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Sample records for multicenter phase ii

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest for dementia: a naturalistic, multicenter phase II study

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    Frank Ana

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Available screening tests for dementia are of limited usefulness because they are influenced by the patient's culture and educational level. The Eurotest, an instrument based on the knowledge and handling of money, was designed to overcome these limitations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest in identifying dementia in customary clinical practice. Methods A cross-sectional, multi-center, naturalistic phase II study was conducted. The Eurotest was administered to consecutive patients, older than 60 years, in general neurology clinics. The patients' condition was classified as dementia or no dementia according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. We calculated sensitivity (Sn, specificity (Sp and area under the ROC curves (aROC with 95% confidence intervals. The influence of social and educational factors on scores was evaluated with multiple linear regression analysis, and the influence of these factors on diagnostic accuracy was evaluated with logistic regression. Results Sixteen neurologists recruited a total of 516 participants: 101 with dementia, 380 without dementia, and 35 who were excluded. Of the 481 participants who took the Eurotest, 38.7% were totally or functionally illiterate and 45.5% had received no formal education. Mean time needed to administer the test was 8.2+/-2.0 minutes. The best cut-off point was 20/21, with Sn = 0.91 (0.84–0.96, Sp = 0.82 (0.77–0.85, and aROC = 0.93 (0.91–0.95. Neither the scores on the Eurotest nor its diagnostic accuracy were influenced by social or educational factors. Conclusion This naturalistic and pragmatic study shows that the Eurotest is a rapid, simple and useful screening instrument, which is free from educational influences, and has appropriate internal and external validity.

  2. An international, multicenter phase II trial of bortezomib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

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    Kim, George P.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Szydlo, Daniel; Mok, Tony S. K.; Marshke, Robert; Holen, Kyle; Picus, Joel; Boyer, Michael; Pitot, Henry C.; Rubin, Joseph; Philip, Philip A.; Nowak, Anna; Wright, John J.; Erlichman, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and Rationale Bortezomib (PS-341, VELCADE®) is a selective inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, an integral component of the ubiquitinproteasome pathway. This phase II study evaluated the activity and tolerability of bortezomib in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Methods The primary endpoint was confirmed tumor response rate (RR) with secondary endpoints including duration of response, time to disease progression, survival and toxicity. Treatment consisted of bortezomib, 1.3 mg/m2 IV bolus on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 of each 21-day treatment cycle. Eligibility included: no prior systemic chemotherapy, ECOG PS 0-2, Child-Pugh A or B, preserved hematologic, hepatic and neurologic function; prior liver-directed therapy was permitted. Results Thirty-five patients enrolled and received a median of 2 cycles of treatment (range 1–12). Overall, 24 and 4 patients had a maximum severity of grade 3 and 4 adverse events (AEs), respectively. No treatment related deaths occurred. Only thrombocytopenia (11%) was seen in greater than 10% of patients. One patient achieved a partial response, lasting 13 weeks during treatment and progressed 11.6 months later; two patients received treatment for greater than 6 months. Median time-to-progression was 1.6 months and median survival was 6.0 months. Conclusions This international, multicenter trial evaluated bortezomib as monotherapy in unresectable HCC patients. And, despite the lack of significant activity, this report serves as a baseline clinical experience for the development of future dual biologic approaches including bortezomib. PMID:20839030

  3. A multicenter phase II trial of carboplatin and cetuximab for treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer.

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    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Bradford, Daniel S; Hensing, Thomas A; LaRocca, Renato V; Saleh, Mansoor; Evans, Tracey; Bakri, Kamal; Socinski, Mark A

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the activity of carboplatin and cetuximab in NSCLC. This was a single arm, multicenter phase II trial, and the primary objective was response rate. The overall response rate observed was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3-19), the progression-free survival was 2.9 months (95% CI, 1.9-3.6), the median overall survival was 8.2 months (95% CI, 4.9-10.5), and 1-year survival rate was 33% (95% CI, 21-45). The combination of carboplatin and cetuximab demonstrated lower activity than double agent platinum-based therapy and does not warrant further development.

  4. Multicenter phase II study of sequential radioembolization-sorafenib therapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Pierce K H Chow

    Full Text Available The safety and tolerability of sequential radioembolization-sorafenib therapy is unknown. An open-label, single arm, investigator-initiated Phase II study (NCT0071279 was conducted at four Asia-Pacific centers to evaluate the safety and efficacy of sequential radioembolization-sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC not amenable to curative therapies.Sorafenib (400 mg twice-daily was initiated 14 days post-radioembolization with yttrium-90 (90Y resin microspheres given as a single procedure. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability and best overall response rate (ORR using RECIST v1.0.Secondary endpoints included: disease control rate (complete [CR] plus partial responses [PR] and stable disease [SD] and overall survival (OS.Twenty-nine patients with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC stage B (38% or C (62% HCC received a median of 3.0 GBq (interquartile range, 1.0 90Y-microspheres followed by sorafenib (median dose/day, 600.0 mg; median duration, 4.1 months. Twenty eight patients experienced ≥1 toxicity; 15 (52% grade ≥3. Best ORR was 25%, including 2 (7% CR and 5 (18% PR, and 15 (54% SD. Disease control was 100% and 65% in BCLC stage B and C, respectively. Two patients (7% had sufficient response to enable radical therapy. Median survivals for BCLC stage B and C were 20.3 and 8.6 months, respectively.This study shows the potential efficacy and manageable toxicity of sequential radioembolization-sorafenib.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00712790.

  5. A multicenter phase II study of carboplatin in advanced ovarian carcinoma: final report.

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    Kjorstad, K; Harris, A; Bertelsen, K; Slevin, M; Schultz, H; Hellman, K; Janssens, N; Martin, A; Canetta, R

    1992-03-01

    A phase II trial of single-agent carboplatin in advanced ovarian cancer was performed by 19 institutions from 10 European countries. A total of 260 patients were treated, with a median age of 55 (range: 20-79) years. Karnofsky performance status was 80-100 in about two-thirds of the patients. Prior therapy consisted of surgery only in 31 patients, irradiation in 9, chemotherapy without cisplatin in 45, and with cisplatin in 175. Carboplatin was administered as second-line therapy in about one-half and as third-line or more in one additional third of the study population. Initial dose was 400 mg/m2 in 90, 360 mg/m2 in 152, and 320 mg/m2 or less in 18 patients. A total of 971 courses (mean 3.7, median 2, range: 1-13) of therapy were administered. A total of 16 complete and 46 partial responses were observed in 226 evaluable patients, for an objective response rate of 27%. Efficacy was greater in chemotherapy-untreated patients (51% vs. 23%, p = 0.002). In cisplatin-pretreated patients activity was significantly higher in non-refractory patients (26% vs. 4%, p = 0.015). Myelosuppression was the most significant side effect. However, low hematologic counts seldom translated into clinically significant complications. Patients with impaired baseline creatinine clearance and poor performance status were at higher risk of developing severe myelosuppression during the initial course of treatment. Non hematologic side effects were rare and mild, except for emesis. Carboplatin has a definite role in the treatment of ovarian cancer, but almost complete cross-resistance with the parent compound was observed clinically.

  6. Multicenter phase II study of an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Matsuura, Kazuto; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Homma, Akihiro; Kirita, Tadaaki; Monden, Nobuya; Iwae, Shigemichi; Ota, Yojiro; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Otsuru, Hiroshi; Tahara, Makoto; Kato, Kengo; Asai, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this multi-center phase II study was to clarify the clinical benefit of an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients during chemoradiotherapy. Patients and methods: Head and neck cancer patients who were to receive definitive or postoperative chemoradiotherapy were enrolled. The opioid-based pain control program consisted of a three-step ladder, with basic regimens of: Step 1: acetaminophen at 500–1000 mg three times a day. Step 2: fast-acting morphine at 5 mg three times a day before meals for a single day. Step 3: long-acting morphine administered around-the-clock, with a starting dosage of 20 mg/day and no upper limit set in principle. The primary endpoint of this study was compliance with radiotherapy. Results: A total of 101 patients from 10 institutions were registered between February 2008 and May 2009 and included in the analysis. The major combination chemotherapy regimen was cisplatin alone (76%). The rate of completion of radiotherapy was 99% and the rate of unplanned breaks in radiotherapy was 13% (13/101, 90% confidence interval: 9.9–16.5%). Median maximum quantity of morphine used per day was 35 mg (range 0–150 mg). Conclusions: Use of a systematic pain control program may improve compliance with CRT.

  7. Brain injury in the international multicenter randomized SafeBoosC phase II feasibility trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Anne M; Hagmann, Cornelia; Alderliesten, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal cerebral perfusion during the first days of life in preterm infants is associated with higher grades of intraventricular hemorrhages and lower developmental score. In SafeBoosC II, we obtained a significant reduction of cerebral hypoxia by monitoring cerebral oxygenation in c...

  8. Melphalan, prednisone, thalidomide and defibrotide in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: results of a multicenter phase I/II trial.

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    Palumbo, Antonio; Larocca, Alessandra; Genuardi, Mariella; Kotwica, Katarzyna; Gay, Francesca; Rossi, Davide; Benevolo, Giulia; Magarotto, Valeria; Cavallo, Federica; Bringhen, Sara; Rus, Cecilia; Masini, Luciano; Iacobelli, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Mitsiades, Constantine; Anderson, Kenneth; Boccadoro, Mario; Richardson, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Defibrotide is a novel orally bioavailable polydisperse oligonucleotide with anti-thrombotic and anti-adhesive effects. In SCID/NOD mice, defibrotide showed activity in human myeloma xenografts. This phase I/II study was conducted to identify the most appropriate dose of defibrotide in combination with melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide in patients with relapsed and relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, and to determine its safety and tolerability as part of this regimen. This was a phase I/II, multicenter, dose-escalating, non-comparative, open label study. Oral melphalan was administered at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg on days 1-4, prednisone at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg also on days 1-4 and thalidomide at a dose of 50-100 mg/day continuously. Defibrotide was administered orally at three dose-levels: 2.4, 4.8 or 7.2 g on days 1-4 and 1.6, 3.2, or 4.8 g on days 5-35. Twenty-four patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. In all patients, the complete response plus very good partial response rate was 9%, and the partial response rate was 43%. The 1-year progression-free survival and 1-year overall survival rates were 34% and 90%, respectively. The most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events included neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia and fatigue. Deep vein thrombosis was reported in only one patient. This combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide together with defibrotide showed anti-tumor activity with a favorable tolerability. The maximum tolerated dose of defibrotide was identified as 7.2 g p.o. on days 1-4 followed by 4.8 g p.o. on days 5-35. Further trials are needed to confirm the role of this regimen and to evaluate the combination of defibrotide with new drugs.

  9. A Multicenter Phase I/II Study of the BCNU Implant (Gliadel ® Wafer) for Japanese Patients with Malignant Gliomas

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    AOKI, Tomokazu; NISHIKAWA, Ryo; SUGIYAMA, Kazuhiko; NONOGUCHI, Naosuke; KAWABATA, Noriyuki; MISHIMA, Kazuhiko; ADACHI, Jun-ichi; KURISU, Kaoru; YAMASAKI, Fumiyuki; TOMINAGA, Teiji; KUMABE, Toshihiro; UEKI, Keisuke; HIGUCHI, Fumi; YAMAMOTO, Tetsuya; ISHIKAWA, Eiichi; TAKESHIMA, Hideo; YAMASHITA, Shinji; ARITA, Kazunori; HIRANO, Hirofumi; YAMADA, Shinobu; MATSUTANI, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Carmustine (BCNU) implants (Gliadel® Wafer, Eisai Inc., New Jersey, USA) for the treatment of malignant gliomas (MGs) were shown to enhance overall survival in comparison to placebo in controlled clinical trials in the United States and Europe. A prospective, multicenter phase I/II study involving Japanese patients with MGs was performed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of BCNU implants. The study enrolled 16 patients with newly diagnosed MGs and 8 patients with recurrent MGs. After the insertion of BCNU implants (8 sheets maximum, 61.6 mg BCNU) into the removal cavity, various chemotherapies (including temozolomide) and radiotherapies were applied. After placement, overall and progression-free survival rates and whole blood BCNU levels were evaluated. In patients with newly diagnosed MGs, the overall survival rates at 12 months and 24 months were 100.0% and 68.8%, and the progression-free survival rate at 12 months was 62.5%. In patients with recurrent MGs, the progression-free survival rate at 6 months was 37.5%. There were no grade 4 or higher adverse events noted due to BCNU implants, and grade 3 events were observed in 5 of 24 patients (20.8%). Whole blood BCNU levels reached a peak of 19.4 ng/mL approximately 3 hours after insertion, which was lower than 1/600 of the peak BCNU level recorded after intravenous injections. These levels decreased to less than the detection limit (2.00 ng/mL) after 24 hours. The results of this study involving Japanese patients are comparable to those of previous studies in the United States and Europe. PMID:24739422

  10. The impact of written information and counseling (WOMAN-PRO II Program) on symptom outcomes in women with vulvar neoplasia: A multicenter randomized controlled phase II study.

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    Raphaelis, Silvia; Mayer, Hanna; Ott, Stefan; Mueller, Michael D; Steiner, Enikö; Joura, Elmar; Senn, Beate

    2017-07-01

    To determine whether written information and/or counseling based on the WOMAN-PRO II Program decreases symptom prevalence in women with vulvar neoplasia by a clinically relevant degree, and to explore the differences between the 2 interventions in symptom prevalence, symptom distress prevalence, and symptom experience. A multicenter randomized controlled parallel-group phase II trial with 2 interventions provided to patients after the initial diagnosis was performed in Austria and Switzerland. Women randomized to written information received a predefined set of leaflets concerning wound care and available healthcare services. Women allocated to counseling were additionally provided with 5 consultations by an Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) between the initial diagnosis and 6months post-surgery that focused on symptom management, utilization of healthcare services, and health-related decision-making. Symptom outcomes were simultaneously measured 5 times to the counseling time points. A total of 49 women with vulvar neoplasia participated in the study. Symptom prevalence decreased in women with counseling by a clinically relevant degree, but not in women with written information. Sporadically, significant differences between the 2 interventions could be observed in individual items, but not in the total scales or subscales of the symptom outcomes. The results indicate that counseling may reduce symptom prevalence in women with vulvar neoplasia by a clinically relevant extent. The observed group differences between the 2 interventions slightly favor counseling over written information. The results justify testing the benefit of counseling thoroughly in a comparative phase III trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Substitution of ethambutol with linezolid during the intensive phase of treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis: study protocol for a prospective, multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase II trial.

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    Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Jung-Kyu; Yoon, Ho Il; Jeong, Ina; Heo, Eunyoung; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jinwoo; Choi, Sun Mi; Park, Jong Sun; Joh, Joon-Sung; Cho, Young-Jae; Lee, Yeon Joo; Kim, Se Joong; Hwang, Young Ran; Kim, Hyeonjeong; Ki, Jongeun; Choi, Hyungsook; Han, Jiyeon; Ahn, Heejung; Hahn, Seokyung; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2017-02-13

    Linezolid, an oxazolidinone, substantially improves treatment outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. We started a trial to test whether the use of linezolid instead of ethambutol could increase the rate of sputum culture conversion as of 8 weeks of treatment in patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis. This is a phase II, multicenter, randomized study with three arms. We are enrolling patients with pulmonary tuberculosis without rifampicin resistance screened by the Xpert MTB/RIF® assay. The standard treatment arm uses isoniazid (6 months), rifampicin (6 months), pyrazinamide (2 months), and ethambutol (2 months). Experimental arm 1 uses linezolid (600 mg/day) for 4 weeks instead of ethambutol. Experimental arm 2 uses linezolid (600 mg/day) for 2 weeks instead of ethambutol. The primary outcome is the sputum culture conversion rate on liquid media after 2 months of treatment. Secondary outcomes include the sputum culture conversion rate on solid media after 2 months of treatment, time to sputum culture conversion on liquid and solid media, cure rate, and treatment success rate. The frequencies of total adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs will be described and documented. Based on an α = 0.05 level of significance, a power of 85%, a 15% difference in the culture conversion rate after 2 months between the control arm and experimental arm 1 (75% vs. 90%), a 10% default (loss to follow-up) rate, and a 10% culture failure, the required number per arm was calculated to be 143 (429 in total). This trial will reveal the effectiveness and safety of 2 or 4 weeks of use of linezolid instead of ethambutol for patients with drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis. If a new regimen including linezolid shows a higher culture conversion rate by week 8, and is safe, it could be tested as a 4-month antituberculosis treatment regimen in the future. ClincalTrials.gov, NCT01994460 . Registered on 13 November 2013.

  12. Surgical outcomes of robot-assisted rectal cancer surgery using the da Vinci Surgical System: a multi-center pilot Phase II study.

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    Tsukamoto, Shunsuke; Nishizawa, Yuji; Ochiai, Hiroki; Tsukada, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Takeshi; Shida, Dai; Ito, Masaaki; Kanemitsu, Yukihide

    2017-12-01

    We conducted a multi-center pilot Phase II study to examine the safety of robotic rectal cancer surgery performed using the da Vinci Surgical System during the introduction period of robotic rectal surgery at two institutes based on surgical outcomes. This study was conducted with a prospective, multi-center, single-arm, open-label design to assess the safety and feasibility of robotic surgery for rectal cancer (da Vinci Surgical System). The primary endpoint was the rate of adverse events during and after robotic surgery. The secondary endpoint was the completion rate of robotic surgery. Between April 2014 and July 2016, 50 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 10 (20%) had rectosigmoid cancer, 17 (34%) had upper rectal cancer, and 23 (46%) had lower rectal cancer; six underwent high anterior resection, 32 underwent low anterior resection, 11 underwent intersphincteric resection, and one underwent abdominoperineal resection. Pathological stages were Stage 0 in 1 patient, Stage I in 28 patients, Stage II in 7 patients and Stage III in 14 patients. Pathologically complete resection was achieved in all patients. There was no intraoperative organ damage or postoperative mortality. Eight (16%) patients developed complications of all grades, of which 2 (4%) were Grade 3 or higher, including anastomotic leakage (2%) and conversion to open surgery (2%). The present study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of robotic rectal cancer surgery, as reflected by low morbidity and low conversion rates, during the introduction period. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Gemcitabine and irinotecan as first-line therapy for carcinoma of unknown primary: results of a multicenter phase II trial.

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    Shernan G Holtan

    Full Text Available Metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP has a very poor prognosis, and no standard first-line therapy currently exists. Here, we report the results of a phase II study utilizing a combination of gemcitabine and irinotecan as first-line therapy. Treatment was with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2 and irinotecan 75 mg/m(2 weekly times four on a six week cycle (Cohort I. Due to excessive toxicity, the dose and schedule were modified as follows: gemcitabine 750 mg/m(2 and irinotecan 75 mg/m(2 given weekly times three on a four week cycle (Cohort II. The primary endpoint was the confirmed response rate (CR + PR. Secondary endpoints consisted of adverse events based upon the presence or absence of the UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A1*28 (UGT1A1*28 polymorphism, time to progression, and overall survival. Thirty-one patients were enrolled with a median age of 63 (range: 38-94, and 26 patients were evaluable for efficacy. Significant toxicity was observed in Cohort 1, characterized by 50% (7/14 patients experiencing a grade 4+ adverse event, but not in cohort II. The confirmed response rate including patients from both cohorts was 12% (95% CI: 2-30%, which did not meet the criteria for continued enrollment. Overall median survival was 7.2 months (95% CI: 4.0 to 11.6 for the entire cohort but notably longer in cohort II than in cohort I (9.3 months (95% CI: 4.1 to 12.1 versus 4.0 months (95% CI: 2.2 to 15.6. Gemcitabine and irinotecan is not an active combination when used as first line therapy in patients with metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary. Efforts into developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches remain important for improving the outlook for this heterogeneous group of patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00066781.

  14. Multicenter prospective randomized phase II study of antimicrobial prophylaxis in low-risk patients undergoing colon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Junzo; Ikeda, Kimimasa; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Murata, Kohei; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Umeshita, Koji; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Monden, Morito

    2010-10-01

    Postoperative antimicrobial therapy is generally administered as standard prophylaxis against postoperative infection, despite a lack of sufficient evidence for its usefulness. This study was a phase II study to evaluate the necessity of postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing a colectomy. Patients received 1 g cefmetazole or flomoxef immediately after anesthetic induction, every 3 h during surgery, and then later once again on the next day. They were randomly assigned to receive either cefmetazole or flomoxef. Ninety-one patients were enrolled in the study. A surgical site infection (SSI) occurred in 7.7% (7/91) of patients. All cases were superficial incisional infections. When comparing the two drugs, SSI occurred in 8.3% (4/48) of patients treated with cefmetazole and in 7.0% (3/43) treated with flomoxef, showing no significant difference (P > 0.99). Antimicrobial prophylaxis was well tolerated when used on the day of a colectomy and once again on the next day.

  15. A multicenter, phase II study of bortezomib (PS-341) in patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Power, Derek G; Kindler, Hedy L; Holen, Kyle D; Kemeny, Margaret M; Ilson, David H; Tang, Laura; Capanu, Marinela; Wright, John J; Kelsen, David P

    2011-12-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kB (NFkB) is implicated in gastric cancer carcinogenesis and survival, and its inhibition by proteosome inhibition is associated with preclinical gastric cancer anti-tumor activity. We examined the single agent efficacy of bortezomib, a selective proteasome inhibitor, in gastric adenocarcinoma. We performed a phase II trial of bortezomib in patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) was administered on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 every 21 days. The primary endpoint was objective response rate(RR); the null hypothesis was RR <1% versus the alternative ≥15%. One response in the first stage(15 patients) was required before proceeding with an additional 18 patients. If at least 2 or more responses out of 33 were observed, further study with bortezomib was warranted. Correlative studies evaluated pre-treatment tumor expression of NFkB, IkB, p53, p21, and cyclin D1. We enrolled 16 patients (15 evaluable for response) from four institutions. No patients demonstrated an objective response(95% CI, 0-22%); one patient achieved stable disease. Fourteen out of 16 patients experienced ≥ grade 2 toxicity. The most common toxicity was fatigue in six patients (n = 4 grade 2, n = 2 grade 3). Seven patients experienced neuropathy (n = 5 grade 1, and 1 each grade 2 and 3). Seven (60%) had high cytoplasmic staining for NFkB. Single agent bortezomib is inactive in metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma and should not be pursued. Future study of proteasome inhibition in gastric adenocarcinoma should be considered in combination with targeted inhibition of other non-overlapping oncogenic pathways as a potential rational approach.

  16. Cetuximab in combination with chemoradiotherapy in Chinese patients with non-resectable, locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: A prospective, multicenter phase II trail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Xue; Wang, Jianhua; Sun, Xindong; Wang, Lvhua; Ye, Ming; Feng, Pingbo; Zhu, Guangying; Lu, You; Han, Chun; Zhu, Shuchai; Liao, Zhongxing; Yu, Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This multicenter phase II trial investigated cetuximab combined with chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Material and methods: Eligible patients with non-resectable, locally-advanced ESCC received cetuximab 400 mg/m 2 loading dose on day 1; and on day 1 of the 2nd–7th weeks: cetuximab 250 mg/m 2 , paclitaxel 45 mg/m 2 , and cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 , concurrent with 59.4 Gy/33 fractions of radiation therapy. Primary endpoint was clinical response rate. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), safety, and KRAS status. Results: Of 55 patients enrolled, 45 completed therapy. Forty-four patients had a clinical response: 29 complete response and 15 partial response. One-year PFS and OS of 45 evaluable patients were 84.23% and 93.33%, respectively, and 2-year PFS and OS were 74.87% and 80.00%, respectively. Non-hematologic adverse events were generally grade 1 or 2; primarily rash (92.7%), mucositis (45.5%), fatigue (41.8%), and nausea (38.2%). Grade 3 hematologic adverse events included neutropenia (32.7%) and anemia (1.8%). No KRAS mutations were identified in 50 evaluated samples. Conclusions: Cetuximab can be safely administered with chemoradiotherapy to patients with locally-advanced ESCC and may improve clinical response rate

  17. Immunochemotherapy with interleukin-2, interferon- α and 5-fluorouracil for progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a multicenter phase II study

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    Herpen, C M L van; Jansen, R L H; Kruit, W H J; Hoekman, K; Groenewegen, G; Osanto, S; Mulder, P H M De

    2000-01-01

    In patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma response rates of 7–26% have been achieved with immunotherapy. A high response rate of 48% in 35 patients has been reported for treatment with the combination of interferon-α (IFN-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (Atzpodien et al (1993 a) Eur J Cancer29A: S6–8). We conducted a multicentre phase II study to confirm these results. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients were treated as outpatients with an 8-week treatment cycle. Recombinant human IL-2 20 MU m−2was administered subcutaneously (s.c.) three times a week (t.i.w) in weeks 1 and 4 and 5 MU m−2t.i.w. in weeks 2 and 3. Recombinant human IFN-α 2a 6 MU m−2was administered s.c. once in weeks 1 and 4 and t.i.w. in weeks 2 and 3, and 9 MU m−2t.i.w. in weeks 5–8. 5-FU (750 mg m−2) was given as a bolus injection intravenous once a week in weeks 5–8. The treatment cycle was repeated once in case of response or minor response. Fifty-two patients entered the study. All had undergone a nephrectomy and had progressive metastatic disease. The median WHO-performance status was 1, the median number of metastatic sites was 2 (range 1–5) and the median time between the diagnosis of the primary tumour and the start of treatment was 12.9 months (range 1–153). Among the 51 patients, including four patients with early progressive disease, who were evaluable for response, the response rate was 11.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9–20.7%), with no complete responses. Median duration of response was 8.3 (range 3.8–22.4+) months. Median survival was 16.5 (range 1.8–30.5+) months. Grade 3/4 toxicity (WHO) occurred in 29/52 (55.8%) of the patients in cycle 1 and in 6/16 (37.5%) of the patients in cycle 2. It consisted mainly of anorexia, fatigue, nausea, fever and leucocytopenia. We cannot confirm the high response rate in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with the combination of IFN-α, IL-2 and 5-FU, as described

  18. Hypofractionated stereotactic boost in intermediate risk prostate carcinoma: Preliminary results of a multicenter phase II trial (CKNO-PRO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pasquier

    Full Text Available Dose escalation may improve curability in intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma. A multicenter national program was developed to assess toxicity and tumor response with hypofractionated stereotactic boost after conventional radiotherapy in intermediate-risk prostate cancer.Between August 2010 and April 2013, 76 patients with intermediated-risk prostate carcinoma were included in the study. A first course delivered 46 Gy by IMRT (68.4% of patients or 3D conformal radiotherapy (31.6% of patients. The second course delivered a boost of 18 Gy (3x6Gy within 10 days. Gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicities were evaluated as defined by NCI-CTCAE (v4.0. Secondary outcome measures were local control, overall and metastasis-free survival, PSA kinetics, and patient functional status (urinary and sexual according to the IIEF5 and IPSS questionnaires.The overall treatment time was 45 days (median, range 40-55. Median follow-up was 26.4 months (range, 13.6-29.9 months. Seventy-seven per cent (n = 58 of patients presented a Gleason score of 7. At 24 months, biological-free survival was 98.7% (95% CI, 92.8-99.9% and median PSA 0.46 ng/mL (range, 0.06-6.20 ng/mL. Grade ≥2 acute GI and GU toxicities were 13.2% and 23.7%, respectively. Grade ≥2 late GI and GU toxicities were observed in 6.6% and 2.6% of patients, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity was observed.Hypofractionated stereotactic boost is effective and safely delivered for intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma after conventional radiation. Mild-term relapse-free survival and tolerance results are promising, and further follow-up is warranted to confirm the results at long term.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01596816.

  19. Accelerated radiation therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx selected according to tumor cell kinetics--a phase II multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognoni, Paolo; Bignardi, Mario; Cazzaniga, L. Franco; Poli, A. Marisa; Richetti, Antonella; Bossi, Alberto; Rampello, Giuseppina; Barbera, Fernando; Soatti, Carlo; Bardelli, Donata; Giordano, Monica; Danova, Marco

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A Phase II multicenter trial testing an accelerated regimen of radiotherapy in locally advanced and inoperable cancers of the head and neck, in patients selected on the basis of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/DNA flow cytometry-derived tumor potential doubling time (T pot ). Methods and Materials: From September 1992 to September 1993, 23 patients consecutively diagnosed to have locally advanced, inoperable carcinomas of the oral cavity and the oropharynx, with T pot of ≤5 days, received an accelerated radiotherapy regimen (AF) based on a modification of the concomitant boost technique: 2 Gy/fraction once a day, delivered 5 days a week up to 26 Gy, followed by 2 Gy/fraction twice a day, with a 6-h interval, one of the two fractions being delivered as a concomitant boost to reduced fields, up to 66 Gy total dose (off-cord reduction at 46 Gy), shortening the overall treatment time to 4.5 weeks. A contemporary control group of 46 patients with T pot of >5 days or unknown was treated with conventional fractionation (CF): 2 Gy/fraction once a day, 5 days a week, up to 66 Gy in 6.5 weeks, with fields shrinkage after 46 Gy. Results: All patients completed the accelerated regimen according to protocol and in the prescribed overall treatment time. Immediate tolerance was fairly good: 65% of the patients in the AF group experienced Grade 3 mucositis vs. 45% in the CF group (p = n.s.). Symptoms related to mucosal reactions seemed to persist longer in AF than in CF patients. The crude proportion of mild (Grades 1 and 2) late effects on skin (p < 0.01) and salivary glands (p < 0.05) was higher in AF than in CF patients, although these reactions did not exceed the limits of tolerance. Three patients in the AF and 1 in the CF arm experienced a late Grade 4 bone complication. Actuarial estimates of severe (Grades 3 and 4) late complications showed a 2-year hazard of 33.3% in the AF arm and 49.7% in CF (p = NS). The actuarial 2-year local control rate of the AF patients was 49

  20. Nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a multicenter, randomized, open-label Phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu KG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available K Govind Babu,1 Kumar Prabhash,2 Ashok K Vaid,3 Bhawna Sirohi,3 Ravi B Diwakar,4 Raghunadha Rao,5 Madhuchanda Kar,6 Hemant Malhotra,7 Shona Nag,8 Chanchal Goswami,9 Vinod Raina,10 Ravi Mohan111Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 2Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, 3Artemis Health Institute, Delhi, 4Bangalore Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 5Nizam Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, 6B R Singh Hospital, Kolkata, 7Birla Cancer Centre, Jaipur, 8Jehangir Hospital, Pune, 9B P Poddar Hospital and Medical Research Ltd, Kolkata, 10Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi, 11King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, IndiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy (docetaxel and carboplatin versus chemotherapy alone in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer.Methods: This multicenter, open-label, Phase II study randomized 110 patients to receive nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy (nimotuzumab group or chemotherapy alone (control group, and comprised concomitant, maintenance, and follow-up phases. Nimotuzumab 200 mg was administered once weekly for 13 weeks during the first two phases with four cycles of chemotherapy and docetaxel 75 mg/m2 and carboplatin (area under the curve 5 mg/mL*min every 3 weeks for a maximum of four cycles during the concomitant phase. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (sum of complete response and partial response. Secondary endpoints, ie, overall survival and progression-free survival, were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Efficacy was evaluated on the intent-to-treat and efficacy-evaluable sets. Safety was assessed from adverse event and serious adverse event data.Results: The objective response rate was significantly higher in the nimotuzumab group than in the control group in the intent-to-treat population (54% versus 34.5%; P=0.04. A complete response and partial response were achieved in 3

  1. Absorbable hydrogel spacer use in men undergoing prostate cancer radiotherapy: 12 month toxicity and proctoscopy results of a prospective multicenter phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, Matthias; DeWeese, Theodore L; Herfarth, Klaus; Eble, Michael J; Pinkawa, Michael; Triest, Baukelien van; Kalisvaart, Robin; Weber, Damien C; Miralbell, Raymond; Song, Danny Y

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the recommended treatment options for localized prostate cancer. In randomized trials, dose escalation was correlated with better biochemical control but also with higher rectal toxicity. A prospective multicenter phase II study was carried out to evaluate the safety, clinical and dosimetric effects of the hydrogel prostate-rectum spacer. Here we present the 12 months toxicity results of this trial. Fifty two patients with localized prostate cancer received a transperineal PEG hydrogel injection between the prostate and rectum, and then received IMRT to a dose of 78 Gy. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity were recorded during treatment and at 3, 6 and 12 months following irradiation by using the RTOG/EORTC criteria. Additionally, proctoscopy was performed 12 months after treatment and the results were scored using the Vienna Rectoscopy Scale (VRS). Of the patients treated 39.6% and 12.5% experienced acute Grade 1 and Grade 2 GI toxicity, respectively. There was no Grade 3 or Grade 4 acute GI toxicity experienced in the study. Only 4.3% showed late Grade 1 GI toxicity, and there was no late Grade 2 or greater GI toxicity experienced in the study. A total of 41.7%, 35.4% and 2.1% of the men experienced acute Grade 1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 GU toxicity, respectively. There was no Grade 4 acute GU toxicity experienced in the study. Late Grade 1 and Grade 2 GU toxicity was experienced in 17.0% and 2.1% of the patients, respectively. There was no late Grade 3 or greater GU toxicity experienced in the study. Seventy one percent of the patients had a VRS score of 0, and one patient (2%) had Grade 3 teleangiectasia. There was no evidence of ulceration, stricture or necrosis at 12 months. The use of PEG spacer gel is a safe and effective method to spare the rectum from higher dose and toxicity

  2. Phase II multicenter randomized study of amifostine for prevention of acute radiation rectal toxicity: Topical intrarectal versus subcutaneous application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouloulias, Vassilis E.; Kouvaris, John R.; Pissakas, George; Mallas, Elias; Antypas, Christos; Kokakis, John D.; Matsopoulos, George; Michopoulos, Spyros; Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Vlahos, Lambros J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the cytoprotective effect of subcutaneous vs. intrarectal administration of amifostine against acute radiation toxicity. Methods and materials: Patients were randomized to receive amifostine either intrarectally (Group A, n = 27) or a 500-mg flat dose subcutaneously (Group B, n = 26) before irradiation. Therapy was delivered using a four-field technique with three-dimensional conformal planning. In Group A, 1,500 mg of amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution in 40 mL of enema. Two different toxicity scales were used: the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) rectal and urologic toxicity criteria and the Subjective-RectoSigmoid scale based on the endoscopic terminology of the World Organization for Digestive Endoscopy. Objective measurements with rectosigmoidoscopy were performed at baseline and 1-2 days after radiotherapy completion. The area under the curve for the time course of mucositis (RTOG criteria) during irradiation represented the mucositis index. Results: Intrarectal amifostine was feasible and well tolerated without any systemic or local side effects. According to the RTOG toxicity scale, Group A had superior results with a significantly lower incidence of Grades I-II rectal radiation morbidity (11% vs. 42%, p 0.04) but inferior results concerning urinary toxicity (48% vs. 15%, p 0.03). The mean rectal mucositis index and Subjective-RectoSigmoid score were significantly lower in Group A (0.44 vs. 2.45 [p = 0.015] and 3.9 vs. 6.0 [p = 0.01], respectively), and the mean urinary mucositis index was lower in Group B (2.39 vs. 0.34, p < 0.028). Conclusions: Intrarectal administration of amifostine (1,500 mg) seemed to have a cytoprotective efficacy in acute radiation rectal mucositis but was inferior to subcutaneous administration in terms of urinary toxicity. Additional randomized studies are needed for definitive decisions concerning the

  3. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, controlled phase III clinical trial of chicken type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Xu, Jian-Hua; Xiao, Feng; Bao, Chun-De; Ni, Li-Qing; Li, Xing-Fu; Wu, Yu-Qing; Sun, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Rong-Hua; Sun, Bao-Liang; Xu, Sheng-Qian; Liu, Shang; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Jie; Liu, Hua-Xiang; Wang, Ren-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Chicken type II collagen (CCII) is a protein extracted from the cartilage of chicken breast and exhibits intriguing possibilities for the treatment of autoimmune diseases by inducing oral tolerance. A 24-week, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, methotrexate (MTX)-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CCII in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five hundred three RA patients were included in the study. Patients received either 0.1 mg daily of CCII (n = 326) or 10 mg once a week of MTX (n = 177) for 24 weeks. Each patient was evaluated for pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), assessments by investigator and patient, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) by using the standard tools at baseline (week 0) and at weeks 12 and 24. Additionally, rheumatoid factor (RF) was evaluated at weeks 0 and 24. Measurement of a battery of biochemical parameters in serum, hematological parameters, and urine analysis was performed to evaluate the safety of CCII. Four hundred fifty-four patients (94.43%) completed the 24-week follow-up. In both groups, there were decreases in pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, HAQ, and assessments by investigator and patient, and all differences were statistically significant. In the MTX group, ESR and CRP decreased. RF did not change in either group. At 24 weeks, 41.55% of patients in the CCII group and 57.86% in the MTX group met the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR-20) and 16.89% and 30.82%, respectively, met the ACR 50% improvement criteria (ACR-50). Both response rates for ACR-20 and ACR-50 in the CCII group were lower than those of the MTX group, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The DAS28 (disease activity score using 28 joint counts) values of the two treatment groups were calculated, and there was a statistically

  4. Multicenter Phase II Study with Weekly Bendamustine and Paclitaxel as First- or Later-Line Therapy in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: RiTa II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Sibylle; Doering, Gabriele; Müller, Lothar; Grote-Metke, Albert; Müller, Roberto; Tomé, Oliver; Wiest, Wolfgang; Maisch, Andrea; Nekljudova, Valentina; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2011-12-01

    The combination of bendamustine (B) and paclitaxel (P) as anthracycline-free treatment option in patients with advanced breast cancer has been evaluated in the previous RiTa I trial. The regimen of weekly B 70 mg/m(2) and P 90 mg/m(2) with a pause every 4th week was established as an effective regimen with low toxicity. The aim of the present RiTa II study was to investigate the potential of BP as anthracycline-free combination therapy. The primary objective was to determine the progression-free survival (PFS); secondary endpoints were safety, tolerability, overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS). 26 patients were available, 15 received BP as first-line, 11 as beyond first-line treatment. 27% patients had triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Median PFS and OS were 7.3 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.5-10.9) and 14.9 months (95% CI: 9.9-22.9), respectively. The 1-year PFS rate was 20.3% and the 1-year OS rate 71.2%. The ORR was 42.3%, including 4 complete and 7 partial remissions. TNBC patients reached an ORR of 71.4%. Anthracycline-pretreated patients showed an ORR of 43.8%, confirming bendamustine's lack of cross-resistance to anthracycline agents. BP represents a favorable option with moderate toxicity in pretreated metastatic breast cancer and offers a possibility for application in anthracycline-pretreated and TNBC patients.

  5. Treatment of Plaque-Type Psoriasis With Oral CF101: Data from a Phase II/III Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Michael; Gospodinov, Dimitar Konstantinov; Gheorghe, Nicola; Mateev, Grisha Stefanov; Rusinova, Mariyana Venelinova; Hristakieva, Evgeniya; Solovastru, Laura Gheuca; Patel, Rita V; Giurcaneanu, Calin; Hitova, Mariela Chepileva; Purcaru, Anca Ioana; Horia, Beti; Tsingov, Iliya Iliev; Yankova, Rumyana Kaloferova; Kadurina, Miroslava Ilieva; Ramon, Michal; Rotaru, Maria; Simionescu, Olga; Benea, Vasile; Demerdjieva, Zdravka Velichkova; Cosgarea, Maria Rodica; Morariu, Horia Silviu; Michael, Ziv; Cristodor, Patricia; Nica, Carmen; Silverman, Michael H; Bristol, David R; Harpaz, Zivit; Farbstein, Motti; Cohen, Shira; Fishman, Pnina

    2016-08-01

    CF101, an adenosine A3 receptor agonist, is an orally bioavailable small molecule drug presenting an anti-psoriatic effect demonstrated in a Phase 2 clinical trial in psoriasis patients. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CF101 treatment in a Phase 2/3 study in patients with moderate to severe plaque-type psoriasis. This multicenter, double-blind, 2-segment, placebo-controlled study randomized subjects with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis to CF101 1 or 2 mg, or placebo twice daily. At either week 12 (Segment 1) or 16 (Segment 2), the placebo group crossed over to CF101 BID through week 32 in an open-label fashion. At week 12, following an interim analysis, the CF101 1mg group was discontinued due to futility. The primary endpoint was proportion of patients achieving ≥75% improvement in Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI 75). Efficacy testing was performed using the Cochran-Mantel Haenszel test, the primary analysis of PASI 75 was performed at the 0.035 significance level. CF101 had an excellent safety profile at all tested dosages with a profile similar to the placebo group. The most common adverse events were infections and gastrointestinal events, and there was no cumulative intolerance over the 32-week dosing period. The study did not meet the primary endpoint of PASI 75 at week 12 (2 mg: 8.5% vs. placebo: 6.9%, P=0.621). However, at week 32, PASI mean percent improvement with CF101 2 mg was 57% (P<0.001) compared to baseline, with linear improvement in PASI 50 (63.5%), 75 (35.5%), 90 (24.7%), and 100 (10.6%). Oral CF101 was found to be safe and very well tolerated, demonstrating evidence of efficacy in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis through 32 weeks of treatment. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(8):931-938.

  6. Sunitinib in relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a clinical and pharmacodynamic phase II multicenter study of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckstein, Rena; Kuruvilla, John; Chua, Neil; Lee, Christina; Macdonald, David A; Al-Tourah, Abdulwahab J; Foo, Alison H; Walsh, Wendy; Ivy, S Percy; Crump, Michael; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A

    2011-05-01

    There are limited effective therapies for most patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We conducted a phase II trial of the multi-targeted vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, 37.5 mg given orally once daily in adult patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL. Of 19 enrolled patients, 17 eligible patients were evaluable for toxicity and 15 for response. No objective responses were seen and nine patients achieved stable disease (median duration 3.4 months). As a result, the study was closed at the end of the first stage. Grades 3-4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 29% and 35%, respectively. There was no relationship between change in circulating endothelial cell numbers (CECs) and bidimensional tumor burden over time. Despite some activity in solid tumors, sunitinib showed no evidence of response in relapsed/refractory DLBCL and had greater than expected hematologic toxicity.

  7. Valproic Acid, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Combination with Paclitaxel for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Phase II/III Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Graziella Catalano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC has a median survival less than 5 months and, to date, no effective therapy exists. Taxanes have recently been stated as the main drug treatment for ATC, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid efficiently potentiates the effects of paclitaxel in vitro. Based on these data, this trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the combination of paclitaxel and valproic acid for the treatment of ATC. This was a randomized, controlled phase II/III trial, performed on 25 ATC patients across 5 centers in northwest Italy. The experimental arm received the combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m2/weekly and valproic acid (1,000 mg/day; the control arm received paclitaxel alone. Overall survival and disease progression, evaluated in terms of progression-free survival, were the primary outcomes. The secondary outcome was the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. The coadministration of valproic acid did not influence the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. Neither median survival nor median time to progression was statistically different in the two arms. Median survival of operated-on patients was significantly better than that of patients who were not operated on. The present trial demonstrates that the addition of valproic acid to paclitaxel has no effect on overall survival and disease progression of ATC patients. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2008-005221-11.

  8. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter Phase II study comparing the efficacy and safety of oral nemonoxacin with oral levofloxacin in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yingyuan; Wu, Jufang; Zhu, Demei; Sun, Shenghua; Zhao, Li; Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Hua; Ren, Zhenyi; Wang, Changzheng; Xiu, Qingyu; Xiao, Zuke; Cao, Zhaolong; Cui, Shehuai; Yang, Heping; Liang, Yongjie; Chen, Ping; Lv, Yuan; Hu, Chengping; Lv, Xiaoju; Liu, Shuang; Kuang, Jiulong; Li, Jianguo; Wang, Dexi; Chang, Liwen

    2017-12-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy and safety of nemonoxacin with levofloxacin in treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in a Phase II clinical trial. One hundred ninety-two patients with CAP were randomized to receive oral nemonoxacin (500 mg or 750 mg) or levofloxacin (500 mg) once daily for 7-10 days. Clinical and bacteriological responses were determined at the test of cure (TOC) visit in the full analysis set (FAS). The clinical cure rate of nemonoxacin (500 mg), nemonoxacin (750 mg), and levofloxacin (500 mg) was 93.3%, 87.3%, and 88.5%, respectively, in the FAS (n = 168), and 93.0%, 93.9%, and 88.9%, respectively in the per protocol set (n = 152). At the TOC visit, nemonoxacin at 500 mg and 750 mg was proven to be noninferior to levofloxacin at 500 mg in the FAS in terms of clinical efficacy. The overall bacteriological success rate was 83.3% in both nemonoxacin groups and 80.0% in the levofloxacin 500 mg group in the bacteriological FAS. The comprehensive efficacy rate was comparable among the three groups (87.5% for the nemonoxacin 500 mg group, 93.8% for the nemonoxacin 750 mg group, and 81.3% for the levofloxacin 500 mg group). Most drug-related adverse events were mild and transient, mainly gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, transient neutropenia, and elevated liver enzymes. No drug-related serious adverse events occurred. Either 500 mg or 750 mg of oral nemonoxacin taken once daily for 7-10 days demonstrated high clinical and bacteriological success rates in Chinese adult patients with CAP. Nemonoxacin at 500 mg once daily for 7-10 days is recommended for future Phase III clinical trials. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01537250. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Preliminary results of multicenter phase II trial of docetaxel (Taxotere) in combination with doxorubicin as first line chemotherapy in Indonesian patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalib, A; Darwis, I; Prayogo, N; Sutjipto

    2000-05-01

    Docetaxel and doxorubicin have produced a high degree of activity in previously untreated/treated patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The efficacy of Taxotere (T) single agent as 2nd line chemotherapy is well established in large randomized phase III studies. The objective of this study is to confirm the efficacy and safety of a combination of Taxotere with doxorubicin as 1st line chemotherapy in Indonesian MBC patients. TREATMENT AND METHOD: Eighteen patients age < or = 70 years with advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) with no prior taxane chemotherapy or prior cumulative doxorubicin (D) of no more than 250 mg/m2 and no heart disease were enrolled in this phase II study of D (50 mg/m2) IV bolus followed one hour later by Taxotere (T) 60 mg/m2 IV infusion over 1 hour every 3 weeks for 6 cycles treatments. A 3-day oral corticosteroid premedication was administered starting one day before the infusion of each cycle. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated at baseline and after cycle 6. 18 patients (pts) have been treated with 108 cycles administered. Median age was 46 years (31-58), WHO PS 0 = 50%, 1 = 50% and number of organs involved were: 2 (72%), 3 (22%) and 4 (6%). After 3 cycles, partial (PR) and no change (NC) responses occurred in 15 pts (83.3%) and 3 pts (16.7%). The best overall response after 6 cycles, including complete (CR) and partial (PR) responses, occurred in 13 pts (72.2%) including 3 CRs and 10 PRs. Two patients with extensive liver metastases at the baseline had a complete disappearance after 6 cycles. No patients developed congestive heart failure (CHF). Grade 3/4 hematological toxicities included leukopenia in 18 pts (100%), febrile neutropenia in 6 pts (33%), leukopenia with infection in 2 pts (11%), leukopenia with fever in 1 pt (5.5%), and anemia in 6 pts (33.3%). Nonhematological toxicities grade 3/4 included alopecia (61%), asthenia (4.6%), nausea/vomiting (2.7%), pain (2.7%), stomatitis (2.7%), and

  10. Intra-articular injection of two different doses of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells versus hyaluronic acid in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial (phase I/II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamo-Espinosa, José M; Mora, Gonzalo; Blanco, Juan F; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Nuñez-Córdoba, Jorge M; Sánchez-Echenique, Carmen; Bondía, José M; Aquerreta, Jesús Dámaso; Andreu, Enrique J; Ornilla, Enrique; Villarón, Eva M; Valentí-Azcárate, Andrés; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, María Consuelo; Valentí-Nin, Juan Ramón; Prósper, Felipe

    2016-08-26

    Mesenchymal stromal cells are a promising option to treat knee osteoarthritis. Their safety and usefulness must be confirmed and the optimal dose established. We tested increasing doses of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in combination with hyaluronic acid in a randomized clinical trial. A phase I/II multicenter randomized clinical trial with active control was conducted. Thirty patients diagnosed with knee OA were randomly assigned to intraarticularly administered hyaluronic acid alone (control), or together with 10 × 10(6) or 100 × 10(6) cultured autologous BM-MSCs, and followed up for 12 months. Pain and function were assessed using VAS and WOMAC and by measuring the knee motion range. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging analyses were performed to analyze joint damage. No adverse effects were reported after BM-MSC administration or during follow-up. BM-MSC-administered patients improved according to VAS during all follow-up evaluations and median value (IQR) for control, low-dose and high-dose groups change from 5 (3, 7), 7 (5, 8) and 6 (4, 8) to 4 (3, 5), 2 (1, 3) and 2 (0,4) respectively at 12 months (low-dose vs control group p = 0.005 and high-dose vs control group p injection of in vitro expanded autologous BM-MSCs together with HA is a safe and feasible procedure that results in a clinical and functional improvement of knee OA, especially when 100 × 10(6) cells are administered. These results pave the way for a future phase III clinical trial. gov identifier NCT02123368. Nº EudraCT: 2009-017624-72.

