quantitative metric of favorable outcome

  12. Treatment outcome and prognostic factors of adult glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Kani, Amir-Abbas; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Nasrolahi, Hamid; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ansari, Mansour

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to report the characteristics, prognostic factors and treatment outcome of 223 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the medical records of 223 adult patients diagnosed at a tertiary academic hospital between 1990 and 2008. Patients' follow up ranged from 1 to 69 months (median 11 months). Surgery was attempted in all patients in whom complete resection in 15 patients (7%), subtotal resection in 77 patients (34%), partial resection in 73 patients (33%) and biopsy alone in 58 patients (26%) were done. In addition, we performed a literature review of PubMed to find out and analyze major related series. In all, we collected and analyzed the data of 33 major series including more than 11,000 patients with GBM. There were 141 men and 82 women. The median progression free- and overall survival were 6 (95% CI=5.711-8.289) and 11 (95% CI=9.304-12.696) months respectively. In univariate analysis for overall survival, age (P=0.003), tumor size (P<0.013), performance status (P<0.001), the extent of surgical resection (P=0.009), dose of radiation (P<0.001), and adjuvant chemotherapy (P<0.001) were prognostic factors. However, in multivariate analysis, only radiation dose, extent of surgical resection, and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. The prognosis of adult patients with GBM remains poor; however, complete surgical resection and adjuvant treatments improve progression-free and overall survival. Copyright © 2012. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Treatment outcome and prognostic factors of adult glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadloo, N.; Mohammadianpanah, M.; Nasrolahi, H.; Omidvari, Sh.; Ansari, M.; Kani, A.A.; Mosalaei, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to report the characteristics, prognostic factors and treatment outcome of 223 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Subjects and method: This retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the medical records of 223 adult patients diagnosed at a tertiary academic hospital between 1990 and 2008. Patients’ follow up ranged from 1 to 69 months (median 11 months). Surgery was attempted in all patients in whom complete resection in 15 patients (7%), subtotal resection in 77 patients (34%), partial resection in 73 patients (33%) and biopsy alone in 58 patients (26%) were done. In addition, we performed a literature review of Pub Med to find out and analyze major related series. In all, we collected and analyzed the data of 33 major series including more than 11,000 patients with GB M. Results: There were 141 men and 82 women. The median progression free- and overall survival were 6 (95% Cl = 5.711-8.289) and 11 (95% Cl = 9.304-12.696) months respectively. In univariate analysis for overall survival, age (P = 0.003), tumor size (P < 0.013), performance status (P < 0.001), the extent of surgical resection (P - 0.009), dose of radiation (P < 0.001), and adjuvant chemotherapy (P < 0.001) were prognostic factors. However, in multivariate analysis, only radiation dose, extent of surgical resection, and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Conclusion: The prognosis of adult patients with GBM remains poor; however, complete surgical resection and adjuvant treatments improve progression-free and overall survival

  14. Identification of repaglinide as a therapeutic drug for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Zui Xuan; Chen, Ruo Qiao; Hu, Dian Xing; Xie, Xiao Qiang; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain tumor with a median survival time of only 14 months after treatment. It is urgent to find new therapeutic drugs that increase survival time of GBM patients. To achieve this goal, we screened differentially expressed genes between long-term and short-term survived GBM patients from Gene Expression Omnibus database and found gene expression signature for the long-term survived GBM patients. The signaling networks of all those differentially expressed genes converged to protein binding, extracellular matrix and tissue development as revealed in BiNGO and Cytoscape. Drug repositioning in Connectivity Map by using the gene expression signature identified repaglinide, a first-line drug for diabetes mellitus, as the most promising novel drug for GBM. In vitro experiments demonstrated that repaglinide significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of human GBM cells. In vivo experiments demonstrated that repaglinide prominently prolonged the median survival time of mice bearing orthotopic glioma. Mechanistically, repaglinide significantly reduced Bcl-2, Beclin-1 and PD-L1 expression in glioma tissues, indicating that repaglinide may exert its anti-cancer effects via apoptotic, autophagic and immune checkpoint signaling. Taken together, repaglinide is likely to be an effective drug to prolong life span of GBM patients. - Highlights: • Gene expression signarue in long-term survived GBM patients are identified from Gene Expression Omnibus database. • Repaglinide is identified as a survival-related drug for GBM via drug repositioning in CMap. • Repaglinide effectively kills GBM cells, inhibits GBM cell migration and increases survival of mice bearing orthotopic glioma. • Repaglinide reduces Bcl-2, Beclin-1 and PD-L1 in GBM tissues.

  15. Transcranial sonography: integration into target volume definition for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Becker, Georg; Flentje, Michael; Richter, Susanne; Goerttler-Krauspe, Irene; Koelbl, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies indicate that transcranial sonography (TCS) reliably displays the extension of malignant brain tumors. The effect of integrating TCS into radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was investigated herein. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients subtotally resected for GBM underwent TCS during radiotherapy planning and were conventionally treated (54 to 60 Gy). Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and stereotactic boost planning target volumes (PTVs, 3-mm margin) were created, based on contrast enhancement on computed tomography (CT) only (PTV CT ) or the combined CT and TCS information (PTV CT+TCS ). Noncoplonar conformal treatment plans for both PTVs were compared. Tumor progression patterns and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were related to both PTVs. Results: A sufficient temporal bone window for TCS was present in 11 of 13 patients. GTVs as defined by TCS were considerably larger than the respective CT volumes: Of the composite GTV CT+TCS (median volume 42 ml), 23%, 13%, and 66% (medians) were covered by the overlap of both methods, CT only and TCS only, respectively. Median sizes of PTV CT and PTV CT+TCS were 34 and 74 ml, respectively. Addition of TCS to CT information led to a median increase of the volume irradiated within the 80% isodose by 32 ml (median factor 1.51). PTV CT+TCS volume was at median 24% of a 'conventional' MRI(T2)-based PTV. Of eight progressions analyzed, three and six occurred inside the 80% isodose of the plans for PTV CT and for PTV CT+TCS , respectively. Conclusion: Addition of TCS tumor volume to the contrast-enhancing CT volume in postoperative radiotherapy planning for GBM increases the treated volume by a median factor of 1.5. Since a high frequency of marginal recurrences is reported from dose-escalation trials of this disease, TCS may complement established methods in PTV definition

  16. Nanomedicine for therapeutic drug therapy: Approaches to increase the efficacy of drug therapy with nanoemulsion delivery and reduce the toxicity of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambalapally, Swetha Reddy

    The advancement of nanotechnology has paved the way for novel nanoscale materials for use in a wide range of applications. The use of these nanomaterials in biomedicine facilitates the improvement of existing technologies for disease prevention and treatment through diagnostics, tumor detection, drug delivery, medical imaging and vaccine development. Nanotechnology delivery systems for therapeutic uses includes the formulation of nanoparticles in emulsions. These novel delivery systems can improve drug efficacy by their ability to enhance bioavailability, minimize drug side effects, decrease drug toxicity, provide targeted site delivery and increase circulation of the drug in the blood. Additionally, these delivery systems also improve the drug stability and encapsulation efficiency. In the Introduction, this thesis will describe a novel technique for the preparation of nanoemulsions which was utilized in drug delivery and diagnostic applications. This novel Phase Inversion Temperature (PIT) method is a solvent and polymer-free and low energy requiring emulsification method, typically utilizing oils stabilized by nonionic surfactants to prepare water in oil (W/O) emulsions. The correlation between the particle size, zeta potential and the emulsion stability is described. The use of this nanoemulsion delivery system for pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals by utilizing in vitro systems was investigated. Using the PIT method, a self assembling nanoemulsion (SANE) of gamma Tocotrienols (gammaT3), a component of Vitamin E family has been demonstrated to reduce cholesterol accumulation in HepG-2 cells. The nanoemulsion is stable and the particle size is around 20 nm with a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.065. The effect of the nano gammaT3 on the metabolism of cholesterol, HMG-CoA activity and Apo-B levels were evaluated in an in vitro system utilizing HepG2 cells. A new class of nanoparticles, Quantum dots (QDs) has shown immense potential as novel nanomaterials used as

  17. Aplastic anemia as a cause of death in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with temozolomide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, Jindrich; Priester, Peter; Slovacek, Ladislav; Petera, Jiri; Macingova, Zuzana; Kopecky, Otakar

    2010-01-01

    Background: Standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme consists of postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, followed by a 6-month chemotherapy. Serious hematologic complications are rarely reported. Case Report and Results: The authors present the case of a 61-year-old female patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with external-beam radiation therapy and concomitant temozolomide. After completion of treatment, the patient developed symptoms of serious aplastic anemia that eventually led to death due to prolonged neutro- and thrombocytopenia followed by infectious complications. Conclusion: Lethal complications following temozolomide are, per se, extremely rare, however, a total of four other cases of aplastic anemia have been reported in the literature so far. (orig.)

  18. Aplastic anemia as a cause of death in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopecky, Jindrich; Priester, Peter; Slovacek, Ladislav; Petera, Jiri; Macingova, Zuzana [Dept. of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Hospital and Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Kopecky, Otakar [Clinical Oncology, Regional Hospital Nachod (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Background: Standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme consists of postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, followed by a 6-month chemotherapy. Serious hematologic complications are rarely reported. Case Report and Results: The authors present the case of a 61-year-old female patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with external-beam radiation therapy and concomitant temozolomide. After completion of treatment, the patient developed symptoms of serious aplastic anemia that eventually led to death due to prolonged neutro- and thrombocytopenia followed by infectious complications. Conclusion: Lethal complications following temozolomide are, per se, extremely rare, however, a total of four other cases of aplastic anemia have been reported in the literature so far. (orig.)

  19. Erythema multiforme like allergic contact dermatitis associated with laurel oil: a rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuncakmak, Tugba Kevser; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Izol, Belcin; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Cobanoglu, Bengu; Taskin, Secil

    2015-04-16

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common skin disease, which affects approximately 20% of the population. This reaction may present with several clinical manifestations. Erythema multiforme-like allergic contact dermatitis is a rare type of non-eczematous contact dermatitis, which may lead to difficulty in diagnosis.Essential oil of Laurus nobilis is widely used in massage therapy for antiinflammatory and analgesic effects. Laurus nobilis induced contact dermatitis has been reported in the literature but an erythema multiforme-like presentation is rare.

  20. Tonsillary carcinoma after temozolomide treatment for glioblastoma multiforme: treatment-related or dual-pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binello, E; Germano, I M

    2009-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a primary malignant brain tumor with a prognosis of typically less than 2 years. Standard treatment paradigms include surgery, radiation therapy and temozolomide. Little data exists for temozolomide recommendations after the first 6 months. We present a case of a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with surgery, radiation and chronic temozolomide for 6 years. He continues to survive glioblastoma-recurrence-free, but developed tonsillary carcinoma. This case raises the question of whether this secondary solid-organ malignancy is treatment-related or dual pathology.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of {sup 225}Ac-labelled vs. {sup 213}Bi-labelled tumour-homing peptides in a preclinical mouse model of peritoneal carcinomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essler, Markus; Gaertner, Florian C.; Blechert, Birgit; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Seidl, Christof [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Neff, Frauke [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Pathology, Neuherberg (Germany); Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred [Institute for Transuranium Elements, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Targeted delivery of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides is a promising novel option in cancer therapy. We generated stable conjugates of the vascular tumour-homing peptide F3 both with {sup 225}Ac and {sup 213}Bi that specifically bind to nucleolin on the surface of proliferating tumour cells. The aim of our study was to determine the therapeutic efficacy of {sup 225}Ac-DOTA-F3 in comparison with that of {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3. ID{sub 50} values of {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 and {sup 225}Ac-DOTA-F3 were determined via clonogenic assays. The therapeutic efficacy of both constructs was assayed by repeated treatment of mice bearing intraperitoneal MDA-MB-435 xenograft tumours. Therapy was monitored by bioluminescence imaging. Nephrotoxic effects were analysed by histology. ID{sub 50} values of {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 and {sup 225}Ac-DOTA-F3 were 53 kBq/ml and 67 Bq/ml, respectively. The median survival of control mice treated with phosphate-buffered saline was 60 days after intraperitoneal inoculation of 1 x 10{sup 7} MDA-MB-435 cells. Therapy with 6 x 1.85 kBq of {sup 225}Ac-DOTA-F3 or 6 x 1.85 MBq of {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 prolonged median survival to 95 days and 97 days, respectively. While F3 labelled with short-lived {sup 213}Bi (t{sub 1/2} 46 min) reduced the tumour mass at early time-points up to 30 days after treatment, the antitumour effect of {sup 225}Ac-DOTA-F3 (t{sub 1/2} 10 days) increased at later time-points. The difference in the fraction of necrotic cells after treatment with {sup 225}Ac-DOTA-F3 (43%) and with {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 (36%) was not significant. Though histological analysis of kidney samples revealed acute tubular necrosis and tubular oedema in 10-30% of animals after treatment with {sup 225}Ac-DOTA-F3 or {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3, protein casts were negligible (2%), indicating only minor damage to the kidney. Therapy with both {sup 225}Ac-DOTA-F3 and {sup 213}Bi-DTPA-F3 increased survival of mice with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Mild renal toxicity of both

  2. Phase I Trial of Gross Total Resection, Permanent Iodine-125 Brachytherapy, and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Chang, Susan; Pouliot, Jean; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Malec, Mary K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchell S.; Larson, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: From April 1999 to May 2002, 21 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were enrolled on a Phase I protocol investigating planned gross total resection and immediate placement of permanent I-125 seeds, followed by postoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy at 100 cGy b.i.d., 5 days per week. Median age and Karnofsky performance status were 50 years (range, 32-65 years) and 90 (range, 70-100), respectively. Toxicity was assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Eighteen patients completed treatment according to protocol. The median preoperative tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging was 18.6 cm 3 (range, 4.4-41.2 cm 3 ). The median brachytherapy dose measured 5 mm radially outward from the resection cavity was 400 Gy (range, 200-600 Gy). Ten patients underwent 12 reoperations, with 11 of 12 reoperations demonstrating necrosis without evidence of tumor. Because of high toxicity, the study was terminated early. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 57 and 114 weeks, respectively, but not significantly improved compared with historical patients treated at University of California, San Francisco, with gross total resection and radiotherapy without brachytherapy. Conclusions: Treatment with gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy as performed in this study results in high toxicity and reoperation rates, without demonstrated improvement in survival

  3. Understanding cytoskeleton regulators in glioblastoma multiforme for therapy design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumi S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Samaneh Masoumi,1,*, Aditya Harisankar,2,* Aileen Gracias,3 Fabian Bachinger,1 Temesgen Fufa,1,4 Gayathri Chandrasekar,5 Frank Gaunitz,4 Julian Walfridsson,2 Satish S Kitambi1 1Department of Microbiology Tumor and Cell Biology, 2Center for Hematology and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; 4Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany; 5Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The cellular cytoskeleton forms the primary basis through which a cell governs the changes in size, shape, migration, proliferation, and forms the primary means through which the cells respond to their environment. Indeed, cell and tissue morphologies are used routinely not only to grade tumors but also in various high-content screening methods with an aim to identify new small molecules with therapeutic potential. This study examines the expression of various cytoskeleton regulators in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. GBM is a very aggressive disease with a low life expectancy even after chemo- and radiotherapy. Cancer cells of GBM are notorious for their invasiveness, ability to develop resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and to form secondary site tumors. This study aims to gain insight into cytoskeleton regulators in GBM cells and to understand the effect of various oncology drugs, including temozolomide, on cytoskeleton regulators. We compare the expression of various cytoskeleton regulators in GBM-derived tumor and normal tissue, CD133-postive and -negative cells from GBM and neural cells, and GBM stem-like and differentiated cells. In addition, the correlation between the expression of cytoskeleton regulators with the clinical outcome was examined to identify genes associated with longer patient survival. This was followed by a small molecule screening with US Food and Drug

  4. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, N. Andres [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Maudsley, Andrew A. [Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Gupta, Rakesh K. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Walker, Gail R. [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core Resource, Sylvester Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Padgett, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Roy, Bhaswati [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Stoyanova, Radka, E-mail: RStoyanova@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  5. Experimental Assays to Assess the Efficacy of Vinegar and Other Topical First-Aid Approaches on Cubozoan (Alatina alata) Tentacle Firing and Venom Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Angel A; Wilcox, Christie; King, Rebecca; Hurwitz, Kikiana; Castelfranco, Ann M

    2016-01-11

    Despite the medical urgency presented by cubozoan envenomations, ineffective and contradictory first-aid management recommendations persist. A critical barrier to progress has been the lack of readily available and reproducible envenomation assays that (1) recapitulate live-tentacle stings; (2) allow quantitation and imaging of cnidae discharge; (3) allow primary quantitation of venom toxicity; and (4) employ rigorous controls. We report the implementation of an integrated array of three experimental approaches designed to meet the above-stated criteria. Mechanistically overlapping, yet distinct, the three approaches comprised (1) direct application of test solutions on live tentacles (termed tentacle solution assay, or TSA) with single image- and video-microscopy; (2) spontaneous stinging assay using freshly excised tentacles overlaid on substrate of live human red blood cells suspended in agarose (tentacle blood agarose assays, or TBAA); and (3) a "skin" covered adaptation of TBAA (tentacle skin blood agarose assay, or TSBAA). We report the use and results of these assays to evaluate the efficacy of topical first-aid approaches to inhibit tentacle firing and venom activity. TSA results included the potent stimulation of massive cnidae discharge by alcohols but only moderate induction by urine, freshwater, and "cola" (carbonated soft drink). Although vinegar, the 40-year field standard of first aid for the removal of adherent tentacles, completely inhibited cnidae firing in TSA and TSBAA ex vivo models, the most striking inhibition of both tentacle firing and subsequent venom-induced hemolysis was observed using newly-developed proprietary formulations (Sting No More™) containing copper gluconate, magnesium sulfate, and urea.

  6. Glioblastoma multiforme med intra- og ekstramedullær disseminering til spinalkanalen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Karin; Gutte Borgwardt, Henrik; Idris, Fadi

    2013-01-01

    Metastases to the spinal cord from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are uncommon, but important to have in mind when patients with a history of GBM present with symptoms that do not correlate with the primary disease pattern. We report a rare case, where a male with GBM, six months after tumour...

  7. Phase II open-label study of nintedanib in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Mau-Sørensen, Paul Morten

    2013-01-01

    glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who had previously failed radiotherapy plus temozolomide as first-line therapy (STUPP), or the same regimen with subsequent bevacizumab-based therapy as second-line treatment (BEV). Patients with a performance status of 0-1, histologically proven GBM, and measurable disease (by...... GBM who had failed 1-2 prior lines of therapy....

  8. Clinical variables serve as prognostic factors in a model for survival from glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Grunnet, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Although implementation of temozolomide (TMZ) as a part of primary therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has resulted in improved patient survival, the disease is still incurable. Previous studies have correlated various parameters to survival, although no single parameter has yet been...

  9. RNA expression patterns in serum microvesicles from patients with glioblastoma multiforme and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noerholm Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA from exosomes and other microvesicles contain transcripts of tumour origin. In this study we sought to identify biomarkers of glioblastoma multiforme in microvesicle RNA from serum of affected patients. Methods Microvesicle RNA from serum from patients with de-novo primary glioblastoma multiforme (N = 9 and normal controls (N = 7 were analyzed by microarray analysis. Samples were collected according to protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board. Differential expressions were validated by qRT-PCR in a separate set of samples (N = 10 in both groups. Results Expression profiles of microvesicle RNA correctly separated individuals in two groups by unsupervised clustering. The most significant differences pertained to down-regulated genes (121 genes > 2-fold down in the glioblastoma multiforme patient microvesicle RNA, validated by qRT-PCR on several genes. Overall, yields of microvesicle RNA from patients was higher than from normal controls, but the additional RNA was primarily of size Conclusions Serum microvesicle RNA from patients with glioblastoma multiforme has significantly down-regulated levels of RNAs coding for ribosome production, compared to normal healthy controls, but a large overabundance of RNA of unknown origin with size

  10. On the Concepts and History of Glioblastoma Multiforme - Morphology, Genetics and Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyanov George St.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV WHO malignant tumor with astrocytic differentiation. As one of the most common clinically diagnosed central nervous system (CNS oncological entries, there have been a wide variety of historical reports of the description and evolution of ideas regarding these tumors.

  11. RNA expression patterns in serum microvesicles from patients with glioblastoma multiforme and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerholm, Mikkel; Balaj, Leonora; Limperg, Tobias; Salehi, Afshin; Zhu, Lin Dan; Hochberg, Fred H; Breakefield, Xandra O; Carter, Bob S; Skog, Johan

    2012-01-01

    RNA from exosomes and other microvesicles contain transcripts of tumour origin. In this study we sought to identify biomarkers of glioblastoma multiforme in microvesicle RNA from serum of affected patients. Microvesicle RNA from serum from patients with de-novo primary glioblastoma multiforme (N = 9) and normal controls (N = 7) were analyzed by microarray analysis. Samples were collected according to protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board. Differential expressions were validated by qRT-PCR in a separate set of samples (N = 10 in both groups). Expression profiles of microvesicle RNA correctly separated individuals in two groups by unsupervised clustering. The most significant differences pertained to down-regulated genes (121 genes > 2-fold down) in the glioblastoma multiforme patient microvesicle RNA, validated by qRT-PCR on several genes. Overall, yields of microvesicle RNA from patients was higher than from normal controls, but the additional RNA was primarily of size < 500 nt. Gene ontology of the down-regulated genes indicated these are coding for ribosomal proteins and genes related to ribosome production. Serum microvesicle RNA from patients with glioblastoma multiforme has significantly down-regulated levels of RNAs coding for ribosome production, compared to normal healthy controls, but a large overabundance of RNA of unknown origin with size < 500 nt

  12. Jacob's ladders, Riemann's oscillators, quotient of two oscillating multiforms and set of metamorphoses of this system

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we introduce complicated oscillating system, namely quotient of two multiforms based on Riemann-Siegel formula. We prove that there is an infinite set of metamorphoses of this system (=chrysalis) on critical line $\\sigma=\\frac 12$ into a butterfly (=infinite series of M\\" obius functions in the region of absolute convergence $\\sigma>1$).

  13. Discovery of potent and selective cytotoxic activity of new quinazoline-ureas against TMZ-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkamhawy, Ahmed; Viswanath, Ambily Nath Indu; Pae, Ae Nim; Kim, Hyeon Young; Heo, Jin-Chul; Park, Woo-Kyu; Lee, Chong-Ock; Yang, Heekyoung; Kim, Kang Ho; Nam, Do-Hyun; Seol, Ho Jun; Cho, Heeyeong; Roh, Eun Joo

    2015-10-20

    Herein, we report new quinazoline-urea based compounds with potent cytotoxic activities against TMZ-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. Low micromolar IC₅₀ values were exhibited over a panel of three primary GBM patient-derived cell cultures belonging to proneural (GBM-1), mesenchymal (GBM-2), and classical (GBM-3) subtypes. Eight compounds showed excellent selectivity indices for GBM cells comparing to a normal astrocyte cell line. In JC-1 assay, analogues 11, 12, 20, 22, and 24 exerted promising rates of mPTP opening induction towards proneural GBM subtype. Compounds 11, 20, and 24 bound to the translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) in submicromolar range using [(3)H] PK-11195 binding affinity assay. A homology model was built and docked models of 11, 12, 20, 22 and 24 were generated for describing their plausible binding modes in TSPO. In 3D clonogenic assay, compound 20 manifested potent tumoricidal effects on TMZ-resistant GBM cells even at submicromolar concentrations. In addition, CYP450 and hERG assays presented a safe toxicity profile of 20. Taken as a whole, this report presents compound 20 as a potent, selective and safe GBM cytotoxic agent which constitutes a promising direction against TMZ-resistant GBM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Intraoperative MRI to guide the resection of primary supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme - a quantitative radiological analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jens P.; Rubach, Matthias; Schulz, Thomas; Dietrich, Juergen; Zimmer, Claus; Kahn, Thomas [University of Leipzig, Diagnostic Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Trantakis, Christos; Winkler, Dirk; Renner, Christof [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurosurgery, Leipzig (Germany); Schober, Ralf; Geiger, Kathrin [University of Leipzig, Department of Neuropathology, Leipzig (Germany); Brosteanu, Oana [Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Patients with supratentorial high-grade glioma underwent surgery within a vertically open 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) system to evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative MR guidance in achieving gross-total resection. For 31 patients, preoperative clinical data and MR findings were consistent with the putative diagnosis of a high-grade glioma, in 23 cases in eloquent regions. Tumor resections were carried out within a 0.5-T MR SIGNA SP/i (GE Medical Systems, USA). The resection of the lesion was carried out using fully MR compatible neurosurgical equipment and was stopped at the point when the operation was considered complete by the surgeon viewing the operation field with the microscope. We repeated imaging to determine the residual tumor volume only visible with MRI. Areas of tissue that were abnormal on these images were localized in the bed of resection by using interactive MR guidance. The procedure of resection, imaging control and interactive image guidance was repeated where necessary. Almost all tissue with abnormal characteristics was resected, with the exception of tissue localized in eloquent brain areas. The diagnosis of glioblastoma was confirmed in all 31 cases. When comparing the tumor volume before resection and at the point where the neurosurgeon would otherwise have terminated surgery (''first control''), residual tumor tissue was detectable in 29/31 patients; the mean residual tumor volume was 30.7{+-}24%. After repeated resections under interactive image guidance the mean residual tumor volume was 15.1%. At this step we found tumor remnants only in 20/31 patients. The perioperative morbidity (12.9%) was low. Twenty-seven patients underwent sufficient postoperative radiotherapy. We found a significant difference (log{sub rank}p=0.0037) in the mean survival times of the two groups with complete resection (n=10, median survival time 537 days) and incomplete resection (n=17, median survival time 237 days). The resection of

  15. Outcome in elderly patients undergoing definitive surgery and radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme at a tertiary care institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Dasarahally S.; Suh, John H.; Phan, Jennifer L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Cohen, Bruce H.; Barnett, Gene H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of definitive surgery and radiation in patients aged 70 years and older with supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: We selected elderly patients (≥ 70 years) who had primary treatment for glioblastoma multiforme at our tertiary care institution from 1977 through 1996. The study group (n = 102) included 58 patients treated with definitive radiation, 19 treated with palliative radiation, and 25 who received no radiation. To compare our results with published findings, we grouped our patients according to the applicable prognostic categories developed by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG): RTOG group IV (n = 6), V (n = 70), and VI (n = 26). Patients were retrospectively assigned to prognostic group IV, V, or VI based on age, performance status, extent of surgery, mental status, neurologic function, and radiation dose. Treatment included surgical resection and radiation (n 49), biopsy alone (n = 25), and biopsy followed by radiation (n = 28). Patients were also stratified according to whether they were optimally treated (gross total or subtotal resection with postoperative definitive radiation) or suboptimally treated (biopsy, biopsy + radiation, surgery alone, or surgery + palliative radiation). Patients were considered to have a favorable prognosis (n = 39) if they were optimally treated and had a Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score of at least 70. Results: The median survival for patients according to RTOG groups IV, V, and VI was 9.2, 6.6, and 3.1 months, respectively (log-rank, p < 0.0004). The median overall survival was 5.3 months. The definitive radiation group (n = 58) had a median survival of 7.3 months compared to 4.5 months in the palliative radiation group (n = 19) and 1.2 months in the biopsy-alone group (p < 0.0001). Optimally treated patients had a median survival of 7.4 months compared to 2.4 months in those suboptimally treated (p < 0.0001). The favorable prognosis group had an

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of aldoxorubicin in an intracranial xenograft mouse model of human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Luis; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Musto, Alberto E; Wilk, Anna; Vashistha, Himanshu; Zapata, Adriana; Walker, Chelsey; Velasco-Gonzalez, Cruz; Parsons, Christopher; Wieland, Scott; Levitt, Daniel; Reiss, Krzysztof; Prakash, Om

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12 to 15 months after diagnosis. Acquired chemoresistance, high systemic toxicity, and low penetration of the blood brain barrier by many anticancer drugs contribute to the failure of anti-GBM therapies. To circumvent some of these obstacles, we tested a novel prodrug approach to evaluate anti-GBM efficacy by utilizing serum albumin-binding doxorubicin (Doxo), aldoxorubicin (Aldoxo), which is less toxic, is released from albumin in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. A human GBM cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter (U87-luc) was stereotactically injected into the left striatum of the brain of immunodeficient mice. Following initial tumor growth for 12 days, mice were injected once a week in the tail-vein with Aldoxo [24 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg of doxorubicin equivalents-3/4 maximum tolerated dose (MTD)], Doxo [6 mg/kg (3/4 MTD)], or vehicle. Aldoxo-treated mice demonstrated significantly slower growth of the tumor when compared to vehicle-treated or Doxo-treated mice. Five out of eight Aldoxo-treated mice remained alive more than 60 days with a median survival of 62 days, while the median survival of vehicle- and Doxo-treated mice was only 26 days. Importantly, Aldoxo-treated mice exhibited high levels of Doxo within the tumor tissue, accompanied by low tumor cell proliferation (Ki67) and abundant intratumoral programmed cell death (cleaved caspase-3). Effective accumulation of Aldoxo in brain tumor tissues but not normal brain, its anti-tumor efficacy, and low toxicity, provide a strong rationale for evaluating this novel drug conjugate as a treatment for patients afflicted with GBM.

  17. Therapeutic Efficacy of Aldoxorubicin in an Intracranial Xenograft Mouse Model of Human Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Marrero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12 to 15 months after diagnosis. Acquired chemoresistance, high systemic toxicity, and low penetration of the blood brain barrier by many anticancer drugs contribute to the failure of anti-GBM therapies. To circumvent some of these obstacles, we tested a novel prodrug approach to evaluate anti-GBM efficacy by utilizing serum albumin-binding doxorubicin (Doxo, aldoxorubicin (Aldoxo, which is less toxic, is released from albumin in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. A human GBM cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter (U87-luc was stereotactically injected into the left striatum of the brain of immunodeficient mice. Following initial tumor growth for 12 days, mice were injected once a week in the tail-vein with Aldoxo [24 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg of doxorubicin equivalents—3/4 maximum tolerated dose (MTD], Doxo [6 mg/kg (3/4 MTD], or vehicle. Aldoxo-treated mice demonstrated significantly slower growth of the tumor when compared to vehicle-treated or Doxo-treated mice. Five out of eight Aldoxo-treated mice remained alive more than 60 days with a median survival of 62 days, while the median survival of vehicle- and Doxo-treated mice was only 26 days. Importantly, Aldoxo-treated mice exhibited high levels of Doxo within the tumor tissue, accompanied by low tumor cell proliferation (Ki67 and abundant intratumoral programmed cell death (cleaved caspase-3. Effective accumulation of Aldoxo in brain tumor tissues but not normal brain, its anti-tumor efficacy, and low toxicity, provide a strong rationale for evaluating this novel drug conjugate as a treatment for patients afflicted with GBM.

  18. Multifuntional Nanotherapeutics for the Combinatorial Drug and Gene Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, Breanne

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a grade IV glioma, is the most common primary brain tumor, affecting about 3 out of 100,000 persons per year in the United States. GBM accounts for about 80% of primary malignant brain tumors, and is also the most aggressive of malignant brain tumors. With exhaustive treatment, survival only averages between 12 and 15 months, with a 2-year survival rate less than 25%. New therapeutic strategies are necessary to improve the outcomes of this disease. Chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA alkylating agent, is used as a first-line of treatment for GBM. However, GBM tumors develop resistance to TMZ over time due to increased expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a gene responsible for DNA repair. We previously developed cationic, amphiphilic copolymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-g-polyethylenimine (PgP) and demonstrated its utility for nucleic acid delivery. Here, we examine the ability of PgP polyplexes to overcome TMZ resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy through combination drug and gene therapy for GBM treatment. In this study, we evaluated the ability of PgP to deliver siRNA targeting to MGMT (siMGMT), a gene responsible for drug resistance in GBM. Our results demonstrated that PgP effectively forms stable complex with siRNA and protects siRNAs from heparin competition assay, serum- and ribonuclease-mediated degradation, confirming the potential of the polyplex for in vivo delivery. Results from MTT assays showed that PgP/siRNA polyplexes exhibited minimal cytotoxicity compared to untreated cells when incubated with T98G human GBM cells. We also demonstrated that PgP/siMGMT polyplexes mediate knockdown of MGMT protein as well as a significant ˜56% and ˜68% knockdown of MGMT mRNA in T98G GBM cells compared to cells treated with PgP complexed with non-targeting siRNA (siNT) at a 60:1 and 80:1 nitrogen:phosphate (N:P) ratio, respectively. Further, co-incubation of PgP/siMGMT polyplexes with TMZ

  19. Feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of short induction chemotherapy of docetaxel plus cisplatin or carboplatin (TP) followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy for organ preservation in advanced cancer of the hypopharynx, larynx, and base of tongue. Early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semrau, Sabine; Klautke, Gunther; Fietkau, Rainer; Waldfahrer, Frank; Iro, Heinrich; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael; Linke, Rainer; Kuwert, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard treatment for advanced head and neck cancer. Whether short induction chemotherapy (ICT) provides additional benefit or, in particular, predictive benefit for the response to chemoradiotherapy is an open question. The present study aimed to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of induction with docetaxel and platinum salt (TP) and subsequent CRT. A total of 25 patients with functionally inoperable cancer of the base of the tongue, hypopharynx, or larynx received 1 cycle of docetaxel (75 mg/m 2 , day 1) combined with either cisplatin (30 mg/m 2 , days 1-3; n = 23) or carboplatin (AUC 1.5 days 1-3; n = 2). Responders (n = 22, > 30% tumor reduction, graded by endoscopy) and 1 non-responder received CRT (target dose: 69-72 Gy) with cisplatin/paclitaxel, carboplatin/paclitaxel, or cisplatin/docetaxel. All patients completed ICT with acceptable toxicity (leukocytopenia grade 4: 8%). The remission rate of the primary tumor was 88% (22/25 patients). There was no need to delay CRT due to toxicity in any case. Each patient received the full radiation dose. Of the patients, 56% received > 80% of the chemotherapy. The acute toxicity of CRT was moderate, no grade 4 toxicities occurred, while grade 3 toxicities included the following: infection (39%), dermatitis (13%), leukocytopenia (30%), and thrombocytopenia (4%). The local control rate was 84.6% ± 8.5% and the survival rate was 89.6% ± 7.2% at 12 months. Organ preservation was possible in 22/23 (95%) cases. Short induction with a TP regimen and subsequent CRT with a taxan is feasible and associated with an encouraging local control rate. (orig.)

  20. Erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, J.Y.; Safai, B.; Posner, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    In 15 months we encountered eight patients with intracranial tumors who developed erythema multiforme (EM) or erythema multiforme bullosa (Stevens-Johnson syndrome). All occurred shortly after use of phenytoin (DPH) and brain radiation therapy (WBRT). The clinical picture differed from the classic form of EM in that the erythema began on the scalp and spread to the extremities, progressing in three cases to extensive bullous formation. There were no cases of EM among patients who received either DPH or radiotherapy alone. The combination of DPH, WBRT, and tapering of steroids seems to predispose to EM. The pathogenesis of the disorder is probably immunologic. In the absence of seizures, anticonvulsants should not be given routinely to patients with brain tumors. When anticonvulsants are necessary in patients scheduled for WBRT, DPH may not be the drug of choice

  1. A simple route to synthesize multiform structures of tin oxide nanobelts and optical properties investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Chuanwei; Xu Guoyue; Zhang Haiqian; Li Yingying; Luo Yan; Zhang Peigen

    2008-01-01

    Multiform structures of SnO 2 nanobelts including of zigzag, branching and straight structures have been synthesized by a simple molten-salt assisted route. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The growth mechanism of zigzag nanobelts was proposed. A strong blue emission band centered in 425 nm was observed in the photoluminescence spectrum

  2. Metástases intrarraquidianas de glioblastoma multiforme supratentorial da infância: relato de caso Spinal cord metastatic glioblastoma multiforme of childhood: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Imperatriz Porto Rondinelli

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de uma menina de onze anos de idade com glioblastoma multiforme na região têmporo-parietal direita, completamente ressecado cirurgicamente, submetida a radioterapia craniana pós-operatória. Houve recaída três meses após, em topografia distante do sítio primário, na porção caudal do canal raquidiano. Após, ocorreu evolução rápida para o óbito. A propósito desse caso, discutimos nossa experiência quanto à conduta nesses tumores e a literatura sobre o assunto.We report the case of an eleven years-old girl with a right temporo-parietal glioblastoma multiforme. The tumor was totally resected on neurossurgery, and cranial radioteraphy was applied at next. The tumor recurred three months later, far from primary site, in the caudal portion of the spinal canal. Death occurred in less than one month later. Taking into account the data of this case, we discuss our experience in the management of such tumors and the literature on the subject.

  3. Efficacy of Intravenous Cobinamide Versus Hydroxocobalamin or Control for Treatment of Severe Hydrogen Sulfide Toxicity in a Swine (Sus Scrofa) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    Publications and Presentations Section will route the request form to clinical investigations. S02 ISG/JAC ( Ethics Review) and Public Affairs (S9 MOW/PA) for... workplace gas inhalation deaths. H2S is also an attractive terrorism tool because of its high toxicity and ease with which it can be produced. Although

  4. The novel Hsp90 inhibitor NXD30001 induces tumor regression in a genetically engineered mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haihao; Woolfenden, Steve; Bronson, Roderick T; Jaffer, Zahara M; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas; Rubenstein, Allan E; Chen, Ruihong; Charest, Al

    2010-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has an abysmal prognosis. We now know that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway and the loss of function of the tumor suppressor genes p16Ink4a/p19ARF and PTEN play a crucial role in GBM pathogenesis: initiating the early stages of tumor development, sustaining tumor growth, promoting infiltration, and mediating resistance to therapy. We have recently shown that this genetic combination is sufficient to promote the development of GBM in adult mice. Therapeutic agents raised against single targets of the EGFR signaling pathway have proven rather inefficient in GBM therapy, showing the need for combinatorial therapeutic approaches. An effective strategy for concurrent disruption of multiple signaling pathways is via the inhibition of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Hsp90 inhibition leads to the degradation of so-called client proteins, many of which are key effectors of GBM pathogenesis. NXD30001 is a novel second generation Hsp90 inhibitor that shows improved pharmacokinetic parameters. Here we show that NXD30001 is a potent inhibitor of GBM cell growth in vitro consistent with its capacity to inhibit several key targets and regulators of GBM biology. We also show the efficacy of NXD30001 in vivo in an EGFR-driven genetically engineered mouse model of GBM. Our findings establish that the Hsp90 inhibitor NXD30001 is a therapeutically multivalent molecule, whose actions strike GBM at the core of its drivers of tumorigenesis and represent a compelling rationale for its use in GBM treatment.

  5. Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid-Modified Lipid-Polymer Hybrid Nanoparticles for Docetaxel Delivery in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kairong; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Liu, Yayuan; Zong, Taili; He, Qin

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid nanoparticles consisting of lipids and the biodegradable polymer, poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), were developed for the targeted delivery of the anticancer drug, docetaxel. Transmission electron microscopic observations confirmed the presence of a lipid coating over the polymeric core. Using coumarin-6 as a fluorescent probe, the uptake efficacy of RGD conjugated lipid coated nanoparticles (RGD-L-P) by C6 cells was increased significantly, compared with that of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (L-P; 2.5-fold higher) or PLGA-nanoparticles (PLGA-P; 1.76-fold higher). The superior tumor spheroid penetration of RGD-L-P indicated that RGD-L-P could target effectively and specifically to C6 cells overexpressing integrin α(v)β3. The anti-proliferative activity of docetaxel-loaded RGD-L-P against C6 cells was increased 2.69- and 4.13-fold compared with L-P and PLGA-P, respectively. Regarding biodistribution, the strongest brain-localized fluorescence signals were detected in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-bearing rats treated with 1,10-Dioctadecyl-3,3,30,30-tetramethylindotricarb-ocyanine iodide (DiR)-loaded RGD-L-P, compared to rats treated with DiR-loaded L-P or PLGA-P. The median survival time of GBM-bearing rats treated with docetaxel-loaded RGD-L-P was 57 days, a fold increase of 1.43, 1.78, 3.35, and 3.56 compared with animals given L-P (P PLGA-P (P < 0.05), Taxotere (P < 0.01) and saline (P < 0.01), respectively. Collectively, these results support RGD-L-P as a promising drug delivery system for the specific targeting and the treatment of GBM.

