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Sample records for multiaxial ct acquisitions

  1. Multi-channel data acquisition system for CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Fuqiang; He Bin; Liu Guohua; Xu Minjian

    2009-01-01

    The architecture design and realization of a data acquisition system for multi-channel CT is described. The article introduces the conversion of analog signal to digital signal, the data cache and transmission. This data acquisition system can be widely used in the system which requires the multi-channel, weak current signal detection. (authors)

  2. Spectrotemporal CT data acquisition and reconstruction at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used, both clinically and preclinically, for fast, high-resolution anatomic imaging; however, compelling opportunities exist to expand its use in functional imaging applications. For instance, spectral information combined with nanoparticle contrast agents enables quantification of tissue perfusion levels, while temporal information details cardiac and respiratory dynamics. The authors propose and demonstrate a projection acquisition and reconstruction strategy for 5D CT (3D + dual energy + time) which recovers spectral and temporal information without substantially increasing radiation dose or sampling time relative to anatomic imaging protocols. Methods: The authors approach the 5D reconstruction problem within the framework of low-rank and sparse matrix decomposition. Unlike previous work on rank-sparsity constrained CT reconstruction, the authors establish an explicit rank-sparse signal model to describe the spectral and temporal dimensions. The spectral dimension is represented as a well-sampled time and energy averaged image plus regularly undersampled principal components describing the spectral contrast. The temporal dimension is represented as the same time and energy averaged reconstruction plus contiguous, spatially sparse, and irregularly sampled temporal contrast images. Using a nonlinear, image domain filtration approach, the authors refer to as rank-sparse kernel regression, the authors transfer image structure from the well-sampled time and energy averaged reconstruction to the spectral and temporal contrast images. This regularization strategy strictly constrains the reconstruction problem while approximately separating the temporal and spectral dimensions. Separability results in a highly compressed representation for the 5D data in which projections are shared between the temporal and spectral reconstruction subproblems, enabling substantial undersampling. The authors solved the 5D reconstruction

  3. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M.; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition. Methods We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 seconds. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.04375 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical FDK algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality. Results With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose levels

  4. An evaluation on CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seong-wook; Ko, Junho; Yoo, Yon-sik; Kim, Yoonsang

    2017-02-01

    Recent medical virtual reality (VR) applications to minimize re-operations are being studied for improvements in surgical efficiency and reduction of operation error. The CT image acquisition method considering three-dimensional (3D) modeling for medical VR applications is important, because the realistic model is required for the actual human organ. However, the research for medical VR applications has focused on 3D modeling techniques and utilized 3D models. In addition, research on a CT image acquisition method considering 3D modeling has never been reported. The conventional CT image acquisition method involves scanning a limited area of the lesion for the diagnosis of doctors once or twice. However, the medical VR application is required to acquire the CT image considering patients' various postures and a wider area than the lesion. A wider area than the lesion is required because of the necessary process of comparing bilateral sides for dyskinesia diagnosis of the shoulder, pelvis, and leg. Moreover, patients' various postures are required due to the different effects on the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, in this paper, we perform a comparative experiment on the acquired CT images considering image area (unilateral/bilateral) and patients' postures (neutral/abducted). CT images are acquired from 10 patients for the experiments, and the acquired CT images are evaluated based on the length per pixel and the morphological deviation. Finally, by comparing the experiment results, we evaluate the CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications.

  5. Quantitation of respiratory motion during 4D-PET/CT acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehmeh, S.A.; Erdi, Y.E.; Pan, T.; Yorke, E.; Mageras, G.S.; Rosenzweig, K.E.; Schoder, H.; Mostafavi, H.; Squire, O.; Pevsner, A.; Larson, S.M.; Humm, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the variability of the respiratory motion during 4D-PET/CT acquisition. The respiratory motion for five lung cancer patients was monitored by tracking external markers placed on the abdomen. CT data were acquired over an entire respiratory cycle at each couch position. The x-ray tube status was recorded by the tracking system, for retrospective sorting of the CT data as a function of respiration phase. Each respiratory cycle was sampled in ten equal bins. 4D-PET data were acquired in gated mode, where each breathing cycle was divided into ten 500 ms bins. For both CT and PET acquisition, patients received audio prompting to regularize breathing. The 4D-CT and 4D-PET data were then correlated according to their respiratory phases. The respiratory periods, and average amplitude within each phase bin, acquired in both modality sessions were then analyzed. The average respiratory motion period during 4D-CT was within 18% from that in the 4D-PET sessions. This would reflect up to 1.8% fluctuation in the duration of each 4D-CT bin. This small uncertainty enabled good correlation between CT and PET data, on a phase-to-phase basis. Comparison of the average-amplitude within the respiration trace, between 4D-CT and 4D- PET, on a bin-by-bin basis show a maximum deviation of ∼15%. This study has proved the feasibility of performing 4D-PET/CT acquisition. Respiratory motion was in most cases consistent between PET and CT sessions, thereby improving both the attenuation correction of PET images, and co-registration of PET and CT images. On the other hand, in two patients, there was an increased partial irregularity in their breathing motion, which would prevent accurately correlating the corresponding PET and CT images

  6. Uniaxial and Multiaxial Creep Testing of Copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerkari, Pertti; Holmstroem, Stefan; Veivo, Juha; Salonen, Jorma; Nenonen, Pertti; Laukkanen, Anssi

    2003-12-01

    Multiaxial (compact tension, CT) creep testing has been performed for copper with 79 ppm phosphorus and 60 ppm oxygen. The test load levels were selected according to results from preceding uniaxial creep testing and FE analysis of the CT specimens. Interrupted testing was used for metallographic inspection of the specimens for creep damage. After 7,900 h and 10,300 h of testing at 150 deg C and 46 MPa (reference stress), inspected CT specimens showed cavity indications with a low maximum density ( 2 ) and a typical maximum dimension of less than about 1 μm near the notch tip. From previous experience on creep cavitation damage, the expected minimum life to crack initiation at the notch tip would be at least 40,000 hours, but could be considerably longer because the cavity indications are suspected to originate at least partly from precipitates in specimen preparation. The interrupted testing of CT specimens also showed a 'segregation zone' along some grain boundaries, mainly near the notch tip. This zone appears to contain more P and O than the surrounding matrix, but less than the narrow grain boundary films that are already present in the as-new material. The zone is readily etched and shows a relatively sharp edge towards the matrix without an obvious phase boundary. Using converted multiaxial (CT) testing results, the predicted isothermal uniaxial creep life at 150 deg C/46 MPa is about 1,900 years. The corresponding creep life directly predicted from uniaxial data is 3,100 years, when estimated from a parametric best fit expression according to PD6605. Although the two results are satisfactorily within a factor of two in time, the uncertainties in the extended extrapolations remain large. Further testing is recommended, with at least two creep enhancing factors present. Such testing could include notched creep testing at 120-180 deg C in a corrosive environment, and notched model vessel creep testing at elevated pressure. It is also recommended that longer

  7. EXD HME MicroCT Data Acquisition, Processing and Data Request Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetho, Isaac M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, William D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Jr., Harry E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-06

    This document is a short summary of the steps required for MicroCT evaluation of a specimen. This includes data acquisition through image analysis, for the EXD HME program. Expected outputs for each stage are provided. Data shall be shipped to LLNL as described herein.

  8. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Alessio, Adam M; Modgil, Dimple; La Riviere, Patrick J; Branch, Kelley R

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g) −1 , cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min −1 ). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This

  9. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

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    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this “after-the-fact” binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective “Faraday” shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145

  10. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Martin F; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-09-01

    4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this "after-the-fact" binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor. The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective "Faraday" shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories. With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145 projections were acquired per respiratory

  11. Actively triggered 4d cone-beam CT acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, Martin F.; Wisotzky, Eric; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: 4d cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are usually reconstructed by extracting the motion information from the 2d projections or an external surrogate signal, and binning the individual projections into multiple respiratory phases. In this “after-the-fact” binning approach, however, projections are unevenly distributed over respiratory phases resulting in inefficient utilization of imaging dose. To avoid excess dose in certain respiratory phases, and poor image quality due to a lack of projections in others, the authors have developed a novel 4d CBCT acquisition framework which actively triggers 2d projections based on the forward-predicted position of the tumor.Methods: The forward-prediction of the tumor position was independently established using either (i) an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system based on implanted EM-transponders which act as a surrogate for the tumor position, or (ii) an external motion sensor measuring the chest-wall displacement and correlating this external motion to the phase-shifted diaphragm motion derived from the acquired images. In order to avoid EM-induced artifacts in the imaging detector, the authors devised a simple but effective “Faraday” shielding cage. The authors demonstrated the feasibility of their acquisition strategy by scanning an anthropomorphic lung phantom moving on 1d or 2d sinusoidal trajectories.Results: With both tumor position devices, the authors were able to acquire 4d CBCTs free of motion blurring. For scans based on the EM tracking system, reconstruction artifacts stemming from the presence of the EM-array and the EM-transponders were greatly reduced using newly developed correction algorithms. By tuning the imaging frequency independently for each respiratory phase prior to acquisition, it was possible to harmonize the number of projections over respiratory phases. Depending on the breathing period (3.5 or 5 s) and the gantry rotation time (4 or 5 min), between ∼90 and 145

  12. Dependence of image quality on acquisition time for the PET/CT Biograph mCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Duran, Flavia; Glatting, Gerhard [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection; Dinter, Dietmar; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Schoenahl, Frederic [Siemens Healthcare Molecular Imaging, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    The impact of acquisition time on reconstructed PET image quality is analyzed for different acquisition times (1, 2, 3 and 4 min). Image quality was tested according to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007, the evaluation for the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the reconstructed activity ratio (RAR) for three algorithms, i.e. OSEM, TrueX and TOF applying different effective iteration numbers. The present work shows that the image quality of 3 and 4 min acquisition time for spherical lesions of 10 mm diameter are not significantly different between TrueX, TOF and OSEM. The 2 min acquisition time should be used carefully for the TrueX and OSEM algorithms in small lesions, because the levels of background noise are high compared to 3 or 4 min measurements. Also, the reconstructed activity ratio is underestimated to be approximately half of the expected value. For large lesions the three algorithms perform similarly for all acquisition durations, however, OSEM has the advantage of a more accurately reconstructed activity ratio compared to TrueX and TOF, which are more strongly influenced by noise. (orig.)

  13. TH-E-17A-07: Improved Cine Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4D CT) Acquisition and Processing Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, S; Castillo, R; Castillo, E; Pan, T; Ibbott, G; Balter, P; Hobbs, B; Dai, J; Guerrero, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Artifacts arising from the 4D CT acquisition and post-processing methods add systematic uncertainty to the treatment planning process. We propose an alternate cine 4D CT acquisition and post-processing method to consistently reduce artifacts, and explore patient parameters indicative of image quality. Methods: In an IRB-approved protocol, 18 patients with primary thoracic malignancies received a standard cine 4D CT acquisition followed by an oversampling 4D CT that doubled the number of images acquired. A second cohort of 10 patients received the clinical 4D CT plus 3 oversampling scans for intra-fraction reproducibility. The clinical acquisitions were processed by the standard phase sorting method. The oversampling acquisitions were processed using Dijkstras algorithm to optimize an artifact metric over available image data. Image quality was evaluated with a one-way mixed ANOVA model using a correlation-based artifact metric calculated from the final 4D CT image sets. Spearman correlations and a linear mixed model tested the association between breathing parameters, patient characteristics, and image quality. Results: The oversampling 4D CT scans reduced artifact presence significantly by 27% and 28%, for the first cohort and second cohort respectively. From cohort 2, the inter-replicate deviation for the oversampling method was within approximately 13% of the cross scan average at the 0.05 significance level. Artifact presence for both clinical and oversampling methods was significantly correlated with breathing period (ρ=0.407, p-value<0.032 clinical, ρ=0.296, p-value<0.041 oversampling). Artifact presence in the oversampling method was significantly correlated with amount of data acquired, (ρ=-0.335, p-value<0.02) indicating decreased artifact presence with increased breathing cycles per scan location. Conclusion: The 4D CT oversampling acquisition with optimized sorting reduced artifact presence significantly and reproducibly compared to the phase

  14. Multiaxial creep-fatigue rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spindler, M.W.; Hales, R.; Ainsworth, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Within the UK, a comprehensive procedure, called R5, is used to assess the high temperature response of structures. One part of R5 deals with creep-fatigue initiation, and in this paper we describe developments in this part of R5 to cover multiaxial stress states. To assess creep-fatigue, damage is written as the linear sum of fatigue and creep components. Fatigue is assessed using Miner's law with the total endurance split into initiation and growth cycles. Initiation is assessed by entering the curve of initiation cycles vs strain range using a Tresca equivalent strain range. Growth is assessed by entering the curve of growth cycles vs strain range using a Rankine equivalent strain range. The number of allowable cycles is obtained by summing the initiation and growth cycles. In this way the problem of defining an equivalent strain range applicable over a range of endurance is avoided. Creep damage is calculated using ductility exhaustion methods. In this paper we address two aspects; first, the nature of stress relaxation and, hence, accumulated creep strain in multiaxial stress fields; secondly, the effect of multiaxial stress on creep ductility. The effect of multiaxial stress state on creep ductility has been examined using experimental data and mechanistic models. Good agreement is demonstrated between an empirical description of test data and a cavity growth model, provided a simple nucleation criterion is included. A simple scaling factor is applied to uniaxial creep ductility, defined as a function of stress state. The factor is independent of the cavity growth mechanisms and yields a value of equivalent strain which can be conveniently used in determining creep damage by ductility exhaustion. (author). 14 refs, 4 figs

  15. Fast 4D cone-beam CT from 60 s acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Hansen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & purpose: Four dimensional Cone beam CT (CBCT has many potential benefits for radiotherapy but suffers from poor image quality, long acquisition times, and/or long reconstruction times. In this work we present a fast iterative reconstruction algorithm for 4D reconstruction of fast acquisition cone beam CT, as well as a new method for temporal regularization and compare to state of the art methods for 4D CBCT. Materials & methods: Regularization parameters for the iterative algorithms were found automatically via computer optimization on 60 s acquisitions using the XCAT phantom. Nineteen lung cancer patients were scanned with 60 s arcs using the onboard image on a Varian trilogy linear accelerator. Images were reconstructed using an accelerated ordered subset algorithm. A frequency based temporal regularization algorithm was developed and compared to the McKinnon-Bates algorithm, 4D total variation and prior images compressed sensing (PICCS. Results: All reconstructions were completed in 60 s or less. The proposed method provided a structural similarity of 0.915, compared with 0.786 for the classic McKinnon-bates method. For the patient study, it provided fewer image artefacts than PICCS, and better spatial resolution than 4D TV. Conclusion: Four dimensional iterative CBCT reconstruction was done in less than 60 s, demonstrating the clinical feasibility. The frequency based method outperformed 4D total variation and PICCS on the simulated data, and for patients allowed for tumor location based on 60 s acquisitions, even for slowly breathing patients. It should thus be suitable for routine clinical use.

  16. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne; Bailly, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV MAX and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV MAX (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  17. Novel iterative reconstruction method with optimal dose usage for partially redundant CT-acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, H.; Raupach, R.; Sunnegardh, J.; Allmendinger, T.; Klotz, E.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2015-11-01

    In CT imaging, a variety of applications exist which are strongly SNR limited. However, in some cases redundant data of the same body region provide additional quanta. Examples: in dual energy CT, the spatial resolution has to be compromised to provide good SNR for material decomposition. However, the respective spectral dataset of the same body region provides additional quanta which might be utilized to improve SNR of each spectral component. Perfusion CT is a high dose application, and dose reduction is highly desirable. However, a meaningful evaluation of perfusion parameters might be impaired by noisy time frames. On the other hand, the SNR of the average of all time frames is extremely high. In redundant CT acquisitions, multiple image datasets can be reconstructed and averaged to composite image data. These composite image data, however, might be compromised with respect to contrast resolution and/or spatial resolution and/or temporal resolution. These observations bring us to the idea of transferring high SNR of composite image data to low SNR ‘source’ image data, while maintaining their resolution. It has been shown that the noise characteristics of CT image data can be improved by iterative reconstruction (Popescu et al 2012 Book of Abstracts, 2nd CT Meeting (Salt Lake City, UT) p 148). In case of data dependent Gaussian noise it can be modelled with image-based iterative reconstruction at least in an approximate manner (Bruder et al 2011 Proc. SPIE 7961 79610J). We present a generalized update equation in image space, consisting of a linear combination of the previous update, a correction term which is constrained by the source image data, and a regularization prior, which is initialized by the composite image data. This iterative reconstruction approach we call bimodal reconstruction (BMR). Based on simulation data it is shown that BMR can improve low contrast detectability, substantially reduces the noise power and has the potential to recover

  18. Novel iterative reconstruction method with optimal dose usage for partially redundant CT-acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruder, H; Raupach, R; Sunnegardh, J; Allmendinger, T; Klotz, E; Stierstorfer, K; Flohr, T

    2015-01-01

    In CT imaging, a variety of applications exist which are strongly SNR limited. However, in some cases redundant data of the same body region provide additional quanta.Examples: in dual energy CT, the spatial resolution has to be compromised to provide good SNR for material decomposition. However, the respective spectral dataset of the same body region provides additional quanta which might be utilized to improve SNR of each spectral component. Perfusion CT is a high dose application, and dose reduction is highly desirable. However, a meaningful evaluation of perfusion parameters might be impaired by noisy time frames. On the other hand, the SNR of the average of all time frames is extremely high.In redundant CT acquisitions, multiple image datasets can be reconstructed and averaged to composite image data. These composite image data, however, might be compromised with respect to contrast resolution and/or spatial resolution and/or temporal resolution. These observations bring us to the idea of transferring high SNR of composite image data to low SNR ‘source’ image data, while maintaining their resolution.It has been shown that the noise characteristics of CT image data can be improved by iterative reconstruction (Popescu et al 2012 Book of Abstracts, 2nd CT Meeting (Salt Lake City, UT) p 148). In case of data dependent Gaussian noise it can be modelled with image-based iterative reconstruction at least in an approximate manner (Bruder et al 2011 Proc. SPIE 7961 79610J).We present a generalized update equation in image space, consisting of a linear combination of the previous update, a correction term which is constrained by the source image data, and a regularization prior, which is initialized by the composite image data. This iterative reconstruction approach we call bimodal reconstruction (BMR).Based on simulation data it is shown that BMR can improve low contrast detectability, substantially reduces the noise power and has the potential to recover spatial

  19. Head movement during CT brain perfusion acquisition of patients with suspected acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmi, F.; Beenen, L.F.M.; Streekstra, G.J.; Janssen, N.Y.; Jong, H.W. de; Riordan, A.; Roos, Y.B.; Majoie, C.B.; Bavel, E. van; Marquering, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) is a promising tool to support treatment decision for acute ischemic stroke patients. However, head movement during acquisition may limit its applicability. Information of the extent of head motion is currently lacking. Our purpose is to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the extent of head movement during acquisition. Methods: From 103 consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute ischemic stroke, head movement in 220 CTP datasets was qualitatively categorized by experts as none, minimal, moderate, or severe. The movement was quantified using 3D registration of CTP volume data with non-contrast CT of the same patient; yielding 6 movement parameters for each time frame. The movement categorization was correlated with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and baseline characteristic using multinomial logistic regression and student's t-test respectively. Results: Moderate and severe head movement occurred in almost 25% (25/103) of all patients with acute ischemic stroke. The registration technique quantified head movement with mean rotation angle up to 3.6° and 14°, and mean translation up to 9.1 mm and 22.6 mm for datasets classified as moderate and severe respectively. The rotation was predominantly in the axial plane (yaw) and the main translation was in the scan direction. There was no statistically significant association between movement classification and NIHSS score and baseline characteristics. Conclusions: Moderate or severe head movement during CTP acquisition of acute stroke patients is quite common. The presented registration technique can be used to automatically quantify the movement during acquisition, which can assist identification of CTP datasets with excessive head movement

  20. Head movement during CT brain perfusion acquisition of patients with suspected acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmi, F., E-mail: f.fahmi@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M., E-mail: l.f.beenen@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Streekstra, G.J., E-mail: g.j.streekstra@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Janssen, N.Y., E-mail: n.n.janssen@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jong, H.W. de, E-mail: H.W.A.M.deJong@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, UMC Utrecht, 3584CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Riordan, A., E-mail: alan.riordan@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, UMC Utrecht, 3584CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roos, Y.B., E-mail: y.b.roos@amc.uva.nl [Department of Neurology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Majoie, C.B., E-mail: c.b.majoie@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bavel, E. van, E-mail: e.vanbavel@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Marquering, H.A., E-mail: h.a.marquering@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) is a promising tool to support treatment decision for acute ischemic stroke patients. However, head movement during acquisition may limit its applicability. Information of the extent of head motion is currently lacking. Our purpose is to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the extent of head movement during acquisition. Methods: From 103 consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute ischemic stroke, head movement in 220 CTP datasets was qualitatively categorized by experts as none, minimal, moderate, or severe. The movement was quantified using 3D registration of CTP volume data with non-contrast CT of the same patient; yielding 6 movement parameters for each time frame. The movement categorization was correlated with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and baseline characteristic using multinomial logistic regression and student's t-test respectively. Results: Moderate and severe head movement occurred in almost 25% (25/103) of all patients with acute ischemic stroke. The registration technique quantified head movement with mean rotation angle up to 3.6° and 14°, and mean translation up to 9.1 mm and 22.6 mm for datasets classified as moderate and severe respectively. The rotation was predominantly in the axial plane (yaw) and the main translation was in the scan direction. There was no statistically significant association between movement classification and NIHSS score and baseline characteristics. Conclusions: Moderate or severe head movement during CTP acquisition of acute stroke patients is quite common. The presented registration technique can be used to automatically quantify the movement during acquisition, which can assist identification of CTP datasets with excessive head movement.

  1. Usefulness of a breath-holding acquisition method in PET/CT for pulmonary lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Toshiaki; Ueda, Osamu; Hara, Hideyuki; Sakai, Hiroto; Kida, Tohru; Suzuki, Kayo; Adachi, Shuji; Ishii, Kazunari

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a breath-holding (BH) 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET) technique for PET/computed tomography (CT) scanning of pulmonary lesions near the diaphragm, where image quality is influenced by respiratory motion. In a basic study, simulated breath-holding PET (sBH-PET) data were acquired by repeating image acquisition eight times with fixation of a phantom at 15 s/bed. Free-breathing PET (FB-PET) was simulated by acquiring data even as moving the phantom at 120 s/bed (sFB-PET). Images with total acquisition times of 15 s, 30 s, 45 s, 60 s, and 120 s were generated for sBH-PET. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses and determination of the statistical significance of differences between sFB-PET images and sBH-PET images were performed. A total of 22 pulmonary lesions in 21 patients (12 men and 9 women, mean age 61.3±10.6 years, 10 benign lesions in 9 patients and 12 malignant lesions in 12 patients) were examined by FB-PET and BH-PET). For evaluation of these two acquisition methods, displacement of the lesion between CT and PET was considered to be a translation, and the statistical significance of differences in maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of the lesion was assessed using the paired t test. In the basic study, sBH-PET images with acquisition times of 45 s, 60 s, and 120 s had significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than 120-s sFB-PET images (P max of the lesions in the BH-PET images was significantly higher than that in the FB-PET images (benign: 2.40±0.86 vs. 2.20±0.85, P=0.005; malignant: 4.84±2.16 vs. 3.75±2.11, P=0.001). BH-PET provides images with better diagnostic accuracy, avoids image degradation owing to respiratory motion, and yields more accurate attenuation correction. This method is very useful for overcoming the problem of respiratory motion. (author)

  2. Description of patellar movement by 3D parameters obtained from dynamic CT acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Rebelo, Marina; Moreno, Ramon Alfredo; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; de Ávila, Luiz Francisco Rodrigues; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Gutierrez, Marco Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The patellofemoral joint is critical in the biomechanics of the knee. The patellofemoral instability is one condition that generates pain, functional impairment and often requires surgery as part of orthopedic treatment. The analysis of the patellofemoral dynamics has been performed by several medical image modalities. The clinical parameters assessed are mainly based on 2D measurements, such as the patellar tilt angle and the lateral shift among others. Besides, the acquisition protocols are mostly performed with the leg laid static at fixed angles. The use of helical multi slice CT scanner can allow the capture and display of the joint's movement performed actively by the patient. However, the orthopedic applications of this scanner have not yet been standardized or widespread. In this work we present a method to evaluate the biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint during active contraction using multi slice CT images. This approach can greatly improve the analysis of patellar instability by displaying the physiology during muscle contraction. The movement was evaluated by computing its 3D displacements and rotations from different knee angles. The first processing step registered the images in both angles based on the femuŕs position. The transformation matrix of the patella from the images was then calculated, which provided the rotations and translations performed by the patella from its position in the first image to its position in the second image. Analysis of these parameters for all frames provided real 3D information about the patellar displacement.

  3. Task-driven image acquisition and reconstruction in cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, Grace J; Stayman, J Webster; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Ehtiati, Tina

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that incorporates a mathematical definition of the imaging task, a model of the imaging system, and a patient-specific anatomical model to prospectively design image acquisition and reconstruction techniques to optimize task performance. The framework is applied to joint optimization of tube current modulation, view-dependent reconstruction kernel, and orbital tilt in cone-beam CT. The system model considers a cone-beam CT system incorporating a flat-panel detector and 3D filtered backprojection and accurately describes the spatially varying noise and resolution over a wide range of imaging parameters in the presence of a realistic anatomical model. Task-based detectability index (d′) is incorporated as the objective function in a task-driven optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction techniques. The orbital tilt was optimized through an exhaustive search across tilt angles ranging ±30°. For each tilt angle, the view-dependent tube current and reconstruction kernel (i.e. the modulation profiles) that maximized detectability were identified via an alternating optimization. The task-driven approach was compared with conventional unmodulated and automatic exposure control (AEC) strategies for a variety of imaging tasks and anthropomorphic phantoms. The task-driven strategy outperformed the unmodulated and AEC cases for all tasks. For example, d′ for a sphere detection task in a head phantom was improved by 30% compared to the unmodulated case by using smoother kernels for noisy views and distributing mAs across less noisy views (at fixed total mAs) in a manner that was beneficial to task performance. Similarly for detection of a line-pair pattern, the task-driven approach increased d′ by 80% compared to no modulation by means of view-dependent mA and kernel selection that yields modulation transfer function and noise-power spectrum optimal to the task. Optimization of orbital tilt identified the

  4. Dual-energy CT iodine maps as an alternative quantitative imaging biomarker to abdominal CT perfusion: determination of appropriate trigger delays for acquisition using bolus tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skornitzke, Stephan; Fritz, Franziska; Mayer, Philipp; Koell, Marco; Hansen, Jens; Pahn, Gregor; Hackert, Thilo; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Stiller, Wolfram

    2018-05-01

    Quantitative evaluation of different bolus tracking trigger delays for acquisition of dual energy (DE) CT iodine maps as an alternative to CT perfusion. Prior to this retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data, DECT perfusion sequences were dynamically acquired in 22 patients with pancreatic carcinoma using dual source CT at 80/140 kV p with tin filtration. After deformable motion-correction, perfusion maps of blood flow (BF) were calculated from 80 kV p image series of DECT, and iodine maps were calculated for each of the 34 DECT acquisitions per patient. BF and iodine concentrations were measured in healthy pancreatic tissue and carcinoma. To evaluate potential DECT acquisition triggered by bolus tracking, measured iodine concentrations from the 34 DECT acquisitions per patient corresponding to different trigger delays were assessed for correlation to BF and intergroup differences between tissue types depending on acquisition time. Average BF measured in healthy pancreatic tissue and carcinoma was 87.6 ± 28.4 and 38.6 ± 22.2 ml/100 ml min -1 , respectively. Correlation between iodine concentrations and BF was statistically significant for bolus tracking with trigger delay greater than 0 s (r max = 0.89; p alternative to CT perfusion measurements of BF. Advances in knowledge: After clinical validation, DECT iodine maps of pancreas acquired using bolus tracking with appropriate trigger delay as determined in this study could offer an alternative quantitative imaging biomarker providing functional information for tumor assessment at reduced patient radiation exposure compared to CT perfusion measurements of BF.

  5. Optimization of dual-energy CT acquisitions for proton therapy using projection-based decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilches-Freixas, Gloria; Létang, Jean Michel; Ducros, Nicolas; Rit, Simon

    2017-09-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has been presented as a valid alternative to single-energy CT to reduce the uncertainty of the conversion of patient CT numbers to proton stopping power ratio (SPR) of tissues relative to water. The aim of this work was to optimize DECT acquisition protocols from simulations of X-ray images for the treatment planning of proton therapy using a projection-based dual-energy decomposition algorithm. We have investigated the effect of various voltages and tin filtration combinations on the SPR map accuracy and precision, and the influence of the dose allocation between the low-energy (LE) and the high-energy (HE) acquisitions. For all spectra combinations, virtual CT projections of the Gammex phantom were simulated with a realistic energy-integrating detector response model. Two situations were simulated: an ideal case without noise (infinite dose) and a realistic situation with Poisson noise corresponding to a 20 mGy total central dose. To determine the optimal dose balance, the proportion of LE-dose with respect to the total dose was varied from 10% to 90% while keeping the central dose constant, for four dual-energy spectra. SPR images were derived using a two-step projection-based decomposition approach. The ranges of 70 MeV, 90 MeV, and 100 MeV proton beams onto the adult female (AF) reference computational phantom of the ICRP were analytically determined from the reconstructed SPR maps. The energy separation between the incident spectra had a strong impact on the SPR precision. Maximizing the incident energy gap reduced image noise. However, the energy gap was not a good metric to evaluate the accuracy of the SPR. In terms of SPR accuracy, a large variability of the optimal spectra was observed when studying each phantom material separately. The SPR accuracy was almost flat in the 30-70% LE-dose range, while the precision showed a minimum slightly shifted in favor of lower LE-dose. Photon noise in the SPR images (20 mGy dose

  6. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-01-01

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution

  7. Double prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition for CT coronary angiography: Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Qin, J.; He, B.; Zhou, Y.; Yang, J.-J.; Hou, X.-L.; Yang, X.-B.; Chen, J.-H.; Chen, Y.-D.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of double prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition mode (double high-pitch mode) for coronary computed tomography angiography (CTCA). Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients [40 women, 109 men; mean age 58.2 ± 9.2 years; sinus rhythm ≤70 beats/min (bpm) after pre-medication, body weight ≤100 kg] were enrolled for CTCA examinations using a dual-source CT system with 2 × 128 × 0.6 mm collimation, 0.28 s rotation time, and a pitch of 3.4. Double high-pitch mode was prospectively triggered first at 60% and later at 30% of the R–R interval within two cardiac cycles. Image quality was evaluated using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 4 = non-assessable). Results: From 2085 coronary artery segments, 86.4% (1802/2085) were rated as having a score of 1, 12.3% (257/2085) as score of 2, 1.2% (26/2085) as score of 3, and none were rated as “non-assessable”. The average image quality score was 1.15 ± 0.26 on a per-segment basis. The effective dose was calculated by multiplying the coefficient factor of 0.028 by the dose–length product (DLP); the mean effective dose was 3.5 ± 0.8 mSv (range 1.7–7.6 mSv). The total dosage of contrast medium was 78.7 ± 2.9 ml. Conclusion: Double prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition mode provides good image quality with an average effective dose of less than 5 mSv in patients with a heart rate ≤70 bpm

  8. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernatowicz, K.; Knopf, A.; Lomax, A.; Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J.; Mishra, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm 3 spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results: Averaged

  9. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernatowicz, K., E-mail: kingab@student.ethz.ch; Knopf, A.; Lomax, A. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI 5232, Switzerland and Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich 8092 (Switzerland); Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J., E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Mishra, P. [Brigham and Womens Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm{sup 3} spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results

  10. Comparison of an alternative and existing binning methods to reduce the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didierlaurent, David; Ribes, Sophie; Caselles, Olivier; Jaudet, Cyril; Dierickx, Lawrence O.; Zerdoud, Slimane; Brillouet, Severine; Weits, Kathleen; Batatia, Hadj; Courbon, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion is a source of artifacts that reduce image quality in PET. Four dimensional (4D) PET/CT is one approach to overcome this problem. Existing techniques to limiting the effects of respiratory motions are based on prospective phase binning which requires a long acquisition duration (15–25 min). This time is uncomfortable for the patients and limits the clinical exploitation of 4D PET/CT. In this work, the authors evaluated an existing method and an alternative retrospective binning method to reduce the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT. Methods: The authors studied an existing mixed-amplitude binning (MAB) method and an alternative binning method by mixed-phases (MPhB). Before implementing MPhB, they analyzed the regularity of the breathing patterns in patients. They studied the breathing signal drift and missing CT slices that could be challenging for implementing MAB. They compared the performance of MAB and MPhB with current binning methods to measure the maximum uptake, internal volume, and maximal range of tumor motion. Results: MPhB can be implemented depending on an optimal phase (in average, the exhalation peak phase −4.1% of the entire breathing cycle duration). Signal drift of patients was in average 35% relative to the breathing amplitude. Even after correcting this drift, MAB was feasible in 4D CT for only 64% of patients. No significant differences appeared between the different binning methods to measure the maximum uptake, internal volume, and maximal range of tumor motion. The authors also determined the inaccuracies of MAB and MPhB to measure the maximum amplitude of tumor motion with three bins (less than 3 mm for movement inferior to 12 mm, up to 6.4 mm for a 21 mm movement). Conclusions: The authors proposed an alternative binning method by mixed-phase binning that halves the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT. Mixed-amplitude binning was challenging because of signal drift and missing CT slices. They showed that more

  11. Combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for clinical oncology: technical aspects and acquisition protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, T.

    2004-01-01

    Combined PET/CT imaging is a non-invasive means of reviewing both, the anatomy and the molecular pathways of a patient during a quasi-simultaneous examination. Since the introduction of the prototype PET/CT in 1998 a rapid development of this imaging technology is being witnessed. The incorporation of fast PET detector technology into PET/CT designs and the routine use of the CT transmission images for attenuation correction of the PET allow for anato-metabolic whole-body examinations to be completed in less than 30 min. Thus, PET/CT imaging offers a logistical advantage to both, the patient and the clinicians since the two complementary exams - whenever clinically indicated - can be performed almost at the same time and a single integrated report can be created. Nevertheless, a number of pit-falls, primarily from the use of CT-based attenuation correction, have been identified and are being addressed through optimized acquisition protocols. It is fair to say, that PET/CT has been integrated in the diagnostic imaging arena, and in many cases has led to a close collaboration between different, yet complementary diagnostic and therapeutic medical disciplines. (orig.)

  12. Detection and compensation of organ/lesion motion using 4D-PET/CT respiratory gated acquisition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria; Di Muzio, Nadia; Gianolli, Luigi; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Messa, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the degradation effects produced by respiratory organ and lesion motion on PET/CT images and to define the role of respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques to compensate for such effects. Methods: Based on the literature and on our own experience, technical recommendations and clinical indications for the use of RG 4D PET/CT have been outlined. Results: RG 4D-PET/CT techniques require a state of the art PET/CT scanner, a respiratory monitoring system and dedicated acquisition and processing protocols. Patient training is particularly important to obtain a regular breathing pattern. An adequate number of phases has to be selected to balance motion compensation and statistical noise. RG 4D PET/CT motion free images may be clinically useful for tumour tissue characterization, monitoring patient treatment and target definition in radiation therapy planning. Conclusions: RG 4D PET/CT is a valuable tool to improve image quality and quantitative accuracy and to assess and measure organ and lesion motion for radiotherapy planning.

  13. Three dimensional dose distribution comparison of simple and complex acquisition trajectories in dedicated breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Jainil P., E-mail: jainil.shah@duke.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Multi Modality Imaging Lab, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Mann, Steve D. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Multi Modality Imaging Lab, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); McKinley, Randolph L. [ZumaTek, Inc., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Tornai, Martin P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Multi Modality Imaging Lab, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: A novel breast CT system capable of arbitrary 3D trajectories has been developed to address cone beam sampling insufficiency as well as to image further into the patient’s chest wall. The purpose of this study was to characterize any trajectory-related differences in 3D x-ray dose distribution in a pendant target when imaged with different orbits. Methods: Two acquisition trajectories were evaluated: circular azimuthal (no-tilt) and sinusoidal (saddle) orbit with ±15° tilts around a pendant breast, using Monte Carlo simulations as well as physical measurements. Simulations were performed with tungsten (W) filtration of a W-anode source; the simulated source flux was normalized to the measured exposure of a W-anode source. A water-filled cylindrical phantom was divided into 1 cm{sup 3} voxels, and the cumulative energy deposited was tracked in each voxel. Energy deposited per voxel was converted to dose, yielding the 3D distributed dose volumes. Additionally, three cylindrical phantoms of different diameters (10, 12.5, and 15 cm) and an anthropomorphic breast phantom, initially filled with water (mimicking pure fibroglandular tissue) and then with a 75% methanol-25% water mixture (mimicking 50–50 fibroglandular-adipose tissues), were used to simulate the pendant breast geometry and scanned on the physical system. Ionization chamber calibrated radiochromic film was used to determine the dose delivered in a 2D plane through the center of the volume for a fully 3D CT scan using the different orbits. Results: Measured experimental results for the same exposure indicated that the mean dose measured throughout the central slice for different diameters ranged from 3.93 to 5.28 mGy, with the lowest average dose measured on the largest cylinder with water mimicking a homogeneously fibroglandular breast. These results align well with the cylinder phantom Monte Carlo studies which also showed a marginal difference in dose delivered by a saddle trajectory in the

  14. Three dimensional dose distribution comparison of simple and complex acquisition trajectories in dedicated breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Jainil P.; Mann, Steve D.; McKinley, Randolph L.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A novel breast CT system capable of arbitrary 3D trajectories has been developed to address cone beam sampling insufficiency as well as to image further into the patient’s chest wall. The purpose of this study was to characterize any trajectory-related differences in 3D x-ray dose distribution in a pendant target when imaged with different orbits. Methods: Two acquisition trajectories were evaluated: circular azimuthal (no-tilt) and sinusoidal (saddle) orbit with ±15° tilts around a pendant breast, using Monte Carlo simulations as well as physical measurements. Simulations were performed with tungsten (W) filtration of a W-anode source; the simulated source flux was normalized to the measured exposure of a W-anode source. A water-filled cylindrical phantom was divided into 1 cm"3 voxels, and the cumulative energy deposited was tracked in each voxel. Energy deposited per voxel was converted to dose, yielding the 3D distributed dose volumes. Additionally, three cylindrical phantoms of different diameters (10, 12.5, and 15 cm) and an anthropomorphic breast phantom, initially filled with water (mimicking pure fibroglandular tissue) and then with a 75% methanol-25% water mixture (mimicking 50–50 fibroglandular-adipose tissues), were used to simulate the pendant breast geometry and scanned on the physical system. Ionization chamber calibrated radiochromic film was used to determine the dose delivered in a 2D plane through the center of the volume for a fully 3D CT scan using the different orbits. Results: Measured experimental results for the same exposure indicated that the mean dose measured throughout the central slice for different diameters ranged from 3.93 to 5.28 mGy, with the lowest average dose measured on the largest cylinder with water mimicking a homogeneously fibroglandular breast. These results align well with the cylinder phantom Monte Carlo studies which also showed a marginal difference in dose delivered by a saddle trajectory in the

  15. Feasibility of deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT with short-time acquisition. Detectability for pulmonary lesions compared with respiratory-gated PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Shozo; Yamamoto, Haruki; Hiko, Shigeaki; Horita, Akihiro; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Nakajima, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT with short-time acquisition and respiratory-gated (RG) PET/CT are performed for pulmonary lesions to reduce the respiratory motion artifacts, and to obtain more accurate standardized uptake value (SUV). DIBH PET/CT demonstrates significant advantages in terms of rapid examination, good quality of CT images and low radiation exposure. On the other hand, the image quality of DIBH PET is generally inferior to that of RG PET because of short-time acquisition resulting in poor signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, RG PET has been regarded as a gold standard, and its detectability between DIBH and RG PET studies was compared using each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters. In the phantom study, the most optimal reconstruction parameters for DIBH and RG PET were determined. In the clinical study, 19 cases were examined using each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters. In the phantom study, the most optimal reconstruction parameters for DIBH and RG PET were different. Reconstruction parameters of DIBH PET could be obtained by reducing the number of subsets for those of RG PET in the state of fixing the number of iterations. In the clinical study, high correlation in the maximum SUV was observed between DIBH and RG PET studies. The clinical result was consistent with that of the phantom study surrounded by air since most of the lesions were located in the low pulmonary radioactivity. DIBH PET/CT may be the most practical method which can be the first choice to reduce respiratory motion artifacts if the detectability of DIBH PET is equivalent with that of RG PET. Although DIBH PET may have limitations in suboptimal signal-to-noise ratio, most of the lesions surrounded by low background radioactivity could provide nearly equivalent image quality between DIBH and RG PET studies when each of the most optimal reconstruction parameters was used. (author)

  16. Optimization of a shorter variable-acquisition time for legs to achieve true whole-body PET/CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takuro; Miwa, Kenta; Murata, Taisuke; Miyaji, Noriaki; Wagatsuma, Kei; Motegi, Kazuki; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate PET images as a function of acquisition time for various leg sizes, and to optimize a shorter variable-acquisition time protocol for legs to achieve better qualitative and quantitative accuracy of true whole-body PET/CT images. The diameters of legs to be modeled as phantoms were defined based on data derived from 53 patients. This study analyzed PET images of a NEMA phantom and three plastic bottle phantoms (diameter, 5.68, 8.54 and 10.7 cm) that simulated the human body and legs, respectively. The phantoms comprised two spheres (diameters, 10 and 17 mm) containing fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose solution with sphere-to-background ratios of 4 at a background radioactivity level of 2.65 kBq/mL. All PET data were reconstructed with acquisition times ranging from 10 to 180, and 1200 s. We visually evaluated image quality and determined the coefficient of variance (CV) of the background, contrast and the quantitative %error of the hot spheres, and then determined two shorter variable-acquisition protocols for legs. Lesion detectability and quantitative accuracy determined based on maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) in PET images of a patient using the proposed protocols were also evaluated. A larger phantom and a shorter acquisition time resulted in increased background noise on images and decreased the contrast in hot spheres. A visual score of ≥ 1.5 was obtained when the acquisition time was ≥ 30 s for three leg phantoms, and ≥ 120 s for the NEMA phantom. The quantitative %errors of the 10- and 17-mm spheres in the leg phantoms were ± 15 and ± 10%, respectively, in PET images with a high CV (scan mean SUV max of three lesions using the current fixed-acquisition and two proposed variable-acquisition time protocols in the clinical study were 3.1, 3.1 and 3.2, respectively, which did not significantly differ. Leg acquisition time per bed position of even 30-90

  17. Optimal timing of image acquisition for arterial first pass CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelgrim, G.J., E-mail: g.j.pelgrim@umcg.nl [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands (CMI-nen), Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Nieuwenhuis, E.R., E-mail: e.r.nieuwenhuis@student.utwente.nl [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands (CMI-nen), Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Duguay, T.M., E-mail: duguay@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Dept. of Radiology, 25 Courtenay Drive, SC 29425, Charleston (United States); Geest, R.J. van der, E-mail: R.J.van_der_Geest@lumc.nl [Leiden University Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Postbus 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Varga-Szemes, A., E-mail: vargaasz@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Dept. of Radiology, 25 Courtenay Drive, SC 29425, Charleston (United States); Slump, C.H., E-mail: c.h.slump@utwente.nl [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands (CMI-nen), Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Fuller, S.R., E-mail: fullerst@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Dept. of Radiology, 25 Courtenay Drive, SC 29425, Charleston (United States); Oudkerk, M., E-mail: m.oudkerk@umcg.nl [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands (CMI-nen), Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U.J., E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Dept. of Radiology, 25 Courtenay Drive, SC 29425, Charleston (United States); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Optimal timing of static, single-shot CT perfusion scans is important to differentiate ischemic from non-ischemic myocardial segments. • Time delay between reaching 150 and 250 HU thresholds in the ascending aorta and optimal contrast in the myocardium are 4 and 2 s, respectively. • Attenuation difference of more than 15 HU between normal and ischemic myocardium is present during approximately 8 s. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the optimal timing of arterial first pass computed tomography (CT) myocardial perfusion imaging (CTMPI) based on dynamic CTMPI acquisitions. Methods and materials: Twenty-five patients (59 ± 8.4 years, 14 male)underwent adenosine-stress dynamic CTMPI on second-generation dual-source CT in shuttle mode (30 s at 100 kV and 300 mAs). Stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used as reference standard for differentiation of non-ischemic and ischemic segments. The left ventricle (LV) wall was manually segmented according to the AHA 16-segment model. Hounsfield units (HU) in myocardial segments and ascending (AA) and descending aorta (AD) were monitored over time. Time difference between peak AA and peak AD and peak myocardial enhancement was calculated, as well as the, time delay from fixed HU thresholds of 150 and 250 HU in the AA and AD to a minimal difference of 15 HU between normal and ischemic segments. Furthermore, the duration of the 15 HU difference between ischemic and non-ischemic segments was calculated. Results: Myocardial ischemia was observed by MRI in 10 patients (56.3 ± 9.0 years; 8 male). The delay between the maximum HU in the AA and AD and maximal HU in the non-ischemic segments was 2.8 s [2.2–4.3] and 0.0 s [0.0–2.8], respectively. Differentiation between ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial segments in CT was best during a time window of 8.6 ± 3.8 s. Time delays for AA triggering were 4.5 s [2.2–5.6] and 2.2 s [0–2.8] for the 150 HU and 250 HU thresholds, respectively. While for

  18. Feasibility and radiation dose of high-pitch acquisition protocols in patients undergoing dual-source cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Wieland H; Albrecht, Edda; Bamberg, Fabian; Schenzle, Jan C; Johnson, Thorsten R; Neumaier, Klement; Reiser, Maximilian F; Nikolaou, Konstatin

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare image quality and radiation dose between high-pitch and established retrospectively and prospectively gated cardiac CT protocols using an Alderson-Rando phantom and a set of patients. An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminiscent detectors and a set of clinical patients underwent the following cardiac CT protocols: high-pitch acquisition (pitch 3.4), prospectively triggered acquisition, and retrospectively gated acquisition (pitch 0.2). For patients with sinus rhythm below 65 beats per minute (bpm), high-pitch protocol was used, whereas for patients in sinus rhythm between 65 and 100 bpm, prospective triggering was used. Patients with irregular heart rates or heart rates of ≥ 100 bpm, were examined using retrospectively gated acquisition. Evaluability of coronary artery segments was determined, and effective radiation dose was derived from the phantom study. In the phantom study, the effective radiation dose as determined with thermoluminescent detector (TLD) measurements was lowest in the high-pitch acquisition (1.21, 3.12, and 11.81 mSv, for the high-pitch, the prospectively triggered, and the retrospectively gated acquisition, respectively). There was a significant difference with respect to the percentage of motion-free coronary artery segments (99%, 87%, and 92% for high-pitch, prospectively triggered, and retrospectively gated, respectively (p pitch protocol (p pitch scans have the potential to reduce radiation dose up to 61.2% and 89.8% compared with prospectively triggered and retrospectively gated scans. High-pitch protocols lead to excellent image quality when used in patients with stable heart rates below 65 bpm.

  19. Rotator cuff tears: should abduction and external rotation (ABER) positioning be performed before image acquisition? A CT arthrography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, Hubert [Hopital Cardiologique du Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Pessac (France); Couderc, Stephane; Pele, Eric; Moreau-Durieux, Marie-Helene; Hauger, Olivier [Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, Bordeaux (France); Amoretti, Nicolas [CHU Archet, Unite d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, Nice (France)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate the impact of abduction and external rotation (ABER) positioning performed before image acquisition on the assessment of rotator cuff tears. Twenty-seven consecutive patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff tears underwent an initial CT arthrogram of the shoulder in neutral position, immediately followed by temporary ABER positioning, before a second CT acquisition in neutral position. Two observers blinded to potential pre-procedure ABER positioning independently analysed the randomly distributed images. Lesions were classified into partial-thickness (PT) and full-thickness (FT) tear subtypes. Lesion detection and measurements of pre- and post-ABER studies were compared. We found no influence of pre-test ABER positioning on FT detection or measurements. Every PT detected on pre-ABER study was also detected on post-ABER study (28/28 for reader 1, and 32/32 for reader 2). Seven and eight additional PT were found by readers 1 and 2, respectively, on post-ABER study. Lesion size increased after ABER in terms of area (P < 0.001 for both readers) and Ellman's grade (P = 0.02 and 0.002 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). ABER positioning before CT is associated with improved delineation of partial tears, a higher number of detected tears and modification of treatment planning. (orig.)