  11. COMPARE CPM-RMI Trial: Intramyocardial Transplantation of Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived CD133+ Cells and MNCs during CABG in Patients with Recent MI: A Phase II/III, Multicenter, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mohammad Hassan; Madani, Hoda; Ahmadi Tafti, Seyed Hossein; Moshkani Farahani, Maryam; Kazemi Saleh, Davood; Hosseinnejad, Hossein; Hosseini, Saeid; Hekmat, Sepideh; Hossein Ahmadi, Zargham; Dehghani, Majid; Saadat, Alireza; Mardpour, Soura; Hosseini, Seyedeh Esmat; Esmaeilzadeh, Maryam; Sadeghian, Hakimeh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Bassi, Ali; Amin, Ahmad; Fazeli, Roghayeh; Sharafi, Yaser; Arab, Leila; Movahhed, Mansour; Davaran, Saeid; Ramezanzadeh, Narges; Kouhkan, Azam; Hezavehei, Ali; Namiri, Mehrnaz; Kashfi, Fahimeh; Akhlaghi, Ali; Sotoodehnejadnematalahi, Fattah; Vosough Dizaji, Ahmad; Gourabi, Hamid; Syedi, Naeema; Shahverdi, Abdol Hosein; Baharvand, Hossein; Aghdami, Nasser

    2018-07-01

    The regenerative potential of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD133+ stem cells in the heart varies in terms of their pro-angiogenic effects. This phase II/III, multicenter and double-blind trial is designed to compare the functional effects of intramyocardial autologous transplantation of both cell types and placebo in patients with recent myocardial infarction (RMI) post-coronary artery bypass graft. This was a phase II/III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial COMPARE CPM-RMI (CD133, Placebo, MNCs - recent myocardial infarction) conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki that assessed the safety and efficacy of CD133 and MNCs compared to placebo in patients with RMI. We randomly assigned 77 eligible RMI patients selected from 5 hospitals to receive CD133+ cells, MNC, or a placebo. Patients underwent gated single photon emission computed tomography assessments at 6 and 18 months post-intramyocardial transplantation. We tested the normally distributed efficacy outcomes with a mixed analysis of variance model that used the entire data set of baseline and between-group comparisons as well as within subject (time) and group×time interaction terms. There were no related serious adverse events reported. The intramyocardial transplantation of both cell types increased left ventricular ejection fraction by 9% [95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.14% to 15.78%, P=0.01] and improved decreased systolic wall thickening by -3.7 (95% CI: -7.07 to -0.42, P=0.03). The CD133 group showed significantly decreased non-viable segments by 75% (P=0.001) compared to the placebo and 60% (P=0.01) compared to the MNC group. We observed this improvement at both the 6- and 18-month time points. Intramyocardial injections of CD133+ cells or MNCs appeared to be safe and efficient with superiority of CD133+ cells for patients with RMI. Although the sample size precluded a definitive statement about clinical outcomes, these results have provided the

  12. EffenDys-Fentanyl Buccal Tablet for the Relief of Episodic Breathlessness in Patients With Advanced Cancer: A Multicenter, Open-Label, Randomized, Morphine-Controlled, Crossover, Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steffen T; Kloke, Marianne; Alt-Epping, Bernd; Gärtner, Jan; Hellmich, Martin; Hein, Rebecca; Piel, Maren; Cornely, Oliver A; Nauck, Friedemann; Voltz, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Episodic breathlessness is a frequent and burdensome symptom in cancer patients but pharmacological treatment is limited. To determine time to onset, efficacy, feasibility, and safety of transmucosal fentanyl in comparison to immediate-release morphine for the relief of episodic breathlessness. Phase II, investigator-initiated, multicenter, open-label, randomized, morphine-controlled, crossover trial with open-label titration of fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT) in inpatients with incurable cancer. The primary outcome was time to onset of meaningful breathlessness relief. Secondary outcomes were efficacy (breathlessness intensity difference at 10 and 30 minutes; sum of breathlessness intensity difference at 15 and 60 minutes), feasibility, and safety. Study was approved by local ethics committees. Twenty-five of 1341 patients were eligible, 10 patients agreed to participate (four female, mean age 58 ± 11, mean Karnofsky score 67 ± 11). Two patients died before final visits and two patients dropped-out because of disease progression leaving six patients for analysis with 61 episodes of breathlessness. Mean time to onset was for FBT 12.7 ± 10.0 and for immediate-release morphine 23.6 ± 15.1 minutes with a mean difference of -10.9 minutes (95% CI = -24.5 to 2.7, P = 0.094). Efficacy measures were predominately in favor for FBT. Both interventions were safe. Feasibility failed because of too much study demands for a very ill patient group. The description of a faster and greater relief of episodic breathlessness by transmucosal fentanyl versus morphine justifies further evaluation by a full-powered trial. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Efficacy and Tolerability Outcomes of a Phase II, Randomized, Open-Label, Multicenter Study of a New Water-Dispersible Pediatric Formulation of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in African Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Nicola; Madrid, Lola; Valentini, Giovanni; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Halidou, Tinto; Sirima, Sodiomon; Tshefu, Antoinette; Mtoro, Ali; Gesase, Samwel; Bassat, Quique

    2018-01-01

    Artemisinin combination therapies are considered the mainstay of malaria treatment, but pediatric-friendly formulations for the treatment of infants are scarce. We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new dispersible-tablet formulation of dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine phosphate (DHA/PQP) in comparison to the marketed tablet (Eurartesim) in the treatment of infants with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Reported here are the results of a large phase II, randomized, open-label, multicenter trial conducted in African infants (6 to 12 months of age) from Mozambique, Burkina Faso, The Gambia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Tanzania. Primary efficacy endpoint was the PCR-corrected adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR) at day 28. Analysis was performed for the intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) populations. A total of 201 patients received the dispersible-tablet formulation, and 99 received the conventional one administered as crushed tablets. At day 28, the PCR-corrected ACPRs were 86.9% (ITT) and 98.3% (PP) in the dispersible-tablet group and 84.9% (ITT) and 100% (PP) in the crushed-tablet group. At day 42, these values were 85.9% (ITT) and 96.5% (PP) in the dispersible-tablet group and 82.8% (ITT) and 96.4% (PP) in the crushed-tablet group. The comparison between survival curves for time to new infections showed no statistically significant differences ( P = 0.409). The safety and tolerability profile for the two groups was similar in terms of type and frequency of adverse events and was consistent with that expected in African infants with malaria. A standard 3-day treatment with the new dispersible DHA/PQP formulation is as efficacious as the currently used tablet in African infants and has a comparable safety profile. (This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01992900.). Copyright © 2017 Gargano et al.

  14. Multicenter Phase II study of FOLFOX or biweekly XELOX and Erbitux (cetuximab) as first-line therapy in patients with wild-type KRAS/BRAF metastatic colorectal cancer: The FLEET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Hitoshi; Maeda, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Junichi; Takahashi, Takao; Hazama, Shoichi; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Kono, Emiko; Kotaka, Masahito; Sakamoto, Junichi; Nagata, Naoki; Oba, Koji; Mishima, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The clinical benefit of cetuximab combined with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy remains under debate. The aim of the present multicenter open-label Phase II study was to explore the efficacy and safety of biweekly administration of cetuximab and mFOLFOX-6 or XELOX as first-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Sixty-two patients with previously untreated KRAS/BRAF wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer were recruited to the study between April 2010 and May 2011. Patients received one of two treatment regimens, either cetuximab plus mFOLFOX-6 (FOLFOX + Cmab) or cetuximab plus biweekly XELOX (XELOX + Cmab), according to their own preference. Treatment was continued until disease progression or the appearance of intolerable toxicities. The primary endpoint was response rate; secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, overall survival, disease control rate, dose intensity, conversion rate to surgical resection, and safety. The response rates in the FOLFOX + Cmab (n = 37) and XELOX + Cmab (n = 25) groups were 64.9 % (24/37) and 72.0 % (18/25), respectively. The median PFS in the FOLFOX + Cmab and XELOX + Cmab groups was 13.1 months (95 % confidence interval [CI] 12.1–17.5) and 13.4 months (95 % CI 10.1–17.9), respectively. Neutropenia was the most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event in both groups (33.9 %), followed by anorexia, acneiform eruption, skin fissure and paronychia. A waterfall plot of tumor diameter showed prominent shrinkage of the tumors in 88.7 % of patients. The results of the present study indicate that biweekly cetuximab plus mFOLFOX-6/XELOX is an effective and tolerable treatment regimen. Biweekly administration of cetuximab requires only one hospital visit every 2 weeks, and may become a convenient treatment option for patients with KRAS/BRAF wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer

  15. Randomized Multicenter Phase II Study of Modified Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Fluorouracil (DCF) Versus DCF Plus Growth Factor Support in Patients With Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma: A Study of the US Gastric Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Stoller, Ronald; Shibata, Stephen; Kemeny, Margaret; Krishnamurthi, Smitha; Su, Yungpo Bernard; Ocean, Allyson; Capanu, Marinela; Mehrotra, Bhoomi; Ritch, Paul; Henderson, Charles; Kelsen, David P

    2015-11-20

    Docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (DCF) is a standard first-line three-drug chemotherapy regimen for advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma and is associated with significant toxicity. We examined the safety and efficacy of a modified DCF (mDCF) regimen in a randomized multicenter phase II study. Previously untreated patients with metastatic gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned to receive either mDCF (fluorouracil 2,000 mg/m2 intravenously [IV] over 48 hours, docetaxel 40 mg/m2 IV on day 1, cisplatin 40 mg/m2 IV on day 3, every 2 weeks) or parent DCF (docetaxel 75 mg/m2, cisplatin 75 mg/m2, and fluorouracil 750 mg/m2 IV over 5 days with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, every 3 weeks). The study had 90% power to differentiate between 6-month progression-free survival of 26% and 43%, with type I and II error rates of 10% each. An early stopping rule for toxicity was included, defined as grade 3 to 4 adverse event rate > 70% in the first 3 months. From November 2006 to June 2010, 85 evaluable patients were enrolled (male, n = 61; female, n = 24; median age, 58 years; Karnofsky performance status, 90%; GEJ, n = 28; gastric, 57). mDCF (n = 54) toxicity rates included 54% grade 3 to 4 toxicity (22% hospitalized) within the first 3 months and 76% grade 3 to 4 toxicity over the course of treatment. The DCF arm (n = 31) closed early because of toxicity, with rates of 71% grade 3 to 4 toxicity (52% hospitalized) within 3 months and 90% grade 3 to 4 toxicity over the course of treatment. Six-month PFS was 63% (95% CI, 48% to 75%) for mDCF and 53% (95% CI, 34% to 69%) for DCF. Median overall survival was improved for mDCF (18.8 v 12.6 months; P = .007). mDCF is less toxic than parent DCF, even when supported with growth factors, and is associated with improved efficacy. mDCF should be considered a standard first-line option for patients with metastatic gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma.

  16. LICC: L-BLP25 in patients with colorectal carcinoma after curative resection of hepatic metastases--a randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational, double-blinded phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schimanski Carl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 15-20% of all patients initially diagnosed with colorectal cancer develop metastatic disease and surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment available. Current 5-year survival following R0-resection of liver metastases is 28-39%, but recurrence eventually occurs in up to 70%. To date, adjuvant chemotherapy has not improved clinical outcomes significantly. The primary objective of the ongoing LICC trial (L-BLP25 In Colorectal Cancer is to determine whether L-BLP25, an active cancer immunotherapy, extends recurrence-free survival (RFS time over placebo in colorectal cancer patients following R0/R1 resection of hepatic metastases. L-BLP25 targets MUC1 glycoprotein, which is highly expressed in hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. In a phase IIB trial, L-BLP25 has shown acceptable tolerability and a trend towards longer survival in patients with stage IIIB locoregional NSCLC. Methods/Design This is a multinational, phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a sample size of 159 patients from 20 centers in 3 countries. Patients with stage IV colorectal adenocarcinoma limited to liver metastases are included. Following curative-intent complete resection of the primary tumor and of all synchronous/metachronous metastases, eligible patients are randomized 2:1 to receive either L-BLP25 or placebo. Those allocated to L-BLP25 receive a single dose of 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide (CP 3 days before first L-BLP25 dose, then primary treatment with s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg once weekly for 8 weeks, followed by s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg maintenance doses at 6-week (years 1&2 and 12-week (year 3 intervals unless recurrence occurs. In the control arm, CP is replaced by saline solution and L-BLP25 by placebo. Primary endpoint is the comparison of recurrence-free survival (RFS time between groups. Secondary endpoints are overall survival (OS time, safety, tolerability, RFS/OS in MUC-1 positive

  17. Aerospace Systems Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposal Title: Aerospace Systems Monitor PHASE 1 Technical Abstract: This Phase II STTR project will continue development and commercialization of the Aerospace...

  18. Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  19. Multicenter randomized phase II clinical trial of oxaliplatin reintroduction as a third- or later-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer-biweekly versus standard triweekly XELOX (The ORION Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Chu; Honda, Michitaka; Tanaka, Chihiro; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Munemoto, Yoshinori; Hata, Taishi; Bando, Hiroyuki; Oshiro, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Michiya; Tokunaga, Yukihiko; Fujii, Akitomo; Nagata, Naoki; Oba, Koji; Mishima, Hideyuki

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a dose-dense capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) regimen in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for whom reintroduction of oxaliplatin had been planned as a third- or later-line regimen. The patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and were scheduled for reintroduction of oxaliplatin were randomized to capecitabine (1,000 mg/m(2)) twice daily on days 1-14 and oxaliplatin (130 mg/m(2)) on day 1 every 21 days (Q3W group) or capecitabine (2,000 mg/m(2)) twice daily on days 1-7 and oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) on day 1 every 14 days (Q2W group). The primary endpoint was the time-to-treatment failure (TTF). Other endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and other adverse events (AEs). A total of 46 patients were enrolled in the trial-22 patients were randomly assigned to the Q3W group and 23 to the Q2W group. The median TTF was 3.4 months in both groups (hazard ratio [HR] 1.053; p = 0.880). The median PFS and OS were 3.3 and 9.2 months in the Q2W group and 4.3 and 12.1 months in the Q3W group, respectively (HR 1.15; p = 0.153 and 0.672; p = 0.836). The most common grade 3-4 AEs in the Q3W and Q2W groups were fatigue (27.3 vs 21.7), neuropathy (9.1 vs 0 %) and diarrhea (9.1 vs 0 %), respectively. There was no significant inter-group difference in any of the efficacy and safety endpoints, including TTF, OS, RFS and AEs. The results of this clinical trial were convincingly negative.

  20. Curative or pre-emptive adenovirus-specific T cell transfer from matched unrelated or third party haploidentical donors after HSCT, including UCB transplantations: a successful phase I/II multicenter clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongsheng Qian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, the most widely used potentially curable cellular immunotherapeutic approach in the treatment of hematological malignancies, is limited by life-threatening complications: graft versus host disease (GVHD and infections especially viral infections refractory to antiviral drugs. Adoptive transfer of virus-specific T cells is becoming an alternative treatment for infections following HSCT. We report here the results of a phase I/II multicenter study which includes a series of adenovirus-specific T cell (ADV-VST infusion either from the HSCT donor or from a third party haploidentical donor for patients transplanted with umbilical cord blood (UCB. Methods Fourteen patients were eligible and 11 patients received infusions of ADV-VST generated by interferon (IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic isolation from a leukapheresis from their original donor (42.9% or a third party haploidentical donor (57.1%. One patient resolved ADV infection before infusion, and ADV-VST could not reach release or infusion criteria for two patients. Two patients received cellular immunotherapy alone without antiviral drugs as a pre-emptive treatment. Results One patient with adenovirus infection and ten with adenovirus disease were infused with ADV-VST (mean 5.83 ± 8.23 × 103 CD3+IFN-γ+ cells/kg up to 9 months after transplantation. The 11 patients showed in vivo expansion of specific T cells up to 60 days post-infusion, associated with adenovirus load clearance in ten of the patients (91%. Neither de novo GVHD nor side effects were observed during the first month post-infusion, but GVHD reactivations occurred in three patients, irrespective of the type of leukapheresis donor. For two of these patients, GVHD reactivation was controlled by immunosuppressive treatment. Four patients died during follow-up, one due to refractory ADV disease. Conclusions Adoptive transfer of rapidly isolated ADV

  1. Options Study - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  2. An Open-Label, Multicenter, Randomized, Phase II Study of Pazopanib in Combination with Pemetrexed in First-Line Treatment of Patients with Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Felip, Enriqueta; Besse, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This randomized open-label phase II study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pazopanib in combination with pemetrexed compared with the standard cisplatin/pemetrexed doublet in patients with previously untreated, advanced, nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer....

  3. Lunar Health Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During the Phase II Lunar Health Monitor program, Orbital Research will develop a second generation wearable sensor suite for astronaut physiologic monitoring. The...

  4. Status of Gerda Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index (BI) of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached. No signal has been found and a lower limit on the half-life of 2.1.10{sup 25} yr (at 90% C.L.) is extracted. The aim of Phase II is to double the Ge mass and further reduce the BI by an order of magnitude to explore half-lives of about 10{sup 26} yr. Thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by an active veto to read out argon scintillation light. The Phase II commissioning showed that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208}Tl decays, can be suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. This talk presents the current status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade.

  5. Evaluation of immunogenicity and safety of the new tetanus-reduced diphtheria (Td) vaccines (GC1107) in healthy Korean adolescents: a phase II, double-blind, randomized, multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jung-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Kim, Sang-Yong; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Hwang Min; Choi, Young-Youn; Ma, Sang-Hyuk; Kim, Dong-Ho; Ahn, Dong Ho; Kang, Jin-Han

    2013-04-01

    This phase II clinical trial was conducted to compare the immunogenicity and safety of a newly developed tetanus-reduced diphtheria (Td) vaccine (GC1107-T5.0 and GC1107-T7.5) and control vaccine. This study was also performed to select the proper dose of tetanus toxoid in the new Td vaccines. Healthy adolescents aged between 11 and 12 yr participated in this study. A total of 130 subjects (44 GC1107-T5.0, 42 GC1107-T7.5 and 44 control vaccine) completed a single dose of vaccination. Blood samples were collected from the subjects before and 4 weeks after the vaccination. In this study, all subjects (100%) in both GC1107-T5.0 and GC1107-T7.5 groups showed seroprotective antibody levels (≥ 0.1 U/mL) against diphtheria or tetanus toxoids. After the vaccination, the geometric mean titer (GMT) against diphtheria was significantly higher in Group GC1107-T5.0 (6.53) and GC1107-T7.5 (6.11) than in the control group (3.96). The GMT against tetanus was 18.6 in Group GC1107-T5.0, 19.94 in GC1107-T7.5 and 19.01 in the control group after the vaccination. In this study, the rates of local adverse reactions were 67.3% and 59.1% in GC1107-T5.0 and GC1107-7.5, respectively. No significant differences in the number of adverse reactions, prevalence and degree of severity of the solicited and unsolicited adverse reactions were observed among the three groups. Thus, both newly developed Td vaccines appear to be safe and show good immunogenicity. GC1107-T5.0, which contains relatively small amounts of tetanus toxoid, has been selected for a phase III clinical trial.

  6. A Multicenter, Open-Label, Controlled Phase II Study to Evaluate Safety and Immunogenicity of MVA Smallpox Vaccine (IMVAMUNE in 18-40 Year Old Subjects with Diagnosed Atopic Dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N Greenberg

    Full Text Available Replicating smallpox vaccines can cause severe complications in individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD. Prior studies evaluating Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA, a non-replicating vaccine in humans, showed a favorable safety and immunogenicity profile in healthy volunteers.This Phase II study compared the safety and immunogenicity of MVA enrolling groups of 350 subjects with AD (SCORAD ≤ 30 and 282 healthy subjects.Subjects were vaccinated twice with MVA, each dose given subcutaneously 4 weeks apart. Adverse events, cardiac parameters, and the development of vaccinia virus humoral immune responses were monitored.The overall safety of the vaccine was similar in both groups. Adverse events affecting skin were experienced significantly more often in subjects with AD, but the majority of these events were mild to moderate in intensity. Seroconversion rates and geometric mean titers for total and neutralizing vaccinia-specific antibodies in the AD group were non-inferior compared to the healthy subjects.The size of the study population limited the detection of serious adverse events occurring at a frequency less than 1%.MVA has a favorable safety profile and the ability to elicit vaccinia-specific immune responses in subjects with AD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00316602.

  7. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter evaluation of efficacy and dose finding of midodrine hydrochloride in women with mild to moderate stress urinary incontinence: a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, E H; Eerdmans, P H; Dijkman, G A; Tamussino, K; Feyereisl, J; Vierhout, M E; Schmidbauer, C; Egarter, C; Kölle, D; Plasman, J E; Heidler, H; Abbühl, B E; Wein, W

    1998-01-01

    Midodrine is a potent and selective alpha1-receptor agonist and its potential to increase urethral closure pressure could be useful in the treatment of female stress incontinence. The aim of this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of midodrine for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. The primary criterion of efficacy was the maximum urethral closure pressure at rest. Voiding diaries, symptom and incontinence questionnaires and patient/investigator global assessment were also used to evaluate its efficacy. After 4 weeks of treatment no significant changes in MUCP were found. The global assessment by the patient and investigator did indicate that patients on active treatment had a more positive assessment than the placebo group. In conclusion, midodrine did not cause significant improvements in urodynamic parameters, but there were subjective improvements in some of the patients in the treated groups. Furthermore midodrine was well tolerated.

  8. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site's high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified

  9. Clinical effects of prior trastuzumab on combination eribulin mesylate plus trastuzumab as first-line treatment for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from a Phase II, single-arm, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhalla S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shannon Puhalla,1 Sharon Wilks,2 Adam M Brufsky,1 Joyce O’Shaughnessy,3 Lee S Schwartzberg,4 Erhan Berrak,5 James Song,5 Linda Vahdat6 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, 2Department of Hematology Oncology, US Oncology-Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, San Antonio, TX, 3Department of Medical Oncology, Texas Oncology-Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center US Oncology, Dallas, TX, 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, West Cancer Center, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, 5Department of Medical Affairs, Formerly of Eisai Inc., Woodcliff Lake, NJ, 6Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Eribulin mesylate, a novel nontaxane microtubule dynamics inhibitor in the halichondrin class of antineoplastic drugs, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who previously received ≥2 chemotherapy regimens in the metastatic setting. Primary data from a Phase II trial for the first-line combination of ­eribulin plus trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients showed a 71% objective response rate and tolerability consistent with the known profile of these agents. Here, we present prespecified analyses of efficacy of this combination based on prior trastuzumab use. Patients received eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 (equivalent to 1.23 mg/m2 eribulin [expressed as free base] intravenously on days 1 and 8 plus trastuzumab (8 mg/kg intravenously/cycle 1, then 6 mg/kg on day 1 of each 21-day cycle. Objective response rates, progression-free survival, and tolerability were assessed in patients who had and had not received prior adjuvant or neoadjuvant (neo/adjuvant trastuzumab treatment. Fifty-two patients (median age: 59.5 years received eribulin/trastuzumab for a median treatment duration of ~31 weeks; 40.4% (n=21 had been previously treated with neo/adjuvant trastuzumab prior to

  10. Twelve-week, multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative phase II/III study of benzoyl peroxide gel in patients with acne vulgaris: A secondary publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Makoto; Sato, Shinichi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Igarashi, Atsuyuki; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagare, Toshitaka; Katsuramaki, Tsuneo

    2017-07-01

    A placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative, multicenter study was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) gel, administrated once daily for 12 weeks to Japanese patients with acne vulgaris. Efficacy was evaluated by counting all inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions. Safety was evaluated based on adverse events, local skin tolerability scores and laboratory test values. All 609 subjects were randomly assigned to receive the study products (2.5% and 5% BPO and placebo), and 607 subjects were included in the full analysis set, 544 in the per protocol set and 609 in the safety analyses. The median rates of reduction from baseline to the last evaluation of the inflammatory lesion counts, the primary end-point, in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 72.7% and 75.0%, respectively, and were significantly higher than that in the placebo group (41.7%). No deaths or other serious adverse events were observed. The incidences of adverse events in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 56.4% and 58.8%, respectively; a higher incidence than in the placebo group, but there was no obvious difference between the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups. All adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Most adverse events did not lead to study product discontinuation. The results suggested that both 2.5% and 5% BPO are useful for the treatment of acne vulgaris. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Laparoscopy Assisted versus Open Distal Gastrectomy with D2 Lymph Node Dissection for Advanced Gastric Cancer: Design and Rationale of a Phase II Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial (COACT 1001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Byung Ho; Kim, Young-Woo; Reim, Daniel; Eom, Bang Wool; Yu, Wan Sik; Park, Young Kyu; Ryu, Keun Won; Lee, Young Joon; Yoon, Hong Man; Lee, Jun Ho; Jeong, Oh; Jeong, Sang Ho; Lee, Sang Eok; Lee, Sang Ho; Yoon, Ki Young; Seo, Kyung Won; Chung, Ho Young; Kwon, Oh Kyoung; Kim, Tae Bong; Lee, Woon Ki; Park, Seong Heum; Sul, Ji-Young; Yang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Jong Seok

    2013-09-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer has gained acceptance and popularity worldwide. However, laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer is still controversial. Therefore, we propose this prospective randomized controlled multi-center trial in order to evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopy assisted D2-gastrectomy for advanced stage gastric cancer. Patients undergoing distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer staged cT2/3/4 cN0/1/2/3a cM0 by endoscopy and computed tomography are eligible for enrollment after giving their informed consent. Patients will be randomized either to laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy or open distal gastrectomy. Sample size calculation revealed that 102 patients are to be included per treatment arm. The primary endpoint is the non-compliance rate of D2 dissection; relevant secondary endpoints are three-year disease free survival, surgical and postoperative complications, hospital stay and unanimity rate of D2 dissection evaluated by reviewing the intraoperative video documentation. Oncologic safety is the major concern regarding laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer. Therefore, the non-compliance rate of clearing the N2 area was chosen as the most important parameter for the technical feasibility of the laparoscopic procedure. Furthermore, surgical quality will be carefully reviewed, that is, three independent experts will review the video records and score with a check list. For a long-term result, disease free survival is considered a secondary endpoint for this trial. This study will offer promising evidence of the feasibility and safety of Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer. NCT01088204 (international), NCCCTS-09-448 (Korea).

  12. Late gastrointestinal and urogenital side-effects after radiotherapy – Incidence and prevalence. Subgroup-analysis within the prospective Austrian–German phase II multicenter trial for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Maximilian P.; Pötter, Richard; Bombosch, Valentin; Sljivic, Samir; Kirisits, Christian; Dörr, Wolfgang; Goldner, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In general late side-effects after prostate cancer radiotherapy are presented by the use of actuarial incidence rates. The aim of this analysis was to describe additional relevant aspects of late side effects after prostate cancer radiotherapy. Materials and methods: All 178 primary prostate-cancer patients were treated within the Austrian–German multicenter trial by three-dimensional radiotherapy up to a local dose of 70 Gy (low/intermediate-risk) or 74 Gy (high-risk), respectively. Late gastrointestinal/urogenital (GI/GU) side-effects were prospectively assessed by the use of EORTC/RTOG score. Maximum side-effects, actuarial incidence rate and prevalence rates, initial appearance and duration of ⩾grade 2 toxicity were evaluated. Results: Median follow-up was 74 months. Late GI/GU side-effects ⩾grade 2 were detected in 15% (27/178) and 22% (40/178). The corresponding 5-year actuarial incidence rates for GI/GU side-effects were 19% and 23%, whereas the prevalence was 1–2% and 2–7% after 5 years, respectively. Late side effects ⩾grade 2 appeared within 5 years after radiotherapy in all patients with GI side-effects (27/27) and in 85% (34/40) of the patients with GU side-effects, respectively and lasted for less than 3 years in 90% (GI) and 98% (GU). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the majority of late GI and GU side effects after primary external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer are transient. Using only actuarial incidence rates for reporting side effects may lead to misinterpretation or overestimation. The combination of incidence and prevalence rates provides a more comprehensive view on the complex issue of late side effects.

  13. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  14. Phase II clinical development of new drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Naitee; Ho, Shuyen; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on how to appropriately plan and develop a Phase II program, and how to design Phase II clinical trials and analyze their data. It provides a comprehensive overview of the entire drug development process and highlights key questions that need to be addressed for the successful execution of Phase II, so as to increase its success in Phase III and for drug approval. Lastly it warns project team members of the common potential pitfalls and offers tips on how to avoid them.

  15. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  16. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom

  17. Military Family Coping Project - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Anxiety, Life Satisfaction , Addiction, Trauma 4 The Military Family Coping Project reflects two phases. The first consisted of a series of focus...need for and guided the work of the Military Family Coping Project Phase II funded by TATRC. The Military Family Coping Project Phase II was...solidarity. For the purposes of family functioning analyses, married and unmarried soldiers were analyzed separately because marital status affects

  18. Kursk Operation Simulation and Validation Exercise - Phase II (KOSAVE II)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bauman, Walter

    1998-01-01

    ... (KOSAVE) Study (KOSAVE II) documents, in this report a statistical record of the Kursk battle, as represented in the KDB, for use as both a standalone descriptive record for historians, and as a baseline for a subsequent Phase...

  19. DECIDER: prospective randomized multicenter phase II trial of low-dose decitabine (DAC) administered alone or in combination with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in patients >60 years with acute myeloid leukemia who are ineligible for induction chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishina, Olga; Schmoor, Claudia; Döhner, Konstanze; Hackanson, Björn; Lubrich, Beate; May, Annette M.; Cieslik, Caroline; Müller, Michael J.; Lübbert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is predominantly a disease of older patients with a poor long-term survival. Approval of decitabine (DAC) in the European Union (EU) in 2012 for the treatment of patients with AML ≥65 years marks the potential for hypomethylating agents in elderly AML. Nevertheless the situation is dissatisfactory and the quest for novel treatment approaches, including combination epigenetic therapy is actively ongoing. The given randomized trial should be helpful in investigating the question whether combinations of DAC with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) and/or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which in vitro show a very promising synergism, are superior to the DAC monotherapy. The accompanying translational research project will contribute to find surrogate molecular end points for drug efficacy and better tailor epigenetic therapy. An additional aim of the study is to investigate the prognostic value of geriatric assessments for elderly AML patients treated non-intensively. DECIDER is a prospective, randomized, observer blind, parallel group, multicenter, Phase II study with a 2x2 factorial design. The primary endpoint is objective best overall response (complete remission (CR) and partial remission (PR)). The target population is AML patients aged 60 years or older and unfit for standard induction chemotherapy. Patients are randomized to one of the four treatment groups: DAC alone or in combination with VPA or ATRA or with both add-on drugs. One interim safety analysis was planned and carried out with the objective to stop early one or more of the treatment arms in case of an unacceptable death rate. This analysis showed that in all treatment arms the critical stopping rule was not reached. No important safety issues were observed. The Data Monitoring Committee (DMC) recommended continuing the study as planned. The first patient was included in December 2011. A total of 189 out of 200 planned patients were randomized

  20. HPC Benchmark Suite NMx, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the phase II effort, Intelligent Automation Inc., (IAI) and University of Central Florida (UCF) propose to develop a comprehensive numerical test suite for...

  1. Murine Automated Urine Sampler (MAUS), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort involves the development of a novel rodent spaceflight habitat, focusing on care and monitoring of mice for gravitational physiology...

  2. High Resolution Autostereoscopic Cockpit Display, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase II program Dimension Technologies Inc. (DTI) proposes to design and build an autostereoscopic (glasses-free 3D) LCD based aircraft cockpit display...

  3. Pavement performance evaluation, phase II : data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Phase I and II of this study tested approximately 1500 rehabilitated pavements (asphalt and PCC) : throughout the State. These pavements ranged from 5 to 15 years old and were intended to develop a : snapshot of how various rehabilitations were perfo...

  4. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II program is to complete the development of the titanium heat pipe thermal plane and establish all necessary steps for production of this...

  5. Oxygen-Methane Thruster, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two main innovations will be developed in the Phase II effort that are fundamentally associated with our gaseous oxygen/gaseous methane RCS thruster. The first...

  6. Innovation in the Sky, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II proposal presents a scope of work to develop reliable Sense and Avoid for BVLOS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle [UAV] operations. We first analyze a) the...

  7. Crew Cerebral Oxygen Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR proposal is aimed at developing a non-invasive, optical method for monitoring crew member state of awareness in operational environments. All...

  8. Silver Biocide Analysis & Control Device, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rapid, accurate measurement and process control of silver ion biocide concentrations in future space missions is needed. The purpose of the Phase II program is to...

  9. Licensee Performance Evaluation: Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakoff, H.E.; Speaker, D.M.; Thompson, S.R.; Cohen, S.C.

    1979-08-01

    This report details work performed during the second phase of a two-phase contract to develop methodology for Licensee Performance Evaluation. The Phase I report, NUREG/CR-0110 details initial efforts on the contract. The model developed in Phase I was used to evaluate nine additional facilities for this report. Performance indicators from noncompliance data were also evaluated. Methodology was developed employing the noncompliance indicators and used for 12 case studies. It was found that licensee event report indicators could be more easily identified and utilized than noncompliance indicators based on presently available data systems. However, noncompliance data, appropriately related to cause, could provide real insight into why performance was what it was

  10. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  11. Test of GERDA Phase II detector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Gusev, Konstantin [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schwingenheuer, Bernhard; Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. The experiment uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. In GERDA Phase I five BEGe detectors were operated successfully. These detectors are distinguished for improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. In Phase II additional 25 BEGe detectors will be installed. New electronics and radio-pure low-mass holders were specially designed for Phase II. Prior to the installation in GERDA all BEGe detectors are tested in their final assembly in the LNGS underground laboratory. This talk presents the mechanics and performance of the GERDA Phase II detector assembly.

  12. Upgrades for GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of 76Ge. It is a process that violates lepton number conservation and is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. GERDA is located underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. An array of bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge is operated in a cryostat with 64 m3 of liquid argon supplemented by a 3 m thick shield of water. The experiment aims at exploring the 0 νββ decay up to a half life of 2 .1026 yr in two phases: Phase I of the experiment has been concluded last year. No signal is observed and the so far best limit is derived for the half life of the 0 νββ decay of 76Ge, T1/20ν GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of 76Ge. It is a process that violates lepton number conservation and is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. GERDA is located underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. An array of bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge is operated in a cryostat with 64 m3 of liquid argon supplemented by a 3 m thick shield of water. The experiment aims at exploring the 0 νββ decay up to a half life of 2 .1026 yr in two phases: Phase I of the experiment has been concluded last year. No signal is observed and the so far best limit is derived for the half life of the 0 νββ decay of 76Ge, T1/20 ν GERDA Collaboration.

  13. Status of the Gerda phase II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea [Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Gerda experiment searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in {sup 76}Ge. The first phase of the experiment collected 21.6 kg. yr of exposure with a background index (BI) of 0.01 cts/(keV . kg . yr). No signal was observed and a lower limit for the 0νββ half-life was set to T{sup 0νββ}{sub 1/2} < 2.1 . 10{sup 25} yr (90% C.L). The apparatus has now been upgraded to the Phase II configuration. In Phase II 38 kg of HPGe detectors will be operated to reach an exposure of 100 kg . yr. The goal of Gerda Phase II is to lower the BI to 10{sup -3} cts/(keV . kg . y), in order to reach the sensitivity for T{sup 0νββ}{sub 1/2} = O(10{sup 26}) yr. The additional target mass is constituted of 30 custom made BEGe detectors with higher energy resolution and better pulse shape discrimination performance. The detectors are operated in new radio-pure low-mass holders. The liquid argon surrounding the detectors has been instrumented to veto the background events which produce scintillation light. In this talk the current status and the performance of the Gerda Phase II are presented.

  14. Toward an Integrated Psychological Approach - Phase II

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Trauma, Development and Peacebuilding : Toward an Integrated Psychological Approach - Phase II. Over the past decade, the peace, conflict and development community has begun to question the value of medicalized approaches such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in dealing with aftermath of political violence ...

  15. LHC Experiments Phase II - TDRs Approval Process

    CERN Document Server

    Forti, F

    2017-01-01

    The overall review process and steps of Phase II were described in CERN-LHCC-2015-077. As experiments submit detailed technical design reports (TDRs), the LHCC and UCG work in close connection to ensure a timely review of the scientific and technical feasibility as well as of the budget and schedule of the upgrade programme.

  16. First results from GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    Gerda is designed for a background-free search of 76Ge neutrinoless double-β decay, using bare Ge detectors in liquid Ar. The experiment was upgraded after the successful completion of Phase I to double the target mass and further reduce the background. Newly-designed Ge detectors were installed along with LAr scintillation sensors. Phase II of data-taking started in Dec 2015 with approximately 36 kg of Ge detectors and is currently ongoing. The first results based on 10.8 kg· yr of exposure are presented. The background goal of 10-3 cts/(keV· kg· yr) is achieved and a search for neutrinoless double-β decay is performed by combining Phase I and II data. No signal is found and a new limit is set at T1/20ν > 5.3 \\cdot {1025} yr (90% C.L.).

  17. 129I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Roberts, M. L.

    1999-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129 I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129 I/ 127 I ratios of the samples varied from 10 -8 to 10 -14 . In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the 129 I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129 I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I 129 I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the 129 I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating 129 I AMS facilities and 129 I/ 127 I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented

  18. The Gerda Phase II detector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Schoenert, Stefan [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schwingenheuer, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Phase II of the Gerda (Germanium Detector Array) experiment will continue the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. Prerequisites for Phase II are an increased target mass and a reduced background index of < 10 {sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr). Major hardware upgrades to achieve these requirements are scheduled for 2013. They include the deployment of a new radio pure low mass detector assembly. The structural properties of available radio-pure materials and reduction of mass necessitate a change of the electrical contacting used to bias and read-out the detectors. The detector assembly design and the favored contacting solution are presented.

  19. Multicenter transversal two-phase study to determine a national prevalence of epilepsy in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moualek, Dalila; Pacha, Lamia Ali; Abrouk, Samira; Kediha, Mohamed Islam; Nouioua, Sonia; Aissa, Leila Ait; Bellatache, Mounia; Belarbi, Soreya; Slimani, Saddek; Khennouf, Houria; Fellahi, Lynda; El Amine Hamimed, Mohamed; Benali, Nadia; Chekkour, Mohamed Chahine; Maamoun, Ramdane; Dameche, Rachida; Assami, Salima; Tazir, Meriem

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of epilepsy in Algeria is unknown. The aims of this multicenter transversal study were to determine the national prevalence and clinical characteristics of epilepsy in the Algerian population. This two-phase study was conducted in 5 circumscriptions and included 8,046 subjects aged over 2 months who attended the randomly selected public and private primary care clinics. In the phase 1 study, a questionnaire was submitted to the sample of patients. In the phase 2 study, all potentially epileptic people were examined by neurologists and a second questionnaire was submitted, eventually assessed by appropriate investigations. Sixty-seven patients were identified as having active epilepsy, giving a crude prevalence ratio of 8.32 per 1,000 (95% CI, 6.34-10.3) and an age-adjusted prevalence ratio of 8.9 per 1,000. The highest age-specific ratio was found in patients aged 10-19 years (16.92 per 1,000). Generalized seizures (68.7%) were more common than partial seizures (29.8%). Perinatal injuries were the major leading putative causes (11.9%). The prevalence of epilepsy of 8.32 determined in this study is relatively high. These results provide new epidemiological data and suggest that epilepsy remains an important public health issue to consider in Algeria. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. 78 FR 76789 - Additional Connect America Fund Phase II Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... inspection and copying during normal business hours in the FCC Reference Information Center, Portals II, 445... Phase I to Phase II. 2. Timing of Phase II Support Disbursements. In the USF/ICC Transformation Order... language in paragraph 180 of the USF/ICC Transformation Order. We now seek to more fully develop the record...

  1. Phase II study of oral platinum drug JM216 as first-line treatment in patients with small-cell long cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, E; Groen, HJM; Uges, DRA; Weil, C; Smith, IE

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: This multicenter phase II trial wets performed to determine tumor efficacy and tolerance of the oral platinum drug JM216 in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Patients and Methods: patients with SCLC limited disease unfit for intensive chemotherapy or those with extensive disease

  2. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck-Insitut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-06-21

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10{sup −2} cts/(keV·kg·yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1·10{sup 25} yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 10{sup 26} yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208}Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10{sup −3} cts/(keV·kg·yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  3. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10-2 cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set to 2.1.1025 yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 1026 yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from 214Bi and 208Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  4. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of "7"6Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10"−"2 cts/(keV·kg·yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of "7"6Ge was set to 2.1·10"2"5 yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 10"2"6 yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from "2"1"4Bi and "2"0"8Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10"−"3 cts/(keV·kg·yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  5. LAr instrumentation for Gerda phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegmann, Anne [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013. Currently the commissioning of Gerda Phase II is ongoing. To reach the aspired background index of ≤10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). It has been demonstrated by the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. The light instrumentation consisting of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon multipliers (SiPM) has been installed in Gerda. In this talk the low background design of the LAr veto and its performance during the commissioning runs are reported.

  6. Radioembolisation for liver metastases: results from a prospective 151 patient multi-institutional phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Al B; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Mulcahy, Mary F; Rilling, William; Siskin, Gary; Wiseman, Greg; Cunningham, James; Houghton, Bonny; Ross, Mason; Memon, Khairuddin; Andrews, James; Fleming, Chad J; Herman, Joseph; Nimeiri, Halla; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the safety, response rate, progression-free and overall survival of patients with liver metastases treated with (90)Y (glass) radioembolisation in a prospective, multicenter phase II study. 151 patients with liver metastases (colorectal n=61, neuroendocrine n=43 and other tumour types n=47) refractory to standard of care therapies were enrolled in this prospective, multicenter, phase II study under an investigational device exemption. Clinical/laboratory/imaging follow-up were obtained at 30 days followed by 3-month intervals for 1 year and every 6 months thereafter. The primary end-point was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end-points included safety, hepatic progression-free survival (HPFS), response rate and overall survival. Median age was 66 (range 25-88). Grade 3/4 adverse events included pain (12.8%), elevated alkaline phospatase (8.1%), hyperbilirubinemia (5.3%), lymphopaenia (4.1%), ascites (3.4%) and vomiting (3.4%). Treatment parameters including dose delivery were reproducible among centers. Disease control rates were 59%, 93% and 63% for colorectal, neuroendocrine and other primaries, respectively. Median PFS was 2.9 and 2.8 months for colorectal and other primaries, respectively. PFS was not achieved in the neuroendocrine group. Median survival from (90)Y treatment was 8.8 months for colorectal and 10.4 months for other primaries. Median survival for neuroendocrine patients has not been reached. Patients with liver metastases can be safely treated with (90)Y microspheres. This study is the first to demonstrate technical and dose reproducibility of (90)Y glass microspheres between centers in a prospective setting. Based on these promising data, three international, multicenter, randomised phase III studies in colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma have been initiated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Early loading of plalatal implants (ortho-type II a prospective multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedrange Tomasz

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In orthodontic treatment, anchorage control is a fundamental aspect. Usually conventional mechanism for orthodontic anchorage control can be either extraoral or intraoral that is headgear or intermaxillary elastics. Their use are combined with various side effects such as tipping of occlusal plane or undesirable movements of teeth. Especially in cases, where key-teeth are missing, conventional anchorage defined as tooth-borne anchorage will meet limitations. Therefore, the use of endosseous implants for anchorage purposes are increasingly used to achieve positional stability and maximum anchorage. Methods/Design The intended study is designed as a prospective, multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT, comparing and contrasting the effect of early loading of palatal implant therapy versus implant loading after 12 weeks post implantation using the new ortho-implant type II anchor system device (Orthosystem Straumann, Basel, Switzerland. 124 participants, mainly adult males or females, whose diagnoses require temporary stationary implant-based anchorage treatment will be randomized 1:1 to one of two treatment groups: group 1 will receive a loading of implant standard therapy after a healing period of 12 week (gold standard, whereas group 2 will receive an early loading of orthodontic implants within 1 week after implant insertion. Participants will be at least followed for 12 months after implant placement. The primary endpoint is to investigate the behavior of early loaded palatal implants in order to find out if shorter healing periods might be justified to accelerate active orthodontic treatment. Secondary outcomes will focus e.g. on achievement of orthodontic treatment goals and quantity of direct implant-bone interface of removed bone specimens. As tertiary objective, a histologic and microtomography evaluation of all retrieved implants will be performed to obtain data on the performance of the SLA surface in human bone

  8. Performance of GERDA phase II BEGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. GERDA uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. The experiment proceeds in two phases. In Phase I a background index of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached and a new lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1.10{sup 25} yr (at 95% C.L.). In Phase II the background index will be lowered by an order of magnitude and a sensitivity of 10{sup 26} yr will be reached. In order to achieve this goal 30 new custom-made broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors and a liquid argon scintillation light veto will be deployed. Five BEGe detectors have been operated successfully in Phase I and demonstrated their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. Special designed electronics will further improve energy resolution and PSD performance. The first results from commissioning of the new BEGe detectors are presented in this talk.