  6. Vaccine-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis: A case and systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Chahal, Dev; Aleshin, Maria; Turegano, Mamina; Chiu, Melvin; Worswick, Scott

    2018-01-01

    Background: Erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are cutaneous hypersensitivityreactions that develop in response to specific triggers such as medications and certain infections. Vaccines, which undergo rigorous safety testing prior to use in humans, are a rare cause of SJS/TEN and little is known about the frequency of such events and corresponding pathogenesis. Objective: Herein, we discuss a case of suspected TEN in a 19-yea...

  7. Eritema multiforme ampollar extenso asociado a infección por virus herpes simplex Extended Bullous Erythema Multiforme Associated To Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Elgueta-Noy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El Eritema Multiforme (EM es una reacción cutánea aguda generalmente benigna y autolimitada, asociada a la infección por Virus Herpes Simplex (HSV. Se caracteriza por lesiones polimorfas y tipo diana en extremidades y mucosas. Presentamos un paciente de 22 años con pápulas, vesículas y ampollas, que evoluciona con un 90% de la superficie corporal comprometida en tres semanas. Se realizó una reacción de polimerasa en cadena para HSV, resultando positiva en una costra. La biopsia de piel y la tinción de inmunohistoquímica positiva para linfocitos T CD4, fueron compatibles con EM ampollar asociado a HSV. Destacamos la importancia de la correlación clínico patológica, apoyada por el estudio virológico, en el diagnóstico de este caso de presentación atípica. Los hallazgos de laboratorio confirmaron lo descrito en la literatura respecto de la patogenia del EM asociado a HSV.Erythema Multiforme (EM is a generally benign and self-limited acute cutaneous reaction, associated with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV infection. It is characterized by polymorphic "target" lesions in extremities and mucosal tissues. We report a 22-year old patient with papules, vesicles and blisters, which evolved to cover 90% of the body in three weeks. We performed a PCR study for HSV, which was positive in a crust. A skin biopsy and positive immunohistochemical stain for LT CD4+ were compatible with bullous EM associated with HSV. We underline the importance of pathological clinical correlation, reinforced by a virological study, in the diagnosis of this case with atypical symptoms. The laboratory findings confirmed literature descriptions with respect to the pathogenicity of EM associated with HSV.

  8. The use of hypofractionated intensity-modulated irradiation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: preliminary results of a prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanem, Khalil; Patrocinio, Horacio; Lambert, Christine; Corns, Robert; Leblanc, Richard; Parker, William; Shenouda, George; Souhami, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Despite major advances in treatment modalities, the prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains poor. Exploring hypofractionated regimens to replace the standard 6-week radiotherapy schedule is an attractive strategy as an attempt to prevent accelerated tumor cell repopulation. There is equally interest in dose escalation to the gross tumor volume where the majority of failures occur. We report our preliminary results using hypofractionated intensity-modulated accelerated radiotherapy regimen in the treatment of patients with GBM. Between July 1998 and December 2001, 25 patients with histologically proven diagnosis of GBM, Karnofsky performance status > or =60, and a postoperative tumor volume step-and-shoot technique), 60 Gy in 20 daily fractions of 3 Gy each were given to the GTV, whereas the planning target volume received a minimum of 40 Gy in 20 fractions of 2 Gy each at its periphery. Treatments were delivered over a 4-week period using 5 daily fractions per week. Dose was prescribed at the isocenter (ICRU point). Three beam angles were used in all of the cases. Treatments were well tolerated. Acute toxicity was limited to increased brain edema during radiotherapy in 2 patients who were on tapering doses of corticosteroids. This was corrected by increasing the steroid dose. At a median follow-up of 8.8 months, no late toxicity was observed. One patient experienced visual loss at 9 months after completion of treatment. MRI suggested nonspecific changes to the optic chiasm. On review of the treatment plan, the total dose to the optic chiasm was confirmed to be equal to or less than 40 Gy in 20 fractions. When Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis was used, 10 patients were class III-IV, and 15 patients were class V-VI. To date, 21 patients have had clinical and/or radiologic evidence of disease progression, and 16 patients have died. The median survival was 9.5 months (range: 2.8-22.9 months), the 1-year survival

  9. Erythema multiforme in a patient with recurrent non-hodgkins lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Kumara Shankari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema multiforme major (EMM is a hypersensitivity reaction usually secondary to medications, viruses or other infections. Its presentation is fairly typical with a symmetrical distribution of vesicles, bullae or targeted lesions on the upper body, arms, legs, palms, feet and oral mucosa. The authors present a delineated case of EMM in association with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (NHL with a very unusual clinical presentation evolving overtime into a unique, almost dermatomal distribution. Typical therapies were not initially helpful and intravenous immunoglobulin antibody had to be administered.

  10. Primary pontine gliobastoma multiforme: A case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Ji Yeon; Baek, Hye Jin; Moon, Jin Il; Cho, Soo Buem; Choi, Bo Hwa; Bae, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Choi, Dae Seob; Shin, Hwa Seon

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) most commonly occurs in the pons while it is rare in the brainstem. However, diagnosis of brainstem GBM can be difficult due to its rarity and nonspecific clinical manifestations. Herein, we presented a case of a 47-year-old female patient confirmed as primary pontine GBM by histopathological examination. This case highlights that GBM should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with a space-occupying lesion in the brainstem as well as the importance of a meticulous radiological review with clinical suspicion

  11. Primary pontine gliobastoma multiforme: A case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Ji Yeon; Baek, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jin Il; Cho, Soo Buem; Choi, Bo Hwa; Bae, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University Changwon Hospital, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dae Seob; Shin, Hwa Seon [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) most commonly occurs in the pons while it is rare in the brainstem. However, diagnosis of brainstem GBM can be difficult due to its rarity and nonspecific clinical manifestations. Herein, we presented a case of a 47-year-old female patient confirmed as primary pontine GBM by histopathological examination. This case highlights that GBM should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with a space-occupying lesion in the brainstem as well as the importance of a meticulous radiological review with clinical suspicion.

  12. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScan(c) software, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed

  13. A Phase 1 trial of intravenous boronophenylalanine-fructose complex in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.

    1996-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of glioblastoma multiforme was initially performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the early 1950's While this treatment for malignant brain tumors has continued in Japan, new worldwide interest has been stimulated by the development of new and more selective boron compounds. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a blood-brain barrier penetrating compound that has been used in BNCT of malignant melanomas. SPA has been employed experimentally in BNCT of rat gliosarcoma and has potential use in the treatment of human glioblastoma. As a preface to clinical BNCT trials, we studied the biodistribution of SPA in patients with glioblastoma

  14. Coexistence of meningioma and glioblastoma multiforme in a same patient: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Dumont, P.; Romero, P.C.; Lima, J.P.; Caldas, J.G.; Settanni, F.

    1991-01-01

    Tumoral collision has been defined as a coexistence of two or more central nervous system tumors histologically distinct, in a patient not harbouring a neuro-ectodermic disease (phakomatosis). Several theories exist for explaining this phenomenon but most of them assume that there is spacial proximity between the tumors and/or ionizing radiation effects. We report the case of coexistence of meningothelial meningioma and glioblastoma multiforme in a same patient, occurring in different hemispheres on different times. The tomographic aspects of the gliomatous lesion and the difficulty in differentiating by neuroimaging among high grade gliomas and recent hemorrhagic cerebral events are discussed. (author)

  15. Multiformity of inherent randomicity and visitation density in n symbolic dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yagang; Wang Changjiang

    2007-01-01

    The multiformity of inherent randomicity and visitation density in n symbolic dynamics will be clarified in this paper. These stochastic symbolic sequences bear three features. The distribution of frequency, inter-occurrence times and the alignment of two random sequences are amplified in detail. The features of visitation density in surjective maps presents catholicity and the catholicity in n letters randomicity has the same measure foundation. We hope to offer a symbolic platform that satisfies these stochastic properties and to attempt to study certain properties of DNA base sequences, 20 amino acids symbolic sequences of proteid structure, and the time series that can be symbolic in finance market et al

  16. Neoadjuvant Interdigitated Chemoradiotherapy Using Mesna, Doxorubicin, and Ifosfamide for Large, High-grade, Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity: Improved Efficacy and Reduced Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Sen, Neilayan; Jeans, Elizabeth B; Miller, Luke; Batus, Marta; Gitelis, Steven; Wang, Dian; Abrams, Ross A

    2018-05-18

    Patients with large, high-grade extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) are at high risk for both local and distant recurrence. RTOG 95-14, using a regimen of neoadjuvant interdigitated chemoradiotherapy with mesna, doxorubicin, ifosfamide, and dacarbazine followed by surgery and 3 cycles of adjuvant mesna, doxorubicin, ifosfamide, and dacarbazine, demonstrated high rates of disease control at the cost of significant toxicity (83% grade 4, 5% grade 5). As such, this regimen has not been widely adopted. Herein, we report our institutional outcomes utilizing a modified interdigitated chemoradiotherapy regimen, without dacarbazine, and current radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques for high-risk STS. Adults with large (≥5 cm; median, 12.9 cm), grade 3 extremity STS who were prospectively treated as part of our institutional standard of care from 2008 to 2016 are included. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of 3 cycles of mesna, doxorubicin, and ifosfamide (MAI) and 44 Gy (22 Gy in 11 fractions between cycles of MAI) after which patients underwent surgical resection and received 3 additional cycles of MAI. Twenty-six patients received the MAI treatment protocol. At a median follow-up of 47.3 months, 23 (88.5%) patients are still alive. Three year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival are 95.0%, 64.0%, and 95.0%, respectively. There have been no therapy-related deaths or secondary malignancies. The nonhematologic grade 4 toxicity rate was 7.7%. Neoadjuvant interdigitated MAI radiotherapy followed by resection and 3 cycles of adjuvant MAI has resulted in acceptable and manageable toxicity and highly favorable survival in patients at greatest risk for treatment failure.

  17. Randomized Phase III Trial to Test Accelerated Versus Standard Fractionation in Combination With Concurrent Cisplatin for Head and Neck Carcinomas in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0129 Trial: Long-Term Report of Efficacy and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Zhang, Qiang; Ang, K. Kian; Weber, Randal S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Soulieres, Denis; Kim, Harold; Silverman, Craig; Raben, Adam; Galloway, Thomas J.; Fortin, André; Gore, Elizabeth; Westra, William H.; Chung, Christine H.; Jordan, Richard C.; Gillison, Maura L.; List, Marcie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We tested the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin plus accelerated fractionation with a concomitant boost (AFX-C) versus standard fractionation (SFX) in locally advanced head and neck carcinoma (LA-HNC). Patients and Methods Patients had stage III to IV carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, or larynx. Radiation therapy schedules were 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks (SFX) or 72 Gy in 42 fractions over 6 weeks (AFX-C). Cisplatin doses were 100 mg/m2 once every 3 weeks for two (AFX-C) or three (SFX) cycles. Toxicities were scored by using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by using the one-sided log-rank test. Locoregional failure (LRF) and distant metastasis (DM) rates were estimated by using the cumulative incidence method and Gray's test. Results In all, 721 of 743 patients were analyzable (361, SFX; 360, AFX-C). At a median follow-up of 7.9 years (range, 0.3 to 10.1 years) for 355 surviving patients, no differences were observed in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.96; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.18; P = .37; 8-year survival, 48% v 48%), PFS (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.24; P = .52; 8-year estimate, 42% v 41%), LRF (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.38; P = .78; 8-year estimate, 37% v 39%), or DM (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.24; P = .16; 8-year estimate, 15% v 13%). For oropharyngeal cancer, p16-positive patients had better OS than p16-negative patients (HR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.42; P < .001; 8-year survival, 70.9% v 30.2%). There were no statistically significant differences in the grade 3 to 5 acute or late toxicities between the two arms and p-16 status. Conclusion When combined with cisplatin, AFX-C neither improved outcome nor increased late toxicity in patients with LA-HNC. Long-term high survival

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in 67 cases of glioblastoma multiform and occurrence of metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Nelson Fortes; Barbosa, Marcelo; Amaral, Lazaro L. Faria do; Mendonca, Renato Adam; Lima, Sergio Santos

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the main MRI characteristics of glioblastoma multiform (GBM), the most common CNS primary tumor, emphasizing its location and the occurrence of metastases. The MR imaging of 67 pathologically proven cases of glioblastoma multiform were retrospectively reviewed. The exams were realized in the period between 1995 and 2003, in one of three 1.5 Signa GE units (Milwaukee, WI). The ages of the patients ranged from 4 years to 86 years, mean 60 years, and the occurrence of the tumor was preponderant among men, with 39 cases (58%). The most common location was in the frontal lobes (47%) followed by the temporal lobes (18%) and the parietal lobes (16%). In 19% of the cases there were involvement of more than one site and long distance metastases were seen in 22% of the patients. According to the literature, the most common location of GBM was in the frontal lobe of older than 50 years old men. Metastases occurred in 22% of our cases. (author)

  19. Evaluation of antitumor efficacy and toxicity of novel 6-nitro-2-(3-chloropropyl-1H-benz[de]isoquinoline-1,3-dione in vivo in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asama Mukherjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was aimed to assess the in vivo anti-tumoral potency of the novel 6-nitro-2-(3-chloropropyl-1H-benz[de]isoquinoline-1,3-dione [Compound 1] that has earlier demonstrated excellent cytotoxicity in 15 out of 17 human tumor cell lines tested. Materials and Methods: Two murine tumors namely Sarcoma-180 (S-180 and Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC were used to measure its in vivo anti-tumor activity through the increase in median survival times (MST of drug treated (T over untreated control (C mice. Drug-induced toxicity in respect of hematological parameters, femoral bone marrow and splenic cellularity as well as biochemical parameters and histopathology of liver and kidney were assessed in vivo in normal and S-180 bearing mice sequentially on days 9, 14 and 19 following drug treatment at the optimum dose of 60 mg/kg administered from day 1 to 7. Results: Results revealed significant tumor regression effects in S-180 and EAC as T/C max values of 138 and 189 were obtained at its optimum dose of 60 mg/kg for QD 1-7 . Toxicity assay indicated no significant cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity or nephrotoxicity of the compound in normal and S-180 bearing mice. An initial hyposplenic cellularity and the femoral bone marrow suppression effect observed on day 9 reached normalcy by day 19. HPLC analysis revealed that it has appreciable stability (half-life ~ 3 h in murine blood plasma in vitro. Conclusion: Above results justify potential candidature of the compound for further drug development.

  20. Increased intracranial pressure in a case of spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme: analysis of these two rare conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. de Castro-Costa

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a rare case of increased intracranial hypertension consequent to a spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme in a young patient. They analyse the physiopathology of intracranial hypertension in spinal tumors and the rarity of such kind of tumor in this location, and its clinico-pathological aspects.

  1. New extracellular factors in glioblastoma multiforme development: neurotensin, growth differentiation factor-15, sphingosine-1-phosphate and cytomegalovirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbecki, Jan; Gutowska, Izabela; Kojder, Ireneusz; Jeżewski, Dariusz; Goschorska, Marta; Łukomska, Agnieszka; Lubkowska, Anna; Chlubek, Dariusz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena

    2018-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in understanding the biochemistry of cancer. For example, more significance is now assigned to the tumor microenvironment, especially with regard to intercellular signaling in the tumor niche which depends on many factors secreted by tumor cells. In addition, great progress has been made in understanding the influence of factors such as neurotensin, growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) on the ‘hallmarks of cancer’ in glioblastoma multiforme. Therefore, in the present work we describe the influence of these factors on the proliferation and apoptosis of neoplastic cells, cancer stem cells, angiogenesis, migration and invasion, and cancer immune evasion in a glioblastoma multiforme tumor. In particular, we discuss the effect of neurotensin, GDF-15, S1P (including the drug FTY720), and infection with CMV on tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), microglial cells, neutrophil and regulatory T cells (Treg), on the tumor microenvironment. In order to better understand the role of the aforementioned factors in tumoral processes, we outline the latest models of intratumoral heterogeneity in glioblastoma multiforme. Based on the most recent reports, we discuss the problems of multi-drug therapy in treating glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:29467963

  2. Therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of a single and double application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti Hughes, A; Pozzi, E C C; Thorp, S; Garabalino, M A; Farias, R O; Gonzalez, S J; Heber, E M; Itoiz, M E; Aromando, R F; Molinari, A J; Miller, M; Nigg, D W; Curotto, P; Trivillin, V A; Schwint, A E

    2012-01-01

    Tumor development from tissue with potentially malignant disorders (PMD) gives rise to second primary tumors. We previously demonstrated the partial inhibitory effect on tumor development of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) mediated by the boron compounds BPA (boronophenylalanine) and decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) in a hamster pouch oral precancer model. Seeking to optimize BNCT, the aim of the present study was to contribute to the knowledge of BNCT radiobiology for oral precancer and assess new BNCT protocols in terms of inhibition of tumor development and radiotoxicity. Groups of cancerized hamsters were locally exposed to single or double applications (2 weeks apart) of BPA-BNCT or (GB-10 + BPA)-BNCT at a total dose of 8Gy to tissue with PMD; to a single application of BPA-BNCT at 6Gy and to a double application (4 weeks apart) of BPA-BNCT or (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT at a total dose of 10Gy. Cancerized, sham-irradiated hamsters served as controls. Clinical status, tumor development from tissue with PMD and mucositis were followed for 8 months. The marked therapeutic efficacy of single applications of BNCT at 6 and 8Gy were associated to severe radiotoxicity. Dose fractionation into 2 applications reduced mucositis but also reduced therapeutic efficacy, depending on dose and interval between applications. A double application (4 weeks apart) of (GB-10 + BPA)-BNCT at a total dose of 10Gy rendered the best therapeutic advantage, i.e. 63% - 100% inhibition of tumor development with only slight mucositis in 67% of cases. The data reported herein show that issues such as dose levels and dose fractionation, interval between applications, and choice of boron compounds are pivotal to therapeutic advantage and must be tailored for a particular pathology and anatomic site. The present study determined treatment conditions that would contribute to optimize BNCT for precancer and that would warrant cautious assessment in a clinical scenario (author)

  3. Comparison between anti-CEA and anti-HER2 212Pb-labeled mAbs during α-RIT of small volume peritoneal carcinomatosis - Role of activity distribution on therapeutic efficacy and toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgqvist, J.; Boudousq, V.; Bobyk, L.; Busson, M.; Lozza, C.; Navarro-Teulon, I.; Pouget, J.P.; Maquaire, P.; Torgue, J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objectives: we investigated the role of internalizing/non-internalizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on the final outcome (efficacy/toxicity) of mice treated with alpha radioimmunotherapy (α- RIT) using 212 Pb-labeled mAbs. The relationship between distribution of radioactivity at the tissue level and biological parameters was also assessed. Methods: nude mice bearing 2-3 mm peritoneal nodules obtained by xenograft of A-431 tumor cells, expressing low and high level of HER2 and CEA receptors, respectively, were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with increasing activities (370-1480 kBq; 37 MBq/mg) of either 35A7 (non-internalising anti-CEA), Trastuzumab (internalizing anti-HER2) or PX (non-specific) 212 Pb-labeled mAbs. Control groups were injected with corresponding amount of unlabeled mAbs or with NaCl. Tumor growth was followed by bioluminescence and median survival (MS) of control and treated mice was determined. 212 Pb-35A7 and 212 Pb-Trastuzumab biodistribution was used to determine the cumulative uptake of radioactivity (UOR) in organs and tumors. Mean absorbed doses were calculated using the MIRD formalism. Haematological, liver and kidney toxicities were also assessed. Distribution of radioactivity at the tissue level was determined by digital micro-autoradiography and the relationship with biological markers of tissue damage was investigated using immunohistochemistry. Results: a mild and transient haematological toxicity in groups treated with the highest amount of activity was observed. MS of the groups treated either with internalizing or non-internalizing 212 Pb-labeled mAbs was significantly improved compared to those treated with non-specific 212 Pb-PX or those only given unlabeled mAbs or just NaCl. MS ranged from 42 days to 94 days using various activity levels of anti-CEA 212 Pb-35A7 while MS was not reached over the follow-up period of 130 days for mice treated with anti-HER2 212 Pb-Trastuzumab. However, UOR and

  4. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Jandial

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1 to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs. Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S-(p-bromobenzyl glutathione dicyclopentyl ester (p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 increased levels of the DNA-AGE N2-1-(carboxyethyl-2′-deoxyguanosine (CEdG, a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE; and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  5. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandial, Rahul; Neman, Josh; Lim, Punnajit P; Tamae, Daniel; Kowolik, Claudia M; Wuenschell, Gerald E; Shuck, Sarah C; Ciminera, Alexandra K; De Jesus, Luis R; Ouyang, Ching; Chen, Mike Y; Termini, John

    2018-01-30

    Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1) to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG) and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S -( p -bromobenzyl) glutathione dicyclopentyl ester ( p- BrBzGSH(Cp)₂) increased levels of the DNA-AGE N ²-1-(carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG), a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE); and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p -BrBzGSH(Cp)₂ exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  6. Efficacy and toxicity of conventionally fractionated pelvic radiation with a hypo fractionated simultaneous versus conventionally fractionated sequential boost for patients with high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Andrew M.; Jacob, Rojymon; Dobelbower, Michael C.; Kim, Robert Y.; Fiveash, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if high-risk prostate cancer responds differently to hypo fractionation. Material and methods: One hundred and fifty-seven men with NCCN high-risk (T3, PSA 20, or Gleason 8) clinically localized prostate cancer treated between 1998 and 2010 met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. Eighty-two were treated with conventional WPRT with a conventionally fractionated sequential boost to the prostate (cRT), with the prostate receiving 75-77 Gy in 1.8 - 2.0 Gy fractions. Seventy-five were treated with pelvic IMRT with a hypo fractionated simultaneous boost to the prostate (hRT), with the prostate receiving 70 Gy in 2.5 Gy fractions. The dose to the pelvic lymph nodes was 45 Gy in the cRT group and 50.4 Gy in the hRT group, both at 1.8 Gy per fraction. Ninety-two percent received neoadjuvant hormonal ablation therapy, typically beginning two months prior to the start of RT. Results: Median follow-up was 6.5 years for men receiving cRT and 3.7 years for those receiving hRT. The actuarial rate of biochemical control at four years was 88% for cRT and 94% for hRT (p=0.82). The rates of early rectal and urinary grade ≥2 toxicities were 35% (29 of 82) and 49% (40 of 82) for the cRT group and 36% (27 of 75) and 44% (33 of 75) for the hRT group. The actuarial rate of late grade 2 rectal toxicity at four years was 25% for the cRT group and 13% for the hRT group (p=0.037). The rate of late grade 3 rectal complications was 4% (3 of 82) for patients receiving cRT and 1% (1 of 75) for patients receiving hRT. Conclusion: Initial follow-up indicates equivalent biochemical control between regimens. Patients receiving hRT experienced fewer late rectal complications

  7. Treatment of Early-Stage Unfavorable Hodgkin Lymphoma: Efficacy and Toxicity of 4 Versus 6 Cycles of ABVD Chemotherapy With Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, Jillian R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fanale, Michelle A. [Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Reddy, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Akhtari, Mani [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L.; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Milgrom, Sarah A.; Yehia, Zeinab Abou; Allen, Pamela K.; Osborne, Eleanor M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dabaja, Bouthaina S., E-mail: bdabaja@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The German Hodgkin Study Group HD11 trial validated 4 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) for early unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. However, practitioners often recommend 6 cycles followed by RT, especially for bulky disease. We compared patient outcomes after treatment with 4 or 6 cycles of ABVD followed by RT (IFRT and involved site RT [ISRT]). Methods and Materials: We identified 128 patients treated for early unfavorable HL (GHSG criteria) between 2000 and 2013. Clinical outcomes (overall survival [OS] and freedom from relapse [FFR]) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Toxicities were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.0 years. Patients received 4 (70 patients, 55%) or 6 (58 patients, 45%) cycles of chemotherapy. Bulky disease was present in 22 patients (31%; 0 stage IA, 3 stage IB, 19 stage IIA) of the 4-cycle group and 42 patients (72%; 5 stage IA, 3 stage IB, 34 stage IIA) of the 6-cycle group. For patients receiving 4 and 6 cycles, the 6-year OS was 100% and 97% (P=.35), respectively, and the 6 year FFR was 100% and 98% (P=.28), respectively. More patients received 6 cycles if they were treated before 2010 (HD11 report) (P=.01) and if they had bulky disease (P<.01). Sixty-eight percent of patients received ISRT. The 6-year FFR was 99% and 100% for patients receiving ISRT and IFRT, respectively (P=.58). More patients experienced bleomycin pulmonary toxicity in the 6-cycle group (20% vs 31%, P=.16). For patients with bulky disease, the 4-year FFR was similar with receipt of 4 (100%) or 6 (98%) cycles (P=.48) and IFRT (100%) or ISRT (98%) (P=.52). There were no deaths among patients with bulky disease. Conclusions: Patients with early unfavorable HL have excellent outcomes with 4 cycles of ABVD chemotherapy followed by ISRT. Six cycles of chemotherapy does not appear superior for disease control, even for bulky disease.

  8. Treatment of Early-Stage Unfavorable Hodgkin Lymphoma: Efficacy and Toxicity of 4 Versus 6 Cycles of ABVD Chemotherapy With Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Fanale, Michelle A.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Smith, Grace L.; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Milgrom, Sarah A.; Yehia, Zeinab Abou; Allen, Pamela K.; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Mawlawi, Osama; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The German Hodgkin Study Group HD11 trial validated 4 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) for early unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. However, practitioners often recommend 6 cycles followed by RT, especially for bulky disease. We compared patient outcomes after treatment with 4 or 6 cycles of ABVD followed by RT (IFRT and involved site RT [ISRT]). Methods and Materials: We identified 128 patients treated for early unfavorable HL (GHSG criteria) between 2000 and 2013. Clinical outcomes (overall survival [OS] and freedom from relapse [FFR]) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Toxicities were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.0 years. Patients received 4 (70 patients, 55%) or 6 (58 patients, 45%) cycles of chemotherapy. Bulky disease was present in 22 patients (31%; 0 stage IA, 3 stage IB, 19 stage IIA) of the 4-cycle group and 42 patients (72%; 5 stage IA, 3 stage IB, 34 stage IIA) of the 6-cycle group. For patients receiving 4 and 6 cycles, the 6-year OS was 100% and 97% (P=.35), respectively, and the 6 year FFR was 100% and 98% (P=.28), respectively. More patients received 6 cycles if they were treated before 2010 (HD11 report) (P=.01) and if they had bulky disease (P<.01). Sixty-eight percent of patients received ISRT. The 6-year FFR was 99% and 100% for patients receiving ISRT and IFRT, respectively (P=.58). More patients experienced bleomycin pulmonary toxicity in the 6-cycle group (20% vs 31%, P=.16). For patients with bulky disease, the 4-year FFR was similar with receipt of 4 (100%) or 6 (98%) cycles (P=.48) and IFRT (100%) or ISRT (98%) (P=.52). There were no deaths among patients with bulky disease. Conclusions: Patients with early unfavorable HL have excellent outcomes with 4 cycles of ABVD chemotherapy followed by ISRT. Six cycles of chemotherapy does not appear superior for disease control, even for bulky disease.

  9. Prognostic factors in glioblastoma multiforme. 10 years experience of a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Schimmel, E.C.; Gonzalez, D.G.; Koot, R.W.; Bosch, D.A.; Dekker, F.

    2001-01-01

    Background: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with a glioblastoma multiforme treated in an academic institute over the last 10 years. Patients and method: From 1988 to 1998, 198 patients with pathologically confirmed glioblastoma multiforme were analyzed. Five radiation schedules were used mainly based on pretreatment selection criteria: 1. 60 Gy in 30 fractions followed by an interstitial iridium-192 (Ir-192) boost for selected patients with a good performance and a small circumscribed tumor, 2. 66 Gy in 33 fractions for good performance patients, 3. 40 Gy in eight fractions or 4. 28 Gy in four fractions for poor prognostic patients and 5. no irradiation. Results: Median survival was 16 months, 7 months, 5.6 months, 6.6 months and 1.8 months for the groups treated with Ir-192, 66 Gy, 40 Gy, 28 Gy and the group without treatment, respectively. No significant improvement in survival was encountered over the last 10 years. At multivariate analysis patients treated with a hypofractionated scheme showed a similar survival probability and duration of palliative effect compared to the conventionally fractionated group. The poor prognostic groups receiving radiotherapy had a highly significant better survival compared to the no-treatment group. Patients treated with an Ir-192 boost had a better median survival compared to a historical group matched on selection criteria but without boost treatment (16 vs 9.7 months, n.s.). However, survival at 2 years was similar. Analysis on pretreatment characteristics at multivariate analysis revealed age, neurological performance, addition of radiotherapy, total resection, tumor size post surgery and deterioration before start of radiotherapy (borderline) as significant prognostic factors for survival. Conclusion: Despite technical developments in surgery and radiotherapy over the last 10 years, survival of patients with a glioblastoma multiforme has not improved in our institution. The analysis of prognostic factors

  10. Introducing Toxics

    OpenAIRE

    David C. Bellinger

    2013-01-01

    With this inaugural issue, Toxics begins its life as a peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on all aspects of toxic chemicals. We are interested in publishing papers that present a wide range of perspectives on toxicants and naturally occurring toxins, including exposure, biomarkers, kinetics, biological effects, fate and transport, treatment, and remediation. Toxics differs from many other journals in the absence of a page or word limit on contributions, permitting authors to present ...

  11. Erythema multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth sores that interferes with eating and drinking Antibiotics for skin infections Corticosteroids to control inflammation Medicines for eye symptoms Good hygiene and staying away from other people may ...

  12. SU-F-R-17: Advancing Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Recurrence Detection with MRI Image Texture Feature Extraction and Machine Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Ruan, D; Nguyen, D; Kaprealian, T; Chin, R; Sheng, K [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the potential of early Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) recurrence detection utilizing image texture pattern analysis in serial MR images post primary treatment intervention. Methods: MR image-sets of six time points prior to the confirmed recurrence diagnosis of a GBM patient were included in this study, with each time point containing T1 pre-contrast, T1 post-contrast, T2-Flair, and T2-TSE images. Eight Gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture features including Contrast, Correlation, Dissimilarity, Energy, Entropy, Homogeneity, Sum-Average, and Variance were calculated from all images, resulting in a total of 32 features at each time point. A confirmed recurrent volume was contoured, along with an adjacent non-recurrent region-of-interest (ROI) and both volumes were propagated to all prior time points via deformable image registration. A support vector machine (SVM) with radial-basis-function kernels was trained on the latest time point prior to the confirmed recurrence to construct a model for recurrence classification. The SVM model was then applied to all prior time points and the volumes classified as recurrence were obtained. Results: An increase in classified volume was observed over time as expected. The size of classified recurrence maintained at a stable level of approximately 0.1 cm{sup 3} up to 272 days prior to confirmation. Noticeable volume increase to 0.44 cm{sup 3} was demonstrated at 96 days prior, followed by significant increase to 1.57 cm{sup 3} at 42 days prior. Visualization of the classified volume shows the merging of recurrence-susceptible region as the volume change became noticeable. Conclusion: Image texture pattern analysis in serial MR images appears to be sensitive to detecting the recurrent GBM a long time before the recurrence is confirmed by a radiologist. The early detection may improve the efficacy of targeted intervention including radiosurgery. More patient cases will be included to create a generalizable

  13. Dual Inhibition of PDK1 and Aurora Kinase A: An Effective Strategy to Induce Differentiation and Apoptosis of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Simona; Sestito, Simona; Pietrobono, Deborah; Giacomelli, Chiara; Chiellini, Grazia; Di Maio, Danilo; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Martini, Claudia; Rapposelli, Simona

    2017-01-18

    The poor prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is mainly attributed to drug resistance mechanisms and to the existence of a subpopulation of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Multitarget compounds able to both affect different deregulated pathways and the GSC subpopulation could escape tumor resistance and, most importantly, eradicate the stem cell reservoir. In this respect, the simultaneous inhibition of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) and aurora kinase A (AurA), each one playing a pivotal role in cellular survival/migration/differentiation, could represent an innovative strategy to overcome GBM resistance and recurrence. Herein, the cross-talk between these pathways was investigated, using the single-target reference compounds MP7 (PDK1 inhibitor) and Alisertib (AurA inhibitor). Furthermore, a new ligand, SA16, was identified for its ability to inhibit the PDK1 and the AurA pathways at once, thus proving to be a useful tool for the simultaneous inhibition of the two kinases. SA16 blocked GBM cell proliferation, reduced tumor invasiveness, and triggered cellular apoptosis. Most importantly, the AurA/PDK1 blocker showed an increased efficacy against GSCs, inducing their differentiation and apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on combined targeting of PDK1 and AurA. This drug represents an attractive multitarget lead scaffold for the development of new potential treatments for GBM and GSCs.

  14. Serum VEGF-A and CCL5 levels as candidate biomarkers for efficacy and toxicity of regorafenib in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mashima, Tetsuo; Kawata, Naomi; Wakatsuki, Takeru; Horiike, Yuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Dan, Shingo; Shinozaki, Eiji; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Regorafenib is an oral multi-kinase inhibitor used as salvage therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We tested whether serum cytokine levels are associated with clinical outcome in the mCRC patients receiving regorafenib. Serum samples were collected before treatment start, day 21, and progressive disease, and eleven angiogenic and inflammatory cytokine serum levels were examined. Fifty-four patients of a total of 62 enrolled patients were eligible for the analyses. The chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) levels ≤ cut-off value (59959 pg/ml) at baseline was associated with relative tumor shrinkage (P = 0.021), better progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.036) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.019). Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) levels showing a decrease on day 21 were significantly associated with a better PFS (P = 0.021). CCL5 levels ≤ cut-off was associated with any grade hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) (P = 0.025) and thrombocytopenia (P = 0.013). Low chemokine ligand 2 levels at baseline were associated with grade 2 ≤ HFSR. High angiopoietin-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) levels at baseline were associated with grade 3 ≤ total bilirubin increase and transaminases increase, respectively. Low bFGF levels at baseline were associated with grade 3 ≤ hypertension. No correlation with severe events was observed. Baseline serum CCL5 levels and decrease of the serum VEGF-A levels may serve as potential predictive markers for survival or treatment-specific toxicities in mCRC patients receiving regorafenib. PMID:27166185

  15. Simulation of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor cells using ising model on the Creutz Cellular Automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züleyha, Artuç; Ziya, Merdan; Selçuk, Yeşiltaş; Kemal, Öztürk M.; Mesut, Tez

    2017-11-01

    Computational models for tumors have difficulties due to complexity of tumor nature and capacities of computational tools, however, these models provide visions to understand interactions between tumor and its micro environment. Moreover computational models have potential to develop strategies for individualized treatments for cancer. To observe a solid brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we present a two dimensional Ising Model applied on Creutz cellular automaton (CCA). The aim of this study is to analyze avascular spherical solid tumor growth, considering transitions between non tumor cells and cancer cells are like phase transitions in physical system. Ising model on CCA algorithm provides a deterministic approach with discrete time steps and local interactions in position space to view tumor growth as a function of time. Our simulation results are given for fixed tumor radius and they are compatible with theoretical and clinic data.

  16. Current status and future therapeutic perspectives of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Komal; Shagufta, Bibi Ibtesam; Abbas, Syed Qamar; Patel, Seema; Khan, Ishrat; Shah, Sayed Asmat Ali; Akhter, Najeeb; Hassan, Syed Shams Ul

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the deadliest form of heterogeneous brain cancer. It affects an enormous number of patients every year and the survival is approximately 8 to 15 months. GBM has driven by complex signaling pathways and considered as a most challenging to treat. Standard treatment of GBM includes surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and also the combined treatment. This review article described inter and intra- tumor heterogeneity of GMB. In addition, recent chemotherapeutic agents, with their mechanism of action have been defined. FDA-approved drugs also been focused over here and most importantly highlighting some natural and synthetic and novel anti- glioma agents, that are the main focus of researchers nowadays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Primary glioblastoma multiforme of medulla oblongata: Case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotai, Silky P.; Moon, Hong-Joo; Kim, Joo-Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kwon, Taek-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common glial tumor of the adult brain. However, the primary GBM of medulla oblongata is a rarity. To the best of our knowledge, only four cases of GBM of medulla oblongata have been reported so far in the literature, and this is the second report of conventional GBM of the medulla oblongata in adults. We describe a case of 51-year-old female, who presented with a heterogeneous mass with exophytic feature located in the caudal brain stem that was approached and a near total tumor removal was achieved by median suboccipital route. A literature review with emphasis on anatomical location, radiological and histopathological findings, extent of tumor resectibility, and outcome is included. PMID:22639691

  18. Role of 5-ALA in improving extent of tumour resection in patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Inamullah; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-10-01

    Goal of surgery for patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is gross total resection with no new neurological deficits. Surgical resection is often restricted due the difficulty in differentiating the tumour from surrounding normal brain using either naked eye, or standard intra-operative white light microscopy. GBM uptakes orally administered 5-ALA becomes fluorescent when viewed by a special light, and this property has been used to improve intra-operative tumour identification. This technique should therefore allow better extent of tumour resection. The hypothesis has been tested through several studies and even though most studies are of low quality, they strongly favour the use of 5- ALA in improving the extent of resection when compared to white light microscopy. A systematic review on the topic had a similar conclusion. Few studies have also hinted on a high false negative rate with the use of this technique..

  19. Prognostic significance of IDH 1 mutation in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inamullah; Waqas, Muhammad; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-05-01

    Focus of brain tumour research is shifting towards tumour genesis and genetics, and possible development of individualized treatment plans. Genetic analysis shows recurrent mutation in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) gene in most Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. In this review we evaluated the prognostic significance of IDH 1 mutation on the basis of published evidence. Multiple retrospective clinical analyses correlate the presence of IDH1 mutation in GBM with good prognostic outcomes compared to wild-type IDH1. A systematic review reported similar results. Based on the review of current literature IDH1 mutation is an independent factor for longer overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) in GBM patients when compared to wild-type IDH1. The prognostic significance opens up new avenues for treatment.

  20. Comparing predictive models of glioblastoma multiforme built using multi-institutional and local data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Kyle W; Hsu, William; Bui, Alex A T

    2012-01-01

    The growing amount of electronic data collected from patient care and clinical trials is motivating the creation of national repositories where multiple institutions share data about their patient cohorts. Such efforts aim to provide sufficient sample sizes for data mining and predictive modeling, ultimately improving treatment recommendations and patient outcome prediction. While these repositories offer the potential to improve our understanding of a disease, potential issues need to be addressed to ensure that multi-site data and resultant predictive models are useful to non-contributing institutions. In this paper we examine the challenges of utilizing National Cancer Institute datasets for modeling glioblastoma multiforme. We created several types of prognostic models and compared their results against models generated using data solely from our institution. While overall model performance between the data sources was similar, different variables were selected during model generation, suggesting that mapping data resources between models is not a straightforward issue.

  1. Varicella zoster with erythema multiforme in a young girl: a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, B Nanda; Ankadavar, Nandini S; Kamath, Ganesh H; Martis, Jacintha

    2014-05-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute, self-limited, mucocutaneous disorder regarded as a hypersensitivity reaction which is triggered by various factors like infection, drugs, and food. Infectious agents are considered to be a major cause of EM other than idiopathic cause. A young girl presented with fluid-filled lesions all over the body of 3 days duration with history of similar lesions with fever in her sibling 2 weeks prior to admission. This was followed by large fluid-filled lesions with halo 3 days thereafter over the trunk, extremities suggesting target lesions of EM. The diagnosis was confirmed by cytology and positive serology. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) has rarely been reported as an etiological agent, despite its high incidence in childhood. VZV as an etiology of EM in a young girl has not been reported so far. This case was reported for its rare association of EM and varicella zoster and also for its rare presentation in a young girl.