  20. CT image quality improvement using adaptive iterative dose reduction with wide-volume acquisition on 320-detector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervaise, Alban; Osemont, Benoit; Lecocq, Sophie; Blum, Alain; Noel, Alain; Micard, Emilien; Felblinger, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction (AIDR) on image quality and radiation dose in phantom and patient studies. A phantom was examined in volumetric mode on a 320-detector CT at different tube currents from 25 to 550 mAs. CT images were reconstructed with AIDR and with Filtered Back Projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Image noise, Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution were compared between FBP and AIDR images. AIDR was then tested on 15 CT examinations of the lumbar spine in a prospective study. Again, FBP and AIDR images were compared. Image noise and SNR were analysed using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In the phantom, spatial resolution assessment showed no significant difference between FBP and AIDR reconstructions. Image noise was lower with AIDR than with FBP images with a mean reduction of 40%. CNR and SNR were also improved with AIDR. In patients, quantitative and subjective evaluation showed that image noise was significantly lower with AIDR than with FBP. SNR was also greater with AIDR than with FBP. Compared to traditional FBP reconstruction techniques, AIDR significantly improves image quality and has the potential to decrease radiation dose. (orig.)

  1. Variability in "1"8F-FDG PET/CT methodology of acquisition, reconstruction and analysis for oncologic imaging: state survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Andreia C.F. da S.; Druzian, Aline C.; Bacelar, Alexandre; Pianta, Diego B.; Silva, Ana M. Marques da

    2016-01-01

    The SUV in "1"8F-FDG PET/CT oncological imaging is useful for cancer diagnosis, staging and treatment assessment. There are, however, several factors that can give rise to bias in SUV measurements. When using SUV as a diagnostic tool, one needs to minimize the variability in this measurement by standardization of patient preparation, acquisition and reconstruction parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the methodological variability in PET/CT acquisition in Rio Grande do Sul State. For that, in each department, a questionnaire was applied to survey technical information from PET/CT systems and about the acquisitions and analysis methods utilized. All departments implement quality assurance programs consistent with (inter)national recommendations. However, the acquisition and reconstruction methods of acquired PET data differ. The implementation of a harmonized strategy for quantifying the SUV is suggested, in order to obtain greater reproducibility and repeatability. (author)

  2. Random accumulated damage evaluation under multiaxial fatigue loading conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Anes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiaxial fatigue is a very important physical phenomenon to take into account in several mechanical components; its study is of utmost importance to avoid unexpected failure of equipment, vehicles or structures. Among several fatigue characterization tools, a correct definition of a damage parameter and a load cycle counting method under multiaxial loading conditions show to be crucial to estimate multiaxial fatigue life. In this paper, the SSF equivalent stress and the virtual cycle counting method are presented and discussed, regarding their physical foundations and their capability to characterize multiaxial fatigue damage under complex loading blocks. Moreover, it is presented their applicability to evaluate random fatigue damage.

  3. SU-F-T-626: Intracranial SRS Re-Treatment Without Acquisition of New CT Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiant, D; Manning, M; Liu, H; Maurer, J; Hayes, T; Sintay, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for multiple intracranial lesions with frequent surveillance is becoming a popular treatment option. This strategy leads to retreatment with SRS as new lesions arise. Currently, each course of treatment uses magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images for treatment planning. We propose that new MR images, with course 1 CT images, may be used for future treatment plans with negligible loss of dosimetric accuracy. Methods: Ten patients that received multiple courses of SRS were retrospectively reviewed. The treatment plans and contours from non-initial courses were copied to the initial CTs and recalculated. Doses metrics for the plans calculated on the initial CTs and later CTs were compared. All CT scans were acquired on a Philips CT scanner with a 600 mm field of view and 1 mm slice thickness (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA). All targets were planned to 20 Gy and calculated in Eclipse V. 13.6 (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) using analytic anisotropic algorithm with 1 mm calculation grid. Results: Sixteen lesions were evaluated. The mean time between courses was 250 +/− 215 days (range 103–979). The mean target volume was 2.0 +/− 2.9 cc (range 0.1–10.1). The average difference in mean target dose between the two calculations was 0.2 +/− 0.3 Gy (range 0.0 – 1.0). The mean conformity index (CI) was 1.28 +/− 0.14 (range 1.07 – 1.82). The average difference in CI was 0.03 +/− 0.16 (range 0.00 – 0.44). Targets volumes < 0.5 cc showed the largest changes in both metrics. Conclusion: Continued treatment based on initial CT images is feasible. Dose calculation on the initial CT for future treatments provides reasonable dosimetric accuracy. Changes in dose metrics are largest for small volumes, and are likely dominated by partial volume effects in target definition.

  4. CT and MR imaging acquisition performance in a neuroradiology PACS module 1-year clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, S.L.; Loloyan, M.; Weinberg, W.S.; Valentino, D.J.; Lufkin, R.B.; Hanafee, W.N.; Bentson, J.; Jabour, B.A.; Huang, H.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper analyzes the operational efficiency of our neuroradiology PACS compared with conventional film-based management systems. The authors neuroradiology PACS module has been in clinical evaluation for 6 months. Three SUN microcomputers, two PC/ATs, and an automated optical disk library are connected through Ethernet. Software implemented at the TCP/IP level is used to transfer images from MR imagers and CT scanners to a viewing station. Performance measurements include the time elapsed at each stage of the system

  5. Micro-vision servo control of a multi-axis alignment system for optical fiber assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Weihai; Yu, Fei; Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Wenjie; Zhang, Jianbin

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a novel optical fiber assembly system featuring a multi-axis alignment function based on micro-vision feedback control. It consists of an active parallel alignment mechanism, a passive compensation mechanism, a micro-gripper and a micro-vision servo control system. The active parallel alignment part is a parallelogram-based design with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) function to achieve precise rotation without fatal lateral motion. The passive mechanism, with five degrees of freedom (5-DOF), is used to implement passive compensation for multi-axis errors. A specially designed 1-DOF micro-gripper mounted onto the active parallel alignment platform is adopted to grasp and rotate the optical fiber. A micro-vision system equipped with two charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras is introduced to observe the small field of view and obtain multi-axis errors for servo feedback control. The two CCD cameras are installed in an orthogonal arrangement—thus the errors can be easily measured via the captured images. Meanwhile, a series of tracking and measurement algorithms based on specific features of the target objects are developed. Details of the force and displacement sensor information acquisition in the assembly experiment are also provided. An experiment demonstrates the validity of the proposed visual algorithm by achieving the task of eliminating errors and inserting an optical fiber to the U-groove accurately. (paper)

  6. Clinical Evaluation of PET Image Quality as a Function of Acquisition Time in a New TOF-PET/MRI Compared to TOF-PET/CT--Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos G; Barbosa, Felipe; Hüllner, Martin; ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare only the performance of the PET component between a TOF-PET/CT (henceforth noted as PET/CT) scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MRI (henceforth noted as PET/MRI) scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of standardized uptake value (SUV) as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). The CT and MR image quality were not assessed, and that is beyond the scope of this study. Five brain and five whole-body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MRI acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of the emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts, and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in the white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed strong correlation between PET/CT and PET/MRI brain SUVs. Liver correlation was good, however, with lower uptake estimation in PET/MRI, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MRI offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artifacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole-body scans while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The TOF-PET/MRI showed higher image quality compared to TOF-PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, this result accounts mainly for body imaging, while no significant differences were found in brain imaging.

  7. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A.; Foran, Bernadette H.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Wild, Jim M.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p < 0.001) and mean landmark error 0.75 ± 0.24 cm versus 1.25 ± 0.60 cm (p = 0.002). Image registration is significantly improved by using an imaging protocol that enables both 3He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  8. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, Rob H; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A; Foran, Bernadette H; Hatton, Matthew Q; Wild, Jim M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging ( 3 He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3 He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3 He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3 He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p 3 He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3 He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3 He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of 128-slice dual-source CT coronary angiography: a randomized comparison of different acquisition protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neefjes, Lisan A.; Kate, Gert-Jan R. ten; Rossi, Alexia; Nieman, Koen; Papadopoulou, Stella L.; Dharampal, Anoeshka S.; Dedic, Admir; Feyter, Pim J. de; Mollet, Nico R.; Genders, Tessa S.S.; Hunink, M.G.M.; Schultz, Carl J.; Weustink, Annick C.; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Straten, Marcel van; Cademartiri, Filippo; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance and radiation exposure of 128-slice dual-source CT coronary angiography (CTCA) protocols to detect coronary stenosis with more than 50 % lumen obstruction. We prospectively included 459 symptomatic patients referred for CTCA. Patients were randomized between high-pitch spiral vs. narrow-window sequential CTCA protocols (heart rate below 65 bpm, group A), or between wide-window sequential vs. retrospective spiral protocols (heart rate above 65 bpm, group B). Diagnostic performance of CTCA was compared with quantitative coronary angiography in 267 patients. In group A (231 patients, 146 men, mean heart rate 58 ± 7 bpm), high-pitch spiral CTCA yielded a lower per-segment sensitivity compared to sequential CTCA (89 % vs. 97 %, P = 0.01). Specificity, PPV and NPV were comparable (95 %, 62 %, 99 % vs. 96 %, 73 %, 100 %, P > 0.05) but radiation dose was lower (1.16 ± 0.60 vs. 3.82 ± 1.65 mSv, P 0.05). Radiation dose of sequential CTCA was lower compared to retrospective CTCA (6.12 ± 2.58 vs. 8.13 ± 4.52 mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic performance was comparable in both groups. Sequential CTCA should be used in patients with regular heart rates using 128-slice dual-source CT, providing optimal diagnostic accuracy with as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation dose. circle 128-slice dual-source CT coronary angiography offers several different acquisition protocols. (orig.)

  10. Creep-fatigue damage under multiaxial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobitz, D.W.; Nickell, R.E.

    1977-02-01

    ASME Code rules for design against creep-fatigue damage for Class 1 nuclear components operating at elevated temperatures are currently being studied by ASME working groups and task forces with a view toward major modification. In addition, the design rules being developed for Class 2 and Class 3 components would be affected by any major modifications of Class 1 Rules. The report represents an attempt to evaluate the differences between two competing procedures--linear damage summation and strainrange partitioning--for multiaxial stress conditions. A modified version of strainrange partitioning is also developed to alleviate some limitations on nonproportional loading

  11. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  12. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-18

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  13. Microstructural study of multiaxial low cycle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Sakane

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the relationship between the stress response and the microstructure under tension-torsion multiaxial proportional and nonproportional loadings. Firstly, this paper discusses the material dependency of additional hardening of FCC materials in relation with the stacking fault energy of the materials. The FCC materials studied were Type 304 stainless steel, pure copper, pure nickel, pure aluminum and 6061 aluminum alloy. The material with lower stacking fault energy showed stronger additional hardening, which was discussed in relation with slip morphology and dislocation structures. This paper, next, discusses dislocation structures of Type 304 stainless steel under proportional and nonproportional loadings at high temperature. The relationship between the microstructure and the hardening behavior whether isotropic or anisotropic was discussed. The re-arrangeability of dislocation structure was discussed in loading mode change tests. Microstructures of the steel was discussed in more extensively programmed multiaxial low cycle fatigue tests at room temperature, where three microstructures, dislocation bundle, stacking fault and cells, which were discussed in relation with the stress response. Finally, temperature dependence of the microstructure was discussed under proportional and nonproportional loadings, by comparing the microstructures observed at room and high temperatures.

  14. Multi-axial response of idealized cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, E.G.; Bele, E.; Deshpande, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    The yield response of two idealized cermets comprising mono and bi-disperse steel spheres in a Sn/Pb solder matrix has been investigated for a range of axisymmetric stress states. Proportional stress path experiments are reported, from which are extracted the initial yield surfaces and their evolution with increasing plastic strain. The initial yield strength is nearly independent of the hydrostatic pressure but the strain hardening rate increases with stress triaxiality up to a critical value. For higher triaxialities, the responses are independent of hydrostatic pressure. Multi-axial measurements along with X-ray tomography were used to demonstrate that the deformation of these idealized cermets occurs by two competing mechanisms: (i) a granular flow mechanism that operates at low levels of triaxiality, where volumetric dilation occurs under compressive stress states, and (ii) a plastically incompressible mechanism that operates at high stress triaxialities. A phenomenological viscoplastic constitutive model that incorporates both deformation mechanisms is presented. While such multi-axial measurements are difficult for commercial cermets with yield strengths on the order of a few GPa, the form of their constitutive relation is expected to be similar to that of the idealized cermets presented here.

  15. Characterization of a multi-axis ion chamber array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Thomas A; Kozelka, Jakub; Simon, William E; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Chihray

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize a multi-axis ion chamber array (IC PROFILER; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL, USA) that has the potential to simplify the acquisition of LINAC beam data. The IC PROFILER (or panel) measurement response was characterized with respect to radiation beam properties, including dose, dose per pulse, pulse rate frequency (PRF), and energy. Panel properties were also studied, including detector-calibration stability, power-on time, backscatter dependence, and the panel's agreement with water tank measurements [profiles, fractional depth dose (FDD), and output factors]. The panel's relative deviation was typically within (+/-) 1% of an independent (or nominal) response for all properties that were tested. Notable results were (a) a detectable relative field shape change of approximately 1% with linear accelerator PRF changes; (b) a large range in backscatter thickness had a minimal effect on the measured dose distribution (typically less than 1%); (c) the error spread in profile comparison between the panel and scanning water tank (Blue Phantom, CC13; IBA Schwarzenbruck, DE) was approximately (+/-) 0.75%. The ability of the panel to accurately reproduce water tank profiles, FDDs, and output factors is an indication of its abilities as a dosimetry system. The benefits of using the panel versus a scanning water tank are less setup time and less error susceptibility. The same measurements (including device setup and breakdown) for both systems took 180 min with the water tank versus 30 min with the panel. The time-savings increase as the measurement load is increased.

  16. New Acquisition Protocol of 18F-Choline PET/CT in Prostate Cancer Patients: Review of the Literature about Methodology and Proposal of Standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Chondrogiannis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. (1 To evaluate a new acquisition protocol of 18F-choline (FCH PET/CT for prostate cancer patients (PC, (2 to review acquisition 18F-choline PET/CT methodology, and (3 to propose a standardized acquisition protocol on FCH PET/CT in PC patients. Materials. 100 consecutive PC patients (mean age 70.5 years, mean PSA 21.35 ng/mL were prospectively evaluated. New protocol consisted of an early scan of the pelvis immediately after the injection of the tracer (1 bed position of 4 min followed by a whole body scan at one 1 hour. Early and 1 hour images were compared for interfering activity and pathologic findings. Results. The overall detection rate of FCH PET/CT was 64%. The early static images of the pelvis showed absence of radioactive urine in ureters, bladder, or urethra which allowed a clean evaluation of the prostatic fossae. Uptake in the prostatic region was better visualized in the early phase in 26% (7/30 of cases. Other pelvic pathologic findings (bone and lymph nodes were visualized in both early and late images. Conclusion. Early 18F-choline images improve visualization of abnormal uptake in prostate fossae. All pathologic pelvic deposits (prostate, lymph nodes, and bone were visualized in both early and late images.

  17. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-01: Investigation of the Effective Dose From Bolus Tracking Acquisitions at Different Anatomical Locations in the Chest for CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowik, P; Bujila, R; Merzan, D [Dept. of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stationary table acquisitions (Bolus tracking) in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) can Result in dose length products (DLP) comparable to spiral scans. It is today unclear whether or not the effective dose (E) for Bolus Tracking can be approximated using target region specific conversion factors (E/DLP). The purpose of this study was to investigate how E depends on the anatomical location of the Bolus Tracking in relation to Chest CT scans with the same DLP. Methods: Effective doses were approximated for the ICRP 110 adult Reference Male (AM) and adult Reference Female (FM) computational voxel phantoms using software for CT dose approximations (pre-simulated MC data). The effective dose was first approximated for a Chest CT scan using spiral technique and a CTDIvol (32 cm) of 6 mGy. The effective dose from the spiral scan was then compared to E approximated for contiguous Bolus Tracking acquisitions (1 cm separation), with a total collimation of 1 cm, over different locations of the chest of the voxel phantoms. The number of rotations used for the Bolus Tracking acquisitions was adjusted to yield the same DLP (32 cm) as the spiral scan. Results: Depending on the anatomical location of the Bolus Tracking, E ranged by factors of 1.3 to 6.8 for the AM phantom and 1.4 to 3.3 for the AF phantom, compared to the effective dose of the spiral scans. The greatest E for the Bolus Tracking acquisitions was observed for anatomical locations coinciding with breast tissue. This can be expected as breast tissue has a high tissue weighting factor in the calculation of E. Conclusion: For Chest CT scans, the effective dose from Bolus Tracking is highly dependent on the anatomical location where the scan is administered and will not always accurately be represented using target region specific conversion factors.

  18. Physical performance evaluation of GE DST PET-CT and evaluation of characteristics in dynamic image acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. I.; Kim, J. Y.; Min, J. J.; Song, H. C.; Bom, H. S.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    As a new standard for performance measurement, NEMA NU2-2001 was presented recently. In this study, we investigated the spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and noise equivalent count ratio (NECR) in order to know the information of physical characteristics and system performance. Bismuth germinate crystals (6 X 6 array, 6.3mm X 6.3mm X 30mm) were used in discovery ST (energy window: 375-650 keV, coincidence window: 11.7 nsec). To measure the sensitivity, five aluminum sleeves (Data Spectrum Corp., Chapel Hill, NC., USA, thickness:1.25 mm) -NEMA sensitivity phantom- filled with F-18 solution were used. Spatial resolution was estimated using a point source (F-18, 0.1 mCi). Data were acquired while the count reaches at 100,000 and another experiment was performed at a distance of one-fourth the axial extent of the FOV. Scatter fraction and NECR was tested. Dynamic data were acquired for 7 half-lives. And true to background ratio was averaged at last three frames when the random rate was as small as ignorable for the calculation of scatter fraction. Sensitivity was 1.79 cps/kBq (2D) and 9.84 cps/kBq (3D) at the center and 1.78 cps/kBq (2D) and 9.60 cps/kBq (3D) at 10 cm off from the center. Spatial resolution at center was 6.15 mm (2D), 6.16 mm (3D) transverse direction and 5.77 mm (2D) and 5.93 mm (3D) at axial direction. At 10 cm radius, resolution of transverse radial was 7.19 mm (2D) and 7.16 mm (3D) and transverse tangential was 6.81 mm (2D) and 6.80mm (3D). Scatter fraction was 45.1% in 3D mode. Peak true rate and NECR were 325.1 kcps at 30.1 kBq/cc and 59.3 kcps at 13.7 kBq/cc. Dynamic image acquisition and gating image acquisition were acquired successfully. The physical characteristics of PET-CT were investigated. The sensitivity of installed system in 3D mode was better than the result of published study. We anticipate this overall evaluated results could be used for the quantification and optimized image acquisition for clinical research

  19. Estimation of organ-absorbed radiation doses during 64-detector CT coronary angiography using different acquisition techniques and heart rates: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Kawashima, Hiroko (Dept. of Quantum Medical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa (Japan)), email: matsuk@mhs.mp.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Noto, Kimiya; Takata, Tadanori; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki (Dept. of Radiological Technology, Kanazawa Univ. Hospital, Kanazawa (Japan)); Shimono, Tetsunori (Dept. of Radiology, Hoshigaoka Koseinenkin Hospital, Hirakata (Japan)); Matsui, Osamu (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa (Japan))

    2011-07-15

    Background: Though appropriate image acquisition parameters allow an effective dose below 1 mSv for CT coronary angiography (CTCA) performed with the latest dual-source CT scanners, a single-source 64-detector CT procedure results in a significant radiation dose due to its technical limitations. Therefore, estimating the radiation doses absorbed by an organ during 64-detector CTCA is important. Purpose: To estimate the radiation doses absorbed by organs located in the chest region during 64-detector CTCA using different acquisition techniques and heart rates. Material and Methods: Absorbed doses for breast, heart, lung, red bone marrow, thymus, and skin were evaluated using an anthropomorphic phantom and radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLDs). Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated helical and ECG-triggered non-helical acquisitions were performed by applying a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute (bpm) and ECG-gated helical acquisitions using ECG modulation (ECGM) of the tube current were performed by applying simulated heart rates of 40, 60, and 90 bpm after placing RPLDs on the anatomic location of each organ. The absorbed dose for each organ was calculated by multiplying the calibrated mean dose values of RPLDs with the mass energy coefficient ratio. Results: For all acquisitions, the highest absorbed dose was observed for the heart. When the helical and non-helical acquisitions were performed by applying a simulated heart rate of 60 bpm, the absorbed doses for heart were 215.5, 202.2, and 66.8 mGy for helical, helical with ECGM, and non-helical acquisitions, respectively. When the helical acquisitions using ECGM were performed by applying simulated heart rates of 40, 60, and 90 bpm, the absorbed doses for heart were 178.6, 139.1, and 159.3 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: ECG-triggered non-helical acquisition is recommended to reduce the radiation dose. Also, controlling the patients' heart rate appropriately during ECG-gated helical acquisition with

  20. Japanese guideline for the oncology FDG-PET/CT data acquisition protocol. Synopsis of Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukukita, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Matsumoto, Keiichi; Terauchi, Takashi; Shimada, Naoki; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Senda, Michio

    2014-01-01

    This synopsis outlines the Japanese guideline Version 2.0 for the data acquisition protocol of oncology FDG-PET/CT scans that was created by a joint task force of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine Technology, the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine and the Japanese Council of PET Imaging, and was published in Kakuigaku-Gijutsu 2013; 33:377-420 in Japanese. The guideline aims at standardizing the PET image quality among PET centers and different PET camera models by providing criteria for the IEC body phantom image quality as well as for the patient PET image quality based on the noise equivalent count (NEC), NEC density and liver signal-to-noise ratio, so that the appropriate scanning parameters can be determined for each PET camera. This Version 2.0 covers issues that were not focused on in Version 1.0, including the accuracy of the standardized uptake value (SUV), effect of body size together with adjustment of scanning duration, and time-of-flight (TOF) reconstruction technique. Version 2.0 also presents data acquired with new PET camera models that were not tested in Version 1.0. Reference values for physical indicators of phantom image quality have been updated as well. (author)

  1. Tailoring four-dimensional cone-beam CT acquisition settings for fiducial marker-based image guidance in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; van Wieringen, Niek; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2018-04-01

    Use of four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) and fiducial markers for image guidance during radiation therapy (RT) of mobile tumors is challenging due to the trade-off among image quality, imaging dose, and scanning time. This study aimed to investigate different 4D-CBCT acquisition settings for good visibility of fiducial markers in 4D-CBCT. Using these 4D-CBCTs, the feasibility of marker-based 4D registration for RT setup verification and manual respiration-induced motion quantification was investigated. For this, we applied a dynamic phantom with three different breathing motion amplitudes and included two patients with implanted markers. Irrespective of the motion amplitude, for a medium field of view (FOV), marker visibility was improved by reducing the imaging dose per projection and increasing the number of projection images; however, the scanning time was 4 to 8 min. For a small FOV, the total imaging dose and the scanning time were reduced (62.5% of the dose using a medium FOV, 2.5 min) without losing marker visibility. However, the body contour could be missing for a small FOV, which is not preferred in RT. The marker-based 4D setup verification was feasible for both the phantom and patient data. Moreover, manual marker motion quantification can achieve a high accuracy with a mean error of [Formula: see text].

  2. Multiaxial low cycle fatigue life under non-proportional loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Takamoto; Sakane, Masao; Ohsuga, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    A simple and clear method of evaluating stress and strain ranges under non-proportional multiaxial loading where principal directions of stress and strain are changed during a cycle is needed for assessing multiaxial fatigue. This paper proposes a simple method of determining the principal stress and strain ranges and the severity of non-proportional loading with defining the rotation angles of the maximum principal stress and strain in a three dimensional stress and strain space. This study also discusses properties of multiaxial low cycle fatigue lives for various materials fatigued under non-proportional loadings and shows an applicability of a parameter proposed by author for multiaxial low cycle fatigue life evaluation

  3. Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    Hutchinson, Adv. Appl . Mech. 29 (1992). [34] H. Ming-Yuan, J.W. Hutchinson, Int. J. Solids Struct. 25 (1989) 1053. [35] J. Salem , L. Ghosn, Int. J...Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot- Pressed Aluminum Nitride by Guangli Hu, C. Q. Chen, K. T. Ramesh, and J. W. McCauley ARL-RP-0487...Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-RP-0487 June 2014 Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot- Pressed Aluminum Nitride

  4. Dual Numbers Approach in Multiaxis Machines Error Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Hrdina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiaxis machines error modeling is set in the context of modern differential geometry and linear algebra. We apply special classes of matrices over dual numbers and propose a generalization of such concept by means of general Weil algebras. We show that the classification of the geometric errors follows directly from the algebraic properties of the matrices over dual numbers and thus the calculus over the dual numbers is the proper tool for the methodology of multiaxis machines error modeling.

  5. Multiaxial pedicle screw designs: static and dynamic mechanical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Ralph Edward; Loefler, Andreas Herman; Stanford, Philip Mark; Walsh, William R

    2004-02-15

    Randomized investigation of multiaxial pedicle screw mechanical properties. Measure static yield and ultimate strengths, yield stiffness, and fatigue resistance according to an established model. Compare these measured properties with expected loads in vivo. Multiaxial pedicle screws provide surgical versatility, but the complexity of their design may reduce their strength and fatigue resistance. There is no published data on the mechanical properties of such screws. Screws were assembled according to a vertebrectomy model for destructive mechanical testing. Groups of five assemblies were tested in static tension and compression and subject to three cyclical loads. Modes of failure, yield, and ultimate strength, yield stiffness, and cycles to failure were determined for six designs of screw. Static compression yield loads ranged from 217.1 to 388.0 N and yield stiffness from 23.7 to 38.0 N/mm. Cycles to failure ranged from 42 x 10(3) to 4,719 x 10(3) at 75% of static ultimate load. There were significant differences between designs in all modes of testing. Failure occurred at the multiaxial link in static and cyclical compression. Bending yield strengths just exceeded loads expected in vivo. Multiaxial designs had lower static bending yield strength than fixed screw designs. Five out of six multiaxial screw designs achieved one million cycles at 200 N in compression bending. "Ball-in-cup" multiaxial locking mechanisms were vulnerable to fatigue failure. Smooth surfaces and thicker material appeared to be protective against fatigue failure.

  6. PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver mass biopsies and ablations: Targeting accuracy of a single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyn, P.B.; Tatli, S.; Sahni, V.A.; Sadow, C.A.; Forgione, K.; Mauri, G.; Morrison, P.R.; Catalano, P.J.; Silverman, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether a single 20 s breath-hold positron-emission tomography (PET) acquisition obtained during combined PET/computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous liver biopsy or ablation procedures has the potential to target 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-avid liver masses as accurately as up to 180 s breath-hold PET acquisitions. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 10 adult patients with 13 liver masses who underwent FDG PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies (n = 5) or ablations (n = 5). PET was acquired as nine sequential 20 s, monitored, same-level breath-hold frames and CT was acquired in one monitored breath-hold. Twenty, 40, 60, and 180 s PET datasets were reconstructed. Two blinded readers marked tumour centres on randomized PET and CT datasets. Three-dimensional spatial localization differences between PET datasets and either 180 s PET or CT were analysed using multiple regression analyses. Statistical tests were two-sided and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Targeting differences between 20 s PET and 180 s PET ranged from 0.7–20.3 mm (mean 5.3 ± 4.4 mm; median 4.3) and were not statistically different from 40 or 60 s PET (p = 0.74 and 0.91, respectively). Targeting differences between 20 s PET and CT ranged from 1.4–36 mm (mean 9.6 ± 7.1 mm; median 8.2 mm) and were not statistically different from 40, 60, or 180 s PET (p = 0.84, 0.77, and 0.35, respectively). Conclusion: Single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisitions from PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver procedures have the potential to target FDG-avid liver masses with equivalent accuracy to 180 s summed, breath-hold PET acquisitions and may facilitate strategies that improve image registration and shorten procedure times

  7. Suitability of helical multislice acquisition technique for routine unenhanced brain CT: an image quality study using a 16-row detector configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernalsteen, Danielle; Cosnard, Guy; Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium); Robert, Annie [Public Health School, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Epidemiologics and Medical Statistics, Brussels (Belgium); Vlassenbroek, Alain [CT Clinical Science, Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Subjective and objective image quality (IQ) criteria, radiation doses, and acquisition times were compared using incremental monoslice, incremental multislice, and helical multislice acquisition techniques for routine unenhanced brain computed tomography (CT). Twenty-four patients were examined by two techniques in the same imaging session using a 16-row CT system equipped with 0.75-width detectors. Contiguous ''native'' 3-mm-thick slices were reconstructed for all acquisitions from four detectors for each slice (4 x 0.75 mm), with one channel available per detector. Two protocols were tailored to compare: (1) one-slice vs four-slice incremental images; (2) incremental vs helical four-slice images. Two trained observers independently scored 12 subjective items of IQ. Preference for the technique was assessed by one-tailed t test and the interobserver variation by two-tailed t test. The two observers gave very close IQ scores for the three techniques without significant interobserver variations. Measured IQ parameters failed to reveal any difference between techniques, and an approximate half radiation dose reduction was obtained by using the full 16-row configuration. Acquisition times were cumulatively shortened by using the multislice and the helical modality. (orig.)

  8. Suitability of helical multislice acquisition technique for routine unenhanced brain CT: an image quality study using a 16-row detector configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernalsteen, Danielle; Cosnard, Guy; Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry; Robert, Annie; Vlassenbroek, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Subjective and objective image quality (IQ) criteria, radiation doses, and acquisition times were compared using incremental monoslice, incremental multislice, and helical multislice acquisition techniques for routine unenhanced brain computed tomography (CT). Twenty-four patients were examined by two techniques in the same imaging session using a 16-row CT system equipped with 0.75-width detectors. Contiguous ''native'' 3-mm-thick slices were reconstructed for all acquisitions from four detectors for each slice (4 x 0.75 mm), with one channel available per detector. Two protocols were tailored to compare: (1) one-slice vs four-slice incremental images; (2) incremental vs helical four-slice images. Two trained observers independently scored 12 subjective items of IQ. Preference for the technique was assessed by one-tailed t test and the interobserver variation by two-tailed t test. The two observers gave very close IQ scores for the three techniques without significant interobserver variations. Measured IQ parameters failed to reveal any difference between techniques, and an approximate half radiation dose reduction was obtained by using the full 16-row configuration. Acquisition times were cumulatively shortened by using the multislice and the helical modality. (orig.)

  9. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality : a digital phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernatowicz, K; Keall, P; Mishra, P; Knopf, A; Lomax, A; Kipritidis, J

    PURPOSE: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on

  10. Multi-detector CT evaluation in patients suspected of tracheobronchomalacia: Comparison of end-expiratory with dynamic expiratory volumetric acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, Gilbert R. [Department of Radiology (France)], E-mail: gferretti@chu-grenoble.fr; Jankowski, Adrien [Department of Radiology (France)], E-mail: ajankowski@chu-grenoble.fr; Perrin, Marie Amelie [Department of Radiology (France)], E-mail: maperrin@chu-grenoble.fr; Chouri, Nathalie [Department of Respiratory Diseases (France)], E-mail: nchouri@chu-grenoble.fr; Arnol, Nathalie [Sleep Laboratory and EFCR, University Hospital, Grenoble (France); HP2 Laboratory, INSERM ERI 0017 (Hypoxia: Pathophysiology), Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: narnold@chu-grenoble.fr; Aubaud, Laurent [Department of Radiology (France)], E-mail: laubaud@chu-grenoble.fr; Pepin, Jean-Louis [Sleep Laboratory and EFCR, University Hospital, Grenoble (France); HP2 Laboratory, INSERM ERI 0017 (Hypoxia: Pathophysiology), Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: jlpepin@chu-grenoble.fr

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare dynamic expiratory imaging and end-expiratory imaging using multi-detector CT (MDCT) of the central airways in patients suspected of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). Methods: This study had local ethical committee approval. Seventy patients suspected of TBM were prospectively included. All patients underwent evaluation of central airways by three different low-dose MDCT acquisitions: end inspiration, end expiration, and dynamic expiration. Degree of airway collapse was measured by calculating the percentage change in the area and diameter of the airways between inspiratory and the two expiratory techniques at three levels of the trachea and in the sagittal diameter of the right and left main bronchi. Three threshold levels of percentage reduction in diameter or area (30%, 50%, and 70%) for defining TBM were evaluated. Results: In the entire population, the mean percentage of airway collapse was significantly greater with dynamic expiratory imaging than with the end-expiratory imaging at three different levels: lower thoracic trachea (26% vs. 16.6%, p < 0.009), right (25.2% vs. 14%, p < 0.01) and left main (24.7% vs. 13.3%, p < 0.01) bronchus. Whatever the threshold value for defining TBM, dynamic expiratory imaging always resulted in diagnosing TBM in more patients than end-expiratory imaging. Conclusions: Dynamic expiratory imaging shows a significantly greater degree and a significantly greater extent of airway collapse than standard end-expiratory imaging in patients suspected of TBM. Further evaluation of the clinical relevance of such findings is warranted.

  11. Multiaxis, Lightweight, Computer-Controlled Exercise System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Leonard; Bachrach, Benjamin; Harvey, William

    2006-01-01

    The multipurpose, multiaxial, isokinetic dynamometer (MMID) is a computer-controlled system of exercise machinery that can serve as a means for quantitatively assessing a subject s muscle coordination, range of motion, strength, and overall physical condition with respect to a wide variety of forces, motions, and exercise regimens. The MMID is easily reconfigurable and compactly stowable and, in comparison with prior computer-controlled exercise systems, it weighs less, costs less, and offers more capabilities. Whereas a typical prior isokinetic exercise machine is limited to operation in only one plane, the MMID can operate along any path. In addition, the MMID is not limited to the isokinetic (constant-speed) mode of operation. The MMID provides for control and/or measurement of position, force, and/or speed of exertion in as many as six degrees of freedom simultaneously; hence, it can accommodate more complex, more nearly natural combinations of motions and, in so doing, offers greater capabilities for physical conditioning and evaluation. The MMID (see figure) includes as many as eight active modules, each of which can be anchored to a floor, wall, ceiling, or other fixed object. A cable is payed out from a reel in each module to a bar or other suitable object that is gripped and manipulated by the subject. The reel is driven by a DC brushless motor or other suitable electric motor via a gear reduction unit. The motor can be made to function as either a driver or an electromagnetic brake, depending on the required nature of the interaction with the subject. The module includes a force and a displacement sensor for real-time monitoring of the tension in and displacement of the cable, respectively. In response to commands from a control computer, the motor can be operated to generate a required tension in the cable, to displace the cable a required distance, or to reel the cable in or out at a required speed. The computer can be programmed, either locally or via

  12. Creating a Multi-axis Machining Postprocessor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Vavruška

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the postprocessor creation process. When using standard commercially available postprocessors it is often very difficult to modify its internal source code, and it is a very complex process, in many cases even impossible, to implement the newly-developed functions. It is therefore very important to have a method for creating a postprocessor for any CAM system, which allows CL data (Cutter Location data to be generated to a separate text file. The goal of our work is to verify the proposed method for creating a postprocessor. Postprocessor functions for multi-axis machiningare dealt with in this work. A file with CL data must be translated by the postprocessor into an NC program that has been customized for a specific production machine and its control system. The postprocessor is therefore verified by applications for machining free-form surfaces of complex parts, and by executing the NC programs that are generated on real machine tools. This is also presented here.

  13. SU-E-I-91: Reproducibility in Prescribed Dose in AEC CT Scans Due to Table Height, Patient Size, and Localizer Acquisition Order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winslow, J; Hurwitz, L; Christianson, O; Samei, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In CT scanners, the automatic exposure control (AEC) tube current prescription depends on the acquired prescan localizer image(s). The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect that table height, patient size, and localizer acquisition order may have on the reproducibility in prescribed dose. Methods: Three phantoms were used for this study: the Mercury Phantom (comprises three tapered and four uniform regions of polyethylene 16, 23, 30, and 37 cm in diameter), acrylic sheets, and an adult anthropomorphic phantom. Phantoms were positioned per clinical protocol by our chief CT technologist or broader symmetry. Using a GE Discovery CT750HD scanner, a lateral (LAT) and posterior-anterior (PA) localizer was acquired for each phantom at different table heights. AEC scan acquisitions were prescribed for each combination of phantom, localizer orientation, and table height; the displayed volume CTDI was recorded for each. Results were analyzed versus table height. Results: For the two largest Mercury Phantom section scans based on the PA localizer, the percent change in volume CTDI from ideal were at least 20% lower and 35% greater for table heights 4 cm above and 4 cm below proper centering, respectively. For scans based on the LAT localizer, the percent change in volume CTDI from ideal were no greater than 12% different for 4 cm differences in table height. The properly centered PA and LAT localizer-based volume CTDI values were within 13% of each other. Conclusion: Since uncertainty in vertical patient positioning is inherently greater than lateral positioning and because the variability in dose exceeds any dose penalties incurred, the LAT localizer should be used to precisely and reproducibly deliver the intended amount of radiation prescribed by CT protocols. CT protocols can be adjusted to minimize the expected change in average patient dose

  14. SU-F-I-57: Evaluate and Optimize PET Acquisition Overlap in 18F-FDG Oncology Wholebody PET/CT: Can We Scan PET Faster?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Natwa, M; Hall, NC; Knopp, MV; Knopp, MU; Zhang, B; Tung, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The longer patient has to remain on the table during PET imaging, the higher the likelihood of motion artifacts due to patient discomfort. This study was to investigate and optimize PET acquisition overlap in 18F-FDG oncology wholebody PET/CT to speed up PET acquisition and improve patient comfort. Methods: Wholebody 18F-FDG PET/CT of phantoms, 8 pre-clinical patients (beagles) and 5 clinical oncology patients were performed in 90s/bed on a time-of-flight Gemini TF 64 system. Imaging of phantoms and beagles was acquired with reduced PET overlaps (40%, 33%, 27%, 20%, 13% and no overlap) in addition to the system default (53%). In human studies, 1 or 2 reduced overlaps from the listed options were used to acquire PET/CT sweeps right after the default standard of care imaging. Image quality was blindly reviewed using visual scoring criteria and quantitative SUV assessment. NEMA PET sensitivity was performed under different overlaps. Results: All PET exams demonstrated no significant impact on the visual grades for overlaps >20%. Blinded reviews assigned the best visual scores to PET using overlaps 53%–27%. Reducing overlap to 27% for oncology patients (12-bed) saved an average of ∼40% acquisition time (11min) compared to using the default overlap (18min). No significant SUV variances were found when reducing overlap to half of default for cerebellum, lung, heart, aorta, liver, fat, muscle, bone marrow, thighs and target lesions (p>0.05), except expected variability in urinary system. Conclusion: This study demonstrated by combined phantom, pre-clinical and clinical PET/CT scans that PET acquisition overlap in axial of today’s systems can be reduced and optimized. It showed that a reduction of PET acquisition overlap to 27% (half of system default) can be implemented to reduce table time by ∼40% to improve patient comfort and minimize potential motion artifacts, without prominently degrading image quality or compromising PET quantification.

  15. SU-F-I-57: Evaluate and Optimize PET Acquisition Overlap in 18F-FDG Oncology Wholebody PET/CT: Can We Scan PET Faster?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Natwa, M; Hall, NC; Knopp, MV [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Knopp, MU [Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA (United States); Zhang, B; Tung, C [Philips Healthcare, Highland Heights, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The longer patient has to remain on the table during PET imaging, the higher the likelihood of motion artifacts due to patient discomfort. This study was to investigate and optimize PET acquisition overlap in 18F-FDG oncology wholebody PET/CT to speed up PET acquisition and improve patient comfort. Methods: Wholebody 18F-FDG PET/CT of phantoms, 8 pre-clinical patients (beagles) and 5 clinical oncology patients were performed in 90s/bed on a time-of-flight Gemini TF 64 system. Imaging of phantoms and beagles was acquired with reduced PET overlaps (40%, 33%, 27%, 20%, 13% and no overlap) in addition to the system default (53%). In human studies, 1 or 2 reduced overlaps from the listed options were used to acquire PET/CT sweeps right after the default standard of care imaging. Image quality was blindly reviewed using visual scoring criteria and quantitative SUV assessment. NEMA PET sensitivity was performed under different overlaps. Results: All PET exams demonstrated no significant impact on the visual grades for overlaps >20%. Blinded reviews assigned the best visual scores to PET using overlaps 53%–27%. Reducing overlap to 27% for oncology patients (12-bed) saved an average of ∼40% acquisition time (11min) compared to using the default overlap (18min). No significant SUV variances were found when reducing overlap to half of default for cerebellum, lung, heart, aorta, liver, fat, muscle, bone marrow, thighs and target lesions (p>0.05), except expected variability in urinary system. Conclusion: This study demonstrated by combined phantom, pre-clinical and clinical PET/CT scans that PET acquisition overlap in axial of today’s systems can be reduced and optimized. It showed that a reduction of PET acquisition overlap to 27% (half of system default) can be implemented to reduce table time by ∼40% to improve patient comfort and minimize potential motion artifacts, without prominently degrading image quality or compromising PET quantification.

  16. A state-of-the-art pipeline for postmortem CT and MRI visualization: from data acquisition to interactive image interpretation at autopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Anders (Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Univ. of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Dept. of Radiology of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Linkoeping Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden)), email: anders.persson@cmiv.liu.se; Lindblom, Maria (Dept. of Radiology of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Linkoeping Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden)); Jackowski, Christian (Inst. of Legal Medicine, Univ. of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland))

    2011-06-15

    The importance of autopsy procedures leading to the establishment of the cause of death is well-known. A recent addition to the autopsy work flow is the possibility of conducting postmortem imaging, in its 3D version also called virtual autopsy (VA), using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) or magnetic resonance imagining (MRI) data from scans of cadavers displayed with direct volume rendering (DVR) 3D techniques. The use of the data and their workflow are presented. Data acquisition was performed and high quality data-sets with submillimeter precision were acquired. New data acquisition techniques such as dual-energy CT (DECT) and quantitative MRI, then were implemented and provided additional information. Particular findings hardly visualized in conventional autopsy can rather easy be seen at the full body CT, such as air distribution, e.g. pneumothorax, pneumopericardium, air embolism, and wound channels. MRI shows natural deaths such as myocardial infarctions. Interactive visualization of these 3D data-sets can provide valuable insight into the corpses and enables non-invasive diagnostic procedures. In postmortem CT imaging, not being limited by a patient depending radiation dose limit the data-sets can, however, be generated with such a high resolution that they become difficult to handle in today's archive retrieval and interactive visualization systems, specifically in the case of full body scans. To take full advantage of these new technologies the postmortem workflow needs to be tailored to the demands and opportunities that the new technologies allow

  17. A state-of-the-art pipeline for postmortem CT and MRI visualization: from data acquisition to interactive image interpretation at autopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Anders; Lindblom, Maria; Jackowski, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The importance of autopsy procedures leading to the establishment of the cause of death is well-known. A recent addition to the autopsy work flow is the possibility of conducting postmortem imaging, in its 3D version also called virtual autopsy (VA), using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) or magnetic resonance imagining (MRI) data from scans of cadavers displayed with direct volume rendering (DVR) 3D techniques. The use of the data and their workflow are presented. Data acquisition was performed and high quality data-sets with submillimeter precision were acquired. New data acquisition techniques such as dual-energy CT (DECT) and quantitative MRI, then were implemented and provided additional information. Particular findings hardly visualized in conventional autopsy can rather easy be seen at the full body CT, such as air distribution, e.g. pneumothorax, pneumopericardium, air embolism, and wound channels. MRI shows natural deaths such as myocardial infarctions. Interactive visualization of these 3D data-sets can provide valuable insight into the corpses and enables non-invasive diagnostic procedures. In postmortem CT imaging, not being limited by a patient depending radiation dose limit the data-sets can, however, be generated with such a high resolution that they become difficult to handle in today's archive retrieval and interactive visualization systems, specifically in the case of full body scans. To take full advantage of these new technologies the postmortem workflow needs to be tailored to the demands and opportunities that the new technologies allow

  18. Noninvasive detection of coronary vasospastic angina using a double-acquisition coronary CT angiography protocol in the presence and absence of an intravenous nitrate: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Dong Won; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Lee, Ki-Nam [Dong-A University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hyun; Jin, Cai De [Dong-A University, Department of Cardiology, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Dong-A University Hospital, Global Clinical Trial Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jeongmin; Park, Tae-Ho [Dong-A University, Department of Cardiology, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Il [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yeonyee Elizabeth [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of a double-acquisition coronary CT angiography (CCTA) protocol in the presence and absence of an intravenous (IV) vasodilator infusion for detecting vasospastic angina. Twenty patients with a high clinical probability of vasospastic angina were enrolled. All subjects underwent baseline CCTA without a vasodilator in the early morning followed by a catheterized coronary angiography with ergonovine provocation test. Within 3 days, all subjects underwent repeat CCTA during a continuous IV infusion of nitrate. Vasospastic angina as detected by CCTA was defined as significant stenosis (≥50 %) with negative remodelling without definite plaques or diffuse small diameter (<2 mm) of a major coronary artery with a beaded appearance on baseline CT that completely dilated on IV nitrate CT. The CCTA results were compared to the catheterized ergonovine provocation test as the reference standard. Among 20 patients, the catheterized ergonovine provocation test detected vasospasm in 15 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of CCTA in a per-patient-based analysis were 73, 100, 100 and 56 %, respectively. Double-acquisition CCTA in the presence and absence of IV infusion of nitrate allows noninvasive detection of vasospastic angina with moderate sensitivity and high specificity. (orig.)

  19. Multiaxial creep-fatigue life analysis using strainrange partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, S.S.; Halford, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Strain-Range Partitioning is a recently developed method for treating creep-fatigue interaction at elevated temperature. Most of the work to date has been on uniaxially loaded specimens, whereas practical applications often involve load multiaxiality. This paper shows how the method can be extended to treat multiaxiality through a set of rules for combining the strain components in the three principal directions. Closed hysteresis loops, as well as plastic and creep strain ratcheting, are included. An application to hold-time tests in torsion is used to illustrate the approach

  20. A Simplified Whole-Organ CT Perfusion Technique with Biphasic Acquisition: Preliminary Investigation of Accuracy and Protocol Feasibility in Kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, XiaoDong; Zhang, Jing; Quan, ChangBin; Tian, Yuan; Li, Hong; Ao, GuoKun

    2016-04-01

    To determine the feasibility and accuracy of a protocol for calculating whole-organ renal perfusion (renal blood flow [RBF]) and regional perfusion on the basis of biphasic computed tomography (CT), with concurrent dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) CT perfusion serving as the reference standard. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Biphasic CT of the kidneys, including precontrast and arterial phase imaging, was integrated with a first-pass dynamic volume CT protocol and performed and analyzed in 23 patients suspected of having renal artery stenosis. The perfusion value derived from biphasic CT was calculated as CT number enhancement divided by the area under the arterial input function and compared with the DCE CT perfusion data by using the paired t test, correlation analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Correlation analysis was made between the RBF and the extent of renal artery stenosis. All postprocessing was independently performed by two observers and then averaged as the final result. Mean ± standard deviation biphasic and DCE CT perfusion data for RBF were 425.62 mL/min ± 124.74 and 419.81 mL/min ± 121.13, respectively (P = .53), and for regional perfusion they were 271.15 mL/min per 100 mL ± 82.21 and 266.33 mL/min per 100 mL ± 74.40, respectively (P = .31). Good correlation and agreement were shown between biphasic and DCE CT perfusion for RBF (r = 0.93; ±10% variation from mean perfusion data [P < .001]) and for regional perfusion (r = 0.90; ±13% variation from mean perfusion data [P < .001]). The extent of renal artery stenosis was negatively correlated with RBF with biphasic CT perfusion (r = -0.81, P = .012). Biphasic CT perfusion is clinically feasible and provides perfusion data comparable to DCE CT perfusion data at both global and regional levels in the kidney. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  1. SU-F-J-220: Micro-CT Based Quantification of Mouse Brain Vasculature: The Effects of Acquisition Technique and Contrast Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, C; Lamba, M; Qi, Z; LaSance, K; Tipton, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cognitive impairment from radiation therapy to the brain may be linked to the loss of total blood volume in the brain. To account for brain injury, it is crucial to develop an understanding of blood volume loss as a result of radiation therapy. This study investigates µCT based quantification of mouse brain vasculature, focusing on the effect of acquisition technique and contrast material. Methods: Four mice were scanned on a µCT scanner (Siemens Inveon). The reconstructed voxel size was 18µm3 and all protocols were Hounsfield Unit (HU) calibrated. The mice were injected with 40mg of gold nanoparticles (MediLumine) or 100µl of Exitron 12000 (Miltenyi Biotec). Two acquisition techniques were also performed. A single kVp technique scanned the mouse once using an x-ray beam of 80kVp and segmentation was completed based on a threshold of HU values. The dual kVp technique scanned the mouse twice using 50kVp and 80kVp, this segmentation was based on the ratio of the HU value of the two kVps. After image reconstruction and segmentation, the brain blood volume was determined as a percentage of the total brain volume. Results: For the single kVp acquisition at 80kVp, the brain blood volume had an average of 3.5% for gold and 4.0% for Exitron 12000. Also at 80kVp, the contrast-noise ratio was significantly better for images acquired with the gold nanoparticles (2.0) than for those acquired with the Exitron 12000 (1.4). The dual kVp acquisition shows improved separation of skull from vasculature, but increased image noise. Conclusion: In summary, the effects of acquisition technique and contrast material for quantification of mouse brain vasculature showed that gold nanoparticles produced more consistent segmentation of brain vasculature than Exitron 12000. Also, dual kVp acquisition may improve the accuracy of brain vasculature quantification, although the effect of noise amplification warrants further study.