  9. Serum ARCHITECT PIVKA-II reference interval in healthy Chinese adults: Sub-analysis from a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Cunling; Hu, Jian; Yang, Jia; Chen, Zhaoyun; Li, Huijun; Wei, Lianhua; Zhang, Wei; Xing, Hao; Sang, Guoyao; Wang, Xiaoqin; Han, Ruilin; Liu, Ping; Li, Zhihui; Li, Zhiyan; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Li; Li, Shunjun; Dai, Shuyang; Wang, Nianyue; Yang, Yongfeng; Ma, Li; Soh, Andrew; Beshiri, Agim; Shen, Feng; Yang, Tian; Fan, Zhuping; Zheng, Yijie; Chen, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) has been widely used as a biomarker for liver cancer diagnosis in Japan for decades. However, the reference intervals for serum ARCHITECT PIVKA-II have not been established in the Chinese population. Thus, this study aimed to measure serum PIVKA-II levels in healthy Chinese subjects. This is a sub-analysis from the prospective, cross-sectional and multicenter study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03047603). A total of 892 healthy participants (777 Han and 115 Uygur) with complete health checkup results were recruited from 7 regional centers in China. Serum PIVKA-II level was measured by ARCHITECT immunoassay. All 95% reference ranges were estimated by nonparametric method. The distribution of PIVKA-II values showed significant difference with ethnicity and sex, but not age. The 95% reference range of PIVKA-II was 13.62-40.38 mAU/ml in Han Chinese subjects and 15.16-53.74 mAU/ml in Uygur subjects. PIVKA-II level was significantly higher in males than in females (P < 0.001). The 95% reference range of PIVKA-II was 15.39-42.01 mAU/ml in Han males while 11.96-39.13 mAU/ml in Han females. The reference interval of serum PIVKA-II on the Architect platform was established in healthy Chinese adults. This will be valuable for future clinical and laboratory studies performed using the Architect analyzer. Different ethnic backgrounds and analytical methods underline the need for redefining the reference interval of analytes such as PIVKA-II, in central laboratories in different countries. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiming Sun

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M and O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M and O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M and O 2000a)

  11. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  12. Phase-II Associative Memory ASIC Specifications

    CERN Document Server

    Stabile, Alberto; Warren, Matthew; Green, Barry; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Motuk, Halil Erdem; Frontini, Luca; Liberali, Valentino; Crescioli, Francesco; Fedi, Giacomo; Sotiropoulou, Calliope-louisa; De Canio, Francesco; Traversi, Gianluca; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Kubota, Takashi; Calderini, Giovanni; Palla, Fabrizio; Checcucci, Bruno; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Mcnamara, Peter Charles

    2018-01-01

    This documents defines the specifications for the Associative Memory ASIC for Phase-II. The work-flow toward the final ASIC is organized in the following three steps • AM08 prototype: small area MPW prototype to test all the full custom features, the VHDL logic and the I/O. This chip must be fully functional with smaller memory area than the final ASIC; • AM09pre pre-production: full area ASIC to be fabricated with a full-mask set pilot run. Production corner wafers will be created; • AM09 production: full area ASIC with refinements for the mass production. The AM09 will be developed built on the AM08 extending the memory area, therefore the specification of both versions must be compatible.

  13. Quality of reporting in oncology phase II trials: A 5-year assessment through systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langrand-Escure, Julien; Rivoirard, Romain; Oriol, Mathieu; Tinquaut, Fabien; Rancoule, Chloé; Chauvin, Frank; Magné, Nicolas; Bourmaud, Aurélie

    2017-01-01

    Phase II clinical trials are a cornerstone of the development in experimental treatments They work as a "filter" for phase III trials confirmation. Surprisingly the attrition ratio in Phase III trials in oncology is significantly higher than in any other medical specialty. This suggests phase II trials in oncology fail to achieve their goal. Objective The present study aims at estimating the quality of reporting in published oncology phase II clinical trials. A literature review was conducted among all phase II and phase II/III clinical trials published during a 5-year period (2010-2015). All articles electronically published by three randomly-selected oncology journals with Impact-Factors>4 were included: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology and British Journal of Cancer. Quality of reporting was assessed using the Key Methodological Score. 557 articles were included. 315 trials were single-arm studies (56.6%), 193 (34.6%) were randomized and 49 (8.8%) were non-randomized multiple-arm studies. The Methodological Score was equal to 0 (lowest level), 1, 2, 3 (highest level) respectively for 22 (3.9%), 119 (21.4%), 270 (48.5%) and 146 (26.2%) articles. The primary end point is almost systematically reported (90.5%), while sample size calculation is missing in 66% of the articles. 3 variables were independently associated with reporting of a high standard: presence of statistical design (p-value <0.001), multicenter trial (p-value = 0.012), per-protocol analysis (p-value <0.001). Screening was mainly performed by a sole author. The Key Methodological Score was based on only 3 items, making grey zones difficult to translate. This literature review highlights the existence of gaps concerning the quality of reporting. It therefore raised the question of the suitability of the methodology as well as the quality of these trials, reporting being incomplete in the corresponding articles.

  14. Hysteroscopic Essure Inserts for Permanent Contraception: Extended Follow-Up Results of a Phase III Multicenter International Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnoff, Scott G; Nichols, John E; Levie, Mark

    2015-01-01

    To describe safety, tolerability, and effectiveness results through 5 years of follow-up of a Phase III trial with Essure inserts. Multicenter, nonrandomized, single-arm international study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). Thirteen clinical study centers in the United States, Europe, and Australia. A total of 518 previously fertile women seeking permanent contraception. The objective of the hysteroscopic sterilization procedure was bilateral Essure insert placement (ESS205 model) and tubal occlusion. Women with satisfactory device location and tube occlusion (based on modified hysterosalpingography [HSG]) were instructed to discontinue alternative contraception and to rely on Essure inserts for permanent contraception. The primary endpoint for the Phase III study was the rate of pregnancies occurring during the first year of relying (i.e., HSG-confirmed occlusion) on the Essure inserts for permanent contraception (i.e., 12 months after HSG). For the full 5 years of follow-up (5 years total of relying on the Essure inserts for contraception), the endpoints of interest were safety, prevention of pregnancy, and satisfaction. No pregnancies were reported among women relying on the Essure inserts who completed the full 5 years of follow-up. As of December 5, 2007, 449 women with successful bilateral placement relying on the Essure inserts contributed a total 24 942 woman-months of follow-up for assessing effectiveness. Overall, the Essure inserts were generally well tolerated, with participant comfort rated as "good" to "excellent" by 99% of women (382 of 385) after 5 years of use. Similarly, overall satisfaction was rated as "somewhat" to "very satisfied" by 98% of women (376 of 384) after 5 years of use. The majority of adverse events reported during the 5 years of follow-up were rated as either "mild" or "moderate" in severity. Three severe events (abdominal pain with very heavy periods and irregular menstrual bleeding) were reported in 2 subjects during

  15. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.B.; Hudson, E.D.; Lord, R.S.; Johnson, J.W.; Martin, J.A.; McNeilly, G.S.; Milner, W.T.; Mosko, S.W.; Sayer, R.O.; Robinson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, with the completion of Phase I in late 1979, will include the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) and associated research areas, the new 25 MV tandem accelerator with new research areas for tandem beams, and modifications to utilize the ORIC as a booster accelerator. The combination of the tandem and ORIC will provide beam energies of 25 MeV/A for light heavy ions and 6 MeV/A up to A = 160. This paper discusses plans for a Phase II expansion of the facility to include an isochronous cyclotron with superconducting magnet and reconfiguration of the existing research areas and the ORIC vault to handle the higher energy beams from the new cyclotron. The new booster cyclotron is a low-flutter high-spiral design patterned after the MSU K = 800 design, with a central magnetic field of about 5 tesla and an extraction radius of 1 meter. The new beam transport system will incorporate an rf beam-splitter system that will be able to deliver successive beam pulses to two or three experiment areas

  16. High Performance Wafer-Based Capillary Electrochromatography, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II research comprises designing, constructing, and testing a chip-based capillary electrochromatography (CEC) prototype for separation and analysis of...

  17. Ultraflat Tip-Tilt-Piston MEMS Deformable Mirror, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes a Phase II SBIR project to develop high-resolution, ultraflat micromirror array devices using advanced silicon surface micromachining...

  18. Post Process Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes in this STTR Phase II project to continue development and validation of Luna's amplitude-dependent, nonlinear ultrasonic...

  19. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase II program, builds on the phase I feaibility where a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite was developed and fabricated. This...

  20. Reclaimable Thermally Reversible Polymers for AM Feedstock, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG proposes to continue efforts from the 2016 NASA SBIR Phase I topic H5.04 Reclaimable Thermally Reversible Polymers for AM Feedstock. In Phase II, CRG will refine...

  1. Single Electron Transistor Platform for Microgravity Proteomics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II program builds from the successful Phase I efforts to demonstrate that Quantum Logic Devices' nanoelectronic platform for biological detection could...

  2. Pressure Controlled Heat Pipe for Precise Temperature Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The principal Phase II objective is to refine and further develop the prototype PCHP into a useful thermal management tool. The Phase I program established the...

  3. Compact 2-Micron Transmitter for Remote Sensing Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II effort we propose to work with NASA to extend the Phase I achievements, which focused on design and development of very compact master and...

  4. The Phase II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the "ITk" (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m$^2$ , depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as $|\\eta| < 4$. Supporting structures will be ...

  5. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  6. Design of Phase II Non-inferiority Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2017-09-01

    With the development of inexpensive treatment regimens and less invasive surgical procedures, we are confronted with non-inferiority study objectives. A non-inferiority phase III trial requires a roughly four times larger sample size than that of a similar standard superiority trial. Because of the large required sample size, we often face feasibility issues to open a non-inferiority trial. Furthermore, due to lack of phase II non-inferiority trial design methods, we do not have an opportunity to investigate the efficacy of the experimental therapy through a phase II trial. As a result, we often fail to open a non-inferiority phase III trial and a large number of non-inferiority clinical questions still remain unanswered. In this paper, we want to develop some designs for non-inferiority randomized phase II trials with feasible sample sizes. At first, we review a design method for non-inferiority phase III trials. Subsequently, we propose three different designs for non-inferiority phase II trials that can be used under different settings. Each method is demonstrated with examples. Each of the proposed design methods is shown to require a reasonable sample size for non-inferiority phase II trials. The three different non-inferiority phase II trial designs are used under different settings, but require similar sample sizes that are typical for phase II trials.

  7. 40 CFR 73.20 - Phase II early reduction credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase II early reduction credits. 73.20 Section 73.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Allocations § 73.20 Phase II early reduction credits...

  8. Roux-en-Y or Billroth II Reconstruction After Radical Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Jimmy Bok-Yan; Rao, Jaideepraj; Wong, Andrew Siang-Yih; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Pang, Ning Qi; Tay, Amy Yuh Ling; Yung, Man Yee; Su, Zheng; Phua, Janelle Niam Sin; Shabbir, Asim; Ng, Enders Kwok Wai

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the clinical symptoms between Billroth II (B-II) and Roux-en-Y (R-Y) reconstruction after distal subtotal gastrectomy (DG) for gastric cancer. Surgery is the mainstay of curative treatment for gastric cancer. The technique for reconstruction after DG remains controversial. Both B-II and R-Y are popular methods. This is a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial. From October 2008 to October 2014, 162 patients who underwent DG were randomly allocated to B-II (n = 81) and R-Y (n = 81) groups. The primary endpoint is Gastrointestinal (GI) Symptoms Score 1 year after surgery. We also compared the nutritional status, extent of gastritis on endoscopy, and quality of life after surgery between the 2 procedures at 1 year. Operative time was significantly shorter for B-II than for R-Y [mean difference 21.5 minutes, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3.8-39.3, P = 0.019]. The B-II and R-Y groups had a peri-operative morbidity of 28.4% and 33.8%, respectively (P = 0.500) and a 30-day mortality of 2.5% and 1.2%, respectively (P = 0.500). GI symptoms score did not differ between R-Y versus B-II reconstruction (mean difference -0.45, 95% CI -1.21 to 0.31, P = 0.232). R-Y resulted in a lower median endoscopic grade for gastritis versus B-II (mean difference -1.32, 95% CI -1.67 to -0.98, P Y versus B-II mean difference -0.31, 95% CI -3.27 to 2.65, P = 0.837) and quality of life at 1 year between the 2 groups too. Although BII is associated with a higher incidence of heartburn symptom and higher median endoscopic grade for gastritis, BII and RY are similar in terms of overall GI symptom score and nutritional status at 1 year after distal gastrectomy.

  9. Kilowatt isotope power system. Phase II plan. Volume I. Phase II program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of a Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) was begun in 1975 for the purpose of satisfying the power requirements of satellites in the 1980's. The KIPS is a 238 PuO 2 -fueled organic Rankine cycle turbine power system to provide a design output of 500 to 2000 W. Phase II of the overall 3-phase KIPS program is described. This volume presents a program plan for qualifying the organic Rankine power system for flight test in 1982. The program plan calls for the design and fabrication of the proposed flight power system; conducting a development and a qualification program including both environmental and endurance testing, using an electrical and a radioisotope heat source; planning for flight test and spacecraft integration; and continuing ground demonstration system testing to act as a flight system breadboard and to accumulate life data

  10. Durability of lightweight concrete : Phase II : wetting and drying tests, Phase III : freezing and thawing tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-12-01

    This report describes a laboratory research program on the durability of lightweight concrete. Two phases of a three phase study are covered by this report, while the remaining phase is still under study. The two phases being reported are Phase II - ...

  11. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will advance innovative, cost effective and reliable nano-phase exothermic RCC joining processes (ExoBrazeTM) in order to be able to reinforce...

  12. Composite Structure Monitoring using Direct Write Sensors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II project seeks to develop and demonstrate a suite of sensor products to monitor the health of composite structures. Sensors will be made using...

  13. Instrument for Airborne Measurement of Carbonyl Sulfide, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II SBIR program, Southwest Sciences will continue the development of small, low power instrumentation for real-time direct measurement of carbonyl...

  14. Advanced Technology Cloud Particle Probe for UAS, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II SPEC will design, fabricate and flight test a state-of-the-art combined cloud particle probe called the Hawkeye. Hawkeye is the culmination of two...

  15. Novel Instrumentation for Rocket Propulsion Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase II program is to develop, deploy and deliver novel laser-based instruments that provide rapid, in situ, simultaneous...

  16. Space-Ready Advanced Imaging System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II effort Toyon will increase the state-of-the-art for video/image systems. This will include digital image compression algorithms as well as system...

  17. Lightweight Metal RubberTM Sensors and Interconnects, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA Phase II program is to develop and increase the Technology Readiness Level of multifunctional Metal RubberTM (MRTM) materials that can be...

  18. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort will continue to develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular...

  19. InGaN High Temperature Photovoltaic Cells, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this Phase II project are to develop InGaN photovoltaic cells for high temperature and/or high radiation environments to TRL 4 and to define the...

  20. High Radiation Resistance Inverted Metamorphic Solar Cell, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation in this SBIR Phase II project is the development of a unique triple junction inverted metamorphic technology (IMM), which will enable the...

  1. Ground Processing Optimization Using Artificial Intelligence Techniques, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ultimate goal is the automation of a large amount of KSC's planning, scheduling, and execution decision making. Phase II will result in a complete full-scale...

  2. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  3. Diagnosis-Driven Prognosis for Decision Making, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II, the QSI-Vanderbilt team seeks to develop a system-level diagnostics and prognostic process that incorporates a "sense and respond capability," which...

  4. Compact, High Accuracy CO2 Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a low cost, robust, highly precise and accurate CO2 monitoring system. This system will...

  5. Multifunctional Aerogel Thermal Protection Systems for Hypersonic Vehicles, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the Phase II project is to develop lightweight reinforced aerogel materials for use as the core structural insulation material in...

  6. UltraSail Solar Sail Flight Experiment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A team of CU Aerospace, the University of Illinois, and ManTech SRS Technologies proposes Phase II development of a 3 kg CubeSat spacecraft for initial flight test...

  7. South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic re

  8. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration, Phase II at Ravenswood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project: Phase II Construction at Ravenswood, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  9. Recession-Tolerant Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will develop a suite of diagnostic sensors using Direct Write technology to measure temperature, surface recession depth, and heat flux of an...

  10. Improved Lunar and Martian Regolith Simulant Production, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The technical objective of the Phase II project is to provide a more complete investigation of the long-term needs of the simulant community based on the updated...

  11. A Nanodroplet Processor for Advanced Microencapsulated Drug Formulations, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase II program we propose to build on the key aspects of the nanodroplet encapsulation technology to demonstrate optimized formulation and...

  12. Multi-Channel Tunable Source for Atomic Sensors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR will seek to develop a prototype laser source suitable for atomic interferometry from compact, robust, integrated components. AdvR's design is...

  13. Cash Impact of the Consumable Item Transfer, Phase II

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    ...). This report is the third in a series of reports regarding the consumable item transfer (CIT), phase II. The Deputy Secretary of Defense directed the transfer of the management of consumable items to Defense Logistics Agency...

  14. Savanna ecosystem project: phase I summary and phase II progress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Huntely, BJ

    1978-07-01

    Full Text Available A summary of the results of the first phase (mid 1974 to mid 1976) of the South African Savanna Ecosystem Project being undertaken at Nylsvley in the northern Transvaal is presented. Phase I of this ten year study of the structure and functioning...

  15. Barriers to participation in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Y M W; Chan, W K; Yue, C S S

    2005-12-01

    To identify barriers to participation in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme and measures that may enhance participation. Prospective study. Regional hospital, Hong Kong. Cardiac patients recruited for a phase I cardiac rehabilitation programme from July 2002 to January 2003. Reasons for not participating in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme. Of the 193 patients recruited for a phase I cardiac rehabilitation programme, 152 (79%) patients, with a mean age of 70.3 years (standard deviation, 11.9 years), did not proceed to phase II programme. Eleven (7%) deaths occurred before commencement of phase II and 74 (49%) patients were considered physically unfit. Reasons for the latter included fractures, pain, or degenerative changes in the lower limbs (24%), and co-morbidities such as cerebrovascular accident (19%), chronic renal failure (11%), congestive heart failure (9%), and unstable angina (8%). Phase II rehabilitation was postponed until after completion of scheduled cardiac interventions in 13% of patients. Failure of physicians to arrange the pre-phase II exercise stress test as per protocol was reported in 7% of patients. Other reasons were reported: work or time conflicts (16%), non-compliance with cardiac treatment (5%), financial constraints (4%), self-exercise (3%), fear after exercise stress testing (3%), and patients returning to their original cardiologists for treatment (3%). A significant (79%) proportion of patients did not proceed to a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme for a variety of reasons. These included physical unfitness, work or time conflicts, and need to attend scheduled cardiac interventions. Further studies are required to determine how to overcome obstacles to cardiac rehabilitation.

  16. Miniature Active Space Radiation Dosimeter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro will extend our Phase I R&D to develop a family of miniature, active space radiation dosimeters/particle counters, with a focus on biological/manned...

  17. Longwave Imaging for Astronomical Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact portable longwave camera for astronomical applications. In Phase 1, we successfully developed the eye of the camera, i.e. the focal...

  18. On-Demand Urine Analyzer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this program (through Phase III) is to develop an analyzer that can be integrated into International Space Station (ISS) toilets to measure key...

  19. Optical Landing Hazard Sensor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne's Phase I effort has established through modeling and analysis that a unique concept for an active optical 3-D Imager (or Imaging LADAR) has high potential...

  20. Integrated Multidisciplinary Optimization Objects, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During Phase I, M4 Engineering integrated a prototype system into OpenMDAO, a NASA GRC open-source framework. This prototype system was a proof-of-concept that M4...

  1. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mobitrum has started the development of virtual sensor test instrumentation in Phase I for characterization and measurement of ground testing of propulsion systems....

  2. Software Defined Multiband EVA Radio, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of Phase 2 is to build a reliable, lightweight, programmable, multi-mode, miniaturized EVA Software Defined Radio (SDR) that supports data telemetry,...

  3. Tactile Data Entry System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building on our successful Phase I Tactile Data Entry program, Barron Associates proposes development of a Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system to permit...

  4. Upgrade for Phase II of the Gerda experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hiller, R.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kermaïdic, Y.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Ransom, C.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2018-05-01

    The Gerda collaboration is performing a sensitive search for neutrinoless double beta decay of ^{76}Ge at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. The upgrade of the Gerda experiment from Phase I to Phase II has been concluded in December 2015. The first Phase II data release shows that the goal to suppress the background by one order of magnitude compared to Phase I has been achieved. Gerda is thus the first experiment that will remain "background-free" up to its design exposure (100 kg year). It will reach thereby a half-life sensitivity of more than 10^{26} year within 3 years of data collection. This paper describes in detail the modifications and improvements of the experimental setup for Phase II and discusses the performance of individual detector components.

  5. Design of clinical trials Phase I and II with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, C.A.; Soroa, V.E.

    2015-01-01

    We presented some usual designs for clinical studies in Phase I and Phase II. For Phase I we considered the 3 + 3 Classic design, designs with accelerated titration and those with dose escalation schemes with overdose control (EWOC). For Phase II designs with efficacy outcomes are presented. The design proposed by Fleming is discussed as well as those with inclusion of patients in two stages: Gehan’s design and the Optimal two–stage Simon’s design. We also discussed the design of combined endpoints of efficacy and safety of Bryant and Day with an application example of therapeutically Lu-177. Finally some proposals for phase II trials with control group are considered. (authors) [es

  6. Caspian energy phase II: Beyond 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the major factors that will shape the second phase of Caspian oil and natural gas export. The article compares the prospects of the post-2005 period with the Caspian energy developments in the first decade and a half after independence. This article claims: One, political considerations will continue to play an important role in the decisions on export routes for and participants in Caspian energy production and export projects. However, those political considerations will produce different policies in phase two of Caspian energy production than they did in the first phase. Second, the relative influence and interest in the Caspian region of various global and regional powers have changed significantly from Caspian energy phase one to phase two. Third, the producers in the region are not as anxious for foreign investment as they were earlier. The major resources that will be developed in Caspian phase two are: new production of Azerbaijan's natural gas, extension to new markets and expansion of capacity of existing gas export routes; new production projects for Turkmenistan's natural gas and new pipelines; and additional Kazakhstani oil production and natural gas increased production and initiation of export.

  7. Brain Oxygen Optimization in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Phase-II: A Phase II Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, David O; Shutter, Lori A; Moore, Carol; Temkin, Nancy R; Puccio, Ava M; Madden, Christopher J; Andaluz, Norberto; Chesnut, Randall M; Bullock, M Ross; Grant, Gerald A; McGregor, John; Weaver, Michael; Jallo, Jack; LeRoux, Peter D; Moberg, Dick; Barber, Jason; Lazaridis, Christos; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon R

    2017-11-01

    A relationship between reduced brain tissue oxygenation and poor outcome following severe traumatic brain injury has been reported in observational studies. We designed a Phase II trial to assess whether a neurocritical care management protocol could improve brain tissue oxygenation levels in patients with severe traumatic brain injury and the feasibility of a Phase III efficacy study. Randomized prospective clinical trial. Ten ICUs in the United States. One hundred nineteen severe traumatic brain injury patients. Patients were randomized to treatment protocol based on intracranial pressure plus brain tissue oxygenation monitoring versus intracranial pressure monitoring alone. Brain tissue oxygenation data were recorded in the intracranial pressure -only group in blinded fashion. Tiered interventions in each arm were specified and impact on intracranial pressure and brain tissue oxygenation measured. Monitors were removed if values were normal for 48 hours consecutively, or after 5 days. Outcome was measured at 6 months using the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended. A management protocol based on brain tissue oxygenation and intracranial pressure monitoring reduced the proportion of time with brain tissue hypoxia after severe traumatic brain injury (0.45 in intracranial pressure-only group and 0.16 in intracranial pressure plus brain tissue oxygenation group; p injury after severe traumatic brain injury based on brain tissue oxygenation and intracranial pressure values was consistent with reduced mortality and increased proportions of patients with good recovery compared with intracranial pressure-only management; however, the study was not powered for clinical efficacy. Management of severe traumatic brain injury informed by multimodal intracranial pressure and brain tissue oxygenation monitoring reduced brain tissue hypoxia with a trend toward lower mortality and more favorable outcomes than intracranial pressure-only treatment. A Phase III randomized trial to assess

  8. Brazilian Decimetric Array (BDA) project - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, C.; Stephany, S.; Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.; Fernandes, F. C. R.

    2010-02-01

    The configuration of the second phase of the Brazilian Decimetric Array (BDA), installed at Cachoeira Paulista, Brazil (Longitude 45° 0‧ 20″ W and Latitude 22° 41‧ 19″ S), is a T-shaped array where 21 antennas are being added to existing 5 antennas of the first phase. In the third phase, in each arm of the T array, four more antennas will be added and baselines will be increased to 2.5 × 1.25 km in east-west and south directions, respectively. The antennas will be equally spaced at the distances of 250 meters from the central antenna of the T-array. Also, the frequency range will be increased to 1.2-1.7, 2.8 and 5.6 GHz. The Second phase of the BDA should be operational by the middle of 2010 and will operate in the frequency range of (1.2-1.7) GHz for solar and non solar observations. Here, we present the characteristics of the second phase of the BDA project, details of the array configuration, the u-v coverage, the synthesized beam obtained for the proposed configuration.

  9. U10 : Trusted Truck(R) II (phase B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Phase B of the Trusted Truck II project built on the system developed in Phase A (or Year 1). For the implementation portion of the project, systems were added to the trailer to provide additional diagnostic trailer data that can be sent to the TTM...

  10. Performance of the LAr scintillation veto of Gerda Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Christoph [Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013 and Gerda has been upgraded to Phase II. To reach the aspired background index of ∝10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques are applied, including an active liquid argon (LAr) veto. It has been demonstrated with the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium detectors, which simultaneously deposit energy in the LAr. The light instrumentation consisting of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has been installed in Gerda. In this talk the low background design of the LAr veto and its performance during Phase II start-up is reported.

  11. Interventions to increase enrollment in a large multicenter phase 3 trial of carotid stenting vs. endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbottom, Mary E; Roberts, Jamie N; Tom, Meelee; Hughes, Susan E; Howard, Virginia J; Sheffet, Alice J; Meschia, James F; Brott, Thomas G

    2012-08-01

    Randomized clinical trials often encounter slow enrollment. Failing to meet sample size requirements has scientific, financial, and ethical implications. We report interventions used to accelerate recruitment in a large multicenter clinical trial that was not meeting prespecified enrollment commitments. The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial began randomization in December 2000. To accelerate enrollment, multiple recruitment tactics were initiated, which included expanding the number of sites, hiring a recruitment director (May 2003), broadening eligibility criteria (April 2005), branding with a study logo, Web site, and recruitment materials, increasing site visits by study leadership, sending e-mails to the site teams after every enrollment, distributing electronic newsletters, and implementing investigator and coordinator conferences. From December 2000 through May 2003, 14 sites became active (54 patients randomized), from June 2003 through April 2005, 44 sites were added (404 patients randomized), and from May 2005 through July 2008, 54 sites were added (2044 patients randomized). During these time intervals, the number of patients enrolled per site per year was 1·5, 3·6, and 5·6. For the single years 2004 to 2008, the mean monthly randomization rates per year were 19·7, 38·1, 56·4, 53·0, and 54·7 (annualized), respectively. Enrollment was highest after recruitment tactics were implemented: 677 patients in 2006, 636 in 2007, and 657 in 2008 (annualized). The prespecified sample size of 2502 patients, 47% asymptomatic, was accomplished on July 2008. Aggressive recruitment tactics and investment in a full-time recruitment director who can lead implementation may be effective in accelerating recruitment in multicenter trials. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  12. PLANNING PHASE 2 MULTICENTER RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF NEOADJUVANT CHEMO-RADIOTHERAPY FOLLOWED BY D2 GASTRECTOMY AND ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Skoropad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prognosis for surgical treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer remains disappointing. Neoadjuvant chemo-radiation therapy is relatively new and the least researched method of treatment, it is attracting more and more attention, mainly abroad in recent years. The aims of neoadjuvant therapy is the earliest start of systemic therapy, damage of the primary tumor and regional metastases, an increase in the percentage of radical operations, improving treatment outcome. Material and methods. The planning study is a multicenter, randomized clinical phase II trial. Patients of the first (experimental group will be treated as the followes: neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (total tumor dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions with the concurrent modified CapOX scheme followed by D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients of the second (control group will be treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy will be carried out under the following schemes (optional for the researchers: CapOX or FOLFOX. Toxicity evaluation of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy will be conducted with NCI CTC Toxicity Scale Version 3.0. The main objectives of the trial are to assess the safety and immediate effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy according to the criteria of the frequency and severity of postoperative complications and mortality, and tumor response. We are planning to include 80 patients with morphologically confirmed gastric cancer сT2–4N1–3, сT3–4N0–3; М0. The proposed trial will be carried out in accordance with the principles of the Helsinki Declaration, it has been approved by local ethic committees of the participated institutions. Results. As a result of this multicenter randomized trial it is planned to show the reproducibility of obtained in MRRC and a number of foreign centers results – that is, the safety and high immediate effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemo

  13. Configuration management: Phase II implementation guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    Configuration management (CM) is essential to maintaining an acceptable level of risk to the public, workers, environment, or mission success. It is a set of activities and techniques used to maintain consistency among physical and functional configuration, applicable requirements, and key documents. This document provides guidance for continuing the implementation of CM in a phased and graded manner. It describes a cost-effective approach to documented consistency with requirements, with early emphasis on items most important to safety and environmental protection. It is intended to help responsible line managers and configuration management staff personnel in meeting the Energy Systems configuration management policy standard.

  14. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, controlled clinical trial of chicken type II collagen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling-Ling; Wei, Wei; Xiao, Feng; Xu, Jian-Hua; Bao, Chun-De; Ni, Li-Qing; Li, Xing-Fu

    2008-07-15

    To assess the efficacy and safety of chicken type II collagen (CCII) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with methotrexate (MTX). We conducted a prospective, 24-week, followup, multicenter, double-blind, controlled study of CCII (0.1 mg/day) versus MTX (10 mg/week) in patients with active RA. Clinical assessments were performed at screening and at 12, 18, and 24 weeks of treatment. A total of 236 RA patients were included; 211 patients (89.4%) completed the 24-week followup. In both groups there was a decrease in pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, Health Assessment Questionnaire score, and investigator and patient assessment of function; all differences were statistically significant. In the MTX group, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level decreased. Rheumatoid factor did not change in either group. At 24 weeks, 68.57% of patients in the CCII group and 83.02% in the MTX group met the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR20), and 40.95% and 57.54%, respectively, met the ACR50 criteria. The ACR20 and ACR50 response rates in the CCII group were lower than those in the MTX group, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal symptoms were common in both groups. There were fewer and milder side effects in the CCII group than the MTX group. The difference in incidence of adverse events between the 2 groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). CCII is effective in the treatment of RA. CCII is well tolerated, and the incidence of adverse events of CCII is lower than that of MTX.

  15. SIMMER-II analysis of transition-phase experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, T.R.; Bell, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of Los Alamos transition-phase experiments with the SIMMER-II computer code are reported. These transient boilup experiments simulated the recriticality-induced transient motion of a boiling pool of molten fuel, molten steel and steel vapor, within a subassembly duct in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor during the transition phase of a core-disruptive accident. The two purposes of these experiments were to explore and reach a better understanding of fast reactor safety issues, and to provide data for SIMMER-II verification. Experimental data, consisting of four pressure traces and a high-speed movie, were recorded for four sets of initial conditions. For three of the four cases, SIMMER-II-calculated pressures compared reasonably well with the experimental pressures. After a modification to SIMMER-II's liquid-vapor drag correlation, the comparison for the fourth case was reasonable also. 12 refs., 4 figs

  16. Phase II beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-06-01

    The expansion of the National Synchrotron Light Source has been funded by the US Department of Energy. The Phase II program consists of both increased conventional facilities and six new beam lines. In this paper, an overview of the six beam lines which will be constructed during Phase II is presented. For five of the lines special radiation sources are necessary and the designs of four of the devices are complete. The relevant parameters of the insertion devices under construction and development are presented

  17. Performance of BEGe detectors for GERDA Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    After the end of the data-taking for GERDA Phase I, the apparatus has been upgraded to fulfill the requirements of the second phase. Phase II sensitivity will be driven by 30 custom made BEGe detectors. This detectors are now available and can be operated in phaseII configuration in the GERDA cryostat together with the liquid argon scintillation veto. The performances of BEGe detectors in liquid argon are presented in this talk. Besides the spectroscopy capability, the focus will be placed on the expectations in terms of background rejection via pulse shape discrimination (PSD). In particular the main goal the BEGe's pulse shape analysis is to discriminate surface events produced by beta emitters (e.g. {sup 42}K) present in the liquid Ar.

  18. The SafeBoosC Phase II Randomised Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer, Adelina; Greisen, Gorm; Benders, Manon

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rStO2) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rStO2 can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises that the bur...

  19. The SafeBoosC phase II clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riera, Joan; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Bravo, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial recently demonstrated the benefits of a combination of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (rStO2) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a treatment guideline to reduce the oxygen imbalance in extremely preterm infants. AIMS: ...

  20. Caelyx (TM) in malignant mesothelioma : A phase II EORTC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P; van Meerbeeck, J; Groen, H; Schouwink, H; Burgers, S; Daamen, S; Giaccone, G

    Background: The use of doxorubicin has shown some activity in malignant mesothelioma but prolonged administration is hampered by cardiotoxicity. Caelyx(TM), a new liposomal and pegylated form of doxorubicin has shown a better pharmacokinetic and toxic profile then doxorubicin. In a phase II study,

  1. Mechanical Engineering and Design of the LHC Phase II Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Gentini, L; Mariani, N; Perret, R; Timmins, M A

    2010-01-01

    Phase II collimators will complement the existing system to improve the expected high RF impedance and limited efficiency of Phase I jaws. An international collaborative effort has been launched to identify novel advanced materials responding to the very challenging requirements of the new collimators. Complex numerical calculations simulating extreme conditions and experimental tests are in progress. In parallel, an innovative modular design concept of the jaw assembly is being developed to allow fitting in alternative materials, minimizing the thermally induced deformations, withstanding accidents and accepting high radiation doses. Phase II jaw assembly is made up of a molybdenum back-stiffener ensuring high geometrical stability and a modular jaw split in threes sectors. Each sector is equipped with a high-efficiency independent cooling circuit. Beam position monitors (BPM) are embedded in the jaws to fasten setup time and improve beam monitoring. An adjustment system will permit to fine-tune the jaw flat...

  2. Performance of the LAr scintillation veto of GERDA Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Dept. E15, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013 and Gerda is upgraded to Phase II. To reach the aspired background index of ≤ 10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques are applied, including an active liquid argon (LAr) veto. It has been demonstrated with the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in the LAr. The light instrumentation consisting of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon multipliers (SiPM) has been installed in Gerda. In this talk the low background design of the LAr veto and its performance during the commissioning runs are reported.

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid in advanced polycystic liver disease: A phase 2 multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agnolo, Hedwig M A; Kievit, Wietske; Takkenberg, R Bart; Riaño, Ioana; Bujanda, Luis; Neijenhuis, Myrte K; Brunenberg, Ellen J L; Beuers, Ulrich; Banales, Jesus M; Drenth, Joost P H

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) inhibits proliferation of polycystic human cholangiocytes in vitro and hepatic cystogenesis in a rat model of polycystic liver disease (PLD) in vivo. Our aim was to test whether UDCA may beneficially affect liver volume in patients with advanced PLD. We conducted an international, multicenter, randomized controlled trial in symptomatic PLD patients from three tertiary referral centers. Patients with PLD and total liver volume (TLV) ⩾2500ml were randomly assigned to UDCA treatment (15-20mg/kg/day) for 24weeks, or to no treatment. Primary endpoint was proportional change in TLV. Secondary endpoints were change in symptoms and health-related quality of life. We performed a post-hoc analysis of the effect of UDCA on liver cyst volume (LCV). We included 34 patients and were able to assess primary endpoint in 32 patients, 16 with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and 16 with autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease (ADPLD). Proportional TLV increased by 4.6±7.7% (mean TLV increased from 6697ml to 6954ml) after 24weeks of UDCA treatment compared to 3.1±3.8% (mean TLV increased from 5512ml to 5724ml) in the control group (p=0.493). LCV was not different after 24weeks between controls and UDCA treated patients (p=0.848). However, UDCA inhibited LCV growth in ADPKD patients compared to ADPKD controls (p=0.049). UDCA administration for 24weeks did not reduce TLV in advanced PLD, but UDCA reduced LCV growth in ADPKD patients. Future studies might explore whether ADPKD and ADPLD patients respond differently to UDCA treatment. Current therapies for polycystic liver disease are invasive and have high recurrence risks. Our trial showed that the drug, ursodeoxycholic acid, was not able to reduce liver volume in patients with polycystic liver disease. However, a subgroup analysis in patients that have kidney cysts as well showed that liver cyst volume growth was reduced in patients who received ursodeoxycholic acid in comparison

  4. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, Alain H.; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair (κ = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis

  5. Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted.

  6. Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted

  7. Development of ceramics based fuel, Phase II; Razvoj goriva na bazi keramike, II faza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, M M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Laboratorija za reaktorske materijale, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-12-15

    Phase II of this task covers the following: testing the changes of UO{sub 2} properties during sintering; interpretation of results obtained from the analysis of the sintering process kinetics; fabrication of UO{sub 2} samples with cladding by vibrational compacting.

  8. Status report of the Gerda Phase II startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Andrea, Valerio

    2017-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (Gerda) experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN, searches for 0νββ of "7"6Ge. Germanium diodes enriched to ∼ 86 % in the double beta emitter "7"6Ge ("e"n"rGe) are exposed being both source and detector of 0νββ decay. This process is considered a powerful probe to address still open issues in the neutrino sector of the (beyond) Standard Model of particle Physics. Since 2013, at the completion of the first experimental phase (Phase I), the Gerda setup has been upgraded to perform its next step (Phase II). The aim is to reach a sensitivity to the 0νββ decay half life larger than 10"2"6 yr in about 3 years of physics data taking, exposing a detector mass of about 35 kg of "e"n"rGe with a background index of about 10"−"3cts/(keV·kg·yr). One of the main new implementations is the liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light read-out, to veto those events that only partially deposit their energy both in Ge and in the surrounding LAr. In this paper the Gerda Phase II expected goals, the upgraded items and few selected features from the first 2016 physics and calibration runs will be presented. The main Phase I achievements will be also reviewed.

  9. Status report of the Gerda Phase II startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Valerio; Gerda Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN, searches for 0νββ of 76Ge . Germanium diodes enriched to ˜ 86 % in the double beta emitter 76Ge ( enrGe are exposed being both source and detector of 0νββ decay. This process is considered a powerful probe to address still open issues in the neutrino sector of the (beyond) Standard Model of particle Physics. Since 2013, at the completion of the first experimental phase (Phase I), the GERDA setup has been upgraded to perform its next step (Phase II). The aim is to reach a sensitivity to the 0νββ decay half-life larger than 10^{26} yr in about 3 years of physics data taking, exposing a detector mass of about 35 kg of enrGe with a background index of about 10^{-3} cts/(keV . kg . yr). One of the main new implementations is the liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light read-out, to veto those events that only partially deposit their energy both in Ge and in the surrounding LAr. In this paper the GERDA Phase II expected goals, the upgraded items and few selected features from the first 2016 physics and calibration runs will be presented. The main Phase I achievements will be also reviewed.

  10. Phase II cancer clinical trials for biomarker-guided treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2018-01-01

    The design and analysis of cancer clinical trials with biomarker depend on various factors, such as the phase of trials, the type of biomarker, whether the used biomarker is validated or not, and the study objectives. In this article, we demonstrate the design and analysis of two Phase II cancer clinical trials, one with a predictive biomarker and the other with an imaging prognostic biomarker. Statistical testing methods and their sample size calculation methods are presented for each trial. We assume that the primary endpoint of these trials is a time to event variable, but this concept can be used for any type of endpoint.

  11. Microbial Dark Matter Phase II: Stepping deeper into unknown territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter; Peura, Sari; Wielen, Paul van der; Hedlund, Brian; Elshahed, Mostafa; Kormas, Konstantinos; Stott, Andreas Teske8, Matt; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Zhang, Chuanlun; Rengefors, Karin; Lindemann, Stephen; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Spear, John; Hallam, Steven; Crowe, Sean; Steele, Jillian; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Kyrpides, Nikos; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-10-27

    Currently available microbial genomes are of limited phylogenetic breadth due to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. The first phase of the Microbial Dark Matter project used single-cell genomics to sequence 201 single cells from uncultivated lineages, and was able to resolve new superphyla and reveal novel metabolic features in bacteria and archaea. However, many fundamental questions about the evolution and function of microbes remain unanswered, and many candidate phyla remain uncharacterized. Phase II of the Microbial Dark Matter project will target candidate phyla with no sequenced representatives at a variety of new sites using a combination of single-cell sequencing and shotgun metagenomics approaches.

  12. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively

  13. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gasparini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery and phase II (orthognathic surgery procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP and those who accepted phase II (IIP. To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation.

  14. Study of the GERDA Phase II background spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The Gerda experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN in Italy, searches for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. Gerda Phase II is aiming to reach a sensitivity for the 0νββ half life of 1026 yr in ˜ 3 years of physics data taking with 100 kg·yr of exposure and a background index of ˜ 10-3 cts/(keV·kg·yr). After 6 months of acquisition a first data release with 10.8 kg·yr of exposure is performed, showing that the design background is achieved. In this work a study of the Phase II background spectrum, the main spectral structures and the background sources will be presented and discussed.

  15. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  16. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  17. The STAR beam energy scan phase II physics and upgrades

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Vértési, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 967, č. 11 (2017), s. 800-803 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * BES-II * detector upgrade * QCD phase diagram * physics oppotrunity Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  18. Malignant pleural mesothelioma: a phase II trial with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiof, D A; Rapoport, B L; Chasen, M R; Abratt, R P; Cronje, N; Fourie, L; McMichael, G; Hacking, D

    2002-03-01

    Current cytotoxic therapy has been of limited benefit to patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Single agent chemotherapy has been extensively evaluated in small series of phase II clinical trials, with disappointing responses. Docetaxel, an effective taxane in the treatment of advanced breast cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer, was administered intravenously at a dose of 100 mg/m2 every 3 weeks to 30 chemotherapy naive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma in a prospective multi-institutional phase II clinical trial. An objective response rate (partial responses) of 10% was documented. Additionally, 21% of the patients had minor responses (intention-to-treat analysis). Three patients died within 2 weeks post-first cycle of therapy, although only one patient's death was directly attributed to the investigational drug, whilst in the majority of the patients, manageable and treatable toxicities were encountered. In this phase II clinical trial, docetaxel proved to be mildly effective in the treatment of patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma.

  19. Reassessing Phase II Heart Failure Clinical Trials: Consensus Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Javed; Hamo, Carine E.; Udelson, James E.; O’Connor, Christopher; Sabbah, Hani N.; Metra, Marco; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Teerlink, John; Bernstein, Harold S.; Brooks, Gabriel; Depre, Christophe; DeSouza, Mary M.; Dinh, Wilfried; Donovan, Mark; Frische-Danielson, Regina; Frost, Robert J.; Garza, Dahlia; Gohring, Udo-Michael; Hellawell, Jennifer; Hsia, Judith; Ishihara, Shiro; Kay-Mugford, Patricia; Koglin, Joerg; Kozinn, Marc; Larson, Christopher J.; Mayo, Martha; Gan, Li-Ming; Mugnier, Pierrre; Mushonga, Sekayi; Roessig, Lothar; Russo, Cesare; Salsali, Afshin; Satler, Carol; Shi, Victor; Ticho, Barry; van der Laan, Michael; Yancy, Clyde; Stockbridge, Norman; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing burden and the continued suboptimal outcomes for patients with heart failure underlines the importance of continued research to develop novel therapeutics for this disorder. This can only be accomplished with successful translation of basic science discoveries into direct human application through effective clinical trial design and execution that results in a substantially improved clinical course and outcomes. In this respect, phase II clinical trials play a pivotal role in determining which of the multitude of potential basic science discoveries should move to the large and expansive registration trials in humans. A critical examination of the phase II trials in heart failure reveals multiple shortcomings in their concept, design, execution, and interpretation. To further a dialogue regarding the challenges and potential for improvement and the role of phase II trials in patients with heart failure, the Food and Drug Administration facilitated a meeting on October 17th 2016 represented by clinicians, researchers, industry members, and regulators. This document summarizes the discussion from this meeting and provides key recommendations for future directions. PMID:28356300

  20. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-05-01

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Neutrinoless double beta decay in GERDA Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macolino, C.

    2014-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76 Ge and it is installed in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN, Italy. The GERDA experiment has completed the Phase I with a total collected exposure of 21.6 kg yr and a background index (BI) of the order of BI ≃ 10 −2 cts/(keVkg yr). No excess of events from 0νββ decay has been observed and a lower limit on the half-life on the 0νββ decay for 76 Ge has been estimated: T 0ν 1 /2 > 2.1·10 25 yr at 90% CL. The goal of GERDA Phase II is to reach the target sensitivity of T 0ν 1 /2 ≃ 1.4 · 10 26 yr, with an increased total mass of the enriched material and a reduced background level. In this paper the results from GERDA Phase I and the major improvements planned for Phase II are discussed.