  2. Modeling the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme and Cancer Stem Cells with Ordinary Differential Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernathy, Kristen; Burke, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in cancer therapy and treatments, tumor recurrence is a common event in cancer patients. One explanation of recurrence is that cancer therapy focuses on treatment of tumor cells and does not eradicate cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are postulated to behave similar to normal stem cells in that their role is to maintain homeostasis. That is, when the population of tumor cells is reduced or depleted by treatment, CSCs will repopulate the tumor, causing recurrence. In this paper, we study the application of the CSC Hypothesis to the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme by immunotherapy. We extend the work of Kogan et al. (2008) to incorporate the dynamics of CSCs, prove the existence of a recurrence state, and provide an analysis of possible cancerous states and their dependence on treatment levels.

  3. Erythema Multiforme-Like Reaction Due to Rosewood: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eylem Ceren

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Woods and their dusts can lead to various cutaneous reactions such as folliculitis, contact urticaria, irritant and allergic dermatitis. Erythema multiforme-like (EM cutaneous and respiratory system reactions such as astma and allergic rhinitis were also reported. The cutaneous reactions typically affect the areas such as the face, neck and arms exposed to the dust of the tree and usually occur on carpenters as occupational dermatitis\t. Rosewood is one of the most allergic varieties of the trees leading to contact dermatitis. It is a tropical tree and does not grow up in our country. It is especially used in the production of furniture and music instruments and imported from abroad to our country. A few cases of EM-like reaction were reported in 1976 and 1988 in the literature. Herein, two carpenters with severe EM-like skin reaction due to the rosewood, treated with systemic corticosteroids are reported for the first time in our country

  4. Cancer stem cells from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shengwen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis posits that deregulated neural stem cells (NSCs form the basis of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. GBM, however, usually forms in the cerebral white matter while normal NSCs reside in subventricular and hippocampal regions. We attempted to characterize CSCs from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall. Methods We described isolating CSCs from a GBM involving the lateral ventricles and characterized these cells with in vitro molecular biomarker profiling, cellular behavior, ex vivo and in vivo techniques. Results The patient’s MRI revealed a heterogeneous mass with associated edema, involving the left subventricular zone. Histological examination of the tumor established it as being a high-grade glial neoplasm, characterized by polygonal and fusiform cells with marked nuclear atypia, amphophilic cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, frequent mitotic figures, irregular zones of necrosis and vascular hyperplasia. Recurrence of the tumor occurred shortly after the surgical resection. CD133-positive cells, isolated from the tumor, expressed stem cell markers including nestin, CD133, Ki67, Sox2, EFNB1, EFNB2, EFNB3, Cav-1, Musashi, Nucleostemin, Notch 2, Notch 4, and Pax6. Biomarkers expressed in differentiated cells included Cathepsin L, Cathepsin B, Mucin18, Mucin24, c-Myc, NSE, and TIMP1. Expression of unique cancer-related transcripts in these CD133-positive cells, such as caveolin-1 and −2, do not appear to have been previously reported in the literature. Ex vivo organotypic brain slice co-culture showed that the CD133+ cells behaved like tumor cells. The CD133-positive cells also induced tumor formation when they were stereotactically transplanted into the brains of the immune-deficient NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions This brain tumor involving the neurogenic lateral ventricular wall was comprised of tumor-forming, CD133-positive cancer

  5. Physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, efficacy and toxicity profiling of a potential nitrofuranyl methyl piperazine derivative IIIM-MCD-211 for oral tuberculosis therapy via in-silico-in-vitro-in-vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magotra, Asmita; Sharma, Anjna; Singh, Samsher; Ojha, Probir Kumar; Kumar, Sunil; Bokolia, Naveen; Wazir, Priya; Sharma, Shweta; Khan, Inshad Ali; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Singh, Gurdarshan; Nandi, Utpal

    2018-02-01

    Recent tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery programme involve continuous pursuit for new chemical entity (NCE) which can be not only effective against both susceptible and resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) but also safe and faster acting with the target, thereby shortening the prolonged TB treatments. We have identified a potential nitrofuranyl methyl piperazine derivative, IIIM-MCD-211 as new antitubercular agent with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.0072 μM against H37Rv strain. Objective of the present study is to investigate physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, efficacy and toxicity profile using in-silico, in-vitro and in-vivo model in comprehensive manner to assess the likelihood of developing IIIM-MCD-211 as a clinical candidate. Results of computational prediction reveal that compound does not violate Lipinski's, Veber's and Jorgensen's rule linked with drug like properties and oral bioavailability. Experimentally, IIIM-MCD-211 exhibits excellent lipophilicity that is optimal for oral administration. IIIM-MCD-211 displays evidence of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) induction but no inhibition ability in rhodamine cell exclusion assay. IIIM-MCD-211 shows high permeability and plasma protein binding based on parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) and rapid equilibrium dialysis (RED) assay model, respectively. IIIM-MCD-211 has adequate metabolic stability in rat liver microsomes (RLM) and favourable pharmacokinetics with admirable correlation during dose escalation study in Swiss mice. IIIM-MCD-211 has capability to appear into highly perfusable tissues. IIIM-MCD-211 is able to actively prevent progression of TB infection in chronic infection mice model. IIIM-MCD-211 shows no substantial cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell line. In acute toxicity study, significant increase of total white blood cell (WBC) count in treatment group as compared to control group is observed. Overall, amenable preclinical data make IIIM-MCD-211 ideal

  6. Comparison of vitamins K1, K2 and K3 effects on growth of rat glioma and human glioblastoma multiforme cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztopçu, Pinar; Kabadere, Selda; Mercangoz, Ayşe; Uyar, Ruhi

    2004-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is characterized as highly invasive and rapidly growing astrocytomas, and scientists have sought for efficient treatment against malignant gliomas for a long time. Therefore, we compared the respond of rat glioma (C6) and glioblastoma multiforme cells derived from two patients to vitamins K1, K2 and K3. The cells were exposed to 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 microM of vitamins K1 and K2, and 1, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 microM of vitamin K3 for 24 hours in an incubator atmosphere of 5% CO2, 37 degrees C and 100% humidity. Cell viability was estimated by MTT assay. Vitamin K1 showed no growth effect on all the glioma cells examined. Vitamin K2 did not cause any change in number of C6, however induced growth inhibition in a dose-dependent manner on glioblastoma multiforme. The IC50 values of vitamin K2 were 960 microM and 970 microM for glioblastoma multiforme, respectively. Vitamin K3 had also growth inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner on both C6 and glioblastoma multiforme. The IC50 values were 41 microM, 24 microM and 23 microM for vitamin K3, respectively. We concluded that vitamin K3 is more effective than vitamin K2 for inhibition of cancer cell growth, and might have an alternative value as an anticancer drug against glioblastoma multiforme.

  7. Efficacy and toxicity of the combination chemotherapy of thalidomide, alkylating agent, and steroid for relapsed/refractory myeloma patients: a report from the Korean Multiple Myeloma Working Party (KMMWP) retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jihyun; Min, Chang-Ki; Kim, Kihyun; Han, Jae-Joon; Moon, Joon Ho; Kang, Hye Jin; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Kim, Min Kyoung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Lee, Won Sik; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Je-Jung; Choi, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the treatment responses, toxicities, and survival outcomes of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who received daily thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone (CTD) or daily thalidomide, melphalan, and prednisolone (MTP) at 17 medical centers in Korea. Three-hundred and seventy-six patients were enrolled. The combined chemotherapy of thalidomide, corticosteroid, and an alkylating agent (TAS) was second-line chemotherapy in 142 (37.8%) patients, and third-line chemotherapy in 135 (35.9%) patients. The response rate overall was 69.4%. Patients who were not treated with bortezomib and lenalidomide before TAS showed a higher response rate compared to those who were exposed to these agents. The estimated median progression-free survival and overall survival times were 10.4 months and 28.0 months, respectively. The adverse events during TAS were generally tolerable, but 39 (10.4%) patients experienced severe infectious complications. There were no differences in terms of efficacy between CTD and MTP, but infectious complications were more common in CTD group. TAS is an effective treatment regimen which induces a high response rate in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma patients. Due to the high incidence of grade 3 or 4 infection, proper management of infection is necessary during the TAS treatment, especially the CTD. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Prognostic factors in glioblastoma multiforme. 10 years experience of a single institution

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    Hulshof, M C.C.M.; Schimmel, E C; Gonzalez, D G [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Koot, R W; Bosch, D A [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Dekker, F [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Epidemiology

    2001-06-01

    Background: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with a glioblastoma multiforme treated in an academic institute over the last 10 years. Patients and method: From 1988 to 1998, 198 patients with pathologically confirmed glioblastoma multiforme were analyzed. Five radiation schedules were used mainly based on pretreatment selection criteria: 1. 60 Gy in 30 fractions followed by an interstitial iridium-192 (Ir-192) boost for selected patients with a good performance and a small circumscribed tumor, 2. 66 Gy in 33 fractions for good performance patients, 3. 40 Gy in eight fractions or 4. 28 Gy in four fractions for poor prognostic patients and 5. no irradiation. Results: Median survival was 16 months, 7 months, 5.6 months, 6.6 months and 1.8 months for the groups treated with Ir-192, 66 Gy, 40 Gy, 28 Gy and the group without treatment, respectively. No significant improvement in survival was encountered over the last 10 years. At multivariate analysis patients treated with a hypofractionated scheme showed a similar survival probability and duration of palliative effect compared to the conventionally fractionated group. The poor prognostic groups receiving radiotherapy had a highly significant better survival compared to the no-treatment group. Patients treated with an Ir-192 boost had a better median survival compared to a historical group matched on selection criteria but without boost treatment (16 vs 9.7 months, n.s.). However, survival at 2 years was similar. Analysis on pretreatment characteristics at multivariate analysis revealed age, neurological performance, addition of radiotherapy, total resection, tumor size post surgery and deterioration before start of radiotherapy (borderline) as significant prognostic factors for survival. Conclusion: Despite technical developments in surgery and radiotherapy over the last 10 years, survival of patients with a glioblastoma multiforme has not improved in our institution. The analysis of prognostic factors

  9. Use of ERC-1671 Vaccine in a Patient with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme after Progression during Bevacizumab Therapy: First Published Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bota, Daniela A; Alexandru-Abrams, Daniela; Pretto, Chrystel; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Fu, Beverly; Carrillo, Jose A; Schijns, Virgil Ejc; Stathopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a highy aggressive tumor that recurs despite resection, focal beam radiation, and temozolamide chemotherapy. ERC-1671 is an experimental treatment strategy that uses the patient's own immune system to attack the tumor cells. The authors report preliminary data on the first human administration of ERC-1671 vaccination under a single-patient, compassionate-use protocol. The patient survived for ten months after the vaccine administration without any other adjuvant therapy and died of complications related to his previous chemotherapies.

  10. Long-term Survival of Six Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapour Omidvari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The median overall survival in glioblastoma multiforme is usually less than one year. Long-term survival is rare and is seen in only 3%-6% of GBM patients. The present study reports the characteristics and treatment outcomes of six cases of glioblastoma multiforme with long-term survival. A literature review is also presented.Between 1990 and 2008, 217 glioblastoma multiforme patients have been treated at our center of which six cases (four males survived for three years or longer. The mean age of the six cases was 25.7 years. All patients received postoperative radiotherapy with a mean dose of 55 gray and four patients received nitrosourea-based chemotherapy.Patients' mean survival was 5.2 years. The results of this study and review of the literature have indicated that long-term (more than three years survival is exceptional and mainly observed in younger patients with good performance status and following complete surgical tumor resection.

  11. Difficult diagnosis of brainstem glioblastoma multiforme in a woman: a case report and review of the literature

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    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Brainstem gliomas are rare in adults. They most commonly occur in the pons and are most likely to be high-grade lesions. The diagnosis of a high-grade brainstem glioma is usually reached due to the presentation of rapidly progressing brainstem, cranial nerve and cerebellar symptoms. These symptoms do, however, overlap with a variety of other central nervous system disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the radiographic modality of choice, but can still be misleading. Case presentation A 48-year-old Caucasian woman presented with headache and vomiting followed by cerebellar signs and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were suggestive of a demyelinating process, but the patient failed to respond to therapy. Her condition rapidly progressed and she died. At autopsy, a high-grade invasive pontine tumor was identified. Histological evaluation revealed glioblastoma multiforme. Conclusion While pontine gliomas are rare in adults, those that do occur tend to be high-grade and rapidly progressive. Progression of symptoms from non-specific findings of headache and vomiting to rapid neurological deterioration, as occurred in our patient, is common in glioblastoma multiforme. While radiographic findings are often suggestive of the underlying pathology, this case represents the possibility of glioblastoma multiforme presenting as a deceptively benign appearing lesion.

  12. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors to h...

  13. The Role of Extracellular Binding Proteins in the Cellular Uptake of Drugs: Impact on Quantitative In Vitro-to-In Vivo Extrapolations of Toxicity and Efficacy in Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick; Burczynski, Frank J; Haddad, Sami

    2016-02-01

    (IVIVEs) of toxicity (efficacy) at the cellular level from data generated in cell assays. Overall, this present study may help to optimize the human dose prediction in preclinical and clinical studies, while prescribing drugs with narrow therapeutic windows that are highly bound to extracellular proteins and/or highly ionized at the physiological pH. This may facilitate building a more accurate safety (efficacy) profile for such drugs. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Introducing Toxics

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    David C. Bellinger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With this inaugural issue, Toxics begins its life as a peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on all aspects of toxic chemicals. We are interested in publishing papers that present a wide range of perspectives on toxicants and naturally occurring toxins, including exposure, biomarkers, kinetics, biological effects, fate and transport, treatment, and remediation. Toxics differs from many other journals in the absence of a page or word limit on contributions, permitting authors to present their work in as much detail as they wish. Toxics will publish original research papers, conventional reviews, meta-analyses, short communications, theoretical papers, case reports, commentaries and policy perspectives, and book reviews (Book reviews will be solicited and should not be submitted without invitation. Toxins and toxicants concern individuals from a wide range of disciplines, and Toxics is interested in receiving papers that represent the full range of approaches applied to their study, including in vitro studies, studies that use experimental animal or non-animal models, studies of humans or other biological populations, and mathematical modeling. We are excited to get underway and look forward to working with authors in the scientific and medical communities and providing them with a novel venue for sharing their work. [...

  15. Postoperative treatment of glioblastoma multiforme with radiation therapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide : A mono-institutional experience of 215 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Julka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the clinical results and prognostic factors of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM treated by postoperative radiation therapy (PORT and concomitant temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Methods: From 2005 to 2008, 215 patients (median age 48 years with GBM were treated with PORT plus temozolomide chemotherapy. Radiation therapy (RT was employed with a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks by conventional fractionation with concomitant temozolomide (75 mg/m 2 /day. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 6 cycles of temozolomide (150 mg/m 2 for 5 days, 28 days cycle. The primary end point of the study was overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were progression free survival (PFS and toxicity. OS was determined with respect to different variables to study the prognostic significance. Results: Median follow up was 11 months (range 2-50 months. Median OS and PFS were 13 months and 11 months respectively. The 1-year and 2-year OS was 44% and 18% respectively. There was no statistical significant impact of age, sex, KP score, anatomical location and extent of surgery. Presentation without seizures (on univariate analysis and 6 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide therapy (on univariate as well as multivariate analysis were found significant prognostic factors. Sixteen patients developed grade III-IV neutropenia/thrombocytopenia during the course of RT. Conclusion: Our results authenticate the role of concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in combination with PORT for the management of GBM patients. We strongly recommend complete 6 cycle of adjuvant temozolomide since it significantly improved the survival in our study.

  16. Combined stereotactic biopsy and stepping-source interstitial irradiation of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehmer, Stefanie; Guthier, Christian V; Clausen, Sven; Schneider, Frank; Schulte, Dirk-Michael; Benker, Matthias; Bludau, Frederic; Glatting, Gerhard; Marx, Alexander; Schmiedek, Peter; Hesser, Jürgen; Wenz, Frederik; Giordano, Frank A

    2018-04-01

    Patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme receiving stereotactic biopsy only either due to tumor localization or impaired clinical status face a devastating prognosis with very short survival times. One strategy to provide an initial cytoreductive and palliative therapy at the time of the stereotactic biopsy is interstitial irradiation through the pre-defined trajectory of the biopsy channel. We designed a novel treatment planning system and evaluated the treatment potential of a fixed-source and a stepping-source algorithm for interstitial radiosurgery on non-spherical glioblastoma in direct adjacency to risk structures. Using both setups, we show that radiation doses delivered to 100% of the gross tumor volume shifts from sub-therapeutic (10-12 Gy) to sterilizing single doses (25-30 Gy) when using the stepping source algorithm due to improved sparing of organs-at-risk. Specifically, the maximum doses at the brain stem were 100% of the PTV dose when a fixed central source and 38% when a stepping-source algorithm was used. We also demonstrated precision of intracranial target points and stability of superficial and deep trajectories using both a phantom and a body donor study. Our setup now for the first time provides a basis for a clinical proof-of-concept trial and may widen palliation options for patients with limited life expectancy that should not undergo time-consuming therapies.

  17. Patterns of failure for glioblastoma multiforme following limited-margin radiation and concurrent temozolomide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, Brian J; Dobelbower, Michael C; Ennis, William H; Bag, Asim K; Markert, James M; Fiveash, John B

    2014-01-01

    To analyze patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with limited-margin radiation therapy and concurrent temozolomide. We hypothesize that patients treated with margins in accordance with Adult Brain Tumor Consortium guidelines (ABTC) will demonstrate patterns of failure consistent with previous series of patients treated with 2–3 cm margins. A retrospective review was performed of patients treated at the University of Alabama at Birmingham for GBM between 2000 and 2011. Ninety-five patients with biopsy-proven disease and documented disease progression after treatment were analyzed. The initial planning target volume includes the T1-enhancing tumor and surrounding edema plus a 1 cm margin. The boost planning target volume includes the T1-enhancing tumor plus a 1 cm margin. The tumors were classified as in-field, marginal, or distant if greater than 80%, 20-80%, or less than 20% of the recurrent volume fell within the 95% isodose line, respectively. The median progression-free survival from the time of diagnosis to documented failure was 8 months (range 3–46). Of the 95 documented recurrences, 77 patients (81%) had an in-field component of treatment failure, 6 (6%) had a marginal component, and 27 (28%) had a distant component. Sixty-three patients (66%) demonstrated in-field only recurrence. The low rate of marginal recurrence suggests that wider margins would have little impact on the pattern of failure, validating the use of limited margins in accordance ABTC guidelines

  18. Surprisal analysis of Glioblastoma Multiform (GBM) microRNA dynamics unveils tumor specific phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadran, Sohila; Remacle, Francoise; Levine, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Gliomablastoma multiform (GBM) is the most fatal form of all brain cancers in humans. Currently there are limited diagnostic tools for GBM detection. Here, we applied surprisal analysis, a theory grounded in thermodynamics, to unveil how biomolecule energetics, specifically a redistribution of free energy amongst microRNAs (miRNAs), results in a system deviating from a non-cancer state to the GBM cancer -specific phenotypic state. Utilizing global miRNA microarray expression data of normal and GBM patients tumors, surprisal analysis characterizes a miRNA system response capable of distinguishing GBM samples from normal tissue biopsy samples. We indicate that the miRNAs contributing to this system behavior is a disease phenotypic state specific to GBM and is therefore a unique GBM-specific thermodynamic signature. MiRNAs implicated in the regulation of stochastic signaling processes crucial in the hallmarks of human cancer, dominate this GBM-cancer phenotypic state. With this theory, we were able to distinguish with high fidelity GBM patients solely by monitoring the dynamics of miRNAs present in patients' biopsy samples. We anticipate that the GBM-specific thermodynamic signature will provide a critical translational tool in better characterizing cancer types and in the development of future therapeutics for GBM.

  19. The Radiologic Features of Cystic versus Noncystic Glioblastoma Multiforme as Significant Prognostic Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Na Rae; Lee, Sheen Woo; Kim, Jeong Ho; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the preoperative radiological characteristic and survival differences of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with and without cysts. Twenty-one GBMs were collected retrospectively; these tumors were pathologic confirmed as GBM. Based on the preoperative MR imaging, we compared the cystic GBMs with the noncystic GBMs according to the the tumor size, the tumor interface, the tumor wall thickness and peritumoral edema. Seven cases were classified as cystic GBMs and fourteen were noncystic GBMs. The cystic GBMs had a well-defined tumor interface, a less than 2 cm thickness of the tumor wall and less than 40 cm 3 thick peritumoral edema as compared to that of the noncystic GBMs. There was a statistically significant difference in age between the patients with cystic tumors and those with noncystic tumors. For the patients with cystic GBMs and noncystic GBMs, median survival time after surgery was 43.8 months and 12.5 months, respectively. The cystic GBMs had a well-defined tumor interface, a thin wall and minimal edema, as compared with that of the noncystic GBMs. The patients with cystic GBMs were significantly younger and they had more favorable survival outcomes than did the patients with noncystic GBMs

  20. Glioblastoma multiforme and papillary thyroid carcinoma - A rare combination of multiple primary malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaroopa Pulivarthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are describing a 19-year-old white woman who presented with two synchronous primary cancers, namely glioblastoma multiforme and papillary thyroid cancer. The patient was admitted with dizziness, headache, and vomiting. CT head revealed acute intraparenchymal hematoma in the right cingulate gyrus and the splenium of the corpus callosum. Carotid and cerebral angiogram were unremarkable. MRI of the brain demonstrated a non-enhancing and non-hemorrhagic component of the lesion along the lateral margin of the hemorrhage just medial to the atrium of the right lateral ventricle that was suspicious for a tumor or metastasis. Brain biopsy confirmed it as glioblastoma mutiforme. CT chest was done to rule out primary cancer that revealed a 11 mm hypodense lesion in the left lobe of the thyroid and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy confirmed it as papillary thyroid carcinoma. We should evaluate for multiple primary malignancies in young patients who are found to have primary index cancer.

  1. Association of Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem Cell Characteristics, Differentiation, and Microglia Marker Genes with Patient Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bien-Möller

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are at high risk to develop a relapse despite multimodal therapy. Assumedly, glioma stem cells (GSCs are responsible for treatment resistance of GBM. Identification of specific GSC markers may help to develop targeted therapies. Here, we performed expression analyses of stem cell (ABCG2, CD44, CD95, CD133, ELF4, Nanog, and Nestin as well as differentiation and microglia markers (GFAP, Iba1, and Sparc in GBM compared to nonmalignant brain. Furthermore, the role of these proteins for patient survival and their expression in LN18 stem-like neurospheres was analyzed. At mRNA level, ABCG2 and CD95 were reduced, GFAP was unchanged; all other investigated markers were increased in GBM. At protein level, CD44, ELF4, Nanog, Nestin, and Sparc were elevated in GBM, but only CD133 and Nestin were strongly associated with survival time. In addition, ABCG2 and GFAP expression was decreased in LN18 neurospheres whereas CD44, CD95, CD133, ELF4, Nanog, Nestin, and Sparc were upregulated. Altogether only CD133 and Nestin were associated with survival rates. This raises concerns regarding the suitability of the other target structures as prognostic markers, but makes both CD133 and Nestin candidates for GBM therapy. Nevertheless, a search for more specific marker proteins is urgently needed.

  2. Glioblastoma multiforme subterfuge as acute cerebral hemorrhage: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidu A. Richard

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic related Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are rare and characterizes with severe clinical scuffle. The etiology of this presentation although not well known is believed to be multifactorial. We present a case as well as review on the pathogenesis of evolution of the hematoma into ring enhancing features of GBM on imaging studies. We present a case of 28 years old man who suddenly went into coma for 9 hours preceded with seizures that latest for 10 minutes. He had no focal neurological signs. CT-Scans images indicated acute cerebral hemorrhage near the frontal horn of the left ventricle with brain edema about the hemorrhagic lesion and MRI done a week later revealed a cerebral ring enhancing lesion. The lesion was partially resected during surgery and immunohistochemical staining confirmed GBM (WHO, grade 4. The diagnosis of intratumoral hemorrhage in GBM was very challenging at the initial stages but with time the hematoma evolved into ring enhancing images typical of GBM. It’s not every intracranial hematoma that is of pure vascular origin.

  3. Improved Outcomes with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Combined with Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel J. Aherne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months. We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  4. Improved outcomes with intensity modulated radiation therapy combined with temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Horsley, Patrick J; Silva, Thomaz; Wilcox, Shea; Amalaseelan, Julan; Dwyer, Patrick; Tahir, Abdul M R; Hill, Jacques; Last, Andrew; Hansen, Carmen; McLachlan, Craig S; Lee, Yvonne L; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy) and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months). We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  5. Semi-automated segmentation of a glioblastoma multiforme on brain MR images for radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Daisuke; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Murakami, Ryuuji; Hirai, Toshinori

    2010-04-20

    We propose a computerized method for semi-automated segmentation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) of a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) on brain MR images for radiotherapy planning (RTP). Three-dimensional (3D) MR images of 28 cases with a GBM were used in this study. First, a sphere volume of interest (VOI) including the GBM was selected by clicking a part of the GBM region in the 3D image. Then, the sphere VOI was transformed to a two-dimensional (2D) image by use of a spiral-scanning technique. We employed active contour models (ACM) to delineate an optimal outline of the GBM in the transformed 2D image. After inverse transform of the optimal outline to the 3D space, a morphological filter was applied to smooth the shape of the 3D segmented region. For evaluation of our computerized method, we compared the computer output with manually segmented regions, which were obtained by a therapeutic radiologist using a manual tracking method. In evaluating our segmentation method, we employed the Jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC) and the true segmentation coefficient (TSC) in volumes between the computer output and the manually segmented region. The mean and standard deviation of JSC and TSC were 74.2+/-9.8% and 84.1+/-7.1%, respectively. Our segmentation method provided a relatively accurate outline for GBM and would be useful for radiotherapy planning.

  6. Quality of Radiomic Features in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Impact of Semi-Automated Tumor Segmentation Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myungeun; Woo, Boyeong; Kuo, Michael D; Jamshidi, Neema; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) derived from tumor volumes obtained with semi-automated tumor segmentation software. MR images of 45 GBM patients (29 males, 16 females) were downloaded from The Cancer Imaging Archive, in which post-contrast T1-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR sequences were used. Two raters independently segmented the tumors using two semi-automated segmentation tools (TumorPrism3D and 3D Slicer). Regions of interest corresponding to contrast-enhancing lesion, necrotic portions, and non-enhancing T2 high signal intensity component were segmented for each tumor. A total of 180 imaging features were extracted, and their quality was evaluated in terms of stability, normalized dynamic range (NDR), and redundancy, using intra-class correlation coefficients, cluster consensus, and Rand Statistic. Our study results showed that most of the radiomic features in GBM were highly stable. Over 90% of 180 features showed good stability (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] ≥ 0.8), whereas only 7 features were of poor stability (ICC NDR ≥1), while above 35% of the texture features showed poor NDR (software tools provided sufficiently reliable tumor segmentation and feature stability; thus helping to overcome the inherent inter-rater and intra-rater variability of user intervention. However, certain aspects of feature quality, including NDR and redundancy, need to be assessed for determination of representative signature features before further development of radiomics.

  7. 5-ALA Fluorescence Image Guided Resection of Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Meta-Analysis of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Eljamel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is one of the most deadly cancers in humans. Despite recent advances in anti-cancer therapies, most patients with GBM die from local disease progression. Fluorescence image guided surgical resection (FIGR was recently advocated to enhance local control of GBM. This is meta-analyses of 5-aminolevulinic (5-ALA induced FIGR. Materials: Review of the literature produced 503 potential publications; only 20 of these fulfilled the inclusion criteria of this analysis, including a total of 565 patients treated with 5-ALA-FIGR reporting on its outcomes and 800 histological samples reporting 5-ALA-FIGR sensitivity and specificity. Results: The mean gross total resection (GTR rate was 75.4% (95% CI: 67.4–83.5, p < 0.001. The mean time to tumor progression (TTP was 8.1 months (95% CI: 4.7–12, p < 0.001. The mean overall survival gain reported was 6.2 months (95% CI: −1–13, p < 0.001. The specificity was 88.9% (95% CI: 83.9–93.9, p < 0.001 and the sensitivity was 82.6% (95% CI: 73.9–91.9, p < 0.001. Conclusion: 5-ALA-FIGR in GBM is highly sensitive and specific, and imparts significant benefits to patients in terms of improved GTR and TTP.

  8. Cyclophilin B Supports Myc and Mutant p53 Dependent Survival of Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Won; Schroeder, Mark A.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Bram, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive, treatment-refractory type of brain tumor for which effective therapeutic targets remain important to identify. Here we report that cyclophilin B (CypB), a prolyl isomerase residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), provides an essential survival signal in GBM cells. Analysis of gene expression databases revealed that CypB is upregulated in many cases of malignant glioma. We found that suppression of CypB reduced cell proliferation and survival in human GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. We also found that treatment with small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilins, including the approved drug cyclosporine, greatly reduced the viability of GBM cells. Mechanistically, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CypB caused hyperactivation of the oncogenic RAS-MAPK pathway, induction of cellular senescence signals, and death resulting from loss of MYC, mutant p53, Chk1 and JAK/STAT3 signaling. Elevated reactive oxygen species, ER expansion and abnormal unfolded protein responses in CypB-depleted GBM cells indicated that CypB alleviates oxidative and ER stresses and coordinates stress adaptation responses. Enhanced cell survival and sustained expression of multiple oncogenic proteins downstream of CypB may thus contribute to the poor outcome of GBM tumors. Our findings link chaperone-mediated protein folding in the ER to mechanisms underlying oncogenic transformation, and they make CypB an attractive and immediately targetable molecule for GBM therapy. PMID:24272483

  9. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling in glioblastoma multiforme-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan-Thakur, Shailaja; Bien-Möller, Sandra; Marx, Sascha; Schroeder, Henry; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2017-11-17

    The multifunctional sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid signaling molecule and central regulator in the development of several cancer types. In recent years, intriguing information has become available regarding the role of S1P in the progression of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and common brain tumor in adults. S1P modulates numerous cellular processes in GBM, such as oncogenesis, proliferation and survival, invasion, migration, metastasis and stem cell behavior. These processes are regulated via a family of five G-protein-coupled S1P receptors (S1PR1-5) and may involve mainly unknown intracellular targets. Distinct expression patterns and multiple intracellular signaling pathways of each S1PR subtype enable S1P to exert its pleiotropic cellular actions. Several studies have demonstrated alterations in S1P levels, the involvement of S1PRs and S1P metabolizing enzymes in GBM pathophysiology. While the tumorigenic actions of S1P involve the activation of several kinases and transcription factors, the specific G-protein (Gi, Gq, and G12/13)-coupled signaling pathways and downstream mediated effects in GBM remain to be elucidated in detail. This review summarizes the recent findings concerning the role of S1P and its receptors in GBM. We further highlight the current insights into the signaling pathways considered fundamental for regulating the cellular processes in GMB and ultimately patient prognosis.

  10. Erythema multiforme-like eruption from a slimming drug preparation cutaneous adverse drug reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Tognetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 34-year-old woman presenting with an erythema multiforme (EM-like eruption. Lesions developed after a 12-day treatment with a slimming drug preparation (food integrator with thermogenic activity and a herbal remedy (pilosella tincture. Serological investigations excluded viral or bacterial infections. Patch testing with galenic preparations of both drugs demonstrated sensitization to the slimming drug preparation. According to literature reports and immune-chemical properties, those components that are likely to have triggered the skin eruption are clorazepate dipotassium and theobromine. Their interaction with other two constituents such as pseudoephedrine hydrochloride and dehydrocholic acid may have caused the adverse reaction by means of a summation effect. There are no reports specifically about EM caused by a slimming drug preparation and no studies have identified thermogenic pills as cause of EM/EM-like eruption. Weight-loss compounds in slimming preparations should be kept in mind as a possible cause of drug-induced EM-like eruption.

  11. Can high-dose fotemustine reverse MGMT resistance in glioblastoma multiforme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Chiara; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Romeo, Valeria; De Placido, Sabino; Marinelli, Alfredo

    2010-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest grade malignant glioma, is associated with a grim prognosis-median overall survival is in the range 12-15 months, despite optimum treatment. Surgery to the maximum possible extent, external beam radiotherapy, and systemic temozolomide chemotherapy are current standard treatments for newly diagnosed GBM, with intracerebral delivery of carmustine wafers (Gliadel). Unfortunately, the effectiveness of chemotherapy can be hampered by the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT), which confers resistance both to temozolomide and nitrosoureas, for example fotemustine and carmustine. MGMT activity can be measured by PCR and immunohistochemistry, with the former being the current validated technique. High-dose chemotherapy can deplete MGMT levels in GBM cells and has proved feasible in various trials on temozolomide, in both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM. We here report the unique case of a GBM patient, with high MGMT expression by immunohistochemistry, who underwent an experimental, high-dose fotemustine schedule after surgery and radiotherapy. Although treatment caused two episodes of grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia, a complete response and survival of more than three years were achieved, with a 30% increase in dose intensity compared with the standard fotemustine schedule.

  12. Subcutaneous tissue metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade Porto, Natalia; Delgado Fernández, Juan; García Pallero, María de Los Ángeles; Penanes Cuesta, Juan Ramón; Pulido Rivas, Paloma; Gil Simoes, Ricardo

    2018-05-16

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary brain tumor, despite an aggressive clinical course, less than 2% of patients develop extraneural metastasis. We present a 72-year-old male diagnosed with a right temporal glioblastoma due to headache. He underwent total gross resection surgery and after that the patient was treated with adyuvant therapy. Five months after the patient returned with trigeminal neuralgia, and MRI showed an infratemporal cranial mass which infiltrates masticator space, the surrounding bone, the temporal muscle and superior cervical and parotid lymph nodes. The patient underwent a new surgery reaching partial resection of the temporal lesion. After that the patient continued suffering from disabling trigeminal neuralgia, that's why because of the bad clinical situation and the treatment failure we decided to restrict therapeutic efforts. The patient died 3 weeks after the diagnosis of extracranial metastasis. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiotherapy with concurrent or sequential temozolomide in elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashem, Sameh A.; Salem, Ahmed; Al-Rashdan, Abdulla

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated by surgery followed by combined modality therapy and compare achievable outcomes to those of a younger age population. Seventy-eight adult patients with histologically confirmed grade IV astrocytoma were treated at King Hussein Cancer Center (Amman, Jordan) between September 2004 and December 2008. Records were retrospectively reviewed and included 55 males and 23 females between 19 and 78 years of age (median age 50 years). This case series included 20 patients aged 60 years or older. All patients underwent craniotomy followed radiotherapy and concurrent or sequential temozolomide. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 56 months (median 9.4 months). The median survival for the whole cohort was 13.8 months. The median survival for patients less than 60 years was 14.3 months and for patients 60 years or older was 12.3 months (P = 0.19). Among elderly patients, radical surgical resection (P = 0.002), concurrent delivery of chemoradiation (0.041) and radiotherapy dose ≥5400 cGy (P = 0.0001) conferred statistically significant improvements in overall survival. Management of GBM in elderly patients should include maximal surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide whenever medically feasible. Outcomes comparable to those obtained in younger age groups can be expected. Our results indicate that concurrent chemoradiation is superior to sequential chemoradiation in these patients.

  14. ORAL LESIONS OF DRUG INDUCED ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME and ndash; REPORT OF THREE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Hegde

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Erythema multiforme (EM is an acute, self-limited, and sometimes recurring skin condition considered to be a hypersensitivity reaction associated with certain infections and medications. A range of medications can trigger the EM. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS which are most commonly prescribed for pain relief can also produce rare adverse reactions such as EM. EM is clinically characterized by a and lsquo; and lsquo;minor'' form and a and lsquo; and lsquo;major'' form. Only few reports have stated about oral EM as the third variant of EM. However it is unclear whether EM involving only oral mucosa is a separate entity or is a part of minor form of EM. In this report three cases of EM are discussed , in which two cases involved exclusively oral mucosal lesions and in one case skin manifestations along with oral mucosa was observed. Also the uncommon adverse effects of NSAIDS is highlighted in this report along with its management. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 193-196

  15. Association of Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem Cell Characteristics, Differentiation, and Microglia Marker Genes with Patient Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balz, Ellen; Herzog, Susann; Plantera, Laura; Vogelgesang, Silke; Seifert, Carolin; Bialke, Angela; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W. S.

    2018-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are at high risk to develop a relapse despite multimodal therapy. Assumedly, glioma stem cells (GSCs) are responsible for treatment resistance of GBM. Identification of specific GSC markers may help to develop targeted therapies. Here, we performed expression analyses of stem cell (ABCG2, CD44, CD95, CD133, ELF4, Nanog, and Nestin) as well as differentiation and microglia markers (GFAP, Iba1, and Sparc) in GBM compared to nonmalignant brain. Furthermore, the role of these proteins for patient survival and their expression in LN18 stem-like neurospheres was analyzed. At mRNA level, ABCG2 and CD95 were reduced, GFAP was unchanged; all other investigated markers were increased in GBM. At protein level, CD44, ELF4, Nanog, Nestin, and Sparc were elevated in GBM, but only CD133 and Nestin were strongly associated with survival time. In addition, ABCG2 and GFAP expression was decreased in LN18 neurospheres whereas CD44, CD95, CD133, ELF4, Nanog, Nestin, and Sparc were upregulated. Altogether only CD133 and Nestin were associated with survival rates. This raises concerns regarding the suitability of the other target structures as prognostic markers, but makes both CD133 and Nestin candidates for GBM therapy. Nevertheless, a search for more specific marker proteins is urgently needed. PMID:29535786

  16. Patterns of failure for glioblastoma multiforme following concurrent radiation and temozolomide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, Michael C.; Burnett, Omer L. III; Haytt, Mark D.; Fiveash, John B.; Nordal, Robert A.; Nabors, Louis B.; Markert, James M.

    2011-01-01

    To analyse patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme treated with concurrent radiation and temozolomide. A retrospective review of patients treated with concurrent radiation and temozolomide was performed. Twenty patients treated at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, with biopsy-proven disease, documented disease progression after treatment, and adequate radiation dosimetry and imaging records were included in the study. Patients generally received 46 Gy to the primary tumour and surrounding oedema plus 1 cm, and 60 Gy to the enhancing tumour plus 1 cm. MRIs documenting failure after therapy were fused to the original treatment plans. Contours of post-treatment tumour volumes were generated from MRIs showing tumour failure and were overlaid onto the original isodose curves. The recurrent tumours were classified as in-field, marginal or regional. Recurrences were also evaluated for distant failure. Of the 20 documented failures, all patients had some component of failure at the primary site. Eighteen patients (90%) failed in-field, 2 patients (10%) had marginal failures, and no regional failures occurred. Four patients (20%) had a component of distant failure in which an independent satellite lesion was located completely outside of the 95% isodose curve. Radiation concurrent with temozolomide appears to be associated with a moderate risk of distant brain failure in addition to the high rate of local failure. The risk of distant failure was consistent with that observed with radiation alone, suggesting that temozolomide does not act to reduce distant brain failure but to improve local control.

  17. In silico studies on marine actinomycetes as potential inhibitors for Glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubakaran, Palani; Kothapalli, Roopa; Singh, Kh Dhanachandra; Nagamani, Selvaraman; Arjunan, Subramanian; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is considered to be the most common and often deadly disorder which affects the brain. It is caused by the over expression of proteins such as ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and EGFRvIII. These 3 proteins are considered to be the potential therapeutic targets for GBM. Among these, EphA2 is reported to be over-expressed in ˜90% of GBM. Herein we selected 35 compounds from marine actinomycetes, 5 in vitro and in vivo studied drug candidates and 4 commercially available drugs for GBM which were identified from literature and analysed by using comparative docking studies. Based on the glide scores and other in silico parameters available in Schrödinger, two selected marine actinomycetes compounds which include Tetracenomycin D and Chartreusin exhibited better binding energy among all the compounds studied in comparative docking. In this study we have demonstrated the inhibition of the 3 selected targets by the two bioactive compounds from marine actinomycetes through in-silico docking studies. Furthermore molecular dynamics simulation were also been performed to check the stability and the amino acids interacted with the 3 molecular targets (EphA2 receptor, EGFR, EGFRvIII) for GBM. Our results suggest that Tetracinomycin D and Chartreusin are the novel and potential inhibitor for the treatment of GBM. PMID:21584184

  18. Activation of PPARγ mediates icaritin-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongji; Shi, Ling; Liu, Yuan; Li, Peng; Jiang, Guoping; Gao, Xiaoning; Zhang, Yongbin; Jiang, Chuanwu; Zhu, Weiping; Han, Hongxing; Ju, Fang

    2018-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most prevalent primary malignancy of the brain. This study was designed to investigate whether icaritin exerts anti-neoplastic activity against GBM in vitro. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was utilized to examine the viability of GBM cells. The apoptotic cell population was measured by flow cytometry analysis. Cell cycle distribution was detected by flow cytometry as well. Western blot analysis was performed to examine the level of biomarker proteins in GBM cells. Levels of PPARγ mRNA and protein were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. To examine the role of PPARγ in the anti-neoplastic activity of icaritin, PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or PPARγ siRNA was used. The activity of PPARγ was determined by DNA binding and luciferase assays. Our findings revealed that icaritin markedly suppresses cell growth in a dose-dependent and time-dependent fashion. The cell population at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle was significantly increased following icaritin treatment. Meanwhile, icaritin promoted apoptotic cell death in T98G and U87MG cells. Further investigation showed upregulation of PPARγ played a key role in the anti-neoplastic activities of icaritin. Moreover, our result demonstrated activation of AMPK signaling by icaritin mediated the modulatory effect of icaritin on PPARγ. Our results suggest the PPARγ may mediate anti-neoplastic activities against GBM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimony Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically.