  2. SU-F-J-220: Micro-CT Based Quantification of Mouse Brain Vasculature: The Effects of Acquisition Technique and Contrast Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipton, C; Lamba, M; Qi, Z; LaSance, K; Tipton, C [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cognitive impairment from radiation therapy to the brain may be linked to the loss of total blood volume in the brain. To account for brain injury, it is crucial to develop an understanding of blood volume loss as a result of radiation therapy. This study investigates µCT based quantification of mouse brain vasculature, focusing on the effect of acquisition technique and contrast material. Methods: Four mice were scanned on a µCT scanner (Siemens Inveon). The reconstructed voxel size was 18µm3 and all protocols were Hounsfield Unit (HU) calibrated. The mice were injected with 40mg of gold nanoparticles (MediLumine) or 100µl of Exitron 12000 (Miltenyi Biotec). Two acquisition techniques were also performed. A single kVp technique scanned the mouse once using an x-ray beam of 80kVp and segmentation was completed based on a threshold of HU values. The dual kVp technique scanned the mouse twice using 50kVp and 80kVp, this segmentation was based on the ratio of the HU value of the two kVps. After image reconstruction and segmentation, the brain blood volume was determined as a percentage of the total brain volume. Results: For the single kVp acquisition at 80kVp, the brain blood volume had an average of 3.5% for gold and 4.0% for Exitron 12000. Also at 80kVp, the contrast-noise ratio was significantly better for images acquired with the gold nanoparticles (2.0) than for those acquired with the Exitron 12000 (1.4). The dual kVp acquisition shows improved separation of skull from vasculature, but increased image noise. Conclusion: In summary, the effects of acquisition technique and contrast material for quantification of mouse brain vasculature showed that gold nanoparticles produced more consistent segmentation of brain vasculature than Exitron 12000. Also, dual kVp acquisition may improve the accuracy of brain vasculature quantification, although the effect of noise amplification warrants further study.

  3. Improved assessment of mediastinal and pulmonary pathologies in combined staging CT examinations using a fast-speed acquisition dual-source CT protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Holzner, Veronica; Meinel, Felix G.; Armbruster, Marco; Brandlhuber, Martina; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sommer, Wieland H. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Dual-Source CT (DSCT) and to evaluate the clinical utility in chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT studies. 45 cancer patients with two follow-up combined chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations (maximally ±10 kV difference in tube potential) were included. The first scan had to be performed with our standard protocol (fixed pitch 0.6), the second one using a novel fast-speed DSCT protocol (fixed pitch 1.55). Effective doses (ED) were calculated, noise measurements performed. Scan times were compared, motion artefacts and the diagnostic confidence rated in consensus reading. ED for the standard and fast-speed scans was 9.1 (7.0-11.1) mSv and 9.2 (7.4-12.8) mSv, respectively (P = 0.075). Image noise was comparable (abdomen; all P > 0.05) or reduced for fast-speed CTs (trachea, P = 0.001; ascending aorta, P < 0.001). Motion artefacts of the heart/the ascending aorta (all P < 0.001) and breathing artefacts (P < 0.031) were reduced in fast DSCT. The diagnostic confidence for the evaluation of mediastinal (P < 0.001) and pulmonary (P = 0.008) pathologies was improved for fast DSCT. Fast DSCT for chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations is performed within 2 seconds scan time and eliminates relevant intrathoracic motion/breathing artefacts. Mediastinal/pulmonary pathologies can thus be assessed with high diagnostic confidence. Abdominal image quality remains excellent. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of multi-axial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 4. Evaluation of electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of multi-axial fabrics and their reinforced PES composites. RAMAZAN ERDEM. Volume 39 Issue 4 August 2016 pp 963-970 ...

  5. Evaluation of electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of multi-axial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The usage of electrical and electronic equipments has been increasing in daily life, which has a potential hazardous impact on humans and other living organisms. In this paper, multi-axial fabrics containing steel yarns and carbon filaments, and their polyester (PES) resin-reinforced composites have been prepared for ...

  6. Concurrent Validity of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory Depression Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joel O.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Compared two new measures of depression (Millon Multiaxial Inventory Dysthymia and Major Depression subscales) with two established instruments: Beck Depression Inventory, a self-report measure which emphasizes the cognitive-affective aspects of depression, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, an interview measure that emphasizes somatic…

  7. Multi-axial mechanical stimulation of tissue engineered cartilage: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S D Waldman

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of tissue engineered cartilage is a promising new approach for the repair of damaged or diseased tissue. Since it has proven difficult to generate cartilaginous tissue with properties similar to that of native articular cartilage, several studies have used mechanical stimuli as a means to improve the quantity and quality of the developed tissue. In this study, we have investigated the effect of multi-axial loading applied during in vitro tissue formation to better reflect the physiological forces that chondrocytes are subjected to in vivo. Dynamic combined compression-shear stimulation (5% compression and 5% shear strain amplitudes increased both collagen and proteoglycan synthesis (76 ± 8% and 73 ± 5%, respectively over the static (unstimulated controls. When this multi-axial loading condition was applied to the chondrocyte cultures over a four week period, there were significant improvements in both extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation and the mechanical properties of the in vitro-formed tissue (3-fold increase in compressive modulus and 1.75-fold increase in shear modulus. Stimulated tissues were also significantly thinner than the static controls (19% reduction suggesting that there was a degree of ECM consolidation as a result of long-term multi-axial loading. This study demonstrated that stimulation by multi-axial forces can improve the quality of the in vitro-formed tissue, but additional studies are required to further optimize the conditions to favour improved biochemical and mechanical properties of the developed tissue.

  8. Whole-organ perfusion of the pancreas using dynamic volume CT in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma: acquisition technique, post-processing and initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandel, Sonja; Kloeters, Christian; Meyer, Henning; Hein, Patrick; Rogalla, Patrik; Hilbig, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a whole-organ perfusion protocol of the pancreas in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma and to analyse perfusion differences between normal and diseased pancreatic tissue. Thirty patients with primary pancreatic malignancy were imaged on a 320-slice CT unit. Twenty-nine cancers were histologically proven. CT data acquisition was started manually after contrast-material injection (8 ml/s, 350 mg iodine/ml) and dynamic density measurements in the right ventricle. After image registration, perfusion was determined with the gradient-relationship technique and volume regions-of-interest were defined for perfusion measurements. Contrast time-density curves and perfusion maps were generated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for analysis of normal distribution and Kruskal-Wallis test (nonparametric ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction for multiple stacked comparisons. In all 30 patients the entire pancreas was imaged, and registration could be completed in all cases. Perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas was significantly lower than of normal pancreatic tissue (P < 0.001) and could be visualized on colored perfusion maps. The 320-slice CT allows complete dynamic visualization of the pancreas and enables calculation of whole-organ perfusion maps. Perfusion imaging carries the potential to improve detection of pancreatic cancers due to the perfusion differences. (orig.)

  9. Variability in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT methodology of acquisition, reconstruction and analysis for oncologic imaging: state survey; Variabilidade metodologica na aquisicao, reconstrucao e analise de estudos de PET/CT oncologico com FDG-{sup 18}F: levantamento estadual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Andreia C.F. da S.; Druzian, Aline C.; Pianta, Diego B.; Bacelar, Alexandre, E-mail: acfischer@hcpa.edu.br [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Silva, Ana M. Marques da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (NIMed/PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica. Nucleo de Pesquisas em Imagens Medicas

    2016-07-01

    The SUV in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT oncological imaging is useful for cancer diagnosis, staging and treatment assessment. There are, however, several factors that can give rise to bias in SUV measurements. When using SUV as a diagnostic tool, one needs to minimize the variability in this measurement by standardization of patient preparation, acquisition and reconstruction parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the methodological variability in PET/CT acquisition in Rio Grande do Sul State. For that, in each department, a questionnaire was applied to survey technical information from PET/CT systems and about the acquisitions and analysis methods utilized. All departments implement quality assurance programs consistent with (inter)national recommendations. However, the acquisition and reconstruction methods of acquired PET data differ. The implementation of a harmonized strategy for quantifying the SUV is suggested, in order to obtain greater reproducibility and repeatability. (author)

  10. Optimization of the boards of management/acquisition of a PET-CT in the design phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verde Velasco, M. E.; Ramos Pacho, J. M.; Montes Fuentes, J. A.; Delgado Aparicio, C.; Gomez Llorente, J. M.; Cons Perez, N.; Garcia Repiso, N.; Saez Beltran, S.; Gomez Llorente, P. L.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the doses received by the personnel of managing activity to the patients of the PET-CT, due to patients who are already injected and are resting during the uptake phase. The parameters will be taken into account are the placement in the pits of the armchairs or couches to inject patients, as well as the order of entry of such patients in each of the available boxes. (Author)

  11. Prospectively Electrocardiogram-Gated High-Pitch Spiral Acquisition Mode Dual-Source CT Coronary Angiography in Patients with High Heart Rates: Comparison with Retrospective Electrocardiogram-Gated Spiral Acquisition Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kai; Ma, Rui; Wang, Li Jun [Dept. of Radiology, Baotou Central Hospital, Baotou (China); Li, Li Gang; Chen, Jiu Hong [CT BM Clinic Marketing, Siemens Healthcare, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    To assess the image quality and effective radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated high-pitch spiral acquisition mode (flash mode) of dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with high heart rates (HRs) as compared with retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition mode. Two hundred and sixty-eight consecutive patients (132 female, mean age: 55 {+-} 11 years) with mean HR > 65 beats per minute (bpm) were prospectively included in this study. The patients were divided into two groups. Collection was performed in group A CTCA using flash mode setting at 20-30% of the R-R interval, and retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition mode in group B. The image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), image quality scores, effective radiation dose and influencing factors on image quality between the two groups were assessed. There were no significant differences in image quality scores and proportions of non-diagnostic coronary artery segments between two groups (image quality scores: 1.064 {+-} 0.306 [group A] vs. 1.084 {+-} 0.327 [group B], p = 0.063; proportion of non-diagnostic coronary artery segments: segment-based analysis 1.52% (group A) vs. 1.74% (group B), p = 0.345; patient-based analysis 7.5% (group A) vs. 6.7% (group B), p = 0.812). The estimated radiation dose was 1.0 {+-} 0.16 mSv in group A and 7.1 {+-} 1.05 mSv in group B (p = 0.001). In conclusion, in patients with HRs > 65 bpm without cardiac arrhythmia, the prospectively high-pitch spiral-acquisition mode with image-acquired timing set at 20-30% of the R-R interval provides a similar image quality and low rate of non-diagnostic coronary segments to the retrospectively ECG-gated low-pitch spiral acquisition mode, with significant reduction of radiation exposure.

  12. Prospectively Electrocardiogram-Gated High-Pitch Spiral Acquisition Mode Dual-Source CT Coronary Angiography in Patients with High Heart Rates: Comparison with Retrospective Electrocardiogram-Gated Spiral Acquisition Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Kai; Ma, Rui; Wang, Li Jun; Li, Li Gang; Chen, Jiu Hong

    2012-01-01

    To assess the image quality and effective radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated high-pitch spiral acquisition mode (flash mode) of dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with high heart rates (HRs) as compared with retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition mode. Two hundred and sixty-eight consecutive patients (132 female, mean age: 55 ± 11 years) with mean HR > 65 beats per minute (bpm) were prospectively included in this study. The patients were divided into two groups. Collection was performed in group A CTCA using flash mode setting at 20-30% of the R-R interval, and retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition mode in group B. The image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), image quality scores, effective radiation dose and influencing factors on image quality between the two groups were assessed. There were no significant differences in image quality scores and proportions of non-diagnostic coronary artery segments between two groups (image quality scores: 1.064 ± 0.306 [group A] vs. 1.084 ± 0.327 [group B], p = 0.063; proportion of non-diagnostic coronary artery segments: segment-based analysis 1.52% (group A) vs. 1.74% (group B), p = 0.345; patient-based analysis 7.5% (group A) vs. 6.7% (group B), p = 0.812). The estimated radiation dose was 1.0 ± 0.16 mSv in group A and 7.1 ± 1.05 mSv in group B (p = 0.001). In conclusion, in patients with HRs > 65 bpm without cardiac arrhythmia, the prospectively high-pitch spiral-acquisition mode with image-acquired timing set at 20-30% of the R-R interval provides a similar image quality and low rate of non-diagnostic coronary segments to the retrospectively ECG-gated low-pitch spiral acquisition mode, with significant reduction of radiation exposure.

  13. Detection of intestinal bleeding with multi-detector row CT in an experimental setup. How many acquisitions are necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobritz, Martin; Engels, Heinz-Peter; Bauer, Jan; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Schneider, Armin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) acquired in different acquisitions (unenhanced, and arterial and portal venous phase following intravenous contrast medium) for detection of intestinal bleeding using an experimental bowel model. The model consisted of an injector tube with a perforation placed in a 7-m-long small bowel of a pig. The bowel was filled with water/contrast medium solution of 30-40 HU and was incorporated in a phantom model. Intestinal bleeding in different locations and bleeding velocities varying from zero to 0.75 ml/min (0.05 ml/min increments) were simulated. Twenty-six datasets in simulated unenhanced, arterial and portal venous contrast phase using increasing bleeding velocities and ten negative controls were measured using 64-row MDCT. Two radiologists blinded to the experimental settings evaluated the datasets in a random order. The likelihood of intestinal bleeding was assessed using a 5-point scale with subsequent ROC analysis. The overall sensitivity for detecting bleeding was 0.44 for an arterial acquisition alone, 0.68 for a portal venous acquisition, 0.68 for the combination unenhanced/arterial, 0.72 for unenhanced/portal venous and 0.80 for arterial/portal. Bleeding velocities of above 0.25 ml/min were detected with a sensitivity of 0.59 for arterial, 0.88 for portal venous, 0.85 for unenhanced/arterial, 0.94 for unenhanced/portal venous and 0.97 for arterial/portal venous contrast phase protocols, respectively. The specificity was 1.00. MDCT provides the highest sensitivity and specificity in the detection of intestinal bleeding using arterial and portal venous acquisition in comparison to mono-phase protocols. (orig.)

  14. Multiaxial elastoplastic cyclic loading of austenitic 316L steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazánová, Veronika; Polák, Jaroslav; Škorík, Viktor; Kruml, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 40 (2017), s. 162-169 ISSN 1971-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-23652S; GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA ČR GA15-08826S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : 316L steel * Crack initiation * Cyclic stress-strain curve * Multiaxial cyclic loading Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis

  15. Fatigue life assessment under multiaxial variable amplitude loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morilhat, P.; Kenmeugne, B.; Vidal-Salle, E.; Robert, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    A variable amplitude multiaxial fatigue life prediction method is presented in this paper. It is based on a stress as input data are the stress tensor histories which may be calculated by FEM analysis or measured directly on the structure during the service loading. The different steps of he method are first presented then its experimental validation is realized for log and finite fatigue lives through biaxial variable amplitude loading tests using cruciform steel samples. (authors). 9 refs., 7 figs

  16. Prediction of multiaxial fatigue life for notched specimens of titanium alloy TC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Z. R.; Li, Z. X. [Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Hu, X. T.; Song, Y. D. [Nanjing University, Nanjing (China)

    2016-05-15

    Both the proportional and nonproportional multiaxial fatigue tests were conducted on two kinds of notched specimens of titanium alloy TC4. The multiaxial fatigue critical area of notched specimen is considered as the location experiencing the maximum damage. It is unsatisfactory to predict the multiaxial fatigue life with the local stress and strain in the fatigue critical area. The critical distance concepts are employed in the multiaxial life prediction method for notched specimens. The proposed method was checked by the test data of TC4 notched specimens. The prediction results are almost within a factor of three scatter band of the test results.

  17. The Impact of Combining a Low-Tube Voltage Acquisition with Iterative Reconstruction on Total Iodine Dose in Coronary CT Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toon Van Cauteren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the impact of combining low-tube voltage acquisition with iterative reconstruction (IR techniques on the iodine dose in coronary CTA. Methods. Three minipigs underwent CCTA to compare a standard of care protocol with two alternative study protocols combining low-tube voltage and low iodine dose with IR. Image quality was evaluated objectively by the CT value, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR in the main coronary arteries and aorta and subjectively by expert reading. Statistics were performed by Mann–Whitney U test and Chi-square analysis. Results. Despite reduced iodine dose, both study protocols maintained CT values, SNR, and CNR compared to the standard of care protocol. Expert readings confirmed these findings; all scans were perceived to be of at least diagnostically acceptable quality on all evaluated parameters allowing image interpretation. No statistical differences were observed (all p values > 0.11, except for streak artifacts (p=0.02 which were considered to be more severe, although acceptable, with the 80 kVp protocol. Conclusions. Reduced tube voltage in combination with IR allows a total iodine dose reduction between 37 and 50%, by using contrast media with low iodine concentrations of 200 and 160 mg I/mL, while maintaining image quality.

  18. Influence of multiaxial preloading on the strength of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linse, D.

    1975-01-01

    In a preliminary study about the influence of the loading direction discs of 20/20/5 cm were loaded at different stress-rates in one direction, then unloaded and loaded up to failure again. Two series of each about 15 specimens were tested: the first series was reloaded in the same direction as it was loaded before. If the preloading was not greater than about 90% of the original short-term uniaxial strength βsub(p), one could achieve in the second loading a higher strength than the strength βsub(p). The second series was reloaded normal to the direction of preloading. By an other series of about 50 specimens the influence of triaxial preloading on the uniaxial strength of concrete was tested. Cubes of 10cm were loaded by brush bearing platens up to a stress which was maximally three times higher than the uniaxial short-term strength βsub(p), then unloaded and tested again under uniaxial compression. The achieved ultimate strength of the cubes at the second loading was obviously dependent upon the stress-state and the stress-rate of the preloading. Multiaxial preloading which is far below the ultimate multiaxial strength can considerably defect the remaining strength of concrete. The decrease in strength was defined by the reduction of the uniaxial strength. It can be assumed that the remaining multiaxial strength is reduced at least to the same rate. Further tests are planned

  19. Time-resolved C-arm cone beam CT angiography (TR-CBCTA) imaging from a single short-scan C-arm cone beam CT acquisition with intra-arterial contrast injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinsheng; Garrett, John W.; Li, Ke; Wu, Yijing; Johnson, Kevin; Schafer, Sebastian; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2018-04-01

    Time-resolved C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) angiography (TR-CBCTA) images can be generated from a series of CBCT acquisitions that satisfy data sufficiency condition in analytical image reconstruction theory. In this work, a new technique was developed to generate TR-CBCTA images from a single short-scan CBCT data acquisition with contrast media injection. The reconstruction technique enabling this application is a previously developed image reconstruction technique, synchronized multi-artifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON). In this new application, the acquired short-scan CBCT projection data were sorted into a union of several sub-sectors of view angles and each sub-sector of view angles corresponds to an individual image volume to be reconstructed. The SMART-RECON method was then used to jointly reconstruct all of these individual image volumes under two constraints: (1) each individual image volume is maximally consistent with the measured cone-beam projection data within the corresponding view angle sector and (2) the nuclear norm of the image matrix is minimized. The difference between these reconstructed individual image volumes is used to generated the desired subtracted angiograms. To validate the technique, numerical simulation data generated from a fractal tree angiogram phantom were used to quantitatively study the accuracy of the proposed method and retrospective in vivo human subject studies were used to demonstrate the feasibility of generating TR-CBCTA in clinical practice.

  20. Assessment of aortitis by semiquantitative analysis of 180-min {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT acquisition images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Rodriguez, Isabel [University of Cantabria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital, Santander (Spain); Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, S. Medicina Nuclear, Santander (Spain); Martinez-Amador, N.; Banzo, I.; Quirce, R.; Jimenez-Bonilla, J.; Arcocha-Torres, M. de; Ibanez-Bravo, S.; Lavado-Perez, C.; Bravo-Ferrer, Z.; Carril, J.M. [University of Cantabria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital, Santander (Spain); Blanco, R.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A. [University of Cantabria, Department of Rheumatology, Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital, Santander (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of semiquantitative analysis of 180-min {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images for the assessment of aortitis in cases of suspected large vessel vasculitis (LVV) and to establish a threshold index for application in the clinical setting. This prospective study included 43 patients (mean age 67.5 ± 12.9 years) with suspicion of LVV (25 with a final diagnosis of aortitis). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan was acquired 180 min after injection of 7 MBq/kg of {sup 18}F-FDG. A semiquantitative analysis was performed calculating the aortic wall maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) (T), the lumen SUV{sub max} (B) and the target to background ratio (TBR). These results were also compared with those obtained in a control population. The mean aortic wall SUV{sub max} was 2.00 ± 0.62 for patients with aortitis and 1.45 ± 0.31 for patients without aortitis (p < 0.0001). The TBR was 1.66 ± 0.26 for patients with aortitis and 1.24 ± 0.08 for patients without aortitis (p < 0.0001). The differences were also statistically significant when the patients with aortitis and controls were compared. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that the area under the curve was greater for the TBR than for the aortic wall SUV{sub max} (0.997 vs 0.871). The highest sensitivity and specificity was obtained for a TBR of 1.34 (sensitivity 100 %, specificity 94.4 %). Semiquantitative analysis of PET/CT images acquired 180 min after {sup 18}F-FDG injection and the TBR index of 1.34 show very high accuracy and, therefore, are strongly recommended for the diagnosis of aortitis in the clinical setting. (orig.)

  1. Interdependencies of acquisition, detection, and reconstruction techniques on the accuracy of iodine quantification in varying patient sizes employing dual-energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, Daniele; Pratts-Emanuelli, Jose J.; Mileto, Achille; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Nelson, Rendon C.; Boll, Daniel T. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Husarik, Daniela B. [University Hospital Zurich, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-03

    To assess the impact of patient habitus, acquisition parameters, detector efficiencies, and reconstruction techniques on the accuracy of iodine quantification using dual-source dual-energy CT (DECT). Two phantoms simulating small and large patients contained 20 iodine solutions mimicking vascular and parenchymal enhancement from saline isodensity to 400 HU and 30 iodine solutions simulating enhancement of the urinary collecting system from 400 to 2,000 HU. DECT acquisition (80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp) was performed using two DECT systems equipped with standard and integrated electronics detector technologies. DECT raw datasets were reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP), and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE I/V). Accuracy for iodine quantification was significantly higher for the small compared to the large phantoms (9.2 % ± 7.5 vs. 24.3 % ± 26.1, P = 0.0001), the integrated compared to the conventional detectors (14.8 % ± 20.6 vs. 18.8 % ± 20.4, respectively; P = 0.006), and SAFIRE V compared to SAFIRE I and FBP reconstructions (15.2 % ± 18.1 vs. 16.1 % ± 17.6 and 18.9 % ± 20.4, respectively; P ≤ 0.003). A significant synergism was observed when the most effective detector and reconstruction techniques were combined with habitus-adapted dual-energy pairs. In a second-generation dual-source DECT system, the accuracy of iodine quantification can be substantially improved by an optimal choice and combination of acquisition parameters, detector, and reconstruction techniques. (orig.)

  2. Dual source multidetector CT-angiography before transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) using a high-pitch spiral acquisition mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, W.; Anders, K.; May, M.S.; Uder, M. [University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Schuhbaeck, A.; Gauss, S.; Marwan, M.; Arnold, M.; Muschiol, G.; Daniel, W.G.; Achenbach, S. [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Ensminger, S. [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is an alternative to surgical valve replacement in high risk patients. Angiography of the aortic root, aorta and iliac arteries is required to select suitable candidates, but contrast agents can be harmful due to impaired renal function. We evaluated ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral dual source Computed Tomography (CT) with minimized volume of contrast agent to assess aortic root anatomy and vascular access. 42 patients (82 {+-} 6 years) scheduled for TAVI underwent dual source (DS) CT angiography (CTA) of the aorta using a prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral mode (pitch = 3.4) with 40 mL iodinated contrast agent. We analyzed aortic root/iliac dimensions, attenuation, contrast to noise ratio (CNR), image noise and radiation exposure. Aortic root/iliac dimensions and distance of coronary ostia from the annulus could be determined in all cases. Mean aortic and iliac artery attenuation was 320 {+-} 70 HU and 340 {+-} 77 HU. Aortic/iliac CNR was 21.7 {+-} 6.8 HU and 14.5 {+-} 5.4 HU using 100 kV (18.8 {+-} 4.1 HU and 8.7 {+-} 2.6 HU using 120 kV). Mean effective dose was 4.5 {+-} 1.2 mSv. High-pitch spiral DSCTA can be used to assess the entire aorta and iliac arteries in TAVI candidates with a low volume of contrast agent while preserving diagnostic image quality. (orig.)

  3. Calcium scoring in unenhanced and enhanced CT data of the aorta-iliacal arteries: impact of image acquisition, reconstruction, and analysis parameter settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, N. (Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Medical Center Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium)), email: nielskomen@hotmail.com; Klitsie, P.; Jeekel, J.; Lange, J.F. (Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Medical Center Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Hermans, J.J.; Niessen, W.J. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Medical Center Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Kleinrensink, G.J. (Dept. of Neurosciences and Anatomy, Univ. Medical Center Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Several studies have been published on the matter of abdominal aortic and iliac calcifications and the association to clinical entities such as diabetes mellitus and renal failure. However, comparing of these studies is questionable since quantification methods for atherosclerosis differ. Purpose. To evaluate the effect of image acquisition settings, reconstruction parameters, and analysis methods on calcium quantification in the abdominal aorta. Material and Methods. Calcium scores were retrospectively determined on standardized abdominal CT scans of 15 patients. Two researchers obtained calcium scores with 10 different lower thresholds (LT) (130, 145, 160, 175, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 1000) in CT scans with and without contrast enhancement, with slice thicknesses (ST) varying between 2.0-5.0 mm for the non-contrast-enhanced series and between 1.0-5.0 mm for the contrast-enhanced series. In addition calcium scores obtained with two convolution kernels (B10f, B20f) were compared. Inter-observer variability was calculated. Results. Calcium scoring at higher STs is overestimated compared to smaller STs and this effect was more pronounced with increasing calcium loads. Concerning the convolution kernel, scores obtained with kernel B10f were overestimated compared to kernel B20f. Increase of LT resulted in a decrease of the calcium score and scoring in contrast-enhanced series resulted in higher scores compared to non-contrast-enhanced series. These effects are more apparent in patients with higher calcium loads. Calcium scoring reproducibility with the reference standard is limited for the aorta-iliac trajectory, whereas scoring with the remaining settings is reproducible. Conclusion. Scores obtained with different settings cannot be compared. The inter-observer reproducibility was limited using the reference standard and practical difficulties were substantial. Scoring with higher LT, ST, and contrast enhancement is faster and has less practical

  4. Multiaxial Stress-Strain Modeling and Effect of Additional Hardening due to Nonproportional Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashed, G.; Ghajar, R.; Farrahi, G.

    2007-01-01

    Most engineering components are subjected to multiaxial rather than uniaxial cyclic loading, which causes multiaxial fatigue. The pre-requisite to predict the fatigue life of such components is to determine the multiaxial stress strain relationship. In this paper the multiaxial cyclic stress-strain model under proportional loading is derived using the modified power law stress-strain relationship. The equivalent strain amplitude consisted of the normal strain excursion and maximum shear strain amplitude is used in the proportional model to include the additional hardening effect due to nonproportional loading. Therefore a new multiaxial cyclic stress-strain relationship is devised for out of phase nonproportional loading. The model is applied to the nonproportional loading case and the results are compared with the other researchers' experimental data published in the literature, which are in a reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The relationship presented here is convenient for the engineering applications

  5. Value of an early arteriographic acquisition for evaluating the splanchnic vessels as an adjunct to biphasic CT using a multislice scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandrino, F.; Curone, P.; Benzi, L.; Musante, F. [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliera ' ' SS Antonio e Biagio e C. Arrigo' ' , Via Venezia 16, 15100 Alessandria (Italy)

    2003-05-01

    Our objective was to assess the clinical value of an early arterial scan for assessing the hepatic and mesenteric vasculature in patients with suspected primary or metastatic hypervascular liver disease undergoing multislice computed tomography. In 42 patients a very early arteriographic scan was performed before standard arterial and portal venous scans. Technical parameters of the very early acquisition were: 2.5-mm image thickness; table speed 15 mm/s; pitch 6; 120 kVp; 300 mA; 8.9-s scan time; cranio-caudal acquisition direction; 1.25-mm image interval reconstruction;16-s delay after injection of 110 ml of iodinated contrast agent at 5 ml/s; scan volume focused to image hepatic, splenic, and superior mesenteric arteries (SMA). Standard arterial and portal venous phases were performed with 5-mm image thickness, 15-mm/s table speed, pitch 6, 8- to 10-s scan time, 30- and 70-s delay. The three phases were performed during three different breath-holds. Axial, multiplanar reformatted, maximum intensity projection, and volume-rendering images were evaluated. Image quality was scored, and vascular abnormalities were recorded. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed in 17 patients. In 36 of 42 patients good-quality CT angiograms were obtained. In 9 patients 12 vascular abnormalities were found, all confirmed at DSA: 3 right hepatic arteries originating from the SMA, 2 left hepatic arteries from the gastric artery, 2 stenoses of the SMA, 1 independent origin of the hepatic and splenic arteries, 2 arteriovenous fistulas, and 2 aneurysms of the common hepatic artery and the SMA. This technique could add important information about vascular splanchnic anatomy which would be particularly useful for surgeons and interventional radiologists. (orig.)

  6. Classification of Headache Disorders: Extending to a Multiaxial System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul R

    2016-11-01

    This article argues for extending the International Classification of Headache Disorders to include information that goes beyond diagnosis. The obvious model is a multiaxial system as has been developed for other taxonomies. An axis for recording disability and impact on functioning, and an axis for recording the triggers of headache/migraine, are perhaps the strongest contenders for adding to the system, but there are other possibilities such as lifestyle factors relevant to headache. Extensions such as these would contribute to headache management, provide clear targets for change, and encourage adoption of a biopsychosocial perspective. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  7. Multi-Axis Heterodyne Interferometry (MAHI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James

    . We propose to develop a laboratory prototype of a LISA-like interferometric metrology system capable of simultaneously making picometer-level position and nanoradian-level attitude measurements of a free-flying target. In the LISA application, this prototype would represent the short-arm interferometer, measuring the displacement and relative attitude between the gravitational test mass and the spacecraft. This measurement is used both to drive the drag-free attitude and control system as well as to extract the gravitational wave science signal. In addition to the LISA application, such a system would have broader applications in future geodesy and formation-flying missions. The prototype free-flying metrology system will consist of the following subcomponents: an optical bench providing stable pathlengths, an optical target mounted on a precision actuator, a low-noise quadrant photoreceiver for generating differential wavefront signals, and a phase measurement system to measure the individual heterodyne signals and convert them into quantities such as position and angle. In addition to the moving target, the optical bench will include a pair of fixed targets to be used as references. Comparing the two reference interferometers will provide an estimate of the noise performance of the measurement system, while comparing a reference interferometer with the free-flying target will allow us to demonstrate measurement over a large dynamic range. In addition to making performance measurements, we will use this prototype system to explore a number of system-level issues related to free-flying interferometry including initial acquisition, beam-walk effects, and jitter couplings.

  8. An investigation of deformed microstructure and mechanical properties of Zircaloy-4 processed through multiaxial forging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuloria, Devasri; Nageswararao, P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering & Centre of Nanotechnology, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Jayaganthan, R., E-mail: rjayafmt@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering & Centre of Nanotechnology, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Jha, S. [Nuclear Fuel Complex Limited, Hyderabad 501301 (India); Srivastava, D. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 40085 (India)

    2016-04-15

    In the present work, the mechanical behavior of Zircaloy-4 subjected to various deformation strains by multiaxial forging (MAF) at cryogenic temperature (CT) was investigated. The alloy was strained up to different number of cycles, viz., 6 cycles, 9 cycles, and 12 cycles at cumulative strains of 2.96, 4.44, and 5.91, respectively. The mechanical properties of the alloy were investigated by performing the universal tensile test and the Vickers hardness test. Both the test showed improvement in the ultimate tensile strength and hardness value by 51% and 26%, respectively, at the highest cumulative strain of 5.91. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurement and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for analyzing the deformed microstructure. The microstructures of the alloy underwent deformation at various cumulative strains/cycles showed grain refinement with the evolution of shear and twin bands that were highest for the alloy deformed at the highest number of cycles. The effective grain refinement was due to twins formation and their intersection, which led to the improvement in mechanical properties of the MAFed alloy, as observed in the present work. - Highlights: • Zircaloy-4 was subjected to MAF at cryogenic temperature. • Microstructural evolution was studied through EBSD and TEM. • Deformed microstructure was marked with various types of twinning and shear banding. • Twins formations are responsible for effective grain refinement and enhanced mechanical properties.

  9. Fracture criteria of reactor graphite under multiaxial stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Kawamata, K.; Kurumada, A.; Oku, T.

    1987-01-01

    New fracture criteria for graphite under multiaxial stresses are presented for designing core and support materials of a high temperature gas cooled reactor. Different kinds of fracture strength tests are carried out for a near isotropic graphite IG-11. Results show that, under the stress state in which tensile stresses are predominant, the maximum principal stress theory is seen as applicable for brittle fracture. Under the stress state in which compressive stresses are predominant there may be two fracture modes for brittle fracture, namely, slipping fracture and mode II fracture. For the former fracture mode the maximum shear stress criterion is suitable, but for the latter fracture mode a new mode II fracture criterion including a restraint effect for cracks is verified to be applicable. Also a statistical correction for brittle fracture criteria under multiaxial stresses is discussed. By considering the allowable stress values for safe design, the specified minimum ultimate strengths corresponding to a survival probability of 99% at the 95% confidence level are presented. (orig./HP)

  10. Multiaxial Polarity Determines Individual Cellular and Nuclear Chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Michael J; Ray, Poulomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Fredericks, Michael; Singh, Ajay V; Wan, Leo Q

    2017-02-01

    Intrinsic cell chirality has been implicated in the left-right (LR) asymmetry of embryonic development. Impaired cell chirality could lead to severe birth defects in laterality. Previously, we detected cell chirality with an in vitro micropatterning system. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that chirality can be quantified as the coordination of multiaxial polarization of individual cells and nuclei. Using an object labeling, connected component based method, we characterized cell chirality based on cell and nuclear shape polarization and nuclear positioning of each cell in multicellular patterns of epithelial cells. We found that the cells adopted a LR bias the boundaries by positioning the sharp end towards the leading edge and leaving the nucleus at the rear. This behavior is consistent with the directional migration observed previously on the boundary of micropatterns. Although the nucleus is chirally aligned, it is not strongly biased towards or away from the boundary. As the result of the rear positioning of nuclei, the nuclear positioning has an opposite chirality to that of cell alignment. Overall, our results have revealed deep insights of chiral morphogenesis as the coordination of multiaxial polarization at the cellular and subcellular levels.

  11. Design and implementation of a multiaxial loading capability during heating on an engineering neutron diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benafan, O.; Padula, S. A.; Skorpenske, H. D.; An, K.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2014-01-01

    A gripping capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during multiaxial loading and heating on the VULCAN engineering materials diffractometer at the spallation neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed capability allowed for the acquisition of neutron spectra during tension, compression, torsion, and/or complex loading paths at elevated temperatures. The design consisted of age-hardened, Inconel ® 718 grips with direct attachment to the existing MTS load frame having axial and torsional capacities of 100 kN and 400 N·m, respectively. Internal cooling passages were incorporated into the gripping system for fast cooling rates during high temperature experiments up to ∼1000 K. The specimen mounting couplers combined a threaded and hexed end-connection for ease of sample installation/removal without introducing any unwanted loads. Instrumentation of this capability is documented in this work along with various performance parameters. The gripping system was utilized to investigate deformation in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes (e.g., isothermal, isobaric, and cyclic), and preliminary results are presented. The measurements facilitated the quantification of the texture, internal strain, and phase fraction evolution in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes

  12. Design and implementation of a multiaxial loading capability during heating on an engineering neutron diffractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benafan, O., E-mail: othmane.benafan@nasa.gov [NASA Glenn Research Center, Structures and Materials Division, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Padula, S. A. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Structures and Materials Division, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Skorpenske, H. D.; An, K. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Vaidyanathan, R. [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A gripping capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during multiaxial loading and heating on the VULCAN engineering materials diffractometer at the spallation neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed capability allowed for the acquisition of neutron spectra during tension, compression, torsion, and/or complex loading paths at elevated temperatures. The design consisted of age-hardened, Inconel{sup ®} 718 grips with direct attachment to the existing MTS load frame having axial and torsional capacities of 100 kN and 400 N·m, respectively. Internal cooling passages were incorporated into the gripping system for fast cooling rates during high temperature experiments up to ~1000 K. The specimen mounting couplers combined a threaded and hexed end-connection for ease of sample installation/removal without introducing any unwanted loads. Instrumentation of this capability is documented in this work along with various performance parameters. The gripping system was utilized to investigate deformation in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes (e.g., isothermal, isobaric, and cyclic), and preliminary results are presented. The measurements facilitated the quantification of the texture, internal strain, and phase fraction evolution in NiTi shape memory alloys under various loading/control modes.

  13. Universal CNC platform motion control technology for industrial CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Senlin; Wang Yang

    2011-01-01

    According to the more scanning methods and the higher speed of industrial CT, the higher precision of the motion location and the data collection sync-control is required at present, a new motion control technology was proposed, which was established based on the universal CNC system with high precision of multi-axis control. Aiming at the second and the third generation of CT scanning motion, a control method was researched, and achieved the demands of the changeable parameters and network control, Through the simulation of the second and the third generation of CT scanning motion process, the control precision of the rotation axis reached 0.001° and the linear axis reached 0.002 mm, Practical tests showed this system can meet the requirements of the multi-axis motion integration and the sync signal control, it also have advantages in the control precision and the performance. (authors)

  14. Designing aluminium friction stir welded joints against multiaxial fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Susmel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating multiaxial fatigue strength of aluminium friction stir (FS welded joints. Having developed a bespoke joining technology, circumferentially FS welded tubular specimens of Al 6082-T6 were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out using the experimental results have demonstrated that the MWCM applied in terms of nominal stresses, notch stresses, and also the Point Method is accurate in predicting the fatigue lifetime of the tested FS welded joints, with its use resulting in life estimates that fall within the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  15. Multiaxial fatigue of aluminium friction stir welded joints: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Hattingh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to check the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating the fatigue strength of friction stir (FS welded tubular joints of Al 6082-T6 subjected to in-phase and out-of-phase multiaxial fatigue loading. The welded samples being investigated were manufactured by equipping an MTS I-STIR process development system with a retracting tool that was specifically designed and optimised for this purpose. These specimens were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out by using the generated experimental results allowed us to prove that the MWCM (applied in terms of nominal stresses is highly accurate in predicting the fatigue strength of the tested FS welded joints, its usage resulting in estimates falling with the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  16. Phenomenological model for coupled multi-axial piezoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuchen; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2018-03-01

    A quantitative calibration of an existing phenomenological model for polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics is presented. The model relies on remnant strain and polarization as independent variables. Innovative experimental and numerical model identification procedures are developed for the characterization of the coupled electro-mechanical, multi-axial nonlinear constitutive law. Experiments were conducted on thin PZT-5A4E plates subjected to cross-thickness electric field. Unimorph structures with different thickness ratios between PZT-5A4E plate and substrate were tested, to subject the piezo plates to coupled electro-mechanical fields. Material state histories in electric field-strain-polarization space and stress-strain-polarization space were recorded. An optimization procedure is employed for the determination of the model parameters, and the calibrated constitutive law predicts both the uncoupled and coupled experimental observations accurately.

  17. Evaluation of new multiaxial damage parameters on low carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cruces

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most mechanical components are subjected to the complex fatigue loading conditions, where both amplitude and direction of loading cycles change over the time. The estimation of damage caused by these complex loading scenarios are often done by simplified uniaxial fatigue theories, which ultimately leads to higher factor of safety during the final design considerations. Critical plane-based fatigue theories have been considered more accurate for computing the fatigue damage for multiaxial loading conditions in comparison to energy-based and equivalent stress-based theories. Two recently developed fatigue theories have been evaluated in this work for the available test data. Test data includes significant amount of biaxial load paths.

  18. Comparison of two multiaxial fatigue models applied to dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM. Ayllon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two multiaxial fatigue life prediction models applied to a commercial dental implant. One model is called Variable Initiation Length Model and takes into account both the crack initiation and propagation phases. The second model combines the Theory of Critical Distance with a critical plane damage model to characterise the initiation and initial propagation of micro/meso cracks in the material. This paper discusses which material properties are necessary for the implementation of these models and how to obtain them in the laboratory from simple test specimens. It also describes the FE models developed for the stress/strain and stress intensity factor characterisation in the implant. The results of applying both life prediction models are compared with experimental results arising from the application of ISO-14801 standard to a commercial dental implant.

  19. A study on multi-axial fatigue model based on structural stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol; Kim, Jong Sung; Jin, Tae Eun; Dong, P.

    2004-01-01

    In nuclear components, cyclic loadings that cause complex states of stress are common. Through a reference review, four sources of the multi-axial fatigue data were collected from LBF, University of Illinois, EPRI, and TWI. All these tests were conducted using tube to flange specimens with a circumferential fillet welds. The loading conditions were mostly bending/ torsion combinations, except that TWI used tension/ torsion combinations. None of fatigue correlation parameters have been demonstrated to be satisfactory in correlating the multi-axial fatigue data outside of their own. In this paper, we proposed the characterizing multi-axial fatigue behavior in terms of the structural stress methods by using some of the well-known multi-axial fatigue data available in the references

  20. A review of creep analysis and design under multi-axial stress states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, H.-T.; Xuan Fuzhen; Wang Zhengdong; Tu Shantung

    2007-01-01

    The existence of multi-axial states of stress cannot be avoided in elevated temperature components. It is essential to understand the associated failure mechanisms and to predict the lifetime in practice. Although metal creep has been studied for about 100 years, many problems are still unsolved, in particular for those involving multi-axial stresses. In this work, a state-of-the-art review of creep analysis and engineering design is carried out, with particular emphasis on the effect of multi-axial stresses. The existing theories and creep design approaches are grouped into three categories, i.e., the classical plastic theory (CPT) based approach, the cavity growth mechanism (CGM) based approach and the continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based approach. Following above arrangements, the constitutive equations and design criteria are addressed. In the end, challenges on the precise description of the multi-axial creep behavior and then improving the strength criteria in engineering design are presented

  1. Microcrack propagation under multiaxial loading - experiment and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter, K.; Suhartono, A.; Yousefi, F.; Zenner, H.; Duewel, V.; Schram, A.

    2000-01-01

    The accuracy of lifetime prediction for technical components subjected to cyclic loading is still not satisfying. One essential reason for the deviation between the results of the lifetime calculation and experimental results is that it is not yet possible to generate a model capable to describe the microstructural damage process which occurs in the tested material and to integrate this model in the calculation. All of the present research results recognize that the growth of microcracks is significantly influenced by the microstructure of the material. In order to take into account the influence of the microstructure on the damage process a simulation model is suggested in this paper which considers the local stress state in addition to the random nature of the material structure in the form of grain boundaries and slip systems. The results generated by means of the simulation model are compared and verified with those experiences obtained from multiaxial fatigue testing of the investigated aluminum material. For this purpose the surfaces of the tested specimens are carefully observed to discover and analyze microcracks which are classified according to their number, length, and orientation. Moreover the mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation are major points of interest for the comparison of theoretical and experimental results. The developed computer software is suitable to simulate the microcrack initiation, the propagation and coalescence of microcracks as well as the transition of stage I cracks to stage II cracks for uniaxial and multiaxial loading. Results obtained from the simulation model could be verified with the experiment. The future aim to be emphasized is the utilization of the parameter investigations carried out with the computer simulation model in order to improve the lifetime prediction. (orig.)

  2. WE-AB-204-06: Pseudo-CT Generation Using Undersampled, Single-Acquisition UTE-MDixon and Direct-Mapping Artificial Neural Networks for MR-Based Attenuation Correction and Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, K; Kuo, J [Case Center for Imaging Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hu, L; Traughber, M [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Pereira, G; Traughber, B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Herrmann, K [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Muzic, R [Case Center for Imaging Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Emerging technologies such as dedicated PET/MRI and MR-therapy systems require robust and clinically practical methods for determining photon attenuation. Herein, we propose using novel MR acquisition methods and processing for the generation of pseudo-CTs. Methods: A single acquisition, 190-second UTE-mDixon sequence with 25% (angular) sampling density and 3D radial readout was performed on nine volunteers. Three water-filled tubes were placed in the FOV for trajectory-delay correction. The MR data were reconstructed to generate three primitive images acquired at TEs of 0.1, 1.5 and 2.8 ms. In addition, three derived MR images were generated, i.e. two-point Dixon water/fat separation and R2* (1/T2*) map. Furthermore, two spatial features, i.e. local binary pattern (S-1) and relative spatial coordinates (S-2), were incorporated. A direct-mapping operator was generated using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for transforming the MR features to a pseudo-CT. CT images served as the training data and, using a leave-one-out method, for performance evaluation using mean prediction deviation (MPD), mean absolute prediction deviation (MAPD), and correlation coefficient (R). Results: The errors between measured CT and pseudo-CT declined dramatically when the spatial features, i.e. S-1 and S-2, were included. The MPD, MAPD, and R were, respectively, 5±57 HU, 141±41 HU, and 0.815±0.066 for results generated by the ANN trained without the spatial features and were 32±26 HU, 115±18 HU, and 0.869±0.035 with the spatial features. The estimation errors of the pseudo-CT were smaller when both the S-1 and S-2 were used together than when either the S-1 or the S-2 was used. Pseudo-CT generation (256×256×256 voxels) by ANN took < 0.5 s using a computer having an Intel i7 3.4GHz CPU and 16 GB RAM. Conclusion: The proposed direct-mapping ANN approach is a technically accurate, clinically practical method for pseudo-CT generation and can potentially help improve the

  3. WE-AB-204-06: Pseudo-CT Generation Using Undersampled, Single-Acquisition UTE-MDixon and Direct-Mapping Artificial Neural Networks for MR-Based Attenuation Correction and Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, K; Kuo, J; Hu, L; Traughber, M; Pereira, G; Traughber, B; Herrmann, K; Muzic, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Emerging technologies such as dedicated PET/MRI and MR-therapy systems require robust and clinically practical methods for determining photon attenuation. Herein, we propose using novel MR acquisition methods and processing for the generation of pseudo-CTs. Methods: A single acquisition, 190-second UTE-mDixon sequence with 25% (angular) sampling density and 3D radial readout was performed on nine volunteers. Three water-filled tubes were placed in the FOV for trajectory-delay correction. The MR data were reconstructed to generate three primitive images acquired at TEs of 0.1, 1.5 and 2.8 ms. In addition, three derived MR images were generated, i.e. two-point Dixon water/fat separation and R2* (1/T2*) map. Furthermore, two spatial features, i.e. local binary pattern (S-1) and relative spatial coordinates (S-2), were incorporated. A direct-mapping operator was generated using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for transforming the MR features to a pseudo-CT. CT images served as the training data and, using a leave-one-out method, for performance evaluation using mean prediction deviation (MPD), mean absolute prediction deviation (MAPD), and correlation coefficient (R). Results: The errors between measured CT and pseudo-CT declined dramatically when the spatial features, i.e. S-1 and S-2, were included. The MPD, MAPD, and R were, respectively, 5±57 HU, 141±41 HU, and 0.815±0.066 for results generated by the ANN trained without the spatial features and were 32±26 HU, 115±18 HU, and 0.869±0.035 with the spatial features. The estimation errors of the pseudo-CT were smaller when both the S-1 and S-2 were used together than when either the S-1 or the S-2 was used. Pseudo-CT generation (256×256×256 voxels) by ANN took < 0.5 s using a computer having an Intel i7 3.4GHz CPU and 16 GB RAM. Conclusion: The proposed direct-mapping ANN approach is a technically accurate, clinically practical method for pseudo-CT generation and can potentially help improve the

  4. Coverage of multiaxial fatigue criteria in fatigue limit region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papuga J.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a power of methods aimed at calculation of equivalent fatigue limit for arbitrary multiaxial loading. Although there are so many ways of computation, their thorough mutual comparison in a larger scale is missing. The database project presented in this paper comprise of several databases crowned with the FatLim database, which comprise of a huge number of experimental results and of 18 computational method working in the category mentioned before. The great block of data was acquired using in-house fatigue software PragTic, which is offered as a freeware application. The FatLim database follows its philosophy of a simple and non-paid accessibility. Its query tool written in MySQL and PhP allows to users to evaluate a practical usability of tested methods on load cases, which the users define. All the issues covered within this paper are available on the website www.pragtic.com, structure of which is described here.