  2. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  3. Pomaglumetad Methionil (LY2140023 Monohydrate and Aripiprazole in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Phase 3, Multicenter, Double-Blind Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Adams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that long-term treatment with pomaglumetad methionil would demonstrate significantly less weight gain than aripiprazole in patients with schizophrenia. In this 24-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, Phase 3 study, 678 schizophrenia patients were randomized to either pomaglumetad methionil (n=516 or aripiprazole (n=162. Treatment groups were also compared on efficacy and various safety measures, including serious adverse events (SAEs, discontinuation due to adverse events (AEs, treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs, extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS, and suicide-related thoughts and behaviors. The pomaglumetad methionil group showed significantly greater weight loss at Week 24 (Visit 12 compared with the aripiprazole group (−2.8 ± 0.4 versus 0.4 ± 0.6; P<0.001. However, change in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS total scores for aripiprazole was significantly greater than for pomaglumetad methionil (−15.58 ± 1.58 versus −12.03 ± 0.99; P=0.045. The incidences of SAEs (8.2% versus 3.1%; P=0.032 and discontinuation due to AEs (16.2% versus 8.7%; P=0.020 were significantly higher for pomaglumetad methionil compared with aripiprazole. No statistically significant differences in the incidence of TEAEs, EPS, or suicidal ideation or behavior were noted between treatment groups. In conclusion, long-term treatment with pomaglumetad methionil resulted in significantly less weight gain than aripiprazole. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01328093.

  4. Comparison of Iohexol-380 and Iohexol-350 for coronary CT angiography: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind phase 3 trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun Ah; Lee, Whal [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Doo Kyoung [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-06-15

    This multi-center, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial was conducted to compare the safety and efficacy of contrast agents iohexol-380 and iohexol-350 for coronary CT angiography in healthy subjects. Volunteers were randomized to receive 420 mgI/kg of either iohexol-350 or iohexol-380 using a flow rate of 4 mL/sec. All adverse events were recorded. Two blinded readers independently reviewed the CT images and conflicting results were resolved by a third reader. Luminal attenuations (ascending aorta, left main coronary artery, and left ventricle) in Hounsfield units (HUs) and image quality on a 4-point scale were calculated. A total of 225 subjects were given contrast media (115 with iohexol-380 and 110 with iohexol-350). There was no difference in number of adverse drug reactions between groups: 75 events in 56 (48.7%) of 115 subjects in the iohexol-380 group vs. 74 events in 51 (46.4%) of 110 subjects in the iohexol-350 group (p = 0.690). No severe adverse drug reactions were recorded. Neither group showed an increase in serum creatinine. Significant differences in mean density between the groups was found in the ascending aorta: 375.8 ± 71.4 HU with iohexol-380 vs. 356.3 ± 61.5 HU with iohexol-350 (p = 0.030). No significant differences in image quality scores between both groups were observed for all three anatomic evaluations (all, p > 0.05). Iohexol-380 provides improved enhancement of the ascending aorta and similar attenuation of the coronary arteries without any increase in adverse drug reactions, as compared with iohexol-350 using an identical amount of total iodine.

  5. Comparison of Iohexol-380 and Iohexol-350 for coronary CT angiography: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind phase 3 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eun Ah; Lee, Whal; Kang, Doo Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    This multi-center, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial was conducted to compare the safety and efficacy of contrast agents iohexol-380 and iohexol-350 for coronary CT angiography in healthy subjects. Volunteers were randomized to receive 420 mgI/kg of either iohexol-350 or iohexol-380 using a flow rate of 4 mL/sec. All adverse events were recorded. Two blinded readers independently reviewed the CT images and conflicting results were resolved by a third reader. Luminal attenuations (ascending aorta, left main coronary artery, and left ventricle) in Hounsfield units (HUs) and image quality on a 4-point scale were calculated. A total of 225 subjects were given contrast media (115 with iohexol-380 and 110 with iohexol-350). There was no difference in number of adverse drug reactions between groups: 75 events in 56 (48.7%) of 115 subjects in the iohexol-380 group vs. 74 events in 51 (46.4%) of 110 subjects in the iohexol-350 group (p = 0.690). No severe adverse drug reactions were recorded. Neither group showed an increase in serum creatinine. Significant differences in mean density between the groups was found in the ascending aorta: 375.8 ± 71.4 HU with iohexol-380 vs. 356.3 ± 61.5 HU with iohexol-350 (p = 0.030). No significant differences in image quality scores between both groups were observed for all three anatomic evaluations (all, p > 0.05). Iohexol-380 provides improved enhancement of the ascending aorta and similar attenuation of the coronary arteries without any increase in adverse drug reactions, as compared with iohexol-350 using an identical amount of total iodine

  6. Advanced materials for future Phase II LHC collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Dallocchio, A; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Artoos, K

    2009-01-01

    Phase I collimators, equipped with Carbon-Carbon jaws, effectively met specifications for the early phase of LHC operation. However, the choice of carbon-based materials is expected to limit the nominal beam intensity mainly because of the high RF impedance and limited efficiency of the collimators. Moreover, C/C may be degraded by high radiation doses. To overcome these limitations, new Phase II secondary collimators will complement the existing system. Their extremely challenging requirements impose a thorough material investigation effort aiming at identifying novel materials combining very diverse properties. Relevant figures of merit have been identified to classify materials: Metal-diamonds composites look a promising choice as they combine good thermal, structural and stability properties. Molybdenum is interesting for its good thermal stability. Ceramics with non-conventional RF performances are also being evaluated. The challenges posed by the development and industrialization of these materials are ...

  7. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State issuance of Phase II permits. 72.73 Section 72.73 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits...

  8. Search for neutrinoless double beta decay with GERDA phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Csáthy, J. Janicskó; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knies, J.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Marissens, G.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Ransom, C.; Reissfelder, M.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Seitz, H.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-10-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (gerda) experiment, located at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy, is one of the leading experiments for the search of 0νββ decay. In Phase II of the experiment 35.6 kg of enriched germanium detectors are operated. The application of active background rejection methods, such as a liquid argon scintillation light read-out and pulse shape discrimination of germanium detector signals, allowed to reduce the background index to the intended level of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr). In the first five month of data taking 10.8 kg yr of exposure were accumulated. No signal has been found and together with data from Phase I a new limit for the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life of 76Ge of 5.3 . 1025 yr at 90% C.L. was established in June 2016. Phase II data taking is ongoing and will allow the exploration of half-lifes in the 1026 yr regime. The current status of data taking and an update on the background index are presented.

  9. Searching Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; Comellato, T.; D’Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Giordano, M.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hahne, C.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hiller, R.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, P.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Csáthy, J. Janicskó; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kermaidic, Y.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Marissens, G.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Ransom, C.; Reissfelder, M.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Sala, E.; Salamida, F.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schweisshelm, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schönert, S.; Schütz, A.-K.; Seitz, H.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zschocke, A.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    An observation of neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay would allow to shed light onto the nature of neutrinos. GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) aims to discover this process in a background-free search using 76Ge. The experiment is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) in Italy. Bare, isotopically enriched, high purity germanium detectors are operated in liquid argon. GERDA follows a staged approach. In Phase II 35.6 kg of enriched germanium detectors are operated since December 2015. The application of active background rejection methods, such as a liquid argon scintillation light read-out and pulse shape discrimination of germanium detector signals, allows to reduce the background index to the intended level of 10‑3 cts/(keVṡkgṡyr). No evidence for the 0νββ decay has been found in 23.2 kgṡyr of Phase II data, and together with data from Phase I the up-to-date most stringent half-life limit for this process in 76Ge has been established, at a median sensitivity of 5.8ṡ1025yr the 90% C.L. lower limit is 8.0ṡ1025yr.

  10. Graphical linking of MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. II-5-c rings and 6-c heterocyclic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollini, Carlos Guido; Giambiagi, Mario; Giambiagi, Myriam Segre de; Figueiredo, Aloysio Paiva de

    2001-02-01

    Through the graphical method proposed it is possible to set a link between an MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. The value of the index depends on the order of the atoms involved if they are more than three. For 5-c rings three basic structures are required; the eventually different values are 12. Unlike the 6-c case it may happen that different pairs of basic structures are used to build the same polygon. For the 6-c rings including heteroatoms the original degeneracy of benzene splits leading eventually to 60 different I ring values. (author)

  11. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated...... and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing...

  12. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated...... and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing...

  13. Graphical linking of MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. II-5-c rings and 6-c heterocyclic rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bollini, C G; Giambiagi, M

    2001-01-01

    Through the graphical method proposed it is possible to set a link between an MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. The value of the index depends on the order of the atoms involved if they are more than three. For 5-c rings three basic structures are required; the eventually different values are 12. Unlike the 6-c case it may happen that different pairs of basic structures are used to build the same polygon. For the 6-c rings including heteroatoms the original degeneracy of benzene splits leading eventually to 60 different I sub r sub i sub n sub g values.

  14. NNWSI Phase II materials interaction test procedure and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. This report describes a test method (Phase II) that has been developed to measure the release of radionuclides from the waste package under simulated repository conditions, and provides information on materials interactions that may occur in the repository. The results of 13 weeks of testing using the method are presented, and an analog test is described that investigates the relationship between the test method and expected repository conditions. 9 references, 10 figures, 11 tables

  15. ATCA - thermal management study for the ATLAS phase II upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bortolin, Claudio; Kalinowski, Michal; Koziol, Piotr; Mendez, Julian; Walerianczyk, Jan; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    The AdvancedTCA (ATCA) telecom industry standard has been selected as the hardware platform for the “Phase-II Upgrade” of ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. In November 2014 a project dedicated to the study of the impact of the ATCA integration in the actual counting rooms was launched analysing the impact on the cooling infrastructures. A spare rack equipped with two ATCA shelves, high power dissipating load blades, temperature and air velocity sensors were installed in a lab. Vertical and horizontal cooling performance were checked and some crtitical aspects identified.

  16. Improved nuclear gage development - phase i and ii. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, E.L.; Champion, F.C.; Castanon, D.R.; Chang, J.C.; Hannon, J.B.

    1976-09-01

    This report contains Phase I and II of an investigation covering the design and construction of a prototype nuclear-moisture-density backscatter gage. Gage development was based upon the analysis of several factors which affect gage performance. This research indicated that the prototype gage measurements are approximately equivalent to measurements obtained by a commercial transmission gage. The implication of this research finding concerns the qualification of the backscatter test method as a valid, reliable, and expedient procedure for determining in-situ soil conditions

  17. ATCA - thermal management study for the ATLAS phase II upgrades

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolin, Claudio; Dyngosz, Damian; Kalinowski, Michal; Koziol, Piotr; Mendez, Julian; Walerianczyk, Jan; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    The AdvancedTCA (ATCA) telecom industry standard has been selected as the hardware platform for the “Phase-II Upgrade” of ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. In November 2014 a project dedicated to the study of the impact of the ATCA integration in the actual counting rooms was launched analysing the impact on the cooling infrastructures. A spare rack equipped with two ATCA shelves, high power dissipating load blades, temperature and air velocity sensors were installed in a lab....

  18. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment

  19. FALSIRE Phase II. CSNI project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (Phase II). Comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, J.; Schulz, H.; Bass, R.; Pugh, C.; Keeney, J.

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for Fracture Analysis of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE) is presented. A FALSIRE II Workshop focused on analyses of reference fracture experiments. More than 30 participants representing 22 organizations from 12 countries took part in the workshop. Final results for 45 analyses of the reference experiments were received from the participating analysts. For each experiment, analysis results provided estimates of variables that include temperature, crack-mouth-opening displacement, stress, strain, and applied K and J values. The data were sent electronically to the Organizing Committee, who assembled the results into a comparative data base using a special-purpose computer program. A comparative assessment and discussion of the analysis results are presented in the report. Generally, structural responses of the test specimens were predicted with tolerable scatter bands. (orig./DG)

  20. Targeting radioimmunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma with iodine (131I) metuximab injection: Clinical Phase I/II trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhinan; Mi Li; Xu Jing

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: HAb18G/CD147 is a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated antigen. We developed iodine ( 131 I) metuximab injection (Licartin), a novel 131 I-labeled HAb18G/CD147-specific monoclonal antibody F(ab') 2 fragment, and evaluated its safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy on HCC in Phase I/II trials. Methods and Materials: In a Phase I trial, 28 patients were randomly assigned to receive the injection in 9.25-, 18.5-, 27.75-, or 37-MBq/kg doses by hepatic artery infusion. In a multicenter Phase II trial, 106 patients received the injection (27.75 MBq/kg) on Day 1 of a 28-day cycle. Response rate and survival rate were the endpoints. Results: No life-threatening toxic effects were found. The safe dosage was 27.75 MBq/kg. The blood clearance fitted a biphasic model, and its half-life was 90.56-63.93 h. In the Phase II trial, the injection was found to be targeted and concentrated to tumor tissues. Of the 73 patients completing two cycles, 6 (8.22%) had a partial response, 14 (19.18%) minor response, and 43 (58.90%) stable disease. The 21-month survival rate was 44.54%. The survival rate of progression-free patients was significantly higher than that of patients with progressive disease after either one or two cycles (p 131 I) metuximab injection is safe and active for HCC patients

  1. A phase I/II clinical trial for the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi; Uno, Takashi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Kuroda, Yuki; Yoshio, Kotaro; Itami, Jun

    2016-08-17

    This paper describes about a study protocol of phase I/II multicenter prospective clinical trial evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy (HBT) for locally advanced uterine cervical cancer patients. Patients with histologically confirmed FIGO stage IB2, IIA2, IIB, and IIIB uterine cervical carcinoma width of which is larger than 5 cm assessed by MRI will be entered to this clinical trial. Protocol therapy is 30-30.6 Gy in 15-17 fractions of whole pelvic radiotherapy concurrent with weekly CDDP (40 mg/m(2)), followed by 24 Gy in 4 fractions of HBT and central shield EBRT up to 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. Tumor width is assessed again within one week before the first HBT and if the tumor width is larger than 4 cm, patients proceed to the secondary registration. In phase I section, feasibility of this will be investigated. If less than 10 % out of 20 patients experienced greater than grade 3 acute non-hematologic adverse effects, the study proceeds to phase II part. In phase II part a total of 55 patients will be accrued and the efficacy of the HBT will be investigated comparing with historical control data. If the lower margin of 90 % confidence interval of the 2-year pelvic progression-free survival of the HBT trial is higher than 64 %, the HBT is considered to be more effective than conventional ICBT. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the HBT for locally advanced cervical cancer. This trial will clarify the indication, feasibility, and efficacy of this new technique. UMIN000019081 ; Registration date: 2015/9/30.

  2. [Fungal community structure in phase II composting of Volvariella volvacea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changqing; Li, Tong; Jiang, Yun; Li, Yu

    2014-12-04

    To understand the fungal community succession during the phase II of Volvariella volvacea compost and clarify the predominant fungi in different fermentation stages, to monitor the dynamic compost at the molecular level accurately and quickly, and reveal the mechanism. The 18S rDNA-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing methods were used to analyze the fungal community structure during the course of compost. The DGGE profile shows that there were differences in the diversity of fungal community with the fermentation progress. The diversity was higher in the stages of high temperature. And the dynamic changes of predominant community and relative intensity was observed. Among the 20 predominant clone strains, 9 were unknown eukaryote and fungi, the others were Eurotiales, Aspergillus sp., Melanocarpus albomyces, Colletotrichum sp., Rhizomucor sp., Verticillium sp., Penicillium commune, Microascus trigonosporus and Trichosporon lactis. The 14 clone strains were detected in the stages of high and durative temperature. The fungal community structure and predominant community have taken dynamic succession during the phase II of Volvariella volvacea compost.

  3. Test Plan for Hydrogen Getters Project - Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mroz, G.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (''poison'') the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The result of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP. Phase II for the Hydrogen Getters Project will focus on four primary objectives: Conduct measurements of the relative permeability of hydrogen and chlorinated VOCs through Tedlar (and possibly other candidate packaging materials) Test alternative getter systems as alternatives to semi-permeable packaging materials. Candidates include DEB/Pd/Al2O3 and DEB/Cu-Pd/C. Develop, test, and deploy kinetic optimization model Perform drum-scale test experiments to demonstrate getter effectiveness

  4. Single Photon Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector (APD), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging Phase I SBIR successes, in Phase II, a single photon sensitive LIDAR receiver will be fabricated and delivered to NASA. In Phase I, high-gain,...

  5. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I II & III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016 were done in three phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. The goal of the third phase was to see if surrogate aerosol gets released from the PC when the drum lid is off. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I, II, and III, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  6. Are written information or counseling (WOMAN-PRO II program) able to improve patient satisfaction and the delivery of health care of women with vulvar neoplasms? Secondary outcomes of a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, Larissa; Kobleder, Andrea; Werner, Birgit; Denhaerynck, Kris; Senn, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients with vulvar neoplasms report a lack of information, missing support in self-management and a gap in delivery of health care. Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate if written information or counseling based on the WOMAN-PRO II program are able to improve patient satisfaction and the delivery of health care from the health professional's perspective of women with vulvar neoplasms. Method: Patient satisfaction and the delivery of health care have been investigated as two secondary outcomes in a multicenter randomized controlled parallel-group phase II study (Clinical Trial ID: NCT01986725). In total, 49 women, from four hospitals (CH, AUT), completed the questionnaire PACIC-S11 after written information (n = 13) and counseling (n = 36). The delivery of health care was evaluated by ten Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) by using the G-ACIC before and after implementing counseling based on the WOMAN-PRO II program. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups identified (p = 0.25). Only few aspects were rated highly by all women, such as the overall satisfaction (M = 80.3 %) and satisfaction with organization of care (M = 83.0 %). The evaluation of delivery of health care by APNs in women who received counseling improved significantly (p = 0.031). Conclusions: There are indications, that the practice of both interventions might have improved patient satisfaction and counseling the delivery of health care. The aspects that have been rated low in the PACIC-S11 and G-ACIC indicate possibilities to optimize the delivery of health care.

  7. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-11-12

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  8. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  9. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Freedman, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bott, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murray, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rockhold, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, A. [LBNL; Steefel, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waichler, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-28

    quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  10. Phase II Vault Testing of the Argonne RFID System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management (EM), Office of Packaging and Transportation (EM-45)) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase

  11. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step

  12. Phase II trial of epidermal growth factor ointment for patients with Erlotinib-related skin effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kang, Jung Hun; Oh, Sung Yong; Lee, Suee; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Song, Ki-Hoon; Son, Choonhee; Park, Min Jae; Kang, Myung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Young Suk; Sun, Jong Mu; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chan Kyu; Yi, Seong Yoon; Jang, Joung-Soon; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Hyo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of erlotinib, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been demonstrated in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and pancreatic cancer (PC). In the present study, we evaluated the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) ointment on erlotinib-related skin effects (ERSEs). This was an open-label, non-comparative, multicenter, phase II trial. The patients included those diagnosed with NSCLC or PC who were treated with erlotinib. The effectiveness of the ointment was defined as follows: (1) grade 2, 3, or 4 ERSEs downgraded to ≤ grade 1 or (2) grade 3 or 4 ERSEs downgraded to grade 2 and persisted for at least 2 weeks. Fifty-two patients from seven institutes in Korea were enrolled with informed consent. The final assessment included 46 patients (30 males, 16 females). According to the definition of effectiveness, the EGF ointment was effective in 36 (69.2%) intention to treat patients. There were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of the EGF ointment by gender (p = 0.465), age (p = 0.547), tumor type (p = 0.085), erlotinib dosage (p = 0.117), and number of prior chemotherapy sessions (p = 0.547). The grading for the average National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) rating of rash/acne and itching improved from 2.02 ± 0.83 to 1.13 ± 0.89 and 1.52 ± 0.84 to 0.67 ± 0.90, respectively (p reason for discontinuing the study was progression of cancer (37%). Based on the results, the EGF ointment is effective for ERSEs, regardless of gender, age, type of tumor, and dosage of erlotinib. The EGF ointment evenly improved all kinds of symptoms of ERSEs. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01593995.

  13. Biomarker-Based Phase II Trial of Savolitinib in Patients With Advanced Papillary Renal Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, Toni K; Plimack, Elizabeth; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias; Jonasch, Eric; Heng, Daniel Y C; Powles, Thomas; Frigault, Melanie M; Clark, Edwin A; Handzel, Amir A; Gardner, Humphrey; Morgan, Shethah; Albiges, Laurence; Pal, Sumanta Kumar

    2017-09-10

    Purpose Patients with advanced papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) have limited therapeutic options. PRCC may involve activation of the MET pathway, for example, through gene amplification or mutations. Savolitinib (AZD6094, HMPL-504, volitinib) is a highly selective MET tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We report results of a single-arm, multicenter, phase II study evaluating the safety and efficacy of savolitinib in patients with PRCC according to MET status. Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed locally advanced or metastatic PRCC were enrolled and received savolitinib 600 mg orally once daily. MET-driven PRCC was defined as any of the following: chromosome 7 copy gain, focal MET or HGF gene amplification, or MET kinase domain mutations. Efficacy was assessed according to MET status. Safety, toxicity, and patient-reported health-related quality-of-life outcomes were assessed in all patients. Results Of 109 patients treated, PRCC was MET driven in 44 (40%) and MET independent in 46 (42%); MET status was unknown in 19 (17%). MET-driven PRCC was strongly associated with response; there were eight confirmed partial responders with MET-driven disease (18%), but none with MET-independent disease ( P = .002). Median progression-free survival for patients with MET-driven and MET-independent PRCC was 6.2 months (95% CI, 4.1 to 7.0 months) and 1.4 months (95% CI, 1.4 to 2.7 months), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.52; log-rank P < .001). The most frequent adverse events associated with savolitinib were nausea, fatigue, vomiting, and peripheral edema. Conclusion These data show activity and tolerability of savolitinib in the subgroup of patients with MET-driven PRCC. Furthermore, molecular characterization of MET status was more predictive of response to savolitinib than a classification based on pathology. These findings justify investigating savolitinib in MET-driven PRCC.

  14. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruella, Marco [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruna, Riccardo [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Di Russo, Anna [Radiation Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Magni, Michele [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Caracciolo, Daniele [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Passera, Roberto [Division of Nuclear Medicine, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Corradini, Paolo [Division of Haematology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Parvis, Guido [Division of Haematology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino (Italy); Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio [Division of Haematology, Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona (Italy); Ladetto, Marco [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Tarella, Corrado, E-mail: corrado.tarella@gmail.com [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Hemato-Oncology Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Devizzi, Liliana [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  15. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruella, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Bruna, Riccardo; Di Russo, Anna; Magni, Michele; Caracciolo, Daniele; Passera, Roberto; Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo; Corradini, Paolo; Parvis, Guido; Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio; Ladetto, Marco; Ricardi, Umberto; Tarella, Corrado; Devizzi, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m"2, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  16. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I & II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. However, POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a new series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016, and described herein, were done in two phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I and II, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  17. Lunar Quest in Second Life, Lunar Exploration Island, Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, F. M.; Day, B. H.; Mitchell, B.; Hsu, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    Linden Lab’s Second Life is a virtual 3D metaverse created by users. At any one time there may be 40,000-50,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars move through Second Life by walking, flying, or teleporting. Users form communities or groups of mutual interest such as music, computer graphics, and education. These groups communicate via e-mail, voice, and text within Second Life. Information on downloading the Second Life browser and joining can be found on the Second Life website: www.secondlife.com. This poster details Phase II in the development of Lunar Exploration Island (LEI) located in Second Life. Phase I LEI highlighted NASA’s LRO/LCROSS mission. Avatars enter LEI via teleportation arriving at a hall of flight housing interactive exhibits on the LRO/ LCROSS missions including full size models of the two spacecraft and launch vehicle. Storyboards with information about the missions interpret the exhibits while links to external websites provide further information on the mission, both spacecraft’s instrument suites, and related EPO. Other lunar related activities such as My Moon and NLSI EPO programs. A special exhibit was designed for International Observe the Moon Night activities with links to websites for further information. The sim includes several sites for meetings, a conference stage to host talks, and a screen for viewing NASATV coverage of mission and other televised events. In Phase II exhibits are updated to reflect on-going lunar exploration highlights, discoveries, and future missions. A new section of LEI has been developed to showcase NASA’s Lunar Quest program. A new exhibit hall with Lunar Quest information has been designed and is being populated with Lunar Quest information, spacecraft models (LADEE is in place) and kiosks. A two stage interactive demonstration illustrates lunar phases with static and 3-D stations. As NASA’s Lunar Quest program matures further

  18. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  19. The NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence - Phase I Lessons and Phase II Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Peter [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa (Canada). Uranium and Radioactive Waste Div.; Pescatore, Claudio [Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France)

    2006-09-15

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created under a mandate from the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue with the public, and considers ways to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. The Forum was launched in August 2000 and completed its first phase in 00 . Major findings and principles for action were published under the title of 'Learning and Adapting to Societal Requirements'. Activities of the FSC were also reported at Valdor 2003. In the second mandate of the FSC, there is continued use of a variety of tools and formats to allow dialogue among stakeholders in an atmosphere of mutual trust: national workshops and community visits, topical sessions, and desk and interview studies. In Phase II, the FSC is exploring: the link between research, development and demonstration and stakeholder confidence; cultural and organisational changes in RWM institutions; the role of media relations and outreach opportunities; tools and processes to help society prepare and manage decisions through stakeholder involvement; and increasing the value of waste management facilities to local communities. Workshops have been held in Germany and Spain. A large set of publications makes both Phase I and Phase II findings widely available.

  20. The NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence - Phase I Lessons and Phase II Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created under a mandate from the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue with the public, and considers ways to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. The Forum was launched in August 2000 and completed its first phase in 00 . Major findings and principles for action were published under the title of 'Learning and Adapting to Societal Requirements'. Activities of the FSC were also reported at Valdor 2003. In the second mandate of the FSC, there is continued use of a variety of tools and formats to allow dialogue among stakeholders in an atmosphere of mutual trust: national workshops and community visits, topical sessions, and desk and interview studies. In Phase II, the FSC is exploring: the link between research, development and demonstration and stakeholder confidence; cultural and organisational changes in RWM institutions; the role of media relations and outreach opportunities; tools and processes to help society prepare and manage decisions through stakeholder involvement; and increasing the value of waste management facilities to local communities. Workshops have been held in Germany and Spain. A large set of publications makes both Phase I and Phase II findings widely available

  1. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  2. Investigation of the explosion hazards of hydrogen sulphide. (Phase II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moen, I.O.

    1986-01-01

    The results of Phase II of an investigation directed towards quantifying the explosive hazards of hydrogen sulphide in air are described. This second and final phase is focussed on flame acceleration until detonation in obstacle environments simulating a heavy water plant. The results of previous experimental tests, both small and large scale, are compiled and summarized and the results of a series of flame acceleration tests are reported. These tests were performed in order to assess the potential for damaging explosions in simulated industrial environments with repeated obstacles. The experimented apparatus consisted of a channel 1.8 m x 1.8 m in cross-section and 15.5 m long. Two obstacle configurations were tested, corresponding to 500 mm or 220 mm diameter tubes mounted across the channel at regular intervals. Tests were performed with acetylene, propane and hydrogen sulphide fuels. The results of numerical simulation are also reported and compared with the observed results. Scaling predictions are also made. The key results are summarized in the main text, and detailed reports covering the various aspects are included in three annexes

  3. Investigation of the explosion hazards of hydrogen sulphide. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moen, I.O.

    1986-01-01

    The results of Phase II of an investigation directed towards quantifying the explosive hazards of hydrogen sulphide in air are described. This second and final phase is focussed on flame acceleration until detonation in obstacle environments simulating a heavy water plant. The results of previous experimental tests, both small and large scale, are compiled and summarized and the results of a series of flame acceleration tests are reported. These tests were performed in order to assess the potential for damaging explosions in simulated industrial environments with repeated obstacles. The experimented apparatus consisted of a channel 1.8 m x 1.8 m in cross-section and 15.5 m long. Two obstacle configurations were tested, corresponding to 500 mm or 220 mm diameter tubes mounted across the channel at regular intervals. Tests were performed with acetylene, propane and hydrogen sulphide fuels. The results of numerical simulation are also reported and compared with the observed results. Scaling predictions are also made. The key results are summarized in the main text, and detailed reports covering the various aspects are included in three annexes

  4. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  5. Alternate Reductant Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace Phase II Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste

  6. MHD seed recovery and regeneration, Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by the Space and Technology Division of the TRW Space and Electronics Group for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for the Econoseed process. This process involves the economical recovery and regeneration of potassium seed used in the MHD channel. The contract period of performance extended from 1987 through 1994 and was divided into two phases. The Phase II test results are the subject of this Final Report. However, the Phase I test results are presented in summary form in Section 2.3 of this Final Report. The Econoseed process involves the treatment of the potassium sulfate in spent MHD seed with an aqueous calcium formate solution in a continuously stirred reactor system to solubilize, as potassium formate, the potassium content of the seed and to precipitate and recover the sulfate as calcium sulfate. The slurry product from this reaction is centrifuged to separate the calcium sulfate and insoluble seed constituents from the potassium formate solution. The dilute solids-free potassium formate solution is then concentrated in an evaporator. The concentrated potassium formate product is a liquid which can be recycled as a spray into the MHD channel. Calcium formate is the seed regenerant used in the Econoseed process. Since calcium formate is produced in the United States in relatively small quantities, a new route to the continuous production of large quantities of calcium formate needed to support an MHD power industry was investigated. This route involves the reaction of carbon monoxide gas with lime solids in an aqueous medium.

  7. Phase II Results of RTOG 0537: A Phase II/III Study Comparing Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Versus Pilocarpine in Treating Early Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Raimond K. W.; James, Jennifer L.; Sagar, Stephen; Wyatt, Gwen; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc Felix; Singh, Anurag K.; Lukaszczyk, Barbara; Cardinale, Francis; Yeh, Alexander M.; Berk, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II component of a multi-institutional phase II/III randomized trial assessed the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) in reducing radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods Head and neck cancer patients who were 3–24 months from completing radiotherapy ± chemotherapy (RT±C) and experiencing xerostomia symptoms with basal whole saliva production ≥0.1 ml/min and without recurrence were eligible. Patients received twice weekly ALTENS sessions (24 over 12 weeks) using a Codetron™ unit. The primary objective assessed the feasibility of ALTENS treatment. A patient was considered compliant if 19/24 ALTENS were delivered, with a targeted 85% compliance rate. Secondary objectives measured treatment-related toxicities and ALTENS effect on overall radiation-induced xerostomia burden using the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS). Results Of 48 accrued patients, 47 were evaluable. Median age was 60 years; 84% were male, 70% completed RT±C for > 12 months and 21% had received prior pilocarpine. All ALTENS sessions were completed in 34 patients, but 9 and 1 completed 20–23 and 19 sessions respectively, representing a 94% total compliance rate. 6-month XeQOLS scores were available for 35 patients; 30 (86%) achieved a positive treatment response with a mean reduction of 35.9% (SD 36.1). Five patients developed grade 1–2 gastrointestinal toxicity and one had grade 1 pain event. Conclusions ALTENS treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia can be uniformly delivered in a cooperative multicenter setting and has possible beneficial treatment response. Given these results, the phase III component of this study was initiated. PMID:22252927

  8. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II: Shallow Plus Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, K. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Parker, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Martin, E. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Chasar, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Amos, B. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-02-03

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013. A full account of Phase I of this project, including detailed home details and characterization, is found in Parker et al, 2015 (currently in draft). Phase II of this project, which is the focus of this report, applied the following additional retrofit measures to select homes that received a shallow retrofit in Phase I: a) Supplemental mini-split heat pump (MSHP) (6 homes); b) Ducted and space coupled Heat Pump Water Heater (8 homes); c) Exterior insulation finish system (EIFS) (1 homes); d) Window retrofit (3 homes); e) Smart thermostat (21 homes: 19 NESTs; 2 Lyrics); f) Heat pump clothes dryer (8 homes); g) Variable speed pool pump (5 homes).

  9. Multifunctional Metal/Polymer Composite Fiber for Space Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Program, Syscom Technology, Inc. will implement an integrated processing scheme to fabricate a conductive...

  10. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Hidefumi, E-mail: mimura@marianna-u.ac.jp [St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki, E-mail: arai-y3111@mvh.biglobe.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com; Takeuchi, Yoshito, E-mail: yotake62@qg8.so-net.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Miki, Tsuneharu, E-mail: tmiki@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Urology (Japan); Gobara, Hideo, E-mail: gobara@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sakuhara, Yusuke, E-mail: yusaku@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamamoto, Takanobu, E-mail: tyamamot@tcc.pref.tochigi.lg.jp [Tochigi Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sato, Yozo, E-mail: ysato@aichi-cc.jp [Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu, E-mail: susumu@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  11. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Hidefumi; Arai, Yasuaki; Yamakado, Koichiro; Sone, Miyuki; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Miki, Tsuneharu; Gobara, Hideo; Sakuhara, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Sato, Yozo; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  12. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.; Shah, H.; Wilmarth, W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  13. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87+/-0.95 mm and rotations of 1.56+/-0.66 degrees . Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4+/-7.5 [ml/100 g/min] with a between-subject standard variation SD(b)=5.5 [ml/100 g/min] and a within-subject standard deviation SD(w)=4.7 [ml/100 g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100 g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies.

  14. Aluminum potassium sulfate and tannic acid sclerotherapy for Goligher Grades II and III hemorrhoids: Results from a multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hidenori; Hada, Takenori; Ishiyama, Gentaro; Ono, Yoshito; Watanabe, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To show that aluminum potassium sulfate and tannic acid (ALTA) sclerotherapy has a high success rate for Grade II and III hemorrhoids. METHODS: This study was based on the clinical data of 604 patients with hemorrhoids who underwent ALTA sclerotherapy between January 2009 and February 2015. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of this treatment for Grades II and III hemorrhoids. Preoperative and postoperative symptoms, complications and success rate were all assessed retrospectively. Follow-up consisted of a simple questionnaire, physical examination and an anoscopy. Patients were followed-up at one day, one week, two weeks, one month, one year, two years, three years, four years and five years after the ALTA sclerotherapy. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-nine patients were diagnosed with Grade II hemorrhoids and 435 patients were diagnosed with Grade III hemorrhoids. The one year, three year and five year cumulative success rates of ALTA sclerotherapy for Grades II and III hemorrhoids were 95.9% and 93.1%; 89.3% and 83.7%; and 89.3% and 78.2%, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the cumulative success rates after ALTA sclerotherapy between Grades II and III hemorrhoids (P = 0.09). There were forty-seven post-operative complications (low grade fever; anal pain; urinary retention; rectal ulcer; and others). No serious or life-threatening complications occurred and all cases improved through conservative treatment. At univariate analysis there were no predictive factors of failure. CONCLUSION: ALTA sclerotherapy has had a high success rate for Grade II and III hemorrhoids during five years of post-operative treatment. However, additional studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this ALTA sclerotherapy in the management of hemorrhoidal disease. PMID:27458504

  15. Space Qualified Non-Destructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring Technology, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Encouraged by Phase I accomplishments, the proposed Phase II program will significantly mature and align the development of a Space Qualified Non-Destructive...

  16. Lightweight Thermally Stable Multi-Meter Aperture Submillimeter Reflectors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II effort will be an affordable demonstrated full-scale design for a thermally stable multi-meter submillimeter reflector. The Phase I...

  17. Reconfigurable L-band Radar Transceiver using Digital Signal Synthesis, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II proposal, builds upon the extensive research and digital radar design that has been successfully completed during the Phase I contract. Key innovations...

  18. MULTIFUNCTIONAL, SELF-HEALING HYBRIDSIL MATERIALS FOR EVA SPACE SUIT PRESSURE GARMENT SYSTEMS, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Phase II SBIR transition of NanoSonic's high flex HybridSil space suit bladder and glove materials will provide a pivotal funding bridge toward Phase III...

  19. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  20. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase I and Phase II Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights nine of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and Phase II projects that emphasize one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high temperature environmental barrier coating systems, deployable space structures, solid oxide fuel cells, and self-lubricating hard coatings for extreme temperatures. Each featured technology describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  1. X-ray diffraction study of phase transitions in iron(II) trisnioximate hexadecylboronate clathrochelate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorontsov, I.I.; Antipin, M.Yu.; Dubovik, I.I.; Papkov, V.S.; Potekhin, K.A.; Voloshin, Ya.Z.; Stash, A.I.; Belsky, V.K.

    2001-01-01

    Crystals of the iron(II) nioximate hexadecylboronate clathrochelate complex-FeNx 3 (BHd ) 2 [tris(μ-1,2-cyclohexanedionedioximato-O:O ' )di-n-hexadecyldiborato(2-) - N,'''N''',N''',N''',N''',N ' ]iron(II) - are investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Two structural phase transitions are revealed at T cr1 = 290(3) K and T cr2 = 190(3) K. The crystal structures of phases I, II, and III are determined by X-ray diffraction analysis at 303, 243, and 153 K, respectively. It is demonstrated that the I ↔ II phase transition is due to a change in the system of translations, and the II ↔ III phase transition is accompanied only by a jumpwise change in the unit cell parameters. The possible mechanisms of phase transitions are discussed in terms of geometry and molecular packing of FeNx 3 (BHd) 2 in all three phases

  2. Aging of snubbers in nuclear service: Phase I study results and Phase II plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, R.L.; Bush, S.H.; Page, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Two major research areas were investigated in the Phase I snubber aging studies. The first area involved a preliminary evaluation of the effects of various aging mechanisms on snubber operation; failure modes of mechanisms were identified and their contributions to aging degradation were assessed relative to other failure modes. The second area involved estimating the efficacy of existing tests and examinations that are intended to determine the effects of aging and degradation. Available data on snubber behavior and operating experience were reviewed, using licensee event reports and other historical data for the 10-year period from 1973 through 1983. Value-impact was considered in terms of (1) exposure of workers to radioactive environments for examination/testing and (2) the cost for expansion of the snubber testing program due to failed snubbers. Results from the Phase I studies identified the need to modify or improve examination and testing procedures to enhance snubber reliability. Based on the results of the Phase I snubber studies, the seals and fluids were identified as the two principal elements affected by aging degradation in hydraulic snubbers. Phase II work, which was initiated in FY 1987, will develop cooperative activities between PNL and operating utilities through the Snubber Utility Group (SNUG), who will work to establish a strong data and experience base for both hydraulic and mechanical snubbers based on actual operating and maintenance history at nuclear power plants. Application guidelines for snubbers will be recommended based on the study results

  3. A Phase II Study of Weekly Docetaxel as Second-Line Chemotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Saing; Lee, Soon Il; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Silvia; Hwang, In Gyu; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Sun, Jong-Mu; Lee, Jeeyun; Lim, Ho Yeong

    2016-02-01

    The present multicenter phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of weekly docetaxel as second-line chemotherapy for metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Weekly docetaxel was well tolerated but demonstrated modest activity, with a response rate of 6%, a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 1.4 months, and a median overall survival (OS) of 8.3 months. The dichotomy between PFS and OS was likely associated with subsequent platinum-based chemotherapy received by 58% of the patients. Docetaxel is commonly used for second-line therapy for metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC). However, myelosuppression is a substantial concern when the traditional 3-week docetaxel cycle is used. The present multicenter phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of weekly docetaxel as second-line chemotherapy for metastatic UC. Patients with progression after previous platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced or metastatic disease were treated with docetaxel 30 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 every 21 days. The primary endpoint was the response rate. The study enrolled 31 patients. Their median age was 64 years (range, 40-79 years). An Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1, liver metastasis, and a hemoglobin level chemotherapy had been administered for metastatic disease in 29 patients (94%). Although fatigue (13%) and anorexia (6%) were the most frequently observed grade 3 to 4 toxicities, the safety profiles were generally mild and manageable. Two patients (6%) achieved an objective response, which was maintained for 3.0 to 7.8 months. Eight patients experienced disease stabilization (disease control rate, 32%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 1.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-1.6) and 8.3 months (95% CI, 5.9-10.6), respectively. A relatively long OS was associated with further salvage platinum-based chemotherapy (n = 18, 58%) showing an encouraging activity (response rate, 44%; median PFS, 4.0 months

  4. Background rejection of n+ surface events in GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Björn

    2016-05-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta (0vββ) decay in 76Ge using an array of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors immersed in liquid argon (LAr). Phase II of the experiment uses 30 new broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors with superior pulse shape discrimination capabilities compared to the previously used semi-coaxial detector design. By far the largest background component for BEGe detectors in GERDA are n+-surface events from 42K β decays which are intrinsic in LAr. The β particles with up to 3.5 MeV can traverse the 0.5 to 0.9 mm thick electrode and deposit energy within the region of interest for the 0vββ decay. However, those events have particular pulse shape features allowing for a strong discrimination. The understanding and simulation of this background, showing a reduction by up to a factor 145 with pulse shape discrimination alone, is presented in this work.

  5. The Phase II ATLAS Pixel Upgrade: The Inner Tracker (ITk)

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, Tobias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ITk (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m^2, depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Four layout options are being investigated at the moment, two with forward coverage to eta < 3.2 and two to eta < 4. For each coverage option, a layout with long barrel staves and a layout with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region are considered. All potential layouts include modules mounted on ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. Support...

  6. Micromegas R&D for ATLAS MUON PHASE II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Edoardo Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade, a proposal to extend the detector acceptance of the muon system to high η has been put forward (namely up to | η| ~ 4). Extension of the muon coverage has been demonstrated to enhance physics performance. The proposed location for the new detector is in between the end-cap calorimeter cryostat and the JD shielding; in this region there is no magnetic field applied, the aim of the new detector is therefore to only tag muons without performing any momentum measurement. The new η tagger should cope with extremely high particle rate, that has been calculated, by means of simulations, to be 9 MHz at R = 25 cm and 0.4 MHz at R = 60 cm for μ = 200, where μ stands for the number of pp collisions per bunch crossing. The required spatial resolution at the inner edge of the detector has been estimated in few hundreds micrometres. One of the most promising candidate technology for the new detector is the MicroMegaS one, which has already been adopted for the NSW upgrad...

  7. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behl Susanne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0 with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01, a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage in addition to response to thymostimulin, while an invasive HCC phenotype had no influence in the multivariate analysis. Thymostimulin could therefore be considered a safe and promising candidate for palliative treatment in a selected target population with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, in particular as component of a multimodal therapy concept. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29319366.

  8. Validation of KENOREST with LWR-PROTEUS phase II samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M.; Kilger, R.; Pautz, A.; Zwermann, W. [GRS, Garching (Germany); Grimm, P.; Vasiliev, A.; Ferroukhi, H. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-11-01

    In order to broaden the validation basis of the reactivity and nuclide inventory code KENOREST two samples of the LWR-PROTEUS phase II program have been calculated and compared to the experimental results. In general most nuclides are reproduced very well and agree within about ten percent with the experiment. Some already known problems, the overprediction of metallic fission products and the underprediction of the higher curium isotopes, have been confirmed. One of the largest uncertainties in the calculation was the burnup of the samples due to differences between a core simulation of the fuel vendor and the burnup determined from the measured values of the burnup indicator Nd-148. Two different models taking into account the environment for a peripheral fuel rod have been studied. The more detailed model included the three direct neighbor fuel assemblies depleted along with the fuel rod of interest. The influence on the results has been found to be very small. Compared to the uncertainties from the burnup, this effect can be considered negligible. The reason for the low influence was basically that the spectrum did not get considerably harder with increasing burnup beyond about 20GWd/tHM. Since the sample reached burnups far beyond that value, an effect could not be seen. In the near future an update of the used libraries is planned and it will be very interesting to study the effect on the results, especially for Curium. (orig.)

  9. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used to determine compound effects on both neural function and cell health in primary cortical networks grown on mwMEA plates following exposure to ~1100 compounds from EPA’s Phase II ToxCast libraries. On DIV 13, baseline activity (40 min) was recorded prior to exposure to each compound at 40 µM. DMSO and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (BIC) were included as controls on each mwMEA plate. Changes in spontaneous network activity (mean firing rate; MFR) and cell viability (lactate dehydrogenase; LDH and CellTiter Blue; CTB) were assessed within the same well following compound exposure. Activity calls (“hits”) were established using the 90th and 20th percentiles of the compound-induced change in MFR (medians of triplicates) across all tested compounds; compounds above (top 10% of compounds increasing MFR), and below (bottom 20% of compounds decreasing MFR) these thresholds, respectively were considered hits. MFR was altered beyond one of these thresholds by 322 compounds. Four compound categories accounted for 66% of the hits, including: insecticides (e.g. abamectin, lindane, prallethrin), pharmaceuticals (e.g. haloperidol, reserpine), fungicides (e.g. hexaconazole, fenamidone), and h

  10. Postirradiation examination of BEATRIX-II, Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slagle, O.D.; Hobbs, F.D.; Baldwin, D.L.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Takahashi, T.; Noda, K.; Verrall, R.A.

    1993-09-01

    BEATRIX-II is an in situ tritium recovery experiment that was designed to characterize the behavior of lithium ceramics irradiated to high burnup in a fast neutron flux. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the Phase 1 vented canisters: one containing a Li 2 O ring capable of temperature changes and the other a Li 2 O solid specimen with a center temperature of 1,000 degrees C. The tritium inventory of the ring specimen at 650 degrees C was determined to be in the range from 0.2--0.6 wppm while for the solid specimen the inventory varied from 1.4 wppm at the surface to 0.06 wppm at the inner surface. Downstream transport of the Li 2 O by the sweep gas was determined to be insignificant from analyses of acid rinses of selected canister surfaces. Densification and restructuring of the solid specimen during irradiation resulted in the development of a central annulus. Ceramography was used to characterize the columnar grain structure and the mechanisms involved in its evolution

  11. Efficacy and safety of long-acting pasireotide in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism: results from a multicenter, open-label, randomized, phase 2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Shigeyuki; Murakami, Mami; Kaneko, Tomomi; Shimatsu, Akira

    2017-07-28

    A multicenter, open-label, phase 2 study was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of long-acting pasireotide formulation in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism. Medically naïve or inadequately controlled patients (on somatostatin analogues or dopamine agonists) were included. Primary end point was the proportion of all patients who achieved biochemical control (mean growth hormone [GH] levelsacromegaly, n=32; pituitary gigantism, n=1) were enrolled and randomized 1:1:1 to receive open-label pasireotide 20mg, 40mg, or 60mg. The median age was 52 years (range, 31-79) and 20 patients were males. At month 3, 18.2% of patients (6/33; 90% confidence interval: 8.2%, 32.8%) had biochemical control (21.2% [7/33] when including a patient with mean GHacromegaly or pituitary gigantism.