  20. Antimony Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The...

  1. Oxygen toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. van der Westhuizen

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen has been discovered about 200 years ago. Since then the vital physiological involvement of oxygen in various biologi­cal processes, mainly energy production, has been established. However, in the body molecular oxygen can be converted to toxic oxygen metabolites such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. These toxic metabolites are produced mainly in the mitochondria, plasma membranes and endoplasmic reticulum.

  2. Strong adverse prognostic impact of hyperglycemic episodes during adjuvant chemoradiotherapy of glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Arnulf; Vaupel, Peter; Stockinger, Marcus; Schmidberger, Heinz [University Medical Center, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Mainz (Germany); Struss, Hans-Garlich [University Medical Center, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Mainz (Germany); Giese, Alf [University Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Mainz (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    In comparison to normal brain tissue, glioblastomas exhibit significantly increased glucose uptake. Brain edema is a common complication during adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, leading to a requirement for glucocorticoid treatment. Glucocorticoid treatment frequently causes considerable deregulation of blood glucose levels. Therefore, episodes of hyperglycemia may contribute to radio- and/or chemoresistance. This study comprises a retrospective analysis of the influence of hyperglycemic episodes (HEs) during adjuvant therapy on the overall survival of 106 glioblastoma multiforme patients. The occurrence of one or more deregulated blood glucose value(s) > 10 mM is associated with a reduction in median overall survival from 16.7 to 8.8 months. A significantly poorer overall survival of patients with hyperglycemia could also be detected in subgroup analyses of patients with complete tumor resection and complete treatment according to the EORTC 22891/26891 trial protocol, as well as in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis. A history of diabetes mellitus had no influence on prognosis. Our data suggest that the observed negative impact of elevated blood glucose levels on overall survival may not solely be explained by the patients' poorer general condition; the elevated blood glucose concentration itself may play a pathogenetic role. This could be due to increased activity of antioxidant systems, elevated expression of DNA damage response proteins and protection of hypoxic tumor cells against apoptosis combined with hypoxia-mediated radioresistance. A possible prognostic impact of elevated blood glucose levels during the period of adjuvant (chemo-) radiotherapy of glioblastoma should be evaluated in a prospective clinical trial. (orig.) [German] Glioblastome zeigen im Vergleich mit normalem Gehirngewebe eine deutlich vermehrte Glukoseaufnahme. Im Rahmen der adjuvanten Radio(chemo)therapie von Glioblastomen treten vielfach Hirnoedeme auf, die eine

  3. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  4. The prognostic significance of midline shift at presentation on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamburg, Eugene S.; Regine, William F.; Patchell, Roy A.; Strottmann, James M.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Young, A. Byron

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: While patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who present with midline shift have a presumably worse prognosis, there is little literature evaluating the prognostic significance of this presentation in multivariate analysis in the context of other known prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: From March 1981 to September 1993, 219 patients underwent irradiation for intracranial glioma at our institution. One hundred fourteen patients with a diagnosis of a primary GBM were analyzed for the influence of the presence of midline shift at diagnosis on survival with respect to other known prognostic factors, including age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), and extent of surgery. Eighty-five patients (74%) presented with midline shift. Surgical treatment consisted of subtotal/total resection in 86 patients (75%). Among patients presenting with midline shift, 68 (80%) underwent subtotal/total resection before irradiation. Results: Multivariate analysis of the entire cohort of patients found none of the potential prognostic factors analyzed to significantly influence survival. The overall median survival was 6 months. However, when multivariate analysis was limited to patients with a KPS of ≥ 70, only the presence of midline shift and age were found to significantly influence survival. Patients with a KPS ≥ 70 and with midline shift present at diagnosis had a median survival of 8 months, as compared to 14 months for those not having midline shift at presentation (p = 0.04). Patients with a KPS ≥ 70 and age > 50 years had a median survival of 5 months as compared to 11 months for those ≤ 50 (p 0.02). Conclusion: In this series, where 80% of patients who presented with a midline shift underwent decompressive resection of GBM before irradiation, the presence of midline shift at diagnosis remained an independent prognostic factor influencing survival among good performance status patients. While the role of decompressive surgery in this setting is

  5. Invariant delineation of nuclear architecture in glioblastoma multiforme for clinical and molecular association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Borowsky, Alexander; Loss, Leandro; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-04-01

    Automated analysis of whole mount tissue sections can provide insights into tumor subtypes and the underlying molecular basis of neoplasm. However, since tumor sections are collected from different laboratories, inherent technical and biological variations impede analysis for very large datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our objective is to characterize tumor histopathology, through the delineation of the nuclear regions, from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections. Such a representation can then be mined for intrinsic subtypes across a large dataset for prediction and molecular association. Furthermore, nuclear segmentation is formulated within a multi-reference graph framework with geodesic constraints, which enables computation of multidimensional representations, on a cell-by-cell basis, for functional enrichment and bioinformatics analysis. Here, we present a novel method, multi-reference graph cut (MRGC), for nuclear segmentation that overcomes technical variations associated with sample preparation by incorporating prior knowledge from manually annotated reference images and local image features. The proposed approach has been validated on manually annotated samples and then applied to a dataset of 377 Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) whole slide images from 146 patients. For the GBM cohort, multidimensional representation of the nuclear features and their organization have identified 1) statistically significant subtypes based on several morphometric indexes, 2) whether each subtype can be predictive or not, and 3) that the molecular correlates of predictive subtypes are consistent with the literature. Data and intermediaries for a number of tumor types (GBM, low grade glial, and kidney renal clear carcinoma) are available at: http://tcga.lbl.gov for correlation with TCGA molecular data. The website also provides an interface for panning and zooming of whole mount tissue sections with/without overlaid segmentation results for quality

  6. Phase I trial of verubulin (MPC-6827) plus carboplatin in patients with relapsed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Kenneth F; Colman, Howard; Akerley, Wallace A; Glantz, Michael; Matsuoko, Yuko; Beelen, Andrew P; Yu, Margaret; De Groot, John F; Aiken, Robert D; Olson, Jeffrey J; Olsen, Jeffery J; Evans, Brent A; Jensen, Randy L

    2012-11-01

    Verubulin (MPC-6827) is a microtubule-destabilizing agent that achieves high concentrations in the brain. Verubulin disrupts newly formed blood vessels in xenografts. We determined the safety and tolerability of verubulin administered in combination with carboplatin in patients with relapsed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Three pre-selected doses of verubulin were tested: 2.1, 2.7, and 3.3 mg/m(2) in a standard "3+3" design. Verubulin was given every second week of a 6-week cycle in the 2.1 mg/m(2) cohort or weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle in subsequent cohorts. Carboplatin was administered intravenously at an area under the curve (AUC) dosage 4 every 2 weeks for the 2.1 mg/m(2) cohort or on day 1 of each 4-week cycle in subsequent cohorts. Nineteen patients with GBM in first or second relapse were enrolled. Four patients (21 %) experienced a grade 3 or greater verubulin- or carboplatin-related adverse event, including hypesthesia, cerebral ischemia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. The mean plasma half life of verubulin was 3.2 h (SD = 0.82). Two patients achieved at least a partial response by Macdonald criteria. One of these patients remains progression free and off treatment more than 24 months beyond his initiation of verubulin. Five patients had stable disease. Median progression-free survival (PFS) across all patients was 8 weeks, and the 6-month PFS rate was 21 %. The combination of verubulin at the previously determined single-agent maximum tolerated dose of 3.3 mg/m(2) with carboplatin in patients with recurrent/refractory GBM is safe and well tolerated. In this patient population with a highly vascularized tumor, no cerebral hemorrhage was observed.

  7. Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme in the Era of Temozolomide

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    Badiyan, Shahed N.; Markovina, Stephanie; Simpson, Joseph R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; DeWees, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tran, David D.; Linette, Gerry [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Jalalizadeh, Rohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Dacey, Ralph; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Kim, Albert H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Huang, Jiayi, E-mail: jhuang@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To review clinical outcomes of moderate dose escalation using high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) in the setting of concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), compared with standard-dose radiation therapy (SDRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients aged <70 years with biopsy-proven GBM were treated with SDRT (60 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction) or with HDRT (>60 Gy) and TMZ from 2000 to 2012. Biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions was calculated for the HDRT assuming an α/β ratio of 5.6 for GBM. Results: Eighty-one patients received SDRT, and 128 patients received HDRT with a median (range) biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions of 64 Gy (61-76 Gy). Overall median follow-up time was 1.10 years, and for living patients it was 2.97 years. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for patients that received HDRT versus SDRT were 12.4% versus 13.2% (P=.71), and 5.6% versus 4.1% (P=.54), respectively. Age (P=.001) and gross total/near-total resection (GTR/NTR) (P=.001) were significantly associated with PFS on multivariate analysis. Younger age (P<.0001), GTR/NTR (P<.0001), and Karnofsky performance status ≥80 (P=.001) were associated with improved OS. On subset analyses, HDRT failed to improve PFS or OS for those aged <50 years or those who had GTR/NTR. Conclusion: Moderate radiation therapy dose escalation above 60 Gy with concurrent TMZ does not seem to improve clinical outcomes for patients with GBM.

  8. Impact of CD133 positive stem cell proportion on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, Marju; Minajeva, Ave; Niinepuu, Kristi; Kase, Sandra; Vardja, Markus; Asser, Toomas; Jaal, Jana

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact of CD133-positive (CD133+) cancer stem cell proportions on treatment results of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Patients with GBM (n = 42) received postoperative radiotherapy (± chemotherapy). Surgically excised GBM tissue sections were immunohistochemically examined for CD133 expression. The proportions of CD133+ GBM cells were determined (%). The proportion of CD133+ GBM stem cells was established by 2 independent researchers whose results were in good accordance (R = 0.8, p < 0.01). Additionally, CD133 expression levels were correlated with patients overall survival. The proportion of CD133+ cells varied between patients, being from 0.5% to 82%. Mean and median proportions of CD133+ cells of the entire study group were 33% ± 24% (mean ± SD) and 28%, respectively. Clinical data do not support the association between higher proportion of stem cells and the aggressiveness of GBM. Median survival time of the study group was 10.0 months (95% CI 9.0–11.0). The survival time clearly depended on the proportion of CD133+ cells (log rank test, p = 0.02). Median survival times for patients with low (< median) and high (≥ median) proportion of CD133+ cells were 9.0 months (95% CI 7.6–10.5) and 12.0 months (95% CI 9.3–14.7), respectively. In multivariate analysis, the proportion of CD133+ cells emerged as a significant independent predictor for longer overall survival (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–3.8, p = 0.04). In patients with higher stem cell proportion, significantly longer survival times after postoperative radiotherapy were achieved. Underlying reasons and possible higher sensitivity of GBM stem cells to fractionated radio-therapy should be clarified in further studies

  9. Acquired MET expression confers resistance to EGFR inhibition in a mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, H J; Acquaviva, J; Chi, D; Lessard, J; Zhu, H; Woolfenden, S; Bronson, R T; Pfannl, R; White, F; Housman, D E; Iyer, L; Whittaker, C A; Boskovitz, A; Raval, A; Charest, A

    2012-06-21

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor for which there is no cure. Overexpression of wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and loss of the tumor suppressor genes Ink4a/Arf and PTEN are salient features of this deadly cancer. Surprisingly, targeted inhibition of EGFR has been clinically disappointing, demonstrating an innate ability for GBM to develop resistance. Efforts at modeling GBM in mice using wild-type EGFR have proven unsuccessful to date, hampering endeavors at understanding molecular mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. Here, we describe a unique genetically engineered mouse model of EGFR-driven gliomagenesis that uses a somatic conditional overexpression and chronic activation of wild-type EGFR in cooperation with deletions in the Ink4a/Arf and PTEN genes in adult brains. Using this model, we establish that chronic activation of wild-type EGFR with a ligand is necessary for generating tumors with histopathological and molecular characteristics of GBMs. We show that these GBMs are resistant to EGFR kinase inhibition and we define this resistance molecularly. Inhibition of EGFR kinase activity using tyrosine kinase inhibitors in GBM tumor cells generates a cytostatic response characterized by a cell cycle arrest, which is accompanied by a substantial change in global gene expression levels. We demonstrate that an important component of this pattern is the transcriptional activation of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase and that pharmacological inhibition of MET overcomes the resistance to EGFR inhibition in these cells. These findings provide important new insights into mechanisms of resistance to EGFR inhibition and suggest that inhibition of multiple targets will be necessary to provide therapeutic benefit for GBM patients.

  10. Pim1 kinase is upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme and mediates tumor cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Susann; Fink, Matthias Alexander; Weitmann, Kerstin; Friedel, Claudius; Hadlich, Stefan; Langner, Sönke; Kindermann, Katharina; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Eskilsson, Eskil; Miletic, Hrvoje; Hildner, Markus; Fritsch, Michael; Vogelgesang, Silke; Havemann, Christoph; Ritter, Christoph Alexander; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Elisabeth; Rauch, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Kroemer, Heyo Klaus; Schroeder, Henry; Bien-Möller, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background The current therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and common primary brain tumor of adults, involves surgery and a combined radiochemotherapy that controls tumor progression only for a limited time window. Therefore, the identification of new molecular targets is highly necessary. Inhibition of kinases has become a standard of clinical oncology, and thus the oncogenic kinase Pim1 might represent a promising target for improvement of GBM therapy. Methods Expression of Pim1 and associated signaling molecules was analyzed in human GBM samples, and the potential role of this kinase in patients' prognosis was evaluated. Furthermore, we analyzed the in vivo role of Pim1 in GBM cell growth in an orthotopic mouse model and examined the consequences of Pim1 inhibition in vitro to clarify underlying pathways. Results In comparison with normal brain, a strong upregulation of Pim1 was demonstrated in human GBM samples. Notably, patients with short overall survival showed a significantly higher Pim1 expression compared with GBM patients who lived longer than the median. In vitro experiments with GBM cells and analysis of patients' GBM samples suggest that Pim1 regulation is dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, inhibition of Pim1 resulted in reduced cell viability accompanied by decreased cell numbers and increased apoptotic cells, as seen by elevated subG1 cell contents and caspase-3 and -9 activation, as well as modulation of several cell cycle or apoptosis regulatory proteins. Conclusions Altogether, Pim1 could be a novel therapeutic target, which should be further analyzed to improve the outcome of patients with aggressive GBM. PMID:25155357

  11. 23Na-MRI of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after intraoperative radiotherapy: technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneder, Stefan; Buesing, Karen A.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Ong, Melissa M.; Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R.; Brehmer, Stefanie; Schmiedek, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of an intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who was followed up with a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method - 23 Na-MRI - in comparison to a standard contrast-enhanced 1 H-MRI and 18 F-FET-PET. A 56-year-old female patient with diagnosed GBM in July 2012 underwent tumor resection, radiochemotherapy, and three cycles of chemotherapy. After a relapse, 6 months after the initial diagnosis, an IORT was recommended which was performed in March 2013 using the INTRABEAM system (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany) with a 3-cm applicator and a surface dose of 20 Gy. Early post-operative contrast-enhanced and 1-month follow-up 1 H-MRI and a 18 F-FET-PET were performed. In addition, an IRB-approved 23 Na-MRI was performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner (MAGNETOM TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Germany). After re-surgery and IORT in March 2013, only a faint contrast enhancement but considerable surrounding edema was visible at the medio-posterior resection margins. In April 2013, new and progressive contrast enhancement, edema, 23 Na content, and increased uptake in the 18 F-FET-PET were visible, indicating tumor recurrence. Increased sodium content within the area of contrast enhancement was found in the 23 Na-MRI, but also exceeding this area, very similar to the increased uptake depicted in the 18 F-FET-PET. The clearly delineable zone of edema in both examinations exhibits a lower 23 Na content compared to areas with suspected proliferating tumor tissue. 23 Na-MRI provided similar information in the suspicious area compared to 18 F-FET-PET, exceeding conventional 1 H-MRI. Still, 23 Na-MRI remains an investigational technique, which is worth to be further evaluated. (orig.)

  12. Differential Expression of Circular RNAs in Glioblastoma Multiforme and Its Correlation with Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junle Zhu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to explore the expression profiles of circular RNAs (circRNAs in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM in an attempt to identify potential core genes in the pathogenesis of this tumor. METHODS: Differentially expressed circRNAs were screened between tumor tissues from five GBM patients and five normal brain samples using Illumina Hiseq. Bioinformatics analysis was used to analyze their potential function. CircBRAF was further detected in different WHO grades glioma tissues and normal brain tissues. Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox's analysis were used to analyze the association between circBRAF expression level and prognosis of glioma patients. RESULTS: A total of 1411 differentially expressed circRNAs were identified in GBM patients including 206 upregulated circRNAs and 1205 downregulated circRNAs. Differential expression of circRNAs was closely associated with the biological process and molecular function. The downregulated circRNAs were mainly associated with ErbB and Neurotrophin signaling pathways. Moreover, the expression level of circBRAF in normal brain tissues was significantly higher than that in glioma tissues (P < .001. CircBRAF was significantly lower in glioma patients with high pathological grade (WHO III & IV than those with low grade (WHO I & II (P < .001. Cox analysis revealed that high circBRAF expression was an independent biomarker for predicting good progression-free survival and overall survival in glioma patients (HR = 0.413, 95% CI 0.201-0.849; HR = 0.299, 95% CI 0.135-0.661; respectively. CONCLUSION: The present study identified a profile of dysregulated circRNAs in GBM. Bioinformatics analysis showed that dysregulated circRNAs might be associated with tumorigenesis and development of GBM. In addition, circBRAF could severe as a biomarker for predicting pathological grade and prognosis in glioma patients.

  13. The addition of temozolomide does not change the pattern of progression glioblastoma multiforme post-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunjur, Ashray; Bressel, Mathias; Ryan, Gail

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the pattern of progressive disease (PD) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients has changed with the introduction of the current standard of care protocol – postoperative conformal radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray in 30 fractions with concurrent low-dose (75–100 mg/m 2 ) temozolomide, followed by six cycles of adjuvant high-dose (150–200 mg/m 2 ) temozolomide – as compared with radiotherapy alone. For GBM patients commencing combined modality treatment between October 2005 and August 2009, the MRI scan confirming progression (if any) was co-registered with the original planning CT scan, and progression site(s) marked. Coverage of the composite progression volume (PDvol) by the original 95% prescription isodose volume was obtained from dose-volume histogram (DVH) data, and assigned as ‘central’, ‘in field’, ‘marginal’ and ‘out of field’, corresponding to >95%, >80%, 20–80% and <20% coverage. Of 68 consecutive patients identified, 54 (79.4%) had documented PD. Of the 47 (87%) evaluable patients, 43 (91%) had in field progression with 36 (77%) of these being central. Of the remaining four cases, three (6%) had marginal progression, and only one patient (2%) had out of field progression. Median overall and progression-free survival were 11.6 and 6.6 months, respectively. The pattern of progression in our GBM patients does not appear to have been altered by the addition of temozolomide. The overwhelming majority of first PD occurred within the original radiotherapy planning target volume, as is the case in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Major changes to radiotherapy volumes are not indicated, with alternative strategies required to improve outcomes.

  14. Quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme: Impact of semi-automated tumor segmentation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Eun; Kim, Jong Hyo; Woo, Bo Yeong; Ko, Micheal D.; Jamshidi, Neema

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) derived from tumor volumes obtained with semi-automated tumor segmentation software. MR images of 45 GBM patients (29 males, 16 females) were downloaded from The Cancer Imaging Archive, in which post-contrast T1-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR sequences were used. Two raters independently segmented the tumors using two semi-automated segmentation tools (TumorPrism3D and 3D Slicer). Regions of interest corresponding to contrast-enhancing lesion, necrotic portions, and non-enhancing T2 high signal intensity component were segmented for each tumor. A total of 180 imaging features were extracted, and their quality was evaluated in terms of stability, normalized dynamic range (NDR), and redundancy, using intra-class correlation coefficients, cluster consensus, and Rand Statistic. Our study results showed that most of the radiomic features in GBM were highly stable. Over 90% of 180 features showed good stability (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] ≥ 0.8), whereas only 7 features were of poor stability (ICC NDR ≥1), while above 35% of the texture features showed poor NDR (< 1). Features were shown to cluster into only 5 groups, indicating that they were highly redundant. The use of semi-automated software tools provided sufficiently reliable tumor segmentation and feature stability; thus helping to overcome the inherent inter-rater and intra-rater variability of user intervention. However, certain aspects of feature quality, including NDR and redundancy, need to be assessed for determination of representative signature features before further development of radiomics

  15. Involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation of human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Aldaz

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM-initiating cells (GICs represent a tumor subpopulation with neural stem cell-like properties that is responsible for the development, progression and therapeutic resistance of human GBM. We have recently shown that blockade of NFκB pathway promotes terminal differentiation and senescence of GICs both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that induction of differentiation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for GBM. MicroRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of GBM, but a high-throughput analysis of their role in GIC differentiation has not been reported. We have established human GIC cell lines that can be efficiently differentiated into cells expressing astrocytic and neuronal lineage markers. Using this in vitro system, a microarray-based high-throughput analysis to determine global expression changes of microRNAs during differentiation of GICs was performed. A number of changes in the levels of microRNAs were detected in differentiating GICs, including over-expression of hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-29b, hsa-miR-221 and hsa-miR-222, and down-regulation of hsa-miR-93 and hsa-miR-106a. Functional studies showed that miR-21 over-expression in GICs induced comparable cell differentiation features and targeted SPRY1 mRNA, which encodes for a negative regulator of neural stem-cell differentiation. In addition, miR-221 and miR-222 inhibition in differentiated cells restored the expression of stem cell markers while reducing differentiation markers. Finally, miR-29a and miR-29b targeted MCL1 mRNA in GICs and increased apoptosis. Our study uncovers the microRNA dynamic expression changes occurring during differentiation of GICs, and identifies miR-21 and miR-221/222 as key regulators of this process.

  16. Prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score for glioblastoma multiforme patients treated with radiotherapy and temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkan, Erkan; Selek, Ugur; Ozdemir, Yurday; Yildirim, Berna A; Guler, Ozan C; Ciner, Fuat; Mertsoylu, Huseyin; Tufan, Kadir

    2018-04-25

    To evaluate the prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), the combination of C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin, in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent plus adjuvant temozolomide (GPS). Data of newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with partial brain RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped into three according to the GPS criteria: GPS-0: CRP L and albumin > 35 g/L; GPS-1: CRP L and albumin L or CRP > 10 mg/L and albumin > 35 g/L; and GPS-2: CRP > 10 mg/L and albumin L. Primary end-point was the association between the GPS groups and the overall survival (OS) outcomes. A total of 142 patients were analyzed (median age: 58 years, 66.2% male). There were 64 (45.1%), 40 (28.2%), and 38 (26.7%) patients in GPS-0, GPS-1, and GPS-2 groups, respectively. At median 15.7 months follow-up, the respective median and 5-year OS rates for the whole cohort were 16.2 months (95% CI 12.7-19.7) and 9.5%. In multivariate analyses GPS grouping emerged independently associated with the median OS (P GPS grouping and the RTOG RPA classification were found to be strongly correlated in prognostic stratification of GBM patients (correlation coefficient: 0.42; P GPS appeared to be useful in prognostic stratification of GBM patients into three groups with significantly different survival durations resembling the RTOG RPA classification.

  17. SU-F-T-392: Superior Brainstem and Cochlea Sparing with VMAT for Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Briere, TM; McAleer, MF; Levy, LB; Yang, JN; Anderson, MD [Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) can provide similar target coverage and normal tissue sparing as IMRT but with shorter treatment times. At our institution VMAT was adopted for the treatment glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after a small number of test plans demonstrated its non-inferiority. In this study, we compare actual clinical treatment plans for a larger cohort of patients treated with either VMAT or IMRT. Methods: 90 GBM patients were included in this study, 45 treated with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All planning target volumes (PTVs) were prescribed a dose of 50 Gy, with a simultaneous integrated boost to 60 Gy. Most IMRT plans used 5 non-coplanar beams, while most VMAT plans used 2 coplanar beams. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher’s exact test or the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank sum test. Included in the analysis were patient and treatment characteristics as well as the doses to the target volumes and organs at risk. Results: Treatment times for the VMAT plans were reduced by 5 minutes compared with IMRT. The PTV coverage was similar, with at least 95% covered for all plans, while the median boost PTV dose differed by 0.1 Gy between the IMRT and VMAT cohorts. The doses to the brain, optic chiasm, optic nerves and eyes were not significantly different. The mean dose to the brainstem, however, was 9.4 Gy less with VMAT (p<0.001). The dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral cochleae were respectively 19.7 and 9.5 Gy less (p<0.001). Conclusion: Comparison of clinical treatment plans for separate IMRT and VMAT cohorts demonstrates that VMAT can save substantial treatment time while providing similar target coverage and superior sparing of the brainstem and cochleae. To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate this benefit of VMAT in the management of GBM.

  18. Differential Radiosensitizing Potential of Temozolomide in MGMT Promoter Methylated Glioblastoma Multiforme Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifterik, Krista A. van; Berg, Jaap van den; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lafleur, M. Vincent M.; Leenstra, Sieger; Slotman, Ben J.; Hulsebos, Theo J.M.; Sminia, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiosensitizing potential of temozolomide (TMZ) for human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines using single-dose and fractionated γ-irradiation. Methods and Materials: Three genetically characterized human GBM cell lines (AMC-3046, VU-109, and VU-122) were exposed to various single (0-6 Gy) and daily fractionated doses (2 Gy per fraction) of γ-irradiation. Repeated TMZ doses were given before and concurrent with irradiation treatment. Immediately plated clonogenic cell-survival curves were determined for both the single-dose and the fractionated irradiation experiments. To establish the net effect of clonogenic cell survival and cell proliferation, growth curves were determined, expressed as the number of surviving cells. Results: All three cell lines showed MGMT promoter methylation, lacked MGMT protein expression, and were sensitive to TMZ. The isotoxic TMZ concentrations used were in a clinically feasible range of 10 μmol/L (AMC-3046), 3 μmol/L (VU-109), and 2.5 μmol/L (VU-122). Temozolomide was able to radiosensitize two cell lines (AMC 3046 and VU-122) using single-dose irradiation. A reduction in the number of surviving cells after treatment with the combination of TMZ and fractionated irradiation was seen in all three cell lines, but only AMC 3046 showed a radiosensitizing effect. Conclusions: This study on TMZ-sensitive GBM cell lines shows that TMZ can act as a radiosensitizer and is at least additive to γ-irradiation. Enhancement of the radiation response by TMZ seems to be independent of the epigenetically silenced MGMT gene

  19. Glioblastoma multiforme in Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Tevfik; Cikla, Ulas; Kirst, Alice; Baskaya, Mustafa K

    2015-04-17

    Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome (KTWS) is a rare syndrome in which patients usually present with cutaneous hemangiomas, venous varicosities, and bone and soft tissue hypertrophy of the affected limb. Intracranial lesions in patients with KTWS are extremely rare, and are generally reported as single cases in the literature. We describe a rare case, where a patient with KTWS was found with a hemorrhagic grade IV astrocytoma. Although central nervous system abnormalities such as intracranial aneurysms and cerebral and spinal cord cavernomas have been described in patients with KTWS, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between glioblastoma multiforme (grade IV astrocytoma) and KTWS in the English-language medical literature. A 61-year-old white Caucasian man with a history of KTWS presented with seizures. Left upper and lower extremity hypertrophy, left foot, leg and ear gigantism and left-sided abdominal capillary hemangiomas were noted in the physical examination. Cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained, showing a heterogeneous lesion in the cingulate gyrus, with peripheral and central areas of T1 hyperintensity and layering T2 hypointensity consistent with a hemorrhage. A right parasagittal frontal craniotomy was performed with an interhemispheric approach. We had difficulty controlling the bleeding with bipolar electrocautery during surgery and finally were able to stop the bleeding using surgicel and gelfoam. Postoperative cranial CT and MRI scans showed intraparenchymal hemorrhage centered within the medial right frontal lobe. There was no increase in hematoma size in consecutive CT scans. Co-occurrence of vascular abnormalities with KWTS should be taken into consideration to avoid perilous preoperative and postoperative complications.

  20. Quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme: Impact of semi-automated tumor segmentation software

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    Lee, Myung Eun; Kim, Jong Hyo [Center for Medical-IT Convergence Technology Research, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Bo Yeong [Dept. of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Micheal D.; Jamshidi, Neema [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and quality of radiomic features in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) derived from tumor volumes obtained with semi-automated tumor segmentation software. MR images of 45 GBM patients (29 males, 16 females) were downloaded from The Cancer Imaging Archive, in which post-contrast T1-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR sequences were used. Two raters independently segmented the tumors using two semi-automated segmentation tools (TumorPrism3D and 3D Slicer). Regions of interest corresponding to contrast-enhancing lesion, necrotic portions, and non-enhancing T2 high signal intensity component were segmented for each tumor. A total of 180 imaging features were extracted, and their quality was evaluated in terms of stability, normalized dynamic range (NDR), and redundancy, using intra-class correlation coefficients, cluster consensus, and Rand Statistic. Our study results showed that most of the radiomic features in GBM were highly stable. Over 90% of 180 features showed good stability (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] ≥ 0.8), whereas only 7 features were of poor stability (ICC < 0.5). Most first order statistics and morphometric features showed moderate-to-high NDR (4 > NDR ≥1), while above 35% of the texture features showed poor NDR (< 1). Features were shown to cluster into only 5 groups, indicating that they were highly redundant. The use of semi-automated software tools provided sufficiently reliable tumor segmentation and feature stability; thus helping to overcome the inherent inter-rater and intra-rater variability of user intervention. However, certain aspects of feature quality, including NDR and redundancy, need to be assessed for determination of representative signature features before further development of radiomics.

  1. Marital status, treatment, and survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Susan M; Barker, Fred G

    2005-11-01

    Social factors influence cancer treatment choices, potentially affecting patient survival. In the current study, the authors studied the interrelations between marital status, treatment received, and survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GM), using population-based data. The data source was the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Public Use Database, 1988-2001, 2004 release, all registries. Multivariate logistic, ordinal, and Cox regression analyses adjusted for demographic and clinical variables were used. Of 10,987 patients with GM, 67% were married, 31% were unmarried, and 2% were of unknown marital status. Tumors were slightly larger at the time of diagnosis in unmarried patients (49% of unmarried patients had tumors larger than 45 mm vs. 45% of married patients; P = 0.004, multivariate analysis). Unmarried patients were less likely to undergo surgical resection (vs. biopsy; 75% of unmarried patients vs. 78% of married patients) and were less likely to receive postoperative radiation therapy (RT) (70% of unmarried patients vs. 79% of married patients). On multivariate analysis, the odds ratio (OR) for resection (vs. biopsy) in unmarried patients was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.79-0.98; P = 0.02), and the OR for RT in unmarried patients was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.62-0.77; P Unmarried patients more often refused both surgical resection and RT. Unmarried patients who underwent surgical resection and RT were found to have a shorter survival than similarly treated married patients (hazard ratio for unmarried patients, 1.10; P = 0.003). Unmarried patients with GM presented with larger tumors, were less likely to undergo both surgical resection and postoperative RT, and had a shorter survival after diagnosis when compared with married patients, even after adjustment for treatment and other prognostic factors. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society.

  2. A Non-randomized Controlled Trial of EMDR on Affective Symptoms in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Szpringer

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly aggressive brain cancer and its survival after diagnosis is less than 2 years. Therefore, GBM patients are especially prone to co-occurring psychological conditions such as anxiety and depressive disorders. Furthermore, aggressive medical therapies affect patients’ lives, undermining their sense of meaning and coherence. The main aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR therapy on anxiety, depression and sense of coherence in patients with GBM. Thirty-seven GBM-diagnosed women were included in this trial and received standard medical care. Of those, 18 patients were treated during 4 months with 10–12 individual EMDR sessions (60–90 minutes each. Nineteen GBM patients were used as a non-randomized control group as they consented to psychological evaluations but not to a psychotherapeutic intervention. The groups were homogeneous in terms of gender, age, educational level and treatment, but not in anxiety and depressive levels at baseline. All patients were evaluated at baseline, after treatment (4 months and at follow-up (further 4 months by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-M and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-29. Caregivers in both groups were interviewed by the Patient Caregiver Questionnaire after 4 months follow-up. Statistical analyses were conducted using ANOVA statistics, correlation and regression analysis. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in the EMDR group in anxiety, depression and anger, when compared to the experimental group. EMDR therapy also had a positive impact upon the sense of coherence level in the experimental group, whereas in the control group this declined. Finally, the caregivers reported beneficial outcomes of the EMDR therapy with less anxiety- and anger-related behaviors in patients in the experimental group compared to the control group. This study is the first to show

  3. Eficácia e toxicidade do pó comercial de Hoodia gordonii (Masson swet ex decne utilizado no tratamento da obesidade Efficacy and toxicity of Hoodia gordonii commercial powder used to combat obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Pereira

    2012-01-01

    gordonii has currently aroused great interest worldwide, especially for recent discoveries and scientific proof of inhibition of appetite and thirst by the active glycoside P57 isolated from plant species. Nevertheless, such effects have not been evaluated and proven for commercial samples of H. gordonii powder (PHG, with no scientific evidence to ensure its effectiveness and safety. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct biological tests with rats to evaluate the pharmacological activity and toxicity of commercial samples of H. gordonii powder. The samples were administered through gavage, at doses equivalent to 20 times those recommended for humans, in female Wistar rats during 4 weeks for evaluation of the parameters indicative of therapeutic efficacy. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and blood and organ samples were collected and subjected to the evaluation of metabolic, endocrine, hematological and histopathological indicators. Results showed that for all evaluated parameters, there were no significant differences between the control group that only received sterile saline solution and the groups treated with PHG, indicating that the latter, although presenting no evidence of toxicity, are unable to produce the alleged effects of appetite inhibition and subsequent obesity treatment.

  4. The suppression of manganese superoxide dismutase decreased the survival of human glioblastoma multiforme T98G cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novi S. Hardiany

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a primary malignant brain tumor which has poor prognosis. High incidence of oxidative stress-based therapy resistance could be related to the high antioxidant status of GBM cells. Our previous study has reported that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD antioxidant expression was significantly higher in high grade glioma than in low grade. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of MnSOD suppression toward GBM cell survival.Methods: This study is an experimental study using human glioblastoma multiforme T98G cell line. Suppression of MnSOD expression was performed using in vitro transfection MnSOD-siRNA. The MnSOD expression was analyzed by measuring the mRNA using real time RT-PCR, protein using ELISA technique, and specific activity of enzyme using inhibition of xantine oxidase. Concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS intracellular was determined by measuring superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide. Cell survival was analyzed by measuring viability, proliferation, and cell apoptosis.Results: In vitro transfection of MnSOD-siRNA suppressed the mRNA, protein, and specific activity of MnSOD. This treatment significantly increased the concentration of superoxide radical; however, it did not influence the concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, viability MnSOD-suppressing cell significantly decreased, accompanied by increase of cell apoptosis without affecting cell proliferation.Conclusion: The suppression of MnSOD expression leads to decrease glioblastoma multiforme cell survival, which was associated to the increase of cell apoptotic.

  5. In vitro evaluation of the effects of graphene platelets on glioblastoma multiforme cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaworski, Slawomir; Sawosz, Ewa; Grodzik, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a single atom-thick material with exciting potential. It can be used in many fields, from electronics to biomedicine. However, little is known about its toxicity and biocompatibility. Herein, we report a study on the toxicity of graphene platelets (GPs) by examining the influence of G...

  6. Phase 1/2 Trials of Temozolomide, Motexafin Gadolinium, and 60-Gy Fractionated Radiation for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme: Final Results of RTOG 0513

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachman, David G., E-mail: david.brachman@dignityhealth.org [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Pugh, Stephanie L. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ashby, Lynn S. [Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Thomas, Theresa A. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Dunbar, Erin M. [University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Narayan, Samir [St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bovi, Joseph A. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Rockhill, Jason K. [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Won, Minhee [Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Curran, Walter P. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of phase 1 was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) given concurrently with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Phase 2 determined whether this combination improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in GBM recursive partitioning analysis class III to V patients compared to therapies for recently published historical controls. Methods and Materials: Dose escalation in phase 1 progressed through 3 cohorts until 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity or a dose of 5 mg/kg was reached. Once MTD was established, a 1-sided 1-sample log-rank test at significance level of .1 had 85% power to detect a median survival difference (13.69 vs 18.48 months) with 60 deaths over a 12-month accrual period and an additional 18 months of follow-up. OS and PFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In phase 1, 24 patients were enrolled. The MTD established was 5 mg/kg, given intravenously 5 days a week for the first 10 RT fractions, then 3 times a week for the duration of RT. The 7 patients enrolled in the third dose level and the 94 enrolled in phase 2 received this dose. Of these 101 patients, 87 were eligible and evaluable. Median survival time was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.9-17.6 months), not significantly different from that of the historical control (P=.36). Median PFS was 7.6 months (95% CI: 5.7-9.6 months). One patient (1%) experienced a grade 5 adverse event possibly related to therapy during the concurrent phase, and none experience toxicity during adjuvant TMZ therapy. Conclusions: Treatment was well tolerated, but median OS did not reach improvement specified by protocol compared to historical control, indicating that the combination of standard RT with TMZ and MGd did not achieve a significant survival advantage.

  7. The “Great Masquerader" Strikes Again: Secondary Syphilis Presentation with Erythema Multiforme (EM-Like Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Brom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease known to present with highly variable manifestations, especially when left untreated. Patients who present to Internal Medicine Departments with fever and a rash are always a diagnostic challenge since mild viral diseases and life-threatening bacterial infections may manifest themselves similarly. In the following case presentation, we describe a patient with 1 month’s duration of fever and rash on the palms of the hand and soles of the feet, in the form of erythema multiforme (EM-like lesions. His disease was diagnosed as secondary syphilis, once again justifying its name: the “great masquerader".

  8. Myelin structure is a key difference in the x-ray scattering signature between meningioma, schwannoma and glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falzon, G; Pearson, S; Murison, R; Hall, C; Siu, K; Round, A; Schueltke, E; Kaye, A H; Lewis, R

    2007-01-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns of benign and malignant brain tumour tissue were examined. Independent component analysis was used to find a feature set representing the images collected. A set of coefficients was then used to describe each image, which allowed the use of the statistical technique of flexible discriminant analysis to discover a hidden order in the data set. The key difference was found to be in the intensity and spectral content of the second and fourth order myelin scattering peaks. This has clearly demonstrated that significant differences in the structure of myelin exist in the highly malignant glioblastoma multiforme as opposed to the benign: meningioma and schwannoma

  9. Prospective evaluation of angiogenic, hypoxic and EGFR-related biomarkers in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme treated with cetuximab, bevacizumab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Broholm, Helle

    2010-01-01

    , hypoxia and mediators of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway were investigated. Tumor tissue was obtained from a previous phase II study, treating recurrent primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab in combination with bevacizumab and irinotecan....... Of the 37 patients with available tumor tissue, 29 were evaluable for response. We concurrently performed immunohistochemical stainings on tumor tissue from 21 GBM patients treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan. We found a tendency of correlation between the hypoxia-related markers, indicating...