  5. PRIGo: a new multi-axis goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltersperger, Sandro; Olieric, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch; Pradervand, Claude [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Glettig, Wayne [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et Microtechnique SA, Neuchâtel 2002 (Switzerland); Salathe, Marco; Fuchs, Martin R.; Curtin, Adrian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Ebner, Simon; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Weinert, Tobias [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schulze-Briese, Clemens [Dectris Ltd, Baden 5400 (Switzerland); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-05-09

    The design and performance of the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo developed at the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute is described. The Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer (PRIGo) is a novel compact and high-precision goniometer providing an alternative to (mini-)kappa, traditional three-circle goniometers and Eulerian cradles used for sample reorientation in macromolecular crystallography. Based on a combination of serial and parallel kinematics, PRIGo emulates an arc. It is mounted on an air-bearing stage for rotation around ω and consists of four linear positioners working synchronously to achieve x, y, z translations and χ rotation (0–90°), followed by a ϕ stage (0–360°) for rotation around the sample holder axis. Owing to the use of piezo linear positioners and active correction, PRIGo features spheres of confusion of <1 µm, <7 µm and <10 µm for ω, χ and ϕ, respectively, and is therefore very well suited for micro-crystallography. PRIGo enables optimal strategies for both native and experimental phasing crystallographic data collection. Herein, PRIGo hardware and software, its calibration, as well as applications in macromolecular crystallography are described.

  6. Efficient lifetime estimation techniques for general multiaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papuga, Jan; Halama, Radim; Fusek, Martin; Rojíček, Jaroslav; Fojtík, František; Horák, David; Pecha, Marek; Tomčala, Jiří; Čermák, Martin; Hapla, Václav; Sojka, Radim; Kružík, Jakub

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss and present our progress toward a project, which is focused on fatigue life prediction under multiaxial loading in the domain of low-cycle fatigue, i.e. cases, where the plasticity cannot be neglected. First, the elastic-plastic solution in the finite element analysis is enhanced and verified on own experiments. Second, the method by Jiang describing the instantaneous damage increase by analyses of load time by time, is in implementation phase. In addition, simplified routines for conversion of elastic stresses-strains to elastic-plastic ones as proposed by Firat and Ye et.al. are evaluated on the basis of data gathered from external sources. In order to produce high quality complex analyses, which could be feasible in an acceptable time, and allow the period for next analyses of results to be expanded; the core of PragTic fatigue solver used for all fatigue computations are being re-implemented to get the fully parallelized scalable solution.

  7. Multiaxial fatigue assessment of welded joints using the notch stress approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Melters

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the safety involved when performing fatigue assessment of multiaxially loaded welded joints. The notch stress approach according to the IIW is used together with 8 different multiaxial criteria, including equivalent stress-, interaction equation- and critical...... plane approaches. The investigation is carried out by testing the criteria on a large amount of fatigue test results collected from the literature (351 specimens total). Subsequently, the probability of achieving a non-conservative fatigue assessment is calculated in order to evaluate the different...

  8. Multiaxial brittle failure of a 3D carbon-carbon composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    Several industrial equipments, for example in aeronautics, civil or military nuclear applications, imply multi-axially loaded brittle materials for which reliable failure models are needed. In that context, our study focuses on a 3D carbon-carbon composite submitted in service to a triaxial strain state along its orthotropy axes. A failure criterion based on a bibliographical analysis is identified thanks to uniaxial tensile tests, and validated through an original multiaxial experiment. The scatter on its failure characteristics is also identified. (author) [fr

  9. Edema associated with I-125 or Pd-103 prostate brachytherapy and its effect on post-implant dosimetry: an analysis based on serial CT acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterman, Frank M.; Yue Ning; Corn, Benjamin W.; Dicker, Adam P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The dosimetric evaluation of prostate implants is based on analyses of post-implant CT scans. However, if the prostate is edematous as a consequence of needle insertion at the time of imaging, parameters such as dose coverage and the minimum prostatic dose may be underestimated. The purpose of this study is to characterize the magnitude and duration of post-implant edema, and its effect on dosimetry. Materials and Methods: Serial CT scans were obtained at 0, 1, 3, 7, and 15 weeks post-implant on 10 patients who received either I-125 or Pd-103 seed implants. Pre-implant CT scans of each prostate were also obtained. None of the patients received hormone therapy. The magnitude and duration of edema were evaluated by two different methods. In the first, the relative change in the prostate dimensions was determined from the change in the spatial distribution of the implanted seeds, which contract as edema decreases. The radial distance of each seed from the geometric center of the seed cluster was first calculated and then the mean value was computed. The relative change in the mean radial distance in the serial CT scans reflects the relative change in the prostate dimensions. In the second, the prostate in each CT scan was contoured by the same individual, and the prostate volume was computed. A dose-volume histogram of each contoured volume was compiled, from which the minimum prostatic dose and the percentage of the prostate volume which received the prescribed dose were determined. Results: Edema was present in all of the implanted prostates. The magnitude of the edema, expressed as the ratio of the post- to pre-implant volume, ranged from 1.25 to 1.70 (mean 1.47) immediately after implantation. Both methodologies revealed that the edema decreased exponentially with time; however, the edema half-life (time for the edema to decrease by (1(2))) varied considerably, ranging from 3 to 23 days (mean 8.5 days). As edema regressed, the minimum prostatic

  10. Multiaxial probabilistic elastic-plastic constitutive simulations of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrinezhad, Arezoo

    Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation approach has recently been developed to simulate elastic-plastic constitutive behaviors of materials with uncertain material properties. The FPK equation approach transforms the stochastic constitutive rate equation, which is a stochastic, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation (ODE) in the stress-pseudo time space into a second-order accurate, deterministic, linear FPK partial differential equation (PDE) in the probability density of stress-pseudo time space. This approach does not suffer from the drawbacks of the traditional approaches such as the Monte Carlo approach and the perturbation approach for solving nonlinear ODEs with random coefficients. In this study, the existing one dimensional FPK framework for probabilistic constitutive modeling of soils is extended to multi--dimension. However, the multivariate FPK PDEs cannot be solved using the traditional mathematical techniques such as finite difference techniques due to their high computational cost. Therefore, computationally efficient algorithms based on the Fourier spectral approach are developed for solving a class of FPK PDEs that arises in probabilistic elasto-plasticity. This class includes linear FPK PDEs in (stress) space and (pseudo) time - having space-independent but time-dependent, and both space- and time-dependent coefficients - with impulse initial conditions and reflecting boundary conditions. The solution algorithms, rely on first mapping the stress space of the governing PDE between 0 and 2pi using the change of coordinates rule, followed by approximating the solution of the PDE in the 2pi-periodic domain by a finite Fourier series in the stress space and unknown time-dependent solution coefficients. Finally, the time-dependent solution coefficients are obtained from the initial condition. The accuracy and efficiency of the developed algorithms are tested. The developed algorithms are used to simulate uniaxial and multiaxial, monotonic and cyclic

  11. Multiaxial fatigue criterion based on parameters from torsion and axial S-N curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Margetin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiaxial high cycle fatigue is a topic that concerns nearly all industrial domains. In recent years, a great deal of recommendations how to address problems with multiaxial fatigue life time estimation have been made and a huge progress in the field has been achieved. Until now, however, no universal criterion for multiaxial fatigue has been proposed. Addressing this situation, this paper offers a design of a new multiaxial criterion for high cycle fatigue. This criterion is based on critical plane search. Damage parameter consists of a combination of normal and shear stresses on a critical plane (which is a plane with maximal shear stress amplitude. Material parameters used in proposed criterion are obtained from torsion and axial S-N curves. Proposed criterion correctly calculates life time for boundary loading condition (pure torsion and pure axial loading. Application of proposed model is demonstrated on biaxial loading and the results are verified with testing program using specimens made from S355 steel. Fatigue material parameters for proposed criterion and multiple sets of data for different combination of axial and torsional loading have been obtained during the experiment.

  12. Review of Response and Damage of Linear and Nonlinear Systems under Multiaxial Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Habtour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of past and recent developments in multiaxial excitation of linear and nonlinear structures is presented. The objective is to review some of the basic approaches used in the analytical and experimental methods for kinematic and dynamic analysis of flexible mechanical systems, and to identify future directions in this research area. In addition, comparison between uniaxial and multiaxial excitations and their impact on a structure’s life-cycles is provided. The importance of understanding failure mechanisms in complex structures has led to the development of a vast range of theoretical, numerical, and experimental techniques to address complex dynamical effects. Therefore, it is imperative to identify the failure mechanisms of structures through experimental and virtual failure assessment based on correctly identified dynamic loads. For that reason, techniques for mapping the dynamic loads to fatigue were provided. Future research areas in structural dynamics due to multiaxial excitation are identified as (i effect of dynamic couplings, (ii modal interaction, (iii modal identification and experimental methods for flexible structures, and (iv computational models for large deformation in response to multiaxial excitation.

  13. Crack mode and life of Ti-6Al-4V under multiaxial low cycle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamoto Itoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies multiaxial low cycle fatigue crack mode and failure life of Ti-6Al-4V. Stress controlled fatigue tests were carried out using a hollow cylinder specimen under multiaxial loadings of λ=0, 0.4, 0.5 and 1 of which stress ratio R=0 at room temperature. λ is a principal stress ratio and is defined as λ=II/I, where I and II are principal stresses of which absolute values take the largest and middle ones, respectively. Here, the test at λ=0 is a uniaxial loading test and that at λ=1 an equi-biaxial loading test. A testing machine employed is a newly developed multiaxial fatigue testing machine which can apply push-pull and reversed torsion loadings with inner pressure onto the hollow cylinder specimen. Based on the obtained results, this study discusses evaluation of the biaxial low cycle fatigue life and crack mode. Failure life is reduced with increasing λ induced by cyclic ratcheting. The crack mode is affected by the surface condition of cut-machining and the failure life depends on the crack mode in the multiaxial loading largely.

  14. Effects of multiaxial cyclic loading conditions on the evolution of porous defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbiakop Armel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiaxial loading conditions are one of the important parameters in estimating the lifetime of structure both in high and low cycle fatigue ([1 3]. In order to understand the coupling between the macroscopic multiaxial loading and the microscopic defects, we propose to investigate the evolution of an elasto-plastic porous material up to failure under low cycle fatigue conditions. The analysis is performed numerically, using finite elements, on a periodic 3D unit-cell under the assumption of finite strains and subjected to various stress triaxialities, translated as ratios between deviatoric, hydrostatic stress and Lode angles. The present discussion introduces several novel factors in the analysis: (i 3D geometry in cyclic loading (ii finite strains (iii free evolving void shape (iiii different hardening laws. That one of the important factors is the void shape and that its evolution during cyclic loading depends on its multiaxiality. Moreover, these factors will equally influence the apparent macroscopic hardening or softening of the material and the initiation of localized shear zones at the microscopic level. The Lode angle has a significant impact on the evolution of the aspect ratios and the ellipsoidicity of the pores, but has only a weak influence on the evolution of macroscopic variables such as the stress or the porosity. As a consequence, the results show that multiaxiality of the loading have an important on the evolution and growth of defects, pores in the present case problem, but are less important in the definition of the yield surface.

  15. Constitutive relations describing creep deformation for multi-axial time-dependent stress states

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, L. N.

    1981-02-01

    A THEORY of primary and secondary creep deformation in metals is presented, which is based upon the concept of tensor internal state variables and the principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics. The theory is able to account for both multi-axial and time-dependent stress and strain states. The wellknown concepts of elastic, anelastic and plastic strains follow naturally from the theory. Homogeneous stress states are considered in detail and a simplified theory is derived by linearizing with respect to the internal state variables. It is demonstrated that the model can be developed in such a way that multi-axial constant-stress creep data can be presented as a single relationship between an equivalent stress and an equivalent strain. It is shown how the theory may be used to describe the multi-axial deformation of metals which are subjected to constant stress states. The multi-axial strain response to a general cyclic stress state is calculated. For uni-axial stress states, square-wave loading and a thermal fatigue stress cycle are analysed.

  16. Evaluation and visualization of multiaxial fatigue behavior under random non-proportional loading condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Morishita

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In cyclic multiaxial stress/strain condition under nonproportional loading in which principal direction of stress/strain are changed in a cycle, it becomes difficult to analyze stress/strain ranges because of complexity of multiaxial stress/strain states depending on time in cycles. In order to evaluate stress/strain simply and suitably under non-proportional loading, Itoh and Sakane have proposed a method called as IS-method and a strain parameter for life evaluation under non-proportional loading NP. In the method, 6-components of stress/strain are converted to an equivalent stress/strain indicating the amplitude and the direction of principal stress/strain as a function of time as well as an intensity of loading nonproportionality fNP. Based on IS-method, the authors also have developed a tool which enables to analyze multiaxial stress/strain condition with the nonproportionality of loading history and evaluate failure life under nonproportional multiaxial loading. The tool indicates the analyzed results on monitor and users can understand visually not only variation of the stress/strain conditions but also non-proportionality during the cycle, which helps the design of material strength.

  17. First industrial strength multi-axial Robotic testing campaign for composite material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Michopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Athanasios Iliopoulos

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we are reporting on the first successful campaign of systematic, automated and massive multiaxial tests for composite material constitutive characterization. The 6 degrees of freedom system developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) called NRL66.3, was used for this task. This was the inaugural run that served as the validation of the...

  18. Optimization of the boards of management/acquisition of a PET-CT in the design phase; Optimizacion de las salas de administracion/captacion de un PET-CT en la fase de diseno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verde Velasco, M. E.; Ramos Pacho, J. M.; Montes Fuentes, J. A.; Delgado Aparicio, C.; Gomez Llorente, J. M.; Cons Perez, N.; Garcia Repiso, N.; Saez Beltran, S.; Gomez Llorente, P. L.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we study the doses received by the personnel of managing activity to the patients of the PET-CT, due to patients who are already injected and are resting during the uptake phase. The parameters will be taken into account are the placement in the pits of the armchairs or couches to inject patients, as well as the order of entry of such patients in each of the available boxes. (Author)

  19. A New Multiaxial High-Cycle Fatigue Criterion Based on the Critical Plane for Ductile and Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Shang, De-Guang; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2015-02-01

    An improved high-cycle multiaxial fatigue criterion based on the critical plane was proposed in this paper. The critical plane was defined as the plane of maximum shear stress (MSS) in the proposed multiaxial fatigue criterion, which is different from the traditional critical plane based on the MSS amplitude. The proposed criterion was extended as a fatigue life prediction model that can be applicable for ductile and brittle materials. The fatigue life prediction model based on the proposed high-cycle multiaxial fatigue criterion was validated with experimental results obtained from the test of 7075-T651 aluminum alloy and some references.

  20. Edema associated with I-125 or Pd-103 prostate brachytherapy and its impact on post-implant dosimetry: an analysis based on serial CT acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterman, Frank M.; Yue, Ning; Corn, Benjamin W.; Dicker, Adam P.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude and duration of post-implant edema following the implantation of I-125 or Pd-103 seeds into the prostate and to investigate its effect on the CT-based calculation of the total dose delivered by the implant. Materials and Methods: A pre-implant CT scan and 3 to 5 serial post-implant CT scans were obtained on 10 patients who received either I-125 or Pd-103 seed implants. None of the patients received hormone therapy. The magnitude and duration of edema were determined from the change in the spatial distribution of the implanted seeds as the edema resolves. Dose volume histograms were compiled to determine the percentage of the prostate volume that received a dose equal to, or greater than, the prescribed dose. Results: The magnitude of the edema, expressed as the ratio of the post- to pre-implant volume on the day of the procedure, ranged from 1.33 to 1.96 (mean 1.52). The edema decreased exponentially with time; however, the edema half-life (time for the edema to decrease by 1/2) varied from 4 to 25 days (mean 9.3 days). As the edema resolved, the percentage of the prostate that received a dose equal to or greater than the prescribed dose increased by at least 7% in 7 of the 10 patients and increased by more than 15% in 2. In those patients in whom dose coverage was unaffected by the resolution of edema, more than 90% of the prostate was covered by the prescribed dose in the initial CT scan. Conclusion: Post-implant edema increased the prostate volume by factors which ranged from 1.33 to 1.96 (mean: 1.52). The edema resolved exponentially with an edema half-life which varied from 4 to 25 days (mean: 9.3 days). Edema had a significant effect on the post-implant dosimetry in 7 of 10 cases. Factors that affect the impact of edema on the dosimetry are the magnitude of the edema and the planned margin between the prescribed isodose line and the periphery of the prostate

  1. The reliability of child psychiatric diagnosis. A comparison among Danish child psychiatrists of traditional diagnoses and a multiaxial diagnostic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, A M; Isager, T; Jørgensen, O S

    1988-01-01

    The study was conducted to compare an experimental multiaxial diagnostic system (MAS) with traditional multicategorical diagnoses in child psychiatric work. Sixteen written case histories were circulated to 21 child psychiatrists, who made diagnoses independently of one another, using two different...

  2. CT-Urography; Urografia CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Grotto, Maurizio [Trieste Univ., Trieste (Italy). Dipartimento di scienze cliniche, morfologiche e tecnologiche, UCO di radiologia; Morra, Aldo [CRO, Aviano (Italy). Reparto di radiologia

    2005-09-15

    In this paper we present an overview of CT-Urography. With the advent of multislice CT scanners and the evolution of image processing methods this technique now affords optimal urographic images comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques. We describe the acquisition techniques and protocols used by the various authors. Effective radiation dose has conditioned the use of CT-Urography so that the tendency today is to reduce the number of scans by performing, after the non enhanced scan, a single contrast-enhanced scan comprising both the nephrographic and urographic phase. With the use of multislice CT the quality of the urogram improves with the number of slices. We illustrate a variety of processing techniques, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum (MIP) and average intensity projection (AIP) and volume rendering (VR) and present a series of upper urinary tract tumours testifying to the superiority of the AIP technique over MIP. We then review the results of comparative studies of CT-Urography with conventional urography in upper urinary tract diagnostics. Finally, we describe the advantages and limitations of CT-Urography. [Italian] Gli Autori presentano una panoramica sulla Urografia TC (Uro TC). L'avvento della TC multistrato e l'evoluzione delle tecniche di elaborazione consentono di ottenere dei quadri urografici ottimali comparativi con quelli convenzionali. Vengono ricordate le varie tecniche di acquisizione e i protocolli usati dai vari Autori. La dose effettiva di radiazioni ha rappresentato uno dei fattori condizionanti per cui oggi prevale l'orientamento di ridurre il numero di scansioni, considerando dopo la scansione senza mezzo di contrasto un'unica scansione contrasto grafica comprendente sia la fase nefrografica che quella urografica. Con l'uso della TC multistrato la qualita dell'urogramma migliora con l'aumento del numero degli strati. Vengono descritte le varie tecniche di elaborazione, la

  3. Fast assessment of the critical principal stress direction for multiple separated multiaxial loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The critical plane calculation for multiaxial damage assessment is often a demanding task, particularly for large FEM models of real components. Anyway, in actual engineering requests, sometime, it is possible to take advantage of the specific properties of the investigated case. This paper deals with the problem of a mechanical component loaded by multiple, but “time-separated”, multiaxial external loads. The specific material damage is dependent from the max principal stress variation with a significant mean stress sensitivity too. A specifically fitted procedure was developed for a fast computation, at each node of a large FEM model, of the direction undergoing the maximum fatigue damage; the procedure is defined according to an effective stress definition based on the max principal stress amplitude and mean value. The procedure is presented in a general form, applicable to the similar cases.

  4. Optimization of inverse model identification for multi-axial test rig control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Tino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory testing of multi-axial fatigue situations improves repeatability and allows a time condensing of tests which can be carried out until component failure, compared to field testing. To achieve realistic and convincing durability results, precise load data reconstruction is necessary. Cross-talk and a high number of degrees of freedom negatively affect the control accuracy. Therefore a multiple input/multiple output (MIMO model of the system, capturing all inherent cross-couplings is identified. In a first step the model order is estimated based on the physical fundamentals of a one channel hydraulic-servo system. Subsequently, the structure of the MIMO model is optimized using correlation of the outputs, to increase control stability and reduce complexity of the parameter optimization. The identification process is successfully applied to the iterative control of a multi-axial suspension rig. The results show accurate control, with increased stability compared to control without structure optimization.

  5. Multiaxial loading of large-diameter, thin-walled tube rock specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecker, S.S.; Petrovic, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    A large-scale mechanical testing facility permits previously impossible thin-walled tube multiaxial loading experiments on rock materials. Constraints are removed regarding tube wall thickness in relation to rock microstructural features and tube diameter as well as test machine load capacity. Thin-walled tube studies clarify the influence of intermediate principal stress sigma 2 on rock fracture and help define a realistic rock fracture criterion for all multiaxial stressing situations. By comparing results of thin-walled and thick-walled tube fracture investigations, effects of stress gradients can be established. Finally, influence of stress path on rock fracture, an area largely ignored in current rock failure criteria, can be examined in detail using controlled loading changes as well as specimen prestrains

  6. Stress factors for the deformation systems of zirconium under multiaxial stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.O.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation of the resolved shear stresses (rss) that act on various deformation systems in metals and, in particular, the determination of those systems subjected to the highest rss by a given set of multiaxial stresses is of importance in the study of texture development, yielding and plastic flow. This study examines the geometrical influences of any stress state on the deformation modes of zirconium. One slip mode and three twinning modes, comprising twenty-one deformation systems, are considered. Stress factors computed for these systems are shown on a coordinate system that allows specimen orientation, most highly stressed deformation system, and stress factor to be shown without ambiguity. The information in this report allows the determination of the rss that results from any multiaxial stress state; this information also allows the prediction of the deformation modes that might operate for any specimen orientation in that strss state

  7. Validation of a new multiaxial criteria for creep-fatigue damage evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrillat, M.T.; Martin, P.

    1989-01-01

    For many years, design codes evaluated creep damage using the Von Mises criterion to take account of multiaxiality of stresses. However, recent studies have confirmed that the Von Mises criterion is overconservative for nonuniaxial stress state. Various criteria have been put forward to take account of the real stress state. This paper describes a criterion which was introduced in 1987 and the various studies which led to its adoption

  8. Determination of the critical plane and durability estimation for a multiaxial cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burago, N. G.; Nikitin, A. D.; Nikitin, I. S.; Yakushev, V. L.

    2018-03-01

    An analytical procedure is proposed to determine the critical plane orientation according to the Findley criterion for the multiaxial cyclic loading. The cases of in-phase and anti-phase cyclic loading are considered. Calculations of the stress state are carried out for the system of the gas turbine engine compressor disk and blades for flight loading cycles. The formulas obtained are used for estimations of the fatigue durability of this essential element of structure.

  9. The effect of multi-axiality on damage with alternating stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, J.; Zenner, H.; Schram, A.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this project is a better understanding of the development of damage with multi-axial alternating stress. Hollow samples of the materials X6 CrNiTi 18 0 and Ck 15 are submitted to equal phase, phase displaced and consecutively alternating normal and thrust stresses. The amplitude ratio τ/σ is 1/2. Apart from the service life, the cyclic alternating deformation behaviour and the initiation and prapagation of microcracks are examined. (orig./MM) [de

  10. A New Energy-Critical Plane Damage Parameter for Multiaxial Fatigue Life Prediction of Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Yong Yu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As one of fracture critical components of an aircraft engine, accurate life prediction of a turbine blade to disk attachment is significant for ensuring the engine structural integrity and reliability. Fatigue failure of a turbine blade is often caused under multiaxial cyclic loadings at high temperatures. In this paper, considering different failure types, a new energy-critical plane damage parameter is proposed for multiaxial fatigue life prediction, and no extra fitted material constants will be needed for practical applications. Moreover, three multiaxial models with maximum damage parameters on the critical plane are evaluated under tension-compression and tension-torsion loadings. Experimental data of GH4169 under proportional and non-proportional fatigue loadings and a case study of a turbine disk-blade contact system are introduced for model validation. Results show that model predictions by Wang-Brown (WB and Fatemi-Socie (FS models with maximum damage parameters are conservative and acceptable. For the turbine disk-blade contact system, both of the proposed damage parameters and Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT model show reasonably acceptable correlations with its field number of flight cycles. However, life estimations of the turbine blade reveal that the definition of the maximum damage parameter is not reasonable for the WB model but effective for both the FS and SWT models.

  11. Practical application of fracture mechanics with consideration of multiaxiality of stress state to degraded nuclear piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Blind, D.; Herter, K.H.; Eisele, U.; Schuler, X.

    1995-01-01

    Within the scope of a research project nuclear piping components (T-branches and elbows) with dimensions like the primary coolant lines of PWR plants were investigated. In addition to the experimental full scale tests, extensive numerical calculations by means of the finite element method (FEM) as well as fracture mechanics analyses were performed. The applicability of these methods was verified by comparison with the experimental results. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters as well as the calculated component stress enabled a statement on crack initiation. The failure behavior could be evaluated by means of the multiaxiality of stress state in the ligament (gradient of the quotient of the multiaxiality of stress state q). With respect to practical application on other pressurized components it is shown how to use the procedure (e.g. in a LBB analysis). A quantitative assessment with regard to crack initiation is possible by comparison of the effective crack initiation value J ieff with the calculated component stress. If the multiaxiality of stress state and the q gradient in the ligament of the fracture ligament of the fracture mechanics specimen and the pressurized component to be evaluated is comparable a quantitative assessment is possible as for crack extension and maximum load. If there is no comparability of the gradients a qualitative assessment is possible for the failure behavior

  12. Preliminary study on flexible core design of super FBR with multi-axial fuel shuffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukarman; Yamaji, Akifumi; Someya, Takayuki; Noda, Shogo

    2017-01-01

    Preliminary study has been conducted on developing a new flexible core design concept for the Supercritical water-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (Super FBR) with multi-axial fuel shuffling. The proposed new concept focuses on the characteristic large axial coolant density change in supercritical water cooled reactors (SCWRs) when the coolant inlet temperature is below the pseudocritical point and large coolant enthalpy rise is taken in the core for achieving high thermal efficiency. The aim of the concept is to attain both the high breeding performance and good thermal-hydraulic performance at the same time. That is, short Compound System Doubling Time (CSDT) for high breeding, large coolant enthalpy rise for high thermal efficiency, and large core power. The proposed core concept consists of horizontal layers of mixed oxide (MOX) fuels and depleted uranium (DU) blanket layers at different elevation levels. Furthermore, the upper core and the lower core are separated and independent fuel shuffling schemes in these two core regions are considered. The number of fuel batches and fuel shuffling scheme of the upper core were changed to investigate influence of multi-axial fuel shuffling on the core characteristics. The core characteristics are evaluated with-three-dimensional diffusion calculations, which are fully-coupled with thermal-hydraulics calculations based on single channel analysis model. The results indicate that the proposed multi-axial fuel shuffling scheme does have a large influence on CSDT. Further investigations are necessary to develop the core concept. (author)

  13. Fatigue Behavior of 2A12 Aluminum Alloy Under Multiaxial Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Ya-jun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The multiaxial fatigue behavior of 2A12 aluminum alloy was studied with SDN100/1000 electro-hydraulic servo tension-torsion fatigue tester under multiple variables, and the failure mechanism was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results show that under the loading condition of equivalent stress, the fatigue life decreases with the increase of phase angle. For the phase angle 0°, some special features can be observed in the crack initial zone, such as the tire pattern,fishbone pattern and stalactite pattern. There are secondary cracks and vague fatigue striations in the crack propagation zone; the multiaxial fatigue life decreases with the change of mean stress for tension or torsion. Some white flocculent oxides can be found in the crack initiation zone, and secondary crack as well as shear-type elongated dimples in the instantaneous fracture zone; facing different loading waveforms, the multiaxial life of sine wave is the longest, triangle wave in the second place, and the square wave is the shortest, under the loading condition of equivalent stress, square wave leads to the maximum structural energy dissipation. Under the low and high two step loading, 2A12 shows training effect.

  14. Unit-Sphere Multiaxial Stochastic-Strength Model Applied to Anisotropic and Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel, N.

    2013-01-01

    Models that predict the failure probability of brittle materials under multiaxial loading have been developed by authors such as Batdorf, Evans, and Matsuo. These "unit-sphere" models assume that the strength-controlling flaws are randomly oriented, noninteracting planar microcracks of specified geometry but of variable size. This methodology has been extended to predict the multiaxial strength response of transversely isotropic brittle materials, including polymer matrix composites (PMCs), by considering (1) flaw-orientation anisotropy, whereby a preexisting microcrack has a higher likelihood of being oriented in one direction over another direction, and (2) critical strength, or K (sub Ic) orientation anisotropy, whereby the level of critical strength or fracture toughness for mode I crack propagation, K (sub Ic), changes with regard to the orientation of the microstructure. In this report, results from finite element analysis of a fiber-reinforced-matrix unit cell were used with the unit-sphere model to predict the biaxial strength response of a unidirectional PMC previously reported from the World-Wide Failure Exercise. Results for nuclear-grade graphite materials under biaxial loading are also shown for comparison. This effort was successful in predicting the multiaxial strength response for the chosen problems. Findings regarding stress-state interactions and failure modes also are provided.

  15. Multiaxial ratcheting behavior of zirconium alloy tubes under combined cyclic axial load and internal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G.; Zhang, X. [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xu, D.K. [Environmental Corrosion Center, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, D.H. [Hunan Taohuajiang Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Yiyang, 413000 (China); Chen, X. [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Z., E-mail: zhe.zhang@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, a series of uniaxial and multiaxial ratcheting tests were conducted at room temperature on zirconium alloy tubes. The experimental results showed that for uniaxial symmetrical cyclic test, the axial ratcheting strain ɛ{sub x} did not accumulate obviously in initial stage, but gradually increased up to 1% with increasing stress amplitude σ{sub xa}. For multiaxial ratcheting tests, the zirconium alloy tube was highly sensitive to both the axial stress amplitude σ{sub xa} and the internal pressure p{sub i}. The hoop ratcheting strain ɛ{sub θ} increased continuously with the increase of axial stress amplitude, whereas the evolution of axial ratcheting strain ɛ{sub x} was related to the axial stress amplitude. The internal pressure restricted the ratcheting accumulation in the axial direction, but promoted the hoop ratcheting strain on the contrary. The prior loading history greatly restrained the ratcheting behavior of subsequent cycling with a small internal pressure. - Highlights: •Uniaxial and multiaxial ratcheting behavior of the zirconium alloy tubes are investigated at room temperature. •The ratcheting depends greatly on the stress amplitude or internal pressure. •The interaction between the axial and hoop ratcheting mechanisms is greatly dependent on the internal pressure level. •The ratcheting is influenced significantly by the loading history of internal pressure.

  16. Multiaxial ratcheting behavior of zirconium alloy tubes under combined cyclic axial load and internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.; Zhang, X.; Xu, D.K.; Li, D.H.; Chen, X.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a series of uniaxial and multiaxial ratcheting tests were conducted at room temperature on zirconium alloy tubes. The experimental results showed that for uniaxial symmetrical cyclic test, the axial ratcheting strain ɛ x did not accumulate obviously in initial stage, but gradually increased up to 1% with increasing stress amplitude σ xa . For multiaxial ratcheting tests, the zirconium alloy tube was highly sensitive to both the axial stress amplitude σ xa and the internal pressure p i . The hoop ratcheting strain ɛ θ increased continuously with the increase of axial stress amplitude, whereas the evolution of axial ratcheting strain ɛ x was related to the axial stress amplitude. The internal pressure restricted the ratcheting accumulation in the axial direction, but promoted the hoop ratcheting strain on the contrary. The prior loading history greatly restrained the ratcheting behavior of subsequent cycling with a small internal pressure. - Highlights: •Uniaxial and multiaxial ratcheting behavior of the zirconium alloy tubes are investigated at room temperature. •The ratcheting depends greatly on the stress amplitude or internal pressure. •The interaction between the axial and hoop ratcheting mechanisms is greatly dependent on the internal pressure level. •The ratcheting is influenced significantly by the loading history of internal pressure.

  17. Enhanced Application of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Bladder Cancer by Adding Early Dynamic Acquisition to a Standard Delayed PET Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Yoo, Jang; Kim, Yemi; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Kim, Bom Sahn

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the value of early dynamic (ED) PET for the detection and characterization of bladder cancer. Fifty-two bladder cancer patients were prospectively enrolled. The study protocol was composed of ED, whole-body (WB, 60 minutes after injection), and additional delayed (AD, 120 minutes after injection) PET acquisition. Early dynamic PET was acquired for 10 minutes and reconstructed as 5 frames at 2-minute intervals. A focal radiotracer accumulation confined to the bladder wall was considered as PET positive and referred for further quantitative measurement. SUVmax on ED (SUVmax, SUVmax, SUVmax, SUVmax, and SUVmax for 5 frames), WB (SUVmax), and AD PET (SUVmax) were measured. PET results were correlated with bladder cancer pathology variables. The sensitivities of ED, WB, and AD PET for bladder cancer were 84.6%, 57.7%, and 61.2%, respectively. The sensitivity of ED PET was significantly higher than that of WB (P = 0.002) and AD PET (P = 0.008). On ED PET, SUVmax was significantly correlated with muscle invasiveness, histological grade, and pathological tumor size (P = 0.018, P = 0.030, and P = 0.030). On WB and AD PET, only pathological tumor size showed significant positive correlation with SUVmax and SUVmax (P = 0.043 and P = 0.007). Early dynamic PET can help to detect and characterize bladder cancer.

  18. Multiaxial creep of tubes from Incoloy 800 H and Inconel 617 under static and cyclic loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penkalla, H.J.; Nickel, H.; Schubert, F.

    1989-01-01

    At temperatures above 800 0 C the material behaviour under mechanical load is determined by creep. The service of heat exchanging components leads to multiaxial loading conditions. For design and inelastic analysis of the component behaviour time dependent design values and suitable constitutive equations are necessary. The present report gives a survey of the approaches to describing creep under multiaxial loading. Norton's law and v. Mises' theory are applied. The load combinations of internal pressure, tensile and torsional stress are studied more closely, cyclic stress superposition in the tensile-pulsating range is discussed and cases of partial relaxation are examined. Experimental results are presented for the loading conditions discussed, and satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment has been found up to now for these results. Regarding lifetime determination under multiaxial creep load, a more precise analysis of creep damage is presented suggesting a suitable deviatoric stress for evaluation in the long-time range. (orig.)

  19. Multiaxial fatigue strength of type 316 stainless steel under push–pull, reversed torsion, cyclic inner and outer pressure loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Takahiro; Itoh, Takamoto; Bao, Zhenlong

    2016-01-01

    Multiaxial fatigue tests under non-proportional loading in which principal directions of stress and strain are changed in a cycle were carried out using a developed multiaxial fatigue testing machine which can load a push–pull and reversed torsion loading with cyclic inner and outer pressure. This paper presents the developed testing machine and experimental results under several multiaxial loading conditions including non-proportional loading. In strain control tests, the failure life is reduced in accordance with increasing inner pressure at each strain path. The failure life can be correlated by von Mises' equivalent stress amplitude relatively well independent of not only inner pressure but also loading path. In load control tests, the failure life is reduced largely by non-proportional loading but the influence of inner and outer pressure on the failure life is relative small.

  20. A Critical Plane-energy Model for Multiaxial Fatigue Life Prediction of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haoyang

    A new critical plane-energy model is proposed in this thesis for multiaxial fatigue life prediction of homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. Brief review of existing methods, especially on the critical plane-based and energy-based methods, are given first. Special focus is on one critical plane approach which has been shown to work for both brittle and ductile metals. The key idea is to automatically change the critical plane orientation with respect to different materials and stress states. One potential drawback of the developed model is that it needs an empirical calibration parameter for non-proportional multiaxial loadings since only the strain terms are used and the out-of-phase hardening cannot be considered. The energy-based model using the critical plane concept is proposed with help of the Mroz-Garud hardening rule to explicitly include the effect of non-proportional hardening under fatigue cyclic loadings. Thus, the empirical calibration for non-proportional loading is not needed since the out-of-phase hardening is naturally included in the stress calculation. The model predictions are compared with experimental data from open literature and it is shown the proposed model can work for both proportional and non-proportional loadings without the empirical calibration. Next, the model is extended for the fatigue analysis of heterogeneous materials integrating with finite element method. Fatigue crack initiation of representative volume of heterogeneous materials is analyzed using the developed critical plane-energy model and special focus is on the microstructure effect on the multiaxial fatigue life predictions. Several conclusions and future work is drawn based on the proposed study.

  1. Multiaxial creep of tubes of Alloy 800 and Alloy 617 at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penkalla, H.J.; Schubert, F.; Nickel, H.

    1989-01-01

    The deformation behaviour under multiaxial loading at temperature higher than 800 deg. C is strongly controlled by creep. For dimensioning and inelastic analysis the use of v. Mises theory and Norton's creep law for stationary creep are demonstrated for different combination of internal pressure and axial or torsional stress or strains. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement with the theoretical predicted deformation behaviour if values for the coefficient k and n in Norton's creep law are used, which are close to the real creep resistance in the component. (author). 11 refs, 12 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Cyclic response and early damage evolution in multiaxial cyclic loading of 316L austenitic steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazánová, Veronika; Škorík, Viktor; Kruml, Tomáš; Polák, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, JUL (2017), s. 466-476 ISSN 0142-1123 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-23652S; GA ČR GA15-08826S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : 316L steel * Crack initiation * Cyclic plasticity * Damage mechanism * Multiaxial straining Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  3. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking under multiaxial deformation conditions: technique and application to admiralty brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, W.K.; Heldt, L.A.; Koss, D.

    1984-01-01

    A set of straightforward experimental techniques are described for the examination of slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sheet deforming under nearly all multiaxial deformation conditions which result in sheet thinning. Based on local fracture strain as a failure criterion, the results contrast stress corrosion susceptibility in uniaxial tension with those in both plane strain and balanced biaxial tension. These results indicate that the loss of ductility of the brass increases as the stress state changes from uniaxial toward balanced biaxial tension

  4. Fatigue of weld ends under combined in- and out-of-phase multiaxial loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shams

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Weld start and end points are fatigue failure sensitive locations. Their fatigue behaviour especially in thin sheet structures under multiaxial load conditions is not sufficiently explored so far. Therefore, a research project was initiated to increase the knowledge concerning this topic, which is of special interest in the automotive industry. In the present study, fatigue tests on welded joints were conducted. In the numerical part of the study, notch stresses were calculated with an idealised weld end model. A numerical method which combines the geometrical and statistical size effect to an integrated approach was used, in order to consider the size effects

  5. Anisotropy of domain switching in prepoled lead titanate zirconate ceramics under multiaxial electrical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Ming; Li, Fa-Xin; Fang, Dai-Ning

    2007-01-01

    The authors report an observation of anisotropic domain switching process in prepoled lead titanate zirconate (PZT) ceramics under multiaxial electrical loading. Prepoled PZT blocks were obliquely cut to apply an electric field at discrete angles θ (0°-180°) to the initial poling direction. Both the coercive field and switchable polarization are found to decrease significantly when sinθ increases from zero to unity. The measured strain curves show that most domains that accomplished 180° domain switching actually experienced two successive 90° switching. The oriented domain texture after poling plus the induced nonuniform stress are used to explain the observed domain switching anisotropy.

  6. A method for calculation of finite fatigue life under multiaxial loading in high-cycle domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Malnati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A method for fatigue life assessment in high-cycle domain under multiaxial loading is presented in this paper. This approach allows fatigue assessment under any kind of load history, without limitations. The methodology lies on the construction - at a macroscopic level - of an “indicator” in the form of a set of cycles, representing plasticity that can arise at mesoscopic level throughout fatigue process. During the advancement of the loading history new cycles are created and a continuous evaluation of the damage is made.

  7. Experimental creep behaviour determination of cladding tube materials under multi-axial loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosjean, Catherine; Poquillon, Dominique; Salabura, Jean-Claude; Cloue, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Cladding tubes are structural parts of nuclear plants, submitted to complex thermomechanical loadings. Thus, it is necessary to know and predict their behaviour to preserve their integrity and to enhance their lifetime. Therefore, a new experimental device has been developed to control the load path under multi-axial load conditions. The apparatus is designed to determine the thermomechanical behaviour of zirconium alloys used for cladding tubes. First results are presented. Creep tests with different biaxial loadings were performed. Results are analysed in terms of thermal expansion and of creep strain. The anisotropy of the material is revealed and iso-creep strain curves are given.

  8. Crack formation and crack propagation under multiaxial mechanical and thermal stresses. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 25th meeting of the DV Fracture Group was held on 16/17 February 1993 at Karlsruhe Technical University. The main topic, ''Crack formation and crack propagation under multiaxial mechanical and thermal stresses'', was discussed by five invited papers (by K.J. Miller, D. Loehe, H.A. Richard, W. Brocks, A. Brueckner-Foit) and 23 short papers. The other 21 papers were devoted to various domains of fracture mechanics, with emphasis on elastoplastic fracture mechanics. (orig./MM) [de

  9. CT-Urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Grotto, Maurizio; Morra, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present an overview of CT-Urography. With the advent of multislice CT scanners and the evolution of image processing methods this technique now affords optimal urographic images comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques. We describe the acquisition techniques and protocols used by the various authors. Effective radiation dose has conditioned the use of CT-Urography so that the tendency today is to reduce the number of scans by performing, after the non enhanced scan, a single contrast-enhanced scan comprising both the nephrographic and urographic phase. With the use of multislice CT the quality of the urogram improves with the number of slices. We illustrate a variety of processing techniques, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum (MIP) and average intensity projection (AIP) and volume rendering (VR) and present a series of upper urinary tract tumours testifying to the superiority of the AIP technique over MIP. We then review the results of comparative studies of CT-Urography with conventional urography in upper urinary tract diagnostics. Finally, we describe the advantages and limitations of CT-Urography [it

  10. Slicing algorithms for multi-axis 3-D metal printing of overhangs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Bok; Jee, Hae Seong

    2015-01-01

    A group of 3D metal printing or Additive metal manufacturing (AMM) processes, officially categorized as 'directed energy deposition (DED)' according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) classification, has enabled the building of full dense metallic tools and parts using metal powders precisely delivered and controlled with no powder bed. Mold making and metalworking are being taken in an entirely new direction. The overhang/undercut problem in DED processes, as much as other Additive manufacturing (AM) processes, has long remained unsolved, and the ones equipped with more than 3-axis tool mechanism turn out to be capable of depositing overhang/undercut features onto the part to be made. Multi-axis machines introduced for resolving the problem, however, require advanced preprocess software support for the process management that controls multi-axis tool paths. This study proposes slicing algorithms, sophisticatedly designed for the control of the tool paths on a 5-axis base table, to build overhang/undercut features. A methodical approach, using an auto-partitioning algorithm for generating three-dimensional layer (3DL) information, is proposed in this study, and various overhang features, as case studies, have been investigated and implemented by using the proposed method.

  11. ELESTRES: performance of nuclear fuel, circumferential ridging, and multiaxial elastic-plastic stresses in sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayal, M.

    1986-10-01

    The finite element code ELESTRES models the two-dimensional axisymmetric behaviour of a CANDU fuel element during normal operation. The main focus of the code is to estimate temperatures, fission gas release, and axial variations of deformation/stresses in the pellet and in the sheath. Thus the code is able to predict details like stresses/strains at circumferential ridges. This paper describes the current version of ELESTRES. The emphasis is on a recent addition: multiaxial stresses in the sheath near circumferential ridges. For accuracy in the critical region, a fine mesh is used near the ridge. To keep computing costs low, a coarse mesh is used near the midplane of the pellet. Predictions of ELESTRES show good agreement with abouth 80 measurements of fission-gas-release. In this paper, we also present ELESTRES predictions of hoop strains in sheaths, for two irradiations: element ABS and bundle GB. For both irradiations, predictions, compare favourably with measurements. An illustrative example shows that near circumferential ridges, bending contributes to multiaxial stresses in the sheath. This can have a significant effect on sheath integrity, such as during stress-corrosion-cracking due to power-increases, or during corrosion-assisted-fatigue due to power cycling

  12. Cycle counting procedure for fatigue failure preditions for complicated multi-axial stress histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.P.; Friedrich, C.M.; Hoppe, R.G.

    1977-12-01

    A procedure has been developed to determine the cumulative fatigue damage in structures experiencing complicated multi-axial stress histories. The procedure is a generalization of the rainflow method developed by Matsuishi and Endo for one-dimensional situations. It provides a consistent treatment of three-dimensional stress states that is especially suited to computer programming applications for the post-processing of finite element stress data. The procedure includes a unique method to account for the rotation of principal stresses with time during the stress history and for the cumulative fatigue damage resulting from partial stress reversals within a stress cycle. The general procedure and necessary equations for programming are presented. Comparisons are made with life predictions using Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for two hypothetical multi-axial stress histories for which the principal stresses are rotating with time. These comparisons show that the cycle counting method provides a consistent unambiguous interpretation of the fatigue design procedure in the ASME Code for these cases. Finally, the fatigue life of a perforated plate, as analyzed by finite elements, is computed for the combination of several hypothetical stress histories. This example demonstrates the utility of the proposed method when used in conjunction with finite element programs

  13. Slicing algorithms for multi-axis 3-D metal printing of overhangs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu Bok; Jee, Hae Seong [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    A group of 3D metal printing or Additive metal manufacturing (AMM) processes, officially categorized as 'directed energy deposition (DED)' according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) classification, has enabled the building of full dense metallic tools and parts using metal powders precisely delivered and controlled with no powder bed. Mold making and metalworking are being taken in an entirely new direction. The overhang/undercut problem in DED processes, as much as other Additive manufacturing (AM) processes, has long remained unsolved, and the ones equipped with more than 3-axis tool mechanism turn out to be capable of depositing overhang/undercut features onto the part to be made. Multi-axis machines introduced for resolving the problem, however, require advanced preprocess software support for the process management that controls multi-axis tool paths. This study proposes slicing algorithms, sophisticatedly designed for the control of the tool paths on a 5-axis base table, to build overhang/undercut features. A methodical approach, using an auto-partitioning algorithm for generating three-dimensional layer (3DL) information, is proposed in this study, and various overhang features, as case studies, have been investigated and implemented by using the proposed method.