  12. The PACOVAR-trial: A phase I/II study of pazopanib (GW786034) and cyclophosphamide in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent, pre-treated ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichbaum, Michael; Fersis, Nikos; Schmidt, Marcus; Wallwiener, Markus; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Mayer, Christine; Eickhoff, Regina; Bischofs, Esther; Gebauer, Gerhard; Fehm, Tanja; Lenz, Florian; Fricke, Hans-Christian; Solomayer, Erich

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is poor. There is no standard treatment available. Emerging evidence suggests a major role for antiangiogenic treatment modalities in EOC, in particular in combination with the metronomic application of low dose chemotherapy. The novel, investigational oral antiangiogenic agent pazopanib targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and c-kit is currently being studied in different tumour types and is already used as first line therapy in recurrent renal cell carcinoma. A combined therapy consisting of pazopanib and metronomic oral cyclophosphamide may offer a well-tolerable treatment option to patients with recurrent, pretreated EOC. This study is designed as a multicenter phase I/II trial evaluating the optimal dose for pazopanib (phase I) as well as activity and tolerability of a combination regimen consisting of pazopanib and metronomic cyclophosphamide in the palliative treatment of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant, pre-treated ovarian cancer (phase II). The patient population includes patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed diagnosis of EOC, cancer of the fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer which is platinumresistant or -refractory. Patients must have measurable disease according to RECIST criteria and must have failed available standard chemotherapy. Primary objectives are determination of the optimal doses for pazopanib (phase I) and the overall response rate according to RECIST criteria (phase II). Secondary objectives are time to progression, overall survival, safety and tolerability. The treatment duration is until disease progression or intolerability of study drug regimen (with a maximum of 13 cycles up to 52 weeks per subject). The current phase I/II trial shall clarify the potential of the multitargeting antiangiogenic tyrosinkinaseinhibitor GW 786034 (pazopanib) in

  13. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijts, Charlotte M; Santegoets, Saskia J; Eertwegh, Alfons J van den; Pijpers, Laura S; Haanen, John B; Gruijl, Tanja D de; Verheul, Henk M; Vliet, Hans J van der

    2011-01-01

    For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part). In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus induced Treg expansion in patients with metastatic renal cell

  14. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijts Charlotte M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. Methods/design This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part. In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. Discussion This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus

  15. Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project. Synthesis of phase II (construction phase) investigations to a depth of 350 m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshinori; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Ishii, Eiichi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Hayano, Akira; Miyakawa, Kazuya; Fujita, Tomoo; Tanai, Kenji; Nakayama, Masashi; Takeda, Masaki; Yokota, Hideharu; Aoyagi, Kazuhei; Ohno, Hirokazu; Shigeta, Naotaka; Hanamuro, Takahiro; Ito, Hiroaki

    2017-03-01

    The Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL) Project is being pursued by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to enhance the reliability of relevant disposal technologies through investigations of the deep geological environment within the host sedimentary formations at Horonobe, northern Hokkaido. The project consists of two major research areas, 'Geoscientific Research' and 'R and D on Geological Disposal', and proceeds in three overlapping phases, 'Phase I: Surface-based investigation', 'Phase II: Construction' and 'Phase III: Operation', over a period of 20 years. This report summarizes the results of the Phase II investigations carried out from April 2005 to June 2014 to a depth of 350 m. Integration of work from different disciplines into a 'geosynthesis' ensures that the Phase II goals have been successfully achieved and identifies key issues that need to be addressed in the Phase II investigations. Efforts are made to summarize as many lessons learnt from the Phase II investigations and other technical achievements as possible to form a 'knowledge base' that will reinforce the technical basis for both implementation and the formulation of safety regulations. (author)

  16. A steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system: Phase II. Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, A.; Shenhar, J.; Lum, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the phase II work on the Position Location Device (POLO) for penetrometers. Phase II was carried out to generate an integrated design of a full-scale steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system. Steering provides for the controlled and directional use of the penetrometer, while vibratory thrusting can provide greater penetration ability

  17. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  18. Selumetinib in Combination With Dacarbazine in Patients With Metastatic Uveal Melanoma: A Phase III, Multicenter, Randomized Trial (SUMIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Richard D; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Chapman, Paul B; Frank, Stephen; Joshua, Anthony M; Piulats, Josep M; Wolter, Pascal; Cocquyt, Veronique; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Evans, T R Jeffry; Gastaud, Lauris; Linette, Gerald; Berking, Carola; Schachter, Jacob; Rodrigues, Manuel J; Shoushtari, Alexander N; Clemett, Delyth; Ghiorghiu, Dana; Mariani, Gabriella; Spratt, Shirley; Lovick, Susan; Barker, Peter; Kilgour, Elaine; Lai, Zhongwu; Schwartz, Gary K; Nathan, Paul

    2018-04-20

    Purpose Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults with no effective systemic treatment option in the metastatic setting. Selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142886) is an oral, potent, and selective MEK1/2 inhibitor with a short half-life, which demonstrated single-agent activity in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma in a randomized phase II trial. Methods The Selumetinib (AZD6244: ARRY-142886) (Hyd-Sulfate) in Metastatic Uveal Melanoma (SUMIT) study was a phase III, double-blind trial ( ClinicalTrial.gov identifier: NCT01974752) in which patients with metastatic uveal melanoma and no prior systemic therapy were randomly assigned (3:1) to selumetinib (75 mg twice daily) plus dacarbazine (1,000 mg/m 2 intravenously on day 1 of every 21-day cycle) or placebo plus dacarbazine. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) by blinded independent central radiologic review. Secondary end points included overall survival and objective response rate. Results A total of 129 patients were randomly assigned to receive selumetinib plus dacarbazine (n = 97) or placebo plus dacarbazine (n = 32). In the selumetinib plus dacarbazine group, 82 patients (85%) experienced a PFS event, compared with 24 (75%) in the placebo plus dacarbazine group (median, 2.8 v 1.8 months); the hazard ratio for PFS was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.48 to 1.27; two-sided P = .32). The objective response rate was 3% with selumetinib plus dacarbazine and 0% with placebo plus dacarbazine (two-sided P = .36). At 37% maturity (n = 48 deaths), analysis of overall survival gave a hazard ratio of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.39 to 1.46; two-sided P = .40). The most frequently reported adverse events (selumetinib plus dacarbazine v placebo plus dacarbazine) were nausea (62% v 19%), rash (57% v 6%), fatigue (44% v 47%), diarrhea (44% v 22%), and peripheral edema (43% v 6%). Conclusion In patients with metastatic uveal melanoma, the combination of selumetinib plus dacarbazine had a tolerable safety

  19. Solid phase selective separation and preconcentration of Cu(II) by Cu(II)-imprinted polymethacrylic microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakova, Ivanka; Karadjova, Irina; Ivanov, Ivo; Georgieva, Ventsislava; Evtimova, Bisera; Georgiev, George

    2007-02-12

    Ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) particles are prepared by copolymerization of methacrylic acid as monomer, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate as crosslinking agent and 2,2'-azo-bis-isobutyronitrile as initiator in the presence of Cu(II), a Cu(II)-4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (Cu(II)-PAR) complex, and PAR only. A batch procedure is used for the determination of the characteristics of the Cu(II) solid phase extraction from the IIP produced. The results obtained show that the Cu(II)-PAR IIP has the greatest adsorption capacity (37.4 micromol g(-1) of dry copolymer) among the IIPs investigated. The optimal pH value for the quantitative preconcentration is 7, and full desorption is achieved by 1 M HNO(3). The selectivity coefficients (S(Cu/Me)) for Me=Ni(II), Co(II) are 45.0 and 38.5, respectively. It is established that Cu(II)-PAR IIPs can be used repeatedly without a considerable adsorption capacity loss. The determination of Cu(II) ions in seawater shows that the interfering matrix does not influence the preconcentration and selectivity values of the Cu(II)-PAR IIPs. The detection and quantification limits are 0.001 micromol L(-1) (3sigma) and 0.003 micromol L(-1) (6sigma), respectively.

  20. Phase II trial of pazopanib in advanced/progressive malignant pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, Sina; Suman, Vera J; Jimenez, Camilo; Harris, Pamela; Sideras, Kostandinos; Burton, Jill K; Worden, Francis Paul; Auchus, Richard J; Bible, Keith C

    2017-08-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (Pheo/PGL) are rare, vascular, sometimes malignant endocrine tumors. Case reports indicate the activity of vascular endothelium growth factor receptor-targeted kinase inhibitors in these cancers. To assess the antitumor activity and tolerability of pazopanib in progressive malignant Pheo/PGL. This multicenter Phase II trial (MC107C) enrolled individuals  ≥18 years old with disease progression ≤ 6 months prior to registration, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS 0-2, and measurable disease (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors 1.0). Pazopanib was administered in 28-day cycles, with the regimen ultimately being as follows: cycle 1: 400 mg daily on days 1-14, cycle 2: 800 mg daily on days 1-14, and then cycle 2 + : 800 mg daily on all days. The study was halted due to poor accrual. Seven patients were enrolled (05/2011-11/2014). One patient withdrew consent prior to treatment, leaving six evaluable patients. Treatment was discontinued, due to the following reasons: disease progression (4); withdrawal (1); and grade 4 (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy (1). The median number of cycles administered was 4 (range: 2-29, total: 49). Four patients had >1 dose reduction due to the following reasons: fatigue (1), abnormal liver tests (2), hypertension and (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy (1), and headaches (1). Common severe (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grades 3-5) toxicities were as follows: hypertension (3/6), (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy (2/6), diarrhea (1/6), fatigue (1/6), headache (1/6), and hematuria (1/6). One confirmed partial response was observed in PGL (17%, duration 2.4 years); median progression-free survival and overall survival were 6.5 and 14.8 months, respectively. Pazopanib has activity in Pheo/PGL requiring more study; optimal alpha- and beta-blockade are imperative pre-therapy in patients with secretory tumors, as risk of hypertension and cardiomyopathy are potentially life

  1. Physical Improvements in Exciter/Igniter Units, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase 2 project consists of the physical integration of our Phase 1 small, compact exciter with a "flight like" igniter or spark plug capable of...

  2. Multicenter Phase 2 Study of Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil With Concurrent Radiation Therapy as an Organ Preservation Approach in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervical Esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenda, Sadamoto, E-mail: szenda@east.ncc.go.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Kojima, Takashi [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Kato, Ken [Division of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Izumi, Sachiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Ozawa, Taijiro [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Aichi (Japan); Kiyota, Naomi [Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Kobe University Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Katada, Chikatoshi [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara (Japan); Tsushima, Takahiro [Department of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Akimoto, Tetsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Hasegawa, Yasuhisa [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Aichi (Japan); Kanamaru, Miyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Daiko, Hiroyuki [Department of Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To clarify, in a multicenter, single-arm, phase 2 study (UMIN Clinical Trials Registry no. UMIN000001439), the clinical profile of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for cervical esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients with operable cervical esophageal cancer, excluding candidates for endoscopic resection, were enrolled. Protocol treatment consisted of CRT and adjuvant chemotherapy (CT). First, patients received concurrent CRT with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus cisplatin (CDDP). Chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU at 700 mg/m{sup 2} intravenous on days 1 to 4 and CDDP at 70 mg/m{sup 2} intravenous on day 1, repeated every 4 weeks for 2 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. After completion of CRT, 2 additional cycles of CT with 5-FU (800 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-5) and CDDP (80 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1) were repeated at a 4-week interval. The primary endpoint was 3-year overall survival. Results: Thirty patients were enrolled across 8 institutions in Japan, consisting of 26 men and 4 women with a median age of 64.5 years (range, 50-75 years). No grade 4 hematologic toxicity was seen in the CRT phase, and 1 grade 4 thrombocytopenia was seen in the CT phase. Grade 3 nonhematologic acute toxicities in the CRT phase were nausea (10%), mucositis (13.3%), and dysphagia (13.3%). No treatment-related death in either phase occurred. Overall complete response rate was 73%, and 3-year overall and laryngectomy-free survival were 66.5% and 52.5%, respectively. Regarding T4 disease, 3-year overall and laryngectomy-free survival were 58.3% and 38.5%, respectively. Conclusions: This study, the first prospective study for cervical esophageal cancer, showed that CRT has sufficient efficacy and safety for use as an alternative to surgery for these patients.

  3. Radiation therapy for ocular choroidal neovascularization (phase I/II study): preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasai, Keisuke; Murata, Rumi; Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo; Ogura, Yuichiro; Ngata, Yasushi; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    2 months after treatment, but this had disappeared spontaneously by the fourth month. The subjective symptoms, visual acuity, and size of the neovascular membrane were evaluated at 6 and 12 months after treatment in each patient. In the group of patients irradiated with 10 Gy and with 20 Gy, respectively, subjective symptoms improved in five and seven eyes, did not change in seven and four eyes, and deteriorated in six and six eyes at 12 months. Although visual acuity was significantly decreased in the control group, the patients in both irradiated groups did not show such a decrease in visual acuity. The size of the neovascular membrane in the control group progressed significantly. However, the patients in the 20 Gy group showed significant regression of the membrane, although those in the 10 Gy group showed no significant change in size. Conclusion: This Phase I/II study including a dose escalation study showed that radiation therapy seems to be useful for CNV. The dose of 20 Gy in 10 fractions was more useful in treating neovascular membranes than the dose of 10 Gy in five fractions. These results have encouraged us to start a multicenter randomized prospective study of the treatment of CNV with radiation therapy

  4. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Sumit [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Krok, Michael [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  5. Solid-phase extraction of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, Celal [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Gundogdu, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Bulut, Volkan Numan [Department of Chemistry, Giresun Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 28049 Giresun (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)]. E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr; Elci, Latif [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Pamukkale University, 20020 Denizli (Turkey); Sentuerk, Hasan Basri [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Tuefekci, Mehmet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2007-07-19

    A new method using a column packed with Amberlite XAD-2010 resin as a solid-phase extractant has been developed for the multi-element preconcentration of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) ions based on their complex formation with the sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (Na-DDTC) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determinations. Metal complexes sorbed on the resin were eluted by 1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} in acetone. Effects of the analytical conditions over the preconcentration yields of the metal ions, such as pH, quantity of Na-DDTC, eluent type, sample volume and flow rate, foreign ions etc. have been investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) of the analytes were found in the range 0.08-0.26 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials. The method has been applied for the determination of trace elements in some environmental samples.

  6. French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Benezery, Karen; Dassonville, Olivier; Magne, Nicolas; Poissonnet, Gilles; Ramaioli, Alain; Lemanski, Claire; Bourdin, Sylvain; Tortochaux, Jacques; Peyrade, Frederic; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar; Vallicioni, Jacques; Seng Hang; Alzieu, Claude; Gery, Bernard; Chauvel, Pierre; Schneider, Maurice; Santini, Jose; Demard, Francois; Calais, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Background: Unresectable carcinomas of the oropharynx and hypopharynx still have a poor long-term prognosis. Following a previous phase II study, this phase III multicenter trial was conducted between November 1997 and March 2002. Methods: Nontreated, strictly unresectable cases were eligible. Twice-daily radiation: two fractions of 1.2 Gy/day, 5 days per week, with no split (D1 → D46). Total tumor doses: 80.4 Gy/46 day (oropharynx), 75.6 Gy/44 day (hypopharynx). Chemotherapy (arm B): Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 (D1, D22, D43); 5FU, continuous infusion (D1 → D5), 750 mg/m 2 /day cycle 1; 430 mg/m 2 /day cycles 2 and 3. Results: A total of 163 evaluable patients. Grade 3-4 acute mucositis 82.6% arm B/69.5% arm A (NS); Grade 3-4 neutropenia 33.3% arm B/2.4% arm A (p < 0.05). Enteral nutrition through gastrostomy tube was more frequent in arm B before treatment and at 6 months (p < 0.01). At 24 months, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and specific survival (SS) were significantly better in arm B. OS: 37.8% arm B vs. 20.1% arm A (p = 0.038); DFS: 48.2% vs. 25.2% (p = 0.002); SS: 44.5% vs. 30.2% (p 0.021). No significant difference between the two arms in the amount of side effects at 1 and 2 years. Conclusion: For these unresectable cases, chemoradiation provides better outcome than radiation alone, even with an 'aggressive' dose-intensity radiotherapy schedule

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of the new reduced-dose tetanus-diphtheria vaccine in healthy Korean adolescents: A comparative active control, double-blind, randomized, multicenter phase III study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Beom; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Shin, Hye Jo; Kim, Sang Yong; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Hee; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Kim, Hwang Min; Choi, Young Youn; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Chun Soo; Kim, Dong Ho; Ahn, Dong Ho; Kang, Jin Han

    2017-04-01

    A new reduced-dose tetanus-diphtheria (Td) vaccine was developed in Korea, and phase I and II clinical trials were successfully undertaken. We conducted this double-blind, randomized, multicenter phase III clinical trial to assess the immunogenicity and safety of the new Td vaccine. Healthy adolescents 11-12 years of age were enrolled and randomized to receive the new Td vaccine (study group) or a commercially available Td vaccine (control group). Blood samples were collected prior to and 4 weeks after the vaccination. Between the study and control groups, seroprotection rate, booster response, and geometric mean titer of antibodies against diphtheria and tetanus toxoids were compared after the vaccination. All solicited and unsolicited adverse events and serious adverse events during the 6-week study period were monitored. A total of 164 adolescents received vaccination, and 156 of them were evaluated to assess immunogenicity. The seroprotection rate and geometric mean titer for antibodies against diphtheria were significantly higher in the study group, whereas those against tetanus were significantly higher in the control group. However, all seroprotection rates against diphtheria and tetanus in the study and control groups were high: 100% against diphtheria and tetanus in the study group, and 98.7% against diphtheria and 100% against tetanus in the control group. No significant differences in the frequency of solicited and unsolicited adverse events were observed between the two vaccine groups. The new Td vaccine is highly immunogenic and safe, and this new Td vaccine can be effectively used for preventing diphtheria and tetanus. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Phase II open-label study to assess efficacy and safety of lenalidomide in combination with cetuximab in KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Siena

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of combination treatment with lenalidomide and cetuximab in KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients. This was a phase II multicenter, open-label trial comprising a safety lead-in phase (phase IIa to determine the maximum tolerated dose, and a randomized proof of concept phase (phase IIb to determine the response rate of lenalidomide plus cetuximab combination therapy. Phase IIa treatment comprised oral lenalidomide (starting dose 25 mg/day and intravenous cetuximab (400 mg/m(2 followed by weekly 250 mg/m(2 in 28-day cycles. In phase IIb patients were randomized to either the phase IIa treatment schedule of lenalidomide plus cetuximab combination therapy or lenalidomide 25 mg/day monotherapy. Eight patients were enrolled into phase IIa. One patient developed a dose-limiting toxicity and the maximum tolerated dose of lenalidomide was determined at 25 mg/day. Forty-three patients were enrolled into phase IIb proof of concept. Best response was stable disease in 9 patients and study enrollment was terminated prematurely due to lack of efficacy in both treatment arms and failure to achieve the planned response objective. The majority of adverse events were grade 1 and 2. In both phases, the adverse events most commonly attributed to any study drugs were fatigue, rash and other skin disorders, diarrhea, nausea, and stomatitis. Thirty-nine deaths occurred; none was related to study drug. The combination of lenalidomide and cetuximab appeared to be well tolerated but did not have clinically meaningful activity in KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01032291.

  9. Report of a Multicenter Phase II Trial Testing a Combination of Biweekly Bevacizumab and Daily Erlotinib in Patients With Unresectable Biliary Cancer: A Phase II Consortium Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubner, Sam J.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Kolesar, Jill L.; LoConte, Noelle K.; Kim, George P.; Pitot, Henry C.; Philip, Philip A.; Picus, Joel; Yong, Wei-Peng; Horvath, Lisa; Van Hazel, Guy; Erlichman, Charles E.; Holen, Kyle D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Biliary cancers overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and angiogenesis has been correlated with poor outcome. Erlotinib, an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and bevacizumab, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor have each been shown to have activity in biliary cancer. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the response rate by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP), VEGF levels, and molecular studies of EGFR and k-ras. Patients and Methods Eligible patients had advanced cholangiocarcinoma or gallbladder cancer. Patients were treated with bevacizumab 5 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 15 and erlotinib 150 mg by mouth daily on days 1 through 28. Responses were evaluated by RECIST. VEGF levels were collected, and samples were analyzed for EGFR mutation by polymerase chain reaction. Results Fifty-three eligible patients were enrolled at eight sites. Of 49 evaluable patients, six (12%; 95% CI, 6% to 27%) had a confirmed partial response. Stable disease was documented in another 25 patients (51%). Rash was the most common grade 3 toxicity. Four patients had grade 4 toxicities. Median OS was 9.9 months, and TTP was 4.4 months. Low repeats (G k-ras Q38 genotype (wild type) were associated with improved outcomes. Conclusion Combination chemotherapy with bevacizumab and erlotinib showed clinical activity with infrequent grade 3 and 4 adverse effects in patients with advanced biliary cancers. On the basis of preliminary molecular analysis, presence of a k-ras mutation may alter erlotinib efficacy. The combination of bevacizumab and erlotinib may be a therapeutic alternative in patients with advanced biliary cancer. PMID:20530271

  10. Safety and hemostatic efficacy of fibrin pad in partial nephrectomy: Results of an open-label Phase I and a randomized, standard-of-care-controlled Phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nativ Ofer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bleeding severity, anatomic location, tissue characteristics, and visibility are common challenges encountered while managing intraoperative bleeding, and conventional hemostatic measures (suture, ligature, and cautery may sometimes be ineffective or impractical. While topical absorbable hemostats (TAH are useful hemostatic adjuvants, each TAH has associated disadvantages. Methods We evaluated the safety and hemostatic efficacy of a new advanced biologic combination product―fibrin pad―to potentially address some gaps associated with TAHs. Fibrin pad was assessed as adjunctive hemostat in open partial nephrectomy in single-center, open-label, Phase I study (N = 10, and as primary hemostat in multicenter, single-blind, randomized, standard-of-care (SOC-controlled Phase I/II study (N = 7 in Israel. It was used to control mild-to-moderate bleeding in Phase I and also spurting arterial bleeding in Phase I/II study. Phase I study assessed safety and Phase I/II study, proportion of successes at 10 min following randomization, analyzed by Fisher exact tests at 5% significance level. Results Phase I (N = 10: All patients completed the study. Hemostasis was achieved within 3–4 min (average = 3.1 min of a single application in all patients. Fibrin pad was found to be safe for human use, with no product-related adverse events reported. Phase I/II (N = 7: Hemostatic success at 10 min (primary endpoint was achieved in 3/4 patients treated with fibrin pad versus 0/3 patients treated with SOC. No clinically significant change in laboratory or coagulation parameters was recorded, except a case of post-procedural hemorrhage with fibrin pad, which was considered serious and related to the fibrin pad treatment, and required re-operation. Although Data Safety Monitoring Board authorized trial continuation, the sponsor decided against proceeding toward an indication for primary treatment of severe arterial

  11. High Transparent Metal Oxide / Polyimide Antistatic Coatings, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Through this Phase I program, Agiltron has successfully produced an innovative transparent conductive nanocomposite paint that holds the promise of meeting space...

  12. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase 1, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS), in collaboration with North Carolina State University, successfully demonstrated a Fiber Bragg...

  13. [Use of itopride in the symptoms of functional dyspepsia in Russia: results of a phase IV prospective open-label multicenter clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas'ianenko, V I; Denisov, N L; Vasil'ev, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of itopride used to treat the symptoms of functional dyspepsia (FD) of the upper gastrointestinal tract. A prospective, open-label, multicenter trial using as a control the placebo response obtained in the previous investigations enrolled 96 adult patients. The diagnosis of FD corresponded to its Rome II criteria. Patients received itopride (Ganaton) oral tablets (50 mg) 3 times daily for 8 weeks. When included into the trial, the patients were orally given itopride (ganaton) tablets (50 mg) thrice daily before meals for 8 weeks. The patients' status was evaluated during (at weeks 4 and 8) and after (at week 12) treatment. Treatment response was assessed using the Global Patient Assessment (GPA) and the Leeds Dyspepsia Questionnaire (LDQ). To evaluate the safety of itopride use, the investigators studied the frequency of adverse events and carried out laboratory tests (renal and liver function tests) and electrocardiography (ECG). The GPA showed that 53.76, 85.71, and 82.22% of the patients achieved a therapeutic effect of itopride at weeks 4, 8, and 12, respectively. The proportion of the patients who achieved the therapeutic effect (86%) at week 8 was higher than the historical placebo controls in the previous studies--45% (86% vs 45%; X2 = 68.868, df = 3; p Itopride is an effective and well-tolerated drug in the treatment of functional dyspepsia in the Russian patients.

  14. SmartPark Technology Demonstration Project, Phase II: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of FMCSA's SmartPark project was to determine the feasibility of a technology for providing truck parking space availability information in real time to truckers on the road. SmartPark consisted of two phases. Phase I was a field operatio...

  15. The active phasing experiment: Part II. Design and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Araujo, C.; Brast, R.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Noethe, L.; Sedghi, B.; Surdej, I.; Wilhelm, R.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Langlois, M.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of the Active Phasing Experiment, designed under the lead of ESO, is to validate wavefront control concepts for ELT class telescopes. This instrument includes an Active Segmented Mirror, located in a pupil image. It will be mounted at a Nasmyth focus of one of the Unit Telescopes of the ESO VLT. APE contains four different types of phasing sensors, which are developed by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Arcetri, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. These phasing sensors can be compared simultaneously under identical optical and environmental conditions. All sensors receive telecentric F/15 beams with identical optical quality and intensity. Each phasing sensor can measure segmentation errors of the active segmented mirror and correct them in closed loop. The phasing process is supervised by an Internal Metrology system developed by FOGALE Nanotech and capable of measuring piston steps with an accuracy of a few nanometers. The Active Phasing Experiment is equipped with a turbulence generator to simulate atmospheric seeing between 0.45 and 0.85 arcsec in the laboratory. In addition, the Active Phasing Experiment is designed to control simultaneously with the phasing corrections the guiding and the active optics of one of the VLT Unit Telescopes. This activity is supported by the European Community (Framework Programme 6, ELT Design Study, contract No 011863).

  16. F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility. Phase II. CAC basic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, W.W.; O'Leary, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    Project objectives and requirements are listed for both Phase I and II. Schedule is listed with startup targeted for 1989. Storage facilities will be provided for both chemical and radioactive effluents. 8 figs., 19 tabs

  17. Advanced 3D Human Simulation Components with Thermal/Haptic Feedback and Tissue Deformation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In integrating the following three significant components for its research/research and development (R/R&D) effort, the power of this candidate Phase II project...

  18. Dynamic Flight Simulation Utilizing High Fidelity CFD-Based Nonlinear Reduced Order Model, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nonlinear Dynamic Flight Simulation (NL-DFS) system will be developed in the Phase II project by combining the classical nonlinear rigid-body flight dynamics...

  19. Finite Element Models for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication Process, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II proposal offers to develop a comprehensive computer simulation methodology based on the finite element method for...

  20. An Instrument for Inspecting Aspheric Optical Surfaces and Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a Phase II SBIR proposal to develop an extremely versatile optical inspection tool for aspheric optical components and optics that are not easily inspected...

  1. A High Energy and High Efficiency Spectral Shaping Single Frequency Fiber Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase II project proposes a single frequency high energy fiber laser system for coherent Lidar systems for remote sensing. Current state-of-art...

  2. Expanded Operational Temperature Range for Space Rated Li-Ion Batteries, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quallion's Phase II proposal calls for expanding the nominal operation range of its space rated lithium ion cells, while maintaining their long life capabilities. To...

  3. Lunar Navigator - A Miniature, Fully Autonomous, Lunar Navigation, Surveyor, and Range Finder System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm will use existing hardware and software from related programs to create a prototype Lunar Navigation Sensor (LNS) early in Phase II, such that most of the...

  4. Scaled Model Technology for Flight Research of General Aviation Aircraft, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our proposed future Phase II activities are aimed at developing a scientifically based "tool box" for flight research using scaled models. These tools will be of...

  5. Solid State Transmitters for Water Vapor and Ozone DIAL Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of this Select Phase II program is to build and deliver laser components both for airborne water vapor and ozone DIAL systems. Specifically, Fibertek...

  6. Magnetic sensor for nondestructive evaluation of deteriorated prestressing strand : phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This report gives an account of the execution and achievements in Phase II of the project completed through August 2011. The main objective of this project is to advance the practical development of a nondestructive testing and evaluation method usin...

  7. Large Format LW Type-II SLS FPAs for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposes to develop high performance (low dark current, high quantum efficiency, and low NEdT) infrared epitaxy materials based on Type II Strained...

  8. Extreme Environment Damage Index and Accumulation Model for CMC Laminate Fatigue Life Prediction, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Materials Research & Design (MR&D) is proposing in the SBIR Phase II an effort to develop a tool for predicting the fatigue life of C/SiC composite...

  9. Monolithic, High-Speed Fiber-Optic Switching Array for Lidar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II effort will develop a 1 x 10 prototype non-mechanical fiber optic switch for use with high power lasers. The proposed optical device is a...

  10. Trimodality therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma: Results from an EORTC phase II multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); P. Baas (Paul); R.M. Gaafar (Rabab); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F. Van De Pol (Francien); B. Hasane (B.); H.M. Klomp (Houke); A.M. Abdelrahman (A.); J. Welche (J.); J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC; protocol 08031) phase II trial investigated the feasibility of trimodality therapy consisting of induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and post-operative radiotherapy in patients with malignant

  11. Lightweight Design of an HTS Coil for the VASIMR Experiment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II SBIR contract Tai-Yang Research Company of Tennessee proposes to design, fabricate, and test an ultra-lightweight High Temperature Superconducting...

  12. Coordinated Control of Multi-Agent Systems in Rapidly Varying Environments, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main objective of this Phase II STTR project is to develop advanced control algorithms that enable multiple autonomous agents to perform complex tasks in rapidly...

  13. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc., (ATA) proposes a Phase II SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane...

  14. OrFPGA: An Empirical Performance Tuning Tool for FPGA Designs, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II STTR project, RNET and its subcontractors are proposing to fully develop an empirical performance optimization tool called OrFPGA that efficiently...

  15. Advanced Nongray Radiation Module in the LOCI Framework for Combustion CFD, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiative heat fluxes are important in the design of launch vehicles for Project Constellation. In this Phase II STTR, CFDRC and its partner Mississippi State...

  16. Generic FMS Platform for Evaluation of Autonomous Trajectory-Based Operation Concepts, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II work is to develop a generic, advanced Flight Management System (FMS) for the evaluation of autonomous 4D-trajectory based operations...

  17. Battery Separator Membrane Having a Selectable Thermal Shut-Down Temperature, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II proposal to NASA requests $596,750.96 support for Policell Technologies, Inc. to develop a series of separator...

  18. Efficient Integration, Validation and Troubleshooting in Multimodal Distributed Diagnostic Schemes, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In general, development and validation of diagnostic models for complex safety critical systems are time and cost intensive jobs. The proposed Phase-II effort will...

  19. Polymer-Reinforced, Nonbrittle, Lightweight Cryogenic Insulation for Reduced Life-Cycle Costs, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR project focuses to continue developing cryogenic insulation foams that are flexible, deforming under compression. InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated...

  20. Development of Diamond Vacuum Differential Amplifier for Harsh Environment Power Electronics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase II, Scientic and Vanderbilt University will develop a novel vacuum field emission differential amplifier (VFEDA) using low electron affinity...

  1. Fiber Coupled Pulse Shaper for Sub-Nanosecond Pulse Lidar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II effort will develop an all-diode laser and fiber optic based, single frequency, sub-nanosecond pulsed laser source...

  2. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  3. Phase I/II Multi-Institutional Study of Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Painful Osteoid Osteoma (JIVROSG-0704)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Masaya, E-mail: mmiyazak@gunma-u.ac.jp [Gunma University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology and Clinical Ultrasound Center (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki [National Center Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Myoui, Akira [Osaka University Hospital, Medical Center for Translational Research (Japan); Gobara, Hideo [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki [National Center Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Tsushima, Yoshito [Gunma University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology and Clinical Ultrasound Center (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ehara, Shigeru [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Endo, Keigo [Gunma University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology and Clinical Ultrasound Center (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeThis multicenter prospective study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for painful osteoid osteoma (OO).Materials and MethodsPatients with OO (femur: n = 17, tibia: n = 2, humerus: n = 1, rib: n = 1) were enrolled and treated with RFA. In phase I, nine patients were evaluated for safety. In phase II, 12 patients were accrued, and an intent-to-treat analysis was performed on all patients. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the treatment safety. The secondary endpoint was to evaluate the efficacy for pain relief by the visual analogue scale (VAS) at 4 weeks after RFA. Treatment efficacy was classified as significantly effective (SE) when VAS score decreased by ≥5 or score was <2, moderately effective when VAS score decreased by <5–≥2 and score was ≥2, and not effective (NE) when VAS score decreased by <2 or score was increased. Cases where the need for analgesics increased after treatment were also NE.ResultsRFA procedures were completed in all patients. Minor adverse effects (AEs) were observed as 4.8–14.3 % in 12 patients, and no major AEs were observed. Mean VAS score was 7.1 before treatment, 1.6 at 1 week, 0.3 at 4 weeks, and 0.2 at 3 months. All procedures were classified as SE. Pain recurrence was not noted in any patient during follow-up (mean: 15.1 months).ConclusionRFA is a safe, highly effective, and fast-acting treatment for painful extraspinal OO. Future studies with a greater number of patients are needed.

  4. Supplementation of iron in pulmonary hypertension: Rationale and design of a phase II clinical trial in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Luke S.G.E.; Watson, Geoffrey M.J.; Wharton, John; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Chan, Kakit; Khengar, Rajeshree; Robbins, Peter A.; Kiely, David G.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliott, Charlie A.; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Sheares, Karen; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Davies, Rachel; Ashby, Deborah; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Wilkins, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to assess the safety and potential clinical benefit of intravenous iron (Ferinject) infusion in iron deficient patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Iron deficiency in the absence of anemia (1) is common in patients with IPAH; (2) is associated with inappropriately raised levels of hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis; and (3) correlates with disease severity and worse clinical outcomes. Oral iron absorption may be impeded by reduced absorption due to elevated hepcidin levels. The safety and benefits of parenteral iron replacement in IPAH are unknown. Supplementation of Iron in Pulmonary Hypertension (SIPHON) is a Phase II, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial of iron in IPAH. At least 60 patients will be randomized to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject) or saline placebo with a crossover point after 12 weeks of treatment. The primary outcome will be the change in resting pulmonary vascular resistance from baseline at 12 weeks, measured by cardiac catheterization. Secondary measures include resting and exercise hemodynamics and exercise performance from serial bicycle incremental and endurance cardiopulmonary exercise tests. Other secondary measurements include serum iron indices, 6-Minute Walk Distance, WHO functional class, quality of life score, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and cardiac anatomy and function from cardiac magnetic resonance. We propose that intravenous iron replacement will improve hemodynamics and clinical outcomes in IPAH. If the data supports a potentially useful therapeutic effect and suggest this drug is safe, the study will be used to power a Phase III study to address efficacy. PMID:23662181

  5. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for comprehensive treatment of oligometastatic tumors (SABR-COMET): Study protocol for a randomized phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, David A; Griffioen, GwendolynHMJ; Gaede, Stewart; Slotman, Ben; Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J A; Rodrigues, George B; Dahele, Max; Lock, Michael; Yaremko, Brian; Olson, Robert; Liu, Mitchell; Panarotto, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has emerged as a new treatment option for patients with oligometastatic disease. SABR delivers precise, high-dose, hypofractionated radiotherapy, and achieves excellent rates of local control. Survival outcomes for patients with oligometastatic disease treated with SABR appear promising, but conclusions are limited by patient selection, and the lack of adequate controls in most studies. The goal of this multicenter randomized phase II trial is to assess the impact of a comprehensive oligometastatic SABR treatment program on overall survival and quality of life in patients with up to 5 metastatic cancer lesions, compared to patients who receive standard of care treatment alone. After stratification by the number of metastases (1-3 vs. 4-5), patients will be randomized between Arm 1: current standard of care treatment, and Arm 2: standard of care treatment + SABR to all sites of known disease. Patients will be randomized in a 1:2 ratio to Arm 1:Arm 2, respectively. For patients receiving SABR, radiotherapy dose and fractionation depends on the site of metastasis and the proximity to critical normal structures. This study aims to accrue a total of 99 patients within four years. The primary endpoint is overall survival, and secondary endpoints include quality of life, toxicity, progression-free survival, lesion control rate, and number of cycles of further chemotherapy/systemic therapy. This study will provide an assessment of the impact of SABR on clinical outcomes and quality of life, to determine if long-term survival can be achieved for selected patients with oligometastatic disease, and will inform the design of a possible phase III study. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446744

  6. Viet Nam Economic Research Network (VERN) - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    VERN I (101273) constituted the first network for young economic researchers in Viet Nam, where previously there had been no modality for cooperation or peer review. Guided by the philosophy of "understanding and managing globalization" that underpinned the earlier project, VERN II proposes to expand the network, ...

  7. First results of GERDA Phase II and consistency with background models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode1, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-01-01

    The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) is an experiment for the search of neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge, located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN (Italy). GERDA operates bare high purity germanium detectors submersed in liquid Argon (LAr). Phase II of data-taking started in Dec 2015 and is currently ongoing. In Phase II 35 kg of germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge including thirty newly produced Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors is operating to reach an exposure of 100 kg·yr within about 3 years data taking. The design goal of Phase II is to reduce the background by one order of magnitude to get the sensitivity for T1/20ν = O≤ft( {{{10}26}} \\right){{ yr}}. To achieve the necessary background reduction, the setup was complemented with LAr veto. Analysis of the background spectrum of Phase II demonstrates consistency with the background models. Furthermore 226Ra and 232Th contamination levels consistent with screening results. In the first Phase II data release we found no hint for a 0νββ decay signal and place a limit of this process T1/20ν > 5.3 \\cdot {1025} yr (90% C.L., sensitivity 4.0·1025 yr). First results of GERDA Phase II will be presented.

  8. Semantic Summarization for Context Aware Manipulation of Data, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's exploration and scientific missions will produce terabytes of information. As NASA enters a new phase of space exploration, managing large amounts of...

  9. Thermo-Acoustic Convertor for Space Power, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase Sunpower looked at Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engines (TASHEs). These ranged from a TASHE which was sized for the heat from a single General Purpose Heat...

  10. Sputter-Resistant Materials for Electric Propulsion, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase 2 project shall develop sputter-resistant materials for use in electric propulsion test facilities and for plume shields on spacecraft using electric...

  11. Advanced Filtering Techniques Applied to Spaceflight, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IST-Rolla developed two nonlinear filters for spacecraft orbit determination during the Phase I contract. The theta-D filter and the cost based filter, CBF, were...

  12. Propellant Flow Actuated Piezoelectric Rocket Engine Igniter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under a Phase 1 effort, IES successfully developed and demonstrated a spark ignition concept where propellant flow drives a very simple fluid mechanical oscillator...

  13. Surface Modification of Exfoliated Graphite Nano-Reinforcements, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I results showed that two surface treatments, oxidative plasma and reactive finishes, are effective means of modifying the surface chemistry of exfoliated...

  14. SMALL MAIN-BELT ASTEROID SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY, PHASE II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains visible-wavelength (0.435-0.925 micron) spectra for 1341 main-belt asteroids observed during the second phase of the Small Main-belt Asteroid...

  15. Scalable Lunar Surface Networks and Adaptive Orbit Access, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on our proposed innovations and accomplished work in Phase I, we will focus on developing the new MAC protocol and hybrid routing protocol for lunar surface...

  16. MOIDSS?- Mobile Online Intelligent Decision Support System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — GRID has had a successfully completed Phase I 'Mobile Online Intelligent Decision Support System' (MOIDSS). The system developed into a total solution that supports...

  17. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors and System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I demonstrated the technical feasibility of creating surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors that respond rapidly (under 0.5 second) and reversibly...

  18. Identification and Reduction of Turbomachinery Noise, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Communities near airports are often exposed to high noise levels due to low flying aircraft in the takeoff and landing phases of flight. Propulsion source noise is...

  19. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Design with Transition Prediction, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enhance aerodynamic design capabilities, Desktop Aeronautics proposes to significantly improve upon the integration (performed in Phase 1) of a new sweep/taper...

  20. Structural Integrity Inspection and Visualization System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the successful feasibility demonstration in Phase I, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to continue the development of a novel Structural Integrity...

  1. Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging the Phase I achievements of the Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System (DiRETHMS) including its software toolsets and system building...

  2. Aerodynamic Efficiency Enhancements for Air Vehicles, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for aerodynamics-based efficiency enhancements for air vehicles is presented. The results of the Phase I investigation of concepts for morphing aircraft are...

  3. No-Oven, No-Autoclave, Composite Processing, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to continue the efforts from the 2010 NASA SBIR Phase I topic X5.03, "No-Oven, No-Autoclave (NONA) Composite...

  4. Modular Ultra-High Power Solar Array Architecture, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems (DSS) will focus the proposed Phase 2 SBIR program on the hardware-based development and TRL advance of a highly-modularized and...

  5. Laser Femto-Tesla Magnetic Gradiometer (LFMG), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The LFMG instrument is used to make extremely high resolution scalar magnetic field and difference measurements at the Earthfs surface. The Phase 1 effort included...

  6. Open System of Agile Ground Stations, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I effort demonstrated, through actual development and tests with a spacecraft system, the technical and programmatic feasibility of developing, within the...

  7. Multipurpose Electric Potential Sensor for Spacecraft Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The original goal of Phase I was to study the feasibility of developing an electric sensor that can be used for as many NASA sensing applications as possible. During...

  8. Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transit System (HERTS) (Phase II)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our proposal builds upon our teams technical findings in Phase 1 - that an E-Sail propelled spacecraft can travel 100 AU in less than 10 years or to the Heliopause...

  9. Transportation Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Synthesis, Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-24

    The Transportation Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Synthesis includes an LCA Learning Module Series, case studies, and analytics on the use of the modules. The module series is a set of narrated slideshows on topics related to environmental LCA. Phase I ...

  10. Digital Conically Scanned L-Band Radar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort seeks to develop a digitally steered polarimetric phased array L-Band radar utilizing a novel, high performance architecture leveraging recent...

  11. Outcome Mapping Virtual Learning Community - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The first phase of the project (103520) focused on developing the Outcome ... as distance learning) and strategically communicating Outcome Mapping to key ... an organization based in India with South Asian reach, to facilitate exchange ...

  12. Contact Stress Design Parameters for Titanium Bearings, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Air-Lock's Phase I effort tested the effects of ball induced contact stresses on Titanium bearing races. The contact stress design limit that would achieve a...

  13. Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Tethered Marsupial Rovers, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building upon the successful proof of concept work in Phase I, Luna Innovations Incorporated is proposing to design, build, and test a sensing tether for marsupial...

  14. Low Cost, Light Weight Materials for Mirrors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During the phase I program Northwestern and APS, Inc., have manufactured several different materials systems that are lighter than Beryllium and stiffer than...

  15. In-Process Monitoring of Additive Manufacturing, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I of this project MLPC, WSU, and AFIT were successfully able to identify several optical data features that are indicative of the quality of components...

  16. Fine Water Mist Fire Extinguisher for Spacecraft, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This three phase SBIR project from ADA Technologies Inc. (ADA) builds upon the experience of ADA in development of fine water mist (FWM) fire suppression technology....

  17. High Performance Low Mass Nanowire Enabled Heatpipe, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Heat pipes are widely used for passive, two-phase electronics cooling. As advanced high power, high performance electronics in space based and terrestrial...

  18. Conversion of Phase II Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Data to Common Format; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hand, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    A vast amount of aerodynamic, structural, and turbine performance data were collected during three phases of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE). To compare data from the three phases, a similar format of engineering unit data is required. The process of converting Phase II data from a previous engineering unit format to raw integer counts is discussed. The integer count files can then be input to the new post-processing software, MUNCH. The resulting Phase II engineering unit files are in a common format with current and future UAE engineering unit files. An additional objective for changing the file format was to convert the Phase II data from English units to SI units of measurement

  19. PBFA [Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator] II: The pulsed power characterization phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.; Turman, B.N.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, PBFA II, is now the largest pulsed power device in operation. This paper summarizes its first year and a half of operation for the Department of Energy (DOE) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. Thirty-six separate modules provide 72 output pulses that combine to form a 100 TW output pulse at the accelerator center. PBFA II was successfully test fired for the first time on December 11, 1985. This test completed the construction phase (Phase 1) within the expected schedule and budget. The accelerator checkout phase then started (Phase 2). The first priority during checkout was to bring the Phase 1 subsystems into full operation. The accelerator was first tested to determine overall system performance. Next, subsystems that were not performing adequately were modified. The accelerator is now being used for ion diode studies. 32 refs

  20. The 2 + 1 paradigm: an efficient algorithm for central reading of Mayo endoscopic subscores in global multicenter phase 3 ulcerative colitis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Harris A; Gottlieb, Klaus; Hussain, Fez

    2016-02-01

    Despite its importance and potential impact in clinical trials, central reading continues to be an under-represented topic in the literature about inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) clinical trials. Although several IBD studies have incorporated central reading to date, none have fully detailed the specific methodology with which the reads were conducted. Here we outline key principles for designing an efficient central reading paradigm for an ulcerative colitis (UC) study that addresses regulatory, operational and clinical expectations. As a step towards standardization of read methodology for the growing number of multicenter phase 3 clinical trials in IBD, we have applied these principles to the design of an optimal read methodology that we call the '2 + 1 paradigm.' The 2 + 1 paradigm involves the use of both site and central readers, validated scoring criteria and multiple measures for blinding readers, all of which contribute to reducing bias and generating a reliable endoscopic subscore that reflects endoscopic disease severity. The paradigm can be utilized while maintaining a practical workflow compatible with an operationally feasible clinical trial. The 2 + 1 paradigm represents a logical approach to endoscopic assessment in IBD clinical trials, one that should be considered attractive to prospective sponsors, contract research organizations, key opinion leaders and regulatory authorities and be ready for implementation and further evaluation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  1. Pre-fracture nutritional status is predictive of functional status at discharge during the acute phase with hip fracture patients: A multicenter prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tatsuro; Misu, Syogo; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Iwata, Kentaro; Chuman, Yuki; Ono, Rei

    2017-10-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients with hip fractures, and elderly patients with hip fractures lose functional independence and often fail to recover previous functional status. The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-fracture nutritional status predicts functional status of patients with hip fracture at discharge from acute hospitals. In the present multicenter prospective cohort study, pre-fracture nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short-Form (MNA-SF). At discharge from acute hospitals, functional status was evaluated using a functional independent measurement instrument (FIM). Subsequently, multiple regression analyses were performed using FIM as the dependent variable and MNA-SF as the independent variable. Among the 204 patients analyzed in the present study, the mean length of hospital stay was 26.2 ± 12.6 days, and according to MNA-SF assessments, 51 (25.0%) patients were malnourished, 98 (48.0%) were at risk of malnutrition, and 55 (27.0%) were well-nourished before fracture. At discharge, FIM scores were higher in patients who were well-nourished than in those who were malnourished or were at risk of malnutrition (p fracture nutritional status was a significant independent predictor for functional status at discharge during the acute phase, warranting early assessment of nutritional status and early intervention for successful postoperative rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Grassmann phase space methods for fermions. II. Field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, B.J., E-mail: bdalton@swin.edu.au [Centre for Quantum and Optical Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Jeffers, J. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4ONG (United Kingdom); Barnett, S.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    In both quantum optics and cold atom physics, the behaviour of bosonic photons and atoms is often treated using phase space methods, where mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator equivalent to a distribution function of these variables. The anti-commutation rules for fermion annihilation, creation operators suggests the possibility of using anti-commuting Grassmann variables to represent these operators. However, in spite of the seminal work by Cahill and Glauber and a few applications, the use of Grassmann phase space methods in quantum-atom optics to treat fermionic systems is rather rare, though fermion coherent states using Grassmann variables are widely used in particle physics. This paper presents a phase space theory for fermion systems based on distribution functionals, which replace the density operator and involve Grassmann fields representing anti-commuting fermion field annihilation, creation operators. It is an extension of a previous phase space theory paper for fermions (Paper I) based on separate modes, in which the density operator is replaced by a distribution function depending on Grassmann phase space variables which represent the mode annihilation and creation operators. This further development of the theory is important for the situation when large numbers of fermions are involved, resulting in too many modes to treat separately. Here Grassmann fields, distribution functionals, functional Fokker–Planck equations and Ito stochastic field equations are involved. Typical applications to a trapped Fermi gas of interacting spin 1/2 fermionic atoms and to multi-component Fermi gases with non-zero range interactions are presented, showing that the Ito stochastic field equations are local in these cases. For the spin 1/2 case we also show how simple solutions can be obtained both for the untrapped case and for an optical lattice trapping potential.