  10. Level of Notch activation determines the effect on growth and stem cell-like features in glioblastoma multiforme neurosphere cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Karina; Villingshøj, Mette; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) are cancer cells with neural stem cell (NSC)-like properties found in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and they are assigned a central role in tumor initiation, progression and relapse. The Notch pathway is important for maintenance and cell fate decisions...... in the normal NSC population. Notch signaling is often deregulated in GBM and recent results suggest that this pathway plays a significant role in bCSC as well. We therefore wished to further elucidate the role of Notch activation in GBM-derived bCSC....

  11. Treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme with carmustine, cisplatin and etoposide followed by radiotherapy. A phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Kristjansen, P E; Wagner, A

    1999-01-01

    fractions. Twenty-nine patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), mean age 50 (27-66) and performance status (PS) 0-2 were included. Using the Macdonald criteria 33% had partial remission (PR), 41% stable disease (SD) and 26% progressive disease (PD) after chemotherapy. After additional...... (6.0-9.1) and median survival was 11.4 months (10.1-12.7). We conclude that this regimen is effective and feasible in patients with GBM. The short course pre-irradiatory chemotherapy may be less cumbersome than adjuvant chemotherapy and the regimen may be even more active in grade III gliomas....

  12. Transgenic nude mouse with green fluorescent protein expression-based human glioblastoma multiforme animal model with EGFR expression and invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guo-Wei; Lan, Fo-Lin; Gao, Jian-Guo; Jiang, Cai-Mou; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Xiao-Hong; Ma, Yue-Hong; Shao, He-Dui; He, Xue-Yang; Chen, Jin-Long; Long, Jian-Wu; Xiao, Hui-Sheng; Guo, Zhi-Tong; Diao, Yi

    2012-08-01

    Previously, we developed an orthotopic xenograft model of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with high EGFR expression and invasiveness in Balb/c nu/nu nude mice. Now we also developed the same orthotopic xenograft model in transgenic nude mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. The present orthotopic xenografts labeled by phycoerythrin fluorescing red showed high EGFR expression profile, and invasive behavior under a bright green-red dual-color fluorescence background. A striking advantage in the present human GBM model is that the change of tumor growth can be observed visually instead of sacrificing animals in our further antitumor therapy studies.

  13. EGFR gene overexpression retained in an invasive xenograft model by solid orthotopic transplantation of human glioblastoma multiforme into nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Diao; Hua, Tian Xin; Lin, Huang Yan

    2011-03-01

    Orthotopic xenograft animal model from human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines often do not recapitulate an extremely important aspect of invasive growth and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene overexpression of human GBM. We developed an orthotopic xenograft model by solid transplantation of human GBM into the brain of nude mouse. The orthotopic xenografts sharing the same histopathological features with their original human GBMs were highly invasive and retained the overexpression of EGFR gene. The murine orthotopic GBM models constitute a valuable in vivo system for preclinical studies to test novel therapies for human GBM.

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chadha, M.

    1997-01-01

    The abstract describes evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for two groups of glioblastoma multiforme patients. From September 1994 to February 1996 15 patients have been treated. In September 1997 another 34 patients were examined. Authors determined a safe starting dose for BNCT using epithermal neutrons and BPA-F. They have also evaluated adverse effects of BNCT at this starting dose. Therapeutic effectiveness of this starting dose has been evaluated. No significant side effects from BPA-F infusion or BNCT treatment were observed in normal brains

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Diaz, A.Z.; Chadha, M. [Univ. Hospital, State Univ. of New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The abstract describes evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for two groups of glioblastoma multiforme patients. From September 1994 to February 1996 15 patients have been treated. In September 1997 another 34 patients were examined. Authors determined a safe starting dose for BNCT using epithermal neutrons and BPA-F. They have also evaluated adverse effects of BNCT at this starting dose. Therapeutic effectiveness of this starting dose has been evaluated. No significant side effects from BPA-F infusion or BNCT treatment were observed in normal brains.

  16. Ultrastructural characterization of primary cilia in pathologically characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Joanna J; Fritzler, Marvin J; Rattner, Jerome B

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that are involved in cell cycle progression. Ultrastructurally, the primary cilium region is complex, with normal ciliogenesis progressing through five distinct morphological stages in human astrocytes. Defects in early stages of ciliogenesis are key features of astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines and provided the impetus for the current study which describes the morphology of primary cilia in molecularly characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. Seven surgically resected human GBM tissue samples were molecularly characterized according to IDH1/2 mutation status, EGFR amplification status and MGMT promoter methylation status and were examined for primary cilia expression and structure using indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. We report for the first time that primary cilia are disrupted in the early stages of ciliogenesis in human GBM tumors. We confirm that immature primary cilia and basal bodies/centrioles have aberrant ciliogenesis characteristics including absent paired vesicles, misshaped/swollen vesicular hats, abnormal configuration of distal appendages, and discontinuity of centriole microtubular blades. Additionally, the transition zone plate is able to form in the absence of paired vesicles on the distal end of the basal body and when a cilium progresses beyond the early stages of ciliogenesis, it has electron dense material clumped along the transition zone and a darkening of the microtubules at the proximal end of the cilium. Primary cilia play a role in a variety of human cancers. Previously primary cilia structure was perturbed in cultured cell lines derived from astrocytomas/glioblastomas; however there was always some question as to whether these findings were a cell culture phenomena. In this study we confirm that disruptions in ciliogenesis at early stages do occur in GBM tumors and that these ultrastructural findings bear resemblance to those previously

  17. {sup 23}Na-MRI of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after intraoperative radiotherapy: technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haneder, Stefan; Buesing, Karen A.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Ong, Melissa M. [Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg University, Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Brehmer, Stefanie; Schmiedek, Peter [Heidelberg University, Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    We report the first case of an intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who was followed up with a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method - {sup 23}Na-MRI - in comparison to a standard contrast-enhanced {sup 1}H-MRI and {sup 18}F-FET-PET. A 56-year-old female patient with diagnosed GBM in July 2012 underwent tumor resection, radiochemotherapy, and three cycles of chemotherapy. After a relapse, 6 months after the initial diagnosis, an IORT was recommended which was performed in March 2013 using the INTRABEAM system (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany) with a 3-cm applicator and a surface dose of 20 Gy. Early post-operative contrast-enhanced and 1-month follow-up {sup 1}H-MRI and a {sup 18}F-FET-PET were performed. In addition, an IRB-approved {sup 23}Na-MRI was performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner (MAGNETOM TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Germany). After re-surgery and IORT in March 2013, only a faint contrast enhancement but considerable surrounding edema was visible at the medio-posterior resection margins. In April 2013, new and progressive contrast enhancement, edema, {sup 23}Na content, and increased uptake in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET were visible, indicating tumor recurrence. Increased sodium content within the area of contrast enhancement was found in the {sup 23}Na-MRI, but also exceeding this area, very similar to the increased uptake depicted in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET. The clearly delineable zone of edema in both examinations exhibits a lower {sup 23}Na content compared to areas with suspected proliferating tumor tissue. {sup 23}Na-MRI provided similar information in the suspicious area compared to {sup 18}F-FET-PET, exceeding conventional {sup 1}H-MRI. Still, {sup 23}Na-MRI remains an investigational technique, which is worth to be further evaluated. (orig.)

  18. Feasibility of extreme dose escalation for glioblastoma multiforme using 4π radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Dan; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Yu, Victoria Y; Kaprealian, Tania; Kupelian, Patrick; Selch, Michael; Lee, Percy; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) frequently recurs at the same location after radiotherapy. Further dose escalation using conventional methods is limited by normal tissue tolerance. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy has recently emerged as a new potential method to deliver highly conformal radiation dose using the C-arm linacs. We aim to study the feasibility of very substantial GBM dose escalation while maintaining normal tissue tolerance using 4π. 11 GBM patients previously treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT/RapidArc) on the NovalisTx™ platform to a prescription dose of either 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were included. All patients were replanned with 30 non-coplanar beams using a 4π radiotherapy platform, which inverse optimizes both beam angles and fluence maps. Four different prescriptions were used including original prescription dose and PTV (4πPTV PD ), 100 Gy to the PTV and GTV (4πPTV 100Gy ), 100 Gy to the GTV only while maintaining prescription dose to the rest of the PTV (4πGTV 100Gy ), and a 5 mm margin expansion plan (4πPTV PD+5mm ). OARs included in the study are the normal brain (brain – PTV), brainstem, chiasm, spinal cord, eyes, lenses, optical nerves, and cochleae. The 4π plans resulted in superior dose gradient indices, as indicated by >20% reduction in the R50, compared to the clinical plans. Among all of the 4π cases, when compared to the clinical plans, the maximum and mean doses were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by a range of 47.01-98.82% and 51.87-99.47%, respectively, or unchanged (p > 0.05) for all of the non-brain OARs. Both the 4πPTV PD and 4π GTV 100GY plans reduced the mean normal brain mean doses. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy substantially increases the dose gradient outside of the PTV and better spares critical organs. Dose escalation to 100 Gy to the GTV or additional margin expansion while meeting clinical critical organ dose constraints is feasible. 100 Gy to the PTV result in higher normal brain doses but may

  19. The future role of personalized medicine in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Jing Li1,2, Chunhui Di1,2, Austin K Mattox1,2, Linda Wu1,2, D Cory Adamson1,2,3,41Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 2Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 3Department of Neurobiology, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 4Neurosurgery Section, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USAAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains one of the most malignant primary central nervous system tumors. Personalized therapeutic approaches have not become standard of care for GBM, but science is fast approaching this goal. GBM’s heterogeneous genomic landscape and resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy make this tumor one of the most challenging to treat. Recent advances in genome-wide studies and genetic profiling show that there is unlikely to be a single genetic or cellular event that can be effectively targeted in all patients. Instead, future therapies will likely require personalization for each patient’s tumor genotype or proteomic profile. Over the past year, many investigations specifically focused simultaneously on strategies to target oncogenic pathways, angiogenesis, tumor immunology, epigenomic events, glioma stem cells (GSCs, and the highly migratory glioma cell population. Combination therapy targeting multiple pathways is becoming a fast growing area of research, and many studies put special attention on small molecule inhibitors. Because GBM is a highly vascular tumor, therapy that directs monoclonal antibodies or small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors toward angiogenic factors is also an area of focus for the development of new therapies. Passive, active, and adoptive immunotherapies have been explored by many studies recently, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression with microRNAs is also becoming an important area of study. GSCs can be useful targets to stop tumor recurrence and

  20. Parameter optimization for constructing competing endogenous RNA regulatory network in glioblastoma multiforme and other cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chen, Yidong; Chuang, Eric Y

    2015-01-01

    In addition to direct targeting and repressing mRNAs, recent studies reported that microRNAs (miRNAs) can bridge up an alternative layer of post-transcriptional gene regulatory networks. The competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) regulation depicts the scenario where pairs of genes (ceRNAs) sharing, fully or partially, common binding miRNAs (miRNA program) can establish coexpression through competition for a limited pool of the miRNA program. While the dynamics of ceRNA regulation among cellular conditions have been verified based on in silico and in vitro experiments, comprehensive investigation into the strength of ceRNA regulation in human datasets remains largely unexplored. Furthermore, pan-cancer analysis of ceRNA regulation, to our knowledge, has not been systematically investigated. In the present study we explored optimal conditions for ceRNA regulation, investigated functions governed by ceRNA regulation, and evaluated pan-cancer effects. We started by investigating how essential factors, such as the size of miRNA programs, the number of miRNA program binding sites, and expression levels of miRNA programs and ceRNAs affect the ceRNA regulation capacity in tumors derived from glioblastoma multiforme patients captured by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We demonstrated that increased numbers of common targeting miRNAs as well as the abundance of binding sites enhance ceRNA regulation and strengthen coexpression of ceRNA pairs. Also, our investigation revealed that the strength of ceRNA regulation is dependent on expression levels of both miRNA programs and ceRNAs. Through functional annotation analysis, our results indicated that ceRNA regulation is highly associated with essential cellular functions and diseases including cancer. Furthermore, the highly intertwined ceRNA regulatory relationship enables constitutive and effective intra-function regulation of genes in diverse types of cancer. Using gene and microRNA expression datasets from TCGA, we successfully

  1. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  2. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    all chemicals and impact pathways characterizes the contribution of each factor to the total variation of 10–12 orders of magnitude in impacts per kg across all chemicals. This large variation between characterisation factors for different chemicals as well as the 3 orders of magnitude uncertainty....... As a whole, the assessment of toxicity in LCA has progressed on a very sharp learning curve during the past 20 years. This rapid progression is expected to continue in the coming years, focusing more on direct exposure of workers to chemicals during manufacturing and of consumers during product use...

  3. 18F-Fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography may differentiate glioblastoma multiforme from less malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Kenji; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Hattori, Naoya; Magota, Keiichi; Tanaka, Shinya; Kuge, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and its prognosis is significantly poorer than those of less malignant gliomas. Pathologically, necrosis is one of the most important characteristics that differentiate GBM from lower grade gliomas; therefore, we hypothesized that 18 F fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a radiotracer for hypoxia imaging, accumulates in GBM but not in lower grade gliomas. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of FMISO positron emission tomography (PET) for the differential diagnosis of GBM from lower grade gliomas. This prospective study included 23 patients with pathologically confirmed gliomas. All of the patients underwent FMISO PET and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET within a week. FMISO images were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 400 MBq of FMISO. Tracer uptake in the tumor was visually assessed. Lesion to normal tissue ratios and FMISO uptake volume were calculated. Of the 23 glioma patients, 14 were diagnosed as having GBM (grade IV glioma in the 2007 WHO classification), and the others were diagnosed as having non-GBM (5 grade III and 4 grade II). In visual assessment, all GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor greater than that in the surrounding brain tissues, whereas all the non-GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor equal to that in the surrounding brain tissues (p ≤ 0.001). One GBM patient was excluded from FDG PET study because of hyperglycemia. All GBM patients and three of the nine (33%) non-GBM patients showed FDG uptake greater than or equal to that in the gray matter. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing GBM were 100 and 100% for FMISO, and 100 and 66% for FDG, respectively. The lesion to cerebellum ratio of FMISO uptake was higher in GBM patients (2.74 ± 0.60, range 1.71-3.81) than in non-GBM patients (1.22 ± 0.06, range 1.09-1.29, p ≤ 0.001) with no overlap between the groups. The lesion to gray matter ratio of FDG was also higher in GBM

  4. {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography may differentiate glioblastoma multiforme from less malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Kenji; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Houkin, Kiyohiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo (Japan); Hattori, Naoya [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo (Japan); Tanaka, Shinya [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Cancer Pathology, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and its prognosis is significantly poorer than those of less malignant gliomas. Pathologically, necrosis is one of the most important characteristics that differentiate GBM from lower grade gliomas; therefore, we hypothesized that {sup 18}F fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a radiotracer for hypoxia imaging, accumulates in GBM but not in lower grade gliomas. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of FMISO positron emission tomography (PET) for the differential diagnosis of GBM from lower grade gliomas. This prospective study included 23 patients with pathologically confirmed gliomas. All of the patients underwent FMISO PET and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET within a week. FMISO images were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 400 MBq of FMISO. Tracer uptake in the tumor was visually assessed. Lesion to normal tissue ratios and FMISO uptake volume were calculated. Of the 23 glioma patients, 14 were diagnosed as having GBM (grade IV glioma in the 2007 WHO classification), and the others were diagnosed as having non-GBM (5 grade III and 4 grade II). In visual assessment, all GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor greater than that in the surrounding brain tissues, whereas all the non-GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor equal to that in the surrounding brain tissues (p {<=} 0.001). One GBM patient was excluded from FDG PET study because of hyperglycemia. All GBM patients and three of the nine (33%) non-GBM patients showed FDG uptake greater than or equal to that in the gray matter. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing GBM were 100 and 100% for FMISO, and 100 and 66% for FDG, respectively. The lesion to cerebellum ratio of FMISO uptake was higher in GBM patients (2.74 {+-} 0.60, range 1.71-3.81) than in non-GBM patients (1.22 {+-} 0.06, range 1.09-1.29, p {<=} 0.001) with no overlap between the groups. The lesion to gray matter ratio of FDG was also

  5. Maintenance of EGFR and EGFRvIII expressions in an in vivo and in vitro model of human glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Broholm, Helle; Villingshøj, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common, and most aggressive primary brain tumor among adults. A vast majority of the tumors express high levels of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a consequence of gene amplification. Furthermore, gene amplification is often associated...... with mutation of EGFR, and the constitutive activated deletion variant EGFRvIII is the most common EGFR mutation found in GBM. Activated EGFR signaling, through overexpression and/or mutation, is involved in increased tumorigenic potential. As such, EGFR is an attractive target for GBM therapy. However......, clinical studies with EGFR inhibitors have shown inconsistent results, and as such, further knowledge regarding the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII in GBM is needed. For this, an appropriate in vivo/in vitro tumor model is required. Here, we report the establishment of an experimental GBM model in which...

  6. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Chadha, M. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1994-12-31

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report.

  7. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L.; Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report

  8. Bilateral posterior RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, Stefanie; Prox-Vagedes, Vanessa; Elolf, Erck; Brueggemann, Ines; Gademann, Guenther; Galazky, Imke; Bartels, Claudius

    2010-01-01

    Radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) is a rare but severe consequence of radiation therapy that is associated with adjuvant chemotherapy, specifically therapy with vincristine or nitrosoureas. However, there is very little evidence regarding the occurrence of RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide. The case of a 63 year old woman with glioblastoma multiforme and concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide is described. Due to a slight depressive episode the patient also took hypericum perforatum. Five months after cessation of fractionated radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (cumulative dose of 11040 mg) the patient developed bilateral amaurosis due to RION. Tumor regrowth was excluded by magnetic resonance imaging. After the application of gadolinium a pathognomonic contrast enhancement of both prechiasmatic optic nerves could be observed. In this patient, the occurrence of RION may have been the result of radiosensitization by temozolomide, which could have been strengthened by hypericin. Consequently, physicians should avoid a concomitant application of hypericum perforatum and radiochemotherapy

  9. The use of positron emission tomography in BNCT treatment planning for metastatic malignant melanoma and glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabalka, G.; Nichols, T.; Smith, G.; Miller, L.; Kahn, M.

    2000-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) evaluations of six glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and one metastatic melanoma (MM) patient have been carried out utilizing fluorine-18 labeled p-boronophenylalanine. Four of the GBM patients were imaged both prior to and post BNCT. In one GBM patient, biopsy derived boron distribution data compared favorably to the PET derived data. The PET data have been used as input to dosimetry calculations and the results vary from those obtained using current protocols. In addition, PET images of the thorax would indicate that the utility of PET for staging tumors for BNCT may extend beyond the brain. However, higher than anticipated levels of activity in the lungs (as also seen in salivary glands) indicate the more effective BNCT agents will be required. (author)

  10. Connection between cell phone use, p53 gene expression in different zones of glioblastoma multiforme and survival prognoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akhavan-Sigari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate p53 gene expression in the central and peripheral zones of glioblastoma multiforme using a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technique in patients who use cell phones ≥3 hours a day and determine its relationship to clinicopathological findings and overall survival. Sixty-three patients (38 males and 25 females, diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, underwent tumor resection between 2008 and 2011. Patient ages ranged from 25 to 88 years, with a mean age of 55. The levels of expression of p53 in the central and peripheral zone of the GBM were quantified by RT-PCR. Data on p53 gene expression from the central and peripheral zone, the related malignancy and the clinicopatholagical findings (age, gender, tumor location and size, as well as overall survival, were analyzed. Forty-one out of 63 patients (65% with the highest level of cell phone use (≥3 hours/day had higher mutant type p53 expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.034. Results from the present study on the use of mobile phones for ≥3 hours a day show a consistent pattern of increased risk for the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma, and that this increase was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival time. The risk was not higher for ipsilateral exposure. We found that the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma was increased in 65% of patients using cell phones ≥3 hours a day.

  11. Characterization of efficacy and toxicity after high-dose pelvic reirradiation with palliative intent for genitourinary second malignant neoplasms or local recurrences after full-dose radiation therapy in the pelvis: A high-volume cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia C. Kamran, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: This small series suggests that aggressive re-RT of inoperable and symptomatic GU malignancies that is undertaken with meticulous treatment planning is well tolerated and provides excellent, durable relief without undue short-term toxicity. Validation in a larger prospective cohort is required.

  12. Initial care and outcome of glioblastoma multiforme patients in 2 diverse health care scenarios in Brazil: does public versus private health care matter?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Luiz Victor Maia; Pontes, Lucíola de Barros; Callegaro-Filho, Donato; Koch, Ludmila de Oliveira; Weltman, Eduardo; Victor, Elivane da Silva; Santos, Adrialdo José; Borges, Lia Raquel Rodrigues; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Malheiros, Suzana Maria Fleury

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological and survival features of patients with glioblastoma multiforme treated in 2 health care scenarios--public and private--in Brazil. We retrospectively analyzed clinical, treatment, and outcome characteristics of glioblastoma multiforme patients from 2003 to 2011 at 2 institutions. The median age of the 171 patients (117 public and 54 private) was 59.3 years (range, 18-84). The median survival for patients treated in private institutions was 17.4 months (95% confidence interval, 11.1-23.7) compared with 7.1 months (95% confidence interval, 3.8-10.4) for patients treated in public institutions (P public setting (median of 64 days for the public hospital and 31 days for the private institution; P = .003). The patients at the private hospital received radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy in 59.3% of cases; at the public hospital, only 21.4% (P Brazil is critical.

  13. Andrographolide suppresses the migratory ability of human glioblastoma multiforme cells by targeting ERK1/2-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shih-Liang; Kuo, Fu-Hsuan; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Yu, Nuo-Yi; Yang, Wei-En; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can be a fatal tumor because of difficulties in treating the related metastasis. Andrographolide is the bioactive component of the Andrographis paniculata. Andrographolide possesses the anti-inflammatory activity and inhibits the growth of various cancers; however, its effect on GBM cancer motility remains largely unknown. In this study, we examined the antimetastatic properties of andrographolide in human GBM cells. Our results revealed that andrographolide inhi...

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis brain abscess mimicking meningitis after surgery for glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, L?a; Dubourg, Gr?gory; Graillon, Thomas; Honnorat, Estelle; Lepidi, Hubert; Drancourt, Michel; Seng, Piseth; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Salmonella brain abscess associated with brain tumor is rare. Only 11 cases have been reported to date. Here we report a case of brain abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mimicking post-surgical meningitis in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Case presentation A 60-year-old Algerian woman was admitted through an emergency department for a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting, and behavioral disorders. Surgery for cerebral tumor excision was per...

  15. The effect of GABA A receptor antagonist - bicucullin - administration on the number of multiform neurons in the brain parabrachial nucleus due to pain induction of adult male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Kamali

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim:  A lot of biological investigations are aimed to find pain decreasing or relieving substances that appear in various diseases. Parabrachial nucleus plays an important role in cognitive and emotional aspects of pain. The present study was designed to evaluate the inhibitory effect of bicuculine- as a GABA A receptor antagonist- on the number of multiform neurons in Parabrachial region of adult male rats in tonic pain model. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was carried out on 40 Wistar male rats. Based on the pain induction, the animals were divided into 8 groups (n=5. Bicuculine was administrated in doses of  50, 100, and 200 ng/rat.  Using stereotaxic method, Bicuculine was administrated to the rats` brain parabrachial area. The present study utilized Formalin test as a standard method for pain stimulations. Thereafter, Gimsa staining method was applied for histological determination of multiform cells. The obtained data was analyzed using statistical testsincluding Student-t and  one-way ANOVA. Results: Our data showed no significant changes in the number of multiform cells in Parabrachial nucleus between the animals administrated by bicuculine at the dose of 50   compared  with the controls (P>0.05. Nevertheless, the number of these cells was decreased significantly in the animals administrated by bicuculine at the doses of 100 and 200   when compared to the controls (p<0.05. Conclusion:  It was found that nociceptive stimulations cause changes in the number of multiform neurons in para- brachial nucleus. Nevertheless, higher dose administration of GABA A receptor antagonist has preventive effects on neuronal dysmorphogenesis at this brain area.

  16. Correlação clínico-topográfica em glioblastomas multiformes nas síndromes motoras: significados fisiopatológicos Clinical topographic findings in glioblastoma multiforme and the relation with motor impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia G. Lucena

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O glioblastoma multiforme (GBM é o tumor glial com maior grau de malignidade. Acomete principalmente os hemisférios cerebrais apresentando sintomas e sinais focais ou gerais, relacionados ao tamanho, localização e taxa de crescimento tumoral. OBJETIVO: Analisar a relação do déficit motor com a topografia do GBM. MÉTODO: Foram estudados 43 casos de GBM, referidos quanto à idade, sexo, localização e a síndrome motora. RESULTADOS: O tumor predominou em adultos (média de 55 anos, sexo masculino (55,82%, localização frontal (aproximadamente 40%. A hemiparesia prevaleceu como distúrbio motor, somente não ocorrendo em 2 casos de lesão frontal, 2 temporais, 1 parietal, 1 occipital e 1 fronto-temporal. CONCLUSÃO: Os achados clínico-topográficos favorecem os efeitos infiltrativos (lesões extensas como responsáveis pela síndrome motora em detrimento aos efeitos compressivos (lesões localizadas.Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the glial tumor with the highest grade of malignity. It mainly affects the cerebral hemispheres, presenting general or focal signs and symptoms, which depend on the size, the location of the lesion and rate of growth of the tumor. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between motor impairment and GBM topography. METHOD: We studied 43 cases of GBM, related to the age, gender, localization and motor impairment. RESULTS: The occurrence of the tumor was preponderant in adults (mean age 55 years old, men (55.82%, and frontal lobe (approximately 40%. The principal motor impairment was hemiparesis, with the exception of 2 cases in the frontal lobe, 2 temporal, 1 parietal, 1 occipital and 1 frontotemporal. CONCLUSION: The clinical-topographic findings lead to consider the infiltrative effects (broad lesions are responsible for the motor impairment rather than compressive effects (located lesions.

  17. Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) online resource provides high quality chemical structures and annotations in association with toxicity data....

  18. Collective Efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ying; Zhou, Xiaohu; Klyver, Kim

    2018-01-01

    at manufacturing companies show that benevolent leadership and moral leadership, both components of paternalistic leadership, are positively related to organizational commitment and further that collective efficacy mediates the moral leadership–organizational commitment relationship. We did not find a relationship...... between authoritarian leadership and organizational commitment. Besides, it was found that team cohesion negatively moderates the relationship between moral leadership and collective efficacy and positively moderates the relationship between collective efficacy and organizational commitment. Explanations......Based on social cognitive theory, we theorize that collective efficacy plays a mediating role in the relationship between paternalistic leadership and organizational commitment and that this mediating role depends on team cohesion. The empirical results from a study of 238 employees from 52 teams...

  19. Graphene nanoribbons as a drug delivery agent for lucanthone mediated therapy of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Surhland, Cassandra; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Suresh Kumar, M A; Lee, Stephen; Peña, Louis A; Waring, Michael; Sitharaman, Balaji; Naidu, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    We report use of PEG-DSPE coated oxidized graphene nanoribbons (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) as agent for delivery of anti-tumor drug Lucanthone (Luc) into Glioblastoma Multiformae (GBM) cells targeting base excision repair enzyme APE-1 (Apurinic endonuclease-1). Lucanthone, an endonuclease inhibitor of APE-1, was loaded onto O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs using a simple non-covalent method. We found its uptake by GBM cell line U251 exceeding 67% and 60% in APE-1-overexpressing U251, post 24h. However, their uptake was ~38% and 29% by MCF-7 and rat glial progenitor cells (CG-4), respectively. TEM analysis of U251 showed large aggregates of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE in vesicles. Luc-O-GNR-PEG-DSPE was significantly toxic to U251 but showed little/no toxicity when exposed to MCF-7/CG-4 cells. This differential uptake effect can be exploited to use O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs as a vehicle for Luc delivery to GBM, while reducing nonspecific cytotoxicity to the surrounding healthy tissue. Cell death in U251 was necrotic, probably due to oxidative degradation of APE-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A case of toxic epidermal necrolysis initially affecting the skin site of radiation therapy for an intra-cranial post-transplantation lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanoue, Toshihide; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Fukushima, Satoshi; Wakasugi, Syoji; Ono, Tomomichi; Yoshida, Shinsuke; Kouchi, Masato; Nishi, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of post-transplantation lymphoma (intra-cranial EBV-related malignant lymphoma) who developed toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) during concomitant phenobarbital administration and radiotherapy. The erythema exsudativum multiforme-like eruption first appeared on the site of radiation and extended to approximately 35% of the body surface. After stopping radiation therapy and all medications, including immunosuppressant, anticonvulsant, and diuretic drugs, treatment was successfully administered by systemic corticosteroids including semi-pulse therapy (500 mg of methylpredonisolone sodium succinate for 3 days). (author)

  1. Graphene Functionalized with Arginine Decreases the Development of Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor in a Gene-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sawosz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies revealed that graphene had anticancer properties in experiments in vitro with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cells and in tumors cultured in vivo. We hypothesized that the addition of arginine or proline to graphene solutions might counteract graphene agglomeration and increase the activity of graphene. Experiments were performed in vitro with GBM U87 cells and in vivo with GBM tumors cultured on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes. The measurements included cell morphology, mortality, viability, tumor morphology, histology, and gene expression. The cells and tumors were treated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO and rGO functionalized with arginine (rGO + Arg or proline (rGO + Pro. The results confirmed the anticancer effect of graphene on GBM cells and tumor tissue. After functionalization with amino acids, nanoparticles were distributed more specifically, and the flakes of graphene were less agglomerated. The molecule of rGO + Arg did not increase the expression of TP53 in comparison to rGO, but did not increase the expression of MDM2 or the MDM2/TP53 ratio in the tumor, suggesting that arginine may block MDM2 expression. The expression of NQO1, known to be a strong protector of p53 protein in tumor tissue, was greatly increased. The results indicate that the complex of rGO + Arg has potential in GBM therapy.

  2. Establishment and Biological Characterization of a Panel of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and GBM Variant Oncosphere Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Zev A; Wilson, Kelli M; Salmasi, Vafi; Orr, Brent A; Eberhart, Charles G; Siu, I-Mei; Lim, Michael; Weingart, Jon D; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bettegowda, Chetan; Kassam, Amin B; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Riggins, Gregory J; Gallia, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Human tumor cell lines form the basis of the majority of present day laboratory cancer research. These models are vital to studying the molecular biology of tumors and preclinical testing of new therapies. When compared to traditional adherent cell lines, suspension cell lines recapitulate the genetic profiles and histologic features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with higher fidelity. Using a modified neural stem cell culture technique, here we report the characterization of GBM cell lines including GBM variants. Tumor tissue samples were obtained intra-operatively and cultured in neural stem cell conditions containing growth factors. Tumor lines were characterized in vitro using differentiation assays followed by immunostaining for lineage-specific markers. In vivo tumor formation was assayed by orthotopic injection in nude mice. Genetic uniqueness was confirmed via short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling. Thirteen oncosphere lines derived from GBM and GBM variants, including a GBM with PNET features and a GBM with oligodendroglioma component, were established. All unique lines showed distinct genetic profiles by STR profiling. The lines assayed demonstrated a range of in vitro growth rates. Multipotency was confirmed using in vitro differentiation. Tumor formation demonstrated histologic features consistent with high grade gliomas, including invasion, necrosis, abnormal vascularization, and high mitotic rate. Xenografts derived from the GBM variants maintained histopathological features of the primary tumors. We have generated and characterized GBM suspension lines derived from patients with GBMs and GBM variants. These oncosphere cell lines will expand the resources available for preclinical study.

  3. The effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on proliferation and apoptosis of in ovo cultured glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbańska, Kaja; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz; Sokołowska, Justyna; Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Szmidt, Maciej; Sysa, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) provide a unique approach to the treatment of tumors, especially those of neuroepithelial origin. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of AgNPs on proliferation and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells cultured in an in ovo model. Human GBM cells, line U-87, were placed on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane. After 8 days, the tumors were divided into three groups: control (non-treated), treated with colloidal AgNPs (40 μg/ml), and placebo (tumors supplemented with vehicle only). At the end of the experiment, all tumors were isolated. Assessment of cell proliferation and cell apoptosis was estimated by histological, immunohistochemical, and Western blot analyses. The results show that AgNPs can influence GBM growth. AgNPs inhibit proliferation of GBM cells and seem to have proapoptotic properties. Although there were statistically significant differences between control and AgNP groups in the AI and the levels of active caspase 9 and active caspase 3, the level of these proteins in GBM cells treated with AgNPs seems to be on the border between the spontaneous apoptosis and the induced. Our results indicate that the antiproliferative properties of silver nanoparticles overwhelm proapoptotic ones. Further research focused on the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs on tumor and normal cells should be conducted.

  4. In vivo bioluminescence imaging validation of a human biopsy-derived orthotopic mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzabek, Monika A; Huszthy, Peter C; Skaftnesmo, Kai O; McCormack, Emmet; Dicker, Patrick; Prehn, Jochen H M; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Byrne, Annette T

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive brain malignancy, is characterized by extensive cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, and single-cell infiltration into the brain. We have previously shown that a xenograft model based on serial xenotransplantation of human biopsy spheroids in immunodeficient rodents maintains the genotype and phenotype of the original patient tumor. The present work further extends this model for optical assessment of tumor engraftment and growth using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). A method for successful lentiviral transduction of the firefly luciferase gene into multicellular spheroids was developed and implemented to generate optically active patient tumor cells. Luciferase-expressing spheroids were injected into the brains of immunodeficient mice. BLI photon counts and tumor volumes from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were correlated. Luciferase-expressing tumors recapitulated the histopathologic hallmarks of human GBMs and showed proliferation rates and microvessel density counts similar to those of wild-type xenografts. Moreover, we detected widespread invasion of luciferase-positive tumor cells in the mouse brains. Herein we describe a novel optically active model of GBM that closely mimics human pathology with respect to invasion, angiogenesis, and proliferation indices. The model may thus be routinely used for the assessment of novel anti-GBM therapeutic approaches implementing well-established and cost-effective optical imaging strategies.

  5. DNM3, p65 and p53 from exosomes represent potential clinical diagnosis markers for glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-kai; Song, Jian; Huo, Hao-ran; Zhao, Yin-long; Zhang, Guang-yu; Zhao, Zong-mao; Sun, Guo-zhu; Jiao, Bao-hua

    2017-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and deadly primary brain cancer that arises from astrocytes and classified as grade IV. Recently, exosomes have been reported as an essential mediator in diverse cancer carcinogenesis and metastasis. However, their role in GBM is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether blood exosomes can be potential clinical diagnostic markers for GBM. Methods: We used a xenograft orthotopic mouse model to detect the differentially expressed genes in the brain and blood exosomes of original/recurrent GBM. Results: We found that recurrent GBM had stronger growth capacity and lethality than original GBM in the mouse model. A gene microarray of original tumors and blood exosomes from GBM orthotopic xenografts results showed that DNM3, p65 and CD117 expressions increased, whereas PTEN and p53 expressions decreased in both original tumors and blood exosomes. In the recurrent GBM tumor model, DNM3 and p65 showed increased expressions, whereas ST14 and p53 showed decreased expressions in tumor and blood exosomes of the recurrent GBM mouse model. Conclusion: In summary, we found that DNM3, p65 and p53 had a similar trend in brain and blood exosomes both for original and recurrent GBM, and could serve as potential clinical diagnostic markers for GBM. PMID:29449895

  6. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging Validation of a Human Biopsy–Derived Orthotopic Mouse Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika A. Jarzabek

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive brain malignancy, is characterized by extensive cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, and single-cell infiltration into the brain. We have previously shown that a xenograft model based on serial xenotransplantation of human biopsy spheroids in immunodeficient rodents maintains the genotype and phenotype of the original patient tumor. The present work further extends this model for optical assessment of tumor engraftment and growth using bioluminescence imaging (BLI. A method for successful lentiviral transduction of the firefly luciferase gene into multicellular spheroids was developed and implemented to generate optically active patient tumor cells. Luciferase-expressing spheroids were injected into the brains of immunodeficient mice. BLI photon counts and tumor volumes from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were correlated. Luciferase-expressing tumors recapitulated the histopathologic hallmarks of human GBMs and showed proliferation rates and microvessel density counts similar to those of wild-type xenografts. Moreover, we detected widespread invasion of luciferase-positive tumor cells in the mouse brains. Herein we describe a novel optically active model of GBM that closely mimics human pathology with respect to invasion, angiogenesis, and proliferation indices. The model may thus be routinely used for the assessment of novel anti-GBM therapeutic approaches implementing well-established and cost-effective optical imaging strategies.

  7. Stereotactic intracranial implantation and in vivo bioluminescent imaging of tumor xenografts in a mouse model system of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Brian C; Dorsey, Jay F; Benci, Joseph L; Joh, Daniel Y; Kao, Gary D

    2012-09-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a high-grade primary brain cancer with a median survival of only 14.6 months in humans despite standard tri-modality treatment consisting of surgical resection, post-operative radiation therapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. New therapeutic approaches are clearly needed to improve patient survival and quality of life. The development of more effective treatment strategies would be aided by animal models of GBM that recapitulate human disease yet allow serial imaging to monitor tumor growth and treatment response. In this paper, we describe our technique for the precise stereotactic implantation of bio-imageable GBM cancer cells into the brains of nude mice resulting in tumor xenografts that recapitulate key clinical features of GBM. This method yields tumors that are reproducible and are located in precise anatomic locations while allowing in vivo bioluminescent imaging to serially monitor intracranial xenograft growth and response to treatments. This method is also well-tolerated by the animals with low perioperative morbidity and mortality.

  8. Nitric oxide released from JS-K induces cell death by mitotic catastrophe as part of necrosis in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günzle, Jessica; Osterberg, Nadja; Saavedra, Joseph E; Weyerbrock, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) donor JS-K is specifically activated by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in GST-overexpressing cells. We have shown the induction of cell death in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells at high JS-K doses but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether NO-induced cell death is triggered by induction of apoptotic or necrotic pathways. For the first time, we demonstrate that NO induces cell death via mitotic catastrophe (MC) with non-apoptotic mechanisms in GBM cells. Moreover, the level of morphological changes indicating MC correlates with increased necrosis. Therefore, we conclude that MC is the main mechanism by which GBM cells undergo cell death after treatment with JS-K associated with necrosis rather than apoptosis. In addition, we show that PARP1 is not an exclusive marker for late apoptosis but is also involved in MC. Activating an alternative way of cell death can be useful for the multimodal cancer therapy of GBM known for its strong anti-apoptotic mechanisms and drug resistance.

  9. Graphene Functionalized with Arginine Decreases the Development of Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor in a Gene-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Vadalasetty, Krishna Prasad; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Hotowy, Anna; Lipińska, Ludwika; Jagiełło, Joanna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that graphene had anticancer properties in experiments in vitro with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells and in tumors cultured in vivo. We hypothesized that the addition of arginine or proline to graphene solutions might counteract graphene agglomeration and increase the activity of graphene. Experiments were performed in vitro with GBM U87 cells and in vivo with GBM tumors cultured on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes. The measurements included cell morphology, mortality, viability, tumor morphology, histology, and gene expression. The cells and tumors were treated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and rGO functionalized with arginine (rGO + Arg) or proline (rGO + Pro). The results confirmed the anticancer effect of graphene on GBM cells and tumor tissue. After functionalization with amino acids, nanoparticles were distributed more specifically, and the flakes of graphene were less agglomerated. The molecule of rGO + Arg did not increase the expression of TP53 in comparison to rGO, but did not increase the expression of MDM2 or the MDM2/TP53 ratio in the tumor, suggesting that arginine may block MDM2 expression. The expression of NQO1, known to be a strong protector of p53 protein in tumor tissue, was greatly increased. The results indicate that the complex of rGO + Arg has potential in GBM therapy. PMID:26512645

  10. FNAB cytology of extra-cranial metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme may resemble a lung primary: A diagnostic pitfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dincer HE

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As extra-cranial metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is rare, it may create a diagnostic dilemma especially during interpretation of fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB cytology. Case presentation We present transbronchial FNAB findings in a 62-year-old smoker with lung mass clinically suspicious for a lung primary. The smears of transbronchial FNAB showed groups of cells with ill-defined cell margins and cytological features overlapping with poorly differentiated non-small cell carcinoma. The tumor cells demonstrated lack of immunoreactivity for cytokeratin, thyroid transcription factor-1, and usual neuroendocrine markers, synaptophysin and chromogranin in formalin-fixed cellblock sections. However, they were immunoreactive for the other neuroendocrine immunomarker, CD56, suggesting neural nature of the cells. Further scrutiny of clinical details revealed a history of GBM, 13 months status-post surgical excision with radiation therapy and systemic chemotherapy. The tumor recurred 7 months earlier and was debulked surgically and with intra-cranial chemotherapy. Additional evaluation of tumor cells for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP immunoreactivity with clinical details resulted in final interpretation of metastatic GBM. Conclusion Lack of clinical history and immunophenotyping may lead to a diagnostic pitfall with possible misinterpretation of metastatic GBM as poorly differentiated non-small cell carcinoma of lung in a smoker.