  14. Experimental study on the Kaiser effect of AE under multiaxial loading in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hidehiko; Hiroi, Takehiro

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the in-situ stresses is essential for underground excavation design, particularly in evaluating stability of excavation. Acoustic Emission method, which utilizes the Kaiser effect, is one of the simple methods for measuring in-situ stresses. Experiments on the Kaiser effect has been carried out under uniaxial compression and triaxial compression (σ 1 > σ 2 = σ 3 ), but has not been carried out under the three different principal stresses (σ 1 > σ 2 > σ 3 ). In this study, we performed two experiments on the Kaiser effect under multiaxial loading, using a hollow cylindrical granite specimen. The rapidly increasing point of cumulative AE event count was determined as the peak point of AE event count rate increment (AERI). The main results are summarized as follows. (1) In the case of the cyclic incremental σ 1 loading under σ 2 ≠σ 3 , the large peak point of AERI appeared just before the pre-stress level. And as more stresses prior to just before the peak point were estimated, the estimated error showed a tendency to increase. (2) In the case of re-loading under the lower σ 2 and σ 3 more than pre-loading, the estimated stresses using the three peak points of AERI corresponded to the pre-differential stresses (σ 1 -σ 2 ), (σ 1 -σ 3 ) and pre-axial stress σ 1 . The magnitudes of the three principal stresses were estimated under multiaxial loading from the Kaiser effect, using only one specimen. (author)

  15. Ability of multiaxial fatigue criteria accounting for stress gradient effect for surface defective material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niamchaona Wichian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available New high strength steels are widely used nowadays in many industrial areas as in automotive industry. These steels are more resistant and provide higher fatigue limits than latter ones but they are also more sensible to small defects. Natural defects that outcome from metallurgy (as shrinkage, inclusion, void are not considered in this study. We focus on small manufacturing defects such as cutting edge defects generated by punching or other surface defects due to stamping. These defects are harmful on the material fatigue behaviour due to high stress concentration at defects root. They also generate stress gradient that is beneficial from the fatigue strength point of view. This study focusses on the stress gradient (it does not account for the size effect from cylindrical defect on specimen edge. Practically a normal stress gradient is added in multiaxial fatigue criteria formulation. Both critical plane approach and integral approach are involved in the present study. This gradient is calculated from stress states at defects root by using FEM. Criteria fatigue function at N cycles is used to assess the material fatigue strength. Obviously multiaxial fatigue criteria accounting for stress gradient give more precise fatigue functions than criteria that do not consider the gradient influence.

  16. Multiaxial stress analysis taking account of the penetration depth of x-rays, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Toshihiko; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kuramoto, Makoto.

    1983-01-01

    The new theory of X-ray multiaxial stress measurement is proposed. This method takes accounts of the influence concerning to the stress gradient and to the dependence of the penetration depth of X-rays upon the incidence angle. As a basic assumption, it's assumed that (1) stress gradient is linear in respect to the depth from the specimen surface, (2) the penetration depth of X-rays shows linear dependence upon sin 2 PSI, and (3) the lattice strain determined by X-rays corresponds to the weighted averaging strain on the intensity of the diffracted X-rays. Consequently, the stress state within the thin layer near to the surface is expressed by making use of three surface stresses and six stress gradients in this theory. It was proved that these nine stress elements were able to be solved through X-ray method by applying ''the integral method'' proposed by Lode and Peiter in 1976. The verification of the validity on this method was carried out through the numerical simulation and residual stress measurement of a ground S55C. As a result, it was found that this method could get a satisfactory accuracy. This method can estimate the multiaxial stress distribution within the surface layer nondestructively. (author)

  17. Multiaxial Fatigue Properties of 2A12 Aluminum Alloy Under Different Stress Amplitude Ratio Loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Ya-jun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The multiaxial fatigue behavior of 2A12 aluminum alloy was studied with SDN100/1000 electro-hydraulic servo tension-torsion fatigue tester under different stress amplitude ratios, the fracture morphology and the fatigue loading curve were observed to study the failure mechanism. The results show that, under the one stage loading condition, the fatigue life prolongs with the stress amplitude ratio increasing. Under pure torsion loading, smooth and even area exists in the fracture surface. As the stress amplitude ratio increases, the number of scratch reduces, the fatigue striation and some special morphology such as the fishbone pattern, scale pattern and honeycomb pattern can be observed; under cumulative paths of different stress amplitude ratios, the variation of multiaxial fatigue life changes with first stage loading cycles; under cumulative paths of high-low stress amplitude ratio, the cycle hardening occurs obviously in the axial direction for the first stage high stress amplitude ratio loading and 2A12 alloy shows training effect.

  18. Data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clout, P.N.

    1982-01-01

    Data acquisition systems are discussed for molecular biology experiments using synchrotron radiation sources. The data acquisition system requirements are considered. The components of the solution are described including hardwired solutions and computer-based solutions. Finally, the considerations for the choice of the computer-based solution are outlined. (U.K.)

  19. Optimization of Protocol CT, PET-CT, whole body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Fredys Santos; Namias, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the acquisition protocols and processing existing of the CT PET/CT scanner for clinical use of Nuclear Diagnostic Center Foundation, a way to minimize the radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality properly. Dosimetric data of PET / CT service were surveyed and obtained the baseline against which we compare and define strategies and modifications to develop online. We selected transaxial up to the pulmonary hilum and liver slices as the anatomical regions of interest that led to the standardization of the study

  20. Damage evolution under cyclic multiaxial stress state: A comparative analysis between glass/epoxy laminates and tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaresimin, M.; Carraro, P.A.; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2014-01-01

    In this work an experimental investigation on damage initiation and evolution in laminates under cyclic loading is presented. The stacking sequence [0/θ2/0/-θ2]s has been adopted in order to investigate the influence of the local multiaxial stress state in the off-axis plies and the possible effect...

  1. Metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796) tested in high-temperature uniaxial and multiaxial experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Houck, C.W.

    1984-03-01

    The results obtained from a number of metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel specimens were compiled. Samples were obtained from uniaxial and multiaxial tests covering a very broad span of temperatures and times. Special emphasis was on the identification of failure modes, cracking patterns, grain distortion, and grain-boundary microstructures. Uniaxial specimens exhibited the following sequence of failure modes with increasing temperature and time: ductile plastic tearing, ductile plastic shear, wedge cracking, and microvoid cracking. Over most of the temperature range examined (482 to 871/sup 0/C), M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated on grain boundaries at long times. Sigma phase and possibly ferrite were often present in the stressed areas at temperatures as low as 482/sup 0/C (900/sup 0/F). These metallurgical features promoted a severe loss in creep ductility at long times and low temperatures. Most multiaxial tests were performed under conditions that promoted wedge cracking. Stress gradients also favored surface crack initiation rather than bulk damage. Testing times for multiaxial tests were less than 10,000 h; hence, there was insufficient time for the development of embrittling features such as microvoids, sigma, and ferrite. Long-time multiaxial tests to failure are recommended.

  2. Optimization of Protocol CT, PET-CT, whole body; Optimizacion de protocolo CT, en PET-CT, de cuerpo entero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Fredys Santos, E-mail: fsantos@ccss.sa.cr [Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (ACCPR/CCSS), San Jose (Costa Rica). Area Control de Calidade Y Proteccion Radiologica; Namias, Mauro, E-mail: mnamias@gmail.com [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (FCDN/CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Fundacion Centro Diagnostico Nuclear

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the acquisition protocols and processing existing of the CT PET/CT scanner for clinical use of Nuclear Diagnostic Center Foundation, a way to minimize the radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality properly. Dosimetric data of PET / CT service were surveyed and obtained the baseline against which we compare and define strategies and modifications to develop online. We selected transaxial up to the pulmonary hilum and liver slices as the anatomical regions of interest that led to the standardization of the study.

  3. Failure analysis of radioisotopic heat source capsules tested under multi-axial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, R.E.; Stacy, E.; Burgan, C.E.

    In order to qualify small radioisotopic heat sources for a 25-yr design life, multi-axial mechanical tests were performed on the structural components of the heat source. The results of these tests indicated that failure predominantly occurred in the middle of the weld ramp-down zone. Examination of the failure zone by standard metallographic techniques failed to indicate the true cause of failure. A modified technique utilizing chemical etching, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis was employed and dramatically indicated the true cause of failure, impurity concentration in the ramp-down zone. As a result of the initial investigation, weld parameters for the heat sources were altered. Example welds made with a pulse arc technique did not have this impurity buildup in the ramp-down zone

  4. The effect of hydrogen on the multiaxial stress-strain behavior of titanium tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, C.W.; Hecker, S.S.; Koss, D.A.; Stout, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of internal hydrogen on the multiaxial stress-strain behavior of commercially pure titanium has been studied. Thin-walled specimens containing either 20 or 1070 ppm hydrogen were tested at constant stress ratios in combined tension and internal pressure. Hydrogen lowers the yield strength but has no significant effect on strain hardening behavior at strains epsilon greater than or equal to 0.02. Thus, hydrogen embrittlement under plain strain or equibiaxial loading is not a consequence of changes of flow behavior. The yielding behavior is described well by Hill's quadratic yield criterion. As measured mechanically and pole figure analysis, the plastic anisotropy changes with deformation in a manner which depends on stress state. A strain dependent, texture-induced strengthening effect in equibiaxial tension an enhanced strain hardening rate

  5. The effect of multiaxial stress state on creep behavior and fracture mechanism of P92 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yuan; Xu, Hong, E-mail: xuhong@ncepu.edu.cn; Ni, Yongzhong; Lan, Xiang; Li, Hongyuan

    2015-06-11

    The creep experiments on plain and double U-typed notched specimens were conducted on P92 steel at 650 °C. The notch strengthening effect was found in the notched specimens. Fracture appearance observed by scanning electron microscopy revealed that dimpled fracture for relatively blunt notched specimen, and dimpled fracture doubled with intergranular brittle fracture for relatively sharp notched specimen, which meant that fracture mechanism of P92 steel altered due to the presence of the notch. Meanwhile, based on Norton–Bailey and Kachanov–Robotnov constitutive models, a modified model was proposed. Finite element simulations were carried out to investigate the effect of multiaxial stress state on the creep behavior, fracture mechanism and damage evolvement of P92 steel. The simulation results agreed well with the fracture behaviors observed experimentally.

  6. Accuracy Improvement of Multi-Axis Systems Based on Laser Correction of Volumetric Geometric Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleshevsky, V. I.; Sokolov, V. A.; Pimushkin, Ya I.

    2018-04-01

    The article describes a volumetric geometric errors correction method for CNC- controlled multi-axis systems (machine-tools, CMMs etc.). The Kalman’s concept of “Control and Observation” is used. A versatile multi-function laser interferometer is used as Observer in order to measure machine’s error functions. A systematic error map of machine’s workspace is produced based on error functions measurements. The error map results into error correction strategy. The article proposes a new method of error correction strategy forming. The method is based on error distribution within machine’s workspace and a CNC-program postprocessor. The postprocessor provides minimal error values within maximal workspace zone. The results are confirmed by error correction of precision CNC machine-tools.

  7. Fatigue damage assessment under multi-axial non-proportional cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohta, Keshav; Gupta, Suneel K.; Jadhav, P.A.; Bhasin, V.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed fatigue analysis is carried out for class I Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) components to rule out the fatigue failure during their design lifetime. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code Section III NB, has provided two schemes for fatigue assessment, one for fixed principal directions (proportional) loading and the other for varying principal directions (non-proportional) loading conditions. Recent literature on multi-axial fatigue tests has revealed lower fatigue lives under nonproportional loading conditions. In an attempt to understand the loading parameter lowering the fatigue life, a finite element based study has been carried out. Here, fatigue damage in a tube has been correlated with the applied axial to shear strain ratio and phase difference between them. The FE analysis has used Chaboche nonlinear kinematic hardening rule to model material's realistic cyclic plastic deformation behavior. The ASME alternating stress intensity (based on linear elastic FEA) and the plastic strain energy dissipation (based on elastic-plastic FEA) have been considered to assess the per cycle fatigue damage. The study has revealed that ASME criteria predicts lower alternating stress intensity (fatigue damage parameter S alt ) for some cases of non-proportional loading than that predicted for corresponding proportional loading case. However, the actual fatigue damage is higher in non-proportional loading than that in corresponding proportional loading case. Further the fatigue damage of an NPP component under realistic multi-axial cyclic loading conditions has been assessed using some popular critical plane based models vis-à-vis ASME Sec. III criteria. (author)

  8. Multiaxial mechanical response and constitutive modeling of esophageal tissues: Impact on esophageal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gerhard; Schriefl, Andreas; Zeindlinger, Georg; Katzensteiner, Andreas; Ainödhofer, Herwig; Saxena, Amulya; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-12-01

    Congenital defects of the esophagus are relatively frequent, with 1 out of 2500 babies suffering from such a defect. A new method of treatment by implanting tissue engineered esophagi into newborns is currently being developed and tested using ovine esophagi. For the reconstruction of the biological function of native tissues with engineered esophagi, their cellular structure as well as their mechanical properties must be considered. Since very limited mechanical and structural data for the esophagus are available, the aim of this study was to investigate the multiaxial mechanical behavior of the ovine esophagus and the underlying microstructure. Therefore, uniaxial tensile, biaxial tensile and extension-inflation tests on esophagi were performed. The underlying microstructure was examined in stained histological sections through standard optical microscopy techniques. Moreover, the uniaxial ultimate tensile strength and residual deformations of the tissue were determined. Both the mucosa-submucosa and the muscle layers showed nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical behavior during uniaxial, biaxial and inflation testing. Cyclical inflation of the intact esophageal tube caused marked softening of the passive esophagi in the circumferential direction. The rupture strength of the mucosa-submucosa layer was much higher than that of the muscle layer. Overall, the ovine esophagus showed a heterogeneous and anisotropic behavior with different mechanical properties for the individual layers. The intact and layer-specific multiaxial properties were characterized using a well-known three-dimensional microstructurally based strain-energy function. This novel and complete set of data serves the basis for a better understanding of tissue remodeling in diseased esophagi and can be used to perform computer simulations of surgical interventions or medical-device applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of fibre arrangement on the multiaxial fatigue of fibrous composites: a micromechanical computational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Brighenti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural components made of fibre-reinforced materials are frequently used in engineering applications. Fibre-reinforced composites are multiphase materials, and complex mechanical phenomena take place at limit conditions but also during normal service situations, especially under fatigue loading, causing a progressive deterioration and damage. Under repeated loading, the degradation mainly occurs in the matrix material and at the fibre-matrix interface, and such a degradation has to be quantified for design structural assessment purposes. To this end, damage mechanics and fracture mechanics theories can be suitably applied to examine such a problem. Damage concepts can be applied to the matrix mechanical characteristics and, by adopting a 3-D mixed mode fracture description of the fibre-matrix detachment, fatigue fracture mechanics concepts can be used to determine the progressive fibre debonding responsible for the loss of load bearing capacity of the reinforcing phase. In the present paper, a micromechanical model is used to evaluate the unixial or multiaxial fatigue behaviour of structures with equi-oriented or randomly distributed fibres. The spatial fibre arrangement is taken into account through a statistical description of their orientation angles for which a Gaussian-like distribution is assumed, whereas the mechanical effect of the fibres on the composite is accounted for by a homogenization approach aimed at obtaining the macroscopic elastic constants of the material. The composite material behaves as an isotropic one for randomly distributed fibres, while it is transversally isotropic for unidirectional fibres. The fibre arrangement in the structural component influences the fatigue life with respect to the biaxiality ratio for multiaxial constant amplitude fatigue loading. One representative parametric example is discussed.

  10. Application du concept de maillon faible à un critère d'endurance multiaxial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flacelière, L.; Morel, F.; Palin-Luc, T.

    2002-12-01

    En fatigue à grand nombre de cycle, il est aujourd'hui admis que la distribution des contraintes, ainsi que la taille des composants, sont responsables de variations de la limite de fatigue. Sous chargement uniaxial ou multiaxial, on peut montrer qu'une approche statistique dite du maillon le plus faible, combiné à un critère multiaxial d'endurance basé sur une analyse micro plastique, permet de prédire la limite de fatigue de plusieurs matériaux métalliques. Quatre types de chargement sont analysés (traction-compression, torsion, flexion rotative et flexion plane), puis comparées aux résultats expérimentaux, pour une fonte et deux aciers haute résistance. L'approche statistique proposée permet d'intégrer un certain nombre d'aspects: la dispersion des données pour tous types de chargement, l'effet de gradient et l'influence de la présence de défauts matériaux. Enfin, ce modèle rend également compte de la diminution de la limite de fatigue avec l'augmentation du volume contraint. Les prédictions des probabilités de rupture sont raisonnables bien que seules des limites de fatigue relatives à des probabilités de rupture de 50% soient utilisées pour l'identification des paramètres du modèle.

  11. Mechanical impedance of the sitting human body in single-axis compared to multi-axis whole-body vibration exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, P; Lundström, R

    2001-01-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the mechanical impedance of the sitting human body and to compare data obtained in laboratory single-axis investigations with multi-axis data from in vehicle measurements. The experiments were performed in a laboratory for single-axis measurements. The multi-axis exposure was generated with an eight-seat minibus where the rear seats had been replaced with a rigid one. The subjects in the multi-axis experiment all participated in the single-axis experiments. There are quite a few investigations in the literature describing the human response to single-axis exposure. The response from the human body can be expected to be affected by multi-axis input in a different way than from a single-axis exposure. The present knowledge of the effect of multiple axis exposure is very limited. The measurements were performed using a specially designed force and accelerometer plate. This plate was placed between the subject and the hard seat. Outcome shows a clear difference between mechanical impedance for multi-axis exposure compared to single-axis. This is especially clear in the x-direction where the difference is very large. The conclusion is that it seems unlikely that single-axis mechanical impedance data can be directly transferred to a multi-axis environment. This is due to the force cross-talk between different directions.

  12. Facile Fabrication of Electrically Conductive Low-Density Polyethylene/Carbon Fiber Tubes for Novel Smart Materials via Multiaxial Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijun; Nie, Min; Wang, Qi

    2018-01-10

    Electromechanical sensors are indispensable components in functional devices and robotics application. However, the fabrication of the sensors still maintains a challenging issue that high percolation threshold and easy failure of conductive network are derived from uniaxial orientation of conductive fillers in practical melt processing. Herein, we reported a facile fabrication method to prepare a multiaxial low-density polyethylene (LDPE)/carbon fibers (CFs) tube with bidirectional controllable electrical conductivity and sensitive strain-responsive performance via rotation extrusion technology. The multidimensional helical flow is confirmed in the reverse rotation extrusion, and the CFs readily respond to the flow field leading to a multiaxial orientation in the LDPE matrix. In contrast to uniaxial LDPE/CF composites, which perform a "head to head" conjunction, multiaxial-orientated CF networks exhibit a unique multilayer structure in which the CFs with distinct orientation direction intersect in the interface, endowing the LDPE/CF composites with a low percolation threshold (15 wt %) to those of the uniaxial ones (∼35 wt %). The angles between two axes play a vital role in determining the density of the conductive networks in the interface, which is predominant in tuning the bending-responsive behaviors with a gauge factor range from 12.5 to 56.3 and the corresponding linear respond region from ∼15 to ∼1%. Such a superior performance of conductive LDPE/CF tube confirms that the design of multiaxial orientation paves a novel way to facile fabrication of advanced cost-effective CF-based smart materials, shedding light on promising applications such as smart materials and intelligent engineering monitoring.

  13. Surrogate fuel assembly multi-axis shaker tests to simulate normal conditions of rail and truck transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, Greg John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uncapher, William Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grey, Carissa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelhardt, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This report describes the third set of tests (the “DCLa shaker tests”) of an instrumented surrogate PWR fuel assembly. The purpose of this set of tests was to measure strains and accelerations on Zircaloy-4 fuel rods when the PWR assembly was subjected to rail and truck loadings simulating normal conditions of transport when affixed to a multi-axis shaker. This is the first set of tests of the assembly simulating rail normal conditions of transport.

  14. Surrogate fuel assembly multi-axis shaker tests to simulate normal conditions of rail and truck transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, Greg John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uncapher, William Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grey, Carissa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelhardt, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-12

    This report describes the third set of tests (the “DCLa shaker tests”) of an instrumented surrogate PWR fuel assembly. The purpose of this set of tests was to measure strains and accelerations on Zircaloy-4 fuel rods when the PWR assembly was subjected to rail and truck loadings simulating normal conditions of transport when affixed to a multi-axis shaker. This is the first set of tests of the assembly simulating rail normal conditions of transport.

  15. Assessment of Creep Deformation, Damage, and Rupture Life of 304HCu Austenitic Stainless Steel Under Multiaxial State of Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, K. C.; Goyal, Sunil; Parameswaran, P.; Ravi, S.; Laha, K.

    2018-03-01

    The role of the multiaxial state of stress on creep deformation and rupture behavior of 304HCu austenitic stainless steel was assessed by performing creep rupture tests on both smooth and notched specimens of the steel. The multiaxial state of stress was introduced by incorporating circumferential U-notches of different root radii ranging from 0.25 to 5.00 mm on the smooth specimens of the steel. Creep tests were carried out at 973 K over the stress range of 140 to 220 MPa. In the presence of notch, the creep rupture strength of the steel was found to increase with the associated decrease in rupture ductility. Over the investigated stress range and notch sharpness, the strengthening was found to increase drastically with notch sharpness and tended toward saturation. The fractographic studies revealed the mixed mode of failure consisting of transgranular dimples and intergranular creep cavitation for shallow notches, whereas the failure was predominantly intergranular for relatively sharper notches. Detailed finite element analysis of stress distribution across the notch throat plane on creep exposure was carried out to assess the creep failure of the material in the presence of notch. The reduction in von-Mises stress across the notch throat plane, which was greater for sharper notches, increased the creep rupture strength of the material. The variation in fracture behavior of the material in the presence of notch was elucidated based on the von-Mises, maximum principal, and hydrostatic stresses. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of creep strain distribution across the notch revealed localized creep straining at the notch root for sharper notches. A master curve for predicting creep rupture life under the multiaxial state of stress was generated considering the representative stress having contributions from both the von-Mises and principal stress components of the stress field in the notch throat plane. Rupture ductility was also predicted based on the

  16. Mergers + acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppszallern, Suzanna

    2002-05-01

    The hospital sector in 2001 led the health care field in mergers and acquisitions. Most deals involved a network augmenting its presence within a specific region or in a market adjacent to its primary service area. Analysts expect M&A activity to increase in 2002.

  17. Fatigue Behavior under Multiaxial Stress States Including Notch Effects and Variable Amplitude Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Nicholas R.

    The central objective of the research performed in this study was to be able to better understand and predict fatigue crack initiation and growth from stress concentrations subjected to complex service loading histories. As such, major areas of focus were related to the understanding and modeling of material deformation behavior, fatigue damage quantification, notch effects, cycle counting, damage accumulation, and crack growth behavior under multiaxial nominal loading conditions. To support the analytical work, a wide variety of deformation and fatigue tests were also performed using tubular and plate specimens made from 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, with and without the inclusion of a circular through-thickness hole. However, the analysis procedures implemented were meant to be general in nature, and applicable to a wide variety of materials and component geometries. As a result, experimental data from literature were also used, when appropriate, to supplement the findings of various analyses. Popular approaches currently used for multiaxial fatigue life analysis are based on the idea of computing an equivalent stress/strain quantity through the extension of static yield criteria. This equivalent stress/strain is then considered to be equal, in terms of fatigue damage, to a uniaxial loading of the same magnitude. However, it has often been shown, and was shown again in this study, that although equivalent stress- and strain-based analysis approaches may work well in certain situations, they lack a general robustness and offer little room for improvement. More advanced analysis techniques, on the other hand, provide an opportunity to more accurately account for various aspects of the fatigue failure process under both constant and variable amplitude loading conditions. As a result, such techniques were of primary interest in the investigations performed. By implementing more advanced life prediction methodologies, both the overall accuracy and the correlation of fatigue

  18. Joined application of a multiaxial critical plane criterion and a strain energy density criterion in low-cycle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Carpinteri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the multiaxial fatigue life assessment of notched structural components is performed by employing a strain-based multiaxial fatigue criterion. Such a criterion, depending on the critical plane concept, is extended by implementing the control volume concept reated to the Strain Energy Density (SED approach: a material point located at a certain distance from the notch tip is assumed to be the verification point where to perform the above assessment. Such a distance, measured along the notch bisector, is a function of both the biaxiality ratio (defined as the ratio between the applied shear stress amplitude and the normal stress amplitude and the control volume radii under Mode I and Mode III. Once the position of the verification point is determined, the fatigue lifetime is assessed through an equivalent strain amplitude, acting on the critical plane, together with a unique material reference curve (i.e. the Manson-Coffin curve. Some uniaxial and multiaxial fatigue data related to V-notched round bars made of titanium grade 5 alloy (Ti-6Al-4V are examined to validate the present criterion.

  19. Reduced softening of EUROFER 97 under thermo-mechanical and multiaxial fatigue loading and its impact on the design rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aktaa, J.; Weick, M.; Petersen, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Toward test blanket module (TBM) in ITER and DEMO fusion power plants design rules for components built from EUROFER 97 get more and more in the midpoint of interest. One of the specific characteristic of EUROFER 97 as a ferritic-martensitic steel is its cyclic softening yielding to lower stresses under strain controlled fatigue loading and thus longer lifetimes. However our thermo-mechanical and multiaxial fatigue tests showed lifetimes remarkably lower than those expected on the base of isothermal uniaxial fatigue tests. Reduced cyclic softening observed in these experiments is believed as one of the reasons of the shorter fatigue lifetimes. When applying the design rules, derived for EUROFER 97 on the base of isothermal uniaxial data considering the recommendations in the ASME and RCC-MR code, to our thermo-mechanical and multiaxial fatigue tests for verification strong loss in their conservatism has been found. The lifetimes observed in a part of the multiaxial experiments are even lower than the design lifetimes supposed to be sufficiently conservative. To overcome this problem new design rules are proposed among others on the base of damage and lifetime prediction model developed lately for EUROFER 97. In this paper the experimental findings as well as the new design approaches will be presented and discussed. (authors)

  20. Fatigue life determination by damage measuring in SAE 8620 specimens steel subjected to multiaxial experiments in neutral and corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luiz L. da; Filho, Nelson do N.A.; Gomes, Paulo de T.V.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Mansur, Tanius R.

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is the fail phenomenon of a material subjected to cyclic loads. This phenomenon affects any component under loads (forces, temperatures, etc.) that changes in time. When there is a combined load, originating multiaxial fatigue, which is the most of the real loads, worst is the situation. Before the component fail, the fatigue phenomenon produces damages to its material and this is a cumulative process that could not be reduced. In the continuum mechanic context, material damage is defined as a parameter that reduces the component resistance and this could cause its fail. The process of damage measuring by changes in electrical resistance is used in this work, and from experimental results of SAE 8620 steel specimens subjected to multiaxial fatigue in corrosive and neutral environment, the remaining specimen time life could be determined. Each specimen has its initial electrical resistance measured and after a certain number of fatigue cycles stopping points, its electrical resistance was measured again. In order to study multiaxial fatigue in specimens, a machine that induces simultaneously bending and torsional loads in the specimen was developed. Air at the temperature range of 18 deg C and 20 deg C was considered neutral environment. The corrosive environment was a NaCl solution with a concentration of 3,5% in weigh. The experimental results showed that the measuring fatigue damage using the changes in electrical resistance is efficient and that is possible to estimate the effect of a corrosive environment in the fatigue damage. (author)

  1. Role of Inelastic Transverse Compressive Behavior and Multiaxial Loading on the Transverse Impact of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramani Sockalingam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available High-velocity transverse impact of ballistic fabrics and yarns by projectiles subject individual fibers to multi-axial dynamic loading. Single-fiber transverse impact experiments with the current state-of-the-art experimental capabilities are challenging due to the associated micron length-scale. Kevlar® KM2 fibers exhibit a nonlinear inelastic behavior in transverse compression with an elastic limit less than 1.5% strain. The effect of this transverse behavior on a single KM2 fiber subjected to a cylindrical and a fragment-simulating projectile (FSP transverse impact is studied with a 3D finite element model. The inelastic behavior results in a significant reduction of fiber bounce velocity and projectile-fiber contact forces up to 38% compared to an elastic impact response. The multiaxial stress states during impact including transverse compression, axial tension, axial compression and interlaminar shear are presented at the location of failure. In addition, the models show a strain concentration over a small length in the fiber under the projectile-fiber contact. A failure criterion, based on maximum axial tensile strain accounting for the gage length, strain rate and multiaxial loading degradation effects are applied to predict the single-fiber breaking speed. Results are compared to the elastic response to assess the importance of inelastic material behavior on failure during a transverse impact.

  2. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Ting; Kinahan, Paul E; Alessio, Adam M; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. (paper)

  3. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for PET/CT quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently-available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration CINE CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. Methods We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. Results CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. Conclusion When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. PMID:22156174

  4. Multi-axial load application and DIC measurement of advanced composite beam deformation behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berggreen C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available For the validation of a new beam element formulation, a wide set of experimental data consisting of deformation patterns obtained for a number of specially designed composite beam elements, have been obtained. The composite materials applied in the beams consist of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with specially designed layup configurations promoting advanced coupling behavior. Furthermore, the beams are designed with different cross-section shapes. The data obtained from the experiments are also used in order to improve the general understanding related to practical implementation of mechanisms of elastic couplings due to anisotropic properties of composite materials. The knowledge gained from these experiments is therefore essential in order to facilitate an implementation of passive control in future large wind turbine blades. A test setup based on a four-column MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a maximum capacity of 100 kN was developed, see Figure 1. The setup allows installing and testing beams of different cross-sections applying load cases such as axial extension, shear force bending, pure bending in two principal directions as well as pure torsion, see Figure 2. In order to apply multi-axial loading, a load application system consisting of three hydraulic actuators were mounted in two planes using multi-axial servo-hydraulic control. The actuator setup consists of the main actuator on the servo-hydraulic test machine working in the vertical axis (depicted on Figure 1 placed at the testing machine crosshead and used for application of vertical forces to the specimens. Two extra actuators are placed in a horizontal plane on the T-slot table of the test machine in different positions in order to apply loading at the tip of the specimen in various configurations. In order to precisely characterize the global as well as surface deformations of the beam specimens tested, a combination of different measurement systems were used during

  5. Increased multiaxial lumbar motion responses during multiple-impulse mechanical force manually assisted spinal manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunzburg Robert

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal manipulation has been found to create demonstrable segmental and intersegmental spinal motions thought to be biomechanically related to its mechanisms. In the case of impulsive-type instrument device comparisons, significant differences in the force-time characteristics and concomitant motion responses of spinal manipulative instruments have been reported, but studies investigating the response to multiple thrusts (multiple impulse trains have not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine multi-axial segmental and intersegmental motion responses of ovine lumbar vertebrae to single impulse and multiple impulse spinal manipulative thrusts (SMTs. Methods Fifteen adolescent Merino sheep were examined. Tri-axial accelerometers were attached to intraosseous pins rigidly fixed to the L1 and L2 lumbar spinous processes under fluoroscopic guidance while the animals were anesthetized. A hand-held electromechanical chiropractic adjusting instrument (Impulse was used to apply single and repeated force impulses (13 total over a 2.5 second time interval at three different force settings (low, medium, and high along the posteroanterior axis of the T12 spinous process. Axial (AX, posteroanterior (PA, and medial-lateral (ML acceleration responses in adjacent segments (L1, L2 were recorded at a rate of 5000 samples per second. Peak-peak segmental accelerations (L1, L2 and intersegmental acceleration transfer (L1–L2 for each axis and each force setting were computed from the acceleration-time recordings. The initial acceleration response for a single thrust and the maximum acceleration response observed during the 12 multiple impulse trains were compared using a paired observations t-test (POTT, alpha = .05. Results Segmental and intersegmental acceleration responses mirrored the peak force magnitude produced by the Impulse Adjusting Instrument. Accelerations were greatest for AX and PA measurement axes. Compared to

  6. CT pelvimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicens, J.L.; Charles, G.; Le Berre, J.; Flageat, J.

    1989-01-01

    Pelvimetry aims at providing the obstetrician with information on the size and morphology of the female pelvis, thus enabling him to assess the obstetrical prognosis as accurately as possible. Computed tomography (CT) has several advantages, in particular the lower mother and fetus radiation dose. After a brief description of obstetrical anatomy, the usual CT exploration method is presented and its results are considered in terms of measurements, indices and morphological findings. If performed with a very strict exploration procedure, CT pelvimetry is a very reliable, fact and comfortable method of examination. All these advantages, combined with the minimized patient dose, should lead to an increasingly widespread use of this technique [fr

  7. Mergers & Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomcenco, Alex

    This dissertation is a legal dogmatic thesis, the goal of which is to describe and analyze the current state of law in Europe in regard to some relevant selected elements related to mergers and acquisitions, and the adviser’s counsel in this regard. Having regard to the topic of the dissertation...... and fiscal neutrality, group-related issues, holding-structure issues, employees, stock exchange listing issues, and corporate nationality....

  8. Optimizing radiation exposure for CT localizer radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohrer, Evelyn; Maeder, Ulf; Fiebich, Martin [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection-IMPS; Schaefer, Stefan; Krombach, Gabriele A. [Univ. Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Noel, Peter B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-08-01

    The trend towards submillisievert CT scans leads to a higher dose fraction of localizer radiographs in CT examinations. The already existing technical capabilities make dose optimization of localizer radiographs worthwhile. Modern CT scanners apply automatic exposure control (AEC) based on attenuation data in such a localizer. Therefore not only this aspect but also the detectability of anatomical landmarks in the localizer for the desired CT scan range adjustment needs to be considered. The effective dose of a head, chest, and abdomen-pelvis localizer radiograph with standard factory settings and user-optimized settings was determined using Monte Carlo simulations. CT examinations of an anthropomorphic phantom were performed using multiple sets of acquisition parameters for the localizer radiograph and the AEC for the subsequent helical CT scan. Anatomical landmarks were defined to assess the image quality of the localizer. CTDI{sub vol} and effective mAs per slice of the helical CT scan were recorded to examine the impact of localizer settings on a helical CT scan. The dose of the localizer radiograph could be decreased by more than 90% while the image quality remained sufficient when selecting the lowest available settings (80 kVp, 20 mA, pa tube position). The tube position during localizer acquisition had a greater impact on the AEC than the reduction of tube voltage and tube current. Except for the use of a pa tube position, all changes of acquisition parameters for the localizer resulted in a decreased total radiation exposure. A dose reduction of CT localizer radiograph is necessary and possible. In the examined CT system there was no negative impact on the modulated helical CT scan when the lowest tube voltage and tube current were used for the localizer.

  9. CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, lung nodules and liver masses Monitor the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as cancer treatment Detect ... scan done in a hospital or an outpatient facility. CT scans are painless and, with newer machines, ...

  10. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  11. CT Enterography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These ... other medical conditions, and if you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ...

  12. Three-phase CT examination of the pancreatobiliary region using multislice CT with 1-mm collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shigeki; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Koujiro; Iwano, Shingo; Satake, Hiroko; Ota, Toyohiro; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement and accuracy of imaging of the circulatory phase in the first-pass, second-pass, and third-pass acquisitions in the pancreato-biliary region with 1-mm collimation obtained by multislice computed tomography (CT). In 53 patients, two sequential acquisitions from the porta hepatis to the pancreas were performed during a single breath-hold, followed by a third-pass acquisition including the liver beginning 15 sec after the second-pass acquisition. Contrast enhancement in each acquisition was measured in the aorta, portal vein and its branches, and pancreas. Four experienced radiologists graded using four-point scoring whether or not each acquisition was appropriate for imaging of the arterial phase, pancreatic phase, and portal venous phase. Aortic enhancement was highest at the beginning of the second-pass acquisition. The portal and splenic veins and pancreas showed maximum enhancement in the second-pass acquisition, while the superior mesenteric vein showed maximum enhancement in the third-pass acquisition. In the visual assessment, significantly higher grades were achieved in the first-pass, second-pass, and third-pass acquisitions with regard to imaging of the arterial phase, pancreatic phase, and portal venous phase, respectively. Multislice CT permits the acquisition of three distinct circulatory phases (arterial, pancreatic, and portal venous phases) in the pancreatobiliary region with 1-mm collimation. (author)

  13. Measurement of multiaxial ply strength by an off-axis flexure test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, John H., Jr.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    An off-axis flexure (OAF) test was performed to measure ply strength under multiaxial stress states. This test involves unidirectional off-axis specimens loaded in bending, using an apparatus that allows these anisotropic specimens to twist as well as flex without the complications of a resisting torque. A 3D finite element stress analysis verified that simple beam theory could be used to compute the specimen bending stresses at failure. Unidirectional graphite/epoxy specimens with fiber angles ranging from 90 deg to 15 deg have combined normal and shear stresses on their failure planes that are typical of 45 deg plies in structural laminates. Tests for a range of stress states with AS4/3501-6 specimens showed that both normal and shear stresses on the failure plane influenced cracking resistance. This OAF test may prove to be useful for generating data needed to predict ply cracking in composite structures and may also provide an approach for studying fiber-matrix interface failures under stress states typical of structures.

  14. Probabilistic multi-scale models and measurements of self-heating under multiaxial high cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, M.; Hild, F.; Doudard, C.; Calloch, S.; Weber, B.

    2010-01-01

    Different approaches have been proposed to link high cycle fatigue properties to thermal measurements under cyclic loadings, usually referred to as 'self-heating tests'. This paper focuses on two models whose parameters are tuned by resorting to self-heating tests and then used to predict high cycle fatigue properties. The first model is based upon a yield surface approach to account for stress multi-axiality at a microscopic scale, whereas the second one relies on a probabilistic modelling of micro-plasticity at the scale of slip-planes. Both model identifications are cost effective, relying mainly on quickly obtained temperature data in self-heating tests. They both describe the influence of the stress heterogeneity, the volume effect and the hydrostatic stress on fatigue limits. The thermal effects and mean fatigue limit predictions are in good agreement with experimental results for in and out-of phase tension-torsion loadings. In the case of fatigue under non-proportional loading paths, the mean fatigue limit prediction error of the critical shear stress approach is three times less than with the yield surface approach. (authors)

  15. Probabilistic multi-scale models and measurements of self-heating under multiaxial high cycle fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncelet, M.; Hild, F. [Univ Paris 11, PRES, Univ Paris 06, LMT Cachan, ENS Cachan, CNRS, F-94235 Cachan (France); Doudard, C.; Calloch, S. [Univ Brest, ENIB, ENSIETA, LBMS EA 4325, F-29806 Brest, (France); Weber, B. [ArcelorMittal Maizieres Res Voie Romaine, F-57283 Maizieres Les Metz (France)

    2010-07-01

    Different approaches have been proposed to link high cycle fatigue properties to thermal measurements under cyclic loadings, usually referred to as 'self-heating tests'. This paper focuses on two models whose parameters are tuned by resorting to self-heating tests and then used to predict high cycle fatigue properties. The first model is based upon a yield surface approach to account for stress multi-axiality at a microscopic scale, whereas the second one relies on a probabilistic modelling of micro-plasticity at the scale of slip-planes. Both model identifications are cost effective, relying mainly on quickly obtained temperature data in self-heating tests. They both describe the influence of the stress heterogeneity, the volume effect and the hydrostatic stress on fatigue limits. The thermal effects and mean fatigue limit predictions are in good agreement with experimental results for in and out-of phase tension-torsion loadings. In the case of fatigue under non-proportional loading paths, the mean fatigue limit prediction error of the critical shear stress approach is three times less than with the yield surface approach. (authors)

  16. Small-scale multi-axial hybrid simulation of a shear-critical reinforced concrete frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Vahid; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Vecchio, Frank

    2017-10-01

    This study presents a numerical multi-scale simulation framework which is extended to accommodate hybrid simulation (numerical-experimental integration). The framework is enhanced with a standardized data exchange format and connected to a generalized controller interface program which facilitates communication with various types of laboratory equipment and testing configurations. A small-scale experimental program was conducted using a six degree-of-freedom hydraulic testing equipment to verify the proposed framework and provide additional data for small-scale testing of shearcritical reinforced concrete structures. The specimens were tested in a multi-axial hybrid simulation manner under a reversed cyclic loading condition simulating earthquake forces. The physical models were 1/3.23-scale representations of a beam and two columns. A mixed-type modelling technique was employed to analyze the remainder of the structures. The hybrid simulation results were compared against those obtained from a large-scale test and finite element analyses. The study found that if precautions are taken in preparing model materials and if the shear-related mechanisms are accurately considered in the numerical model, small-scale hybrid simulations can adequately simulate the behaviour of shear-critical structures. Although the findings of the study are promising, to draw general conclusions additional test data are required.

  17. Assessment of an improved multiaxial strength theory based on creep-rupture data for Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    A new multiaxial strength theory incorporating three independent stress parameters was developed and reported by the author in 1984. It was formally incorporated into ASME Code Case N47-29 in 1990. The new theory provided significantly more accurate stress-rupture life predictions than obtained using the classical theories of von Mises, Tresca, and Rankins (maximum principal stress), for Types 304 and 316 stainless steel tested at 593 and 600 degrees C respectively under different biaxial stress states. Additional results for Inconel 600 specimens tested at 816 degrees C under tension-tension and tension-compression stress states are presented in this paper and show a factor of approximately 2.4 reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed lives as compared to the classical theories of von Mises and Tresca and a factor of about 5 as compared to the Rankins theory. A key feature of the theory, which incorporates the maximum deviatoric stress, the first invariant of the stress tensor, and the second invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor, is its ability to distinguish between life under tensile versus compressive stress states

  18. Development of a Very High Cycle Fatigue (VHCF multiaxial testing device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vieira

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The very high cycle region of the S-N fatigue curve has been the subject of intensive research on the last years, with special focus on axial, bending, torsional and fretting fatigue tests. Very high cycle fatigue can be achieved using ultrasonic exciters which allow for frequency testing of up to 30 kHz. Still, the multiaxial fatigue analysis is not yet developed for this type of fatigue analyses, mainly due to conceptual limitations of these testing devices. In this paper, a device designed to produce biaxial fatigue testing using a single piezoelectric axial exciter is presented, as well as the preliminary testing of this device. The device is comprised of a horn and a specimen, which are both attached to the piezoelectric exciter. The steps taken towards the final geometry of the device are presented. Preliminary experimental testing of the developed device is made using thermographic imaging, strain measurements and vibration speeds and indicates good behaviour of the tested specimen.

  19. Natural fiber composite design and characterization for limit stress prediction in multiaxial stress state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Ihueze

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the design of natural fiber composites and analysis of multiaxial stresses in relation to yield limit stresses of composites loaded off the fibers axis. ASTM D638-10 standard for tensile test was used to design and compose composites of plantain fiber reinforced polyester (PFRP. While the rule of mixtures was used in the evaluation of properties of composites in the fiber direction the evaluation of properties perpendicular or transverse to the fiber direction was done based on the value of the orthogonal stresses evaluated using ANSYS finite element software, the application of the Brintrup equation and Halpin–Tai equation. The yield strength for the plantain empty fruit bunch fiber reinforced polyester resin (PEFBFRP was estimated as 33.69 MPa while the yield strength of plantain pseudo stem fiber reinforced polyester resin (PPSFRP was estimated as 29.24 MPa. Above all, the PEFBFRP with average light absorbance peak of 45.47 was found to have better mechanical properties than the PPSFRP with average light absorbance peak of 45.77.

  20. Fatigue Assessment of Nickel-Titanium Peripheral Stents: Comparison of Multi-Axial Fatigue Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Dario; Berti, Francesca; Migliavacca, Francesco; Pennati, Giancarlo; Petrini, Lorenza

    2018-02-01

    Peripheral Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) stents exploit super-elasticity to treat femoropopliteal artery atherosclerosis. The stent is subject to cyclic loads, which may lead to fatigue fracture and treatment failure. The complexity of the loading conditions and device geometry, coupled with the nonlinear material behavior, may induce multi-axial and non-proportional deformation. Finite element analysis can assess the fatigue risk, by comparing the device state of stress with the material fatigue limit. The most suitable fatigue model is not fully understood for NiTi devices, due to its complex thermo-mechanical behavior. This paper assesses the fatigue behavior of NiTi stents through computational models and experimental validation. Four different strain-based models are considered: the von Mises criterion and three critical plane models (Fatemi-Socie, Brown-Miller, and Smith-Watson-Topper models). Two stents, made of the same material with different cell geometries are manufactured, and their fatigue behavior is experimentally characterized. The comparison between experimental and numerical results highlights an overestimation of the failure risk by the von Mises criterion. On the contrary, the selected critical plane models, even if based on different damage mechanisms, give a better fatigue life estimation. Further investigations on crack propagation mechanisms of NiTi stents are required to properly select the most reliable fatigue model.

  1. Identification of Time-Varying Pilot Control Behavior in Multi-Axis Control Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal, Peter M. T.; Sweet, Barbara T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in fly-by-wire control architectures for rotorcraft have introduced new interest in the identification of time-varying pilot control behavior in multi-axis control tasks. In this paper a maximum likelihood estimation method is used to estimate the parameters of a pilot model with time-dependent sigmoid functions to characterize time-varying human control behavior. An experiment was performed by 9 general aviation pilots who had to perform a simultaneous roll and pitch control task with time-varying aircraft dynamics. In 8 different conditions, the axis containing the time-varying dynamics and the growth factor of the dynamics were varied, allowing for an analysis of the performance of the estimation method when estimating time-dependent parameter functions. In addition, a detailed analysis of pilots adaptation to the time-varying aircraft dynamics in both the roll and pitch axes could be performed. Pilot control behavior in both axes was significantly affected by the time-varying aircraft dynamics in roll and pitch, and by the growth factor. The main effect was found in the axis that contained the time-varying dynamics. However, pilot control behavior also changed over time in the axis not containing the time-varying aircraft dynamics. This indicates that some cross coupling exists in the perception and control processes between the roll and pitch axes.

  2. Multi-axial strain transfer from laminated CFRP composites to embedded Bragg sensor: I. Parametric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyckx, G; Voet, E; De Waele, W; Degrieck, J

    2010-01-01

    Embedded optical fibre sensors are considered in numerous applications for structural health monitoring purposes. However, since the optical fibre and the host material in which it is embedded, will have different material properties, strain in both materials will not be equal when load is applied. Therefore, the multi-axial strain transfer from the host material to the embedded sensor (optical fibre) has to be considered in detail. In the first part of this paper the strain transfer will be determined using finite element modelling of a circular isotropic glass fibre embedded first in an isotropic host and second in an anisotropic composite material. The strain transfer or relation depends on the mechanical properties of the host material and the sensor (Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio), on the lay-up of the composite material (uni-directional lay-up/cross-ply lay-up) and the position of the sensor in a certain layer. In the second part of the paper the developed strain transfer model will be evaluated for one specific lay-up and sensor type

  3. Tests on creep and influence of creep on strength of concrete under multiaxial stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanig, N.; Stoeckl, S.; Kupfer, H.

    1988-12-01

    Long-time tests of three-axially loaded, sealed cylindrical specimens d = 15 cm, h = 40 cm, were carried out. The 20-cm-cube strength of the concrete was app. 45 N/mm 2 . The creep stresses were chosen in the following ranges: 0,3 ≤ σ c /β c ≤ 2,1; 0 ≤ σ r /σ l ≤ 1,0. The creep coefficients obtained were clearly depending on the multi-axial stress conditions. The creep coefficients for a t = 2 years loading were reaching app. 1 for σ l /β c = 0,3 and app. 3 for σ l /β c = 2,1, when the test evaluation was based on the initial deformations meausred after 1 minute. For σ l /β c = 2,1 the creep coefficients obtained were about 4 times as large, proceeding form calculated elastic deformations. Further evaluations concerned the Young's modulus E, Poisson's ratio μ, the bulk modulus K and the shear modulus G. The preceding permanent load leads to an increase in the Young's modulus of the concrete in longitudinal direction of the specimen up to about 4 times the value of not preloaded comparative specimens. (orig.) [de

  4. Fatigue Assessment of Nickel-Titanium Peripheral Stents: Comparison of Multi-Axial Fatigue Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Dario; Berti, Francesca; Migliavacca, Francesco; Pennati, Giancarlo; Petrini, Lorenza

    2018-03-01

    Peripheral Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) stents exploit super-elasticity to treat femoropopliteal artery atherosclerosis. The stent is subject to cyclic loads, which may lead to fatigue fracture and treatment failure. The complexity of the loading conditions and device geometry, coupled with the nonlinear material behavior, may induce multi-axial and non-proportional deformation. Finite element analysis can assess the fatigue risk, by comparing the device state of stress with the material fatigue limit. The most suitable fatigue model is not fully understood for NiTi devices, due to its complex thermo-mechanical behavior. This paper assesses the fatigue behavior of NiTi stents through computational models and experimental validation. Four different strain-based models are considered: the von Mises criterion and three critical plane models (Fatemi-Socie, Brown-Miller, and Smith-Watson-Topper models). Two stents, made of the same material with different cell geometries are manufactured, and their fatigue behavior is experimentally characterized. The comparison between experimental and numerical results highlights an overestimation of the failure risk by the von Mises criterion. On the contrary, the selected critical plane models, even if based on different damage mechanisms, give a better fatigue life estimation. Further investigations on crack propagation mechanisms of NiTi stents are required to properly select the most reliable fatigue model.