  3. Grassmann phase space methods for fermions. II. Field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, B.J.; Jeffers, J.; Barnett, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    In both quantum optics and cold atom physics, the behaviour of bosonic photons and atoms is often treated using phase space methods, where mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator equivalent to a distribution function of these variables. The anti-commutation rules for fermion annihilation, creation operators suggests the possibility of using anti-commuting Grassmann variables to represent these operators. However, in spite of the seminal work by Cahill and Glauber and a few applications, the use of Grassmann phase space methods in quantum-atom optics to treat fermionic systems is rather rare, though fermion coherent states using Grassmann variables are widely used in particle physics. This paper presents a phase space theory for fermion systems based on distribution functionals, which replace the density operator and involve Grassmann fields representing anti-commuting fermion field annihilation, creation operators. It is an extension of a previous phase space theory paper for fermions (Paper I) based on separate modes, in which the density operator is replaced by a distribution function depending on Grassmann phase space variables which represent the mode annihilation and creation operators. This further development of the theory is important for the situation when large numbers of fermions are involved, resulting in too many modes to treat separately. Here Grassmann fields, distribution functionals, functional Fokker–Planck equations and Ito stochastic field equations are involved. Typical applications to a trapped Fermi gas of interacting spin 1/2 fermionic atoms and to multi-component Fermi gases with non-zero range interactions are presented, showing that the Ito stochastic field equations are local in these cases. For the spin 1/2 case we also show how simple solutions can be obtained both for the untrapped case and for an optical lattice trapping potential.

  4. Forensic relevance of glucuronidation in phase-II-metabolism of alcohols and drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeferstein, Herbert

    2009-04-01

    Forensic toxicology means detecting toxic or pharmacologically active substances in body fluids and organs and the evaluation and judgement of the respective results. In the legal judgement, not only the taken in active drugs, but also their metabolites are to be included. Regarding metabolism one distinguishes phase-I- and phase-II-metabolism. In the phase-I-metabolism, active substances are converted by oxidation, reduction or hydrolysis, but influencing the polarity of more lipophilic substances often not decisively. The pharmacological activity is often preserved or even increased. In phase-II-metabolism a highly hydrophilic substance--mostly glucuronic acid--is coupled to the active substances or the respective phase-I-metabolites. This reaction step decisively increases hydrophilicity of lipophilic substances, thus enhancing renal elimination and often also abolishing pharmacologically and/or toxicologically effects. Nevertheless the interaction of different drugs and alcohols in glucuronidation and the glucuronides of phase-II-metabolism still do not play a substantial role in the forensic-toxicological analysis and interpretation of results so far. However, in vitro investigations since 1999 in our lab show that such interactions are not unlikely. For valid interpretation of complex cases in the future it may become necessary not only to quantify drugs and the phase-I-metabolites but also the phase-II-metabolites and discuss possible interactions in the metabolism.

  5. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, J. Preston; And Others

    Phase II of a study on the effectiveness of B. Feingold's recommended diet for hyperactive children involved the nine children (mean age 9 years) who had shown the "best" response to diet manipulation in Phase I. Each child served as his own control and was challenged with specified amounts of placebo and artificial color containing food…

  6. Differential roles of phase I and phase II enzymes in 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine-induced cytotoxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antolino Lobo, I.; Meulenbelt, J.; Nijmeijer, S.M.; Scherpenisse, P.; van den Berg, M.; van Duursen, M.B.M.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolism plays an important role in the toxic effects caused by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Most research has focused on the involvement of CYP2D6 enzyme in MDMA bioactivation, and less is known about the contribution of other cytochrome P450 (P450) and phase II metabolism. In this

  7. China Public Budget Reform Program (CPBR) - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Government of China has adopted a national reform program aimed at making budgeting more transparent and accountable through public involvement and enhanced oversight. Building on work carried out under Phase I (102965), the China Development Research Foundation (CDRF) will analyze China's current ...

  8. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  9. Lebanese Palestinian Dialogue Committee (LPDC) - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    During Phase I (100971), LPDC set up a website and commissioned papers from Lebanese and Palestinian researchers on such subjects as "non-Ids" - Palestinians with no official documents - and employment issues in Lebanon. LPDC was instrumental in coordinating the efforts of Lebanese stakeholders during the Nahr ...

  10. Public Report on Health (India) - Phase II | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Public Report on Health aims to draw federal and state attention to the health needs of ordinary people, so as to develop evidence-based solutions for meeting those needs. The Intensive Village Study carried out during the first phase of ... Outputs. Reports. Public report on health : final technical report. Download PDF ...

  11. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  12. Recent Advances in Understanding of Kinetic Interplay Between Phase II Metabolism and Efflux Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Xing, Huijie; Zhao, Mengjing; Lu, Danyi; Li, Zhijie; Dong, Dong; Wu, Baojian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the metabolism-transport interplay assumes great importance in pharmaceutical fields because the knowledge can help to interpret drug/xenobiotic metabolism and disposition studies as well as the drug-drug interactions in vivo. About 10 years ago, it started to recognize that cellular phase II metabolism is strongly influenced by the excretion (efflux transport) of generated metabolites, a kinetic phenomenon termed "phase II metabolism-transport interplay". This interplay is believed to have significant effects on the pharmacokinetics (bioavailability) of drugs/chemicals undergoing phase II metabolism. In this article, we review the studies investigating the phase II metabolism-transport interplay using cell models, perfused rat intestine, and intact rats. The potential confounding factors in exploring such interplay is also summarized. Moreover, the mechanism underlying the phase II metabolism-transport interplay is discussed. Various studies with engineered cells and rodents have demonstrated that there is an interaction (interplay) between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. This type of interplay mainly refers to the dependence of phase II (conjugative) metabolism on the activities of efflux transporters. In general, inhibiting efflux transporters or decreasing their expression causes the reductions in metabolite excretion, apparent excretion clearance (CLapp) and total metabolism (fmet), as well as an increase in the intracellular level of metabolite (Ci). The deconjugation mediated by hydrolase (acting as a "bridge") is essential for the interplay to play out based on pharmacokinetic modeling/simulations, cell and animal studies. The hydrolases bridge the two processes (i.e., metabolite formation and excretion) and enable the interplay thereof (a bridging effect). Without the bridge, metabolite formation is independent on its downstream process excretion, thus impact of metabolite excretion on its formation is impossible

  13. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  14. Explaining European Emission Allowance Price Dynamics: Evidence from Phase II

    OpenAIRE

    Wilfried Rickels; Dennis Görlich; Gerrit Oberst

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, the European Emission Trading Scheme (EU-ETS) established a new commodity: the right to emit a ton of CO2 (EUA). Since its launch, the corresponding price has shown rather turbulent dynamics, including nervous reactions to policy announcements and a price collapse after a visible over-allocation in Phase I. As a consequence, the question whether fundamental factors (fossil fuel prices, economic activity, weather) affect the EUA price remained partially unresolved. Today, being halfwa...

  15. Phase II Study of Short-Course Radiotherapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: Giuseppe.Minniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Scaringi, Claudia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Caporello, Paola [Department of Medical Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Salvati, Maurizio [Department of Neurosurgery, Umberto I Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Arcella, Antonella [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); De Sanctis, Vitaliana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Giangaspero, Felice [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Department of Pathology, Umberto I Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy may prolong survival in older patients (age {>=}70 years) with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), although the survival benefits remain poor. This Phase II multicenter study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in older patients with GBM. Patients and Methods: Seventy-one eligible patients 70 years of age or older with newly diagnosed GBM and a Karnofsky performance status {>=}60 were treated with a short course of RT (40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks) plus TMZ at the dosage of 75 mg/m{sup 2} per day followed by 12 cycles of adjuvant TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2} for 5 days during each 28-day cycle). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival and toxicity. Results: The Median OS was 12.4 months, and the 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 58% and 20%, respectively. The median and 1-year rates of progression-free survival were 6 months and 20%, respectively. All patients completed the planned programme of RT. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 16 patients (22%). Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia occurred in 10 patients (15%), leading to the interruption of treatment in 6 patients (8%). Nonhematologic Grade 3 toxicity was rare, and included fatigue in 4 patients and cognitive disability in 1 patient. Conclusions: A combination of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated and may prolong survival in elderly patients with GBM. Future randomized studies need to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different schedules of RT in association with chemotherapy.

  16. Phase II trial of the regulatory T cell-depleting agent, denileukin diftitox, in patients with unresectable stage IV melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telang, Sucheta; Gragg, Hana; Clem, Brian F; McMasters, Kelly M; Miller, Donald M; Chesney, Jason; Rasku, Mary Ann; Clem, Amy L; Carter, Karen; Klarer, Alden C; Badger, Wesley R; Milam, Rebecca A; Rai, Shesh N; Pan, Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    We previously found that administration of an interleukin 2/diphtheria toxin conjugate (DAB/IL2; Denileukin Diftitox; ONTAK) to stage IV melanoma patients depleted CD4 + CD25 HI Foxp3 + regulatory T cells and expanded melanoma-specific CD8 + T cells. The goal of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy of DAB/IL2 in an expanded cohort of stage IV melanoma patients. In a single-center, phase II trial, DAB/IL2 (12 μg/kg; 4 daily doses; 21 day cycles) was administered to 60 unresectable stage IV melanoma patients and response rates were assessed using a combination of 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging. After DAB/IL2 administration, 16.7% of the 60 patients had partial responses, 5% stable disease and 15% mixed responses. Importantly, 45.5% of the chemo/immuno-naïve sub-population (11/60 patients) experienced partial responses. One year survival was markedly higher in partial responders (80 ± 11.9%) relative to patients with progressive disease (23.7 ± 6.5%; p value < 0.001) and 40 ± 6.2% of the total DAB/IL2-treated population were alive at 1 year. These data support the development of multi-center, randomized trials of DAB/IL2 as a monotherapy and in combination with other immunotherapeutic agents for the treatment of stage IV melanoma. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00299689

  17. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C., E-mail: mccribei@iq.usp.br [Laboratório de Espectroscopia Molecular, Departamento de Química Fundamental, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 26077, CEP 05513-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, Fabio F.; Costa, Fanny N. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Giles, Carlos [Depto. de Física da Matéria Condensada, Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2016-06-14

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N{sub 1114}][NTf{sub 2}], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N{sub 1114}][NTf{sub 2}] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  18. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m 2 twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m 2 /day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of ≥100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  19. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Masafumi, E-mail: masikeda@east.ncc.go.jp [Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Ioka, Tatsuya [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yonemoto, Naohiro [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Translational Medical Center, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo (Japan); Nagase, Michitaka [Department of Clinical Oncology, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi (Japan); Yamao, Kenji [Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Miyakawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Gastroenterology, Sapporo Kosei General Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ishii, Hiroshi [Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Division, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Furuse, Junji [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology School of Medicine, Kyorin University, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, Keiko [Kyoto Unit Center, Japan Environment and Children' s Study, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Sato, Tosiya [Department of Biostatistics, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Kyoto (Japan); Okusaka, Takuji [Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  20. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m 2 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m 2 /week, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 /week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m 2 /day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  1. Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) Fails to Demonstrate Efficacy in a Prospective Multicenter Phase II Trial on Lung Malignancies: The ALICE Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricke, Jens, E-mail: jens.ricke@med.ovgu.de; Jürgens, Julian H. W., E-mail: julian.juergens@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Deschamps, Frederic; Tselikas, Lambros [Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Department of Image Guided Therapy (France); Uhde, Katja; Kosiek, Ortrud [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Baere, Thierry De [Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Department of Image Guided Therapy (France)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo assess safety and efficacy of irreversible electroporation (IRE) of lung malignancies.Materials and MethodsPatients with primary and secondary lung malignancies and preserved lung function were included in this prospective single arm trial. Primary and secondary endpoints were safety and efficacy. Recruitment goal was 36 subjects in 2 centers. Patients underwent IRE under general anesthesia with probe placement performed in Fluoroscopy-CT. The IRE system employed was NanoKnife{sup ®} (Angiodynamics). System settings for the ablation procedure followed the manufacturer’s recommendations. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to evaluate the correlation of nine technical parameters with local tumor control. Median follow up was 12 months.ResultsThe expected efficacy was not met at interim analysis and the trial was stopped prematurely after inclusion of 23 patients (13/10 between both centers). The dominant tumor entity was colorectal (n = 13). The median tumor diameter was 16 mm (8–27 mm). Pneumothoraces were observed in 11 of 23 patients with chest tubes required in 8 (35 %). Frequently observed alveolar hemorrhage never led to significant hemoptysis. 14/23 showed progressive disease (61 %). Stable disease was found in 1 (4 %), partial remission in 1 (4 %) and complete remission in 7 (30 %) patients. The relative increase of the current during ablation was significantly higher in the group treated successfully as compared to the group presenting local recurrence (p < 0.05). Needle tract seeding was found in three cases (13 %).ConclusionsIRE is not effective for the treatment of lung malignancies. We hypothesize that the energy deposition with current IRE probes is highly sensitive to air exposure.

  2. Multicenter Phase II Study of Intravenous and Intraperitoneal Paclitaxel With S-1 for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Patients With Peritoneal Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoi, Sohei; Fujii, Tsutomu; Yanagimoto, Hiroaki; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Kurata, Masanao; Takahara, Naminatsu; Yamada, Suguru; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Mizuma, Masamichi; Honda, Goro; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Unno, Michiaki; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Ishigami, Hironori; Kon, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and tolerability of intravenous (i.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) paclitaxel combined with S-1, "an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative containing tegafur, gimestat, and otastat potassium" in chemotherapy-naive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients with peritoneal metastasis. PDAC patients with peritoneal metastasis (peritoneal deposits and/or positive peritoneal cytology) have an extremely poor prognosis. An effective treatment strategy remains elusive. Paclitaxel was administered i.v. at 50 mg/m and i.p. at 20 mg/m on days 1 and 8. S-1 was administered at 80 mg/m/d for 14 consecutive days, followed by 7 days of rest. The primary endpoint was 1-year overall survival (OS) rate. The secondary endpoints were antitumor effect and safety (UMIN000009446). Thirty-three patients who were pathologically diagnosed with the presence of peritoneal dissemination (n = 22) and/or positive peritoneal cytology (n = 11) without other organ metastasis were enrolled. The tumor was located at the pancreatic head in 7 patients and the body/tail in 26 patients. The median survival time was 16.3 (11.47-22.57) months, and the 1-year survival rate was 62%. The response rate and disease control rate in assessable patients were 36% and 82%, respectively. OS in 8 patients who underwent conversion surgery was significantly higher than that of nonsurgical patients (n = 25, P = 0.0062). Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities occurred in 42% of the patients and nonhematologic adverse events in 18%. One patient died of thrombosis in the superior mesenteric artery. This regimen has shown promising clinical efficacy with acceptable tolerability in chemotherapy-naive PDAC patients with peritoneal metastasis.

  3. Multicenter phase II study of irinotecan, cisplatin, and bevacizumab in patients with metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Ilson, David H; Levnor, Alissa; D'Adamo, David; O'Reilly, Eileen; Tse, Archie; Trocola, Robin; Schwartz, Lawrence; Capanu, Marinela; Schwartz, Gary K; Kelsen, David P

    2006-11-20

    Bevacizumab improves survival in several solid tumor malignancies when combined with chemotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy in the treatment of gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma. Forty-seven patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric/GEJ adenocarcinoma were treated with bevacizumab 15 mg/kg on day 1, irinotecan 65 mg/m2, and cisplatin 30 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8, every 21 days. The primary end point was to demonstrate a 50% improvement in time to progression over historical values. Secondary end points included safety, response, and survival. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 59 years (range, 25 to 75); Karnofsky performance status 90% (70% to 100%); male:female, 34:13; and gastric/GEJ, 24:23. With a median follow-up of 12.2 months, median time to progression was 8.3 months (95% CI, 5.5 to 9.9 months). In 34 patients with measurable disease, the overall response rate was 65% (95% CI, 46% to 80%). Median survival was 12.3 months (95% CI, 11.3 to 17.2 months). We observed no increase in chemotherapy related toxicity. Possible bevacizumab-related toxicity included a 28% incidence of grade 3 hypertension, two patients with a gastric perforation and one patient with a near perforation (6%), and one patient with a myocardial infarction (2%). Grade 3 to 4 thromboembolic events occurred in 25% of patients. Although the primary tumor was unresected in 40 patients, we observed only one patient with a significant upper gastrointestinal bleed. Bevacizumab can be safely given with chemotherapy even with primary gastric and GEJ tumors in place. The response rate, time to disease progression (TTP), and overall survival are encouraging, with TTP improved over historical controls by 75%. Further development of bevacizumab in gastric and GEJ cancers is warranted.

  4. Dead layer and active volume determination for GERDA Phase II detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bjoern [TU Dresden (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The GERDA experiment investigates the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge and is currently running Phase I of its physics program. Using the same isotope as the Heidelberg Moscow (HDM) experiment, GERDA aims to directly test the claim of observation by a subset of the HDM collaboration. For the update to Phase II of the experiment in 2013, the collaboration organized the production of 30 new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) type detectors from original 35 kg enriched material and tested their performance in the low background laboratory HADES in SCK.CEN, Belgium. With additional 20 kg of detectors, GERDA aims to probe the degenerated hierarchy scenario. One of the crucial detector parameters is the active volume (AV) fraction which directly enters into all physics analysis. This talk presents the methodology of dead layer and AV determination with different calibration sources such as {sup 241}Am, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 228}Th and the results obtained for the new Phase II detectors. Furthermore, the AV fraction turned out to be the largest systematic uncertainty in the analysis of Phase I data which makes it imperative to reduce its uncertainty for Phase II. This talk addresses the major contributions to the AV uncertainty and gives an outlook for improvements in Phase II analysis.

  5. Icotinib in Patients with Pretreated Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with EGFR Overexpression or EGFR Gene Amplification: A Single-Arm, Multicenter Phase 2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Fan, Qingxia; Lu, Ping; Ying, Jianming; Ma, Changwu; Liu, Wei; Liu, Ying; Tan, Fenlai; Sun, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been reported to be overexpressed and amplified in a high percentage of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The activity of icotinib, an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was assessed in previously treated ESCC with EGFR overexpression or amplification. For this phase 2, single-arm, multicenter trial undertaken at six hospitals in China, we included Chinese patients with previously treated, histologically confirmed advanced ESCC and EGFR overexpression (immunohistochemical staining sore of 3+) or amplification (positive fluorescence in situ hybridization result). These patients received oral icotinib (250 mg, three times daily).The primary end point was the proportion of patients with objective responses as assessed by an independent radiology review committee. Between December 5, 2013, and May 28, 2015, a total of 281 patients were screened. Fifty-four eligible patients were enrolled. Nine responses were observed, including one complete response and eight partial responses, and 16 patients had stable disease, resulting in a 16.7% objective response rate (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.7-26.6) and 46.3% disease control rate (95% CI: 33.0-59.6). The median progression-free survival and overall survival times were 52 (95% CI: 40-95) days and 153 (95% CI: 139-218) days, respectively. A total of 43 patients experienced at least one adverse event, but most were only grade 1 to 2 in severity. The most frequent was rash (48.1%), followed by diarrhea (22.2%). Icotinib showed favorable activity in patients with advanced, previously treated ESCC with EGFR overexpression or amplification. These findings suggest further research into EGFR overexpression or amplification for selecting responsive patients. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Results of a Randomized Controlled Multicenter Phase III Trial of Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion Compared with Best Available Care for Patients with Melanoma Liver Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Marybeth S; Zager, Jonathan; Faries, Mark; Alexander, H Richard; Royal, Richard E; Wood, Bradford; Choi, Junsung; McCluskey, Kevin; Whitman, Eric; Agarwala, Sanjiv; Siskin, Gary; Nutting, Charles; Toomey, Mary Ann; Webb, Carole; Beresnev, Tatiana; Pingpank, James F

    2016-04-01

    There is no consensus for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the liver. Percutaneous hepatic perfusion with melphalan (PHP-Mel) is a method of delivering regional chemotherapy selectively to the liver. In this study, we report the results of a multicenter, randomized controlled trial comparing PHP-Mel with best alternative care (BAC) for patients with ocular or cutaneous melanoma metastatic to the liver. A total of 93 patients were randomized to PHP-Mel (n = 44) or BAC (n = 49). On the PHP-Mel arm, melphalan was delivered via the hepatic artery, and the hepatic effluent captured and filtered extracorporeally prior to return to the systemic circulation via a venovenous bypass circuit. PHP-Mel was repeatable every 4-8 weeks. The primary endpoint was hepatic progression-free survival (hPFS), and secondary endpoints included overall PFS (oPFS), overall survival (OS), hepatic objective response (hOR), and safety. hPFS was 7.0 months for PHP-Mel and 1.6 months for BAC (p PHP-Mel and 1.6 months for BAC (p PHP-Mel 10.6 months vs. BAC 10.0 months), likely due to crossover to PHP-Mel treatment (57.1 %) from the BAC arm, and the hOR was 36.4 % for PHP-Mel and 2.0 % for BAC (p PHP-Mel, three in the primary PHP-Mel group, and one post-crossover to PHP-Mel from BAC. This randomized, phase III study demonstrated the efficacy of the PHP-Mel procedure. hPFS, oPFS, and hOR were significantly improved with PHP-Mel. PHP with melphalan should provide a new treatment option for unresectable metastatic melanoma in the liver.

  7. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jae Hwan [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun-Gi [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Ah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Taek-Keun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwang-Ju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ≥3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  8. Safety and tolerability of a cell culture derived trivalent subunit inactivated influenza vaccine administered to healthy children and adolescents: A Phase III, randomized, multicenter, observer-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Terry; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Carson, Simon; Senders, Shelly David; Jaehnig, Peter; de Rooij, Richard; Chandra, Richa

    2016-01-04

    Cell culture-derived inactivated influenza vaccines (TIVc) are necessary for scale and predictability of production to meet global demand. This study compared the safety and tolerability of TIVc with an egg-derived trivalent influenza vaccine (TIVf) in 4-17 yearolds. A Phase 3 observer blind, multicenter study enrolled 2055 healthy participants randomized 2:1 to receive either TIVc or TIVf, respectively (1372 TIVc and 683 TIVf evaluable subjects). Participants received one dose each on Days 1 and 28 (4-8 year-olds not previously vaccinated [NPV]) or one dose on Day 1 (4-8 and 9-17 yearolds previously vaccinated [PV]). Solicited adverse events (AEs) occurring within 7 days after each vaccination were assessed; participants were followed up for 6 months after their last dose for safety. Most solicited and unsolicited AEs were mild to moderate with vaccine-related SAEs were reported. TIVc and TIVf were similar in percentages of participants reporting solicited reactions in 4-8 years NPV group after the 1st dose: local reactions, TIVc: 48%, TIVf: 43%; systemic reactions, TIVc: 34%, TIVf: 32%; percentages were lower following the 2nd dose in TIVc; local reactions: TIVc: 40%; TIVf: 43%; systemic reactions: TIVc: 21%; TIVf: 22%. In 4-17 years PV group, solicited reactions were lower following TIVf, local reactions: TIVc: 53%; TIVf: 43%; systemic reactions: TIVc: 37%, TIVf: 30%. Injection-site pain was the most common solicited reaction, and was similar following TIVc and TIVf in 4-8 yearolds (TIVc: 56%; TIVf: 55%), and lower following TIVf in 9-17 years group (TIVc: 52%; TIVf: 42%). Reporting of unsolicited AEs was similar for TIVc and TIVf across the two age groups. TIVc was well tolerated and had a safety and reactogenicity profile similar to that of TIVf in healthy 4-17 yearolds (NCT01857206). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Immunogenicity and safety assessment of a trivalent, inactivated split influenza vaccine in Korean children: Double-blind, randomized, active-controlled multicenter phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Beom; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Shin, Hye Jo; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Park, Joon Soo; Kim, Hwang Min; Kim, Chun Soo; Kim, Dong Ho; Choi, Young Youn; Cha, Sung-Ho; Hong, Young Jin; Kang, Jin Han

    2015-01-01

    A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, active-control phase III clinical trial was performed to assess the immunogenicity and safety of a trivalent, inactivated split influenza vaccine. Korean children between the ages of 6 months and 18 y were enrolled and randomized into a study (study vaccine) or a control vaccine group (commercially available trivalent, inactivated split influenza vaccine) in a 5:1 ratio. Antibody responses were determined using hemagglutination inhibition assay, and post-vaccination immunogenicity was assessed based on seroconversion and seroprotection rates. For safety assessment, solicited local and systemic adverse events up to 28 d after vaccination and unsolicited adverse events up to 6 months after vaccination were evaluated. Immunogenicity was assessed in 337 and 68 children of the study and control groups. In the study vaccine group, seroconversion rates against influenza A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B strains were 62.0% (95% CI: 56.8-67.2), 53.4% (95% CI: 48.1-58.7), and 54.9% (95% CI: 48.1-60.2), respectively. The corresponding seroprotection rates were 95.0% (95% CI: 92.6-97.3), 93.8% (95% CI: 91.2-96.4), and 95.3% (95% CI: 93.0-97.5). The lower 95% CI limits of the seroconversion and seroprotection rates were over 40% and 70%, respectively, against all strains. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates were not significantly different between the study and control vaccine groups. Furthermore, the frequencies of adverse events were not significantly different between the 2 vaccine groups, and no serious vaccination-related adverse events were noted. In conclusion, the study vaccine exhibited substantial immunogenicity and safety in Korean children and is expected to be clinically effective.

  10. A pivotal registration phase III, multicenter, randomized tuberculosis controlled trial: design issues and lessons learnt from the Gatifloxacin for TB (OFLOTUB project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merle Corinne SC

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been no major advances in tuberculosis (TB drug development since the first East African/British Medical Research Council short course chemotherapy trial 35 years ago. Since then, the landscape for conducting TB clinical trials has profoundly changed with the emergence of HIV infection, the spread of resistant TB bacilli strains, recent advances in mycobacteriological capacity, and drug discovery. As a consequence questions have arisen on the most appropriate approach to design and conduct current TB trials. To highlight key issues discussed: Is a superiority, equivalence, or non-inferiority design most appropriate? What should be the primary efficacy outcome? How to consider re-infections in the definition of the outcome? What is the optimal length of patient follow-up? Is blinding appropriate when treatment duration in test arm is shorter? What are the appropriate assumptions for sample size calculation? Methods Various drugs are currently in the development pipeline. We are presenting in this paper the design of the most recently completed phase III TB trial, the OFLOTUB project, which is the pivotal trial of a registration portfolio for a gatifloxacin-containing TB regimen. It is a randomized, open-label, multicenter, controlled trial aiming to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a gatifloxacin-containing 4-month regimen (trial registration: ClinicalTrial.gov database: NCT00216385. Results In the light of the recent scientific and regulatory discussions, we discuss some of the design issues in TB clinical trials and more specifically the reasons that guided our choices, in order to best answer the trial objectives, while at the same time satisfying regulatory authority requirements. Conclusion When shortening TB treatment, we are advocating for a non-inferiority, non-blinded design, with a composite unfavorable endpoint assessed 12 months post treatment completion, and added trial procedures specifically

  11. 2-Phase NSGA II: An Optimized Reward and Risk Measurements Algorithm in Portfolio Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Elham Eftekharian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Portfolio optimization is a serious challenge for financial engineering and has pulled down special attention among investors. It has two objectives: to maximize the reward that is calculated by expected return and to minimize the risk. Variance has been considered as a risk measure. There are many constraints in the world that ultimately lead to a non–convex search space such as cardinality constraint. In conclusion, parametric quadratic programming could not be applied and it seems essential to apply multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA. In this paper, a new efficient multi-objective portfolio optimization algorithm called 2-phase NSGA II algorithm is developed and the results of this algorithm are compared with the NSGA II algorithm. It was found that 2-phase NSGA II significantly outperformed NSGA II algorithm.

  12. A phase III multicenter trail of radiosensitizing effect and safety of sodium glycididazole in thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Shangbin; Wang Yadi; Yang Junquan; Wang Xiaohu; Li Haibin; Yang Zhiyong; Yu Hong; Li Xueying; Gao Xianshu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and clinical safety glycididazole (CMNa) in thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma. Methods: From June 1, 2008 to October 13, 2009, 66 pathologically proved thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma (stage II a -III, stage IV with metastases only in supraclavicular lymph nodes, by AJCC 6 th ed) were randomized into radiotherapy plus CMNa (A) or radiotherapy plus placebo (B) group. Radiotherapy was given by conventional schedule: 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction, 5 times per week to a total dose of 66 Gy/6.6-7.2 w. CMNa was given intravenously 800 mg/m 2 3 times a week in solution of 100 ml saline within 30 minutes. Radiotherapy was started 30-60 minutes after completion of infusion. Patients of Group B received placebo in saline solution. A total of 66 patients were enrolled (Group A: 32; Group B: 34), and four patients were unanalyzable, remaining 31 patients in each Group. Baseline factors were balanced. Results: Follow-up rate was 97%. Group A vs. Group B: the overall response rate was 93.5% vs. 67.7% (χ 2 =6.61, P=0.01), 2-year overall survival was 39.9% vs. 29.9% (χ 2 = 0.62, P=0.433), 2-year cancer specific survival was 43.1% vs. 26.8% (χ 2 = 0.30, P=0.878), and 2-year progression-free survival was 30.1% vs. 27.9% (χ 2 = 0.02, P=0.586). No severe side effects observed. All patients tolerated CMNa infusion well. Conclusions: CMNa is tolerable and effective as a hypoxic radiosensitizer, and its combination with radiotherapy can improve short term effect. However, survival is not improved within our follow-up period. (authors)

  13. The National Geographic Names Data Base: Phase II instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Donald J.; Payne, Roger L.

    1987-01-01

    The Geographic Names Information System is a computer-based information system developed to meet major national needs by providing information for named entities in the United States, its territories, and outlying areas. The National Geographic Names Data Base, a component of the Geographic Names Information System, currently contains most names and associated information recorded on the 1:24,000-scale (or largest scale available) topographic maps of the U.S. Geological Survey. The work involved in this initial compilation of names shown on the topographic-map series, and the development and editing of the National Geographic Names Data Base, is referred to as Phase I. Optimal use and effectiveness of an automated names system require that the names of features

  14. Plasma resistance behavior during the linear decay phase of RFPs in ETA BETA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalesso, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    In the aided-reversal mode RFP discharges produced in ETA BETA II, the plasma current is characterized by a linear decay phase, which follows an approximately exponential phase. During the same period the measured toroidal voltage is negative and initially increasing in absolute value (exponential phase) and then decreasing to almost zero during the linear phase before the current termination. The same behavior of the current has been observed in the quiescent phase in Zeta where a negative toroidal electric field was also observed. In this note we present a model that can explain the linear decay phase and fits with the experimental parameters and allows us to estimate the plasma resistance behavior during the linear phase of slow reversed field pinch discharges

  15. Cyprus natural analogue project (CNAP). Phase II Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; Milodowski, A.E.

    2011-02-01

    Due to the extremely slow kinetics of bentonite reaction in low alkali cement leachates, natural analogues would appear to be the only viable method of studying bentonite reaction. As a result of a review of the available literature, several sites in Cyprus were selected as particularly promising for this purpose. This report presents the results of two short field campaigns in Cyprus in November/December, 2008 and February, 2009. The main aim of these campaigns was to establish if appropriate sites existed for a natural analogue study of bentonite-low alkali cement leachate reaction. Focus is on mineralogical changes and not changes in physical properties (such as porosity and permeability) of bentonite as the industrially-processed bentonite used in a repository will be completely different in terms of its engineering and hydrogeological properties to the unprocessed natural bentonite or analogue smectite-rich materials. The first campaign was in the form of a reconnaissance study to identify sites of likely interest and the second, follow-up, campaign focussed on obtaining preliminary groundwater and solid phase (bentonites/clay-rich sediments/altered igneous rocks/soils) samples which would allow a more detailed assessment of several of the potential sites. A large amount of information was collected during these short field campaigns and subsequent laboratory analysis of the collected samples so, to keep the main report down to a digestible size, much of the supporting information has been collated in seven appendices. These include full details of all 30 sites visited during both campaigns along with sample details, information on the analytical techniques, the analytical raw data and numerous photographs of the sites. The intention is that this report will provide full supporting information for a potential Phase III and a detailed database for our colleagues at the Geological Survey Department (GSD) in Cyprus. Consequently, all the information acquired

  16. Radiation therapy for ocular choroidal neovascularization (phase I/II study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasai, Keisuke; Murata, Rumi; Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a major cause of severe loss of visual acuity in some ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and angio-streaks. Laser photocoagulation has been used to treat patients with subfoveal neovascular lesions with well demarcated boundaries. However, the treatment method is usually associated with a large decrease in visual acuity. Therefore, indications for this treatment are very limited. Recently, some investigators reported the effect of low dose irradiation on the subretinal neovascular membranes in CNV. We conducted a phase I/II study to determine the toxicity and efficacy of external photon beam radiotherapy in patients with CNV. Materials and Methods: Between April 1994 and July 1995, 36 patients with choroidal neovascularization (34 with ARMD; 2 with angiostreaks) were treated with radiation therapy. Eligibility criteria for this study were as follows: the eyes had subretinal neovascular membranes in the avascular area of the fovea; the neovascular membranes had grown in size in the last 6 months; the best pretreatment corrected visual acuity was worse than (20(25)); there were no large subretinal hemorrhages causing decrease in visual acuity; patients were 50 years or older and had not received laser photocoagulation nor other treatment for this condition. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. The patients underwent fluorescein angiographic evaluation and documentation of their neovascular disease prior to irradiation. Fluorescein angiography, measurement of the best corrected visual acuity, ophthalmoscopic and biomicroscopic examinations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Treatment planning was performed using a CT simulator which enables real-time treatment planning from multiple CT slices. The clinical target volume included the macula and optic disc, which received a dose of 10 Gy/5 fractions/1 week (first 18 eyes) or 20 Gy/10 fractions

  17. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Tracy A [ORNL; Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  18. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Tracy A.; Walker, Randy M.; Hill, David E.; Gross, Ian G.; Smith, Cyrus M.; Abercrombie, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies

  19. Plasma-wall Interaction Studies in the Start-up Phase of TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Cal, E.; Tabares, F.L.; Tafalla, D.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present some first plasma-wall interaction studies made during the first experimental campaign of TJ-II. The different sections contain independent contributions presented orally in the fusion division of the Euratom-Ciemat association during 1998: I. Density limit during the start-up phase of TJ-II : are we limited by radiation?. II. Temporal evolution of oxygen in the plasma during an experimental day. III. The contribution of helium to the plasma electron density IV. First studies of the S.O.L. diffusion coefficient and its dependence with the boundary plasma parameters. (Author) 3 refs

  20. ATLAS calorimeters: Run-2 performances and Phase-II upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to $10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$. A Liquid Argon-lead sampling (LAr) calorimeter is employed as electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, except in the barrel region, where a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter (TileCal) is used as hadronic calorimeter. This presentation gives first an overview of the detector operation and data quality, as well as of the achieved performances of the ATLAS calorimetry system. Additionally the upgrade projects of the ATLAS calorimeter system for the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) are presented. For the HL-LHC, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase up to $L \\simeq 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ and the average pile-up up to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The major R&D item is the upgrade of the electronics for both LAr and Tile calorimeters in order to cope with longer latenc...

  1. The Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will show the status of the upgrade projects of the ATLAS calorimeter system for the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC). For the HL-LHC, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase up to L ≃ 7.5 × 1034 cm−2 s−1 and the average pile-up up to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter electronics will need to be replaced to cope with these challenging conditions: the expected radiation doses will indeed exceed the qualification range of the current readout system, and the upgraded trigger system will require much longer data storage in the electronics (up to 60 us), that the current system cannot sustain. The status of the R&D of the low-power ASICs (pre-amplifier, shaper, ADC, serializer and transmitters) and of the readout electronics design will be discussed. Moreover, a High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed to be added in front of the LAr calorimeters in the end-cap region (2.4 <|eta|< 4.2) for pile-up mitigation a...

  2. The Phase-II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00349918; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase~2 shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ``ITk'' (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and ring-shaped supports in the end-cap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation levels. The new pixel system could include up to 14 $\\mathrm{m^2}$ of silicon, depending on the final layout, which is expected to be decided in 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel end-cap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as |eta| $<4$. Supporting structures will be based on low mass, highly stabl...

  3. ATLAS Calorimeters: Run-2 performance and Phase-II upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 10^{34} cm^{−2} s^{−1}. A liquid argon (LAr)-lead sampling calorimeter is employed as electromagnetic calorimeter and hadronic calorimter, except in the barrel region, where a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter (TileCal) is used as hadronic calorimter. This presentation will give first an overview of the detector operation and data quality, as well as the achieved performance of the ATLAS calorimetry system. Additionally, the upgrade projects of the ATLAS calorimeter system for the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) will be presented. For the HL-LHC, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase up to L ≃ 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2} s^{−1} and the average pile-up up to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The major R&D item is the upgrade of the electronics for both LAr and Tile calorimeters in order to cope wit...

  4. Development of methods for measuring materials nuclear characteristics, Phases, I, II, II and IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maglic, R.

    1963-04-01

    This report contains the following phases of the project 'measurement of nuclear characteristics of reactor materials': nuclear performances of the neutron chopper; method for measuring total effective cross sections by transmission method on the chopper; review of methods for measuring activation cross sections; measurement of neutron spectra of the RA reactor and measurement of total effective cross section of gold by using the chopper

  5. Stable Low Cloud Phase II: Nocturnal Event Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Barrett, Joe, III

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in developing a database of nights that experienced rapid (formation in a stable atmosphere, resulting in ceilings at the Shuttle Landing Facility (TTS) that violated Space Shuttle Flight Rules (FR). This work is the second phase of a similar AMU task that examined the same phenomena during the day. In the first phase of this work, the meteorological conditions favoring the rapid formation of low ceilings include the presence of any inversion below 8000 ft, high relative humidity (RH) beneath the inversion and a clockwise turning of the winds from the surface to the middle troposphere (-15000 ft). The AMU compared and contrasted the atmospheric and thermodynamic conditions between nights with rapid low ceiling formation and nights with low ceilings resulting from other mechanisms. The AMU found that there was little to discern between the rapidly-forming ceiling nights and other low ceiling nights at TTS. When a rapid development occurred, the average RH below the inversions was 87% while non-events had an average RH of 79%. One key parameter appeared to be the vertical wind profile in the Cape Canaveral, FL radiosonde (XMR) sounding. Eighty-three percent of the rapid development events had veering winds with height from the surface to the middle troposphere (-15,000 ft) while 61% of the non-events had veering winds with height. Veering winds indicate a warm-advection regime, which supports large-scale rising motion and ultimately cloud formation in a moist environment. However, only six of the nights (out of 86 events examined) with low cloud ceilings had an occurrence of rapidly developing ceilings. Since only 7% rapid development events were observed in this dataset, it is likely that rapid low cloud development is not a common occurrence during the night, or at least not as common as during the day. In the AMU work on the daytime rapid low cloud development (Case and Wheeler 2005), nearly

  6. Purification and H-1 NMR spectroscopic characterization of phase II metabolites of tolfenamic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, U. G.; Christiansen, E.; Krogh, L.

    1997-01-01

    samples obtained on days 7 to 10 from a human volunteer after oral administration of 200 mg of the drug three times per day (steady-state plasma concentration). The metabolites of tolfenamic acid were initially concentrated by preparative solid phase extraction (PSPE) chromatography, thereby removing...... the endogenous polar compounds that are present in the urine. The individual metabolites were purified by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then identified using H-1 NMR, Both one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were performed to identify the phase II metabolites of tolfenamic......), and N-(2-methyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-anthranilic acid (11) were identified. The phase II metabolites (5-11) had not previously been identified in urine from humans administered tolfenamic acid. The phase I metabolites of the glucuronides 7, 8, 10, and 11 were identified here for the first time. An HPLC...

  7. An FPGA-based trigger for the phase II of the MEG experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa (Italy); Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Morsani, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Nicolò, D., E-mail: donato.nicolo@pi.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa (Italy); Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen AG (Switzerland); Venturini, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    For the phase II of MEG, we are going to develop a combined trigger and DAQ system. Here we focus on the former side, which operates an on-line reconstruction of detector signals and event selection within 450 μs from event occurrence. Trigger concentrator boards (TCB) are under development to gather data from different crates, each connected to a set of detector channels, to accomplish higher-level algorithms to issue a trigger in the case of a candidate signal event. We describe the major features of the new system, in comparison with phase I, as well as its performances in terms of selection efficiency and background rejection. - Highlights: • A new, two-level trigger scheme for the phase-II of the MEG experiment is presented. • Improvements with respect to phase-I are underlined. • The role of detector upgrades and the use of a new generation of FPGA as well are emphasized.

  8. Project NOAH: Regulating modern sea-level rise. Phase II: Jerusalem Underground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Walter S.; Fairbridge, Rhodes W.

    This proposal builds a high-speed inter-urban express between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, generates 1500 megawatts of hydroelectric energy, curtails littoral erosion, builds a port along the Israeli Mediterranean coast and demands peaceful cooperation on both sides of the Jordan River. Phase II represents a pilot project demonstrating the feasibility of continuing to regulate world sea-level by a new series of water regulation schemes. Phase I previously described all those projects already completed or underway which have inadvertently and/or unintentionally served the purpose of sea-level regulation. These forms of Phase I sea-level regulation include large and small reservoirs, irrigation projects, water infiltration schemes, farm ponds, and swimming and reflecting pools. All these water storage projects have already exercised a very appreciable brake on 20th century sea-level rise. Phase II outlines a high-visibility proposal which will serve to illustrate the viability of “Project NOAH”.

  9. Nonlinear Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Structures Interations (NANSI) Methodology for Ballute/Inflatable Aeroelasticity in Hypersonic Atmospheric Entry, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA proposes a phase II effort to fully develop a comprehensive methodology for aeroelastic predictions of the nonlinear aerodynamic/aerothermodynamic - structure...

  10. Forum of stakeholder confidence - Phase II of program of work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, Yves

    2006-01-01

    The author welcomed the Forum for Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) participants and introduced the day's meetings that would investigate the possible contributions and conditions for RD and D to support stakeholder confidence. In his introductory remarks, Mr. Le Bars reviewed the intent of this topical discussion and its contribution to the Phase 2 Programme of Work for FSC. Observations were drawn from previous FSC work concerning the evolving requirements for stakeholder involvement that require a new culture within the organizations. It is recognized that each actor must respect certain values and abilities, and have the capacity to communicate, to learn from the public and to adapt. In particular, it was suggested that the role of the expert in the decision-making process has changed, and there is a need to restore credibility to the voice of experts to support the processes relating to radioactive waste management. Mr. Le Bars spoke about the changing role of the 'expert' and increasing demands from the public to be informed, active participants in decision-making processes. As societal expectations have evolved over the years, there is less willingness to give the expert the legitimacy to decide, or the expert working solely with the decision-maker. Rather, there are growing demands for public policies to be defined and implemented through decision-making processes that also invite stakeholder participation, as another important category of actors. Thus, the decision-making process can be viewed as now involving three parties: the public, the experts and decision-makers. Research must be positioned in this context. Research must be part of the process, structure, behaviour and debate. It is meant to be introduced in the process as contributor to the project definition, by providing scientific background. Further, it is best undertaken through an adaptive behaviour, carried out by institutions with a clearly defined and communicated role. In setting

  11. A Multi-Band Photonic Phased Array Antenna for High-Data Rate Communication, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multi-band phased array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. In order to steer...