  11. What is the value of emission tomography studies in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated by 192Ir brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koot, R.W.; Bosch, D.A.; Habraken, J.B.A.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Paans, A.M.J.; Pruim, J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the use of 201 thallium SPECT and L-[1- 11 C]-tyrosine PET in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated with 192 Ir brachytherapy after surgery and external beam radiation therapy. We hypothesised that the patients most likely to benefit from further surgery after deterioration would be those with radiation necrosis and would be recognised by a negative emission tomography scan. Twenty-one patients underwent 201 thallium SPECT performed before brachytherapy, and this was repeated in 19 patients when recurrence was suspected. Nine patients also underwent a PET scan at the same time. Nine patients underwent a second operation. SPECT and PET were highly concordant concerning the prediction of radionecrosis and/or tumor recurrence. Repeat surgery did not lead to a significant increase in survival. There was no significant association between the duration of survival and tumor-to-background ratio but the number studied was small. Both SPECT and PET showed highly active lesions, which were proved to be recurrent tumor by clinical and histological follow-up. Although PET and SPECT are both highly sensitive in detecting active tumor tissue, emission tomography was not clinically valuable in the investigation of patients with a primary glioblastoma treated with brachytherapy. (author)

  12. Bilateral posterior RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme: a case report

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    Gademann Guenther

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION is a rare but severe consequence of radiation therapy that is associated with adjuvant chemotherapy, specifically therapy with vincristine or nitrosoureas. However, there is very little evidence regarding the occurrence of RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide. Case Presentation The case of a 63 year old woman with glioblastoma multiforme and concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide is described. Due to a slight depressive episode the patient also took hypericum perforatum. Five months after cessation of fractionated radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (cumulative dose of 11040 mg the patient developed bilateral amaurosis due to RION. Tumor regrowth was excluded by magnetic resonance imaging. After the application of gadolinium a pathognomonic contrast enhancement of both prechiasmatic optic nerves could be observed. Conclusions In this patient, the occurrence of RION may have been the result of radiosensitization by temozolomide, which could have been strengthened by hypericin. Consequently, physicians should avoid a concomitant application of hypericum perforatum and radiochemotherapy.

  13. 18F-Fluorothymidine-Pet Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme: Effects of Radiation Therapy on Radiotracer Uptake and Molecular Biomarker Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. PET imaging is a useful clinical tool for studying tumor progression and treatment effects. Conventional 18F-FDG-PET imaging is of limited usefulness for imaging Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM due to high levels of glucose uptake by normal brain and the resultant signal-to-noise intensity. 18F-Fluorothymidine (FLT in contrast has shown promise for imaging GBM, as thymidine is taken up preferentially by proliferating cells. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of 18F-FLT-PET in a GBM mouse model, especially after radiation therapy (RT, and its correlation with useful biomarkers, including proliferation and DNA damage. Methods. Nude/athymic mice with human GBM orthografts were assessed by microPET imaging with 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT. Patterns of tumor PET imaging were then compared to immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for markers of proliferation (Ki-67, DNA damage and repair (γH2AX, hypoxia (HIF-1α, and angiogenesis (VEGF. Results. We confirmed that 18F-FLT-PET uptake is limited in healthy mice but enhanced in the intracranial tumors. Our data further demonstrate that 18F-FLT-PET imaging usefully reflects the inhibition of tumor by RT and correlates with changes in biomarker expression. Conclusions. 18F-FLT-PET imaging is a promising tumor imaging modality for GBM, including assessing RT effects and biologically relevant biomarkers.

  14. A phase I/II trial of hydroxychloroquine in conjunction with radiation therapy and concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Ye, Xiaobu; Supko, Jeffrey G; Desideri, Serena; Grossman, Stuart A; Brem, Steven; Mikkelson, Tom; Wang, Daniel; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; McAfee, Quentin; Fisher, Joy; Troxel, Andrea B; Piao, Shengfu; Heitjan, Daniel F; Tan, Kay-See; Pontiggia, Laura; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Davis, Lisa E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can augment the efficacy of DNA-damaging therapy. The primary objective of this trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of HCQ in combination with radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GB). A 3 + 3 phase I trial design followed by a noncomparative phase II study was conducted in GB patients after initial resection. Patients received HCQ (200 to 800 mg oral daily) with RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Quantitative electron microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess changes in autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling enabled PK-pharmacodynamic correlations. Sixteen phase I subjects were evaluable for dose-limiting toxicities. At 800 mg HCQ/d, 3/3 subjects experienced Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, 1 with sepsis. HCQ 600 mg/d was found to be the MTD in this combination. The phase II cohort (n = 76) had a median survival of 15.6 mos with survival rates at 12, 18, and 24 mo of 70%, 36%, and 25%. PK analysis indicated dose-proportional exposure for HCQ. Significant therapy-associated increases in AV and LC3-II were observed in PBMC and correlated with higher HCQ exposure. These data establish that autophagy inhibition is achievable with HCQ, but dose-limiting toxicity prevented escalation to higher doses of HCQ. At HCQ 600 mg/d, autophagy inhibition was not consistently achieved in patients treated with this regimen, and no significant improvement in overall survival was observed. Therefore, a definitive test of the role of autophagy inhibition in the adjuvant setting for glioma patients awaits the development of lower-toxicity compounds that can achieve more consistent inhibition of autophagy than HCQ.

  15. Concurrent bevacizumab and temozolomide alter the patterns of failure in radiation treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, Lisa BE; Kadner, Robert; Vitaz, Todd W; Spalding, Aaron C

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the pattern of failure in glioblastoma multiforma (GBM) patients treated with concurrent radiation, bevacizumab (BEV), and temozolomide (TMZ). Previous studies demonstrated a predominantly in-field pattern of failure for GBM patients not treated with concurrent BEV. We reviewed the treatment of 23 patients with GBM who received 30 fractions of simultaneous integrated boost IMRT. PTV60 received 2 Gy daily to the tumor bed or residual tumor while PTV54 received 1.8 Gy daily to the surrounding edema. Concurrent TMZ (75 mg/m 2 ) daily and BEV (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) were given during radiation therapy. One month after RT completion, adjuvant TMZ (150 mg/m 2 × 5 days) and BEV were delivered monthly until progression or 12 months total. With a median follow-up of 12 months, the median disease-free and overall survival were not reached. Four patients discontinued therapy due to toxicity for the following reasons: bone marrow suppression (2), craniotomy wound infection (1), and pulmonary embolus (1). Five patients had grade 2 or 3 hypertension managed by oral medications. Of the 12 patients with tumor recurrence, 7 suffered distant failure with either subependymal (5/12; 41%) or deep white matter (2/12; 17%) spread detected on T2 FLAIR sequences. Five of 12 patients (41%) with a recurrence demonstrated evidence of GAD enhancement. The patterns of failure did not correlate with extent of resection or number of adjuvant cycles. Treatment of GBM patients with concurrent radiation, BEV, and TMZ was well tolerated in the current study. The majority of patients experienced an out-of-field pattern of failure with radiation, BEV, and TMZ which has not been previously reported. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether BEV alters the underlying tumor biology to improve survival. These data may indicate that the currently used clinical target volume thought to represent microscopic disease for radiation may not be appropriate in combination with TMZ

  16. Investigating Ceria Nanocrystals Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells and its Related Effects: An Electron Microscopy Study

    KAUST Repository

    Aloufi, Bader

    2017-01-22

    glioblastoma cells was achieved, with minimal toxicity to the healthy astrocyte cells.

  17. Phase II, two-arm RTOG trial (94-11) of bischloroethyl-nitrosourea plus accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (64.0 or 70.4 Gy) based on tumor volume (> 20 or ≤ 20 cm2, respectively) in the treatment of newly-diagnosed radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, C.; Scott, C.; Langer, C.; Coia, L.; Curran, W.; Rubin, P.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To compare survivorship, and acute and delayed toxicities following radiation therapy (RT) of radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with tumor volume-influenced, high-dose accelerated, hyperfractionated RT plus bischloroethyl-nitrosourea (BCNU), using prior RTOG malignant glioblastoma patients as historical controls. Methods and Materials: One hundred four of 108 patients accrued from June 1994 through May 1995 from 26 institutions were analyzable. Patients were histologically confirmed with GBM, and previously untreated. Treatment assignment (52 patients/arm) was based on tumor mass (TM), defined as the product of the maximum diameter and greatest perpendicular dimension of the titanium-gadolinium-enhanced postoperative MRI: Arm A, 64 Gy, TM > 20 cm 2 ; or Arm B, 70.4 Gy, TM ≤ 20 cm 2 . Both Arms A and B received BCNU (80 mg/m 2 , under hyperhydration) days 1-3, 56-58, then 4 cycles, each 8 weeks, for a total of 6 treatment series. Results: During the 24 months immediately post-treatment, the overall median survival was 9.1 months in Arm A (64 Gy) and 11.0 months in Arm B (70.4 Gy). Median survival in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class III/IV was 10.4 months in Arm A and 12.2 months in Arm B, while RPA Class V/VI was 7.6 months in Arm A and 6.1 months in Arm B. There were no grade 4 neurological toxicities in Arm A; 2 grade 4 neurological toxicities were observed in Arm B (1 motor deficit, 1 necrosis at 157 days post-treatment). Conclusion: This strategy of high-dose, accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy shortens overall RT treatment times while allowing dose escalation, and it provides the potential for combination with currently available, as well as newer, chemotherapy agents. Survival is comparable with previously published RTOG data, and toxicities are within acceptable limits.

  18. Toxicity alarm: Case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, D.; Retallack, J.

    1993-01-01

    In late fall 1991, the Novacor petrochemical plant near Joffre, Alberta experienced a toxicity alarm, the first since its startup 14 years ago. Fish exposed to a normal toxicity test were stressed within 2 h and showed 100% mortality after 24 h. A history of the events leading up to, during, and after the toxicity alarm is presented. The major effluent sources were three cooling water systems. Although these sources are well characterized, the event causes were not immediately clear. Initial toxic screening indicated that one was very toxic, another moderately toxic, and the third not toxic at all. All three systems utilized the same chemical treatment program to avoid fouling: stabilized phosphates with minor variants. The most toxic of the cooling systems operated at 10-12 cycles, had three chemicals for biocide control, and had three makeup streams. Toxic and nontoxic system characteristics were compared. An in-depth modified toxicity identification and evaluation program was then performed to identify and evaluate the cause of the toxicity alarm for future prevention. The most probable causes of toxicity were identified by elimination. The combination of high numbers of cycles, hydrocarbons in the makeup water, and bromine added as an antifoulant resulted in formation of aromatic bromamines which are capable of causing the toxic condition experienced. 2 tabs

  19. Toxic substances handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  20. hERG1 channels are overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme and modulate VEGF secretion in glioblastoma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, A; Becchetti, A; Restano-Cassulini, R; Polvani, S; Hofmann, G; Buccoliero, A M; Paglierani, M; Pollo, B; Taddei, G L; Gallina, P; Di Lorenzo, N; Franceschetti, S; Wanke, E; Arcangeli, A

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have led to considerable advancement in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the relentless cell growth and invasiveness of human gliomas. Partial understanding of these mechanisms has (1) improved the classification for gliomas, by identifying prognostic subgroups, and (2) pointed to novel potential therapeutic targets. Some classes of ion channels have turned out to be involved in the pathogenesis and malignancy of gliomas. We studied the expression and properties of K+ channels in primary cultures obtained from surgical specimens: human ether a gò-gò related (hERG)1 voltage-dependent K+ channels, which have been found to be overexpressed in various human cancers, and human ether a gò-gò-like 2 channels, that share many of hERG1's biophysical features. The expression pattern of these two channels was compared to that of the classical inward rectifying K+ channels, IRK, that are widely expressed in astrocytic cells and classically considered a marker of astrocytic differentiation. In our study, hERG1 was found to be specifically overexpressed in high-grade astrocytomas, that is, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In addition, we present evidence that, in GBM cell lines, hERG1 channel activity actively contributes to malignancy by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor secretion, thus stimulating the neoangiogenesis typical of high-grade gliomas. Our data provide important confirmation for studies proposing the hERG1 channel as a molecular marker of tumour progression and a possible target for novel anticancer therapies. PMID:16175187

  1. Tumor-associated macrophages in glioblastoma multiforme-a suitable target for somatostatin receptor-based imaging and therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Lapa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN',N″,N'″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM.15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68, proliferative activity (Ki67 as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry.The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from 50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns.SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies are less promising in GBM.

  2. Differentiation of solitary brain metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme: a predictive multiparametric approach using combined MR diffusion and perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Adam Herman; Moser, Franklin G.; Maya, Marcel [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Erly, William; Nael, Kambiz [University of Arizona Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Solitary brain metastasis (MET) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can appear similar on conventional MRI. The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion-weighted biomarkers that can differentiate MET from GBM. In this retrospective study, patients were included if they met the following criteria: underwent resection of a solitary enhancing brain tumor and had preoperative 3.0 T MRI encompassing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE), and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion. Using co-registered images, voxel-based fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), K{sup trans}, and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were obtained in the enhancing tumor and non-enhancing peritumoral T2 hyperintense region (NET2). Data were analyzed by logistic regression and analysis of variance. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter/s and threshold for predicting of GBM vs. MET. Twenty-three patients (14 M, age 32-78 years old) met our inclusion criteria. Pathology revealed 13 GBMs and 10 METs. In the enhancing tumor, rCBV, K{sup trans}, and FA were higher in GBM, whereas MD was lower, neither without statistical significance. In the NET2, rCBV was significantly higher (p = 0.05) in GBM, but MD was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in GBM. FA and K{sup trans} were higher in GBM, though not reaching significance. The best discriminative power was obtained in NET2 from a combination of rCBV, FA, and MD, resulting in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. The combination of MR diffusion and perfusion matrices in NET2 can help differentiate GBM over solitary MET with diagnostic accuracy of 98 %. (orig.)

  3. Differentiation of solitary brain metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme: a predictive multiparametric approach using combined MR diffusion and perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Adam Herman; Moser, Franklin G.; Maya, Marcel; Erly, William; Nael, Kambiz

    2015-01-01

    Solitary brain metastasis (MET) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can appear similar on conventional MRI. The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion-weighted biomarkers that can differentiate MET from GBM. In this retrospective study, patients were included if they met the following criteria: underwent resection of a solitary enhancing brain tumor and had preoperative 3.0 T MRI encompassing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE), and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion. Using co-registered images, voxel-based fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), K trans , and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were obtained in the enhancing tumor and non-enhancing peritumoral T2 hyperintense region (NET2). Data were analyzed by logistic regression and analysis of variance. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter/s and threshold for predicting of GBM vs. MET. Twenty-three patients (14 M, age 32-78 years old) met our inclusion criteria. Pathology revealed 13 GBMs and 10 METs. In the enhancing tumor, rCBV, K trans , and FA were higher in GBM, whereas MD was lower, neither without statistical significance. In the NET2, rCBV was significantly higher (p = 0.05) in GBM, but MD was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in GBM. FA and K trans were higher in GBM, though not reaching significance. The best discriminative power was obtained in NET2 from a combination of rCBV, FA, and MD, resulting in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. The combination of MR diffusion and perfusion matrices in NET2 can help differentiate GBM over solitary MET with diagnostic accuracy of 98 %. (orig.)

  4. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of 17-allyamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) loaded polymeric mixed micelles for glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vipin; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2013-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in human. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin (17-AAG) is an inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). The highly lipophilic nature and selective targeting of tumor cells makes 17-AAG a promising candidate for therapy of GBMs but poor water solubility, short biological half-life and hepatotoxicity limited its clinical use. Polymeric mixed micelles composed of Pluronic® P-123 and F-127 (2:1 (w/w)) containing 17-AAG were prepared and characterized. Cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of the prepared micelles were determined in U87MG human glioblastoma cells. The particle size of 17-AAG loaded Pluronic(®) P-123 and F-127 mixed micelles was 22.2 ± 0.1 nm; drug loading was about 4.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) with 88.2 ± 3.1% (w/w) encapsulation efficiency. About 90% of drug was released from the nanoparticles over 8 days. Cellular uptake studies showed intracellular uptake of mixed micelles. Cytotoxicity study showed 5-fold increase (P AAG-loaded mixed micelles to free 17-AAG. Due to their targeting ability, size, high drug loading and controlled release behavior, 17-AAG loaded Pluronic(®) P-123 and F-127 mixed micelles might be developed as a delivery system for GBM treatment. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Early post-treatment pseudo-progression amongst glioblastoma multiforme patients treated with radiotherapy and temozolomide: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunjur, Ashray; Lau, Eddie; Taouk, Yamna; Ryan, Gail

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and impact of early post-chemoradiation (cRT) 'pseudoprogression' (PsPD) amongst glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with the current standard of care – 60 Gy conformal radiotherapy with concurrent low-dose temozolomide, followed by six cycles of high-dose temozolomide (the 'Stupp protocol'). Clinical notes and radiology reports for GBM patients treated as per the Stupp protocol were reviewed. PsPD was defined as apparent radiological progression on the first post-cRT scan, with further imaging within 3 months being stable or improving, while true early progression (ePD) was confirmed by continued progression in the subsequent 3 months following the first post-cRT scan. Of the 68 patients evaluated, 14 (21%) and 27 (40%) experienced PsPD and ePD, respectively; 3/14 (21%) patients experiencing PsPD and 14/27(52%), ePD were symptomatic for progression on first post-cRT follow-up (P = 0.096 for difference). Median survival for patients with ePD, PsPD and neither were 10.4, 27.4 and 13.0 months, respectively (P = 0.003 for ePD vs. PsPD, P = 0.19 for neither vs. PsPD groups). These data confirm a significant incidence of PsPD in post-cRT GBM patients, associated with improved median survival compared with those with neither ePD nor PsPD (not statistically significant). It appears likely that PsPD actually represents tumour response, conflicting with the traditional notion that increase in lesion size on contrast-enhanced imaging represents disease progression. Early post-cRT imaging should thus be interpreted with caution. Accompanying clinical symptoms are more commonly associated with ePD, but do not reliably distinguish PsPD from ePD.

  6. Activation of p53 by nutlin-3a induces apoptosis and cellular senescence in human glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Villalonga-Planells

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Despite concerted efforts to improve current therapies and develop novel clinical approaches, patient survival remains poor. As such, increasing attention has focused on developing new therapeutic strategies that specifically target the apoptotic pathway in order to improve treatment responses. Recently, nutlins, small-molecule antagonists of MDM2, have been developed to inhibit p53-MDM2 interaction and activate p53 signaling in cancer cells. Glioma cell lines and primary cultured glioblastoma cells were treated with nutlin-3a. Nutlin-3a induced p53-dependent G1- and G2-M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioma cell lines with normal TP53 status. In addition, nutlin-arrested glioma cells show morphological features of senescence and persistent induction of p21 protein. Furthermore, senescence induced by nutlin-3a might be depending on mTOR pathway activity. In wild-type TP53 primary cultured cells, exposure to nutlin-3a resulted in variable degrees of apoptosis as well as cellular features of senescence. Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis and senescence were firmly dependent on the presence of functional p53, as revealed by the fact that glioblastoma cells with knockdown p53 with specific siRNA, or cells with mutated or functionally impaired p53 pathway, were completely insensitive to the drug. Finally, we also found that nutlin-3a increased response of glioma cells to radiation therapy. The results provide a basis for the rational use of MDM2 antagonists as a novel treatment option for glioblastoma patients.

  7. The role of factor inhibiting HIF (FIH-1 in inhibiting HIF-1 transcriptional activity in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfeng Wang

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM accounts for about 38% of primary brain tumors in the United States. GBM is characterized by extensive angiogenesis induced by vascular growth factors and cytokines. The transcription of these growth factors and cytokines is regulated by the Hypoxia-Inducible-Factor-1(HIF-1, which is a key regulator mediating the cellular response to hypoxia. It is known that Factor Inhibiting HIF-1, or FIH-1, is also involved in the cellular response to hypoxia and has the capability to physically interact with HIF-1 and block its transcriptional activity under normoxic conditions. Delineation of the regulatory role of FIH-1 will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism responsible for tumor growth and progression and may lead to the design of new therapies targeting cellular pathways in response to hypoxia. Previous studies have shown that the chromosomal region of 10q24 containing the FIH-1 gene is often deleted in GBM, suggesting a role for the FIH-1 in GBM tumorigenesis and progression. In the current study, we found that FIH-1 is able to inhibit HIF-mediated transcription of GLUT1 and VEGF-A, even under hypoxic conditions in human glioblastoma cells. FIH-1 has been found to be more potent in inhibiting HIF function than PTEN. This observation points to the possibility that deletion of 10q23-24 and loss or decreased expression of FIH-1 gene may lead to a constitutive activation of HIF-1 activity, an alteration of HIF-1 targets such as GLUT-1 and VEGF-A, and may contribute to the survival of cancer cells in hypoxia and the development of hypervascularization observed in GBM. Therefore FIH-1 can be potential therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM patients with poor prognosis.

  8. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temozolomide chemotherapy may alter the patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Krishna; Chen, Changhu; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report the patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated on a phase II trial of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Patients with newly diagnosed GBM post-resection received postoperative hypo-IMRT to 60Gy in 10 fractions. TMZ was given concurrently at 75mg/m 2 /day for 28 consecutive days and adjuvantly at 150–200mg/m 2 /day for 5 days every 28 days. Radiographic failure was defined as any new T1-enhancing lesion or biopsy-confirmed progressive enhancement at the primary site. MRIs obtained at the time of failure were fused to original hypo-IMRT plans. Central, in-field, marginal and distant failure were defined as ≥95%, 80% to 95%, any to 80% and 0% of the volume of a recurrence receiving 60Gy, respectively. Twenty-four patients were treated on the trial. Median follow-up was 14.8 months (range 2.7–34.2). Seventeen of 24 patients experienced radiographic failure: one central, five in-field, two marginal, eight distant and one both in-field and distant. Two of the eight distant failures presented with leptomeningeal disease. Two other patients died without evidence of radiographic recurrence. Five of 24 patients demonstrated asymptomatic, gradually progressive in-field T1 enhancement, suggestive of post-treatment changes, without clear evidence of failure; three of these patients received a biopsy/second resection, with 100% radiation necrosis found. The median overall survival of this group was 33.0 months. A 60-Gy hypo-IMRT treatment delivered in 6-Gy fractions with TMZ altered the patterns of failure in GBM, with more distant failures.

  9. Establishment, maintenance and in vitro and in vivo applications of primary human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) xenograft models for translational biology studies and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Brett L; Pokorny, Jenny L; Schroeder, Mark A; Sarkaria, Jann N

    2011-03-01

    Development of clinically relevant tumor model systems for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is important for advancement of basic and translational biology. One model that has gained wide acceptance in the neuro-oncology community is the primary xenograft model. This model entails the engraftment of patient tumor specimens into the flank of nude mice and subsequent serial passage of these tumors in the flank of mice. These tumors are then used to establish short-term explant cultures or intracranial xenografts. This unit describes detailed procedures for establishment, maintenance, and utilization of a primary GBM xenograft panel for the purpose of using them as tumor models for basic or translational studies.

  10. Toxicity identification evaluations of produced-water effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, T.C.; Costa, H.J.; Brown, J.S.; Ward, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) were performed on 14 produced-water (PW) samples of various salinities from inland and offshore oil- and gas-production facilities operated by different companies in Wyoming, Texas, California, and Louisiana (USA) to evaluate the efficacy of TIE procedures in determining potential toxicants in PW effluents. The research involved acute (24- and 48-h) freshwater and marine toxicity tests on whole PW and PW fractions generated by standard US Environmental Protection Agency and PW-specific fractionation schemes. Factors influencing PW TIEs were investigated, such as the effect of salinity in selecting fractionation manipulations, the effect of toxicity test replication (i.e., reproducibility) in distinguishing changes in toxicities between whole PW and its fractions, and the suitability of different test species in PW TIEs. The results obtained and lessons learned from conducting these PW TIEs are presented in this article. Components, or fractions, contributing to toxicity differed for each PW with no specific fraction being consistently toxic. For most PW samples, toxicity attributed to any one fraction represented only part of the toxicity of the whole sample. However, no more than two fraction types were identified as potential toxicants in any sample. Potential toxicants identified during this study, besides salinity, included acidic and basic organic compound class fractions, particulates removed by filtration at pH 11, ammonia, hydrocarbons, hydrogen sulfide, material removed by pH change, and volatile compounds

  11. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis brain abscess mimicking meningitis after surgery for glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Léa; Dubourg, Grégory; Graillon, Thomas; Honnorat, Estelle; Lepidi, Hubert; Drancourt, Michel; Seng, Piseth; Stein, Andreas

    2016-07-07

    Salmonella brain abscess associated with brain tumor is rare. Only 11 cases have been reported to date. Here we report a case of brain abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mimicking post-surgical meningitis in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. A 60-year-old Algerian woman was admitted through an emergency department for a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting, and behavioral disorders. Surgery for cerebral tumor excision was performed and histopathological analysis revealed glioblastoma multiforme. On the seventh day post-surgery, she presented a sudden neurological deterioration with a meningeal syndrome, confusion, and fever of 39.8°C. Her cerebrospinal fluid sample and blood cultures were positive for S. enterica Enteritidis. She was treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. On the 17th day post-surgery, she presented a new neurological disorder and purulent discharge from the surgical wound. Brain computed tomography revealed a large cerebral abscess located at the operative site. Surgical drainage of the abscess was performed and microbial cultures of surgical deep samples were positive for the same S. enterica Enteritidis isolate. She recovered and was discharged 6 weeks after admission. In this case report, a brain abscess was initially diagnosed as Salmonella post-surgical meningitis before the imaging diagnosis of the brain abscess. The diagnosis of brain abscess should be considered in all cases of non-typhoidal Salmonella meningitis after surgery for brain tumor. Surgical brain abscess drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic treatment remains a major therapeutic option.

  12. Global diffusion tensor imaging derived metrics differentiate glioblastoma multiforme vs. normal brains by using discriminant analysis: introduction of a novel whole-brain approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Rios, Camilo; Cortez-Conradis, David; Favila, Rafael; Moreno-Jimenez, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Histological behavior of glioblastoma multiforme suggests it would benefit more from a global rather than regional evaluation. A global (whole-brain) calculation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) derived tensor metrics offers a valid method to detect the integrity of white matter structures without missing infiltrated brain areas not seen in conventional sequences. In this study we calculated a predictive model of brain infiltration in patients with glioblastoma using global tensor metrics. Retrospective, case and control study; 11 global DTI-derived tensor metrics were calculated in 27 patients with glioblastoma multiforme and 34 controls: mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, pure isotropic diffusion, pure anisotropic diffusion, the total magnitude of the diffusion tensor, linear tensor, planar tensor, spherical tensor, relative anisotropy, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. The multivariate discriminant analysis of these variables (including age) with a diagnostic test evaluation was performed. The simultaneous analysis of 732 measures from 12 continuous variables in 61 subjects revealed one discriminant model that significantly differentiated normal brains and brains with glioblastoma: Wilks' λ = 0.324, χ(2) (3) = 38.907, p tensor and linear tensor. These metrics might be clinically applied for diagnosis, follow-up, and the study of other neurological diseases.

  13. What’s the clinical significance of adding diffusion and perfusion MRI in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and solitary brain metastasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr F. Mourad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the additional diagnostic value of diffusion and perfusion MRI in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and solitary brain metastasis. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 24 patients with histologically proven brain tumors who underwent conventional MRI with analysis of diffusion (DWI and perfusion (PWI MRI findings of each tumor. The Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC values were calculated in the minimum (ADC-MIN, mean (ADC-MEAN, and maximum (ADC-MAX in all the tumors and the peritumoral regions. The PWI data was expressed as maximum regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV of the tumors and peritumoral regions. Results: After adding diffusion and perfusion to conventional MRI findings, we found that the accuracy of differentiation between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and solitary metastasis increased from 70% to 90%.There is a significant difference in DWI signal intensity between GBM and metastatic tumors (P < 0.05. The ADC values of GBM were lower than that of metastatic tumors. On perfusion MRI, the maximum rCBV of the peritumoral region (rCBVP of GBM was higher than that of brain metastases (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The addition of diffusion and perfusion to the MRI protocol increases the accuracy of differentiation between GBM and solitary brain metastasis and should be considered routinely. Keywords: Diffusion MRI, Perfusion MRI, GBM, Solitary brain metastases

  14. Long-sustaining response in a patient with non-resectable, distant recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy using 5-ALA: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stummer, Walter; Beck, Tobias; Beyer, Wolfgang; Mehrkens, Jan Hendrik; Obermeier, Andreas; Etminan, Nima; Stepp, Herbert; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Baumgartner, Reinhold; Herms, Jochen; Kreth, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2008-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme continues to be a devastating disease despite modest improvements in survival achieved at present, and there is an urgent need for innovative treatment concepts. Five-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a drug which induces protoporphyrin IX accumulation in malignant gliomas and has been explored for fluorescence-guided resections of these tumors. ALA is also under investigation as a photosensitizer. We report a case of a patient with prior left frontal glioblastoma multiforme treated by surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, who developed a remote lesion in the left insula, which was refractory to secondary treatments. In a compassionate use setting she was treated by oral application of ALA (20 mg/kg bodyweight), and stereotactic phototherapy achieved by positioning four laser diffusors using 3-dimensional irradiation planning, and a 633 nm diode laser. The lesion disappeared 24 h after therapy. Circumferential contrast enhancement was observed at 72 h, which disappeared in the course of subsequent months. Edema resolved completely. The patient is still free of recurrence 56 months after treatment, demonstrating an impressive and long-lasting response to this novel mode of therapy.

  15. [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for targeting radiation dose escalation for patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, James G.; Stelzer, Keith J.; Mankoff, David A.; Tralins, Kevin S.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Muzi, Mark; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Scharnhorst, Jeffrey B.S.; Spence, Alexander M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging for brain tumors has been shown to identify areas of active disease. Radiation dose escalation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme may lead to improved disease control. Based on these premises, we initiated a prospective study of FDG-PET for the treatment planning of radiation dose escalation for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Forty patients were enrolled. Patients were treated with standard conformal fractionated radiotherapy with volumes defined by MRI imaging. When patients reached a dose of 45-50.4 Gy, they underwent FDG-PET imaging for boost target delineation, for an additional 20 Gy (2 Gy per fraction) to a total dose of 79.4 Gy (n = 30). Results: The estimated 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) for the entire group was 70% and 17%, respectively, with a median overall survival of 70 weeks. The estimated 1-year and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 18% and 3%, respectively, with a median of 24 weeks. No significant improvements in OS or PFS were observed for the study group in comparison to institutional historical controls. Conclusions: Radiation dose escalation to 79.4 Gy based on FDG-PET imaging demonstrated no improvement in OS or PFS. This study establishes the feasibility of integrating PET metabolic imaging into radiotherapy treatment planning

  16. Drug eruption (erythema multiforme type) following chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil administration for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arikawa, Shunji; Uchida, Masafumi; Ogoh, Etsuyo

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of drug eruption (erythema multiforme type) in a 54-year-old woman, following concurrent chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Chemotherapy comprised one cycle of mitomycin C 10 mg/m 2 /day (intravenous bolus injection) on day 1 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 1, 000 mg/m 2 /day (continuous intravenous infusion) on days 1-4 of radiotherapy. External irradiation of the pelvic space was performed, using daily fractions of 1.5 Gy (total dose, 33 Gy). From day 4 after chemoradiotherapy, erythema appeared proximal to the forearm site used for drug administration. On day 6, erythema was noted on the trunk, hip and thigh. We suspected erythema multiforme based on the appearance of wheals and target lesions of the skin and a patient history of chemoradiotherapy. Steroids were administered orally, which resolved systemic eruption at week 2. The patient also experienced grade 3 leukocytopenia, neutropenia, thrombopenia, diarrhea, and anorexia. Although we could not provide sufficient chemotherapy and radiation therapy due to severe side effects, squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal responded extremely well with a marked decrease in complete response. We surmise that the drug eruption was associated with 5-FU. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is safe and effective for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal, but care is required to prevent drug eruption during treatment. (author)

  17. Identification of novel candidate target genes in amplicons of Glioblastoma multiforme tumors detected by expression and CGH microarray profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Moneo Jose-Luis

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cytogenetic and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH studies in brain malignancies have shown that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by complex structural and numerical alterations. However, the limited resolution of these techniques has precluded the precise identification of detailed specific gene copy number alterations. Results We performed a genome-wide survey of gene copy number changes in 20 primary GBMs by CGH on cDNA microarrays. A novel amplicon at 4p15, and previously uncharacterized amplicons at 13q32-34 and 1q32 were detected and are analyzed here. These amplicons contained amplified genes not previously reported. Other amplified regions containg well-known oncogenes in GBMs were also detected at 7p12 (EGFR, 7q21 (CDK6, 4q12 (PDGFRA, and 12q13-15 (MDM2 and CDK4. In order to identify the putative target genes of the amplifications, and to determine the changes in gene expression levels associated with copy number change events, we carried out parallel gene expression profiling analyses using the same cDNA microarrays. We detected overexpression of the novel amplified genes SLA/LP and STIM2 (4p15, and TNFSF13B and COL4A2 (13q32-34. Some of the candidate target genes of amplification (EGFR, CDK6, MDM2, CDK4, and TNFSF13B were tested in an independent set of 111 primary GBMs by using FISH and immunohistological assays. The novel candidate 13q-amplification target TNFSF13B was amplified in 8% of the tumors, and showed protein expression in 20% of the GBMs. Conclusion This high-resolution analysis allowed us to propose novel candidate target genes such as STIM2 at 4p15, and TNFSF13B or COL4A2 at 13q32-34 that could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of these tumors and which would require futher investigations. We showed that overexpression of the amplified genes could be attributable to gene dosage and speculate that deregulation of those genes could be important in the development

  18. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  19. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  20. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W S; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2016-03-15

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient´s survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient´s survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells.In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation.

  1. SU-F-R-42: Association of Radiomic and Metabolic Tumor Volumes in Radiation Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, C; Nagornaya, N; Parra, N; Kwon, D; Ishkanian, F; Markoe, A; Maudsley, A; Stoyanova, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High-throughput extraction of imaging and metabolomic quantitative features from MRI and MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) results in tens of variables per patient. In radiotherapy (RT) of GBM, the relevant metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) are related to aberrant levels of N-acetyl Aspartate (NAA) and Choline (Cho). Corresponding Clinical Target Volumes (CTVs) for RT planning are based on Contrast Enhancing T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1w) and T2-weighted/Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) MRI. The objective is to build a framework for investigation of associations between imaging, CTV, and MTV features better understanding of the underlying information in the CTVs and dependencies between these volumes. Methods: Necrotic portions, enhancing lesion and edema were manually contoured on T1w/T2w images for 17 GBM patients. CTVs and MTVs for NAA (MTV NAA ) and Cho (MTV Cho ) were constructed. Tumors were scored categorically for ten semantic imaging traits by neuroradiologist. All features were investigated for redundancy. Two-way correlations between imaging and RT/MTV features were visualized as heat maps. Associations between MTV NAA , MTV Cho and imaging features were studied using Spearman correlation. Results: 39 imaging features were computed per patient. Half of the imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. 21 features were extracted from MTVs/CTVs. There were a high number (43) of significant correlations of imaging with CTVs/MTV NAA while very few (10) significant correlations were with CTVs/MTV Cho . MTV NAA was found to be closely associated with MRI volumes, MTV Cho remains elusive for characterization with imaging. Conclusion: A framework for investigation of co-dependency between MRI and RT/metabolic features is established. A series of semantic imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. The approach will allow for exploration of relationships

  2. SU-F-R-42: Association of Radiomic and Metabolic Tumor Volumes in Radiation Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, C; Nagornaya, N; Parra, N; Kwon, D; Ishkanian, F; Markoe, A; Maudsley, A; Stoyanova, R [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High-throughput extraction of imaging and metabolomic quantitative features from MRI and MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) results in tens of variables per patient. In radiotherapy (RT) of GBM, the relevant metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) are related to aberrant levels of N-acetyl Aspartate (NAA) and Choline (Cho). Corresponding Clinical Target Volumes (CTVs) for RT planning are based on Contrast Enhancing T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1w) and T2-weighted/Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) MRI. The objective is to build a framework for investigation of associations between imaging, CTV, and MTV features better understanding of the underlying information in the CTVs and dependencies between these volumes. Methods: Necrotic portions, enhancing lesion and edema were manually contoured on T1w/T2w images for 17 GBM patients. CTVs and MTVs for NAA (MTV{sub NAA}) and Cho (MTV{sub Cho}) were constructed. Tumors were scored categorically for ten semantic imaging traits by neuroradiologist. All features were investigated for redundancy. Two-way correlations between imaging and RT/MTV features were visualized as heat maps. Associations between MTV{sub NAA}, MTV{sub Cho} and imaging features were studied using Spearman correlation. Results: 39 imaging features were computed per patient. Half of the imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. 21 features were extracted from MTVs/CTVs. There were a high number (43) of significant correlations of imaging with CTVs/MTV{sub NAA} while very few (10) significant correlations were with CTVs/MTV{sub Cho}. MTV{sub NAA} was found to be closely associated with MRI volumes, MTV{sub Cho} remains elusive for characterization with imaging. Conclusion: A framework for investigation of co-dependency between MRI and RT/metabolic features is established. A series of semantic imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. The approach will

  3. Toxic substances alert program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  4. Thermoregulatory responses to environmental toxicants: The interaction of thermal stress and toxicant exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Lisa R.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal stress can have a profound impact on the physiological responses that are elicited following environmental toxicant exposure. The efficacy by which toxicants enter the body is directly influenced by thermoregulatory effector responses that are evoked in response to high ambient temperatures. In mammals, the thermoregulatory response to heat stress consists of an increase in skin blood flow and moistening of the skin surface to dissipate core heat to the environment. These physiological responses may exacerbate chemical toxicity due to increased permeability of the skin, which facilitates the cutaneous absorption of many environmental toxicants. The core temperature responses that are elicited in response to high ambient temperatures, toxicant exposure or both can also have a profound impact on the ability of an organism to survive the insult. In small rodents, the thermoregulatory response to thermal stress and many environmental toxicants (such as organophosphate compounds) is often biphasic in nature, consisting initially of a regulated reduction in core temperature (i.e., hypothermia) followed by fever. Hypothermia is an important thermoregulatory survival strategy that is used by small rodents to diminish the effect of severe environmental insults on tissue homeostasis. The protective effect of hypothermia is realized by its effects on chemical toxicity as molecular and cellular processes, such as lipid peroxidation and the formation of reactive oxygen species, are minimized at reduced core temperatures. The beneficial effects of fever are unknown under these conditions. Perspective is provided on the applicability of data obtained in rodent models to the human condition

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadha, Manjeet; Capala, Jacek; Coderre, Jeffrey A.; Elowitz, Eric H.; Joel, Darrel D.; Hungyuan, B. Liu; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Chanana, Arjun D.