  5. Design of a multi-axis implantable MEMS sensor for intraosseous bone stress monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro, Fernando; Weiss, Lee; Campbell, Phil; Fedder, Gary K; Miller, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The capability to assess the biomechanical properties of living bone is important for basic research as well as the clinical management of skeletal trauma and disease. Even though radiodensitometric imaging is commonly used to infer bone quality, bone strength does not necessarily correlate well with these non-invasive measurements. This paper reports on the design, fabrication and initial testing of an implantable ultra-miniature multi-axis sensor for directly measuring bone stresses at a micro-scale. The device, which is fabricated with CMOS-MEMS processes, is intended to be permanently implanted within open fractures, or embedded in bone grafts, or placed on implants at the interfaces between bone and prosthetics. The stress sensor comprises an array of piezoresistive pixels to detect a stress tensor at the interfacial area between the MEMS chip and bone, with a resolution to 100 Pa, in 1 s averaging. The sensor system design and manufacture is also compatible with the integration of wireless RF telemetry, for power and data retrieval, all within a 3 mm × 3 mm × 0.3 mm footprint. The piezoresistive elements are integrated within a textured surface to enhance sensor integration with bone. Finite element analysis led to a sensor design for normal and shear stress detection. A wired sensor was fabricated in the Jazz 0.35 µm BiCMOS process and then embedded in mock bone material to characterize its response to tensile and bending loads up to 250 kPa

  6. Multi-Axis Force Sensor for Human-Robot Interaction Sensing in a Rehabilitation Robotic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosu, Victor; Grosu, Svetlana; Vanderborght, Bram; Lefeber, Dirk; Rodriguez-Guerrero, Carlos

    2017-06-05

    Human-robot interaction sensing is a compulsory feature in modern robotic systems where direct contact or close collaboration is desired. Rehabilitation and assistive robotics are fields where interaction forces are required for both safety and increased control performance of the device with a more comfortable experience for the user. In order to provide an efficient interaction feedback between the user and rehabilitation device, high performance sensing units are demanded. This work introduces a novel design of a multi-axis force sensor dedicated for measuring pelvis interaction forces in a rehabilitation exoskeleton device. The sensor is conceived such that it has different sensitivity characteristics for the three axes of interest having also movable parts in order to allow free rotations and limit crosstalk errors. Integrated sensor electronics make it easy to acquire and process data for a real-time distributed system architecture. Two of the developed sensors are integrated and tested in a complex gait rehabilitation device for safe and compliant control.

  7. Developing Parametric Models for the Assembly of Machine Fixtures for Virtual Multiaxial CNC Machining Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaykin, A. V.; Bezsonov, K. A.; Nekhoroshev, M. V.; Shulepov, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    This paper dwells upon a variance parameterization method. Variance or dimensional parameterization is based on sketching, with various parametric links superimposed on the sketch objects and user-imposed constraints in the form of an equation system that determines the parametric dependencies. This method is fully integrated in a top-down design methodology to enable the creation of multi-variant and flexible fixture assembly models, as all the modeling operations are hierarchically linked in the built tree. In this research the authors consider a parameterization method of machine tooling used for manufacturing parts using multiaxial CNC machining centers in the real manufacturing process. The developed method allows to significantly reduce tooling design time when making changes of a part’s geometric parameters. The method can also reduce time for designing and engineering preproduction, in particular, for development of control programs for CNC equipment and control and measuring machines, automate the release of design and engineering documentation. Variance parameterization helps to optimize construction of parts as well as machine tooling using integrated CAE systems. In the framework of this study, the authors demonstrate a comprehensive approach to parametric modeling of machine tooling in the CAD package used in the real manufacturing process of aircraft engines.

  8. Coronary artery stent imaging with 128-slice dual-source CT using high-pitch spiral acquisition in a cardiac phantom: comparison with the sequential and low-pitch spiral mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Florian; Loewe, Christian; Plank, Christina; Schernthaner, Ruediger; Bercaczy, Dominik; Lammer, Johannes; Leschka, Sebastian; Goetti, Robert; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Homolka, Peter; Friedrich, Guy; Feuchtner, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate coronary stents in vitro using 128-slice-dual-source computed tomography (CT). Twelve different coronary stents placed in a non-moving cardiac/chest phantom were examined by 128-slice dual-source CT using three CT protocols [high-pitch spiral (HPS), sequential (SEQ) and conventional spiral (SPIR)]. Artificial in-stent lumen narrowing (ALN), visible inner stent area (VIA), artificial in-stent lumen attenuation (ALA) in percent, image noise inside/outside the stent and CTDIvol were measured. Mean ALN was 46% for HPS, 44% for SEQ and 47% for SPIR without significant difference. Mean VIA was similar with 31% for HPS, 30% for SEQ and 33% for SPIR. Mean ALA was, at 5% for HPS, significantly lower compared with -11% for SPIR (p = 0.024), but not different from SEQ with -1%. Mean image noise was significantly higher for HPS compared with SEQ and SPIR inside and outside the stent (p < 0.001). CTDIvol was lower for HPS (5.17 mGy), compared with SEQ (9.02 mGy) and SPIR (55.97 mGy), respectively. The HPS mode of 128-slice dual-source CT yields fewer artefacts inside the stent lumen compared with SPIR and SEQ, but image noise is higher. ALN is still too high for routine stent evaluation in clinical practice. Radiation dose of the HPS mode is markedly (less than about tenfold) reduced. (orig.)

  9. Multiaxial creep of fine grained 0.5Cr-0.5Mo-0.25V and coarse grained 1Cr-0.5Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, R.J.; Flewitt, P.E.J.; Lonsdale, D.

    1991-01-01

    To explore the multiaxial creep response of materials used for electrical power generating plant, two steels, a fine grained 0.5Cr-0.5Mo-0.25V steel in a normalised and tempered condition with high creep ductility and a coarse grained 1Cr-0.5Mo steel in a quenched and tempered condition with low uniaxial creep ductility, have been selected. A range of multiaxial stress testing techniques which span the stress states that would allow identification of any technique dependent variables has been used. The deformation and failure of the normalised and tempered 0.5Cr-0.5Mo-0.25V steel for a range of multiaxial test techniques and, therefore, stress states may be described by an equivalent stress criterion. The results from the multiaxial tests carried out on the fully bainitic 1Cr-0.5Mo steel show that the multiaxial stress rupture criterion (MSRC) varies with stress state; at high triaxiality (notch), it is controlled by the maximum principal stress, whereas at low triaxiality (shear) it is dependent on both maximum principal stress and equivalent stress. Furthermore, a simple description of stress state based on maximum principal and equivalent stress does not define this uniquely, since the MSRC derived from uniaxial and torsion testing does not describe the failure of notch, tube, or double shear tests. (author)

  10. Quantification of Artifact Reduction With Real-Time Cine Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Acquisition Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, Ulrich W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the magnitude and frequency of artifacts in simulated four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images using three real-time acquisition methods- direction-dependent displacement acquisition, simultaneous displacement and phase acquisition, and simultaneous displacement and velocity acquisition- and to compare these methods with commonly used retrospective phase sorting. Methods and Materials: Image acquisition for the four 4D CT methods was simulated with different displacement and velocity tolerances for spheres with radii of 0.5 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2.5 cm, using 58 patient-measured tumors and respiratory motion traces. The magnitude and frequency of artifacts, CT doses, and acquisition times were computed for each method. Results: The mean artifact magnitude was 50% smaller for the three real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. The dose was ∼50% lower, but the acquisition time was 20% to 100% longer for the real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. Conclusions: Real-time acquisition methods can reduce the frequency and magnitude of artifacts in 4D CT images, as well as the imaging dose, but they increase the image acquisition time. The results suggest that direction-dependent displacement acquisition is the preferred real-time 4D CT acquisition method, because on average, the lowest dose is delivered to the patient and the acquisition time is the shortest for the resulting number and magnitude of artifacts.

  11. CT portography by multidetector helical CT. Comparison of three rendering models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Funama, Yoshinori; Kadota, Masataka; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Shinya; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of multidetector CT portography in visualizing varices and portosystemic collaterals in comparison with conventional portography, and to compare the visualizations obtained by three rendering models (volume rendering, VR; minimum intensity projection, MIP; and shaded surface display, SSD). A total of 46 patients with portal hypertension were examined by CT and conventional portography for evaluation of portosystemic collaterals. CT portography was performed by multidetector CT (MD-CT) scanner with a slice thickness of 2.5 mm and table feed of 7.5 mm. Three types of CT portographic models were generated and compared with transarterial portography. Among 46 patients, 48 collaterals were identified on CT transverse images, while 38 collaterals were detected on transarterial portography. Forty-four of 48 collaterals identified on CT transverse images were visualized with the MIP model, while 34 and 29 collaterals were visualized by the VR and SSD methods, respectively. The average CT value for the portal vein and varices was 198 HU with data acquisition of 50 sec after contrast material injection. CT portography by multidetector CT provides excellent images in the visualization of portosystemic collaterals. The images of collaterals produced by MD-CT are superior to those of transarterial portography. Among the three rendering techniques, MIP provides the best visualization of portosystemic collaterals. (author)

  12. CT portography by multidetector helical CT. Comparison of three rendering models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Funama, Yoshinori; Kadota, Masataka; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Shinya; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of multidetector CT portography in visualizing varices and portosystemic collaterals in comparison with conventional portography, and to compare the visualizations obtained by three rendering models (volume rendering, VR; minimum intensity projection, MIP; and shaded surface display, SSD). A total of 46 patients with portal hypertension were examined by CT and conventional portography for evaluation of portosystemic collaterals. CT portography was performed by multidetector CT (MD-CT) scanner with a slice thickness of 2.5 mm and table feed of 7.5 mm. Three types of CT portographic models were generated and compared with transarterial portography. Among 46 patients, 48 collaterals were identified on CT transverse images, while 38 collaterals were detected on transarterial portography. Forty-four of 48 collaterals identified on CT transverse images were visualized with the MIP model, while 34 and 29 collaterals were visualized by the VR and SSD methods, respectively. The average CT value for the portal vein and varices was 198 HU with data acquisition of 50 sec after contrast material injection. CT portography by multidetector CT provides excellent images in the visualization of portosystemic collaterals. The images of collaterals produced by MD-CT are superior to those of transarterial portography. Among the three rendering techniques, MIP provides the best visualization of portosystemic collaterals. (author)

  13. Bowel preparation for CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, Emanuele; Lefere, Philippe; Gryspeerdt, Stefaan; Bemi, Pietro; Mantarro, Annalisa; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Bowel preparation represents an essential part of CT colonography, as the accuracy of the exam is strongly related to the adequacy of colonic cleansing, and a poor bowel preparation may compromise the diagnostic quality even despite optimization of all other acquisition parameters. Residual stool and fluid in the large bowel may affect the interpretation of the exam and may increase the number of false positives and false negatives. In this regard, the majority of patients having undergone CT colonography state that bowel preparation is the most unpleasant part. Unfortunately, to date no definite consensus has been reached about the ideal bowel preparation technique, and there is great variability in preparation strategies across diagnostic centers. The purpose of this review article is to describe the development and evolution of bowel preparation techniques in order to choose the best approach for optimizing the diagnostic quality of CT colonography in each patient

  14. Bowel preparation for CT colonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.neri@med.unipi.it [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa (Italy); Lefere, Philippe; Gryspeerdt, Stefaan [Department of Radiology, Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Roeselare (Belgium); Bemi, Pietro; Mantarro, Annalisa; Bartolozzi, Carlo [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Bowel preparation represents an essential part of CT colonography, as the accuracy of the exam is strongly related to the adequacy of colonic cleansing, and a poor bowel preparation may compromise the diagnostic quality even despite optimization of all other acquisition parameters. Residual stool and fluid in the large bowel may affect the interpretation of the exam and may increase the number of false positives and false negatives. In this regard, the majority of patients having undergone CT colonography state that bowel preparation is the most unpleasant part. Unfortunately, to date no definite consensus has been reached about the ideal bowel preparation technique, and there is great variability in preparation strategies across diagnostic centers. The purpose of this review article is to describe the development and evolution of bowel preparation techniques in order to choose the best approach for optimizing the diagnostic quality of CT colonography in each patient.

  15. Multi-axial Creep and the LICON Methodology for Accelerated Creep Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, William H.

    2006-05-01

    The copper-Iron canister for disposal of nuclear waste in the Swedish Programme has a design life exceeding 100,000 years. Whilst the operating temperature (100 deg C max.) and operating stress (50 MPa max.) are modest, the very long design life does require that the likely creep performance of the canister should be investigated. Many studies have been carried out by SKB but these have all involved very short duration tests at relatively high stresses. The process of predicting canister creep life by extrapolation of data from such tests has been challenged for two main reasons. The first is that the deformation and failure mechanisms in the tests employed are different from the mechanism expected under service conditions and the second is that the extrapolation is extreme. It has been recognised that there is usually scope for some increase in test temperatures and stresses which will accelerate the development of creep damage without compromising the use of extrapolation for life prediction. Cane demonstrated that in steels designed for high temperature and pressure applications, conditions of multi-axial stressing could lead to increases or decreases in the rate of damage accumulation without changing the damage mechanism. This provided a third method for accelerating creep testing which has been implemented as the LICON method. This report aims to explain the background to the LICON method and its application to the case of the copper canister. It seems likely that the method could be used to improve our knowledge of the creep resistance of the copper canister. Multiplication factors that may be achieved by the technique could be increased by attention to specimen design but an extensive and targeted programme of data collection on creep of copper would still be needed to implement the method to best advantage

  16. Multiaxial stress analysis taking account of penetration depth of x-rays, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Kuramoto, Makoto.

    1985-01-01

    In the past X-ray stress analysis in which the effect of stress gradients was taken into account within the penetration depth of X-rays, three assumptions have been made; 1) the stress gradient is linear in respect to the depth from the specimen surface, 2) the penetration depth of X-ray is a function of Sin 2 PSI and 3) the strain measured by X-rays corresponds to the weighted average strain on the intensity of the diffracted X-rays. A problem, however, still remains on the assumption of the X-ray penetration depth. We sometimes observed noticiable errors in the stage of the numerical simulation and these errors depend on the combination of stress components in a stress tensor. In the present paper, we proposed a new X-ray multiaxial stress analysis without using the assumption of the X-ray penetration depth. This analysis is also applicable to both the iso-inclination method ( OHM -goniometer) and the side inclination method (PSI-goniometer). The weighted average strain by X-rays, 1 >(phi), is expressed as a 4th degree function of cosPSI for iso-inclination method and 3rd degree for side inclination method. By rearranging this function as a sum of average strain, ( 1 >(0 0 )+ 1 >(90 0 )), and difference of average strain, ( 1 >(0 0 )- 1 >(90 0 )), we can solve the stress components with sufficient accuracy by a least squares method. The validity of this method was proved through numerical simulations and experiments. (author)

  17. Multi-axial Creep and the LICON Methodology for Accelerated Creep Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, William H. [Meadow End Farm, Farnham (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The copper-Iron canister for disposal of nuclear waste in the Swedish Programme has a design life exceeding 100,000 years. Whilst the operating temperature (100 deg C max.) and operating stress (50 MPa max.) are modest, the very long design life does require that the likely creep performance of the canister should be investigated. Many studies have been carried out by SKB but these have all involved very short duration tests at relatively high stresses. The process of predicting canister creep life by extrapolation of data from such tests has been challenged for two main reasons. The first is that the deformation and failure mechanisms in the tests employed are different from the mechanism expected under service conditions and the second is that the extrapolation is extreme. It has been recognised that there is usually scope for some increase in test temperatures and stresses which will accelerate the development of creep damage without compromising the use of extrapolation for life prediction. Cane demonstrated that in steels designed for high temperature and pressure applications, conditions of multi-axial stressing could lead to increases or decreases in the rate of damage accumulation without changing the damage mechanism. This provided a third method for accelerating creep testing which has been implemented as the LICON method. This report aims to explain the background to the LICON method and its application to the case of the copper canister. It seems likely that the method could be used to improve our knowledge of the creep resistance of the copper canister. Multiplication factors that may be achieved by the technique could be increased by attention to specimen design but an extensive and targeted programme of data collection on creep of copper would still be needed to implement the method to best advantage.

  18. Model-based framework for multi-axial real-time hybrid simulation testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermandois, Gaston A.; Spencer, Billie F.

    2017-10-01

    Real-time hybrid simulation is an efficient and cost-effective dynamic testing technique for performance evaluation of structural systems subjected to earthquake loading with rate-dependent behavior. A loading assembly with multiple actuators is required to impose realistic boundary conditions on physical specimens. However, such a testing system is expected to exhibit significant dynamic coupling of the actuators and suffer from time lags that are associated with the dynamics of the servo-hydraulic system, as well as control-structure interaction (CSI). One approach to reducing experimental errors considers a multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) controller design, yielding accurate reference tracking and noise rejection. In this paper, a framework for multi-axial real-time hybrid simulation (maRTHS) testing is presented. The methodology employs a real-time feedback-feedforward controller for multiple actuators commanded in Cartesian coordinates. Kinematic transformations between actuator space and Cartesian space are derived for all six-degrees-offreedom of the moving platform. Then, a frequency domain identification technique is used to develop an accurate MIMO transfer function of the system. Further, a Cartesian-domain model-based feedforward-feedback controller is implemented for time lag compensation and to increase the robustness of the reference tracking for given model uncertainty. The framework is implemented using the 1/5th-scale Load and Boundary Condition Box (LBCB) located at the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign. To demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology, a single-story frame subjected to earthquake loading is tested. One of the columns in the frame is represented physically in the laboratory as a cantilevered steel column. For realtime execution, the numerical substructure, kinematic transformations, and controllers are implemented on a digital signal processor. Results show excellent performance of the maRTHS framework when six

  19. Multi-axial correction system in the treatment of radial club hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Suneel B; Kamath, Atul F; Sehgal, Kriti; Horn, B David; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2009-12-01

    Radial club hand is a well-recognized congenital malformation characterized by hypoplasia of bone and soft tissue on the radial aspect of the forearm and hand. The modalities of treatment have traditionally varied from stretching casts with soft-tissue procedures to the use of multiple corrective osteotomies. These osteotomies can be stabilized by a variety of methods, including external fixators that allow the possibility of gradual distraction with neohistiogenesis. This current study outlines the usage of one such device (multi-axial correction system [MAC]) in the management of deformity associated with severe radial club hand. Three consecutive cases of unilateral or bilateral severe (Bayne type IV) congenital radial club hand were corrected using MAC fixation in the last 5 years. This is a retrospective review of all three cases. Data parameters included: patient demographics, presentation findings, degree of deformity, amount of correction/lengthening, length of procedure, length of treatment, and associated complications. The surgical technique is described in detail for the benefit of the readership. The three patients with severe congenital radial club hand had a total of four limb involvements that underwent correction using osteotomies and usage of the MAC device for external fixation. All three patients underwent successful correction of deformity with the restoration of alignment, lengthening of forearm for improvement of function, and stabilization of the wrist (mean duration, mean lengthening, mean time to consolidation). The MAC system was well tolerated in all patients and associated complications were limited. The MAC fixator seems to be a good alternative modality of stabilization and correction for severe congenital radial club hand deformities. Its usage is fairly simple and it provides the ease of application of a mono-lateral fixator with far superior three-dimensional control, like the circular external fixator. We recommend that

  20. A multi-axis MEMS sensor with integrated carbon nanotube-based piezoresistors for nanonewton level force metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullinan, Michael A; Panas, Robert M; Culpepper, Martin L

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of a multi-axis microelectromechanical system (MEMS) force sensor with integrated carbon nanotube (CNT)-based piezoresistive sensors. Through the use of proper CNT selection and sensor fabrication techniques, the performance of the CNT-based MEMS force sensor was increased by approximately two orders of magnitude as compared to current CNT-based sensor systems. The range and resolution of the force sensor were determined as 84 μN and 5.6 nN, respectively. The accuracy of the force sensor was measured to be better than 1% over the device’s full range. (paper)

  1. Safety assessment of reactor components under complex multiaxial cyclic loading. Final report; Sicherheitsbewertung kerntechnischer Komponenten bei komplexer, mehrachsiger Schwingbeanspruchung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesich, Thomas M.; Herter, Karl-Heinz; Schuler, Xaver

    2012-12-15

    Objective of the project was the experimental assurance of investigations on the theoretical basis of multiaxial fatigue loading. The review of the applicability of existing hypotheses, as well as the extension of the corresponding data base was carried out by experimental studies in fatigue tests under complex multiaxial loading for a ferritic and austenitic material. To investigate the influence of complex multiaxial stress conditions on the fatigue behavior, in this project notched cylindrical specimens were examined under alternating tensile/pressure loading and alternating torsional loading. Through the notch in the notched section inhomogeneous, multiaxial stress states are generated. By uniaxial alternating tests on unnotched specimens and a further series of tests on unnotched specimens under alternating torsional loading an evaluation of the impact and influence of the notch of stress on fatigue behavior was possible. A series of experiments with superimposition of alternating torsional and alternating tensile/pressure loading permits verification of the effect of phase-shifted stress and rotating principal coordinate system. All experiments were performed at room temperature. As part of the research project, the experimental results with the ferritic and austenitic materials were evaluated in terms of material behavior (hardening or softening) under cyclic loading. These were to uniaxial alternating tensile/pressure tests, alternating torsional tests (unnotched cylindrical specimens), alternating tensile/pressure tests on notched cylindrical specimens, alternating torsional tests on notched cylindrical specimens, alternating tensiontorsion tests with complex proportional stresses on unnotched cylindrical specimens (superimposition of normal and shear stress components), as well as alternating tension-torsion tests with complex non-proportional strain on unnotched cylindrical specimens (superimposition of normal and shear stress components with 90 phase

  2. Improved attenuation correction for respiratory gated PET/CT with extended-duration cine CT: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruoqiao; Alessio, Adam M.; Pierce, Larry A.; Byrd, Darrin W.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; De Man, Bruno; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-03-01

    Due to the wide variability of intra-patient respiratory motion patterns, traditional short-duration cine CT used in respiratory gated PET/CT may be insufficient to match the PET scan data, resulting in suboptimal attenuation correction that eventually compromises the PET quantitative accuracy. Thus, extending the duration of cine CT can be beneficial to address this data mismatch issue. In this work, we propose to use a long-duration cine CT for respiratory gated PET/CT, whose cine acquisition time is ten times longer than a traditional short-duration cine CT. We compare the proposed long-duration cine CT with the traditional short-duration cine CT through numerous phantom simulations with 11 respiratory traces measured during patient PET/CT scans. Experimental results show that, the long-duration cine CT reduces the motion mismatch between PET and CT by 41% and improves the overall reconstruction accuracy by 42% on average, as compared to the traditional short-duration cine CT. The long-duration cine CT also reduces artifacts in PET images caused by misalignment and mismatch between adjacent slices in phase-gated CT images. The improvement in motion matching between PET and CT by extending the cine duration depends on the patient, with potentially greater benefits for patients with irregular breathing patterns or larger diaphragm movements.

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  4. Comparison of prospective electrocardiography-gating high-pitch mode and without electrocardiography-synchronization high-pitch mode acquisition for the image quality and radiation doses of the aortic using dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jian; Huan Yi; Zhao Hongliang; Wang Ying; Liu Ying; Wei Mengqi; Shi Mingguo; Zheng Minwen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the application of prospective ECG-gating Flash spiral scan mode dual-source CT in aortography, and compare it's image quality and radiation dose with without ECG-synchronization high-pitch spiral scanning mode. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients (Group A) with suspected aortic dissection or after operations for the aortic dissection were scanned with prospective ECG-gated high-pitch scan and another 50 consecutive patients (Group B) were analyzed by non-ECG-gated high-pitch scan. Image quality of the aortic was assessed by two independent readers. Image noise was measured, radiation dose estimates were calculated. The imaging quality of the aortic and the radiation dose were compared with Mann-whitney U and t test. Results: The average image quality score [(1.18 ± 0.40) in group A and (1.23 ± 0.31) in group B] showed no significant difference between group A and group B (U = 1.20, P = 0.23). The mean radiation dose of group A was lower than that of group B [(1.49 ± 0.38) mSv in group A, (2.79 ± 0.54) mSv in group B, t = 13.677, P < 0.05]. Conclusion: Prospective ECG-gated dual source CT Flash spiral scanning with low radiation dose and good image quality in the aortic dissection with high value of clinical application. (authors)

  5. Diagnosing extracranial atherosclerotic diseases with spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, C.J.; Vannier, M.W.; Erickson, K.K.; Broderick, D.F.; Kido, D.K.; Yoffie, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that this discovery study was performed to determine whether extracranial carotid artery plaques could be diagnosed with a new CT technique (spiral CT) that allows nondistorted three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions in the z axis. Twenty carotid arteries were examined with spiral CT in normal volunteers and in patients suspected of having atherosclerotic plaques in the extracranial carotid arteries. The Somatom Plus CT table was advanced at a constant rate, the x-ray tube was continuously rotated, and 3D data were continuously acquired. Sixty milliliters of nonionic contrast medium was injected intravenously previous to and during the acquisition of data. The carotid bifurcations were identified in all patients. Planar images, similar to conventional intraarterial angiograms, were routinely produced from the volumetric CT data

  6. Development of a method of lifetime assessment of power plant components under complex multi-axial vibration loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesich, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    In general, technical components are loaded and stressed by forces and moments both constant and variable over time. Multi-axial stress conditions can arise as a function of the load on, and/or the geometry of, a component. Assessing the impact on stability of multi-axial stress conditions is a problem for which no generally valid solution has as yet been found, especially when loads and stresses vary over time. This is also due to the fact that the development over time of stresses can give rise to very complex stress conditions. Assessing the lifetime of power plant components subjected to complex vibration loads and stresses often is not reliable if performed by means of conventional codes and approaches, or is associated with high degrees of conservatism. The MPA AIM-Life concept developed at the Stuttgart MPA/IMWF, which is an advanced and verified strength hypothesis based on energy considerations, allows such assessments to be made more reliably, numerically efficient, and avoiding excessive conservatism. (orig.)

  7. Multiaxial fatigue criterion for 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel for use in high-temperature structural design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blass, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    An improved multiaxial fatigue failure criterion is described that is based on a definition of equivalent inelastic strain range incorporating the shear and normal components of inelastic strain range on the planes of maximum inelastic shear strain range. Optimum values of certain parameters contained in the formulation were obtained by the method of least squares from the results of combined axial-torsional strain cycling test of 2--1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel conducted at 538 degrees C (1000 degrees F). The ability of this criterion to correlate the test results was compared with that of the Mises equivalent inelastic strain range criterion and was found to be superior. A procedure is described for calculating the required shear and normal components of strain range under general multiaxial strain cycling conditions. An improved definition of equivalent total strain range based on these considerations is directly applicable to the method of estimating fatigue damage in ASME Code Case N-47. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Damage development - effects of multiaxial loads on creep pore formation and fatigue damage in typical power plant steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenk, P.; Proft, D.; Kussmaul, A.; Fischer, R.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of multiaxial stress on creep pore formation in the steels 14MoV6-3 10CrMo9-10 and X10CrMoVNb9-1 was investigated on the basis of internal pressure experiments on smooth and notched hollow cylinders. In some cases, additional axial forces were applied in order to reproduce component-relevant multiaxial stresses. Local elongation during loading was investigated and analyzed using applied HT-DMS. When different strain levels had been reached, the samples were removed, analyzed, and characterized with regard to different damage parameters. It was found that no interdependence between the surface damage pattern and the deep damage pattern can be derived across the wall thickness if no information on the load state is available. Parallel to the experiments, inelastic FEA were carried out using the ABAQUS program system. The creep law of Graham and Walles was used for calculating flow and creep via a user-defined subroutine CREEP. The parameters of the creep law could be identified by adaptation to monoaxial creep tests [de

  9. Role of multiaxial stress state in the hydrogen-assisted rolling-contact fatigue in bearings for wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toribio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Offshore wind turbines often involve important engineering challenges such as the improvement of hydrogen embrittlement resistance of the turbine bearings. These elements frequently suffer the so-called phenomenon of hydrogen-assisted rolling-contact fatigue (HA-RCF as a consequence of the synergic action of the surrounding harsh environment (the lubricant supplying hydrogen to the material and the cyclic multiaxial stress state caused by in-service mechanical loading. Thus the complex phenomenon could be classified as hydrogen-assisted rolling-contact multiaxial fatigue (HA-RC-MF. This paper analyses, from the mechanical and the chemical points of view, the so-called ball-on-rod test, widely used to evaluate the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of turbine bearings. Both the stress-strain states and the steady-state hydrogen concentration distribution are studied, so that a better elucidation can be obtained of the potential fracture places where the hydrogen could be more harmful and, consequently, where the turbine bearings could fail during their life in service.

  10. Multiaxial mechanical properties and constitutive modeling of human adipose tissue: a basis for preoperative simulations in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gerhard; Eder, Maximilian; Kovacs, Laszlo; Pathak, Heramb; Bonitz, Lars; Mueller, Christoph; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-11-01

    A preoperative simulation of soft tissue deformations during plastic and reconstructive surgery is desirable to support the surgeon's planning and to improve surgical outcomes. The current development of constitutive adipose tissue models, for the implementation in multilayer computational frameworks for the simulation of human soft tissue deformations, has proved difficult because knowledge of the required mechanical parameters of fat tissue is limited. Therefore, for the first time, human abdominal adipose tissues were mechanically investigated by biaxial tensile and triaxial shear tests. The results of this study suggest that human abdominal adipose tissues under quasi-static and dynamic multiaxial loadings can be characterized as a nonlinear, anisotropic and viscoelastic soft biological material. The nonlinear and anisotropic features are consequences of the material's collagenous microstructure. The aligned collagenous septa observed in histological investigations causes the anisotropy of the tissue. A hyperelastic model used in this study was appropriate to represent the quasi-static multiaxial mechanical behavior of fat tissue. The constitutive parameters are intended to serve as a basis for soft tissue simulations using the finite element method, which is an apparent method for obtaining promising results in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A generic validation methodology and its application to a set of multi-axial creep damage constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qiang

    2005-01-01

    A generic validation methodology for a set of multi-axial creep damage constitutive equations is proposed and its use is illustrated with 0.5Cr0.5Mo0.25V ferritic steel which is featured as brittle or intergranular rupture. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology to guide systematically assess the quality of a set of multi-axial creep damage constitutive equations in order to ensure its general applicability. This work adopted a total quality assurance approach and expanded as a Four Stages procedure (Theories and Fundamentals, Parameter Identification, Proportional Load, and Non-proportional load). Its use is illustrated with 0.5Cr0.5Mo0.25V ferritic steel and this material is chosen due to its industry importance, the popular use of KRH type of constitutive equations, and the available qualitative experimental data including damage distribution from notched bar test. The validation exercise clearly revealed the deficiencies existed in the KRH formulation (in terms of mathematics and physics of damage mechanics) and its incapability to predict creep deformation accurately. Consequently, its use should be warned, which is particularly important due to its wide use as indicated in literature. This work contributes to understand the rational for formulation and the quality assurance of a set of constitutive equations in creep damage mechanics as well as in general damage mechanics. (authors)

  12. FDG-PET/CT in oncology. German guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, B.J.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A.; Delbeke, D.; Kotzerke, J.; Minkov, V.; Reiser, M.; Willich, N.

    2007-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT examinations combine metabolic and morphologic imaging within an integrated procedure. Over the past decade PET/CT imaging has gained wide clinical acceptance in the field of oncology. This FDG-PET/CT guideline focuses on indications, data acquisition and processing as well as documentation of FDG-PET/CT examinations in oncologic patients within a clinical and social context specific to Germany. Background information and definitions are followed by examples of clinical and research applications of FDG-PET/CT. Furthermore, protocols for CT scanning (low dose and contrast-enhanced CT) and PET emission imaging are discussed. Documentation and reporting of examinations are specified. Image interpretation criteria and sources of errors are discussed. Quality control for FDG and PET/CT-systems, qualification requirements of personnel as well as legal aspects are presented. (orig.)

  13. CT cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsili, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Cancer of the urinary bladder is one of the commonest urothelial neoplasms. Conventional cystoscopy remains the mainstay in the diagnosis of urinary bladder carcinomas. But it is an invasive and uncomfortable procedure, associated with complications. Computed tomographic (CT) virtual cystoscopy has been proposed as an alternative imaging modality with potential advantages in the detection of urinary bladder neoplasms and good patient acceptance. It is a minimally invasive technique, allowing imaging of the urinary bladder in multiple planes and a 360 0 view. CT cystoscopy provides information about the location, size and morphologic features of urinary bladder lesions, indicating appropriate areas for biopsy. It can be performed in cases in which conventional cystoscopy is not feasible, such as in the presence of urethral strictures, marked prostatic hypertrophy or active bleeding, and in cases in which cystoscopic findings are inconclusive. The technique can be used to evaluate areas of the urinary bladder difficult to evaluate with cystoscopy, such as the anterior bladder neck and narrowmouthed diverticula. Finally, virtual cystoscopy provides both intraluminal and extraluminal pathologic changes, so intravesical disease and exrtavesical extension can be evaluated in the same study. One of the limitations of this technique is the difficulty to demonstrate small-sized lesions. The introduction of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanners was a major technological advancement because among other things it substantially improves z-axis resolution by reducing section collimation and allowing the detection of very small lesions. The near isotropic or isotropic pixels achieved with a multidetector CT scanner, enable the creation of multiplanar reformatted images with a resolution very close to that of the axial images and three-dimensional (3D) renderings of outstanding quality. Transverse, multiplanar reformations and virtual endoscopic images are complementary

  14. 2017 NAIP Acquisition Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Planned States for 2017 NAIP acquisition and acquisition status layer (updated daily). Updates to the acquisition seasons may be made during the season to...

  15. Imatron CT C100 presentation. Limits-advantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molle, M.; Molle, S.; Hernigou, A.

    1994-01-01

    Principles of Electron Beam CT are described and compared to conventional CT. Fast acquisitions and a short exposure time are the major qualities of the machine. Despite of a lower spatial resolution than in mechanical CT it allows exploration of moving organs and especially morphological and dynamic heart studies. The new possibilities of the Continuous Volume Scanning seems to present a promising future outlook. (authors). 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  17. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  18. Creep properties of phosphorus alloyed oxygen free copper under multiaxial stress state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui Wu; Sandstroem, Rolf; Seitisleam, Facredin

    2009-10-01

    Phosphorus alloyed oxygen free copper (Cu-OFP) canisters are planned to be used for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The copper canisters will be subjected to creep under multiaxial stress states in the repository. Creep tests have therefore been carried out at 75 deg C using double notch specimens with notch acuities of 0.5, 2, 5, and 18.8, respectively. The creep lifetime for notched specimens is considerably longer than that for the smooth one at a given net section stress, indicating that the investigated Cu-OFP is notch insensitive (notch strengthening). The notch strengthening factor in time is, for instance, greater than 70 at 180 MPa for the bluntest notch (notch acuity = 0.5). The creep lifetime is notch acuity dependent. The sharper the notch, the longer the creep lifetime is. The creep deformation is to a significant extent concentrated to the region around the notches. Different deformation on the two notches is observed. Both axial and radial strains on the failed notch are several times larger than those on the unbroken one. Linear relation between the axial and the radial strains on the notches is found. Transgranular failure is predominant, independent of stress, rupture time, and notch acuity. Adjacent to fracture, elongated grains along the stress direction, separate pores and cavities are often visible. On the unbroken notch, fewer separate cavities and cracks are only seen intergranularly for the sharper notches (notch acuity > 2). To interpret the tests for the notched creep specimens, finite element computations have been performed. A fundamental model for primary and secondary creep without fitting parameters has been used as constitutive equation. The FEM-modelling could represent the creep strain versus time curves for the notched specimens in a satisfactory way. In these curves the strain on loading is included. From the FEM-computations a stationary creep stress could be assessed, which is close to the reference stress. For a given

  19. Multi-Axis Prosthetic Knee Resembles Alpine Skiing Movements of an Intact Leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Demšar, Jože Duhovnik, Blaž Lešnik, Matej Supej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyse the flexion angles of the ski boot, ankle and knee joints of an above-knee prosthesis and to compare them with an intact leg and a control group of skiers. One subject with an above-knee amputation of the right leg and eight healthy subjects simulated the movement of a skiing turn by performing two-leg squats in laboratory conditions. By adding additional loads in proportion to body weight (BW; +1/3 BW, +2/3 BW, +3/3 BW, various skiing regimes were simulated. Change of Flexion Angle (CoFA and Range of Motion (RoM in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were calculated and compared. An average RoM in the skiing boot on the side of prosthesis (4.4 ± 1.1° was significantly lower compared to an intact leg (5.9 ± 1.8° and the control group (6.5 ± 2.3°. In the ankle joint, the average RoM was determined to be 13.2±2.9° in the prosthesis, 12.7 ± 2.8° in an intact leg and 14.8±3.6 in the control group. However, the RoM of the knee joint in the prosthesis (42.2 ± 4.2° was significantly larger than that of the intact leg (34.7 ± 4.4°. The average RoM of the knee joint in the control group was 47.8 ± 5.4°. The influences of additional loads on the kinematics of the lower extremities were different on the side of the prosthesis and on the intact leg. In contrast, additional loads did not produce any significant differences in the control group. Although different CoFAs in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were used, an above-knee prosthesis with a built-in multi-axis prosthetic knee enables comparable leg kinematics in simulated alpine skiing.

  20. Hybrid analysis of multiaxis electromagnetic data for discrimination of munitions and explosives of concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, M. J.; Asch, T. H.; Oden, C.

    2012-08-01

    The remediation of land containing munitions and explosives of concern, otherwise known as unexploded ordnance, is an ongoing problem facing the U.S. Department of Defense and similar agencies worldwide that have used or are transferring training ranges or munitions disposal areas to civilian control. The expense associated with cleanup of land previously used for military training and war provides impetus for research towards enhanced discrimination of buried unexploded ordnance. Towards reducing that expense, a multiaxis electromagnetic induction data collection and software system, called ALLTEM, was designed and tested with support from the U.S. Department of Defense Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. ALLTEM is an on-time time-domain system that uses a continuous triangle-wave excitation to measure the target-step response rather than traditional impulse response. The system cycles through three orthogonal transmitting loops and records a total of 19 different transmitting and receiving loop combinations with a nominal spatial data sampling interval of 20 cm. Recorded data are pre-processed and then used in a hybrid discrimination scheme involving both data-driven and numerical classification techniques. The data-driven classification scheme is accomplished in three steps. First, field observations are used to train a type of unsupervised artificial neural network, a self-organizing map (SOM). Second, the SOM is used to simultaneously estimate target parameters (depth, azimuth, inclination, item type and weight) by iterative minimization of the topographic error vectors. Third, the target classification is accomplished by evaluating histograms of the estimated parameters. The numerical classification scheme is also accomplished in three steps. First, the Biot-Savart law is used to model the primary magnetic fields from the transmitter coils and the secondary magnetic fields generated by currents induced in the target materials in the

  1. Hybrid analysis of multiaxis electromagnetic data for discrimination of munitions and explosives of concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, M.J.; Asch, T.H.; Oden, C.

    2012-01-01

    The remediation of land containing munitions and explosives of concern, otherwise known as unexploded ordnance, is an ongoing problem facing the U.S. Department of Defense and similar agencies worldwide that have used or are transferring training ranges or munitions disposal areas to civilian control. The expense associated with cleanup of land previously used for military training and war provides impetus for research towards enhanced discrimination of buried unexploded ordnance. Towards reducing that expense, a multiaxis electromagnetic induction data collection and software system, called ALLTEM, was designed and tested with support from the U.S. Department of Defense Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. ALLTEM is an on-time time-domain system that uses a continuous triangle-wave excitation to measure the target-step response rather than traditional impulse response. The system cycles through three orthogonal transmitting loops and records a total of 19 different transmitting and receiving loop combinations with a nominal spatial data sampling interval of 20 cm. Recorded data are pre-processed and then used in a hybrid discrimination scheme involving both data-driven and numerical classification techniques. The data-driven classification scheme is accomplished in three steps. First, field observations are used to train a type of unsupervised artificial neural network, a self-organizing map (SOM). Second, the SOM is used to simultaneously estimate target parameters (depth, azimuth, inclination, item type and weight) by iterative minimization of the topographic error vectors. Third, the target classification is accomplished by evaluating histograms of the estimated parameters. The numerical classification scheme is also accomplished in three steps. First, the Biot–Savart law is used to model the primary magnetic fields from the transmitter coils and the secondary magnetic fields generated by currents induced in the target materials in the

  2. Respiratory monitor system for 4D CT image acquisition based on accelerometer. Design and implementation; Sistema de monitorizacion respiratoria para adquisicion de imagenes 4D de TC basado en un acelerometro. Diseno e implementacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorente Manso, M.; Vivela Serrano, S.; Viera Jorge, J. C.; Garran del Rio, C.; Ferrer Gracia, C.; Carballo Gonzalez, N.

    2013-07-01

    The use of 4D CT images in Radiotherapy planning is increasing. Some commercial systems use abdominal movement to correlate images with respiratory phase. An in-house developed system based on an accelerometer to register patient's abdominal movement and a software to group 4D images in their corresponding respiratory phase is presented. A phantom test evaluates the capacity of the system to properly identify respiratory phases. A volunteers study compares breathing curves acquired by the accelerometer with those obtained using a commercial system. In the phantom images, maximum difference between real and calculated phase is 0.2 s. In the volunteer study, position of the curve maxima found by both systems differs, on average, around 2% (SD=2%) of the respiratory cycle period when volunteer's breathing is regular. Only when breathe is very irregular, differences of up to 10% in the phase assignment are found. (Author)

  3. The effect of a multi-axis suspension on whole body vibration exposures and physical stress in the neck and low back in agricultural tractor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Dennerlein, Jack T; Johnson, Peter W

    2018-04-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) exposures are often predominant in the fore-aft (x) or lateral (y) axis among off-road agricultural vehicles. However, as the current industry standard seats are designed to reduce mainly vertical (z) axis WBV exposures, they may be less effective in reducing drivers' exposure to multi-axial WBV. Therefore, this laboratory-based study aimed to determine the differences between a single-axial (vertical) and multi-axial (vertical + lateral) suspension seat in reducing WBV exposures, head acceleration, self-reported discomfort, and muscle activity (electromyography) of the major muscle of the low back, neck and shoulders. The results showed that the multi-axial suspension seat had significantly lower WBV exposures compared to the single-axial suspension seats (p' suspension seat had lower head acceleration and muscle activity of the neck, shoulder, and low back compared to the single-axial suspension seat; some but not all of the differences were statistically significant. These results indicate that the multi-axial suspension seat may reduce the lateral WBV exposures and associated muscular loading in the neck and low back in agricultural vehicle operators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative 99mTc SPECT/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI vol = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in 99m Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI vol = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ 140 keV on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed 99m Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect

  5. Syntax acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Stephen; Thornton, Rosalind

    2012-03-01

    Every normal child acquires a language in just a few years. By 3- or 4-years-old, children have effectively become adults in their abilities to produce and understand endlessly many sentences in a variety of conversational contexts. There are two alternative accounts of the course of children's language development. These different perspectives can be traced back to the nature versus nurture debate about how knowledge is acquired in any cognitive domain. One perspective dates back to Plato's dialog 'The Meno'. In this dialog, the protagonist, Socrates, demonstrates to Meno, an aristocrat in Ancient Greece, that a young slave knows more about geometry than he could have learned from experience. By extension, Plato's Problem refers to any gap between experience and knowledge. How children fill in the gap in the case of language continues to be the subject of much controversy in cognitive science. Any model of language acquisition must address three factors, inter alia: 1. The knowledge children accrue; 2. The input children receive (often called the primary linguistic data); 3. The nonlinguistic capacities of children to form and test generalizations based on the input. According to the famous linguist Noam Chomsky, the main task of linguistics is to explain how children bridge the gap-Chomsky calls it a 'chasm'-between what they come to know about language, and what they could have learned from experience, even given optimistic assumptions about their cognitive abilities. Proponents of the alternative 'nurture' approach accuse nativists like Chomsky of overestimating the complexity of what children learn, underestimating the data children have to work with, and manifesting undue pessimism about children's abilities to extract information based on the input. The modern 'nurture' approach is often referred to as the usage-based account. We discuss the usage-based account first, and then the nativist account. After that, we report and discuss the findings of several

  6. Relationship among RR interval, optimal reconstruction phase, temporal resolution, and image quality of end-systolic reconstruction of coronary CT angiography in patients with high heart rates. In search of the optimal acquisition protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tomonari; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Kondo, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Sekine, Takako; Arai, Takehiro; Morita, Hitomi; Takase, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship among RR interval (RR), the optimal reconstruction phase, and adequate temporal resolution (TR) to obtain coronary CT angiography images of acceptable quality using 64-multi detector-row CT (MDCT) (Aquilion 64) of end-systolic reconstruction in 407 patients with high heart rates. Image quality was classified into 3 groups [rank A (excellent): 161, rank B (acceptable): 207, and rank C (unacceptable): 39 patients]. The optimal absolute phase (OAP) significantly correlated with RR [OAP (ms)=119-0.286 RR (ms), r=0.832, p<0.0001], and the optimal relative phase (ORP) also significantly correlated with RR [ORP (%)=62-0.023 RR (ms), r=0.656, p<0.0001], and the correlation coefficient of OAP was significantly (p<0.0001) higher than that of ORP. The OAP range (±2 standard deviation (SD)) in which it is highly possible to get a static image was from [119-0.286 RR (ms)-46] to [119-0.286 RR (ms)+46]. The TR was significantly different among ranks A (97±22 ms), B (111±31 ms) and C (135±34 ms). The TR significantly correlated with RR in ranks A (TR=-16+0.149 RR, r=0.767, p<0.0001), B (TR=-15+0.166 RR, r=0.646, p<0.0001), and C (TR=52+0.117 RR, r=0.425, p=0.0069). Rank C was distinguished from ranks A or B by linear discriminate analysis (TR=-46+0.21 RR), and the discriminate rate was 82.6%. In conclusion, both the OAP and adequate TR depend on RR, and the OAP range (±2 SD) can be calculated using the formula [119-0.286 RR (ms)-46] to [119-0.286 RR (ms) +46], and an adequate TR value would be less than (-46+0.21 RR). (author)

  7. Radiation exposure in CT-guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeckner, Roman, E-mail: Roman.Kloeckner@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Santos, Daniel Pinto dos; Schneider, Jens [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Kara, Levent [Department of Radiology, Inselspital Bern, Freiburgstraße 18, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael B. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate radiation exposure in computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions, to establish reference levels for exposure, and to discuss strategies for dose reduction. Materials and methods: We analyzed 1576 consecutive CT-guided procedures in 1284 patients performed over 4.5 years, including drainage placements; biopsies of different organs; radiofrequency and microwave ablations (RFA/MWA) of liver, bone, and lung tumors; pain blockages, and vertebroplasties. Data were analyzed with respect to scanner settings, overall radiation doses, and individual doses of planning CT series, CT intervention, and control CT series. Results: Eighy-five percent of the total radiation dose was applied during the pre- and post-interventional CT series, leaving only 15% applied by the CT-guided intervention itself. Single slice acquisition was associated with lower doses than continuous CT-fluoroscopy (37 mGy cm vs. 153 mGy cm, p < 0.001). The third quartile of radiation doses varied considerably for different interventions. The highest doses were observed in complex interventions like RFA/MWA of the liver, followed by vertebroplasty and RFA/MWA of the lung. Conclusions: This paper suggests preliminary reference levels for various intervention types and discusses strategies for dose reduction. A multicenter registry of radiation exposure including a broader spectrum of scanners and intervention types is needed to develop definitive reference levels.