  12. Causalities between CO2, electricity, and other energy variables during phase I and phase II of the EU ETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, Jan Horst; Mansanet-Bataller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The topic of this article is the analysis of the interplay between daily carbon, electricity and gas price data with the European Union Emission Trading System (EU ETS) for CO 2 emissions. In a first step we have performed Granger causality tests for Phase I of the EU ETS (January 2005 until December 2007) and the first year of Phase II of the EU ETS (2008). The analysis includes both spot and forward markets - given the close interactions between the two sets of markets. The results show that during Phase I coal and gas prices, through the clean dark and spark spread, impacted CO 2 futures prices, which in return Granger caused electricity prices. During the first year of the Phase II, the short-run rent capture theory (in which electricity prices Granger cause CO 2 prices) prevailed. On the basis of the qualitative results of the Granger causality tests we obtained the formulation testable equations for quantitative analysis. Standard OLS regressions yielded statistically robust and theoretically coherent results. (author)

  13. Phase II DeCOG-study of ipilimumab in pretreated and treatment-naïve patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Zimmer

    Full Text Available Up to 50% of patients with uveal melanoma (UM develop metastatic disease with limited treatment options. The immunomodulating agent ipilimumab has shown an overall survival (OS benefit in patients with cutaneous metastatic melanoma in two phase III trials. As patients with UM were excluded in these studies, the Dermatologic Cooperative Oncology Group (DeCOG conducted a phase II to assess the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in patients with metastatic UM.We undertook a multicenter phase II study in patients with different subtypes of metastatic melanoma. Here we present data on patients with metastatic UM (pretreated and treatment-naïve who received up to four cycles of ipilimumab administered at a dose of 3 mg/kg in 3 week intervals. Tumor assessments were conducted at baseline, weeks 12, 24, 36 and 48 according to RECIST 1.1 criteria. Adverse events (AEs, including immune-related AEs were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC v.4.0. Primary endpoint was the OS rate at 12 months.Forty five pretreated (85% and eight treatment-naïve (15% patients received at least one dose of ipilimumab. 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 22% and 7%, respectively. Median OS was 6.8 months (95% CI 3.7-8.1, median progression-free survival 2.8 months (95% CI 2.5-2.9. The disease control rate at weeks 12 and 24 was 47% and 21%, respectively. Sixteen patients had stable disease (47%, none experienced partial or complete response. Treatment-related AEs were observed in 35 patients (66%, including 19 grade 3-4 events (36%. One drug-related death due to pancytopenia was observed.Ipilimumab has very limited clinical activity in patients with metastatic UM. Toxicity was manageable when treated as per protocol-specific guidelines.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01355120.

  14. Phase II DeCOG-Study of Ipilimumab in Pretreated and Treatment-Naïve Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Lisa; Vaubel, Julia; Mohr, Peter; Hauschild, Axel; Utikal, Jochen; Simon, Jan; Garbe, Claus; Herbst, Rudolf; Enk, Alexander; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Bluhm, Leonie; Rompel, Rainer; Griewank, Klaus G.; Fluck, Michael; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Up to 50% of patients with uveal melanoma (UM) develop metastatic disease with limited treatment options. The immunomodulating agent ipilimumab has shown an overall survival (OS) benefit in patients with cutaneous metastatic melanoma in two phase III trials. As patients with UM were excluded in these studies, the Dermatologic Cooperative Oncology Group (DeCOG) conducted a phase II to assess the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in patients with metastatic UM. Patients and Methods We undertook a multicenter phase II study in patients with different subtypes of metastatic melanoma. Here we present data on patients with metastatic UM (pretreated and treatment-naïve) who received up to four cycles of ipilimumab administered at a dose of 3 mg/kg in 3 week intervals. Tumor assessments were conducted at baseline, weeks 12, 24, 36 and 48 according to RECIST 1.1 criteria. Adverse events (AEs), including immune-related AEs were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v.4.0. Primary endpoint was the OS rate at 12 months. Results Forty five pretreated (85%) and eight treatment-naïve (15%) patients received at least one dose of ipilimumab. 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 22% and 7%, respectively. Median OS was 6.8 months (95% CI 3.7–8.1), median progression-free survival 2.8 months (95% CI 2.5–2.9). The disease control rate at weeks 12 and 24 was 47% and 21%, respectively. Sixteen patients had stable disease (47%), none experienced partial or complete response. Treatment-related AEs were observed in 35 patients (66%), including 19 grade 3–4 events (36%). One drug-related death due to pancytopenia was observed. Conclusions Ipilimumab has very limited clinical activity in patients with metastatic UM. Toxicity was manageable when treated as per protocol-specific guidelines. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01355120 PMID:25761109

  15. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase II report. Volume II: study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.; Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Kaletta, G.R.; Waganer, L.M.; Carosella, L.A.; Conlee, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    In this second phase the impact of unscheduled maintenance, several vacuum wall arrangements, and maintenance of other reactor interfacing subsystems and maintenance equipment are added to the evaluation of the maintainability of the fusion power reactor concepts. Four concepts are normalized to common performance parameters and evaluated for their capability to achieve availability and cost of electricity goals considering both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance. The results of this evaluation are used to generate a series of maintainability design guidelines and to select the more desirable features and design options which are used to configure a preliminary reactor concept having improved maintainability

  16. Major therapeutic effect of pentoxifylline-tocopherol association in the superficial radioinduced fibrosis: phase II test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delanian, S.; Balla-Mekias, S.; Maylin, C.; Lefaix, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The association of pentoxifylline-tocopherol seems efficient in the reduction of the superficial human radioinduced fibrosis. This phase II invites to realize a randomized test and to a comparison with the results got with the dismutase superoxide. (N.C.)

  17. Prospera Digital Phase II: Financial inclusion for low-income women ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Prospera Digital Phase II: Financial inclusion for low-income women in Mexico ... a research network in Latin America, to identify barriers and opportunities to scale up ... Call for new OWSD Fellowships for Early Career Women Scientists now open ... conference of McGill's Institute for the Study of International Development.

  18. TA 55 Reinvestment Project II Phase C Update Project Status May 23, 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, Anthony P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-25

    The TA-55 Reinvestment Project (TRP) II Phase C is a critical infrastructure project focused on improving safety and reliability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TA-55 Complex. The Project recapitalizes and revitalizes aging and obsolete facility and safety systems providing a sustainable nuclear facility for National Security Missions.

  19. Kilowatt isotope power system, Phase II Plan. Volume IV. Teledyne FSCD vs GDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-15

    This Volume contains Teledyne's input to the Kilowatt Isotope Power System Phase II Plan. Included is a description of the Flight System Heat Generation System, Flight System Radiator, Thermal Insulation Stability, GDS Heat Generation System and GDS Radiator.

  20. Social Security in Zimbabwe : Phase II: Zunde raMambo and Burial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Phase II of this study the Zimbabwean team selected the Zunde raMambo and burial societies for an in-depth study. Four provinces were selected and key informants were interviewed from senior officials to members of these organizations at the grassroots. Zunde raMambo, which provide for the contingency of famine ...

  1. 76 FR 55947 - Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Secretary Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in... to perform the type of activity to be funded.. DAI, through its Industrial Relations Promotion... provided a letter in support of continued funding of DAI/IRRP based, on part, on the importance of the...

  2. VTAE Equity Staff Development Workshops and Services--Phase II. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, Lorayne; Nelson, Orville

    The Phase II Equity Staff Development project was revised in response to a need to develop an equity strategic planning model with a vision statement, goals, and objectives. The Equity Strategic Planning Model was presented to administrators of Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education (VTAE) colleges for their use in district strategic…

  3. Human Rights and Peace Audit on Partition in South Asia - Phase II ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    3 févr. 2009 ... Human Rights and Peace Audit on Partition in South Asia - Phase II. In South Asia, people's social, political and cultural aspirations often get articulated as movements for territorially defined political change. Very often, these movements find resolution in partition or in an ethnic group/nationality getting ...

  4. A phase II study of gemcitabine in the treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeChevalier, T; Gottfried, M; Gatzemeier, U; Shepherd, F; Weynants, P; Cottier, B; Groen, HJM; Rosso, R; Mattson, K; CortesFunes, H; Tonato, M; Burkes, RL; Voi, M; Ponzio, A

    Gemcitabine is a novel pyrimidine nucleoside whose activity has been demonstrated on solid tumors. We report here the results of a multicentre phase II trial of gemcitabine in chemonaive patients with inoperable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gemcitabine was given weekly at a dose of 1,250

  5. Studies of Inner Detector Layouts with 5 Pixel layers for the Phase-II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Garcia-Sciveres, M

    2013-01-01

    This note describes a study of Inner Detector layouts for the phase-II upgrade. Starting from the LOI layout the impact of adding a 5th pixel layer, and shortening the pixel and/or SCT barrel layers is studied.

  6. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action. 300.305 Section 300.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... the OSC is informed of their activities in natural resource damage assessment that may affect response...

  7. A Tool for Predicting Regulatory Approval After Phase II Testing of New Oncology Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMasi, J A; Hermann, J C; Twyman, K; Kondru, R K; Stergiopoulos, S; Getz, K A; Rackoff, W

    2015-11-01

    We developed an algorithm (ANDI) for predicting regulatory marketing approval for new cancer drugs after phase II testing has been conducted, with the objective of providing a tool to improve drug portfolio decision-making. We examined 98 oncology drugs from the top 50 pharmaceutical companies (2006 sales) that first entered clinical development from 1999 to 2007, had been taken to at least phase II development, and had a known final outcome (research abandonment or regulatory marketing approval). Data on safety, efficacy, operational, market, and company characteristics were obtained from public sources. Logistic regression and machine-learning methods were used to provide an unbiased approach to assess overall predictability and to identify the most important individual predictors. We found that a simple four-factor model (activity, number of patients in the pivotal phase II trial, phase II duration, and a prevalence-related measure) had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting regulatory marketing approval. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  8. 77 FR 73586 - Further Inquiry Into Issues Related to Mobility Fund Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... highest cost areas. 17. Small business participation. In the USF/ICC Transformation Order and FNPRM, the... Phase II of the Mobility Fund. As established in the USF/ICC Transformation Order and FNPRM, 76 FC 78383... previously filed in response to the USF/ICC Transformation Order and FNPRM and the Bureaus' experience in...

  9. A phase II study of gemcitabine in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meerbeeck, JP; Bass, P; Debruyne, C; Groen, HJ; Manegold, C; Ardizzoni, A; Gridelli, C; van Marck, EA; Lentz, M; Giaccone, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND, Gemcitabine has shown activity in patients with less chemosensitive solid tumors. Phase II screening of novel drugs is an accepted method with which to investigate new therapies in malignant mesothelioma. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Lung Cancer

  10. Life cycle and economic efficiency analysis phase II : durable pavement markings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This report details the Phase II analysis of the life cycle and economic efficiency of inlaid tape : and thermoplastic. Waterborne paint was included as a non-durable for comparison purposes : only. In order to find the most economical product for sp...

  11. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  12. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.8 Section 76.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1...

  13. Cerebral near infrared spectroscopy oximetry in extremely preterm infants : Phase II randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Pellicer, Adelina; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun; Van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Franz, Axel R.; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Grevstad, Berit; Hagmann, Cornelia; Lemmers, Petra; Van Oeveren, Wim; Pichler, Gerhard; Plomgaard, Anne Mette; Riera, Joan; Sanchez, Laura; Winkel, Per; Wolf, Martin; Greisen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry. Design: Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial. Setting Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care units in

  14. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier

    2013-01-01

    al, N Engl J Med 2012;367:1187). Compared with bicalutamide in nonclinical studies, enzalutamide had higher androgen receptor– binding affinity, prevented nuclear translocation, showed no DNA binding, and induced apoptosis (Tran et al, Science 2009;324:787). In contrast to previous phase II and III...

  15. Development and Validation of Methodology to Model Flow in Ventilation Systems Commonly Found in Nuclear Facilities - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strons, Philip [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Davis, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grudzinski, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hlotke, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this report we present the results of the Phase II analysis and testing of the flow patterns encountered in the Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), as well as the results from an opportunity to expand upon field test work from Phase I by the use of a Class IIIb laser. The addition to the Phase I work is covered before proceeding to the results of the Phase II work, followed by a summary of findings.

  16. Phase I/Phase II Study of Blinatumomab in Pediatric Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stackelberg, Arend; Locatelli, Franco; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Handgretinger, Rupert; Trippett, Tanya M; Rizzari, Carmelo; Bader, Peter; O'Brien, Maureen M; Brethon, Benoît; Bhojwani, Deepa; Schlegel, Paul Gerhardt; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rheingold, Susan R; Cooper, Todd Michael; Zwaan, Christian M; Barnette, Phillip; Messina, Chiara; Michel, Gérard; DuBois, Steven G; Hu, Kuolung; Zhu, Min; Whitlock, James A; Gore, Lia

    2016-12-20

    Purpose Blinatumomab is a bispecific T-cell engager antibody construct targeting CD19 on B-cell lymphoblasts. We evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, recommended dosage, and potential for efficacy of blinatumomab in children with relapsed/refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). Methods This open-label study enrolled children treatment cycles. Primary end points were maximum-tolerated dosage (phase I) and complete remission rate within the first two cycles (phase II). Results We treated 49 patients in phase I and 44 patients in phase II. Four patients had dose-limiting toxicities in cycle 1 (phase I). Three experienced grade 4 cytokine-release syndrome (one attributed to grade 5 cardiac failure); one had fatal respiratory failure. The maximum-tolerated dosage was 15 µg/m 2 /d. Blinatumomab pharmacokinetics was linear across dosage levels and consistent among age groups. On the basis of the phase I data, the recommended blinatumomab dosage for children with relapsed/refractory ALL was 5 µg/m 2 /d for the first 7 days, followed by 15 µg/m 2 /d thereafter. Among the 70 patients who received the recommended dosage, 27 (39%; 95% CI, 27% to 51%) achieved complete remission within the first two cycles, 14 (52%) of whom achieved complete minimal residual disease response. The most frequent grade ≥ 3 adverse events were anemia (36%), thrombocytopenia (21%), and hypokalemia (17%). Three patients (4%) and one patient (1%) had cytokine-release syndrome of grade 3 and 4, respectively. Two patients (3%) interrupted treatment after grade 2 seizures. Conclusion This trial, which to the best of our knowledge was the first such trial in pediatrics, demonstrated antileukemic activity of single-agent blinatumomab with complete minimal residual disease response in children with relapsed/refractory BCP-ALL. Blinatumomab may represent an important new treatment option in this setting, requiring further investigation in curative indications.

  17. Belotecan/cisplatin versus etoposide/cisplatin in previously untreated patients with extensive-stage small cell lung carcinoma: a multi-center randomized phase III trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Kim, Young-Chul; Lee, Kwan-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Hong; Kim, Sun-Young; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Kye-Chul; Jang, Tae-Won; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Kye-Young; Lee, Sung-Yong

    2016-01-01

    No novel chemotherapeutic combinations have demonstrated superior efficacy to etoposide/cisplatin (EP), a standard treatment regimen for extensive-stage small cell lung carcinoma (ES-SCLC) over the past decade. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of belotecan/cisplatin (BP) and EP regimens in chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-naïve patients with previously untreated ES-SCLC. We conducted a multi-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, phase III clinical study. A total of 157 patients were recruited at 14 centers with 147 patients meeting the inclusion/exclusion criteria and randomized to either BP (n = 71) or EP (n = 76) treatment arms. A non-inferior response rate (RR) in the BP arm, analyzed by intent-to-treat analysis according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.0 criteria, was used as the primary endpoint. The secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In the BP arm, one patient had a complete response, 41 had a partial response (PR), and 17 had stable disease (SD). In the EP arm, 35 patients had PR and 28 had SD. The RR in the BP arm was non-inferior to the EP regimen in patients with ES-SCLC (BP: 59.2 %, EP: 46.1 %, difference: 13.1 %, 90 % two-sided confidence interval: -0.3–26.5, meeting the predefined non-inferiority criterion of -15.0 %). No significant differences in OS or PFS were observed between the treatment arms. Hematologic toxicities, including grade 3/4 anemia and thrombocytopenia, were significantly more prevalent in the BP arm than the EP arm. The RR to the BP regimen was non-inferior to the EP regimen in chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-naïve patients with previously untreated ES-SCLC. Hematologic toxicities were significantly more prevalent in the BP group, indicating that BP should be used with care, particularly in patients with a poor performance status. Further studies assessing PFS and OS are required to validate the superiority of the BP regimen. Clinical

  18. Avelumab, an Anti-Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Antibody, In Patients With Refractory Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma: Results From a Multicenter, Phase Ib Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolo, Andrea B; Infante, Jeffrey R; Balmanoukian, Ani; Patel, Manish R; Wang, Ding; Kelly, Karen; Mega, Anthony E; Britten, Carolyn D; Ravaud, Alain; Mita, Alain C; Safran, Howard; Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Srdanov, Marko; Gelb, Arnold B; Schlichting, Michael; Chin, Kevin; Gulley, James L

    2017-07-01

    Purpose We assessed the safety and antitumor activity of avelumab, a fully human anti-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) IgG1 antibody, in patients with refractory metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Methods In this phase Ib, multicenter, expansion cohort, patients with urothelial carcinoma progressing after platinum-based chemotherapy and unselected for PD-L1 expression received avelumab 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. The primary objectives were safety and tolerability. Secondary objectives included confirmed objective response rate (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] version 1.1), progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), and PD-L1-associated clinical activity. PD-L1 positivity was defined as expression by immunohistochemistry on ≥ 5% of tumor cells. Results Forty-four patients were treated with avelumab and followed for a median of 16.5 months (interquartile range, 15.8 to 16.7 months). The data cutoff was March 19, 2016. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events of any grade were fatigue/asthenia (31.8%), infusion-related reaction (20.5%), and nausea (11.4%). Grades 3 to 4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in three patients (6.8%) and included asthenia, AST elevation, creatine phosphokinase elevation, and decreased appetite. The confirmed objective response rate by independent central review was 18.2% (95% CI, 8.2% to 32.7%; five complete responses and three partial responses). The median duration of response was not reached (95% CI, 12.1 weeks to not estimable), and responses were ongoing in six patients (75.0%), including four of five complete responses. Seven of eight responding patients had PD-L1-positive tumors. The median progression-free survival was 11.6 weeks (95% CI, 6.1 to 17.4 weeks); the median OS was 13.7 months (95% CI, 8.5 months to not estimable), with a 12-month OS rate of 54.3% (95% CI, 37.9% to 68.1%). Conclusion Avelumab was well tolerated and associated with durable responses and prolonged

  19. Avelumab, an Anti–Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Antibody, In Patients With Refractory Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma: Results From a Multicenter, Phase Ib Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolo, Andrea B.; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Balmanoukian, Ani; Patel, Manish R.; Wang, Ding; Kelly, Karen; Mega, Anthony E.; Britten, Carolyn D.; Ravaud, Alain; Mita, Alain C.; Safran, Howard; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Srdanov, Marko; Gelb, Arnold B.; Schlichting, Michael; Chin, Kevin; Gulley, James L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the safety and antitumor activity of avelumab, a fully human anti–programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) IgG1 antibody, in patients with refractory metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Methods In this phase Ib, multicenter, expansion cohort, patients with urothelial carcinoma progressing after platinum-based chemotherapy and unselected for PD-L1 expression received avelumab 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. The primary objectives were safety and tolerability. Secondary objectives included confirmed objective response rate (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] version 1.1), progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), and PD-L1–associated clinical activity. PD-L1 positivity was defined as expression by immunohistochemistry on ≥ 5% of tumor cells. Results Forty-four patients were treated with avelumab and followed for a median of 16.5 months (interquartile range, 15.8 to 16.7 months). The data cutoff was March 19, 2016. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events of any grade were fatigue/asthenia (31.8%), infusion-related reaction (20.5%), and nausea (11.4%). Grades 3 to 4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in three patients (6.8%) and included asthenia, AST elevation, creatine phosphokinase elevation, and decreased appetite. The confirmed objective response rate by independent central review was 18.2% (95% CI, 8.2% to 32.7%; five complete responses and three partial responses). The median duration of response was not reached (95% CI, 12.1 weeks to not estimable), and responses were ongoing in six patients (75.0%), including four of five complete responses. Seven of eight responding patients had PD-L1–positive tumors. The median progression-free survival was 11.6 weeks (95% CI, 6.1 to 17.4 weeks); the median OS was 13.7 months (95% CI, 8.5 months to not estimable), with a 12-month OS rate of 54.3% (95% CI, 37.9% to 68.1%). Conclusion Avelumab was well tolerated and associated with durable responses and

  20. A Phase III, Multicenter, Parallel-Design Clinical Trial to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of 5% Minoxidil Foam Versus Vehicle in Women With Female Pattern Hair Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeld, Wilma; Washenik, Ken; Callender, Valerie; Zhang, Paul; Quiza, Carlos; Doshi, Uday; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    BACKGROUND Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a common hair disorder that affects millions of women. A new 5% minoxidil topical foam (MTF) formulation, which does not contain propylene glycol, has been developed. To compare the efficacy and safety of once-daily 5% MTF with vehicle foam for the treatment of FPHL. This was a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, parallel-group, international multicenter trial (17 sites) in women aged at least 18 years with FPHL (grade D3 to D6 on the Savin Density Scale), treated once daily with 5% MTF or vehicle foam for 24 weeks. The co-primary efficacy endpoints were the change from baseline at week 24 in target area hair count (TAHC) and subject assessment of scalp coverage. Also evaluated were TAHC at week 12, expert panel review of hair regrowth at week 24, and change from baseline in total unit area density (TUAD, sum of hair diameters/cm2) at weeks 12 and 24. A total of 404 women were enrolled. At 12 and 24 weeks, 5% MTF treatment resulted in regrowth of 10.9 hairs/cm2 and 9.1 hairs/cm2 more than vehicle foam, respectively (both P<.0001). Improved scalp coverage at week 24 was observed by both subject self-assessment (0.69-point improvement over vehicle foam; P<.0001) and expert panel review (0.36-point improvement over the vehicle foam; P<.0001). TUAD increased by 658 μm/cm2 and 644 μm/cm2 more with 5% MTF than with vehicle foam at weeks 12 and 24, respectively (both P<.0001). MTF was well tolerated. A low incidence of scalp irritation and facial hypertrichosis was observed, with no clinically significant differences between groups. Five percent MTF once daily for 24 weeks was well tolerated and promoted hair regrowth in women with FPHL, resulting in improved scalp coverage and increased hair density compared with vehicle foam. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: nCT01226459J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):874-881.

  1. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  2. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018

  3. Phase II Upgrade of the GERDA Experiment for the Search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorovits, B.

    Observation of neutrinoless double beta decay could answer the question regarding the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The GERDA experiment utilizes HPGe detectors enriched with the isotope 76Ge to search for this process. Recently the GERDA collaboration has unblinded data of Phase I of the experiment. In order to further improve the sensitivity of the experiment, additionally to the coaxial detectors used, 30 BEGe detectors made from germanium enriched in 76Ge will be deployed in GERDA Phase II. BEGe detectors have superior PSD capability, thus the background can be further reduced. The liquid argon surrounding the detector array will be instrumented in order to reject background by detecting scintillation light induced in the liquid argon by radiation. After a short introduction the hardware preparations for GERDA Phase II as well as the processing and characterization of the 30 BEGe detectors are discussed.

  4. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II. Shallow Plus Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, K. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Parker, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Martin, E. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Chasar, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Amos, B. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013.

  5. Medical information, communication, and archiving system (MICAS): Phase II integration and acceptance testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward M.; Wandtke, John; Robinson, Arvin E.

    1999-07-01

    The Medical Information, Communication and Archive System (MICAS) is a multi-modality integrated image management system that is seamlessly integrated with the Radiology Information System (RIS). This project was initiated in the summer of 1995 with the first phase being installed during the first half of 1997 and the second phase installed during the summer of 1998. Phase II enhancements include a permanent archive, automated workflow including modality worklist, study caches, NT diagnostic workstations with all components adhering to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standards. This multi-vendor phased approach to PACS implementation is designed as an enterprise-wide PACS to provide images and reports throughout our healthcare network. MICAS demonstrates that aa multi-vendor open system phased approach to PACS is feasible, cost-effective, and has significant advantages over a single vendor implementation.

  6. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase II: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes Phase II of a project which developed a system for delivering fire safety training to board and care providers who serve adults with developmental disabilities. Phase II focused on developing and pilot testing a "train the trainers" workshop for instructors and field testing the provider's workshop. Evaluation of…

  7. Phase equilibrium measurements and the tuning behavior of new sII clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Woongchul; Park, Seongmin; Ro, Hyeyoon; Koh, Dong-Yeun; Seol, Jiwoong [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 Program), KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Huen, E-mail: h_lee@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (BK21 Program), KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of EEWS, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Pyrrolidine and piperidine act as sII clathrate hydrate formers under methane gas. Highlights: > New sII clathrate hydrate formers were proposed: pyrrolidine and piperidine. > Formation of gas hydrate with methane as help gas was confirmed. > NMR, Raman, and XRD patterns were analyzed to identify the hydrate structures. > We measured (L + H + V) phase equilibrium with proposed hydrate formers. > Tuning phenomena increase gas storage in (pyrrolidine + CH{sub 4}) clathrate hydrates. - Abstract: We suggest two types of new amine-type sII formers: pyrrolidine and piperidine. These guest compounds fail to form clathrate hydrate structures with host water, but instead have to combine with light gaseous guest molecules (methane) for enclathration. First, two binary clathrate hydrates of (pyrrolidine + methane) and (piperidine + methane) were synthesized at various amine concentrations. {sup 13}C NMR and Raman analysis were done to identify the clathrate hydrate structure and guest distribution over sII-S and sII-L cages. XRD was also used to find the exact structure and corresponding cell parameters. At a dilute pyrrolidine concentration of less than 5.56 mol%, the tuning phenomenon is observed such that methane molecules surprisingly occupy sII-L cages. At the critical guest concentration of about 0.1 mol%, the cage occupancy ratio reaches the maximum of approximately 0.5. At very dilute guest concentration below 0.1 mol%, the methane molecules fail to occupy large cages on account of their rarefied distribution in the network. Direct-release experiments were performed to determine the actual guest compositions in the clathrate hydrate phases. Finally, we measured the clathrate hydrate phase equilibria of (pyrrolidine + methane) and (piperidine + methane).

  8. Phase equilibrium measurements and the tuning behavior of new sII clathrate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Woongchul; Park, Seongmin; Ro, Hyeyoon; Koh, Dong-Yeun; Seol, Jiwoong; Lee, Huen

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Pyrrolidine and piperidine act as sII clathrate hydrate formers under methane gas. Highlights: → New sII clathrate hydrate formers were proposed: pyrrolidine and piperidine. → Formation of gas hydrate with methane as help gas was confirmed. → NMR, Raman, and XRD patterns were analyzed to identify the hydrate structures. → We measured (L + H + V) phase equilibrium with proposed hydrate formers. → Tuning phenomena increase gas storage in (pyrrolidine + CH 4 ) clathrate hydrates. - Abstract: We suggest two types of new amine-type sII formers: pyrrolidine and piperidine. These guest compounds fail to form clathrate hydrate structures with host water, but instead have to combine with light gaseous guest molecules (methane) for enclathration. First, two binary clathrate hydrates of (pyrrolidine + methane) and (piperidine + methane) were synthesized at various amine concentrations. 13 C NMR and Raman analysis were done to identify the clathrate hydrate structure and guest distribution over sII-S and sII-L cages. XRD was also used to find the exact structure and corresponding cell parameters. At a dilute pyrrolidine concentration of less than 5.56 mol%, the tuning phenomenon is observed such that methane molecules surprisingly occupy sII-L cages. At the critical guest concentration of about 0.1 mol%, the cage occupancy ratio reaches the maximum of approximately 0.5. At very dilute guest concentration below 0.1 mol%, the methane molecules fail to occupy large cages on account of their rarefied distribution in the network. Direct-release experiments were performed to determine the actual guest compositions in the clathrate hydrate phases. Finally, we measured the clathrate hydrate phase equilibria of (pyrrolidine + methane) and (piperidine + methane).

  9. Effect of timing on the outcomes of 1-phase nonextraction therapy of Class II malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Kim, Ludia H

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this cephalometric study was to evaluate the role of timing in relation to skeletal maturity on the outcomes of nonextraction comprehensive Class II therapy. Three samples of patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion were treated with headgear combined with fixed appliances and Class II elastics. Lateral cephalograms were taken of all subjects before therapy (T1) and at an average interval of 6 months after therapy (T2). The first sample (23 subjects) was treated before the pubertal growth spurt, the second sample (24 subjects) received therapy during the pubertal growth spurt, and the third sample (13 subjects) was treated at a postpubertal stage of development. The average T1 to T2 interval was approximately 30 months for all patients, with an average treatment duration of 24 months. Longitudinal observations of a group of 17 subjects with untreated Class II malocclusions were compared with the treated groups at the 3 skeletal maturation intervals with nonparametric statistics. Class II treatment before or during the pubertal growth spurt induced significant favorable skeletal changes (restricted maxillary advancement in prepubertal patients and enhanced mandibular growth in pubertal patients). Patients treated after the pubertal growth spurt had only significant dentoalveolar changes. The greatest amount of dentoskeletal correction of Class II malocclusion with 1-phase nonextraction treatment occurred in patients treated during the pubertal growth spurt.

  10. Phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials: proposal of a two-stage Bayesian design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Chevret, Sylvie

    2003-02-01

    We propose a new design for phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials aiming at determining a dose of an experimental treatment to satisfy safety (respectively efficacy) requirements, at treating a sufficiently large number of patients to estimate the toxicity (respectively failure) probability of the dose level with a given reliability, and at stopping the trial early if it is likely that no dose is safe (respectively efficacious). A two-stage design was derived from the Continual Reassessment Method (CRM), with implementation of Bayesian criteria to generate stopping rules. A simulation study was conducted to compare the operating characteristics of the proposed two-stage design to those reached by the traditional CRM. Finally, two applications to real data sets are provided.

  11. Phase transitions in solid Kr-CH4 solutions and rotational excitations in phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagatskii, M.I.; Mashchenko, D.A.; Dudkin, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    The heat capacity C p of solid Kr-n CH 4 solutions with the CH 4 concentrations n=0.82, 0.86, 0.90 as well as solutions with n=0.90, 0.95 doped with 0.002 O 2 impurity has been investigated under equilibrium vapor pressure over the internal 1-24 K. The (T,n)-phase diagram was refined and the region of two-phase states was determined for Kr-n CH 4 solid solutions. The contribution of the rotational subsystem, C r ot, to the heat capacity of the solutions has been separated. Analysis of C r ot(T) at T 1 and E 2 between the tunnel levels of the A-, T- and A-, E--nuclear-spin species of CH 4 molecules in the orientationally ordered subsystem, and to determine the effective energy gaps E 1 between lowest levels of the A- and T- species. The relations τ(n) and E 1 (n) stem from changes of the effective potential field caused as the replacement of CH 4 molecules by Kr atoms at sites of the ordered sublattices. The effective gaps E L between a group of tunnel levels of the ground-state liberation state and the nearest group of excited levels of the liberation state of the ordered CH 4 molecules in the solutions with n=0.90 (E L =52 K) and 0.95 (E L =55 K) has been estimated

  12. Phase II trial (BREAK-2) of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib (GSK2118436) in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Minor, David; Ribas, Antoni; Lebbe, Celeste; O'Hagan, Anne; Arya, Niki; Guckert, Mary; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kefford, Richard F; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Hamid, Omid; Amaravadi, Ravi; Simeone, Ester; Wilhelm, Tabea; Kim, Kevin B; Long, Georgina V; Martin, Anne-Marie; Mazumdar, Jolly; Goodman, Vicki L; Trefzer, Uwe

    2013-09-10

    Dabrafenib (GSK2118436) is a potent inhibitor of mutated BRAF kinase. Our multicenter, single-arm, phase II study assessed the safety and clinical activity of dabrafenib in BRAF(V600E/K) mutation-positive metastatic melanoma (mut(+) MM). Histologically confirmed patients with stage IV BRAF(V600E/K) mut(+) MM received oral dabrafenib 150 mg twice daily until disease progression, death, or unacceptable adverse events (AEs). The primary end point was investigator-assessed overall response rate in BRAF(V600E) mut(+) MM patients. Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Exploratory objectives included the comparison of BRAF mutation status between tumor-specific circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and tumor tissue, and the evaluation of cfDNA as a predictor of clinical outcome. Seventy-six patients with BRAF(V600E) and 16 patients with BRAF(V600K) mut(+) MM were enrolled onto the study. In the BRAF(V600E) group, 45 patients (59%) had a confirmed response (95% CI, 48.2 to 70.3), including five patients (7%) with complete responses. Two patients (13%) with BRAF(V600K) mut(+) MM had a confirmed partial response (95% CI, 0 to 28.7). In the BRAF(V600E) and BRAF(V600K) groups, median PFS was 6.3 months and 4.5 months, and median OS was 13.1 months and 12.9 months, respectively. The most common AEs were arthralgia (33%), hyperkeratosis (27%), and pyrexia (24%). Overall, 25 patients (27%) experienced a serious AE and nine patients (10%) had squamous cell carcinoma. Baseline cfDNA levels predicted response rate and PFS in BRAF(V600E) mut(+) MM patients. Dabrafenib was well tolerated and clinically active in patients with BRAF(V600E/K) mut(+) MM. cfDNA may be a useful prognostic and response marker in future studies.

  13. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Y

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yoichiro Yoshida,1 Keiji Hirata,2 Hiroshi Matsuoka,3 Shigeyoshi Iwamoto,4 Masahito Kotaka,5 Hideto Fujita,6 Naoya Aisu,1 Seiichiro Hoshino,1 Takeo Kosaka,6 Kotaro Maeda,3 Fumiaki Kiyomi,7 Yuichi Yamashita1 1Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Fukuoka University Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Department of Surgery, Fukuoka Sanno Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Department of Surgery, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan; 4Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, Osaka, Japan; 5Gastrointestinal Cancer Center, Sano Hospital, Kobe, Japan; 6Department of Surgical Oncology, Kanazawa Medical University, Uchinada, Japan; 7Academia, Industry and Government Collaborative Research Institute of Translational Medicine for Life Innovation, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan Background: Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions.Patients and methods: The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of

  14. Three-day Field Treatment with Ingenol Disoxate (LEO 43204) for Actinic Keratosis: A Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Daniel M; Tyring, Stephen; Nahm, Walter K; Østerdal, Marie Louise; Petersen, Astrid H; Berman, Brian

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ingenol disoxate gel using a once-daily, three-day field treatment regimen in patients with actinic keratosis. DESIGN: This was a Phase II, multicenter, open-label trial (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02305888). SETTING: The study was conducted in 20 trial sites in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Participants included patients with 5 to 20 clinically typical actinic keratosis lesions on the full face/chest (250cm 2 ), scalp (25-250cm 2 ), or the trunk/extremities (250cm 2 ). MEASUREMENTS: We measured incidence of dose-limiting events based on local skin responses. Percentage reduction in actinic keratosis lesion count from baseline, complete clearance, and partial clearance (≥75%) of actinic keratosis lesions were assessed at Week 8. RESULTS: Nine of 63 (14.3%) patients in the face/chest group reported dose-limiting events; zero of 63 patients in the scalp group reported dose-limiting events; and 11 of 62 (17.7%) patients in the trunk/extremities group reported dose-limiting events. Mean composite local skin response scores peaked at Day 4, then rapidly declined, reaching or approaching baseline levels by Week 4. Less than five percent of patients reported severe adverse events; the most common treatment-related adverse events were application site pain and pruritus. The reduction in actinic keratosis lesion count was 78.9, 76.3, and 69.1 percent for the face/chest, scalp, and trunk/extremities groups, respectively. Complete clearance was achieved in 36.5, 39.7, and 22.6 percent of patients in the face/chest, scalp, and trunk/extremities groups, respectively. Partial clearance was achieved in 71.4, 65.1, and 50.0 percent of patients in the face/chest, scalp, and trunk/extremities groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: Ingenol disoxate demonstrated adverse events and local skin reaction profiles similar to results seen in trials evaluating shorter two-day regimens and was effective in patients

  15. Phase II study of preoperative radiation plus concurrent daily tegafur-uracil (UFT) with leucovorin for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellier, Patrice; Burtin, Pascal; Campion, Loïc; Boisdron-Celle, Michèle; Morel, Alain; Berger, Virginie; Gamelin, Erick; Leduc, Bernard; Martin, Laurent; Vié, Brigitte; Chevelle, Christian; Vendrely, Véronique; Salemkour, Augustin; Carrie, Christian; Calais, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Considerable variation in intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism can occur due to the wide range of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme activity, which can affect both tolerability and efficacy. The oral fluoropyrimidine tegafur-uracil (UFT) is an effective, well-tolerated and convenient alternative to intravenous 5-FU. We undertook this study in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of UFT with leucovorin (LV) and preoperative radiotherapy and to evaluate the utility and limitations of multicenter staging using pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy ultrasound. We also performed a validated pretherapy assessment of DPD activity and assessed its potential influence on the tolerability of UFT treatment. This phase II study assessed preoperative UFT with LV and radiotherapy in 85 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal cancer. Patients with potentially resectable tumors received UFT (300 mg/m/ 2 /day), LV (75 mg/day), and pelvic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, 45 Gy total) 5 days/week for 5 weeks then surgery 4-6 weeks later. The primary endpoints included tumor downstaging and the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Most adverse events were mild to moderate in nature. Preoperative grade 3/4 adverse events included diarrhea (n = 18, 21%) and nausea/vomiting (n = 5, 6%). Two patients heterozygous for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD) experienced early grade 4 neutropenia (variant IVS14+1G > A) and diarrhea (variant 2846A > T). Pretreatment ultrasound TNM staging was compared with postchemoradiotherapy pathology TN staging and a significant shift towards earlier TNM stages was observed (p < 0.001). The overall downstaging rate was 42% for primary tumors and 44% for lymph nodes. The pCR rate was 8%. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for staging was poor. Anal sphincter function was preserved in 55 patients (65%). Overall and recurrence-free survival at 3 years was 86.1% and 66

  16. Enginnering development of coal-fired high performance power systems phase II and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 ''Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III.'' The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R ampersand D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update

  17. 200-ZP-1 phase II and III IRM groundwater pump and treat site safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St. John, C.H.

    1996-07-01

    This safety plan covers operations, maintenance, and support activities related to the 200-ZP-1 Phase II and III Ground Water Pump- and-Treat Facility. The purpose of the facility is to extract carbon tetrachloride contaminated groundwater underlying the ZP-1 Operable Unit; separate the contaminant from the groundwater; and reintroduce the treated water to the aquifer. An air stripping methodology is employed to convert volatile organics to a vapor phase for absorption onto granular activated carbon. The automated process incorporates a variety of process and safety features that shut down the process system in the event that process or safety parameters are exceeded or compromised

  18. Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E.; SCHMIDT,C.O.

    1999-10-01

    This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.

  19. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Power System, Phase II Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Gary; Stanley, John

    2016-01-01

    In Phase II, the manufacture and testing of two 6-kW(sub e)Stirling engines was completed. The engines were delivered in an opposed 12-kW(sub e) arrangement with a common expansion space heater head. As described in the Phase I report, the engines were designed to be sealed both hermetically and with a bolted O-ring seal. The completed Phase II convertor is in the bolted configuration to allow future disassembly. By the end of Phase II, the convertor had passed all of the final testing requirements in preparation for delivery to the NASA Glenn Research Center. The electronic controller also was fabricated and tested during Phase II. The controller sets both piston amplitudes and maintains the phasing between them. It also sets the operating frequency of the machine. Details of the controller are described in the Phase I final report. Fabrication of the direct-current to direct-current (DC-DC) output stage, which would have stepped down the main controller output voltage from 700 to 120 V(sub DC), was omitted from this phase of the project for budgetary reasons. However, the main controller was successfully built, tested with the engines, and delivered. We experienced very few development issues with this high-power controller. The project extended significantly longer than originally planned because of yearly funding delays. The team also experienced several hardware difficulties along the development path. Most of these were related to the different thermal expansions of adjacent parts constructed of different materials. This issue was made worse by the large size of the machine. Thermal expansion problems also caused difficulties in the brazing of the opposed stainless steel sodium-potassium (NaK) heater head. Despite repeated attempts Sunpower was not able to successfully braze the opposed head under this project. Near the end of the project, Glenn fabricated an opposed Inconel NaK head, which was installed prior to delivery for testing at Glenn. Engine

  20. The first preparative solution phase synthesis of melanotan II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Melanotan II is a synthetic cyclic heptapeptide used to prevent a sunlight-induced skin cancer by stimulating the skin tanning process. In this paper we report the first solution phase synthesis of the title compound. The hexapeptide sequence has been assembled by [(2+2+1+1] scheme. After removing the orthogonal protection, a carbodiimide mediated lactamization, involving the ε-amino group of lysine and γ-carboxy group of aspartic acid, led to a cyclic intermediate. Appending N-acetylnorleucine concluded the assembly of melanotan II molecule. Protection of the lateral groups in arginine and tryptophan was omitted for atom and step economy reasons. The total synthesis of melanotan II was accomplished in 12 steps with 2.6% overall yield, affording >90% pure peptide without using preparative chromatography.

  1. Data Quality Objective Summary Report for Phase II of the 105-F and DR Reactor Buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    This data quality objective (DQO) process is to support planning and decision-making activities of Phase II decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities for the 105-F and 105-DR Reactor Buildings.The objective of this DQO is to determine the survey and characterization requirements for these rooms to provide the necessary information for worker safety, waste designation, recycle, reuse, and clean landfill disposal decisions during D and D

  2. How competitive are EU electricity markets? An assessment of ETS Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagneto-Gissey, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the interactions between electricity and carbon allowance prices in the year-ahead energy markets of France, Germany, United Kingdom and the Nordic countries, during Phase II of the EU ETS. VAR and Granger-causality methods are used to analyze causal interfaces, whereas the volatility of electricity prices is studied with basic and asymmetric AR-GARCH models. Among the main results, the marginal rate at which carbon prices feed into electricity prices is shown to be ca. 135% in the EEX and Nord Pool markets, where electricity and carbon prices display bidirectional causality, and 109% in the UK. Therefore, generators in these markets internalized the cost of freely allotted emission allowances into their electricity prices considerably more than the proportionate increase in costs justified by effective carbon intensity. Moreover, electricity prices in France are found to Granger-cause the carbon price. This study also shows how European electricity prices are deeply linked to coal prices among other factors, both in terms of levels and volatility, regardless of the underlying fuel mix, and that coal was marginally more profitable than gas for electricity generation. EU policies aimed at increasing the carbon price are likely to be crucial in limiting the externalities involved in the transition to a low-carbon system. - Highlights: • The interactions between electricity and carbon prices during Phase II are investigated. • This work also studies the determinants of EU electricity price levels and volatilities. • Nord Pool, APX UK and EEX carbon cost pass-through rates emphasize low electricity market competitiveness. • Powernext electricity prices Granger-cause the Phase II carbon price. • Coal was marginally more profitable than gas during Phase II

  3. Phase II study of 4'-(9-acridinylamino) methanesulfon-m- anisidide (AMSA) in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legha, S S; Hall, S W; Powell, K C; Burgess, M A; Benjamin, R S; Gutterman, J U; Bodey, G P

    1980-01-01

    A phase II study of AMSA in previously treated patients with metastatic malignant melanoma was conducted. The dose schedule of AMSA was 40 mg/m2/day for 3 days repeated at 3-week intervals. Among the 30 evaluable patients, one achieved a complete response, one a partial response, and four had minor responses. Side effects included mild nausea and vomiting and moderate degree of myelosuppression. AMSA has poor activity against previously treated metastatic melanoma.

  4. Column Chromatography Of Co(II), Zn(II) And Eu(III) Using Pistachio Shell And Different Mobile Phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Pistachio shell particles (0.5-1 mm) have been applied as the stationary phase for studying the column chromatography of Co(II), Zn(II) and Eu(III) at room temperature; 26 + - 1 oC. This solid sorbent has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Its surface area and percent of swelling have been also determined. Different eluting agents have been used for eluting the sorbed elements. The elution curves have been done from which the distribution coefficients (K d ), number of theoretical plates (N) and heights equivalent to theoretical plates (H) have been determined. Column performance studies have been conducted for a representative system under certain experimented conditions and Van Deemter equation has been applied. Thermodynamic studies have been applied and thermodynamic functions ( δG 0 ,δH 0 andδ S 0 ) have been calculated for this representative system by determining K d at three different room temperatures (18, 26 and 37 + - 1o C).

  5. Column Chromatography Of Co(II), Zn(II) And Eu(III) Using Pistachio Shell And Different Mobile Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, A A [Nuclear Chemistry Department, Radioisotopes Production Division, Hot Laboratories Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-07-01

    Pistachio shell particles (0.5-1 mm) have been applied as the stationary phase for studying the column chromatography of Co(II), Zn(II) and Eu(III) at room temperature; 26{sup +}-{sup 1}oC. This solid sorbent has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Its surface area and percent of swelling have been also determined. Different eluting agents have been used for eluting the sorbed elements. The elution curves have been done from which the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), number of theoretical plates (N) and heights equivalent to theoretical plates (H) have been determined. Column performance studies have been conducted for a representative system under certain experimented conditions and Van Deemter equation has been applied. Thermodynamic studies have been applied and thermodynamic functions ( {delta}G{sup 0} ,{delta}H{sup 0} and{delta} S{sup 0}) have been calculated for this representative system by determining K{sub d} at three different room temperatures (18, 26 and 37{sup +}-{sup 1o}C)

  6. Ginseng Berry Extract Prevents Atherogenesis via Anti-Inflammatory Action by Upregulating Phase II Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ki Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng berry possesses higher ginsenoside content than its root, which has been traditionally used in herbal medicine for many human diseases, including atherosclerosis. We here examined the antiatherogenic effects of the Korean ginseng berry extract (KGBE and investigated its underlying mechanism of action in vitro and in vivo. Administration of KGBE decreased atherosclerotic lesions, which was inversely correlated with the expression levels of phase II genes to include heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and glutamine-cysteine ligase (GCL. Furthermore, KGBE administration suppressed NF-κB-mediated expression of atherogenic inflammatory genes (TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS, COX-2, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1, without altering serum cholesterol levels, in ApoE-/- mice fed a high fat-diet. Treatment with KGBE increased phase II gene expression and suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced reactive oxygen species production, NF-κB activation, and inflammatory gene expression in primary macrophages. Importantly, these cellular events were blocked by selective inhibitors of HO-1 and GCL. In addition, these inhibitors reversed the suppressive effect of KGBE on TNF-α-mediated induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, resulting in decreased interaction between endothelial cells and monocytes. These results suggest that KGBE ameliorates atherosclerosis by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated expression of atherogenic genes via upregulation of phase II enzymes and thus has therapeutic or preventive potential for atherosclerosis.

  7. Evaluation of Beam Loss and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Doyle, E.; Ferrari, A.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Smith, J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.