    1996-01-01

    , respectively. The 10 B concentration in the normal brain was ≤ that in the blood. Radiation Dosimetry: The estimated radiation doses were recorded using a normal brain endothelium to blood 10 B concentration ratio of 1:1 and a tumor to blood 10 B concentration ratio of 3.5:1. The average 10 B blood concentration during irradiation was 13.0 ± 1.5μg 10 B/g (range: 11.2-15.4). The maximum tumor dose ranged from 47.6-64.4 Gy-Eq (mean 52.8±4.2 Gy-Eq). The minimum target volume dose ranged from 7.8-16.2 Gy-Eq (mean 12.3±1.8 Gy-Eq). Dose to scalp ranged from 10-15 Gy-Eq. The critical brain structures in all cases received less than 6.5 Gy-Eq. Clinical Outcome: Following BNCT all patients experienced in-field alopecia, and grade 1 erythema was noted in 2 patients. Transient drop in lymphocyte counts was noted in 6 patients that returned to normal range in 2 weeks. No CNS toxicity attributed to BNCT was observed. At a median follow up of 9.5 mo (range 3-15 mo), 1 patient is dead from disseminated craniospinal disease and 6 from local recurrence. In the remaining 3 patients, all but 1 patient has shown evidence of disease progression at the primary site. Conclusion: It is feasible to deliver a single-fraction of BPA-based BNCT. At the dose prescribed, the patients did not experience any adverse morbidity. To further evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT, a dose escalation study delivering a minimum target volume dose of 17 Gy-Eq is in progress

  6. Toxicity management of angiogenesis inhibitors: resolution of expert panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel O. Rumiantsev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available On 22 June 2017 in St. Petersburg the expert panel was held on the topic “Management of toxicity of angiogenesis inhibitors”, which discussed current issues of systemic therapy of advanced differentiated thyroid cancer resistant to radioactive iodine therapy, advanced kidney cancer and questions of efficacy and safety of new target drugs in the treatment of these diseases. The reports and discussions of experts raised the following questions: 1. Own experience of using lenvatinib in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer refractory to therapy with radioactive iodine and kidney cancer. 2. Profile of efficacy and safety of modern targeted therapy with multikinase inhibitors. 3. Prophylaxis and management of predictable toxicity.

  7. MUD and Self Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan Min

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a theoretical framework for analyzing the effect of MUD (Multi-User Dungeons) playing on users' self-efficacy by applying Bandura's social learning theory, and introduces three types of self-efficacy: computer self-efficacy; social self-efficacy; and generalized self-efficacy. Considers successful performance, vicarious experience,…

  8. Females and Toxic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    labeled as toxic, can he or she be rehabilitated?; Are there leadership styles that can be promoted to combat toxic leadership?; and Are the senior...examines leadership styles that are favorable for female leaders, and offers Transformational/Adaptive leadership as a style promising rehabilitative tools

  9. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisa S. Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3, the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N and arsenic (As, which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  10. A functional study of EGFR and Notch signaling in brain cancer stem-like cells from glioblastoma multiforme (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumor in adults with a median survival for newly diagnosed GBM patients at less than 1.5 year. Despite intense treatment efforts the vast majority of patients will experience relapse and much research today is therefore searching...... for new molecular and cellular targets that can improve the prognosis for GBM patients. One such target is the brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) that are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation, progression, treatment resistance and ultimately relapse. bCSC are identified based...... on their resemblance to normal neural stem cells (NSC) and their tumorigenic potential. Like for NSC, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Notch receptor signaling pathways are believed to be important for the maintenance of bCSC. These pathways as such present promising targets in a future anti-bCSC GBM...

  11. Role of Intra-operative MRI (iMRI) in Improving Extent of Resection and Survival in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inamullah; Waqas, Muhammad; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-07-01

    Multiple intraoperative aids have been introduced to improve the extent of resection (EOR) in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) patients, avoiding any new neurological deficits. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) has been debated for its utility and cost for nearly two decades in neurosurgical literature. Review of literature suggests improved EOR in GBM patients who underwent iMRI assisted surgical resections leading to higher overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). iMRI provides real time intraoperative imaging with reasonable quality. Higher risk for new postoperative deficits with increased EOR is not reported in any study using iMRI. The level of evidence regarding prognostic benefits of iMRI is still of low quality..

  12. Osthole Suppresses the Migratory Ability of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells via Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase-Mediated Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fang Tsai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common type of primary and malignant tumor occurring in the adult central nervous system. GBM often invades surrounding regions of the brain during its early stages, making successful treatment difficult. Osthole, an active constituent isolated from the dried C. monnieri fruit, has been shown to suppress tumor migration and invasion. However, the effects of osthole in human GBM are largely unknown. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is important for the metastasis of cancer cells. Results from this study show that osthole can not only induce cell death but also inhibit phosphorylation of FAK in human GBM cells. Results from this study show that incubating GBM cells with osthole reduces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 expression and cell motility, as assessed by cell transwell and wound healing assays. This study also provides evidence supporting the potential of osthole in reducing FAK activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility in human GBM cells.

  13. Toxicity and management in CAR T-cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Challice L Bonifant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available T cells can be genetically modified to target tumors through the expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR. Most notably, CAR T cells have demonstrated clinical efficacy in hematologic malignancies with more modest responses when targeting solid tumors. However, CAR T cells also have the capacity to elicit expected and unexpected toxicities including: cytokine release syndrome, neurologic toxicity, “on target/off tumor” recognition, and anaphylaxis. Theoretical toxicities including clonal expansion secondary to insertional oncogenesis, graft versus host disease, and off-target antigen recognition have not been clinically evident. Abrogating toxicity has become a critical step in the successful application of this emerging technology. To this end, we review the reported and theoretical toxicities of CAR T cells and their management.

  14. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  15. Enhanced tumor control of human Glioblastoma Multiforme xenografts with the concomitant use of radiotherapy and an attenuated herpes simplex-1 virus (ASTRO research fellowship)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Paul Y.; Sibley, Gregory S.; Advani, Sunil; Hallahan, Dennis; Hyland, John; Kufe, Donald W.; Chou, Joany; Roizman, Bernard; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma Multiforme remains one of the most incurable of human tumors. The current treatment outcomes are dismal. There are several recent reports which suggest that some human glioblastoma xenografts implanted in the brains of athymic mice may be potentially cured with the use of an attenuated herpes simplex-1 virus alone. We have chosen a replication competent, non-neurovirulent HSV-1 mutant, designated R3616 to determine whether there is an interactive cell killing and enhanced tumor control with radiotherapy in the treatment of a human glioblastoma xenograft. Materials and Methods: In vivo, 1 mm 3 pieces of U-87 human glioblastoma cell line xenografts were implanted into the right hind limb of athymic mice and grown to > 200 mm 3 . A total of 112 mice were then equally distributed within four treatment arms (see chart below) based upon tumor volume. Xenografts selected to receive virus as part of the therapy were inoculated with three injections of 2 x 10 7 plaque forming units (PFU) of R3616 virus given on day 1, 2, and 3 for a total dose of 6 x 10 7 PFU. R3616 is a non-neurovirulent HSV-1 mutant created by the deletion of the γ 34.5 gene. Local field irradiation was delivered on day 2 (20 Gy) and day 3 (25 Gy). The mice were then followed for 60 days during which time the xenografts were measured twice weekly. A clinically non-palpable tumor (< 10% original volume) was scored as a cure. In addition percent-fractional tumor volume (FTV) and mean tumor volume (MTV) were calculated for each group. Results: Conclusion: While our tumor control with R3616 alone is similar to that reported in the literature, we have seen significantly enhanced tumor control and cell killing with the addition of RT suggesting a synergistic interaction between an oncolytic virus and radiation in the treatment of human glioblastoma multiforme xenografts

  16. Electronic Cigarette Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J Drew; Michaels, David; Orellana-Barrios, Menfil; Nugent, Kenneth

    2017-04-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often advertised as a healthier product when compared with traditional cigarettes. Currently, there are limited data to support this and only a threat of federal regulation from the US Food and Drug Administration. Calls to poison control centers about e-cigarette toxicity, especially in children, and case reports of toxic exposures have increased over the past 3 years. This research letter reports the frequency of hazardous exposures to e-cigarettes and characterizes the reported adverse health effects associated with e-cigarette toxicity.

  17. Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST) was developed to allow users to easily estimate the toxicity of chemicals using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) methodologies. QSARs are mathematical models used to predict measures of toxicity from the physical c...

  18. Toxicity Reference Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  19. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  20. Toxicity of essential oil compounds against Exorista sorbillans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential oils of Ageratum conyzoides and Ocimum species are potential candidates for management of Exorista sorbillans (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Culicidae), a serious pest of silkworm. Considering that the pure compounds in essential oil may exhibit efficacy against the parasitoid, contact and topical toxicity of 22 essential ...

  1. Acute and Subacute Toxicity Evaluation of Corn Silk Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ae Wha; Kang, Hyeon Jung; Kim, Sun Lim; Kim, Myung Hwan; Kim, Woo Kyoung

    2018-03-01

    Many studies have reported therapeutic efficacy of corn silk extract. However, research on its toxicity and safe dose range is limited. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the acute and subacute toxicity of corn silk extract in ICR mice. To determine acute toxicity, corn silk extract containing high levels of maysin was orally administered to mice at a dose of 0 or 2,000 mg/kg. Clinical symptoms, mortality, and body weight changes were recorded for 14 days. To determine subacute toxicity, corn silk extract was orally administered to mice over a 4-week period, and then body weight, water and food consumption, and organ weight were determined. In addition, urine and serum analyses were performed. In the acute toxicity study, no death or abnormal symptoms was observed in all treatment groups during the study period. Body weights did not show any significant change compared to those of the control group. Lethal dose of corn silk extract was estimated to be more than 2,000 mg/kg. In the 4-week subacute toxicity study, there was no corn silk extract related toxic effect on body weight, water intake, food consumption, urine parameters, clinical chemistry, or organ weight. Histopathological examination showed no abnormality related to the administration of corn silk extract at 500 mg/kg. The maximum non-toxic dose of corn silk extract containing high levels of maysin was found to be more than 500 mg/kg.

  2. The classification and application of toxic Chinese materia medica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinmin; Wang, Qiong; Song, Guangqing; Zhang, Guangping; Ye, Zuguang; Williamson, Elizabeth M

    2014-03-01

    Many important drugs in the Chinese materia medica (CMM) are known to be toxic, and it has long been recognized in classical Chinese medical theory that toxicity can arise directly from the components of a single CMM or may be induced by an interaction between combined CMM. Traditional Chinese Medicine presents a unique set of pharmaceutical theories that include particular methods for processing, combining and decocting, and these techniques contribute to reducing toxicity as well as enhancing efficacy. The current classification of toxic CMM drugs, traditional methods for processing toxic CMM and the prohibited use of certain combinations, is based on traditional experience and ancient texts and monographs, but accumulating evidence increasingly supports their use to eliminate or reduce toxicity. Modern methods are now being used to evaluate the safety of CMM; however, a new system for describing the toxicity of Chinese herbal medicines may need to be established to take into account those herbs whose toxicity is delayed or otherwise hidden, and which have not been incorporated into the traditional classification. This review explains the existing classification and justifies it where appropriate, using experimental results often originally published in Chinese and previously not available outside China. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Haloacetonitriles: metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, John C; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Ahmed, Ahmed E

    2009-01-01

    The haloacetonitriles (HANs) exist in drinking water exclusively as byproducts of disinfection. HANs are found in drinking water more often, and in higher concentrations, when surface water is treated by chloramination. Human exposure occurs through consumption of finished drinking water; oral and dermal contact also occurs, and results from showering, swimming and other activities. HANs are reactive and are toxic to gastrointestinal tissues following oral administration. Such toxicity is characterized by GSH depletion, increased lipid peroxidation, and covalent binding of HAN-associated radioactivity to gut tissues. The presence of GSH in cells is an important protective mechanism against HAN toxicity; depletion of cellular GSH results in increased toxicity. Some studies have demonstrated an apparently synergistic effect between ROS and HAN administration, that may help explain effects observed in GI tissues. ROS are produced in gut tissues, and in vitro evidence indicates that ROS may contribute to the degradation and formation of reactive intermediates from HANs. The rationale for ROS involvement may involve HAN-induced depletion of GSH and the role of GSH in scavenging ROS. In addition to effects on GI tissues, studies show that HAN-derived radiolabel is found covalently bound to proteins and DNA in several organs and tissues. The addition of antioxidants to biologic systems protects against HAN-induced DNA damage. The protection offered by antioxidants supports the role of oxidative stress and the potential for a threshold in han-induced toxicity. However, additional data are needed to substantiate evidence for such a threshold. HANs are readily absorbed from the GI tract and are extensively metabolized. Elimination occurs primarily in urine, as unconjugated one-carbon metabolites. Evidence supports the involvement of mixed function oxidases, the cytochrome P450 enzyme family and GST, in HAN metabolism. Metabolism represents either a detoxification or

  4. The toxicity of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Shipments of plutonium occasionally pass around the Cape coastal waters on its way to Japan from Europe. This invariably leads to a great deal of speculation of the dangers involved and of the extreme toxicity of plutonium, with the media and environmental groups claiming that (a) plutonium is the most toxic substance known to man, and that (b) a few kilograms of plutonium ground finely and dispersed in the atmosphere could kill every human being on earth. Comparisons with other poisons are drawn, e.g. common inorganic chemicals and biological agents. The original scare around the extraordinary toxicity of Pu seems to have started in 1974 with the claims of Tamplin and Cochran's hot particle theory about plutonium lodging in the sensitive portions of the lungs in small concentrated aggregates where they are much more effective in producing cancers. This theory, however, is regarded as thoroughly discredited by the experts in the field of radiotoxicity. 8 refs

  5. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  6. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy–Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, Douglas B.; Wessels, Barry; Bangert, Barbara; Fu, Pingfu; Nelson, A. Dennis; Cohen, Mark; Sagar, Stephen; Lewin, Jonathan; Sloan, Andrew; Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert; Maciunas, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS

  7. External radiation toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    The section contains summaries of research on neutron and gamma-ray toxicity in rodents, late effects of low-dose rate, whole-body, protracted exposure to 60 Co gamma rays on young adult beagles, and the effects of protracted, low-dose rate exposure to 60 Co gamma rays on preclinical leukemic phase-related changes in the granulopoietic system of beagles

  8. Local anaesthetic toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Local anaesthetic toxicity has been known since the introduction of local anaesthetic drugs into anaesthetic practice more than a hundred ... was the first to think of cocaine as a narcotic. ..... anaesthetics act as Na+ channel-blocking agents, they slow down .... all neurons, leading to global CNS depression, slowing and.

  9. Toxicity of lunar dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnarsson, D.; Carpenter, J.; Fubini, B.; Gerde, P.; Loftus, D.; Prisk, K.; Staufer, U.; Tranfield, E.; van Westrenen, W.

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of

  10. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  11. How toxic is ibogaine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litjens, Ruud P. W.; Brunt, Tibor M.

    2016-01-01

    Ibogaine is a psychoactive indole alkaloid found in the African rainforest shrub Tabernanthe Iboga. It is unlicensed but used in the treatment of drug and alcohol addiction. However, reports of ibogaine's toxicity are cause for concern. To review ibogaine's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics,

  12. Monosodium Glutamate Toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    The brain is reportedly sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) toxicity via oxidative stress. Sida acuta leaf ethanolic .... wherein the right hemisphere, was preserved for histology and fixed in 10% ... Biochemical Assays: The left hemisphere of the brain samples was ...... development in male and female rats. Exp Physiol.

  13. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  14. Toxic Hazards in Aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Pasteur, Lillm,FRANCE. (2) CONISH H.H., EARTH M.L.& IANNi F.L, "Comparative Toxicology of Platics during Thar-modecoqiorition Intsw-re8posium on...Pyrolysnis and Combustion of Materials" Firm and Materials (1976).1, 29-35 (8) ALAAIE Y."Toxicity of Platic dacomposition ProductsŖd Annu~al Progress

  15. Impact of therapy on quality of life, neurocognitive function and their correlates in glioblastoma multiforme: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksson, Roger; Asklund, Thomas; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    response or survival, but produce toxicity that is likely to negatively impact QoL. New biological agents, such as bevacizumab, can induce a clinically meaningful proportion of durable responses among patients with recurrent GBM with an acceptable safety profile. Emerging evidence suggests that bevacizumab...... that extend survival in patients with recurrent GBM, so one of the primary aims of new therapies is to reduce morbidity, restore or preserve neurologic functions, and the capacity to perform daily activities. Apart from temozolomide, cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents do not appear to significantly impact...... produces an improvement or preservation of neurocognitive function in GBM patients, suggestive of QoL improvement, in most poor-prognosis patients who would otherwise be expected to show a sudden and rapid deterioration in QoL....

  16. Estimation of toxicity using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Since experimental measurements of toxicity are extremely time consuming and expensive, it is imperative that alternative methods to estimate toxicity are developed.

  17. Comparative metal oxide nanoparticle toxicity using embryonic zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C. Wehmas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO, titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on physicochemical properties. Significant agglomeration of MO NPs in aqueous solutions is common making it challenging to associate NP characteristics such as size and charge with toxicity. However, data from our agglomerated MO NPs suggests that the elemental composition and dissolution potential are major drivers of toxicity. Only ZnO caused significant adverse effects of all MO particles tested, and only when prepared in pure water (point estimate median lethal concentration = 3.5–9.1 mg/L. This toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (∼22.7 fold when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to the 24 h toxicity following embryonic exposure. Investigation into whether dissolution could account for ZnO toxicity revealed high levels of zinc ion (40–89% of total sample were generated. Exposure to zinc ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn2+ may be a major contributor to ZnO toxicity.

  18. Andrographolide suppresses the migratory ability of human glioblastoma multiforme cells by targeting ERK1/2-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Liang; Kuo, Fu-Hsuan; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Yu, Nuo-Yi; Yang, Wei-En; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2017-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can be a fatal tumor because of difficulties in treating the related metastasis. Andrographolide is the bioactive component of the Andrographis paniculata . Andrographolide possesses the anti-inflammatory activity and inhibits the growth of various cancers; however, its effect on GBM cancer motility remains largely unknown. In this study, we examined the antimetastatic properties of andrographolide in human GBM cells. Our results revealed that andrographolide inhibited the invasion and migration abilities of GBM8401 and U251 cells. Furthermore, andrographolide inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity and expression. Real-time PCR and promoter activity assays indicated that andrographolide inhibited MMP-2 expression at the transcriptional level. Such inhibitory effects were associated with the suppression of CREB DNA-binding activity and CREB expression. Mechanistically, andrographolide inhibited the cell motility of GBM8401 cells through the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 pathway, and the blocking of the ERK 1/2 pathway could reverse MMP-2-mediated cell motility. In conclusion, CREB is a crucial target of andrographolide for suppressing MMP-2-mediated cell motility in GBM cells. Therefore, a combination of andrographolide and an ERK inhibitor might be a good strategy for preventing GBM metastasis.

  19. CXCR4 expression varies significantly among different subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and its low expression or hypermethylation might predict favorable overall survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinlong; Shang, Feng; Zhu, Weidong; Lin, Qingtang

    2017-09-01

    CXCR4 is an oncogene in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) but the mechanism of its dysregulation and its prognostic value in GBM have not been fully understood. Bioinformatic analysis was performed by using R2 and the UCSC Xena browser based on data from GSE16011 in GEO datasets and in GBM cohort in TCGA database (TCGA-GBM). Kaplan Meier curves of overall survival (OS) were generated to assess the association between CXCR4 expression/methylation and OS in patients with GBM. GBM patients with high CXCR4 expression had significantly worse 5 and 10 yrs OS (p GBM subtypes, there was an inverse relationship between overall DNA methylation and CXCR4 expression. CXCR4 expression was significantly lower in CpG island methylation phenotype (CIMP) group than in non CIMP group. Log rank test results showed that patients with high CXCR4 methylation (first tertile) had significantly better 5 yrs OS (p = 0.038). CXCR4 expression is regulated by DNA methylation in GBM and its low expression or hypermethylation might indicate favorable OS in GBM patients.

  20. MicroRNA-139-5p acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting ELTD1 and regulating cell cycle in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shouping [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi, Shandong 276000 (China); Wang, Xianjun [Department of Neurology, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi, Shandong 276000 (China); Li, Xiao [Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Cao, Yuandong, E-mail: yuandongcao@sina.com [Department of Radiotherapy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-11-13

    MicroRNA-139-5p was identified to be significantly down-regulated in glioblastoma multiform (GBM) by miRNA array. In this report we aimed to clarify its biological function, molecular mechanisms and direct target gene in GBM. Twelve patients with GBM were analyzed for the expression of miR-139-5p by quantitative RT-PCR. miR-139-5p overexpression was established by transfecting miR-139-5p-mimic into U87MG and T98G cells, and its effects on cell proliferation were studied using MTT assay and colony formation assays. We concluded that ectopic expression of miR-139-5p in GBM cell lines significantly suppressed cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Bioinformatics coupled with luciferase and western blot assays also revealed that miR-139-5p suppresses glioma cell proliferation by targeting ELTD1 and regulating cell cycle. - Highlights: • miR-139-5p is downregulated in GBM. • miR-139-5p regulates cell proliferation through inducing apoptosis. • miR-139-5p regulates glioblastoma tumorigenesis by targeting 3′UTR of ELTD1. • miR-139-5p is involved in cell cycle regulation.

  1. A tumor-targeting p53 nanodelivery system limits chemoresistance to temozolomide prolonging survival in a mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Rait, Antonina; Kim, Eric; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Chang, Esther H

    2015-02-01

    Development of temozolomide (TMZ) resistance contributes to the poor prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. It was previously demonstrated that delivery of exogenous wild-type tumor suppressor gene p53 via a tumor-targeted nanocomplex (SGT-53) which crosses the blood-brain barrier could sensitize highly TMZ-resistant GBM tumors to TMZ. Here we assessed whether SGT-53 could inhibit development of TMZ resistance. SGT-53 significantly chemosensitized TMZ-sensitive human GBM cell lines (U87 and U251), in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, in an intracranial GBM tumor model, two cycles of concurrent treatment with systemically administered SGT-53 and TMZ inhibited tumor growth, increased apoptosis and most importantly, significantly prolonged median survival. In contrast TMZ alone had no significant effect on median survival compared to a single cycle of TMZ. These results suggest that combining SGT-53 with TMZ appears to limit development of TMZ resistance, prolonging its anti-tumor effect and could be a more effective therapy for GBM. Using human glioblastoma multiforma cell lines, this research team demonstrated that the delivery of exogenous wild-type tumor suppressor gene p53 via a tumor-targeted nanocomplex limited the development of temozolomide resistance and prolonged its anti-tumor effect, which may enable future human application of this or similar techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of Y-box binding protein-1 slows the growth of glioblastoma multiforme and sensitizes to temozolomide independent O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuanyuan; Fotovati, Abbas; Lee, Cathy; Wang, Michelle; Cote, Gilbert; Guns, Emma; Toyota, Brian; Faury, Damien; Jabado, Nada; Dunn, Sandra E

    2009-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive type of brain tumor where 5 years. In adults, GBM is the most common type of brain tumor. It is rarer in children, where it constitutes approximately 15% of all brain tumors diagnosed. These tumors are often invasive, making surgical resection difficult. Further, they can be refractory to current therapies such as temozolomide. The current dogma is that temozolomide resistance rests on the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) because it cleaves methylated DNA adducts formed by the drug. Our laboratory recently reported that another drug resistance gene known as the Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) is highly expressed in primary GBM but not in normal brain tissues based on the evaluation of primary tumors. We therefore questioned whether GBM depend on YB-1 for growth and/or response to temozolomide. Herein, we report that YB-1 inhibition reduced tumor cell invasion and growth in monolayer as well as in soft agar. Moreover, blocking this protein ultimately delayed tumor onset in mice. Importantly, inhibiting YB-1 enhanced temozolomide sensitivity in a manner that was independent of MGMT in models of adult and pediatric GBM. In conclusion, inhibiting YB-1 may be a novel way to improve the treatment of GBM.

  3. Pre-clinical analysis of changes in intra-cellular biochemistry of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells due to c-Myc silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Vishal; Vaidyanathan, Muthukumar; Janardhanam, Vanisree Arambakkam; Bradner, James E

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of brain Tumor that has few cures. In this study, we analyze the anti-proliferative effects of a new molecule JQ1 against GBMs induced in Wistar Rats. JQ1 is essentially a Myc inhibitor. c-Myc is also known for altering the biochemistry of a tumor cell. Therefore, the study is intended to analyze certain other oncogenes associated with c-Myc and also the change in cellular biochemistry upon c-Myc inhibition. The quantitative analysis of gene expression gave a co-expressive pattern for all the three genes involved namely; c-Myc, Bcl-2, and Akt. The cellular biochemistry analysis by transmission electron microscopy revealed high glycogen and lipid aggregation in Myc inhibited cells and excessive autophagy. The study demonstrates the role of c-Myc as a central metabolic regulator and Bcl-2 and Akt assisting in extending c-Myc half-life as well as in regulation of autophagy, so as to regulate cell survival on the whole. The study also demonstrates that transient treatment by JQ1 leads to aggressive development of tumor and therefore, accelerating death, emphasizing the importance of dosage fixation, and duration for clinical use in future.

  4. What is the value of emission tomography studies in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated by {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koot, R W; Bosch, D A [Academic Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Habraken, J B.A. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, M C.C.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paans, A M.J.; Pruim, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], e-mail: r.w.koot@lumc.nl

    2008-07-01

    We studied the use of {sup 201}thallium SPECT and L-[1-{sup 11}C]-tyrosine PET in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated with {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy after surgery and external beam radiation therapy. We hypothesised that the patients most likely to benefit from further surgery after deterioration would be those with radiation necrosis and would be recognised by a negative emission tomography scan. Twenty-one patients underwent {sup 201}thallium SPECT performed before brachytherapy, and this was repeated in 19 patients when recurrence was suspected. Nine patients also underwent a PET scan at the same time. Nine patients underwent a second operation. SPECT and PET were highly concordant concerning the prediction of radionecrosis and/or tumor recurrence. Repeat surgery did not lead to a significant increase in survival. There was no significant association between the duration of survival and tumor-to-background ratio but the number studied was small. Both SPECT and PET showed highly active lesions, which were proved to be recurrent tumor by clinical and histological follow-up. Although PET and SPECT are both highly sensitive in detecting active tumor tissue, emission tomography was not clinically valuable in the investigation of patients with a primary glioblastoma treated with brachytherapy. (author)

  5. Reinduction of Bevacizumab in Combination with Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in a Patient with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme Who Progressed on Bevacizumab/Irinotecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Almubarak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM carries a dismal prognosis despite the current standard of multimodality treatments. Recent studies showed promising results to a regimen consisting of a VEGF inhibitor, (bevacizumab and a topoisomerase I inhibitor (irinotecan [BI] in recurrent GBM. However, those patients with GBM who progress on BI will succumb to their disease generally in a very short period of time. We report a case of a 56-year-old male patient with GBM who declined surgical resection and received chemoradiation with temozolomide. This treatment was withheld secondary to significant thrombocytopenia. Subsequently, he achieved stable disease for 10 months with a regimen consisting of thalidomide and tamoxifen before progressing. This was followed by bevacizumab with irinotecan [BI], for which he had a significant partial response for 8 months with subsequent progression. Reinducing the patient with bevacizumab in combination with a pegylated liposomal doxorubicin [PLD] (a topoisomerase II inhibitor demonstrated antitumor activity with significant shrinkage of contrast enhancing mass and peritumoral edema.

  6. ω-3 and ω-6 Fatty Acids Modulate Conventional and Atypical Protein Kinase C Activities in a Brain Fatty Acid Binding Protein Dependent Manner in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa E. Elsherbiny

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly infiltrative brain cancer with a dismal prognosis. High levels of brain fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP are associated with increased migration/infiltration in GBM cells, with a high ratio of arachidonic acid (AA to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA driving B-FABP-mediated migration. Since several protein kinase Cs (PKCs are overexpressed in GBM and linked to migration, we explored a possible relationship between B-FABP and levels/activity of different PKCs, as a function of AA and DHA supplementation. We report that ectopic expression of B-FABP in U87 cells alters the levels of several PKCs, particularly PKCζ. Upon analysis of PKCζ RNA levels in a panel of GBM cell lines and patient-derived GBM neurospheres, we observed a trend towards moderate positive correlation (r = 0.624, p = 0.054 between B-FABP and PKCζ RNA levels. Analysis of PKC activity in U87 GBM cells revealed decreased typical PKC activity (23.4% in B-FABP-expressing cells compared with nonexpressing cells, with no difference in novel and atypical PKC activities. AA and DHA modulated both conventional and atypical PKC activities in a B-FABP-dependent manner, but had no effect on novel PKC activity. These results suggest that conventional and atypical PKCs are potential downstream effectors of B-FABP/fatty acid-mediated alterations in GBM growth properties.

  7. Long-Term Survival and Improved Quality of Life following Multiple Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries for Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik W. Larson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is in most cases complex and must be specifically tailored to the needs of the patient with the goals of extended survival and improved quality of life. Despite advancements in therapy, treatment outcomes remain almost universally poor. Salvage treatment options for the recurrence of the disease is an area of intense study. The following case highlights the utility of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS as a salvage treatment. In this clinical situation, three sequential GKRS treatments led to prolonged survival (beyond four years after diagnosis and improved quality of life in a patient who was unable to receive further chemotherapy regimens and was unwilling to undergo further aggressive resection. To date, there have been few reports of three or more sequential GKRS treatment sessions utilized as salvage therapy for recurrent GBM in patients who can no longer tolerate chemotherapy. This report provides evidence that aggressive local treatment with GKRS at the time of recurrence may be appropriate, depending on a patient’s individual clinical situation, and can lead to prolonged survival and improved quality of life.

  8. Toroidal-spiral particles for codelivery of anti-VEGFR-2 antibody and irinotecan: a potential implant to hinder recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishal; Köllmer, Melanie; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Nitsche, Ludwig C; Gemeinhart, Richard A; Liu, Ying

    2014-03-10

    Heterogeneous toroidal-spiral particles (TSPs) were generated by polymer droplet sedimentation, interaction, and cross-linking. TSPs provide a platform for encapsulation and release of multiple compounds of different sizes and physicochemical properties. As a model system, we demonstrate the encapsulation and independently controlled release of an anti-VEGFR-2 antibody and irinotecan for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. The anti-VEGFR-2 antibody was released from the TS channels and its binding to HUVECs was confirmed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, suggesting active antibody encapsulation and release. Irinotecan, a small molecule drug, was released from the dense polymer matrix of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (MW ~ 700 g/mol; PEGDA 700). Released irinotecan inhibited the proliferation of U251 malignant glioma cells. Since the therapeutic compounds are released through different pathways, specifically diffusion through the polymer matrix versus TS channels, the release rate can be controlled independently through the design of the structure and material of particle components.

  9. Differential toxicity and influence of salinity on acute toxicity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differential toxicity and influence of salinity on acute toxicity of copper sulphate and lead nitrate against Oreochromis niloticus. KA Bawa-Allah, F Osuala, J Effiong. Abstract. This study investigated the salinity-tolerance of Oreochromis niloticus and the influence of salinity changes on the acute toxicities of copper sulphate ...

  10. Phase II Pilot Study of Bevacizumab in Combination with Temozolomide and Regional Radiation Therapy for Up-Front Treatment of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme: Interim Analysis of Safety and Tolerability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Albert; Filka, Emese; McGibbon, Bruce; Nghiemphu, Phioanh Leia; Graham, Carrie; Yong, William H.; Mischel, Paul; Liau, Linda M.; Bergsneider, Marvin; Pope, Whitney; Selch, Michael; Cloughesy, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess interim safety and tolerability of a 10-patient, Phase II pilot study using bevacizumab (BV) in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) and regional radiation therapy (RT) in the up-front treatment of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: All patients received standard external beam regional RT of 60.0 Gy in 30 fractions started within 3 to 5 weeks after surgery. Concurrently TMZ was given daily at 75 mg/m 2 for 42 days during RT, and BV was given every 2 weeks at 10 mg/kg starting with the first day of RT/TMZ. After a 2-week interval upon completion of RT, the post-RT phase commenced with resumption of TMZ at 150 to 200 mg/m 2 for 5 days every 4 weeks and continuation of BV every 2 weeks. Results: For these 10 patients, toxicities were compiled until study discontinuation or up to ∼40 weeks from initial study treatment for those remaining on-study. In terms of serious immediate or delayed neurotoxicity, 1 patient developed presumed radiation-induced optic neuropathy. Among the toxicities that could be potentially treatment related, relatively high incidences of fatigue, myelotoxicity, wound breakdown, and deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism were observed. Conclusion: The observed toxicities were acceptable to continue enrollment toward the overall target group of 70 patients. Preliminary efficacy analysis shows encouraging mean progression-free survival. At this time data are not sufficient to encourage routine off-label use of BV combined with TMZ/RT in the setting of newly diagnosed glioblastoma without longer follow-up, enrollment of additional patients, and thorough efficacy assessment

  11. Biological control of toxic cyanobacteri

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlela, Luyanda L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available . Ecotoxicity studies: is toxicity reduced? (Testing on daphnids, fish and human cell lines) Resulting impacts on cyanotoxins (Toxin conformation changes, ELISA detection) Competition assays against toxic cyanobacteria (Can Bacillus etc. outcompete...

  12. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  13. Use of toxicity assays for evaluating the effectiveness of groundwater remediation with Fenton’s reagent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Bennedsen, Lars; Christophersen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    evaluates in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using modified Fenton’s reagent (H2O2 + chelated Fe2+) as a groundwater remedy. Three injections were performed over a period to test treatment efficacy. Performance monitoring samples were collected from two depths both prior to and during treatment, and analyzed...... treatment with Fenton’s reagent the toxicity had increased and now needed 7100 times dilution to reduce toxicity to the LC10 probably due to mobilization of metals. It is concluded that toxicity assay is a useful tool for evaluating samples from contaminated sites and that toxicity assays and chemical...

  14. Toxic waste liquor disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Toxic waste liquors, especially radio active liquors, are disposed in a sub-zone by feeding down a bore hole a first liquid, then a buffer liquid (e.g. water), then the toxic liquors. Pressure variations are applied to the sub-zone to mix the first liquid and liquors to form gels or solids which inhibit further mixing and form a barrier between the sub-zone and the natural waters in the environment of the sub-zone. In another example the location of the sub-zone is selected so that the environement reacts with the liquors to produce a barrier around the zone. Blind bore holes are used to monitor the sub-zone profile. Materials may be added to the liquor to enhance barrier formation. (author)

  15. The toxicity of vanadium on gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive system, and its influence on fertility and fetuses malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Wilk

    2017-09-01

    Additionally, this research identifies the doses of vanadium which lead to pathological alterations becoming visible within tissues. Moreover, this study includes information about the protective efficacy of some substances in view of the toxicity of vanadium.

  16. Portable, accurate toxicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L.; Hinds, A.A.; Vieaux, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Ever tightening environmental regulations, severe penalties for non-compliance, and expensive remediation costs have stimulated development of methods to detect and measure toxins. Most of these methods are bioassays that must be performed in the laboratory; none previously devised has been truly portable. The US Army, through the Small Business Innovative Research program, has developed a hand-held, field deployable unit for testing toxicity of battlefield water supplies. This patented system employs the measurable quenching, in the presence of toxins, of the natural bioluminescence produced by the marine dinoflagellate alga Pyrocystis lunula. The procedure's inventor used it for years to measure toxicity concentrations of chemical warfare agents actually, their simulants, primarily in the form of pesticides and herbicides plus assorted toxic reagents, waterbottom samples, drilling fluids, even blood. While the procedure is more precise, cheaper, and faster than most bioassays, until recently it was immobile. Now it is deployable in the field. The laboratory apparatus has been proven to be sensitive to toxins in concentrations as low as a few parts per billion, repeatable within a variation of 10% or less, and unlike some other bioassays effective in turbid or colored media. The laboratory apparatus and the hand-held tester have been calibrated with the EPA protocol that uses the shrimplike Mysidopsis bahia. The test organism tolerates transportation well, but must be rested a few hours at the test site for regeneration of its light-producing powers. Toxicity now can be measured confidently in soils, water columns, discharge points, and many other media in situ. Most significant to the oil industry is that drilling fluids can be monitored continuously on the rig

  17. Lead toxicity: current concerns.

    OpenAIRE

    Goyer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has be...

  18. Toxic Substances Control Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  19. Kombucha--toxicity alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Kombucha mushroom, also known as Manchurian mushroom, is a mail-order product touted to lower blood pressure and raise T-cell counts. No controlled trials have been conducted to test these claims. Aspergillus, a mold that may grow on the Kombucha mushroom, attacks the brain and may be fatal to persons with weakened immune systems. Reported toxicity reactions have included stomach problems and yeast infections. Taking Kombucha in combination with other drugs may affect the drugs potency.

  20. Toxicity of nitrogen pentoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diggle, W M; Gage, J C

    1954-01-01

    Two ppM N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ for 4 h or 1 ppM, 4 h/day for 12 days produced acute pulmonary edema in rats. Ten daily 4-h exposures to 0.5 ppM produced no edema but respiratory distress. NO/sub 2/ produced no edema (some hemorrhage) at 80 mg/m/sup 3/. Nitric acid vapor (63 mg/m/sup 3/) had no obvious toxic effect.

  1. Separations chemistry of toxic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.; Barr, M.; Barrans, R.

    1996-01-01

    Sequestering and removing toxic metal ions from their surroundings is an increasingly active area of research and is gaining importance in light of current environmental contamination problems both within the DOE complex and externally. One method of separating metal ions is to complex them to a molecule (a ligand or chelator) which exhibits specific binding affinity for a toxic metal, even in the presence of other more benign metals. This approach makes use of the sometimes subtle differences between toxic and non-toxic metals resulting from variations in size, charge and shape. For example, toxic metals such as chromium, arsenic, and technetium exist in the environment as oxyanions, negatively charged species with a characteristic tetrahedral shape. Other toxic metals such as actinides and heavy metals are positively charged spheres with specific affinities for particular donor atoms such as oxygen (for actinides) and nitrogen (for heavy metals). In most cases the toxic metals are found in the presence of much larger quantities of less toxic metals such as sodium, calcium and iron. The selectivity of the chelators is critical to the goal of removing the toxic metals from their less toxic counterparts. The approach was to build a ligand framework that complements the unique characteristics of the toxic metal (size, charge and shape) while minimizing interactions with non-toxic metals. The authors have designed ligands exhibiting specificity for the target metals; they have synthesized, characterized and tested these ligands; and they have shown that they exhibit the proposed selectivity and cooperative binding effects

  2. Modern toxic antipersonnel projectiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Yvan; Regenstreif, Philippe; Fanton, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 1944, Kurt von Gottberg, the SS police chief in Minsk, was shot and injured by 2 Soviet agents. Although he was only slightly injured, he died 6 hours later. The bullets were hollow and contained a crystalline white powder. They were 4-g bullets, semi-jacketed in cupronickel, containing 28 mg of aconitine. They were later known as akonitinnitratgeschosse. The Sipo (the Nazi security police) then ordered a trial with a 9-mm Parabellum cartridge containing Ditran, an anticholinergic drug with hallucinogenic properties causing intense mental confusion. In later years, QNB was used and given the NATO code BZ (3-quinuclidinyl-benzylate). It was proven that Saddam Hussein had this weapon (agent 15) manufactured and used it against the Kurds. Serbian forces used the same type of weapon in the Bosnian conflict, particularly in Srebrenica.The authors go on to list the Cold War toxic weapons developed by the KGB and the Warsaw pact countries for the discreet elimination of dissidents and proindependence leaders who had taken refuge in the West. These weapons include PSZh-13 launchers, the Troika electronic sequential pistol, and the ingenious 4-S110T captive piston system designed by the engineer Stechkin. Disguised as a cigarette case, it could fire a silent charge of potassium cyanide. This rogues gallery also includes the umbrella rigged to inject a pellet of ricin (or another phytalbumin of similar toxicity, such as abrin or crotin) that was used to assassinate the Bulgarian writer and journalist Georgi Markov on September 7, 1978, in London.During the autopsy, the discovery of a bullet burst into 4 or 5 parts has to make at once suspecting the use of a toxic substance. Toxicological analysis has to look for first and foremost aconitine, cyanide, suxamethonium, Ditran, BZ, or one of the toxic phytalbumins. The use of such complex weapons has to make suspect a powerful organization: army, secret service, terrorism. The existence of the Russian UDAR spray

  3. Thyroid cancer in toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerci C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Many authors have claimed that hyperthyroidism protects against thyroid cancer and believed that the incidence of malignancy is lower in patients with toxic multinodular goiter (TMG than in those with non-toxic multinodular goiter. But in recent studies, it was reported that the incidence of malignancy with TMG is not as low as previously thought. Aim : To compare the thyroid cancer incidence in patients with toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter. Settings and Design : Histology reports of patients treated surgically with a preoperative diagnosis of toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter were reviewed to identify the thyroid cancer incidence. Patients having a history of neck irradiation or radioactive iodine therapy were excluded from the study. Materials and Methods : We reviewed 294 patients operated between 2001-2005 from toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter. One hundred and twenty-four of them were toxic and 170 were non-toxic. Hyperthyroidism was diagnosed by elevated tri-iodothyroinine / thyroxine ratios and low thyroid-stimulating hormone with clinical signs and symptoms. All patients were evaluated with ultrasonography and scintigraphy and fine needle aspiration biopsy. Statistical Analysis Used : Significance of the various parameters was calculated by using ANOVA test. Results : The incidence of malignancy was 9% in the toxic and 10.58% in the non-toxic multinodular goiter group. Any significant difference in the incidence of cancer and tumor size between the two groups could not be detected. Conclusions : The incidence of malignancy in toxic multinodular goiter is not very low as thought earlier and is nearly the same in non-toxic multinodular goiter.