  8. CT urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkin, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-11-15

    With the advent of multidetector row CT scanners, evaluation of the urothelium of the entire urinary tract with high-resolution thin sections during a single breath-hold has become a reality. Multidetector CT urography (MDCTU) is a single examination that allows evaluation of potential urinary tract calculi, renal parenchymal masses, and both benign and malignant urothelial lesions. Initial results with this new technique are encouraging. Current investigations of MDCTU focus on methods to improve opacification and distension of the upper urinary tract - the collecting systems, pelvis, and ureters. The role of abdominal compression, infusion of saline and/or furosemide, and optimal time delay of excretory phase imaging is being explored. Upper tract urothelial malignancies, including small lesions less the 5 mmin diameter, can be detected with high sensitivity. Methods to reduce radiation exposure are being explored, including split-bolus contrast injection techniques that combine nephrographic and excretory phases into a single phase. It is likely that in the near future, radiological evaluation of significant unexplained hematuria or of known or prior urothelial malignancy will consist of a single examination - MDCTU. (orig.)

  9. Multi-Axis Prosthetic Knee Resembles Alpine Skiing Movements of an Intact Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demšar, Ivan; Duhovnik, Jože; Lešnik, Blaž; Supej, Matej

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the flexion angles of the ski boot, ankle and knee joints of an above-knee prosthesis and to compare them with an intact leg and a control group of skiers. One subject with an above-knee amputation of the right leg and eight healthy subjects simulated the movement of a skiing turn by performing two-leg squats in laboratory conditions. By adding additional loads in proportion to body weight (BW; +1/3 BW, +2/3 BW, +3/3 BW), various skiing regimes were simulated. Change of Flexion Angle (CoFA) and Range of Motion (RoM) in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were calculated and compared. An average RoM in the skiing boot on the side of prosthesis (4.4 ± 1.1°) was significantly lower compared to an intact leg (5.9 ± 1.8°) and the control group (6.5 ± 2.3°). In the ankle joint, the average RoM was determined to be 13.2±2.9° in the prosthesis, 12.7 ± 2.8° in an intact leg and 14.8±3.6 in the control group. However, the RoM of the knee joint in the prosthesis (42.2 ± 4.2°) was significantly larger than that of the intact leg (34.7 ± 4.4°). The average RoM of the knee joint in the control group was 47.8 ± 5.4°. The influences of additional loads on the kinematics of the lower extremities were different on the side of the prosthesis and on the intact leg. In contrast, additional loads did not produce any significant differences in the control group. Although different CoFAs in the ski boot, ankle and knee joints were used, an above-knee prosthesis with a built-in multi-axis prosthetic knee enables comparable leg kinematics in simulated alpine skiing. Key points The RoM in the ski boot on the side of the prosthetic leg was smaller than the RoM of the intact leg and the control group of healthy subjects. The RoM in the ankle joint of prosthetic leg was comparable to that of the intact leg and the control group of healthy subjects. The RoM in the prosthetic knee joint was greater than the RoM in the knee joint of the

  10. Issues in the assessment of personality disorder and substance abuse using the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, P M; McCann, J T; Fairbank, J A

    1995-05-01

    Substance abuse treatment clients often present other severe mental health problems that affect treatment outcomes. Hence, screening and assessment for psychological distress and personality disorder are an important part of effective treatment, discharge, and aftercare planning. The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II (MCMI-II) frequently is used for this purpose. In this paper, several issues of concern to MCMI-II users are addressed. These include the extent to which MCMI-II scales correspond to DSM-III-R disorders; overdiagnosis of disorders using the MCMI-II; accuracy of MCMI-II diagnostic cut-off scores; and the clinical utility of MCMI-II diagnostic algorithms. Approaches to addressing these issues are offered.

  11. Prediction of pilot opinion ratings using an optimal pilot model. [of aircraft handling qualities in multiaxis tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A brief review of some of the more pertinent applications of analytical pilot models to the prediction of aircraft handling qualities is undertaken. The relative ease with which multiloop piloting tasks can be modeled via the optimal control formulation makes the use of optimal pilot models particularly attractive for handling qualities research. To this end, a rating hypothesis is introduced which relates the numerical pilot opinion rating assigned to a particular vehicle and task to the numerical value of the index of performance resulting from an optimal pilot modeling procedure as applied to that vehicle and task. This hypothesis is tested using data from piloted simulations and is shown to be reasonable. An example concerning a helicopter landing approach is introduced to outline the predictive capability of the rating hypothesis in multiaxis piloting tasks.

  12. Spatial reliability analysis of a wind turbine blade cross section subjected to multi-axial extreme loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Bitsche, Robert; Blasques, José Pedro Albergaria Amaral

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for structural reliability analysis of wind turbine blades. The study introduces several novel elements by taking into account loading direction using a multiaxial probabilistic load model, considering random material strength, spatial correlation between material...... properties, progressive material failure, and system reliability effects. An example analysis of reliability against material failure is demonstrated for a blade cross section. Based on the study we discuss the implications of using a system reliability approach, the effect of spatial correlation length......, type of material degradation algorithm, and reliability methods on the system failure probability, as well as the main factors that have an influence on the reliability. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. CT colonography: Techniques, indications, findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Thomas; Graser, Anno; Schima, Wolfgang; Maier, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for imaging the entire colon. Based on a helical thin-section CT of the cleansed and air-distended colon, two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections are used for image interpretation. Several clinical improvements in patient preparation, technical advances in CT, and new developments in evaluation software have allowed CTC to develop into a powerful diagnostic tool. It is already well established as a reliable diagnostic tool in symptomatic patients. Many experts currently consider CTC a comparable alternative to conventional colonoscopy, although there is still debate about its sensitivity for the detection of colonic polyps in a screening population. This article summarizes the main indications, the current techniques in patient preparation, data acquisition and data analysis as well as imaging features for common benign and malignant colorectal lesions

  14. Dynamics of thin-film piezoelectric microactuators with large vertical stroke subject to multi-axis coupling and fabrication asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongsoo; Wang, Thomas; Oldham, Kenn

    2018-01-01

    The high performance and small size of MEMS based scanners has allowed various optical imaging techniques to be realized in a small form factor. Many such devices are resonant scanners, and thus their linear and nonlinear dynamic behaviors have been studied in the past. Thin-film piezoelectric materials, in contrast, provide sufficient energy density to achieve both large static displacements and high-frequency resonance, but large deformation can in turn influence dynamic scanner behavior. This paper reports on the influence of very large stroke translation of a piezoelectric vertical actuator on its resonant behavior, which may not be otherwise explained fully by common causes of resonance shift such as beam stiffening or nonlinear forcing. To examine the change of structural compliance over the course of scanner motion, a model has been developed that includes internal forces from residual stress and the resultant additional multi-axis coupling among actuator leg structures. Like some preceding vertical scanning micro-actuators, the scanner of this work has four legs, with each leg featuring four serially connected thin-film PZT unimorphs that allow the scanner to generate larger than 400 µm of vertical displacement at 14 V DC. Using an excitation near one or more resonances, the input voltage can be lowered, and complementary multi-axis rotations can be also generated, but change of the resonant frequencies with scanner height needs to be understood to maximize scanner performance. The presented model well predicts the experimental observation of the decrease of the resonant frequencies of the scanner with the increase of a dc bias voltage. Also, the effects of the magnitude and uniformity of residual stress across the scanner structure on the natural frequencies have been studied.

  15. On the impact of multi-axial stress states on trailing edge bondlines in wind turbine rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever Castelos, Pablo; Balzani, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    For a reliable design of wind turbine systems all of their components have to be designed to withstand the loads appearing in the turbine's lifetime. When performed in an integral manner this is called systems engineering, and is exceptionally important for components that have an impact on the entire wind turbine system, such as the rotor blade. Bondlines are crucial subcomponents of rotor blades, but they are not much recognized in the wind energy research community. However, a bondline failure can lead to the loss of a rotor blade, and potentially of the entire turbine, and is extraordinarily relevant to be treated with strong emphasis when designing a wind turbine. Modern wind turbine rotor blades with lengths of 80 m and more offer a degree of flexibility that has never been seen in wind energy technology before. Large deflections result in high strains in the adhesive connections, especially at the trailing edge. The latest edition of the DNV GL guideline from end of 2015 demands a three-dimensional stress analysis of bondlines, whereas before an isolated shear stress proof was sufficient. In order to quantify the lack of safety from older certification guidelines this paper studies the influence of multi-axial stress states on the ultimate and fatigue load resistance of trailing edge adhesive bonds. For this purpose, detailed finite element simulations of the IWES IWT-7.5-164 reference wind turbine blades are performed. Different yield criteria are evaluated for the prediction of failure and lifetime. The results show that the multi-axial stress state is governed by span-wise normal stresses. Those are evidently not captured in isolated shear stress proofs, yielding non-conservative estimates of lifetime and ultimate load resistance. This finding highlights the importance to include a three-dimensional stress state in the failure analysis of adhesive bonds in modern wind turbine rotor blades, and the necessity to perform a three-dimensional characterization

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  2. Coronary calcium screening with dual-source CT: reliability of ungated, high-pitch chest CT in comparison with dedicated calcium-scoring CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valerie [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics (EA 2694), Lille (France); Molinari, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier General de Tourcoing, Department of Radiology, Tourcoing (France)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the reliability of ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening. One hundred and eighty-five smokers underwent a dual-source CT examination with acquisition of two sets of images during the same session: (a) ungated, high-pitch and high-temporal resolution acquisition over the entire thorax (i.e., chest CT); (b) prospectively ECG-triggered acquisition over the cardiac cavities (i.e., cardiac CT). Sensitivity and specificity of chest CT for detecting positive CAC scores were 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. There was excellent inter-technique agreement for determining the quantitative CAC score (ICC = 0.986). The mean difference between the two techniques was 11.27, representing 1.81 % of the average of the two techniques. The inter-technique agreement for categorizing patients into the four ranks of severity was excellent (weighted kappa = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.98). The inter-technique differences for quantitative CAC scores did not correlate with BMI (r = 0.05, p = 0.575) or heart rate (r = -0.06, p = 0.95); 87.2 % of them were explained by differences at the level of the right coronary artery (RCA: 0.8718; LAD: 0.1008; LCx: 0.0139; LM: 0.0136). Ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT is a reliable imaging mode for CAC screening in the conditions of routine chest CT examinations. (orig.)

  3. Speed in Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meglio, Olimpia; King, David R.; Risberg, Annette

    2017-01-01

    The advantage of speed is often invoked by academics and practitioners as an essential condition during post-acquisition integration, frequently without consideration of the impact earlier decisions have on acquisition speed. In this article, we examine the role speed plays in acquisitions across...... the acquisition process using research organized around characteristics that display complexity with respect to acquisition speed. We incorporate existing research with a process perspective of acquisitions in order to present trade-offs, and consider the influence of both stakeholders and the pre......-deal-completion context on acquisition speed, as well as the organization’s capabilities to facilitating that speed. Observed trade-offs suggest both that acquisition speed often requires longer planning time before an acquisition and that associated decisions require managerial judgement. A framework for improving...

  4. Musculoskeletal wide detector CT: Principles, techniques and applications in clinical practice and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Gervaise, Alban; Louis, Matthias; Lecocq, Sophie; Raymond, Ariane; Aptel, Sabine; Blum, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Wide area-detector CT availability is growing steadily. • Advanced techniques such as Dynamic CT, Perfusion CT and dual energy can be used in clinical practice. • Optimal acquisition protocol is needed to increase diagnostic performance and limit dose exposure. • Guidelines for data acquisition and interpretation may increase diagnostic performance and reproducibility. - Abstract: A progressive increase in the detector width in CT scanners has meant that advanced techniques such as dynamic, perfusion and dual-energy CT are now at the radiologist's disposal. Although these techniques may be important for the diagnosis of various musculoskeletal diseases, data acquisition and interpretation can be challenging. This article offers a practical guide for the use of these tools including acquisition protocol, post-processing options and data interpretation based on 7 years of clinical experience in a tertiary university hospital

  5. Patient position matching between SPECT and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eubig, C.; Lodhi, L.M.; Trueblood, J.H.; Kingsbury, T.; Burke, G.; Flickenger, F.

    1990-01-01

    Since the authors had previously developed an ability for accurate repositioning of patients by means of video imaging of their external features, it was their purpose to determine if separate video systems placed in SPECT and CT rooms could be positioned and a calibration procedure for each modality developed to assure easy identification and acquisition of corresponding congruent axial image sections through the patient. A video frame grabber is used to acquire an image of the patient in one room and superimpose it on a similar image of the patient in the other room. A radioactive ruler visible at CT images obtained with a gamma camera computer, and a CT scout image are used to adjust the initial relative position of the video cameras and calibrate the acquisition parameters of both systems. The success of this alignment procedure was tested with a body phantom. The body phantom studies indicate that this method of positioning the patient and acquiring corresponding aligned CT and SPECT axial sections can be successful where internal organ shift between the acquisitions is minimal. This should lead to a reduction of the time and computer resources necessary to fuse or superimpose images of corresponding patient sections acquired with different modalities

  6. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma; PET y PET/CT en melanoma maligno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J R [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  7. Language Acquisition without an Acquisition Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, William

    2012-01-01

    Most explanatory work on first and second language learning assumes the primacy of the acquisition phenomenon itself, and a good deal of work has been devoted to the search for an "acquisition device" that is specific to humans, and perhaps even to language. I will consider the possibility that this strategy is misguided and that language…

  8. Calo trigger acquisition system

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Calo trigger acquisition system - Evolution of the acquisition system from a multiple boards system (upper, orange cables) to a single board one (below, light blue cables) where all the channels are collected in a single board.

  9. Modelling live forensic acquisition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, MM

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the development of a South African model for Live Forensic Acquisition - Liforac. The Liforac model is a comprehensive model that presents a range of aspects related to Live Forensic Acquisition. The model provides forensic...

  10. Playing at Serial Acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T.J. Smit (Han); T. Moraitis (Thras)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBehavioral biases can result in suboptimal acquisition decisions-with the potential for errors exacerbated in consolidating industries, where consolidators design serial acquisition strategies and fight escalating takeover battles for platform companies that may determine their future

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special ... the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  12. Mergers and Acquisitions

    OpenAIRE

    Frasch, Manfred; Leptin, Maria

    2000-01-01

    Mergers and acquisitions (M&As) are booming a strategy of choice for organizations attempting to maintain a competitive advantage. Previous research on mergers and acquisitions declares that acquirers do not normally benefit from acquisitions. Targets, on the other hand, have a tendency of gaining positive returns in the few days surrounding merger announcements due to several characteristic on the acquisitions deal. The announcement period wealth effect on acquiring firms, however, is as cle...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a ... is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  15. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shyh-Jen [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jay [Institute of Radiological science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S.P. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: g39220003@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, 880, Sec.2, Chien-kuo Rd. Hualien 970, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tzung-Chi, E-mail: tzungchi.huang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, No.91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-21

    Background: Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications. Materials: Image quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan. Results: Radiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2{+-}4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95{+-}0.82 and 4.13{+-}0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53{+-}0.5 to 0.16{+-}0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols. Conclusion: The proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  16. Adding dimension to cellular mechanotransduction: Advances in biomedical engineering of multiaxial cell-stretch systems and their application to cardiovascular biomechanics and mechano-signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, O; Schneidereit, D; Nikolaev, Y A; Nikolova-Krstevski, V; Schürmann, S; Wirth-Hücking, A; Merten, A L; Fatkin, D; Martinac, B

    2017-11-01

    Hollow organs (e.g. heart) experience pressure-induced mechanical wall stress sensed by molecular mechano-biosensors, including mechanosensitive ion channels, to translate into intracellular signaling. For direct mechanistic studies, stretch devices to apply defined extensions to cells adhered to elastomeric membranes have stimulated mechanotransduction research. However, most engineered systems only exploit unilateral cellular stretch. In addition, it is often taken for granted that stretch applied by hardware translates 1:1 to the cell membrane. However, the latter crucially depends on the tightness of the cell-substrate junction by focal adhesion complexes and is often not calibrated for. In the heart, (increased) hemodynamic volume/pressure load is associated with (increased) multiaxial wall tension, stretching individual cardiomyocytes in multiple directions. To adequately study cellular models of chronic organ distension on a cellular level, biomedical engineering faces challenges to implement multiaxial cell stretch systems that allow observing cell reactions to stretch during live-cell imaging, and to calibrate for hardware-to-cell membrane stretch translation. Here, we review mechanotransduction, cell stretch technologies from uni-to multiaxial designs in cardio-vascular research, and the importance of the stretch substrate-cell membrane junction. We also present new results using our IsoStretcher to demonstrate mechanosensitivity of Piezo1 in HEK293 cells and stretch-induced Ca 2+ entry in 3D-hydrogel-embedded cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Smart acquisition EELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sader, Kasim; Schaffer, Bernhard; Vaughan, Gareth; Brydson, Rik; Brown, Andy; Bleloch, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a novel acquisition methodology for the recording of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM): 'Smart Acquisition'. Smart Acquisition allows the independent control of probe scanning procedures and the simultaneous acquisition of analytical signals such as EELS. The original motivation for this work arose from the need to control the electron dose experienced by beam-sensitive specimens whilst maintaining a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio in the EEL signal for the extraction of useful analytical information (such as energy loss near edge spectral features) from relatively undamaged areas. We have developed a flexible acquisition framework which separates beam position data input, beam positioning, and EELS acquisition. In this paper we demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique on beam-sensitive thin films of amorphous aluminium trifluoride. Smart Acquisition has been used to expose lines to the electron beam, followed by analysis of the structures created by line-integrating EELS acquisitions, and the results are compared to those derived from a standard EELS linescan. High angle annular dark-field images show clear reductions in damage for the Smart Acquisition areas compared to the conventional linescan, and the Smart Acquisition low loss EEL spectra are more representative of the undamaged material than those derived using a conventional linescan. Atomically resolved EELS of all four elements of CaNdTiO show the high resolution capabilities of Smart Acquisition.

  18. Smart acquisition EELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sader, Kasim, E-mail: k.sader@leeds.ac.uk [SuperSTEM, J block, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Schaffer, Bernhard [SuperSTEM, J block, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vaughan, Gareth [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Brydson, Rik [SuperSTEM, J block, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Brown, Andy [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Bleloch, Andrew [SuperSTEM, J block, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We have developed a novel acquisition methodology for the recording of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM): 'Smart Acquisition'. Smart Acquisition allows the independent control of probe scanning procedures and the simultaneous acquisition of analytical signals such as EELS. The original motivation for this work arose from the need to control the electron dose experienced by beam-sensitive specimens whilst maintaining a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio in the EEL signal for the extraction of useful analytical information (such as energy loss near edge spectral features) from relatively undamaged areas. We have developed a flexible acquisition framework which separates beam position data input, beam positioning, and EELS acquisition. In this paper we demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique on beam-sensitive thin films of amorphous aluminium trifluoride. Smart Acquisition has been used to expose lines to the electron beam, followed by analysis of the structures created by line-integrating EELS acquisitions, and the results are compared to those derived from a standard EELS linescan. High angle annular dark-field images show clear reductions in damage for the Smart Acquisition areas compared to the conventional linescan, and the Smart Acquisition low loss EEL spectra are more representative of the undamaged material than those derived using a conventional linescan. Atomically resolved EELS of all four elements of CaNdTiO show the high resolution capabilities of Smart Acquisition.

  19. Indeterminate lesions on planar bone scintigraphy in lung cancer patients: SPECT, CT or SPECT-CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Punit; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Harmandeep; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the role of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT) and SPECT-CT of selected volume in lung cancer patients with indeterminate lesions on planar bone scintigraphy (BS). The data of 50 lung cancer patients (53 ± 10.3 years; range 30-75; male/female 38/12) with 65 indeterminate lesions on planar BS (January 2010 to November 2010) were retrospectively evaluated. All of them underwent SPECT-CT of a selected volume. SPECT, CT and SPECT-CT images were independently evaluated by two experienced readers (experience in musculoskeletal imaging, including CT: 5 and 7 years) in separate sessions. A scoring scale of 1 to 5 was used, in which 1 is definitely metastatic, 2 is probably metastatic, 3 is indeterminate, 4 is probably benign and 5 is definitely benign. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for each modality, taking a score ≤2 as metastatic. With receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for each modality and compared. Clinical and imaging follow-up and/or histopathology were taken as reference standard. For both readers SPECT was inferior to CT (P = 0.004, P = 0.022) and SPECT-CT (P = 0.003, P = 0.037). However, no significant difference was found between CT and SPECT-CT for reader 1 (P = 0.847) and reader 2 (P = 0.592). The findings were similar for lytic as well as sclerotic lesions. Moderate inter-observer agreement was seen for SPECT images (κ = 0.426), while almost perfect agreement was seen for CT (κ = 0.834) and SPECT-CT (κ = 0.971). CT alone and SPECT-CT are better than SPECT for accurate characterisation of indeterminate lesions on planar BS in lung cancer patients. CT alone is not inferior to SPECT-CT for this purpose and might be preferred because of shorter acquisition time and wider availability. (orig.)

  20. Dual energy CT: New horizon in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  1. Retrospective data-driven respiratory gating for PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleyer, Paul J; O'Doherty, Michael J; Barrington, Sally F; Marsden, Paul K

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory motion can adversely affect both PET and CT acquisitions. Respiratory gating allows an acquisition to be divided into a series of motion-reduced bins according to the respiratory signal, which is typically hardware acquired. In order that the effects of motion can potentially be corrected for, we have developed a novel, automatic, data-driven gating method which retrospectively derives the respiratory signal from the acquired PET and CT data. PET data are acquired in listmode and analysed in sinogram space, and CT data are acquired in cine mode and analysed in image space. Spectral analysis is used to identify regions within the CT and PET data which are subject to respiratory motion, and the variation of counts within these regions is used to estimate the respiratory signal. Amplitude binning is then used to create motion-reduced PET and CT frames. The method was demonstrated with four patient datasets acquired on a 4-slice PET/CT system. To assess the accuracy of the data-derived respiratory signal, a hardware-based signal was acquired for comparison. Data-driven gating was successfully performed on PET and CT datasets for all four patients. Gated images demonstrated respiratory motion throughout the bin sequences for all PET and CT series, and image analysis and direct comparison of the traces derived from the data-driven method with the hardware-acquired traces indicated accurate recovery of the respiratory signal.

  2. An attenuation correction method for PET/CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ue, Hidenori; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    In PET/CT systems, accurate attenuation correction can be achieved by creating an attenuation map from an X-ray CT image. On the other hand, respiratory-gated PET acquisition is an effective method for avoiding motion blurring of the thoracic and abdominal organs caused by respiratory motion. In PET/CT systems employing respiratory-gated PET, using an X-ray CT image acquired during breath-holding for attenuation correction may have a large effect on the voxel values, especially in regions with substantial respiratory motion. In this report, we propose an attenuation correction method in which, as the first step, a set of respiratory-gated PET images is reconstructed without attenuation correction, as the second step, the motion of each phase PET image from the PET image in the same phase as the CT acquisition timing is estimated by the previously proposed method, as the third step, the CT image corresponding to each respiratory phase is generated from the original CT image by deformation according to the motion vector maps, and as the final step, attenuation correction using these CT images and reconstruction are performed. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated using 4D-NCAT phantoms, and good stability of the voxel values near the diaphragm was observed. (author)

  3. Dual-Energy CT: New Horizon in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Goo, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  4. Technical principles of dual source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersilka, Martin; Bruder, Herbert; Krauss, Bernhard; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2008-01-01

    During the past years, multi-detector row CT (MDCT) has evolved into clinical practice with a rapid increase of the number of detector slices. Today's 64 slice CT systems allow whole-body examinations with sub-millimeter resolution in short scan times. As an alternative to adding even more detector slices, we describe the system concept and design of a CT scanner with two X-ray tubes and two detectors (mounted on a CT gantry with a mechanical offset of 90 deg.) that has the potential to overcome limitations of conventional MDCT systems, such as temporal resolution for cardiac imaging. A dual source CT (DSCT) scanner provides temporal resolution equivalent to a quarter of the gantry rotation time, independent of the patient's heart rate (83 ms at 0.33 s rotation time). In addition to the benefits for cardiac scanning, it allows to go beyond conventional CT imaging by obtaining dual energy information if the two tubes are operated at different voltages. Furthermore, we discuss how both acquisition systems can be used to add the power reserve of two X-ray tubes for long scan ranges and obese patients. Finally, future advances of DSCT are highlighted

  5. Multiaxial Cycle Deformation and Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Mild Carbon Steel and Related Welded-Metal Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilian Qu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-cycle fatigue experiments of mild carbon Q235B steel and its related welded-metal specimens are performed under uniaxial, in-phase, and 90° out-of-phase loading conditions. Significant additional cyclic hardening for 90° out-of-phase loading conditions is observed for both base metal and its related weldment. Besides, welding process produces extra additional hardening under the same loading conditions compared with the base metal. Multiaxial low-cycle fatigue strength under 90° out-of-phase loading conditions is significantly reduced for both base-metal and welded-metal specimens. The weldment has lower fatigue life than the base metal under the given loading conditions, and the fatigue life reduction of weldment increases with the increasing strain amplitude. The KBM, FS, and MKBM critical plane parameters are evaluated for the fatigue data obtained. The FS and MKBM parameters are found to show better correlation with fatigue lives for both base-metal and welded-metal specimens.

  6. Inertia coupling analysis of a self-decoupled wheel force transducer under multi-axis acceleration fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihang Feng

    Full Text Available Wheel force transducer (WFT, which measures the three-axis forces and three-axis torques applied to the wheel, is an important instrument in the vehicle testing field and has been extremely promoted by researchers with great interests. The transducer, however, is typically mounted on the wheel of a moving vehicle, especially on a high speed car, when abruptly accelerating or braking, the mass/inertia of the transducer/wheel itself will have an extra effect on the sensor response so that the inertia/mass loads will also be detected and coupled into the signal outputs. The effect which is considered to be inertia coupling problem will decrease the sensor accuracy. In this paper, the inertia coupling of a universal WFT under multi-axis accelerations is investigated. According to the self-decoupling approach of the WFT, inertia load distribution is solved based on the principle of equivalent mass and rotary inertia, thus then inertia impact can be identified with the theoretical derivation. The verification is achieved by FEM simulation and experimental tests. Results show that strains in simulation agree well with the theoretical derivation. The relationship between the applied acceleration and inertia load for both wheel force and moment is the approximate linear, respectively. All the relative errors are less than 5% which are within acceptable and the inertia loads have the maximum impact on the signal output about 1.5% in the measurement range.

  7. Volumetric error modeling, identification and compensation based on screw theory for a large multi-axis propeller-measuring machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xuemin; Liu, Hongqi; Mao, Xinyong; Li, Bin; He, Songping; Peng, Fangyu

    2018-05-01

    Large multi-axis propeller-measuring machines have two types of geometric error, position-independent geometric errors (PIGEs) and position-dependent geometric errors (PDGEs), which both have significant effects on the volumetric error of the measuring tool relative to the worktable. This paper focuses on modeling, identifying and compensating for the volumetric error of the measuring machine. A volumetric error model in the base coordinate system is established based on screw theory considering all the geometric errors. In order to fully identify all the geometric error parameters, a new method for systematic measurement and identification is proposed. All the PIGEs of adjacent axes and the six PDGEs of the linear axes are identified with a laser tracker using the proposed model. Finally, a volumetric error compensation strategy is presented and an inverse kinematic solution for compensation is proposed. The final measuring and compensation experiments have further verified the efficiency and effectiveness of the measuring and identification method, indicating that the method can be used in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools.

  8. Inertia coupling analysis of a self-decoupled wheel force transducer under multi-axis acceleration fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lihang; Lin, Guoyu; Zhang, Weigong; Dai, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Wheel force transducer (WFT), which measures the three-axis forces and three-axis torques applied to the wheel, is an important instrument in the vehicle testing field and has been extremely promoted by researchers with great interests. The transducer, however, is typically mounted on the wheel of a moving vehicle, especially on a high speed car, when abruptly accelerating or braking, the mass/inertia of the transducer/wheel itself will have an extra effect on the sensor response so that the inertia/mass loads will also be detected and coupled into the signal outputs. The effect which is considered to be inertia coupling problem will decrease the sensor accuracy. In this paper, the inertia coupling of a universal WFT under multi-axis accelerations is investigated. According to the self-decoupling approach of the WFT, inertia load distribution is solved based on the principle of equivalent mass and rotary inertia, thus then inertia impact can be identified with the theoretical derivation. The verification is achieved by FEM simulation and experimental tests. Results show that strains in simulation agree well with the theoretical derivation. The relationship between the applied acceleration and inertia load for both wheel force and moment is the approximate linear, respectively. All the relative errors are less than 5% which are within acceptable and the inertia loads have the maximum impact on the signal output about 1.5% in the measurement range.

  9. Thermal isocreep curves obtained during multi-axial creep tests on recrystallized Zircaloy-4 and M5™ alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautenberg, M.; Poquillon, D.; Pilvin, P.; Grosjean, C.; Cloué, J.M.; Feaugas, X.

    2014-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are widely used in the nuclear industry. Several components, such as cladding or guide tubes, undergo strong mechanical loading during and after their use inside the pressurized water reactors. The current requirements on higher fuel performances lead to the developing on new Zr based alloys exhibiting better mechanical properties. In this framework, creep behaviors of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 and M5™, have been investigated and then compared. In order to give a better understanding of the thermal creep anisotropy of Zr-based alloys, multi-axial creep tests have been carried out at 673 K. Using a specific device, creep conditions have been set using different values of β = σ zz /σ θθ , σ zz and σ θθ being respectively the axial and hoop creep stresses. Both axial and hoop strains are measured during each test which is carried out until stationary creep is stabilized. The steady-state strain rates are then used to build isocreep curves. Considering the isocreep curves, the M5™ alloy shows a largely improved creep resistance compared to the recrystallized Zircaloy-4, especially for tubes under high hoop loadings (0 < β < 1). The isocreep curves are then compared with simulations performed using two different mechanical models. Model 1 uses a von Mises yield criterion, the model 2 is based on a Hill yield criterion. For both models, a coefficient derived from Norton law is used to assess the stress dependence

  10. Spinal CT scan, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections. (Ueda, J.)

  11. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors by spiral angio CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kohi; Nakao, Norio; Takayasu, Yukio; Okawa, Tomohisa

    1995-01-01

    Spiral angio were performed with injection of 30 ml of contrast material at a rate of 1 ml/sec with a scan delay of 6 sec through catheter into the celiac artery while the blood flow of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was occluded by the inflated balloon catheter. Spiral CT scans were obtained using Somatom Plus (Siemens). Parameter for spiral CT were 24-sec acquisition time, 5 mm collimation, 5 mm/sec table incrementation. Reconstructions were performed every 5 mm. Pancreatic cancers were characteristically depicted with spiral angio CT as hypodensity relative to normal enhanced pancreatic parenchyma. On dynamic angio CT studies performed in pancreatic cancers, the area of cancer and normal parenchyma had maximum level of enhancement at 10-15 sec after injection of contrast material via catheter into the celiac, and there was no difference in enhancement between tumor and normal parenchyma. On the other hand, the lesions of cancer were revealed as hypodensity with spiral angio CT. In case of chronic pancreatitis, the enhancement of the entire pancreas obtained with spiral angio CT was homogeneous. Insulinoma in the tail of pancreas was detected by spiral angio CT but was not detected by both selective angiography and conventional CT. Three-dimensional (3-D) rendering spiral angio CT data shows the extent of vascular involvement by pancreatic cancer and provides useful information for surgical planning. Spiral angio CT is the most useful procedure for diagnosis of pancreatic tumor. (author)

  12. National survey of CT colonography practice in Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, A.E.

    2016-06-01

    CT Colonography was first introduced to Ireland in 1999. Our aim of this study is to review current CT Colonography practices in the Republic of Ireland. A questionnaire on CT Colonography practice was sent to all non-maternity adult radiology departments in the Republic of Ireland with a CT scanner. The results are interpreted in the context of the recommendations on CT Colonography quality standards as published by the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) consensus statement in the journal of European Radiology in 2013. Thirty centres provide CT Colonography; 21 of which responded (70%). Each centre performs median 90 studies per year; the majority follow accepted patient preparation and image acquisition protocols. Seventy-six percent of the centres repsonded that the majority of patients imaged are symptomatic. Of the 51 consultant radiologists reading CT Colonography, 37 (73%) have attended a CT Colonography course. In 17 (81%) of the centres the studies are single read although 81% of the centres have access to a second radiologist’s opinion. Fourteen (67%) of the centres reported limited access to CT scanner time as the major limiting factor to expanding their service. CT Colonography is widely

  13. Dose reduction strategies for cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midgley, S.M.; Einsiedel, P.; Langenberg, F.; Lui, E.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Recent advances in CT technology have produced brighter X-ray sources. gantries capable of increased rotation speeds, faster scintil lation materials arranged into multiple rows of detectors, and associated advances in 3D reconstruction methods. These innovations have allowed multi-detector CT to be turned to the diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities and compliment traditional imaging techniques such as coronary angiography. This study examines the cardiac imaging solution offered by the Siemens Somatom Definition Dual Source 64 slice CT scanner. Our dose reduction strategies involve optimising the data acquisition protocols according to diagnostic task, patient size and heart rate. The relationship between scan parameters, image quality and patient dose is examined and verified against measurements with phantoms representing the standard size patient. The dose reduction strategies are reviewed with reference to survey results of patient dose. Some cases allow the insertion of shielding to protect radiosensitive organs, and results are presented to quantify the dose saving.

  14. Clinical applications of PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Ha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of PET, PET/CT focusing on the technical aspects, PET radiopharmaceutical developments and current clinical applications as well. The newest technologic advances have been reviewed, including improved crystal design, acquisition modes, reconstruction algorithms, etc. These advancements will continue to improve contrast, decrease noise, and increase resolution. Combined PET/CT system provides faster attenuation correction and useful anatomic correlation to PET functional information. A number of new radiopharmaceuticals used for PET imaging have been developed, however, FDG have been considered as the principal PET radiotracer. The current clinical applications of PET and PET/CT are widespread and include oncology, cardiology and neurology. (author)

  15. A 4D Digital Phantom for Patient-Specific Simulation of Brain CT Perfusion Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R. van den; Manniesing, R.; Oei, M.T.H.; Woude, W.J. van der; Smit, E.J.; Laue, H.O.A.; Ginneken, B. van; Prokop, M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Optimizing CT brain perfusion protocols is a challenge because of the complex interaction between image acquisition, calculation of perfusion data and patient hemodynamics. Several digital phantoms have been developed to avoid unnecessary patient exposure or suboptimum choice of parameters.

  16. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I tube x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml -1 at 1.2 ml min -1 ) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel (∼85 μm) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid arteries and major cerebral blood vessels

  17. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H [Center for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: youngho.seo@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-04-07

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I{sub tube} x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml{sup -1} at 1.2 ml min{sup -1}) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel ({approx}85 {mu}m) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid

  18. Current state of low-cycle fatigue research based on multiaxial stress intensity and its challenges. Part 1. Focusing on low-cycle fatigue strength evaluation method of elbow piping subjected to in-plane cyclic bending displacement load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urabe, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    The R and D of fatigue strength at multiaxial stress intensity is recognized to become extremely important in the future in terms of the elaboration of low-cycle fatigue evaluation of various structures including piping systems and reflection on those standards. This paper focuses on the evaluation method developed by the author, namely cumulative damage rule in consideration of multiaxial stress intensity, and explains the concept and the results of verification and evaluation. It also discusses the engineering problems of the current low cycle fatigue assessment technology that were clarified in the process of developing low-cycle fatigue assessment method based on multiaxial stress intensity. The conservative lifespan and somewhat more conservative actual lifetime of elbow piping can be estimated by the conventional 'revised universal slope method' and 'advanced revised universal slope method.' However, these are empirical rules, and the theoretical basis is not clear. From 'cumulative damage rule in consideration of multiaxial stress intensity,' the author calculated furthermore 'low cycle fatigue evaluation formula based on cumulative damage rule in consideration of multi-axial stress intensity,' and examined it. As a result, an evaluation formula that can reasonably assume the equivalent thermoplastic strain range could be obtained at half of the repeat count as targeted. Furthermore, at the stage where future high precision FEM analysis can be used, direct low-cycle fatigue life curve can be established. (A.O.)

  19. CT appearance of splenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  20. CT appearance of splenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

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  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... cavities (ventricles) in patients with hydrocephalus . diseases or malformations of the skull. CT scanning is also performed ... biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations through a technique called CT angiography. For more ...

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

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  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

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    Full Text Available ... CT of the Sinuses? CT is usually the first test ordered when a sinus tumor is suspected. ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

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  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... about tumors of the nasal cavity and sinuses. plan for surgery by defining anatomy. top of page ... for sinusitis. CT of the sinuses can help plan the safest and most effective surgery. CT of ...

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

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  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. CT ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

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  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... of CT Scanning of the Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed ... soft tissues and blood vessels. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This ...

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    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the safest ... scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, ...

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  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation ... Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... membranes covering the brain. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... for the moving table. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. CT scanning is painless, ... and blood vessels. A CT scan of the face produces images that also show a patient's paranasal ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  8. CT of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghelman, B.

    1987-01-01

    CT can be combined with arthrography of the knee to study the following abnormalities: meniscal tears and cysts, synovial plicae, chondromalacia patellae, and osteochondritis dissecans. The CT-arthrogram images present abnormalities in a manner that resembles the ''in situ'' surgical findings, allowing management decisions to be made with greater confidence. The CT techniques for imaging the knee after arthrography are discussed, as is the use of plain CT

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  10. Evaluation of diseases of the aorta with ultrafast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldredge, W.J.; Flicker, S.; Altin, R.S.; Naidech, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrafast CT offers several advantages over standard CT for imaging of various congenital and acquired diseases of the aorta. Scan acquisition rates of 50 msec permit evaluation of the entire aorta following a single peripheral intravenous injection of iodinated contrast medium. Pathologic aortic flow patterns may also be defined using an ECG triggered ''flow'' mode, adding another dimension to CT evaluation of the aorta. The papers shows examples of a variety of aortic diseases, including coarctation, Marfan syndrome, atherosclerotic aneurysm, dissection, and postoperative abnormalities. The advantages of the modality are stressed

  11. CT of laryngotracheal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupetin, A.R.; Daffner, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of traumatic laryngotracheal abnormalities. The authors retrospectively evaluated the neck CT studies of 50 patients (36 males, 14 females; age range, 16-75 years) who presented to a level I trauma center after suffering a blunt or penetrating laryngotracheal injury. CT results were correlated with endoscopic or surgical findings in 43 cases. Three groups emerge. CT positive: hyloid bone or laryngotracheal cartilage injury; CT positive: soft-tissue injury only; and CT negative. In group 1, CT demonstrated all bony or cartilaginous injuries proved at surgery or suggested at endoscopy. CT failed to demonstrate laryngotracheal separation in 1 case. In group 2, CT demonstrated all soft-tissue injuries suggested at endoscopy. In group 3, CT findings agreed with those of endoscopy in 7 cases, but minor soft-tissue findings seen at endoscopy were missed in 3 cases. Seven patients were studied only with CT. Ct is an accurate technique for detecting bony or cartilaginous laryngotracheal traumatic abnormalities. However, laryngotracheal separation and minor soft-tissue injuries can be missed

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography ( ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  1. Comparison of radiation dose estimates, image noise, and scan duration in pediatric body imaging for volumetric and helical modes on 320-detector CT and helical mode on 64-detector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Jennifer H.; Podberesky, Daniel J.; Larson, David B.; Alsip, Christopher; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Angel, Erin; Barelli, Alessandra; Toncheva, Greta; Egelhoff, John C.; Anderson-Evans, Colin; Nguyen, Giao B.; Frush, Donald P.; Salisbury, Shelia R.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced multidetector CT systems facilitate volumetric image acquisition, which offers theoretic dose savings over helical acquisition with shorter scan times. Compare effective dose (ED), scan duration and image noise using 320- and 64-detector CT scanners in various acquisition modes for clinical chest, abdomen and pelvis protocols. ED and scan durations were determined for 64-detector helical, 160-detector helical and volume modes under chest, abdomen and pelvis protocols on 320-detector CT with adaptive collimation and 64-detector helical mode on 64-detector CT without adaptive collimation in a phantom representing a 5-year-old child. Noise was measured as standard deviation of Hounsfield units. Compared to 64-detector helical CT, all acquisition modes on 320-detector CT resulted in lower ED and scan durations. Dose savings were greater for chest (27-46%) than abdomen/pelvis (18-28%) and chest/abdomen/pelvis imaging (8-14%). Noise was similar across scanning modes, although some protocols on 320-detector CT produced slightly higher noise. Dose savings can be achieved for chest, abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis examinations on 320-detector CT compared to helical acquisition on 64-detector CT, with shorter scan durations. Although noise differences between some modes reached statistical significance, this is of doubtful diagnostic significance and will be studied further in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  2. Acquisition Research Program Homepage

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Includes an image of the main page on this date and compressed file containing additional web pages. Established in 2003, Naval Postgraduate School’s (NPS) Acquisition Research Program provides leadership in innovation, creative problem solving and an ongoing dialogue, contributing to the evolution of Department of Defense acquisition strategies.

  3. Making Acquisition Measurable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-30

    Corporation. All rights reserved End Users Administrator/ Maintainer (A/M) Subject Matter Expert ( SME ) Trainer/ Instructor Manager, Evaluator, Supervisor... CMMI ) - Acquisition (AQ) © 2011 The MITRE Corporation. All rights reserved 13 CMMI -Development Incremental iterative development (planning & execution...objectives Constructing games highlighting particular aspects of proposed CCOD® acquisition, and conducting exercises with Subject Matter Experts ( SMEs

  4. Flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, Willi A.; Kyriakou, Yiannis

    2007-01-01

    Flat-panel detectors or, synonymously, flat detectors (FDs) have been developed for use in radiography and fluoroscopy with the defined goal to replace standard X-ray film, film-screen combinations and image intensifiers by an advanced sensor system. FD technology in comparison to X-ray film and image intensifiers offers higher dynamic range, dose reduction, fast digital readout and the possibility for dynamic acquisitions of image series, yet keeping to a compact design. It appeared logical to employ FD designs also for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Respective efforts date back a few years only, but FD-CT has meanwhile become widely accepted for interventional and intra-operative imaging using C-arm systems. FD-CT provides a very efficient way of combining two-dimensional (2D) radiographic or fluoroscopic and 3D CT imaging. In addition, FD technology made its way into a number of dedicated CT scanner developments, such as scanners for the maxillo-facial region or for micro-CT applications. This review focuses on technical and performance issues of FD technology and its full range of applications for CT imaging. A comparison with standard clinical CT is of primary interest. It reveals that FD-CT provides higher spatial resolution, but encompasses a number of disadvantages, such as lower dose efficiency, smaller field of view and lower temporal resolution. FD-CT is not aimed at challenging standard clinical CT as regards to the typical diagnostic examinations; but it has already proven unique for a number of dedicated CT applications, offering distinct practical advantages, above all the availability of immediate CT imaging in the interventional suite or the operating room. (orig.)

  5. Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risberg, Annette

    Introduction to the study of mergers and acquisitions. This book provides an understanding of the mergers and acquisitions process, how and why they occur, and also the broader implications for organizations. It presents issues including motives and planning, partner selection, integration......, employee experiences and communication. Mergers and acquisitions remain one of the most common forms of growth, yet they present considerable challenges for the companies and management involved. The effects on stakeholders, including shareholders, managers and employees, must be considered as well...... by editorial commentaries and reflects the important organizational and behavioural aspects which have often been ignored in the past. By providing this in-depth understanding of the mergers and acquisitions process, the reader understands not only how and why mergers and acquisitions occur, but also...

  6. Data Acquisition System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirstea, C.D.; Buda, S.I.; Constantin, F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with a multi parametric acquisition system developed for a four input Analog to Digital Converter working in CAMAC Standard. The acquisition software is built in MS Visual C++ on a standard PC with a USB interface. It has a visual interface which permits Start/Stop of the acquisition, setting the type of acquisition (True/Live time), the time and various menus for primary data acquisition. The spectrum is dynamically visualized with a moving cursor indicating the content and position. The microcontroller PIC16C765 is used for data transfer from ADC to PC; The microcontroller and the software create an embedded system which emulates the CAMAC protocol programming the 4 input ADC for operating modes ('zero suppression', 'addressed' and 'sequential') and handling the data transfers from ADC to its internal memory. From its memory the data is transferred into the PC by the USB interface. The work is in progress. (authors)

  7. Data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirstea, D.C.; Buda, S.I.; Constantin, F.

    2005-01-01

    The topic of this paper deals with a multi parametric acquisition system developed around a four input Analog to Digital Converter working in CAMAC Standard. The acquisition software is built in MS Visual C++ on a standard PC with a USB interface. It has a visual interface which permits Start/Stop of the acquisition, setting the type of acquisition (True/Live time), the time and various menus for primary data acquisition. The spectrum is dynamically visualized with a moving cursor indicating the content and position. The microcontroller PIC16C765 is used for data transfer from ADC to PC; The microcontroller and the software create an embedded system which emulates the CAMAC protocol programming, the 4 input ADC for operating modes ('zero suppression', 'addressed' and 'sequential') and handling the data transfers from ADC to its internal memory. From its memory the data is transferred into the PC by the USB interface. The work is in progress. (authors)

  8. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  9. Radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudan: CT dose, organ and effective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I.I.; Khamis, H.M.; Ombada, T.H.; Alzimami, K.; Alkhorayef, M.; Sulieman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude of radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudanese hospitals. Doses were determined from CT acquisition parameters using CT-Expo 2.1 dosimetry software. Doses were evaluated for three patient ages (0-1, 1-5 and 5-10 y) and two common procedures (head and abdomen). For children aged 0-1 y, volume CT air kerma index (C vol ), air Kerma-length product and effective dose (E) values were 19.1 mGy, 265 mGy.cm and 3.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and those at abdominal CT were 8.8 mGy, 242 mGy.cm and 7.7 mSv, respectively. Those for children aged 1-5 y were 22.5 mGy, 305 mGy.cm and 1.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and 12.6 mGy, 317 mGy.cm, and 5.1 mSv, respectively, at abdominal CT. Dose values and variations were comparable with those reported in the literature. Organ equivalent doses vary from 7.5 to 11.6 mSv for testes, from 9.0 to 10.0 mSv for ovaries and from 11.1 to 14.3 mSv for uterus in abdominal CT. The results are useful for dose optimisation and derivation of national diagnostic reference levels. (authors)

  10. Towards truly integrated hardware fusion with PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, T.

    2005-01-01

    Combined PET/CT imaging is a non-invasive means of acquiring and reviewing both, the anatomy and the molecular pathways of a patient during a quasi-simultaneous examination. Since the introduction of the prototype PET/CT in 1998 this imaging technology has evolved rapidly. State-of-the-art PET/CT tomographs combine the latest technology in spiral, multi-slice CT and PET using novel scintillator materials and image reconstruction techniques. Together with novel patient positioning systems PET/CT tomographs allow to acquire complementary PET and CT data in a single exam with the best intrinsic co-registration. In addition to the hardware integration efforts have been made to integrate the acquisition and viewing software in PET/CT, thus making the diagnostic review and reporting more efficient. Based on the first clinical experiences and the technical evolution of combined imaging technology PET/CT has become a standard in diagnostic oncology. With high-performance imaging technology at hand today, standardized, high-quality PET/CT imaging protocols are needed to provide best oncology patient care. These protocols mandate the joint efforts of a multi-disciplinary team of physicians, physicists and radiochemists. (orig.)

  11. Right heart on multidetector CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, D

    2011-01-01

    Right ventricular function plays an integral role in the pathogenesis and outcome of many cardiovascular diseases. Imaging the right ventricle has long been a challenge because of its complex geometry. In recent years there has been a tremendous expansion in multidetector row CT (MDCT) and its cardiac applications. By judicious modification of contrast medium protocol, it is possible to achieve good opacification of the right-sided cardiac chambers, thereby paving the way for exploring the overshadowed right heart. This article will describe the key features of right heart anatomy, review MDCT acquisition techniques, elaborate the various morphological and functional information that can be obtained, and illustrate some important clinical conditions associated with an abnormal right heart. PMID:22723537

  12. WE-G-209-02: CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kofler, J.

    2016-01-01

    Digital radiography, CT, PET, and MR are complicated imaging modalities which are composed of many hardware and software components. These components work together in a highly coordinated chain of events with the intent to produce high quality images. Acquisition, processing and reconstruction of data must occur in a precise way for optimum image quality to be achieved. Any error or unexpected event in the entire process can produce unwanted pixel intensities in the final images which may contribute to visible image artifacts. The diagnostic imaging physicist is uniquely qualified to investigate and contribute to resolution of image artifacts. This course will teach the participant to identify common artifacts found clinically in digital radiography, CT, PET, and MR, to determine the causes of artifacts, and to make recommendations for how to resolve artifacts. Learning Objectives: Identify common artifacts found clinically in digital radiography, CT, PET and MR. Determine causes of various clinical artifacts from digital radiography, CT, PET and MR. Describe how to resolve various clinical artifacts from digital radiography, CT, PET and MR.