    2011-01-01

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  8. Evaluation of Beam Losses And Energy Deposition for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, L.; Bracco, C.; Assmann, R.W.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Smith, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  9. Phase II randomized trial of neoadjuvant metformin plus letrozole versus placebo plus letrozole for estrogen receptor positive postmenopausal breast cancer (METEOR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jisun; Kim, Lee Su; Han, Sehwan; Nam, Seok Jin; Kang, Han-Sung; Kim, Seung Il; Yoo, Young Bum; Jeong, Joon; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Taewoo; Kim, Sung-Won; Lim, Woosung; Jung, Yongsik; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Ku Sang; Yu, Jong-Han; Chae, Byung Joo; Jung, So-Youn; Kang, Eunyoung; Choi, Su Yun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Min-Kyoon; Paik, Nam-Sun; Jeong, Sang-Seol; Yoon, Jung-han; Park, Chan Heun; Ahn, Sei Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with an aromatase inhibitor has shown efficacy comparable to that of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with postmenopausal breast cancer. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that the antidiabetic drug metformin has anti-tumor activity. This prospective, multicenter, phase II randomized, placebo controlled trial was designed to evaluate the direct anti-tumor effect of metformin in non-diabetic postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. Patients meeting the inclusion criteria and providing written informed consent will be randomized to 24 weeks of neoadjuvant treatment with letrozole (2.5 mg/day) and either metformin (2000 mg/day) or placebo. Target accrual number is 104 patients per arm. The primary endpoint will be clinical response rate, as measured by calipers. Secondary endpoints include pathologic complete response rate, breast conserving rate, change in Ki67 expression, breast density change, and toxicity profile. Molecular assays will be performed using samples obtained before treatment, at week 4, and postoperatively. This study will provide direct evidence of the anti-tumor effect of metformin in non-diabetic, postmenopausal patients with ER-positive breast cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier http://clinicaltrial.gov/ct2/show/NCT01589367?term

  10. Immunomodulatory effects in a phase II study of lenalidomide combined with cetuximab in refractory KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita K Gandhi

    Full Text Available This study assessed the immunomodulatory effects in previously treated KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients participating in a phase II multicenter, open-label clinical trial receiving lenalidomide alone or lenalidomide plus cetuximab. The main findings show the T cell immunostimulatory properties of lenalidomide as the drug induced a decrease in the percentage CD45RA(+ naïve T cells 3-fold while increasing the percentage HLA-DR(+ activated T helper cells and percentage total CD45RO(+ CD8(+ memory T cytotoxic cells, 2.6- and 2.1-fold respectively (p<0.0001. In addition, lenalidomide decreased the percentage of circulating CD19(+ B cells 2.6-fold (p<0.0001. Lenalidomide increased a modest, yet significant, 1.4-fold change in the percentage of circulating natural killer cells. Our findings indicate that lenalidomide significantly activates T cells, suggestive of an immunotherapeutic role for this drug in settings of maintenance therapy and tumor immunity. Furthermore, reported for the first time is the effect of lenalidomide in combination with cetuximab on T cell function, including increases in circulating naïve and central memory T cells. In summary, lenalidomide and cetuximab have significant effects on circulating immune cells in patients with colorectal carcinoma.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01032291.

  11. Molecular, Pathological, Radiological, and Immune Profiling of Non-brainstem Pediatric High-Grade Glioma from the HERBY Phase II Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Alan; Burford, Anna; Molinari, Valeria; Jones, David T W; Izquierdo, Elisa; Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Giangaspero, Felice; Haberler, Christine; Pietsch, Torsten; Jacques, Thomas S; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Rodriguez, Daniel; Morgan, Paul S; Raman, Pichai; Waanders, Angela J; Resnick, Adam C; Massimino, Maura; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Smith, Helen; Capper, David; Pfister, Stefan M; Würdinger, Thomas; Tam, Rachel; Garcia, Josep; Thakur, Meghna Das; Vassal, Gilles; Grill, Jacques; Jaspan, Tim; Varlet, Pascale; Jones, Chris

    2018-05-14

    The HERBY trial was a phase II open-label, randomized, multicenter trial evaluating bevacizumab (BEV) in addition to temozolomide/radiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed non-brainstem high-grade glioma (HGG) between the ages of 3 and 18 years. We carried out comprehensive molecular analysis integrated with pathology, radiology, and immune profiling. In post-hoc subgroup analysis, hypermutator tumors (mismatch repair deficiency and somatic POLE/POLD1 mutations) and those biologically resembling pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma ([PXA]-like, driven by BRAF_V600E or NF1 mutation) had significantly more CD8 + tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and longer survival with the addition of BEV. Histone H3 subgroups (hemispheric G34R/V and midline K27M) had a worse outcome and were immune cold. Future clinical trials will need to take into account the diversity represented by the term "HGG" in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical effects of Angelica dahurica dressing on patients with I-II phase pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fen; Niu, Junzhi; Pei, Xing

    2016-11-02

    Angelica dahurica is a well-known traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), while little information is available about its effects on pressure sores. We aimed to investigate the clinical effect of Angelica dahurica on patients with I-II phase pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Patients (n = 98) with phase I and phase II pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to control and treated groups. In addition to holistic nursing, patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream, while patients in the treated group received continuous 4 weeks of external application of Angelica dahurica dressing. Therapeutic effect was recorded, along with the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Besides, HaCaT cells were cultured with different concentrations of Angelica dahurica, and then cell viability, clone formation numbers, cell cycle, and levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 were determined. The total effective rate in the treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Levels of IL-8, EGF, TGF-β, and VEGF were statistically increased by Angelica dahurica. In addition, the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by Angelica dahurica in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, and levels of cyclin D1 and CDK2 were significantly elevated. Our results suggest that Angelica dahurica may provide an effective clinical treatment for I-II phase pressure sores.

  13. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  14. In vivo induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, glutathione transferase and quinone reductase by citrus triterpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hassan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cell culture and animal studies demonstrated that citrus bioactive compounds have protective effects against certain types of cancer. Among several classes of citrus bioactive compounds, limonoids were reported to prevent different types of cancer. Furthermore, the structures of citrus limonoids were reported to influence the activity of phase II detoxifying enzymes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how variations in the structures of citrus limonoids (namely nomilin, deacetyl nomilin, and isoobacunoic acid and a mixture of limonoids would influence phase II enzyme activity in excised tissues from a mouse model. Methods In the current study, defatted sour orange seed powder was extracted with ethyl acetate and subjected to silica gel chromatography. The HPLC, NMR and mass spectra were used to elucidate the purity and structure of compounds. Female A/J mice were treated with three limonoids and a mixture in order to evaluate their effect on phase II enzymes in four different tissues. Assays for glutathione S-transferase and NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR were used to evaluate induction of phase II enzymatic activity. Results The highest induction of GST against 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB was observed in stomach (whole, 58% by nomilin, followed by 25% isoobacunoic acid and 19% deacetyl nomilin. Deacetyl nomilin in intestine (small as well as liver significantly reduced GST activity against CDNB. Additionally isoobacunoic acid and the limonoid mixture in liver demonstrated a significant reduction of GST activity against CDNB. Nomilin significantly induced GST activity against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO, intestine (280% and stomach (75% while deacetyl nomilin showed significant induction only in intestine (73%. Induction of GST activity was also observed in intestine (93% and stomach (45% treated with the limonoid mixture. Finally, a significant induction of NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR activity was

  15. Highly selective solid-phase extraction of trace Pd(II) by murexide functionalized halloysite nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ruijun; He Qun; Hu Zheng; Zhang Shengrui [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Lijun [Faculty of Science and Engineer, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Chang Xijun, E-mail: lirj2010@lzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-02-03

    Graphical abstract: Murexide functionalized halloysite nanotubes have been developed to separate and concentrate trace Pd(II) from aqueous samples. Parameters that affected the sorption and elution efficiency were studied in column mode, and the new adsorbent presented high selectivity and adsorption capacity for the solid phase extraction of trace Pd(II). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Murexide modified halloysite nanotubes as adsorbent has been reported originally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This adsorbent has a unique selectivity for Pd(II) at pH 1.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This adsorbent had high adsorption capacity for Pd(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The precision and accuracy of the method are satisfactory. - Abstract: The originality on the high efficiency of murexide modified halloysite nanotubes as a new adsorbent of solid phase extraction has been reported to preconcentrate and separate Pd(II) in solution samples. The new adsorbent was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms. Effective preconcentration conditions of analyte were examined using column procedures prior to detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The effects of pH, the amount of adsorbent, the sample flow rate and volume, the elution condition and the interfering ions were optimized in detail. Under the optimized conditions, Pd(II) could be retained on the column at pH 1.0 and quantitatively eluted by 2.5 mL of 0.01 mol L{sup -1} HCl-3% thiourea solution at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min{sup -1}. The analysis time was 5 min. An enrichment factor of 120 was accomplished. Common interfering ions did not interfere in both separation and determination. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent at optimum conditions was found to be 42.86 mg g{sup -1} for Pd(II). The detection limit (3{sigma}) of

  16. Highly selective solid-phase extraction of trace Pd(II) by murexide functionalized halloysite nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruijun; He Qun; Hu Zheng; Zhang Shengrui; Zhang Lijun; Chang Xijun

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Murexide functionalized halloysite nanotubes have been developed to separate and concentrate trace Pd(II) from aqueous samples. Parameters that affected the sorption and elution efficiency were studied in column mode, and the new adsorbent presented high selectivity and adsorption capacity for the solid phase extraction of trace Pd(II). Highlights: ► Murexide modified halloysite nanotubes as adsorbent has been reported originally. ► This adsorbent has a unique selectivity for Pd(II) at pH 1.0. ► This adsorbent had high adsorption capacity for Pd(II). ► The precision and accuracy of the method are satisfactory. - Abstract: The originality on the high efficiency of murexide modified halloysite nanotubes as a new adsorbent of solid phase extraction has been reported to preconcentrate and separate Pd(II) in solution samples. The new adsorbent was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and N 2 adsorption–desorption isotherms. Effective preconcentration conditions of analyte were examined using column procedures prior to detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The effects of pH, the amount of adsorbent, the sample flow rate and volume, the elution condition and the interfering ions were optimized in detail. Under the optimized conditions, Pd(II) could be retained on the column at pH 1.0 and quantitatively eluted by 2.5 mL of 0.01 mol L −1 HCl–3% thiourea solution at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min −1 . The analysis time was 5 min. An enrichment factor of 120 was accomplished. Common interfering ions did not interfere in both separation and determination. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent at optimum conditions was found to be 42.86 mg g −1 for Pd(II). The detection limit (3σ) of the method was 0.29 ng mL −1 , and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.1% (n = 11). The method was

  17. Phase II and III the next generation of CLS beamline control and data acquisition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matias, E.; Beauregard, D.; Berg, R.; Black, G.; Boots, M.J.; Dolton, W.; Hunter, D.; Igarashi, R.; Liu, D.; Maxwell, D.; Miller, C.D.; Wilson, T.; Wright, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Canadian Light Source (CLS) is nearing the completion of its suite of Phase II Beamlines and in detailed design of its Phase III Beamlines. The paper presents an overview of the overall approach adopted by CLS in the development of beamline control and data acquisition systems. Building on the experience of our first phase of beamlines the CLS has continued to make extensive use of EPICS with EDM and QT based user interfaces. Increasing interpretive languages such as Python are finding a place in the beamline control systems. Web based environment such as ScienceStudio have also found a prominent place in the control system architecture as we move to tighter integration between data acquisition, visualization and data analysis. (authors)

  18. NASA's GeneLab Phase II: Federated Search and Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Tran, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    GeneLab is currently being developed by NASA to accelerate 'open science' biomedical research in support of the human exploration of space and the improvement of life on earth. Phase I of the four-phase GeneLab Data Systems (GLDS) project emphasized capabilities for submission, curation, search, and retrieval of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics ('omics') data from biomedical research of space environments. The focus of development of the GLDS for Phase II has been federated data search for and retrieval of these kinds of data across other open-access systems, so that users are able to conduct biological meta-investigations using data from a variety of sources. Such meta-investigations are key to corroborating findings from many kinds of assays and translating them into systems biology knowledge and, eventually, therapeutics.

  19. NASAs GeneLab Phase II: Federated Search and Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Costes, Sylvain; Tran, Peter

    2017-01-01

    GeneLab is currently being developed by NASA to accelerate open science biomedical research in support of the human exploration of space and the improvement of life on earth. Phase I of the four-phase GeneLab Data Systems (GLDS) project emphasized capabilities for submission, curation, search, and retrieval of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics (omics) data from biomedical research of space environments. The focus of development of the GLDS for Phase II has been federated data search for and retrieval of these kinds of data across other open-access systems, so that users are able to conduct biological meta-investigations using data from a variety of sources. Such meta-investigations are key to corroborating findings from many kinds of assays and translating them into systems biology knowledge and, eventually, therapeutics.

  20. Chromospheric oscillations observed with OSO 8. III. Average phase spectra for Si II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, O.R.; Athay, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Time series of intensity and Doppler-shift fluctuations in the Si II emission lines lambda816.93 and lambda817.45 are Fourier analyzed to determine the frequency variation of phase differences between intensity and velocity and between these two lines formed 300 km apart in the middle chromosphere. Average phase spectra show that oscillations between 2 and 9 mHz in the two lines have time delays from 35 to 40 s, which is consistent with the upward propagation of sound wave at 8.6-7.5 km s -1 . In this same frequency band near 3 mHz, maximum brightness leads maximum blueshift by 60 0 . At frequencies above 11 mHz where the power spectrum is flat, the phase differences are uncertain, but approximately 65% of the cases indicate upward propagation. At these higher frequencies, the phase lead between intensity and blue Doppler shift ranges from 0 0 to 180 0 with an average value of 90 0 . However, the phase estimates in this upper band are corrupted by both aliasing and randomness inherent to the measured signals. Phase differences in the two narrow spectral features seen at 10.5 and 27 mHz in the power spectra are shown to be consistent with properties expected for aliases of the wheel rotation rate of the spacecraft wheel section

  1. Efficacy and tolerability of an undenatured type II collagen supplement in modulating knee osteoarthritis symptoms: a multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, James P; Saiyed, Zainulabedin M; Lane, Nancy E

    2016-01-29

    Undenatured type II collagen (UC-II) is a nutritional supplement derived from chicken sternum cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of UC-II for knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain and associated symptoms compared to placebo and to glucosamine hydrochloride plus chondroitin sulfate (GC). One hundred ninety one volunteers were randomized into three groups receiving a daily dose of UC-II (40 mg), GC (1500 mg G & 1200 mg C), or placebo for a 180-day period. The primary endpoint was the change in total Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) from baseline through day 180 for the UC-II group versus placebo and GC. Secondary endpoints included the Lequesne Functional Index (LFI), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain and the WOMAC subscales. Modified intent-to-treat analysis were performed for all endpoints using analysis of covariance and mixed model repeated measures, while incremental area under the curve was calculated by the intent-to-treat method. At day 180, the UC-II group demonstrated a significant reduction in overall WOMAC score compared to placebo (p = 0.002) and GC (p = 0.04). Supplementation with UC-II also resulted in significant changes for all three WOMAC subscales: pain (p = 0.0003 vs. placebo; p = 0.016 vs. GC); stiffness (p = 0.004 vs. placebo; p = 0.044 vs. GC); physical function (p = 0.007 vs. placebo). Safety outcomes did not differ among the groups. UC-II improved knee joint symptoms in knee OA subjects and was well-tolerated. Additional studies that elucidate the mechanism for this supplement's actions are warranted. CTRI/2013/05/003663 ; CTRI/2013/02/003348 .

  2. Methodology of phase II clinical trials in metastatic elderly breast cancer: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarrou, B; Mourey, L; Dalenc, F; Balardy, L; Kanoun, D; Roché, H; Boher, J M; Rougé-Bugat, M E; Filleron, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    As the incidence of invasive breast cancer will increase with age, the number of elderly patients with a diagnosis metastatic breast cancer will also rise. But the use of cytotoxic drugs in elderly metastatic breast cancer patients is not systematic and is dreaded by medical oncologists. The need for prospective oncologic data from this population seems increasingly obvious. The main objective of this review is to investigate design and characteristics of phase II trials that assess activity and feasibility of chemotherapies in elderly advanced/metastatic breast cancer patients. An electronic search in PUBMED allowed us to retrieve articles published in English language on phase II trials in elderly metastatic breast cancer between January 2002 and May 2016. Sixteen publications were finally included in this review. The primary endpoint was a simple, a composite, and a co-primary endpoints in 11, three, and two studies, respectively. Efficacy was the primary objective in 15 studies: simple (n = 10), composite (n = 3), co-primary endpoints (n = 2). Composite or co-primary endpoints combined efficacy and toxicity. Thirteen studies used multistage designs. Only five studies evaluated the feasibility, i.e., to jointly assess efficacy and tolerance to treatment (toxicity, quality of life, etc) as primary endpoint. Development of elderly specific phase III clinical trials might be challenging, it therefore seems essential to conduct phase II clinical trials evaluating jointly efficacy and toxicity in a well-defined geriatric population. Use of multistage designs that take into account heterogeneity would allow to identify a subpopulation at interim analysis and to reduce the number of patients exposed to an inefficient or a toxic treatment regimen. It is crucial to evaluate new therapies (targeted therapies, immunotherapies) using adequate methodologies (Study design, endpoint).

  3. Screened selection design for randomised phase II oncology trials: an example in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Christina; Pettitt, Andrew; Billingham, Lucinda

    2013-07-03

    As there are limited patients for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia trials, it is important that statistical methodologies in Phase II efficiently select regimens for subsequent evaluation in larger-scale Phase III trials. We propose the screened selection design (SSD), which is a practical multi-stage, randomised Phase II design for two experimental arms. Activity is first evaluated by applying Simon's two-stage design (1989) on each arm. If both are active, the play-the-winner selection strategy proposed by Simon, Wittes and Ellenberg (SWE) (1985) is applied to select the superior arm. A variant of the design, Modified SSD, also allows the arm with the higher response rates to be recommended only if its activity rate is greater by a clinically-relevant value. The operating characteristics are explored via a simulation study and compared to a Bayesian Selection approach. Simulations showed that with the proposed SSD, it is possible to retain the sample size as required in SWE and obtain similar probabilities of selecting the correct superior arm of at least 90%; with the additional attractive benefit of reducing the probability of selecting ineffective arms. This approach is comparable to a Bayesian Selection Strategy. The Modified SSD performs substantially better than the other designs in selecting neither arm if the underlying rates for both arms are desirable but equivalent, allowing for other factors to be considered in the decision making process. Though its probability of correctly selecting a superior arm might be reduced, it still performs reasonably well. It also reduces the probability of selecting an inferior arm. SSD provides an easy to implement randomised Phase II design that selects the most promising treatment that has shown sufficient evidence of activity, with available R codes to evaluate its operating characteristics.

  4. Selective solid-phase extraction of Ni(II) by an ion-imprinted polymer from water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraji, Mohammad; Yousefi, Hamideh

    2009-01-01

    A new ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) material was synthesized by copolymerization of 4-vinylpyridine as monomer, ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate as crosslinking agent and 2,2'-azobis-sobutyronitrile as initiator in the presence of Ni-dithizone complex. The IIP was used as sorbent in a solid-phase extraction column. The effects of sampling volume, elution conditions, sample pH and sample flow rate on the extraction of Ni ions form water samples were studied. The maximum adsorption capacity and the relative selectivity coefficients of imprinted polymer for Ni(II)/Co(II), Ni(II)/Cu(II) and Ni(II)/Cd(II) were calculated. Compared with non-imprinted polymer particles, the IIP had higher selectivity for Ni(II). The relative selectivity factor (α r ) values of Ni(II)/Co(II), Ni(II)/Cu(II) and Ni(II)/Cd(II) were 21.6, 54.3, and 22.7, respectively, which are greater than 1. The relative standard deviation of the five replicate determinations of Ni(II) was 3.4%. The detection limit for 150 mL of sample was 1.6 μg L -1 using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace nickel in water samples with satisfactory results.

  5. Neoadjuvant FOLFOX 4 versus FOLFOX 4 with Cetuximab versus immediate surgery for high-risk stage II and III colon cancers: a multicentre randomised controlled phase II trial – the PRODIGE 22 - ECKINOXE trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karoui, Mehdi; Rullier, Anne; Luciani, Alain; Bonnetain, Franck; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Sarran, Antony; Monges, Geneviève; Trillaud, Hervé; Le Malicot, Karine; Leroy, Karen; Sobhani, Iradj; Bardier, Armelle; Moreau, Marie; Brindel, Isabelle; Seitz, Jean François; Taieb, Julien

    2015-01-01

    In patients with high risk stage II and stage III colon cancer (CC), curative surgery followed by adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy has become the standard of care. However, for 20 to 30 % of these patients, the current curative treatment strategy of surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy fails either to clear locoregional spread or to eradicate distant micrometastases, leading to disease recurrence. Preoperative chemotherapy is an attractive concept for these CCs and has the potential to impact upon both of these causes of failure. Optimum systemic therapy at the earliest possible opportunity may be more effective at eradicating distant metastases than the same treatment given after the delay and immunological stress of surgery. Added to this, shrinking the primary tumor before surgery may reduce the risk of incomplete surgical excision, and the risk of tumor cell shedding during surgery. PRODIGE 22 - ECKINOXE is a multicenter randomized phase II trial designed to evaluate efficacy and feasibility of two chemotherapy regimens (FOLFOX-4 alone and FOLFOX-4 + Cetuximab) in a peri-operative strategy in patients with bulky CCs. Patients with CC deemed as high risk T3, T4 and/or N2 on initial abdominopelvic CT scan are randomized to either colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy (control arm), or 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX-4 (for RAS mutated patients). In RAS wild-type patients a third arm testing FOLFOX+ cetuximab has been added prior to colectomy. Patients in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy arms will receive postoperative treatment for 4 months (8 cycles) to complete their therapeutic schedule. The primary endpoint of the study is the histological Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) as defined by Ryan. The secondary endpoints are: treatment strategy safety (toxicity, primary tumor related complications under chemotherapy, peri-operative morbidity), disease-free and recurrence free survivals at 3 years, quality of life, carcinologic quality and

  6. Neoadjuvant FOLFOX 4 versus FOLFOX 4 with Cetuximab versus immediate surgery for high-risk stage II and III colon cancers: a multicentre randomised controlled phase II trial--the PRODIGE 22--ECKINOXE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoui, Mehdi; Rullier, Anne; Luciani, Alain; Bonnetain, Franck; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Sarran, Antony; Monges, Geneviève; Trillaud, Hervé; Le Malicot, Karine; Leroy, Karen; Sobhani, Iradj; Bardier, Armelle; Moreau, Marie; Brindel, Isabelle; Seitz, Jean François; Taieb, Julien

    2015-07-10

    In patients with high risk stage II and stage III colon cancer (CC), curative surgery followed by adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy has become the standard of care. However, for 20 to 30% of these patients, the current curative treatment strategy of surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy fails either to clear locoregional spread or to eradicate distant micrometastases, leading to disease recurrence. Preoperative chemotherapy is an attractive concept for these CCs and has the potential to impact upon both of these causes of failure. Optimum systemic therapy at the earliest possible opportunity may be more effective at eradicating distant metastases than the same treatment given after the delay and immunological stress of surgery. Added to this, shrinking the primary tumor before surgery may reduce the risk of incomplete surgical excision, and the risk of tumor cell shedding during surgery. PRODIGE 22--ECKINOXE is a multicenter randomized phase II trial designed to evaluate efficacy and feasibility of two chemotherapy regimens (FOLFOX-4 alone and FOLFOX-4 + Cetuximab) in a peri-operative strategy in patients with bulky CCs. Patients with CC deemed as high risk T3, T4 and/or N2 on initial abdominopelvic CT scan are randomized to either colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy (control arm), or 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX-4 (for RAS mutated patients). In RAS wild-type patients a third arm testing FOLFOX+ cetuximab has been added prior to colectomy. Patients in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy arms will receive postoperative treatment for 4 months (8 cycles) to complete their therapeutic schedule. The primary endpoint of the study is the histological Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) as defined by Ryan. The secondary endpoints are: treatment strategy safety (toxicity, primary tumor related complications under chemotherapy, peri-operative morbidity), disease-free and recurrence free survivals at 3 years, quality of life, carcinologic quality and

  7. A Phase II Study of Submandibular Gland Transfer Prior to Radiation for Prevention of Radiation-Induced Xerostomia in Head and Neck Cancer (Rtog 0244)s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Naresh; Harris, Jonathan; Seikaly, Hadi; Jacobs, John R.; McEwan, AJB.; Thomas Robbins, K.; Grecula, John; Sharma, Anand K.; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We report the results of a phase II study to determine reproducibility of surgical technique of submandibular salivary gland transfer (SGT) for prevention of radiation (XRT) induced xerostomia in a multi-institutional setting and to assess severity of xerostomia. Methods and Materials Eligible patients had surgery for primary, neck dissection, and SGT followed by XRT during which the transferred salivary gland was shielded. IMRT, amifostine, and pilocarpine were not allowed, but postoperative chemotherapy was allowed. Each operation was reviewed by two and radiation by one reviewer. If 13 or more (out of 43) were “not per protocol”, then technique would be considered not reproducible as per study design. The secondary endpoint was the rate of acute xerostomia, Grade 2 or higher and a rate of ≤ 51% was acceptable. Results 44 of the total 49 patients were analyzable: male (81.8%), oropharynx (63.6%), stage IV (61.4%), median age 56.5 years. SGT was “per protocol” or with acceptable variation in 34 patients (77.3%) and XRT in 79.5%. 9 patients (20.9%) developed grade II acute xerostomia; 2 had grade 0 -1 xerostomia (4.7%) but started on amifostine/pilocarpine. These 11 patients (25.6%) were considered failures for the xerostomia endpoint. 13 patients have died; median follow-up for 31 surviving patients is 2.9 years. Two-year overall and disease-free survival rates are 76.4% and 71.7%, respectively. Conclusions the technique of submandibular salivary gland transfer procedure is reproducible in a multicenter setting. Seventy-four percent of patients had prevention of XRT induced acute xerostomia. PMID:22541957

  8. Development of methods for measuring materials nuclear characteristics, Phases, I, II, II and IV; Razvijanje metoda merenja nuklearnih karakteristika materijala, I, II, II i VI faza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglic, R [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1963-04-15

    This report contains the following phases of the project 'measurement of nuclear characteristics of reactor materials': nuclear performances of the neutron chopper; method for measuring total effective cross sections by transmission method on the chopper; review of methods for measuring activation cross sections; measurement of neutron spectra of the RA reactor and measurement of total effective cross section of gold by using the chopper.

  9. Casein Kinase 1 Coordinates Cohesin Cleavage, Gametogenesis, and Exit from M Phase in Meiosis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello-Miranda, Orlando; Zagoriy, Ievgeniia; Mengoli, Valentina; Rojas, Julie; Jonak, Katarzyna; Oz, Tugce; Graf, Peter; Zachariae, Wolfgang

    2017-01-09

    Meiosis consists of DNA replication followed by two consecutive nuclear divisions and gametogenesis or spore formation. While meiosis I has been studied extensively, less is known about the regulation of meiosis II. Here we show that Hrr25, the conserved casein kinase 1δ of budding yeast, links three mutually independent key processes of meiosis II. First, Hrr25 induces nuclear division by priming centromeric cohesin for cleavage by separase. Hrr25 simultaneously phosphorylates Rec8, the cleavable subunit of cohesin, and removes from centromeres the cohesin protector composed of shugoshin and the phosphatase PP2A. Second, Hrr25 initiates the sporulation program by inducing the synthesis of membranes that engulf the emerging nuclei at anaphase II. Third, Hrr25 mediates exit from meiosis II by activating pathways that trigger the destruction of M-phase-promoting kinases. Thus, Hrr25 synchronizes formation of the single-copy genome with gamete differentiation and termination of meiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  11. Search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge: GERDA Phase II commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    After successful completion of Phase I the Gerda (Germanium Detector Array) experiment underwent a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus. These upgrades include additional 20 kg of custom-made detectors with improved background rejection capabilities, accompanied by improved front-end electronics and an active liquid argon scintillation light veto. A sensitivity on the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life (T{sub 1/2}{sup 0ν}) of 10{sup 26} yr should be reached after a few years of data taking (Phase II). First results of Phase II commissioning and latest results from Phase I analyses are presented in this talk.

  12. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Findlay, J.A.; Hwang, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation

  13. Predicted Geology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Phase II Drilling Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley (PM-OV) Phase II drilling will occur within an area that encompasses approximately 117 square kilometers (45 square miles) near the center of the Phase I PM-OV hydrostratigraphic framework model area. The majority of the investigation area lies within dissected volcanic terrain between Pahute Mesa on the north and Timber Mountain on the south. This area consists of a complex distribution of volcanic tuff and lava of generally rhyolitic composition erupted from nearby calderas and related vents. Several large buried volcanic structural features control the distribution of volcanic units in the investigation area. The Area 20 caldera, including its structural margin and associated caldera collapse collar, underlies the northeastern portion of the investigation area. The southern half of the investigation area lies within the northwestern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex, including portions of the caldera moat and resurgent dome. Another significant structural feature in the area is the west-northwest-trending Northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone, which bisects the northern portion of the investigation area and forms a structural bench. The proposed wells of the UGTA Phase II drilling initiative can be grouped into four generalized volcanic structural domains based on the stratigraphic distribution and structural position of the volcanic rocks in the upper 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) of the crust, a depth that represents the approximate planned total depths of the proposed wells

  14. Turnable Semiconductor Laser Spectroscopy in Hollow Optical Waveguides, Phase II SBIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J. Fetzer, Ph.D.

    2001-12-24

    In this study a novel optical trace gas sensor based on a perforated hollow waveguide (PHW) was proposed. The sensor has been given the acronym ESHOW for Environmental Sensor using Hollow Optical Waveguides. Realizations of the sensor have demonstrated rapid response time (<2s), low minimum detection limits (typically around 3 x 10-5 absorbance). Operation of the PHW technology has been demonstrated in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid0infrared (MIR) regions of the spectrum. Simulation of sensor performance provided in depth understanding of the signals and signal processing required to provide high sensitivity yet retain rapid response to gas changes. A dedicated sensor electronics and software foundation were developed during the course of the Phase II effort. Commercial applications of the sensor are ambient air and continuous emissions monitoring, industrial process control and hazardous waste site monitoring. There are numerous other applications for such a sensor including medical diagnosis and treatment, breath analysis for legal purposes, water quality assessment, combustion diagnostics, and chemical process control. The successful completion of Phase II resulted in additional funding of instrument development by the Nations Institute of Heath through a Phase I SBIR grant and a strategic teaming relationship with a commercial manufacture of medical instrumentation. The purpose of the NIH grant and teaming relationship is to further develop the sensor to monitor NO in exhaled breath for the purposes of asthma diagnosis.

  15. High Fidelity Down-Conversion Source for Secure Communications using On-Demand Single Photons, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this NASA SBIR Phase II effort, AdvR will design and build an efficient, fully integrated, waveguide based, source of spectrally uncorrelated photon pairs that...

  16. Process-Hardened, Multi-Analyte Sensor for Characterizing Rocket Plum Constituents Under Test Environment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II STTR project is to develop a prototype multi-analyte sensor system to detect gaseous analytes present in the test stands during...

  17. Large-Area, Multi-Junction, Epitaxial Lift-Off Solar Cells with Backside Contacts, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II program we propose to develop a manufacturable production process to introduce backside contacts to MicroLink Devices? large-area, multi-junction...

  18. Caltrans WeatherShare Phase II System: An Application of Systems and Software Engineering Process to Project Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-25

    In cooperation with the California Department of Transportation, Montana State University's Western Transportation Institute has developed the WeatherShare Phase II system by applying Systems Engineering and Software Engineering processes. The system...

  19. Dualband MW/LW Strained Layer Superlattice Focal Plane Arrays for Satellite-Based Wildfire Detection, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on Type-II strained layer superlattice (SLS) photodiodes have recently experienced significant advances. In Phase I we...

  20. Miniaturized UHF, S-, and Ka-band RF MEMS Filters for Small Form Factor, High Performance EVA Radio, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II of this SBIR, Harmonic Devices (HDI) proposes to develop miniaturized MEMS filters at UHF, S-band and Ka-band to address the requirements of NASA's...

  1. Lightweight, Wearable Metal Rubber-Textile Sensor for In-Situ Lunar Autonomous Health Monitoring, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase II SBIR program would develop comfortable garments with multiple integrated sensor functions for the monitoring of astronauts during long duration...

  2. A Compact, Wide Area Surveillance 3D Imaging LIDAR Providing UAS Sense and Avoid Capabilities, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II effort will complete the design of a flight prototype of an eye safe 3D LIDAR which, when deployed on Unmanned Ariel Systems (UAS), will detect aircraft...

  3. Dynamic Science Data Services for Display, Analysis and Interaction in Widely-Accessible, Web-Based Geospatial Platforms, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TerraMetrics, Inc., proposes a Phase II R/R&D program to implement the TerraBlocksTM Server architecture that provides geospatial data authoring, storage and...

  4. A phase II study of combination chemotherapy in early relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer using gemcitabine and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Lund, Bente; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting....

  5. Reconsideration of Orth I and Orth II Phases in Ln-System Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue-Wei; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Han

    2006-02-01

    A block model is used to calculate the combinative energy in LnBa2Cu3O7-x (Ln=Y, Er, Nd) systems, and the energy has no difference for orth-I and orth-II in the plateau range. Namely, no matter what phase it is, when the oxygen deficiency is in the range of δ~0.35-0.55, the plateau appears in the energy -δ curves, and the combinative energy has close correlation with the Tc value. The result in the present work gives some hints to reconsider the role of the order of oxygen defects or its effect on superconductivity in LnBa2Cu3O7-x. The existence of the orth-II seems not to be the reason for the plateau in the Tc curve. This is an important problem for LnBa2Cu3O7-x and some suggestion is given in the discussion.

  6. Ni(II) ion-imprinted solid-phase extraction and preconcentration in aqueous solutions by packed-bed columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersoez, Arzu; Say, Ridvan; Denizli, Adil

    2004-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns packed with materials based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were used to develop selective separation and preconcentration for Ni(II) ion from aqueous solutions. SPE is more rapid, simple and economical method than the traditional liquid-liquid extraction. MIPs were used as column sorbent to increase the grade of selectivity in SPE columns. In this study, we have developed a polymer obtained by imprinting with Ni(II) ion as a ion-imprinted SPE sorbent. For this purpose, NI(II)-methacryloylhistidinedihydrate (MAH/Ni(II)) complex monomer was synthesized and polymerized with cross-linking ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate to obtain [poly(EGDMA-MAH/Ni(II))]. Then, Ni(II) ions were removed from the polymer getting Ni(II) ion-imprinted sorbent. The MIP-SPE preconcentration procedure showed a linear calibration curve within concentration range from 0.3 to 25 ng/ml and the detection limit was 0.3 ng/ml (3 s) for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Ni(II) ion-imprinted microbeads can be used several times without considerable loss of adsorption capacity. When the adsorption capacity of nickel imprinted microbeads were compared with non-imprinted microbeads, nickel imprinted microbeads have higher adsorption capacity. The K d (distribution coefficient) values for the Ni(II)-imprinted microbeads show increase in K d for Ni(II) with respect to both K d values of Zn(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) ions and non-imprinted polymer. During that time K d decreases for Zn(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) ions and the k' (relative selectivity coefficient) values which are greater than 1 for imprinted microbeads of Ni(II)/Cu(II), Ni(II)/Zn(II) and Ni(II)/Co(II) are 57.3, 53.9, and 17.3, respectively. Determination of Ni(II) ion in sea water showed that the interfering matrix had been almost removed during preconcentration. The column was good enough for Ni determination in matrixes containing similar ionic radii ions such as Cu(II), Zn(II) and Co(II)

  7. Closure of patent ductus arteriosus in children, small infants, and premature babies with Amplatzer duct occluder II additional sizes: multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungur, Metin; Karakurt, Cemsit; Ozbarlas, Nazan; Baspinar, Osman

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate safety and efficacy of closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with Amplatzer duct occluder II Additional Sizes (ADO II AS) and to report early and midterm results of the device in children and very young symptomatic infants. Retrospective analysis of angiographic data of 60 children from four pediatric cardiology centers. The median patient age and weight were 6.5 (0.5-168) months and 6.8 (1.19-57) kg, respectively. In the study, 26 children had a body weight of ≤ 6 kg. Of these 26 children, 9 had a body weight of ≤ 3 kg. The median narrowest diameter of PDA was 2 (1.2-4) mm. Ductal anatomy was Type A in 29, Type B in 2, Type C in 11, Type D in 1, and Type E in 16 patients, and a residual PDA after surgery in 1 patient. Closure with ADO II AS was achieved in 58 (96.6%) of 60 attempted cases. In two infants, the device was not released because of significant residual shunt. ADO II was used in one, and the other was sent to surgery. Complete closure was observed in all ADO II AS deployed children by the next day on echocardiography. Median follow-up was 12 (1-18) months. Neither death nor any major complications occurred. Our study shows that closure of medium and small sized PDA by using ADO II AS device is effective and safe in children. The use of the device will expand the field of application of PDA closure in small infants. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. 75 FR 62530 - Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Laredo Ridge Wind, LLC; RRI Energy West, Inc.; Goshen Phase II LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Ridge Wind, LLC; RRI Energy West, Inc.; Goshen Phase II LLC; Solar Partners I, LLC; Solar Partners II, LLC; Solar Partners VIII, LLC; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status October 1... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EG10-48-000; EG10-51-000...

  9. Pharmacokinetic interplay of phase II metabolism and transport: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baojian

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the interdependence of cytochrome P450 enzymes and P-glycoprotein in disposition of drugs (also termed "transport-metabolism interplay") has been significantly advanced in recent years. However, whether such "interplay" exists between phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters remains largely unknown. The objective of this article is to explore the role of efflux transporters (acting on the phase II metabolites) in disposition of the parent drug in Caco-2 cells, liver, and intestine via simulations utilizing a catenary model (for Caco-2 system) and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models (for the liver and intestine). In all three models, "transport-metabolism interplay" (i.e., inhibition of metabolite efflux decreases the metabolism) can be observed only when futile recycling (or deconjugation) occurred. Futile recycling appeared to bridge the two processes (i.e., metabolite formation and excretion) and enable the interplay thereof. Without futile recycling, metabolite formation was independent on its downstream process excretion, thus impact of metabolite excretion on its formation was impossible. Moreover, in liver PBPK model with futile recycling, impact of biliary metabolite excretion on the exposure of parent drug [(systemic (reservoir) area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(R1))] was limited; a complete inhibition of efflux resulted in AUC(R1) increases of less than 1-fold only. In intestine PBPK model with futile recycling, even though a complete inhibition of efflux could result in large elevations (e.g., 3.5-6.0-fold) in AUC(R1), an incomplete inhibition of efflux (e.g., with a residual activity of ≥ 20% metabolic clearance) saw negligible increases (interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. Those studying such "interplay" are encouraged to adequately consider potential consequences of inhibition of efflux transporters in humans. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. In Vivo Exposure of Kaempferol Is Driven by Phase II Metabolic Enzymes and Efflux Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liang; Zhu, Lijun; Zhao, Min; Shi, Jian; Li, Yuhuan; Yu, Jia; Jiang, Huangyu; Wu, Jinjun; Tong, Yunli; Liu, Yuting; Hu, Ming; Lu, Linlin; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2016-09-01

    Kaempferol is a well-known flavonoid; however, it lacks extensive pharmacokinetic studies. Phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters play an important role in the disposition of flavonoids. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters determine the in vivo exposure of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetic analysis in Sprague-Dawley rats revealed that kaempferol was mostly biotransformed to conjugates, namely, kaempferol-3-glucuronide (K-3-G), kaempferol-7-glucuronide (K-7-G), and kaempferol-7-sulfate, in plasma. K-3-G represented the major metabolite. Compared with that in wild-type mice, pharmacokinetics in knockout FVB mice demonstrated that the absence of multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) significantly increased the area under the curve (AUC) of the conjugates. The lack of MRP1 resulted in a much lower AUC of the conjugates. Intestinal perfusion in rats revealed that the glucuronide conjugates were mainly excreted in the small intestine, but 7-sulfate was mainly excreted in the colon. In Caco-2 monolayers, K-7-G efflux toward the apical (AP) side was significantly higher than K-3-G efflux. In contrast, K-3-G efflux toward the basolateral (BL) side was significantly higher than K-7-G efflux. The BL-to-AP efflux was significantly reduced in the presence of the MRP2 inhibitor LTC4. The AP-to-BL efflux was significantly decreased in the presence of the BL-side MRPs inhibitor MK571. The BCRP inhibitor Ko143 decreased the glucuronide conjugate efflux. Therefore, kaempferol is mainly exposed as K-3-G in vivo, which is driven by phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters (i.e., BCRP and MRPs).

  11. Sentinel node mapping for gastric cancer: a prospective multicenter trial in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yuko; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Takagi, Yu; Natsugoe, Shoji; Terashima, Masanori; Murakami, Nozomu; Fujimura, Takashi; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Hayashi, Hideki; Yoshimizu, Nobunari; Takagane, Akinori; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Nabeshima, Kazuhito; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Kinami, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Morita, Satoshi; Aikou, Takashi; Miwa, Koichi; Kitajima, Masaki

    2013-10-10

    Complicated gastric lymphatic drainage potentially undermines the utility of sentinel node (SN) biopsy in patients with gastric cancer. Encouraged by several favorable single-institution reports, we conducted a multicenter, single-arm, phase II study of SN mapping that used a standardized dual tracer endoscopic injection technique. Patients with previously untreated cT1 or cT2 gastric adenocarcinomas 4 cm. We observed no serious adverse effects related to endoscopic tracer injection or the SN mapping procedure. The endoscopic dual tracer method for SN biopsy was confirmed as safe and effective when applied to the superficial, relatively small gastric adenocarcinomas included in this study.

  12. Postoperative vaginal cuff irradiation using high dose rate remote afterloading: a Phase II clinical protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, William R.; Bastin, Kenneth; Edwards, Scott A.; Buchler, Dolores A.; Stitt, Judith A.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Fowler, Jack F.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: In September 1989, a postoperative Phase II high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy protocol was started for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma. This review reports the overall survival, local control, and complication rates for the initial 63 patients treated in this Phase II study. Methods and Materials: High dose rate brachytherapy was delivered using an Iridium-192 HDR remote afterloader. Sixty-three patients were entered into the Phase II protocol, each receiving two vaginal cuff treatments 1 week apart (range 4-12 days) with vaginal ovoids (diameter 2.0-3.0 cm). No patient received adjuvant external beam radiation. A dose of 32.4 Gy in two fractions was prescribed to the ovoid surface in 63 patients. The first three patients treated at our institution received 15, 16.2, and 29 Gy, respectively, to determine acute effects. Results: At a median follow-up of 1.6 years (range 0.75-4.3 years) no patient has developed a vaginal cuff recurrence. One regional recurrence (1.6%) occurred at 1.2 years at the pelvic side wall. This patient is alive and without evidence of disease 7 months after completion of salvage irradiation, which resulted in the only vaginal stenosis (1.6%). Fourteen patients (22%) experienced vaginal apex fibrosis by physical exam, which was clinically symptomatic in four patients. Two patients reported stress incontinence; however, these symptoms were noted prior to their HDR therapy. One patient died 2.4 years after HDR therapy due to cardiovascular disease without evidence of cancer at autopsy. Conclusion: Preliminary results of our phase II HDR vaginal cuff protocol for postoperative FIGO Stage IA, Grade 3 or Stage IB, Grade 1-2 patients demonstrate that 32.4 Gy in two fractions is well tolerated by the vaginal cuff mucosa. Local control appears comparable to our prior experience and others with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Additional patient accrual and further follow

  13. Active background suppression with the liquid argon scintillation veto of GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The observation of neutrinoless double beta decay would allow to shed light onto the particle nature of neutrinos. Gerda is aiming to perform a background-free search for this process using high purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge operated in liquid argon. This goal relies on the application of active background suppression techniques. A low background light instrumentation has been installed for Phase II to detect events with coincident energy deposition in the nearby liquid argon. The intended background index of ˜10-3 cts/(keV·ky·yr) has been confirmed.

  14. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  15. Phase II Trials for Heterogeneous Patient Populations with a Time-to-Event Endpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a single-arm phase II trial with a time-to-event end-point. We assume that the study population has multiple subpopulations with different prognosis, but the study treatment is expected to be similarly efficacious across the subpopulations. We review a stratified one-sample log-rank test and present its sample size calculation method under some practical design settings. Our sample size method requires specification of the prevalence of subpopulations. We observe that the power of the resulting sample size is not very sensitive to misspecification of the prevalence.

  16. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    OpenAIRE

    Carrio Argos, Fernando; Valero, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor (TilePPr) demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) Demonstrator Project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived for receiving and processing the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as for configur...

  17. Gas Generation during Sodium Permanganate Addition to HB-Line Phase II Filtrate Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, B.C.

    2002-01-01

    HB-Line Phase II process requires the addition of sodium permanganate followed by a sodium nitrite addition to prevent the precipitation of plutonium solids in a non-geometrically safe vessel. Previous experimental work has shown this method effective. Current concerns are related to the gas generated by the reaction. Potential difficulties include tank over-pressurization and tank overflow due to foaming or eructation. It is also necessary to verify that the quantity of permanganate specified by the facility is sufficient to reach the desired endpoint in a single addition

  18. Product-Improvement Test (Phase II), Jetcal Tester, Model H119A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-03-05

    Ao—A0 51 113 ARMY AVIATION ‘Cs’ BOARD FORT tUCKER ALA — P*OOUCTeII ROVEMCNT TEST ( FHAS ~ I I ) . JETCAL TESTER, MODEL M119A~~’ETC(U) MAR S9...Phase i i ) , Jetcal Tester , Model H 119A , USATECOM Project No. 4-6-5011-03 b . No fur ther consideration be given to the TEMPCAL heater probe as a...essen t i a l component of the Jetcal Tester. e. The service manual instruct ions for con t inu i ty te s t ing of EG1 thermocouples be revised to

  19. Solar heating and cooling of mobile homes, Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, A.A.

    1976-12-01

    The specific objectives of the Phase II program were: (1) through system testing, confirm the feasibility of a solar heated and cooled mobile home; (2) update system performance analysis and provide solar heating and cooling computer model verification; (3) evaluate the performance of both an absorption and a Rankine air conditioning system; (4) perform a consumer demand analysis through field survey to ascertain the acceptance of solar energy into the mobile home market; and (5) while at field locations to conduct the consumer demand analysis, gather test data from various U.S. climatic zones. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  20. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research Phase II: N+4 Advanced Concept Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2012-01-01

    This final report documents the work of the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team on Task 1 of the Phase II effort. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. Using a quantitative workshop process, the following technologies, appropriate to aircraft operational in the N+4 2040 timeframe, were identified: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Hydrogen, fuel cell hybrids, battery electric hybrids, Low Energy Nuclear (LENR), boundary layer ingestion propulsion (BLI), unducted fans and advanced propellers, and combinations. Technology development plans were developed.