  4. Narcissism and Toxic Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Psychology 36, (1978): 635-42; Albert Bandura , “Moral Disengagement in the Perpetration of Inhumanities,” Personality and Social Psychology Review, (3)3...1999): 193-209; Albert Bandura , Self- Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (New York: Freeman, 1997); Albert Bandura , Social Foundations of Thought and...Action: A Social Cognition Theory (Englewood Cliffs, NH: Prentice Hall, 1986). 9. Bandura , “Moral Disengagement in the Perpetration of Inhumanities

  5. Vaccine-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis: A case and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Dev; Aleshin, Maria; Turegano, Mamina; Chiu, Melvin; Worswick, Scott

    2018-01-15

    Erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are cutaneous hypersensitivityreactions that develop in response to specific triggers such as medications and certain infections. Vaccines, which undergo rigorous safety testing prior to use in humans, are a rare cause of SJS/TEN and little is known about the frequency of such events and corresponding pathogenesis. Herein, we discuss a case of suspected TEN in a 19-year-old woman who received the meningococcal B vaccine (the first report of such an association) and conduct a systematic review of the associated literature. We also discuss management of this patient with a single dose of etanercept. Relevant literature was searched using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) method. A total of 29 articles reporting EM, SJS, or TEN following vaccination were included from >5 countries. Of the 29, 22 articles reported EM, 6/29 reported SJS, and 4/29 reported TEN (3 articlesreported cases of both EM and SJS/TEN). We suggest consideration of vaccines as an etiology for cases of SJS or TEN that begin with an EM-like presentation, and provide further evidence for the use of etanercept as a viable treatment for TEN.

  6. Is LSD toxic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, David E; Grob, Charles S

    2018-03-01

    LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) was discovered almost 75 years ago, and has been the object of episodic controversy since then. While initially explored as an adjunctive psychiatric treatment, its recreational use by the general public has persisted and on occasion has been associated with adverse outcomes, particularly when the drug is taken under suboptimal conditions. LSD's potential to cause psychological disturbance (bad trips) has been long understood, and has rarely been associated with accidental deaths and suicide. From a physiological perspective, however, LSD is known to be non-toxic and medically safe when taken at standard dosages (50-200μg). The scientific literature, along with recent media reports, have unfortunately implicated "LSD toxicity" in five cases of sudden death. On close examination, however, two of these fatalities were associated with ingestion of massive overdoses, two were evidently in individuals with psychological agitation after taking standard doses of LSD who were then placed in maximal physical restraint positions (hogtied) by police, following which they suffered fatal cardiovascular collapse, and one case of extreme hyperthermia leading to death that was likely caused by a drug substituted for LSD with strong effects on central nervous system temperature regulation (e.g. 25i-NBOMe). Given the renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of LSD and other psychedelic drugs, it is important that an accurate understanding be established of the true causes of such fatalities that had been erroneously attributed to LSD toxicity, including massive overdoses, excessive physical restraints, and psychoactive drugs other than LSD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxic potential of palytoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patocka, Jiří; Gupta, Ramesh C; Wu, Qing-hua; Kuca, Kamil

    2015-10-01

    This review briefly describes the origin, chemistry, molecular mechanism of action, pharmacology, toxicology, and ecotoxicology of palytoxin and its analogues. Palytoxin and its analogues are produced by marine dinoflagellates. Palytoxin is also produced by Zoanthids (i.e. Palythoa), and Cyanobacteria (Trichodesmium). Palytoxin is a very large, non-proteinaceous molecule with a complex chemical structure having both lipophilic and hydrophilic moieties. Palytoxin is one of the most potent marine toxins with an LD50 of 150 ng/kg body weight in mice exposed intravenously. Pharmacological and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated that palytoxin acts as a hemolysin and alters the function of excitable cells through multiple mechanisms of action. Palytoxin selectively binds to Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with a Kd of 20 pM and transforms the pump into a channel permeable to monovalent cations with a single-channel conductance of 10 pS. This mechanism of action could have multiple effects on cells. Evaluation of palytoxin toxicity using various animal models revealed that palytoxin is an extremely potent neurotoxin following an intravenous, intraperitoneal, intramuscular, subcutaneous or intratracheal route of exposure. Palytoxin also causes non-lethal, yet serious toxic effects following dermal or ocular exposure. Most incidents of palytoxin poisoning have manifested after oral intake of contaminated seafood. Poisonings in humans have also been noted after inhalation, cutaneous/systemic exposures with direct contact of aerosolized seawater during Ostreopsis blooms and/or through maintaining aquaria containing Cnidarian zoanthids. Palytoxin has a strong potential for toxicity in humans and animals, and currently this toxin is of great concern worldwide.

  8. Pharmacokinetics, Biodistribution, and Toxicity Evaluation of Anti-SEMA3A (F11) in In Vivo Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehyun; Kim, Donggeon; Son, Eunju; Yoo, Su-Ji; Sa, Jason K; Shin, Yong Jae; Yoon, Yeup; Nam, DO-Hyun

    2018-05-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK), tissue distribution and toxicity of F11 antibody to semaphorin 3A in mouse models and explore its anti-angiogenic and tumor-inhibitory effect. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models were established via subcutaneous implantation of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells and treated with F11. F11 significantly attenuated tumor growth and angiogenesis in the GBM PDX model. Within the range of administered doses, the PK of F11 in serum demonstrated a linear fashion, consistent with general PK profiles of soluble antigen-targeting antibodies. Additionally, the clearance level was detected at between 4.63 and 7.12 ml/d/kg, while the biological half-life was measured at 6.9 and 9.4 days. Tissue distribution of F11 in kidney, liver and heart was consistent with previously reported antibody patterns. However, the presence of F11 in the brain was an interesting finding. Collectively, our results revealed angiogenic and tumor-inhibitory effect of F11 antibody and its potential therapeutic use within a clinical framework based on PK, biodistribution and toxicity evaluation in mouse models. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. Metal metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Whelton, B.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Peterson, D.P.; Oldham, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    This research focuses on the role of pregnancy and lactation in susceptibility to the toxic effects of cadmium and lead. Responses under investigation include lead-induced changes in pathways for vitamin D and calcium metabolism and cadmium-induced alterations in kidney function and skeletal structure. The second area focuses on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and other actinide elements. Studies currently being conducted in nonhuman primates to develop a procedure to determine GI absorption values of uranium and plutonium that does not require sacrifice of the animal. 6 refs

  10. Control of air toxics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livengood, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    For more than 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory has supported the US DOE's Flue Gas Cleanup Program objective by developing new or improved environmental controls for industries that use fossil fuels. Argonne's pollutant emissions research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing, to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. The work on air toxics is currently divided into two components: Investigating measures to improve the removal of mercury in existing pollution-control systems applied to coal combustion; and, Developing sensors and control techniques for emissions found in the textile industry

  11. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Hernán Pérez de la Ossa

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  12. Dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy and irradiation of subventricular zones in relation to tumor control outcomes of patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusumawidjaja G

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Grace Kusumawidjaja,1 Patricia Zhun Hong Gan,1 Whee Sze Ong,2 Achiraya Teyateeti,3 Pittaya Dankulchai,3 Daniel Yat Harn Tan,1 Eu Tiong Chua,1 Kevin Lee Min Chua,1 Chee Kian Tham,4 Fuh Yong Wong,1 Melvin Lee Kiang Chua1,5 1Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 2Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 3Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand; 4Division of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 5Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with high relapse rate. In this study, we aimed to determine if dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy improved tumor control and survival in GBM patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 49 and 23 newly-diagnosed histology-proven GBM patients, treated with DE radiotherapy delivered in 70 Gy (2.33 Gy per fraction and conventional doses (60 Gy, respectively, between 2007 and 2013. Clinical target volumes for 70 and 60 Gy were defined by 0.5 and 2.0 cm expansion of magnetic resonance imaging T1-gadolinium-enhanced tumor/surgical cavity, respectively. Bilateral subventricular zones (SVZ were contoured on a co-registered pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging and planning computed tomography dataset as a 5 mm wide structure along the lateral margins of the lateral ventricles. Survival outcomes of both cohorts were compared using log-rank test. Radiation dose to SVZ in the DE cohort was evaluated. Results: Median follow-up was 13.6 and 15.1 months for the DE- and conventionally-treated cohorts, respectively. Median overall survival (OS of patients who received DE radiotherapy was 15.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] =11.0–18.6, while median OS of the latter cohort was 18.4 months (95% CI =12.5–31.4, P=0.253. Univariate analyses of

  13. Polish natural bee honeys are anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic agents in human glioblastoma multiforme U87MG cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Moskwa

    Full Text Available Honey has been used as food and a traditional medicament since ancient times. However, recently many scientists have been concentrating on the anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory and other properties of honey. In this study, we investigated for the first time an anticancer effect of different honeys from Poland on tumor cell line - glioblastoma multiforme U87MG. Anti-proliferative activity of honeys and its interferences with temozolomide were determined by a cytotoxicity test and DNA binding by [H3]-thymidine incorporation. A gelatin zymography was used to conduct an evaluation of metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in U87MG treatment with honey samples. The honeys were previously tested qualitatively (diastase activity, total phenolic content, lead and cadmium content. The data demonstrated that the examined honeys have a potent anti-proliferative effect on U87MG cell line in a time- and dose-dependent manner, being effective at concentrations as low as 0.5% (multifloral light honey - viability 53% after 72 h of incubation. We observed that after 48 h, combining honey with temozolomide showed a significantly higher inhibitory effect than the samples of honey alone. We observed a strong inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 for the tested honeys (from 20 to 56% and from 5 to 58% compared to control, respectively. Our results suggest that Polish honeys have an anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effect on U87MG cell line. Therefore, natural bee honey can be considered as a promising adjuvant treatment for brain tumors.

  14. Association of the CC genotype of the regulatory BCL2 promoter polymorphism (-938C>A) with better 2-year survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hindy, Nicolai; Bachmann, Hagen S; Lambertz, Nicole; Adamzik, Michael; Nückel, Holger; Worm, Karl; Zhu, Yuan; Sure, Ulrich; Siffert, Winfried; Sandalcioglu, I Erol

    2011-06-01

    Bcl-2 plays a key role in the downregulation of apoptosis and proliferation and leads to increased chemoresistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The authors investigated the role of a common regulatory single-nucleotide polymorphism (-938C>A), which is located in the inhibitory P2 promoter of BCL2. Data from 160 patients suffering from GBM were retrospectively evaluated. Study inclusion criteria consisted of available DNA and, in patients still alive, a follow-up of at least 24 months. Results were analyzed with respect to the basic clinical data, type of surgical intervention (gross-total resection [GTR] versus stereotactic biopsy [SB]), adjuvant therapy, MGMT promoter methylation, and survival at the 2-year follow-up. At the 2-year follow-up, 127 (79.4%) of the 160 patients had died. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed a significantly higher rate of survival for homo- and heterozygous C-allele carriers (p = 0.031). In the GTR group, the survival rate was 47.1% for homozygous C-allele carriers, 32.0% for heterozygous C-allele carriers, and only 21.4% for homozygous A-allele carriers (p = 0.024). The SB group showed no genotype-dependent differences. Multivariable Cox regression revealed that the BCL2 (-938AA) genotype was an independent negative prognostic factor for 2-year survival in the GTR group according to the BCL2 (-938CC) genotype reference group (hazard ratio 2.50, 95% CI 1.14-5.48, p = 0.022). These results suggested that the (-938C>A) polymorphism is a survival prognosticator as well as a marker for a high-risk group among patients with GBM who underwent GTR.

  15. Immunohistochemically determined total epidermal growth factor receptor levels not of prognostic value in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme: Report from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, Arnab; Seiferheld, Wendy; Tu Xiaoyu; Wang Huijun; Zhang Huazhong; Ang, K. Kian; Hammond, Elizabeth; Curran, Walter; Mehta, Minesh

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) performed an analysis of patterns of immunohistochemically detected total epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein expression levels and their prognostic significance on archival tissue in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients from prior prospective RTOG clinical trials. Methods and materials: Patients in this study had been treated on previous RTOG GBM trials (RTOG 7401, 7918, 8302, 8409, 9006, 9305, 9602, and 9806). Tissue microarrays were prepared from 155 patients enrolled in these trials. These specimens were stained using a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for the extracellular binding domain of EGFR to detect total EGFR (including both wild-type phosphorylated and wild-type unphosphorylated isoforms with some cross-reactivity with EGFRvIII). The intensity of total EGFR protein expression was measured by computerized quantitative image analysis using the SAMBA 4000 Cell Image Analysis System. The parameters measured were the mean optical densities over the labeled areas and the staining index, which represents the proportion of stained area relative to the mean stain concentration. Both parameters were correlated with the clinical outcome. Results: No differences in either overall or progression-free survival could be demonstrated by the mean optical density class or mean optical density quartile or the staining index of total EGFR immunostaining among the representative RTOG GBM cases. Conclusion: Total EGFR protein expression levels, as measured immunohistochemically, do not appear to be of prognostic value in newly diagnosed GBM patients. Given the accumulating clinical evidence of the activity of anti-EGFR agents in GBM and the preclinical data suggesting the important role of downstream mediators as effectors of EGFR signaling, the RTOG is conducting additional investigations into the prognostic value of activation patterns of EGFR signaling, both at the level of the receptor

  16. Functional differences between PD-1+ and PD-1- CD4+ effector T cells in healthy donors and patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany A Goods

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1 have been highly successful in the treatment of cancer. While PD-1 expression has been widely investigated, its role in CD4+ effector T cells in the setting of health and cancer remains unclear, particularly in the setting of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive and common form of brain cancer. We examined the functional and molecular features of PD-1+CD4+CD25-CD127+Foxp3-effector cells in healthy subjects and in patients with GBM. In healthy subjects, we found that PD-1+CD4+ effector cells are dysfunctional: they do not proliferate but can secrete large quantities of IFNγ. Strikingly, blocking antibodies against PD-1 did not rescue proliferation. RNA-sequencing revealed features of exhaustion in PD-1+ CD4 effectors. In the context of GBM, tumors were enriched in PD-1+ CD4+ effectors that were similarly dysfunctional and unable to proliferate. Furthermore, we found enrichment of PD-1+TIM-3+ CD4+ effectors in tumors, suggesting that co-blockade of PD-1 and TIM-3 in GBM may be therapeutically beneficial. RNA-sequencing of blood and tumors from GBM patients revealed distinct differences between CD4+ effectors from both compartments with enrichment in multiple gene sets from tumor infiltrating PD-1-CD4+ effectors cells. Enrichment of these gene sets in tumor suggests a more metabolically active cell state with signaling through other co-receptors. PD-1 expression on CD4 cells identifies a dysfunctional subset refractory to rescue with PD-1 blocking antibodies, suggesting that the influence of immune checkpoint inhibitors may involve recovery of function in the PD-1-CD4+ T cell compartment. Additionally, co-blockade of PD-1 and TIM-3 in GBM may be therapeutically beneficial.

  17. Systemic approaches identify a garlic-derived chemical, Z-ajoene, as a glioblastoma multiforme cancer stem cell-specific targeting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yuchae; Park, Heejoo; Zhao, Hui-Yuan; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Woo-Young

    2014-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most common brain malignancies and has a very poor prognosis. Recent evidence suggests that the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC) in GBM and the rare CSC subpopulation that is resistant to chemotherapy may be responsible for the treatment failure and unfavorable prognosis of GBM. A garlic-derived compound, Z-ajoene, has shown a range of biological activities, including anti-proliferative effects on several cancers. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that Z-ajoene specifically inhibits the growth of the GBM CSC population. CSC sphere-forming inhibition was achieved at a concentration that did not exhibit a cytotoxic effect in regular cell culture conditions. The specificity of this inhibitory effect on the CSC population was confirmed by detecting CSC cell surface marker CD133 expression and biochemical marker ALDH activity. In addition, stem cell-related mRNA profiling and real-time PCR revealed the differential expression of CSC-specific genes, including Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog, upon treatment with Z-ajoene. A proteomic approach, i.e., reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) and Western blot analysis, showed decreased SMAD4, p-AKT, 14.3.3 and FOXO3A expression. The protein interaction map (http://string-db.org/) of the identified molecules suggested that the AKT, ERK/p38 and TGFβ signaling pathways are key mediators of Z-ajoene's action, which affects the transcriptional network that includes FOXO3A. These biological and bioinformatic analyses collectively demonstrate that Z-ajoene is a potential candidate for the treatment of GBM by specifically targeting GBM CSCs. We also show how this systemic approach strengthens the identification of new therapeutic agents that target CSCs.

  18. The effect of combining recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha with local radiation on tumor control probability of a human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Peigen; Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A.; Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF-α) on a human glioblastoma multiforme (U87) xenograft in nude mice, and to study the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation on the tumor control probability of this tumor model. Methods and Materials: U87 xenograft was transplanted SC into the right hindleg of NCr/Sed nude mice (7-8 weeks old, male). When tumors reached a volume of about 110 mm 3 , mice were randomly assigned to treatment: rHuTNF-α alone compared with normal saline control; or local radiation plus rHuTNF-α vs. local radiation plus normal saline. Parameters of growth delay, volume doubling time, percentage of necrosis, and cell loss factor were used to assess the antitumor effects of rHuTNF-α on this tumor. The TCD 50 (tumor control dose 50%) was used as an endpoint to determine the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation. Results: Tumor growth in mice treated with a dose of 150 μg/kg body weight rHuTNF-α, IP injection daily for 7 consecutive days, was delayed about 8 days compared to that in controls. Tumors in the treatment group had a significantly longer volume doubling time, and were smaller in volume and more necrotic than matched tumors in control group. rHuTNF-α also induced a 2.3 times increase of cell loss factor. The administration of the above-mentioned dose of rHuTNF-α starting 24 h after single doses of localized irradiation under hypoxic condition, resulted in a significant reduction in TCD 50 from the control value of 60.9 Gy to 50.5 Gy (p 50 value in the treatment vs. the control groups

  19. SU-E-T-183: Feasibility of Extreme Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme Using 4π Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D; Rwigema, J; Yu, V; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Selch, M; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: GBM recurrence primarily occurs inside or near the high-dose radiation field of original tumor site requiring greater than 100 Gy to significantly improve local control. We utilize 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy to test the feasibility of planning target volume (PTV) margin expansions or extreme dose escalations without incurring additional radiation toxicities. Methods: 11 GBM patients treated with VMAT to a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were replanned with 4π. Original VMAT plans were created with 2 to 4 coplanar or non-coplanar arcs using 3 mm hi-res MLC. The 4π optimization, using 5 mm MLC, selected and inverse optimized 30 beams from a candidate pool of 1162 beams evenly distributed through 4π steradians. 4π plans were first compared to clinical plans using the same prescription dose. Two more studies were then performed to respectively escalate the GTV and PTV doses to 100 Gy, followed by a fourth plan expanding the PTV by 5 mm and maintaining the prescription dose. Results: The standard 4π plan significantly reduced (p<0.01) max and mean doses to critical structures by a range of 47.0–98.4% and 61.0–99.2%, respectively. The high dose PTV/high dose GTV/expanded PTV studies showed a reduction (p<0.05) or unchanged* (p>0.05) maximum dose of 72.1%/86.7%/77.1% (chiasm), 7.2%*/27.7%*/30.7% (brainstem), 39.8%*/84.2%/51.9%* (spinal cord), 69.0%/87.0%/66.9% (L eye), 76.2%/88.1%/84.1% (R eye), 95.0%/98.6%/97.5% (L lens), 93.9%/98.8%/97.6% (R lens), 74.3%/88.5%/72.4% (L optical nerve), 80.4%/91.3%/75.7% (R optical nerve), 64.8%/84.2%/44.9%* (L cochlea), and 85.2%/93.0%/78.0% (R cochlea), respectively. V30 and V36 for both brain and (brain - PTV) were reduced for all cases except the high dose PTV plan. PTV dose coverage increased for all 4π plans. Conclusion: Extreme dose escalation or further margin expansion is achievable using 4π, maintaining or reducing OAR doses. This study indicates that clinical trials employing 4π delivery using

  20. Toxicity of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Among radionuclides of importance in atomic energy, 3 H has relatively low toxicity. The main health and environmental worry is the possibility that significant biological effects may follow from protracted exposure to low concentrations in water. To examine this possible hazard and measure toxicity at low tritium concentrations, chronic exposure studies were done on mice and monkeys. During vulnerable developmental periods animals were exposed to 3 HOH, and mice were exposed also to 60 Co gamma irradiation and energy-related chemical agents. The biological endpoint measured was the irreversible loss of female germ cells. Effects from tritium were observed at surprisingly low concentrations where 3 H was found more damaging than previously thought. Comparisons between tritium and gamma radiation showed the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to be greater than 1 and to reach approximately 3 at very low exposures. For perspective, other comparisons were made: between radiation and chemical agents, which revealed parallels in action on germ cells, and between pre- and postnatal exposure, which warn of possible special hazard to the fetus from both classes of energy-related byproducts

  1. Toxic compounds in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Islam, Md Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-07-01

    There is a wealth of information about the nutritional and medicinal properties of honey. However, honey may contain compounds that may lead to toxicity. A compound not naturally present in honey, named 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), may be formed during the heating or preservation processes of honey. HMF has gained much interest, as it is commonly detected in honey samples, especially samples that have been stored for a long time. HMF is a compound that may be mutagenic, carcinogenic and cytotoxic. It has also been reported that honey can be contaminated with heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium. Honey produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum contains alkaloids that can be poisonous to humans, while honey collected from Andromeda flowers contains grayanotoxins, which can cause paralysis of limbs in humans and eventually leads to death. In addition, Melicope ternata and Coriaria arborea from New Zealand produce toxic honey that can be fatal. There are reports that honey is not safe to be consumed when it is collected from Datura plants (from Mexico and Hungary), belladonna flowers and Hyoscamus niger plants (from Hungary), Serjania lethalis (from Brazil), Gelsemium sempervirens (from the American Southwest), Kalmia latifolia, Tripetalia paniculata and Ledum palustre. Although the symptoms of poisoning due to honey consumption may differ depending on the source of toxins, most common symptoms generally include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, headache, palpitations or even death. It has been suggested that honey should not be considered a completely safe food. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Thallium toxicity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvjetko, Petra; Cvjetko, Ivan; Pavlica, Mirjana

    2010-03-01

    Thallium is a naturally occurring trace element, widely distributed in the earth's crust, but at very low concentrations. It does not have a known biological use and does not appear to be an essential element for life. It has been considered one of the most toxic heavy metals.Occasionally, there are reports on thallium poisoning as results of suicide or murder attempt or accident. The main threat to humans is through occupational exposure, environmental contamination, and accumulation in food, mainly in vegetables grown on contaminated soil. Increasing use in emerging new technologies and demanding high-tech industry constantly raise concern about exposure risk to all living organisms. Thallium is considered a cumulative poison that can cause adverse health effects and degenerative changes in many organs. The effects are the most severe in the nervous system. The exact mechanism of thallium toxicity still remains unknown, although impaired glutathione metabolism, oxidative stress, and disruption of potassium-regulated homeostasis may play a role. The lack of data about mutagenic, carcinogenic, or teratogenic effects of thallium compounds in humans calls for further research.

  3. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  4. Acute and subacute toxicity of 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Danielle Maia

    2013-01-01

    Before starting clinical trials of a new drug, it is necessary to perform a battery of safety tests for assessing human risk. Radiopharmaceuticals like any new drug must be tested taking into account its specificity, duration of treatment and especially the toxicity of both parties, the unlabeled molecule and its radionuclide, apart from impurities emanating from radiolysis. Regulatory agencies like the Food and Drug Administration - USA (FDA) and the European Medicine Agency (EMEA), establish guidelines for the regulation of production and research of radiopharmaceuticals. In Brazil the production of radiopharmaceuticals was not regulated until the end of 2009, when were established by the National Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (ANVISA) resolutions No. 63, which refers to the Good Manufacturing Practices of Radiopharmaceuticals and No. 64 which seeks the registration of record radiopharmaceuticals. To obtain registration of radiopharmaceuticals are necessary to prove the quality, safety, efficacy and specificity of the drug . For the safety of radiopharmaceuticals must be presented studies of acute toxicity, subacute and chronic toxicity as well as reproductive, mutagenic and carcinogenic. Nowadays IPEN-CNEN/SP produces one of the most important radiopharmaceutical of nuclear medicine, the 18 F-FDG, which is used in many clinical applications, particularly in the diagnosis and staging of tumors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the systemic toxicity (acute/ subacute) radiopharmaceutical 18 F-FDG in an in vivo test system, as recommended by the RDC No. 64, which will serve as a model for protocols toxicity of radiopharmaceuticals produced at IPEN. The following tests were performed: tests of acute and subacute toxicity, biodistribution studies of 18 F-FDG, comet assay and reproductive toxicity. In acute toxicity, healthy rats were injected . (author)

  5. Wild lettuce (Lactuca virosa) toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Besharat, Sima; Besharat, Mahsa; Jabbari, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Wild lettuce (Lactuca virosa) can cause toxic effects when eaten. Wild lettuce grows in the north of Iran and some natives consume it unaware of its adverse side effects. We describe eight patients with manifestations of wild lettuce toxicity, admitted to a general hospital affiliated to the Golestan University of Medical Sciences. All the patients recovered (although one had to spend 48 h in the intensive care unit) and no chronic complications were reported. A clinical suspicion of toxicity...

  6. Cyclophosphamide-induced pulmonary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, D.W.; Macler, L.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    Unlike radiation effects, pulmonary toxicity following drug treatments may develop soon after exposure. The dose-response relationship between Cyclophosphamide and lung toxicity was investigated using increased breathing frequency assays used successfully for radiation induced injury. The data indicate that release of protein into the alveolus may play a significant role in Cy induced pulmonary toxicity. Although the mechanism responsible for the increased alveolar protein is as yet not identified, the present findings suggest that therapeutic intervention to inhibit protein release may be an approach to protect the lungs from toxic effects. (UK)

  7. E-Cigarette Toxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegin, Gulay; Mekala, Hema Madhuri; Sarai, Simrat Kaur; Lippmann, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. In just a few short years, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have become increasingly popular, especially for younger individuals. Many people believe that e-cigarettes are safe. The inhaled aerosols of e-cigarettes contain numerous potential toxicities, some of which could be dangerous for health with long-term use. The safety of prolonged aerosol exposure is not known. The use of e-cigarettes as a harm-reduction tool at stopping tobacco smoking is not uniformly successful. E-cigarettes may be safer than tobacco products, but repeated prolonged exposure to their aerosols has its own considerable potential risk. The long-term health consequences of their use remain to be established. Physicians should vigorously discourage the use of e-cigarettes and tobacco products, with special emphasis on abstinence for younger people and during pregnancy or lactation.

  8. Children's Ability to Recognise Toxic and Non-Toxic Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Children's ability to identify common plants is a necessary prerequisite for learning botany. However, recent work has shown that children lack positive attitudes toward plants and are unable to identify them. We examined children's (aged 10-17) ability to discriminate between common toxic and non-toxic plants and their mature fruits presented in…

  9. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  10. Hydroxycut-induced Liver Toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Jan-Feb 2014 | Vol 4 ... supplements can be responsible for documented or undocumented adverse drug effects. The ... Keywords: Hydroxycut, Liver toxicity, Nutritional supplements ... Caffeine anhydrous: 200 mg* ... series and review of liver toxicity from herbal weight loss.

  11. One Health and Toxic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    One Health and toxic cyanobacteria Blooms of toxic freshwater blue-green algae or cyanobacteria (HABs) have been in the news after HABs associated with human and animal health problems have been reported in Florida, California and Utah during 2016. HABs occur in warm, slow moving...

  12. Toxic Leadership in Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James E.

    2014-01-01

    While research on the traits and skills of effective leaders is plentiful, only recently has the phenomenon of toxic leadership begun to be investigated. This research report focuses on toxic leadership in educational organizations--its prevalence, as well as the characteristics and early indicators. Using mixed methods, the study found four…

  13. Building a developmental toxicity ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy; Boobis, Alan; Burgoon, Lyle; Carney, Edward; Currie, Richard; Fritsche, Ellen; Knudsen, Thomas; Laffont, Madeleine; Piersma, Aldert H; Poole, Alan; Schneider, Steffen; Daston, George

    2018-04-03

    As more information is generated about modes of action for developmental toxicity and more data are generated using high-throughput and high-content technologies, it is becoming necessary to organize that information. This report discussed the need for a systematic representation of knowledge about developmental toxicity (i.e., an ontology) and proposes a method to build one based on knowledge of developmental biology and mode of action/ adverse outcome pathways in developmental toxicity. This report is the result of a consensus working group developing a plan to create an ontology for developmental toxicity that spans multiple levels of biological organization. This report provide a description of some of the challenges in building a developmental toxicity ontology and outlines a proposed methodology to meet those challenges. As the ontology is built on currently available web-based resources, a review of these resources is provided. Case studies on one of the most well-understood morphogens and developmental toxicants, retinoic acid, are presented as examples of how such an ontology might be developed. This report outlines an approach to construct a developmental toxicity ontology. Such an ontology will facilitate computer-based prediction of substances likely to induce human developmental toxicity. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Polish Toxic Currency Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Gontarski

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxic currency options are defined on the basis of the opposition to the nature (essence of an option contract, which is justified in terms of norms founded on the general law clause of characteristics (nature of a relation (which represents an independent premise for imposing restrictions on the freedom of contracts. So-understood toxic currency options are unlawful. Indeed they contravene iuris cogentis regulations. These include for instance option contracts, which are concluded with a bank, if the bank has not informed about option risk before concluding the contract; or the barrier options, which focus only on the protection of bank’s interests. Therefore, such options may appear to be invalid. Therefore, performing contracts for toxic currency options may be qualified as a criminal mismanagement. For the sake of security, the manager should then take into consideration filing a claim for stating invalidity (which can be made in a court verdict. At the same time, if the supervisory board member in a commercial company, who can also be a subject to mismanagement offences, commits an omission involving lack of reaction (for example, if he/she fails to notify of the suspected offence committed by the management board members acting to the company’s detriment when the management board makes the company conclude option contracts which are charged with absolute invalidity the supervisory board member so acting may be considered to act to the company’s detriment. In the most recent Polish jurisprudence and judicature the standard of a “good host” is treated to be the last resort for determining whether the manager’s powers resulting from criminal regulations were performed. The manager of the exporter should not, as a rule, issue any options. Issuing options always means assuming an obligation. In the case of currency put options it is an absolute obligation to purchase a given amount in euro at exchange rate set in advance. On the

  15. Toxic releases from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, E.S.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning in 1998, electric power plants burning coal or oil must estimate and report their annual releases of toxic chemicals listed in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) published by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper identifies the toxic chemicals of greatest significance for the electric utility sector and develops quantitative estimates of the toxic releases reportable to the TRI for a representative coal-fired power plant. Key factors affecting the magnitude and types of toxic releases for individual power plants also are discussed. A national projection suggests that the magnitude of electric utility industry releases will surpass those of the manufacturing industries which current report to the TRI. Risk communication activities at the community level will be essential to interpret and provide context for the new TRI results

  16. VARIATIONS IN REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANT IDENTIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, F

    2008-05-13

    Reproductive toxicants are a very important class of compounds. They present unique hazards to those of child bearing ages, perform their 'dirty work' using a wide variety of mechanisms on a number of different organs, and are regulatorily important. Because of all of this, properly identifying reproductive toxicants is important, but fraught with difficulty. In this paper we will describe types or reproductive toxicants, their importance, and both mistakes and good practices that people who are not experts in reproductive toxicology may use in their attempts to identify them. Additionally, this paper will focus on chemical reproductive toxicants and will not address biological agents that could affect reproductive toxicity although many principles outlined here could be applied to that endeavor.

  17. Differentiating primary CNS lymphoma from glioblastoma multiforme: assessment using arterial spin labeling, diffusion-weighted imaging, and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Abe, Koichiro; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Maruoka, Yasuhiro; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshimoto, Koji; Mizoguchi, Masahiro [Kyushu University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Iwaki, Toru [Kyushu University, Department of Neuropathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Our purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in differentiating primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs) from glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs). Fifty-six patients including 19 with PCNSL and 37 with GBM were retrospectively studied. From the ASL data, an absolute tumor blood flow (aTBF) and a relative tumor blood flow (rTBF) were obtained within the enhancing portion of each tumor. In addition, the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin) and the maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) were obtained from DWI and FDG-PET data, respectively. Each of the four parameters was compared between PCNSLs and GBMs using Kruskal-Wallis test. The performance in discriminating between PCNSLs and GBMs was evaluated using the receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Area-under-the-curve (AUC) values were compared among the four parameters using a nonparametric method. The aTBF, rTBF, and ADCmin were significantly higher in GBMs (mean aTBF {+-} SD = 91.6 {+-} 56.0 mL/100 g/min, mean rTBF {+-} SD = 2.61 {+-} 1.61, mean ADCmin {+-} SD = 0.78 {+-} 0.19 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) than in PCNSLs (mean aTBF {+-} SD = 37.3 {+-} 10.5 mL/100 g/min, mean rTBF {+-} SD = 1.24 {+-} 0.37, mean ADCmin {+-} SD = 0.61 {+-} 0.13 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) (p < 0.005, respectively). In addition, SUVmax was significantly lower in GBMs (mean {+-} SD = 13.1 {+-} 6.34) than in PCNSLs (mean {+-} SD = 22.5 {+-} 7.83) (p < 0.005). The AUC for aTBF (0.888) was higher than those for rTBF (0.810), ADCmin (0.768), and SUVmax (0.848), although their difference was not statistically significant. ASL perfusion imaging is useful for differentiating PCNSLs from GBMs as well as DWI and FDG-PET. (orig.)

  18. CircSMARCA5 Inhibits Migration of Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells by Regulating a Molecular Axis Involving Splicing Factors SRSF1/SRSF3/PTB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Barbagallo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Circular RNAs (circRNAs have recently emerged as a new class of RNAs, highly enriched in the brain and very stable within cells, exosomes and body fluids. To analyze their involvement in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM pathogenesis, we assayed the expression of twelve circRNAs, physiologically enriched in several regions of the brain, through real-time PCR in a cohort of fifty-six GBM patient biopsies and seven normal brain parenchymas. We focused on hsa_circ_0001445 (circSMARCA5: it was significantly downregulated in GBM biopsies as compared to normal brain tissues (p-value < 0.00001, student’s t-test, contrary to its linear isoform counterpart that did not show any differential expression (p-value = 0.694, student’s t-test. Analysis of a public dataset revealed a negative correlation between the expression of circSMARCA5 and glioma’s histological grade, suggesting its potential negative role in the progression to malignancy. Overexpressing circSMARCA5 in U87MG cells significantly decreased their migration, but not their proliferation rate. In silico scanning of circSMARCA5 sequence revealed an enrichment in binding motifs for several RNA binding proteins (RBPs, specifically involved in splicing. Among them, serine and arginine rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1, a splicing factor known to be a positive controller of cell migration and known to be overexpressed in GBM, was predicted to bind circSMARCA5 by three different prediction tools. Direct interaction between circSMARCA5 and SRSF1 is supported by enhanced UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (eCLIP data for SRSF1 in K562 cells from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE. Consistently, U87MG overexpressing circSMARCA5 showed an increased expression of serine and arginine rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3 RNA isoform containing exon 4, normally skipped in a SRSF1-dependent manner, resulting in a non-productive non-sense mediated decay (NMD substrate. Interestingly, SRSF3 is known to interplay

  19. The effect of combining recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha with local radiation on tumor control probability of a human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Peigen; Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A; Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman D

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF-{alpha}) on a human glioblastoma multiforme (U87) xenograft in nude mice, and to study the effect of combining rHuTNF-{alpha} with local radiation on the tumor control probability of this tumor model. Methods and Materials: U87 xenograft was transplanted SC into the right hindleg of NCr/Sed nude mice (7-8 weeks old, male). When tumors reached a volume of about 110 mm{sup 3}, mice were randomly assigned to treatment: rHuTNF-{alpha} alone compared with normal saline control; or local radiation plus rHuTNF-{alpha} vs. local radiation plus normal saline. Parameters of growth delay, volume doubling time, percentage of necrosis, and cell loss factor were used to assess the antitumor effects of rHuTNF-{alpha} on this tumor. The TCD{sub 50} (tumor control dose 50%) was used as an endpoint to determine the effect of combining rHuTNF-{alpha} with local radiation. Results: Tumor growth in mice treated with a dose of 150 {mu}g/kg body weight rHuTNF-{alpha}, IP injection daily for 7 consecutive days, was delayed about 8 days compared to that in controls. Tumors in the treatment group had a significantly longer volume doubling time, and were smaller in volume and more necrotic than matched tumors in control group. rHuTNF-{alpha} also induced a 2.3 times increase of cell loss factor. The administration of the above-mentioned dose of rHuTNF-{alpha} starting 24 h after single doses of localized irradiation under hypoxic condition, resulted in a significant reduction in TCD{sub 50} from the control value of 60.9 Gy to 50.5 Gy (p < 0.01). Conclusion: rHuTNF-{alpha} exhibits an antitumor effect against U87 xenograft in nude mice, as evidenced by an increased delay in tumor growth as well as cell loss factor. Also, there was an augmentation of tumor curability when given in combination with radiotherapy, resulting in a significantly lower TCD{sub 50} value in the treatment vs. the

  20. MiR-196a exerts its oncogenic effect in glioblastoma multiforme by inhibition of IκBα both in vitro and in vivo

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Guang

    2014-01-23

    BackgroundRecent studies have revealed that miR-196a is upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and that it correlates with the clinical outcome of patients with GBM. However, its potential regulatory mechanisms in GBM have never been reported.MethodsWe used quantitative real-time PCR to assess miR-196a expression levels in 132 GBM specimens in a single institution. Oncogenic capability of miR-196a was detected by apoptosis and proliferation assays in U87MG and T98G cells. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of IκBα in GBM tissues, and a luciferase reporter assay was carried out to confirm whether IκBα is a direct target of miR-196a. In vivo, xenograft tumors were examined for an antiglioma effect of miR-196a inhibitors.ResultsWe present for the first time evidence that miR-196a could directly interact with IκBα 3′-UTR to suppress IκBα expression and subsequently promote activation of NF-κB, consequently promoting proliferation of and suppressing apoptosis in GBM cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our study confirmed that miR-196a was upregulated in GBM specimens and that high levels of miR-196a were significantly correlated with poor outcome in a large cohort of GBM patients. Our data from human tumor xenografts in nude mice treated with miR-196 inhibitors demonstrated that inhibition of miR-196a could ameliorate tumor growth in vivo.ConclusionsMiR-196a exerts its oncogenic effect in GBM by inhibiting IκBα both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of GBM and indicate that miR-196a may predict clinical outcome of GBM patients and serve as a new therapeutic target for GBM. © 2014 © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.