  13. WE-G-209-02: CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofler, J. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Digital radiography, CT, PET, and MR are complicated imaging modalities which are composed of many hardware and software components. These components work together in a highly coordinated chain of events with the intent to produce high quality images. Acquisition, processing and reconstruction of data must occur in a precise way for optimum image quality to be achieved. Any error or unexpected event in the entire process can produce unwanted pixel intensities in the final images which may contribute to visible image artifacts. The diagnostic imaging physicist is uniquely qualified to investigate and contribute to resolution of image artifacts. This course will teach the participant to identify common artifacts found clinically in digital radiography, CT, PET, and MR, to determine the causes of artifacts, and to make recommendations for how to resolve artifacts. Learning Objectives: Identify common artifacts found clinically in digital radiography, CT, PET and MR. Determine causes of various clinical artifacts from digital radiography, CT, PET and MR. Describe how to resolve various clinical artifacts from digital radiography, CT, PET and MR.

  14. Microstructural and mechanical properties of AA1100 aluminum processed by multi-axial incremental forging and shearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montazeri-Pour, M. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsa, M.H., E-mail: mhparsa@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafarian, H.R. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taieban, S. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Multi-axial incremental forging and shearing (MAIFS), as a new severe plastic deformation technique, was successfully applied up to eight passes on the workpieces of commercially pure Al (AA1100). The microstructure evolutions and mechanisms of the grain refinement in the billets deformed through various passes of process were studied using the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. Microhardness measurements and tensile tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties and deformation behavior of the material after successive passes of the MAIFS process. Measured microhardness evolution indicated that while the distribution of hardness was non-uniform after odd-numbered passes up to four passes, but thereafter outstanding deformation homogeneity was achieved when the consecutive MAIFS passes were applied. Tensile tests indicated that yield stress and ultimate tensile strength increased rapidly during the primary pass of process but thereafter there was only a minor increase up to four passes. After that, a little drop could be observed in strength and then it reached to a saturated magnitude. Measured microhardness distribution values exhibited the same trend, viz. it increased through successive passes to a limiting value beyond which it showed a minor decline by disappearance of points having maximum hardness. Some coarsening was taken place and the dislocation walls between the boundaries were reduced significantly in going from four to six passes. It was suggested that the absorption of the dislocations into grain boundaries as an effective recovery process under large deformations and short-range migration of grain boundaries might be significant mechanisms responsible for the softening observed after four passes of process.

  15. Airborne multi-axis DOAS measurements of tropospheric SO2 plumes in the Po-valley, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available During the second FORMAT (FORMaldehyde as A Tracer of oxidation in the troposphere campaign in 2003 the airborne multi-axis DOAS instrument (AMAXDOAS performed scattered-light spectroscopic measurements of SO2 over the city of Mantova and the power plant Porto Tolle, both situated in the Po-valley, Northern Italy. The SO2 vertical columns and emission flux were derived from two days of measurements, 26 and 27 September 2003. The SO2 emission flux from the power plant Porto Tolle was calculated to 1.93×1025 molec s-1 on 26 September and in good agreement with official emission data, which quote 2.25×1025 molec s-1. On 27 September the measured flux was much lower (3.77×1024 molec s-1 if ECMWF wind data are used, but of comparable magnitude (2.4×1025 molec s-1 if the aircraft on-board wind measurements are utilised. Official emission data was 2.07×1025 molec s-1 indicating only a small change from the previous day. Over the city of Mantova, the observed SO2 vertical columns were 1.1×1016 molec cm-2 and 1.9×1016 molec cm-2 on 26 and 27 September, respectively. This is in good agreement with ground-based measurements of 5.9 ppbv and 10.0 ppbv which correspond to 1.2×1016 molec cm-2 and 2.2×1016 molec cm-2 if a well mixed boundary layer of 500m altitude is assumed.

  16. X-ray multiaxial stress analysis by means of polynomial approximation and an application to plane stress problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Kuramoto, Makoto.

    1984-01-01

    A new polynomial approximation method was proposed for the X-ray multiaxial stress analysis, in which the effect of stress gradient along the penetration depth of X-rays was taken into account. Three basic assumptions were made; (1) the stress gradient is linear in respect to the depth from the specimen surface, (2) the ponetration depth of X-rays is a function of Sin 2 phi and (3) the strain measured by X-rays corresponds to the weighted average strain on the intensity of the diffracted X-rays. Consequently, the stress state within the thin layer near the surface was expressed by making use of three surface stresses and six stress gradients in the present method. The average strains by X-rays were approximated by the third order polynomial equations of sin 2 phi using a least square method at several phi angles on the coordinate system of specimen. Since the coefficients of these polynomials include these nine stress components mentioned above, it is possible to solve them as simultaneous equations. The calculating process of this method is simpler than that of the integral method. An X-ray plane stress problem was analyzed as an application of the present method, and the residual stress distribution on a shot-peened steel plate was actually measured by use of Cr-Kα X-rays to verify the analysis. The result showed that the compressive residual stress near the surface determined by the present method was smaller than the weighted average stress by the Sin 2 phi method because of the steep stress gradient. The present method is useful to obtain a reasonable value of stress for such a specimen with steep stress gradients near the surface. (author)

  17. Microstructural and mechanical properties of AA1100 aluminum processed by multi-axial incremental forging and shearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montazeri-Pour, M.; Parsa, M.H.; Jafarian, H.R.; Taieban, S.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-axial incremental forging and shearing (MAIFS), as a new severe plastic deformation technique, was successfully applied up to eight passes on the workpieces of commercially pure Al (AA1100). The microstructure evolutions and mechanisms of the grain refinement in the billets deformed through various passes of process were studied using the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. Microhardness measurements and tensile tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties and deformation behavior of the material after successive passes of the MAIFS process. Measured microhardness evolution indicated that while the distribution of hardness was non-uniform after odd-numbered passes up to four passes, but thereafter outstanding deformation homogeneity was achieved when the consecutive MAIFS passes were applied. Tensile tests indicated that yield stress and ultimate tensile strength increased rapidly during the primary pass of process but thereafter there was only a minor increase up to four passes. After that, a little drop could be observed in strength and then it reached to a saturated magnitude. Measured microhardness distribution values exhibited the same trend, viz. it increased through successive passes to a limiting value beyond which it showed a minor decline by disappearance of points having maximum hardness. Some coarsening was taken place and the dislocation walls between the boundaries were reduced significantly in going from four to six passes. It was suggested that the absorption of the dislocations into grain boundaries as an effective recovery process under large deformations and short-range migration of grain boundaries might be significant mechanisms responsible for the softening observed after four passes of process

  18. Assessment of laserbeam-welded tubular overlap joints made of magnesium and aluminium under multiaxial loading; Bemessung laserstrahlgeschweisster Ueberlappverbindungen aus Magnesium und Aluminium unter mehrachsiger Beanspruchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exel, Nora; Wiebesiek, Jens; Sonsino, Cetin Morris [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlaessigkeit (LBF), Darmstadt (Germany); Hanselka, Holger [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlaessigkeit (LBF), Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Fachgebiet ' ' Systemzuverlaessigkeit und Maschinenakustik' '

    2013-07-01

    The present paper compares the wrought light-metal alloys AlMg3.5Mn and MgAl3Zn1 based on the fatigue behaviour of laserbeam-welded overlapped tubular joints. The experiments were carried out under pure axial, pure torsional and combined proportional as well as nonproportional loading. The test results were assessed by applying the notch stress concept with a reference radius of r{sub ref} = 0,05 mm and compared with allowable stresses taken from a standard. Finally, two stress based multiaxial hypothesis are compared to each other based on the test results. (orig.)

  19. Monitoring microstructural evolution of alloy 617 with non-linear acoustics for remaining useful life prediction; multiaxial creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lissenden, Cliff [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Hassan, Tasnin [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Rangari, Vijaya [Tuskegee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States)

    2014-10-30

    The research built upon a prior investigation to develop a unified constitutive model for design-­by-­analysis of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs). Model development requires a set of failure data from complex mechanical experiments to characterize the material behavior. Therefore uniaxial and multiaxial creep-­fatigue and creep-­ratcheting tests were conducted on the nickel-­base Alloy 617 at 850 and 950°C. The time dependence of material behavior, and the interaction of time dependent behavior (e.g., creep) with ratcheting, which is an increase in the cyclic mean strain under load-­controlled cycling, are major concerns for NGNP design. This research project aimed at characterizing the microstructure evolution mechanisms activated in Alloy 617 by mechanical loading and dwell times at elevated temperature. The acoustic harmonic generation method was researched for microstructural characterization. It is a nonlinear acoustics method with excellent potential for nondestructive evaluation, and even online continuous monitoring once high temperature sensors become available. It is unique because it has the ability to quantitatively characterize microstructural features well before macroscale defects (e.g., cracks) form. The nonlinear acoustics beta parameter was shown to correlate with microstructural evolution using a systematic approach to handle the complexity of multiaxial creep-­fatigue and creep-­ratcheting deformation. Mechanical testing was conducted to provide a full spectrum of data for: thermal aging, tensile creep, uniaxial fatigue, uniaxial creep-­fatigue, uniaxial creep-ratcheting, multiaxial creep-fatigue, and multiaxial creep-­ratcheting. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Optical Microscopy were conducted to correlate the beta parameter with individual microstructure mechanisms. We researched

  20. Multi-axial model of anisotropic damage: numerical management of failure and application to the ruin of reinforced concrete structures under impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroux, A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to develop the most precise possible numeric modelling of reinforced concrete behaviour with application to the design of structures of protection of nuclear plants against violent dynamic loadings (explosions, impacts). After a discussion of existing models, of their benefits and weaknesses, a multi-axial model of anisotropic damage is proposed and implemented with the finite element method. A new procedure of failure management is also proposed which allows the induced anisotropic damage to be taken into account. Impact tests on concrete beams and concrete cubes with longitudinal steel have been performed in order to validate the model [fr

  1. Monitoring microstructural evolution of alloy 617 with non-linear acoustics for remaining useful life prediction; multiaxial creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissenden, Cliff; Hassan, Tasnin; Rangari, Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    The research built upon a prior investigation to develop a unified constitutive model for design-@by-@analysis of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs). Model development requires a set of failure data from complex mechanical experiments to characterize the material behavior. Therefore uniaxial and multiaxial creep-@fatigue and creep-@ratcheting tests were conducted on the nickel base Alloy 617 at 850 and 950°C. The time dependence of material behavior, and the interaction of time dependent behavior (e.g., creep) with ratcheting, which is an increase in the cyclic mean strain under load-@controlled cycling, are major concerns for NGNP design. This research project aimed at characterizing the microstructure evolution mechanisms activated in Alloy 617 by mechanical loading and dwell times at elevated temperature. The acoustic harmonic generation method was researched for microstructural characterization. It is a nonlinear acoustics method with excellent potential for nondestructive evaluation, and even online continuous monitoring once high temperature sensors become available. It is unique because it has the ability to quantitatively characterize microstructural features well before macroscale defects (e.g., cracks) form. The nonlinear acoustics beta parameter was shown to correlate with microstructural evolution using a systematic approach to handle the complexity of multiaxial creep-@fatigue and creep-@ratcheting deformation. Mechanical testing was conducted to provide a full spectrum of data for: thermal aging, tensile creep, uniaxial fatigue, uniaxial creep-@fatigue, uniaxial creep-ratcheting, multiaxial creep-fatigue, and multiaxial creep-@ratcheting. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Optical Microscopy were conducted to correlate the beta parameter with individual microstructure mechanisms. We researched application of the

  2. The value of precontrast thoraco-abdominopelvic CT in polytrauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, A.A., E-mail: rxandreaesposito@yahoo.it [Department of Radiology, Foundation IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Via Francesco Sforza 35, 20121 Milan (Italy); Zilocchi, M., E-mail: massimo.zilocchi@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Foundation IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Via Francesco Sforza 35, 20121 Milan (Italy); Fasani, P., E-mail: fasapier65@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Foundation IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Via Francesco Sforza 35, 20121 Milan (Italy); Giannitto, C., E-mail: caterina.giannitto@gmail.com [School of Radiology, University of Milan, Via A. di Rudinì 8, Milan (Italy); Maccagnoni, S., E-mail: maccagnnisara@libero.it [School of Radiology, University of Milan, Via A. di Rudinì 8, Milan (Italy); Maniglio, M., E-mail: marinamaniglio@gmail.com [School of Radiology, University of Milan, Via A. di Rudinì 8, Milan (Italy); Campoleoni, M., E-mail: campoleoni@policlinico.mi.it [Medical Phisic Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Via Francesco Sforza, 35, 20121 Milan (Italy); Brambilla, R., E-mail: roberto.brambilla@policlinico.mi.it [Medical Phisic Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Via Francesco Sforza, 35, 20121 Milan (Italy); Casiraghi, E., E-mail: casiraghi@di.unimi.it [Computer Science Department, University of Milan, Via Comelico 39, Milan (Italy); Biondetti, P.R., E-mail: pibionde@tin.it [Department of Radiology, Foundation IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Via Francesco Sforza 35, 20121 Milan (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We evaluated the additional value of precontrast CT in polytrauma patient. • We evaluated the radiation dose CT in polytrauma patient. • Precontrast CT scan does not have an additional value in polytrauma patient. • Precontrast CT expose patient to an unjustified radiation dose. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the utility and radiation dose of thoraco-abdominopelvic precontrast CT in polytrauma patients. Materials and methods: We examined retrospectively 125 patients who underwent a thoraco-abdominopelvic CT for trauma. Two radiologists, independently, evaluated precontrast CT acquisition and two other radiologists examined the contrast-enhanced scans. A further two radiologists assessed both the acquisitions. Mean value of sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated by each group of radiologists. For 104 patients, CTDIvol, DLP data and individual mean size were collected to calculate effective dose. Results: Mean values of SE, SP, PPV and NPV of findings of radiologists who assessed contrast-enhanced acquisitions were respectively: SE = 85%, SP = 98%, PPV = 86%, NPV = 88% versus: SE = 43%, SP = 95%, PPV = 69%, NPV = 88% of radiologists who examined non-contrast-enhanced scans. Mean values of radiologists who analyzed both acquisitions were: SE = 80%, SP = 97%, PPV = 80%, NPV = 88%. Neither the precontrast scans nor the precontrast and postcontrast scans together provided additional useful information compared to the single contrast-enhanced acquisition. Patients received a mean dose of 12 mSv for the precontrast CT. Conclusions: Precontrast CT acquisition did not provide significant information in trauma patients, exposing them to an unjustified radiation dose.

  3. The value of precontrast thoraco-abdominopelvic CT in polytrauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, A.A.; Zilocchi, M.; Fasani, P.; Giannitto, C.; Maccagnoni, S.; Maniglio, M.; Campoleoni, M.; Brambilla, R.; Casiraghi, E.; Biondetti, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We evaluated the additional value of precontrast CT in polytrauma patient. • We evaluated the radiation dose CT in polytrauma patient. • Precontrast CT scan does not have an additional value in polytrauma patient. • Precontrast CT expose patient to an unjustified radiation dose. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the utility and radiation dose of thoraco-abdominopelvic precontrast CT in polytrauma patients. Materials and methods: We examined retrospectively 125 patients who underwent a thoraco-abdominopelvic CT for trauma. Two radiologists, independently, evaluated precontrast CT acquisition and two other radiologists examined the contrast-enhanced scans. A further two radiologists assessed both the acquisitions. Mean value of sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated by each group of radiologists. For 104 patients, CTDIvol, DLP data and individual mean size were collected to calculate effective dose. Results: Mean values of SE, SP, PPV and NPV of findings of radiologists who assessed contrast-enhanced acquisitions were respectively: SE = 85%, SP = 98%, PPV = 86%, NPV = 88% versus: SE = 43%, SP = 95%, PPV = 69%, NPV = 88% of radiologists who examined non-contrast-enhanced scans. Mean values of radiologists who analyzed both acquisitions were: SE = 80%, SP = 97%, PPV = 80%, NPV = 88%. Neither the precontrast scans nor the precontrast and postcontrast scans together provided additional useful information compared to the single contrast-enhanced acquisition. Patients received a mean dose of 12 mSv for the precontrast CT. Conclusions: Precontrast CT acquisition did not provide significant information in trauma patients, exposing them to an unjustified radiation dose

  4. Feasibility of epicardial adipose tissue quantification in non-ECG-gated low-radiation-dose CT: comparison with prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon-Yarza, Isabel; Viteri-Ramirez, Guillermo; Saiz-Mendiguren, Ramon; Slon-Roblero, Pedro J.; Paramo, Maria [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Bastarrika, Gorka [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Cardiac Imaging Unit, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)], e-mail: bastarrika@unav.es

    2012-06-15

    Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. This parameter is generally assessed on ECG-gated computed tomography (CT) images. Purpose: To evaluate feasibility and reliability of EAT quantification on non-gated thoracic low-radiation-dose CT examinations with respect to prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition. Material and Methods: Sixty consecutive asymptomatic smokers (47 men; mean age 64 {+-} 9.8 years) underwent low-dose CT of the chest and prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisitions (64-slice dual-source CT). The two examinations were reconstructed with the same range, field of view, slice thickness, and convolution algorithm. Two independent observers blindly quantified EAT volume using commercially available software. Data were compared with paired sample Student t-test, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), and Bland-Altman plots. Results: No statistically significant difference was observed for EAT volume quantification with low-dose-CT (141.7 {+-} 58.3 mL) with respect to ECG-gated CT (142.7 {+-} 57.9 mL). Estimation of CCC showed almost perfect concordance between the two techniques for EAT-volume assessment (CCC, 0.99; mean difference, 0.98 {+-} 5.1 mL). Inter-observer agreement for EAT volume estimation was CCC: 0.96 for low-dose-CT examinations and 0.95 for ECG-gated CT. Conclusion: Non-gated low-dose CT allows quantifying EAT with almost the same concordance and reliability as using dedicated prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition protocols.

  5. Feasibility of epicardial adipose tissue quantification in non-ECG-gated low-radiation-dose CT: comparison with prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon-Yarza, Isabel; Viteri-Ramirez, Guillermo; Saiz-Mendiguren, Ramon; Slon-Roblero, Pedro J.; Paramo, Maria; Bastarrika, Gorka

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. This parameter is generally assessed on ECG-gated computed tomography (CT) images. Purpose: To evaluate feasibility and reliability of EAT quantification on non-gated thoracic low-radiation-dose CT examinations with respect to prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition. Material and Methods: Sixty consecutive asymptomatic smokers (47 men; mean age 64 ± 9.8 years) underwent low-dose CT of the chest and prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisitions (64-slice dual-source CT). The two examinations were reconstructed with the same range, field of view, slice thickness, and convolution algorithm. Two independent observers blindly quantified EAT volume using commercially available software. Data were compared with paired sample Student t-test, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), and Bland-Altman plots. Results: No statistically significant difference was observed for EAT volume quantification with low-dose-CT (141.7 ± 58.3 mL) with respect to ECG-gated CT (142.7 ± 57.9 mL). Estimation of CCC showed almost perfect concordance between the two techniques for EAT-volume assessment (CCC, 0.99; mean difference, 0.98 ± 5.1 mL). Inter-observer agreement for EAT volume estimation was CCC: 0.96 for low-dose-CT examinations and 0.95 for ECG-gated CT. Conclusion: Non-gated low-dose CT allows quantifying EAT with almost the same concordance and reliability as using dedicated prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition protocols

  6. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia O, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  7. Indexing mergers and acquisitions

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Jianhua; Guo, Jie (Michael); Hu, Nan; Li, Xi

    2017-01-01

    We measure the efficiency of mergers and acquisitions by putting forward an index (the ‘M&A Index’) based on stochastic frontier analysis. The M&A Index is calculated for each takeover deal and is standardized between 0 and 1. An acquisition with a higher index encompasses higher efficiency. We find that takeover bids with higher M&A Indices are more likely to succeed. Moreover, the M&A Index shows a strong and positive relation with the acquirers’ post-acquisition stock perfo...

  8. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  9. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  10. SPECT/CT co-registration of nuclear medicine studies and technologists: challenges and victories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A dual modality SPECT/CT gamma camera was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at Fremantle Hospital, WA in 2000. The challenges were satisfying the requirements of the Radiological Advisory Council of WA with respect to room modifications and presence of a radiographer during CT acquisitions and once installation was complete, learning to operate the camera in dual modality mode. The victories are making CT/SPECT acquisitions a simple and routine procedure and the impact of the co-registered studies in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications in our practice. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  11. The Acquisition of Particles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    process of language acquisition on the basis of linguistic evidence the child is exposed to. ..... particle verbs are recognized in language processing differs from the way morphologically ..... In Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 11.

  12. High speed data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.S.

    1997-07-01

    A general introduction to high speed data acquisition system techniques in modern particle physics experiments is given. Examples are drawn from the SELEX(E78 1) high statistics charmed baryon production and decay experiment now taking data at Fermilab

  13. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  14. Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nattenmüller, Johanna, E-mail: johanna.nattenmueller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Filsinger, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias_filsinger@web.de; Bryant, Mark, E-mail: mark.bryant@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Stiller, Wolfram, E-mail: Wolfram.Stiller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Radeleff, Boris, E-mail: boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Grenacher, Lars, E-mail: lars.grenacher@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Hosch, Waldemar, E-mail: waldemar.hosch@urz.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-19

    PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % in drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.

  15. Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nattenmüller, Johanna; Filsinger, Matthias; Bryant, Mark; Stiller, Wolfram; Radeleff, Boris; Grenacher, Lars; Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich; Hosch, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % in drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only

  16. Spinal CT scan, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival. (Chiba, N.)

  17. Retrieval of Vertical Aerosol and Trace Gas Distributions from Polarization Sensitive Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirpitz, Jan-Lukas; Friess, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    An accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of trace gases and aerosols is crucial for our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes in the lower troposphere. Their accurate determination is typically only possible by means of laborious and expensive airborne in-situ measurements but in the recent decades, numerous promising ground-based remote sensing approaches have been developed. One of them is to infer vertical distributions from "Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy" (DOAS) measurements. DOAS is a technique to analyze UV- and visible radiation spectra of direct or scattered sunlight, which delivers information on different atmospheric parameters, integrated over the light path from space to the instrument. An appropriate set of DOAS measurements, recorded under different viewing directions (Multi-Axis DOAS) and thus different light path geometries, provides information on the atmospheric state. The vertical profiles of aerosol properties and trace gas concentrations can be retrieved from such a set by numerical inversion techniques, incorporating radiative transfer models. The information content of measured data is rarely sufficient for a well-constrained retrieval, particularly for atmospheric layers above 1 km. We showed in first simulations that, apart from spectral properties, the polarization state of skylight is likely to provide a significant amount of additional information on the atmospheric state and thus to enhance retrieval quality. We present first simulations, expectations and ideas on how to implement and characterize a polarization sensitive Multi-Axis DOAS instrument and a corresponding profile retrieval algorithm.

  18. CT of Mirizzi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Fukushima, Keisuke; Ishihara, Kenji; Hirano, Yutaka; Sano, Kaizo

    1983-01-01

    PTC or ERCP findings of four cases of Mirizzi syndrome were demonstrated. They consisted of a smooth stricture of the common hepatic duct, curved impressions of the duct and dilatation of proximal biliary radicles. CT could visualize the impacted stone in the neck of the gallbladder, dilatation of proximal common hepatic and intrahepatic duct. Absence of the dilatation of distal common bile duct could also be confirmed by CT, thus the diagnosis of Mirizzi syndrome might be possible by CT. (author)

  19. Iterative CT reconstruction with correction for known rigid motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, Johan [Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Kim, Jung-Ha; Fulton, Roger [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Westmead Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Medical Physics

    2011-07-01

    In PET/CT brain imaging, correction for motion may be needed, in particular for children and psychiatric patients. Motion is more likely to occur in the lengthy PET measurement, but also during the short CT acquisition patient motion is possible. Rigid motion of the head can be measured independently from the PET/CT system with optical devices. In this paper, we propose a method and some preliminary simulation results for iterative CT reconstruction with correction for known rigid motion. We implemented an iterative algorithm for fully 3D reconstruction from helical CT scans. The motion of the head is incorporated in the system matrix as a view-dependent motion of the CT-system. The first simulation results indicate that some motion patterns may produce loss of essential data. This loss precludes exact reconstruction and results in artifacts in the reconstruction, even when motion is taken into account. However, by reducing the pitch during acquisition, the same motion pattern no longer caused artifacts in the motion corrected image. (orig.)

  20. Coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2009-07-01

    Coronary CT angiography has attained increasing scientific attention at academic institutions and has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality. Extending this knowledge into a practice setting is the purpose of 'Coronary CT Angiography'. This book will assist you in integrating cardiac CT into your daily practice, while also giving an overview of the current technical status and applications. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors are also presented providing an objective overview of noninvasive coronary angiography using CT. (orig.)

  1. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... head size in children Changes in thinking or behavior Fainting Headache, when you have certain other signs ...

  2. Brain perfusion-CT in acute stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, T.; Totsev, N.; Tzvetanov, P.

    2013-01-01

    Since 1979 when Grodfrey Hounsfield and Allan Corman introduced the computed tomography new generations of CT were developed that improved the special resolution and time of acquisition. The role of neuro-imaging in the evaluation of acute stroke has changed dramatically in the past decade. Previously, neuro-imaging was used in this set-ting to provide anatomic imaging that indicated the presence or absence of acute cerebral ischemia and excluded lesions that produce symptoms or signs mimicking those of stroke, such as hemorrhage and neoplasms. More recently, the introduction of thrombolysis has changed the goals of neuro-imaging from providing solely anatomic information to providing physiologic information that could help to determine which patients might benefit from therapy. In particular, significant emphasis has been placed on the delineation of the ischemic penumbra, also called tissue at risk. Modem CT survey, consisting of three indissociable elements; noncontrast CT (NCT) of course, perfusion-CT (PCT) and CT-angiography (CTA), fulfill all the requirements for hyperacute stroke imaging. CTA can define the occlusion site, depict arterial dissection, grade collateral blood flow, and characterize atherosclerotic disease, whereas PCT accurately defines the infarct core and the ischemic penumbra. CT offers a number of practical advantages over other cerebral perfusion imaging methods, including its wide availability. Using PCT and CTA to define new individualized strategies for acute reperfusion will allow more acute stroke patients to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. Key words: Stroke. Penumbra. Computed Tomography. Perfusion-CT. CT Angiography. Outcome

  3. Improved method of in vivo respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, Erin B; Panda, Kunal; Bankson, James A; Brown, Ellana; Cody, Dianna D [Department of Imaging Physics, Unit 56, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2004-09-07

    The presence of motion artifacts is a typical problem in thoracic imaging. However, synchronizing the respiratory cycle with computed tomography (CT) image acquisition can reduce these artifacts. We currently employ a method of in vivo respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging for small laboratory animals (mice). This procedure involves the use of a ventilator that controls the respiratory cycle of the animal and provides a digital output signal that is used to trigger data acquisition. After inspection of the default respiratory trigger timing, we hypothesized that image quality could be improved by moving the data-acquisition window to a portion of the cycle with less respiratory motion. For this reason, we developed a simple delay circuit to adjust the timing of the ventilator signal that initiates micro-CT data acquisition. This delay circuit decreases motion artifacts and substantially improves image quality.

  4. Improved method of in vivo respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, Erin B; Panda, Kunal; Bankson, James A; Brown, Ellana; Cody, Dianna D

    2004-01-01

    The presence of motion artifacts is a typical problem in thoracic imaging. However, synchronizing the respiratory cycle with computed tomography (CT) image acquisition can reduce these artifacts. We currently employ a method of in vivo respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging for small laboratory animals (mice). This procedure involves the use of a ventilator that controls the respiratory cycle of the animal and provides a digital output signal that is used to trigger data acquisition. After inspection of the default respiratory trigger timing, we hypothesized that image quality could be improved by moving the data-acquisition window to a portion of the cycle with less respiratory motion. For this reason, we developed a simple delay circuit to adjust the timing of the ventilator signal that initiates micro-CT data acquisition. This delay circuit decreases motion artifacts and substantially improves image quality

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  6. High Dose MicroCT Does Not Contribute Toward Improved MicroPET/CT Image Quantitative Accuracy and Can Limit Longitudinal Scanning of Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. McDougald

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining accurate quantitative measurements in preclinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT imaging is of paramount importance in biomedical research and helps supporting efficient translation of preclinical results to the clinic. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1 to investigate the effects of different CT acquisition protocols on PET/CT image quality and data quantification; and (2 to evaluate the absorbed dose associated with varying CT parameters.Methods: An air/water quality control CT phantom, tissue equivalent material phantom, an in-house 3D printed phantom and an image quality PET/CT phantom were imaged using a Mediso nanoPET/CT scanner. Collected data was analyzed using PMOD software, VivoQuant software and National Electric Manufactures Association (NEMA software implemented by Mediso. Measured Hounsfield Unit (HU in collected CT images were compared to the known HU values and image noise was quantified. PET recovery coefficients (RC, uniformity and quantitative bias were also measured.Results: Only less than 2 and 1% of CT acquisition protocols yielded water HU values < −80 and air HU values < −840, respectively. Four out of 11 CT protocols resulted in more than 100 mGy absorbed dose. Different CT protocols did not impact PET uniformity and RC, and resulted in <4% overall bias relative to expected radioactive concentration.Conclusion: Preclinical CT protocols with increased exposure times can result in high absorbed doses to the small animals. These should be avoided, as they do not contributed toward improved microPET/CT image quantitative accuracy and could limit longitudinal scanning of small animals.

  7. Post-Acquisition IT Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan; Yetton, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The extant research on post-acquisition IT integration analyzes how acquirers realize IT-based value in individual acquisitions. However, serial acquirers make 60% of acquisitions. These acquisitions are not isolated events, but are components in growth-by-acquisition programs. To explain how...... serial acquirers realize IT-based value, we develop three propositions on the sequential effects on post-acquisition IT integration in acquisition programs. Their combined explanation is that serial acquirers must have a growth-by-acquisition strategy that includes the capability to improve...... IT integration capabilities, to sustain high alignment across acquisitions and to maintain a scalable IT infrastructure with a flat or decreasing cost structure. We begin the process of validating the three propositions by investigating a longitudinal case study of a growth-by-acquisition program....

  8. Simulation evaluation of quantitative myocardial perfusion assessment from cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    Contrast enhancement on cardiac CT provides valuable information about myocardial perfusion and methods have been proposed to assess perfusion with static and dynamic acquisitions. There is a lack of knowledge and consensus on the appropriate approach to ensure 1) sufficient diagnostic accuracy for clinical decisions and 2) low radiation doses for patient safety. This work developed a thorough dynamic CT simulation and several accepted blood flow estimation techniques to evaluate the performance of perfusion assessment across a range of acquisition and estimation scenarios. Cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (Flow = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml/g/min, cardiac output = 3,5,8 L/min). CT acquisitions were simulated with a validated CT simulator incorporating polyenergetic data acquisition and realistic x-ray flux levels for dynamic acquisitions with a range of scenarios including 1, 2, 3 sec sampling for 30 sec with 25, 70, 140 mAs. Images were generated using conventional image reconstruction with additional image-based beam hardening correction to account for iodine content. Time attenuation curves were extracted for multiple regions around the myocardium and used to estimate flow. In total, 2,700 independent realizations of dynamic sequences were generated and multiple MBF estimation methods were applied to each of these. Evaluation of quantitative kinetic modeling yielded blood flow estimates with an root mean square error (RMSE) of ~0.6 ml/g/min averaged across multiple scenarios. Semi-quantitative modeling and qualitative static imaging resulted in significantly more error (RMSE = ~1.2 and ~1.2 ml/min/g respectively). For quantitative methods, dose reduction through reduced temporal sampling or reduced tube current had comparable impact on the MBF estimate fidelity. On average, half dose acquisitions increased the RMSE of estimates by only 18% suggesting that substantial dose reductions can be employed in the context of quantitative myocardial

  9. Myocardial perfusion imaging with dual energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Kwang Nam [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome (Italy); Tesche, Christian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Spandorfer, Adam; Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Stress dual-energy sCTMPI offers the possibility to directly detect the presence of myocardial perfusion defects. • Stress dual-energy sCTMPI allows differentiating between reversible and fixed myocardial perfusion defects. • The combination of coronary CT angiography and dual-energy sCTMPI can improve the ability of CT to detect hemodynamically relevant coronary artery disease. - Abstract: Dual-energy CT (DECT) enables simultaneous use of two different tube voltages, thus different x-ray absorption characteristics are acquired in the same anatomic location with two different X-ray spectra. The various DECT techniques allow material decomposition and mapping of the iodine distribution within the myocardium. Static dual-energy myocardial perfusion imaging (sCTMPI) using pharmacological stress agents demonstrate myocardial ischemia by single snapshot images of myocardial iodine distribution. sCTMPI gives incremental values to coronary artery stenosis detected on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) by showing consequent reversible or fixed myocardial perfusion defects. The comprehensive acquisition of CCTA and sCTMPI offers extensive morphological and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have revealed that dual-energy sCTMPI shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared to single-photon emission computed tomography, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiac MRI. The aim of this review is to present currently available DECT techniques for static myocardial perfusion imaging and recent clinical applications and ongoing investigations.

  10. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional ... advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional ... advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional ... advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. ...

  18. CT of pleural abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, W R [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.).

  19. Tuberculous peritonitis: CT appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, R.D.; Hunter, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    Rare, sporadic cases of tuberculous peritonitis do occur in the United States and other advanced countries. Because there are few descriptions of the CT appearance of the peritoneal forms of tuberculous (TB), this report illustrates a case of tuberculous peritonitis with prominent CT findings and discusses the differentiation of this entity from other, more common diseases

  20. CT urography and hematuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretlau, Thomas; Hansen, Rasmus H; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed tomography (CT) urography is now used in the work-up of patients with hematuria. The dose of contrast medium and radiation varies considerably between the different CT protocols. PURPOSE: To study the disease prevalence in a consecutive group of patients with hematuria...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can help plan the safest and most effective surgery. CT of the sinuses is now widely available and is performed in a relatively short time, especially when compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about tumors of the nasal cavity and sinuses. plan for surgery by defining anatomy. top of page How should ... for sinusitis. CT of the sinuses can help plan the safest and most effective surgery. CT of the sinuses is now widely available ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or nurse at the time of the CT examination. If your child has a known contrast material ... be given to your child for the CT examination. top of page What does the CT equipment ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow new CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called "multislice CT" or "multidetector CT," ...

  6. Data explosion: the challenge of multidetector-row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.

    2000-01-01

    The development of multi detector-row CT has brought many exciting advancements to clinical CT scanning. While multi detector-row CT offers unparalleled speed of acquisition, spatial resolution, and anatomic coverage, a challenge presented by these advantages is the substantial increase on the number of reconstructed cross-sections that are rapidly created and in need of analysis. This manuscript discusses currently available alternative visualization techniques for the assessment of volumetric data acquired with multi detector-row CT. Although the current capabilities of 3-D workstations offer many possibilities for alternative analysis of MCDT data, substantial improvements both in automated processing, processing speed and user interface will be necessary to realize the vision of replacing the primary analysis of transverse reconstruction's with alternative analyses. The direction that some of these future developments might take are discussed

  7. Data explosion: the challenge of multidetector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Geoffrey D. E-mail: grubin@standford.edu

    2000-11-01

    The development of multi detector-row CT has brought many exciting advancements to clinical CT scanning. While multi detector-row CT offers unparalleled speed of acquisition, spatial resolution, and anatomic coverage, a challenge presented by these advantages is the substantial increase on the number of reconstructed cross-sections that are rapidly created and in need of analysis. This manuscript discusses currently available alternative visualization techniques for the assessment of volumetric data acquired with multi detector-row CT. Although the current capabilities of 3-D workstations offer many possibilities for alternative analysis of MCDT data, substantial improvements both in automated processing, processing speed and user interface will be necessary to realize the vision of replacing the primary analysis of transverse reconstruction's with alternative analyses. The direction that some of these future developments might take are discussed.

  8. Clinical feasibility of {sup 90}Y digital PET/CT for imaging microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Chadwick L.; Binzel, Katherine; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Wuthrick, Evan J. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of next generation solid-state digital photon counting PET/CT (dPET/CT) technology and imaging findings in patients following {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization in comparison with standard of care (SOC) bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT (bSPECT/CT). Five patients underwent SOC {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung imaging immediately following routine radioembolization with 3.5 ± 1.7 GBq of {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres. All patients also underwent dPET/CT imaging at 29 ± 11 h following radioembolization. Matched pairs comparison was used to compare image quality, image contrast and {sup 90}Y biodistribution between dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images. Volumetric assessments of {sup 90}Y activity using different isocontour thresholds on dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images were also compared. Digital PET/CT consistently provided better visual image quality and {sup 90}Y-to-background image contrast while depicting {sup 90}Y biodistribution than bSPECT/CT. Isocontour volumetric assessment using a 1% threshold precisely outlined {sup 90}Y activity and the treatment volume on dPET/CT images, whereas a more restrictive 20% threshold on bSPECT/CT images was needed to obtain comparable treatment volumes. The use of a less restrictive 10% threshold isocontour on bSPECT/CT images grossly overestimated the treatment volume when compared with the 1% threshold on dPET/CT images. Digital PET/CT is clinically feasible for the assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization, and provides better visual image quality and image contrast than routine bSPECT/CT with comparable acquisition times. With further optimization and clinical validation, dPET technology may allow faster and more accurate imaging-based assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution. (orig.)

  9. Quantitative myocardial perfusion from static cardiac and dynamic arterial CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Branch, Kelley R.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2018-05-01

    Quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimation by dynamic contrast enhanced cardiac computed tomography (CT) requires multi-frame acquisition of contrast transit through the blood pool and myocardium to inform the arterial input and tissue response functions. Both the input and the tissue response functions for the entire myocardium are sampled with each acquisition. However, the long breath holds and frequent sampling can result in significant motion artifacts and relatively high radiation dose. To address these limitations, we propose and evaluate a new static cardiac and dynamic arterial (SCDA) quantitative MBF approach where (1) the input function is well sampled using either prediction from pre-scan timing bolus data or measured from dynamic thin slice ‘bolus tracking’ acquisitions, and (2) the whole-heart tissue response data is limited to one contrast enhanced CT acquisition. A perfusion model uses the dynamic arterial input function to generate a family of possible myocardial contrast enhancement curves corresponding to a range of MBF values. Combined with the timing of the single whole-heart acquisition, these curves generate a lookup table relating myocardial contrast enhancement to quantitative MBF. We tested the SCDA approach in 28 patients that underwent a full dynamic CT protocol both at rest and vasodilator stress conditions. Using measured input function plus single (enhanced CT only) or plus double (enhanced and contrast free baseline CT’s) myocardial acquisitions yielded MBF estimates with root mean square (RMS) error of 1.2 ml/min/g and 0.35 ml/min/g, and radiation dose reductions of 90% and 83%, respectively. The prediction of the input function based on timing bolus data and the static acquisition had an RMS error compared to the measured input function of 26.0% which led to MBF estimation errors greater than threefold higher than using the measured input function. SCDA presents a new, simplified approach for quantitative

  10. Kidney spiral CT, indications, realization, results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, R.; Beilicke, M.; Hundt, W.; Breiteneder, T.; Reiser, M.

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of spiral computed tomography (spiral CT) has vastly enriched the methodologically diversity of computer-tomographic scans. It allows for the recording of different perfusion or excretion stages of the kidney parenchyma of the urine draining paths by carrying out long-distance, phase-identical multiple examinations of the retroperitoneum. The description of the findings which are characterized by their local and contrasts behavior is possible. The following report describes the indications and technological process of kidney spiral CT using kidney-typical intravenous contrast media. Special emphasis is put on the advantages and limits of multiple phase spiral CT. Decisive preconditions are: 1. Specific clinical query, 2. selection of the corresponding phase contrasts of the kidneys and uretra or bladder, 3. exact technical and temporal adjustment of the acquisition parameters. Scanning times are in the range of seconds. The overall examination can be carried out quick and without any major strain on the part of the patient. A sound proof and a general differentiation of focal kideny lesions can be derived from the acquired data. This is also true for kidneys and ureters findings. Bladder findings can be localized and differentiated according to stage. More than two 'spiral acquisitions' should be carried out with restraint taking exposure to radiation into account. Due to the sound registration of focal lesions, its capability of reproduction and its short-time examination, the spiral CT of the kidneys can be said to be the most effective current scanning method of the retroperitoneum following clinical examinations and sonography. (orig.) [de

  11. Seismic data acquisition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolvankar, V.G.; Nadre, V.N.; Rao, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Details of seismic data acquisition systems developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay are reported. The seismic signals acquired belong to different signal bandwidths in the band from 0.02 Hz to 250 Hz. All these acquisition systems are built around a unique technique of recording multichannel data on to a single track of an audio tape and in digital form. Techniques of how these signals in different bands of frequencies were acquired and recorded are described. Method of detecting seismic signals and its performance is also discussed. Seismic signals acquired in different set-ups are illustrated. Time indexing systems for different set-ups and multichannel waveform display systems which form essential part of the data acquisition systems are also discussed. (author). 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  12. CT of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, B.G.; Federle, M.P.; Minagi, H.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-five consecutive cases of surgically proved splenic injuries were evaluated by CT. CT correctly identified 54 splenic injuries, with one false-negative and three false-positive studies. In the single false-negative study and in two of the three false-positive studies, CT correctly indicated the presence of a large hemoperitoneum and other abdominal visceral lacerations and so correctly indicated the need for surgery. Of the 55 proved cases of splenic injury, CT revealed hemoperitoneum in 54 (99%), perisplenic clot in 47 (85%), splenic laceration in 39 (71%), and subcapsular hematoma in 13 (24%). Perisplenic clot can be distinguished from lysed blood in the peritoneal cavity and is a sensitive and specific sign of splenic trauma, even in the absence of visible splenic laceration. The authors conclude that CT is highly reliable means of evaluating splenic trauma

  13. CT of abdominal abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobkin, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The imaging search for a suspected abdominal abscess is common in hospitalized patients, especially after recent abdominal surgery. This paper examines the role of CT in the detection, localization, and treatment of abdominal abscess. The accuracy, limitations, and technical aspects of CT in this clinical setting are discussed. The diagnosis of an abscess is based on the demonstration of a circumscribed abnormal fluid collection. Although percutaneous aspiration with gram stain and culture is usually indicated to differentiate abscess from other fluid collections, the CT-based detection of extraluminal gas bubbles makes the diagnosis of an abscess highly likely. CT is compared with conventional radiographic studies, US, and radio-nuclide imaging. Specific CT and clinical features of abscesses in the following sites are emphasized: subphrenic space, liver, pancreas, kidneys, psoas muscle, appendix, and colonic diverticula. Most abdominal abscesses can be successfully treated with percutaneous drainage techniques. The techniques, results, and limitations of percutaneous abscess drainage are reviewed

  14. CT of tracheal agenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Newman, Beverley

    2006-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is a rare and usually lethal anomaly. In the past, opaque contrast medium was injected via the esophagus to demonstrate the anatomy. To demonstrate the utility of helical and multidetector CT in delineating the aberrant anatomy in newborns with tracheal agenesis. Four newborns with tracheal agenesis were identified from three institutions. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Each child was imaged with chest radiography. One child was imaged on a single-detector helical CT scanner and the other three on multidetector scanners. Helical and multidetector CT with 2D and 3D reconstructions clearly delineated the aberrant tracheobronchial and esophageal anatomy in each infant. Minimum intensity projection reformatted CT images were particularly helpful. One infant each had type I and type II tracheal agenesis. Two infants had type III tracheal agenesis. All four infants died. CT is a useful tool for delineating the aberrant anatomy of newborns with tracheal agenesis and thus helps in making rational clinical decisions. (orig.)

  15. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    In our cases of acute and subacute subdural hematoma, the use of CT was evaluated. In our department of surgery, acute subdural hematoma was found in 46 of 388 patients of head trauma who underwent CT. Acute subdural hematoma, like epidural hematoma was usually visualized as a high-density area along the cranial inner table, and this was easily differenciated from epidural hematoma because of difference in shape from the other. The picture of acute subdural hematoma was occasionally confused with that of intracerebral hematoma or cerebral contusion. Single use of CT does not differenciate subacute subdural hematoma from chronic subdural hematoma. However, CT usually visualized acute hematoma as a high-density area, showing the extent of hematoma. Comparison of the thickness of hematoma with the axis deviation of the median part such as the 3rd cerebral ventricle suggested severity of cerebral edema. CT also revealed bilateral or multiple lesions of cerebral contusion or intracerebral hematoma. (Ueda, J.)

  16. CT of laryngeal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography has made a significant contribution to the radiologic assessment of the injured larynx. CT is an accurate, noninvasive modality that can rapidly diagnose both soft tissue and cartilaginous injuries. CT of the larynx involves a minimal degree of patient manipulation and discomfort and can be performed in conjunction with CT evaluation of intracranial or facial injuries. Conventional radiologic studies (anteroposterior and lateral soft tissue films of the neck, tomograms, or xerograms) are capable of demonstrating some cartilaginous fractures but are of limited value in defining the extent of soft tissue injury. In the acute trauma setting, laryngography is often technically difficult to perform because of patient discomfort and inability to cooperate. Although the overall experience is somewhat limited, CT appears to overcome many of the limitations of these conventional radiologic methods. The following is a discussion of the role of CT scanning in evaluating injuries to the larynx and cervical soft tissues

  17. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goharian, M; Khan, R F H

    2010-04-01

    For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL) 'X-Ray ON' status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL 'X-Ray ON' indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle) a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 +/- 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for the treatment delivery

  18. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goharian M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient′s breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore™ (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management™ (RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL ′X-Ray ON′ status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL ′X-Ray ON′ indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 ± 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for

  19. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goharian, M.; Khan, R.F.H.

    2010-01-01

    For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL) 'X-Ray ON' status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL 'X-Ray ON' indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle) a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 ± 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for the treatment delivery

  20. LEGS data acquisition facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeVine, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The data acquisition facility for the LEGS medium energy photonuclear beam line is composed of an auxiliary crate controller (ACC) acting as a front-end processor, loosely coupled to a time-sharing host computer based on a UNIX-like environment. The ACC services all real-time demands in the CAMAC crate: it responds to LAMs generated by data acquisition modules, to keyboard commands, and it refreshes the graphics display at frequent intervals. The host processor is needed only for printing histograms and recording event buffers on magnetic tape. The host also provides the environment for software development. The CAMAC crate is interfaced by a VERSAbus CAMAC branch driver

  1. Acquisition IT Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan; Øhrgaard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    of temporary agency workers. Following an analytic induction approach, theoretically grounded in the re-source-based view of the firm, we identify the complimentary and supplementary roles consultants can assume in acquisition IT integration. Through case studies of three acquirers, we investigate how...... the acquirers appropriate the use of agency workers as part of its acquisition strategy. For the investigated acquirers, assigning roles to agency workers is contingent on balancing the needs of knowledge induction and knowledge retention, as well as experience richness and in-depth under-standing. Composition...

  2. The influence of specimen size on creep crack growth rate in cross-weld CT specimens cut out from a welded component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Peder; Segle, Peter; Samuelson, Lars Aa.

    1999-04-01

    A 3D finite element study of creep crack growth in cross-weld CT specimens with material properties of 2.25Cr1Mo at 550 deg C is carried out, where large strain and displacement theory is used. The creep crack growth rate is calculated using a creep ductility based damage model, in which the creep strain rate perpendicular to the crack plane ahead of the crack tip is integrated, considering the multiaxial stress state. The influence of specimen size on creep crack growth rate under constant load is given special attention, but the possibility to transfer results from cross-weld CT specimens to welded high temperature components is also investigated. The creep crack growth rate of a crack in a circumferentially welded pipe is compared with the creep crack growth rate of cross-weld CT specimens of three different sizes, cut out from the pipe. Although the constraint ahead of the crack tip is higher for a larger CT specimen, the creep crack growth rate is higher for a smaller specimen than for a larger one if they are loaded to attain the same stress intensity factor. If the specimens are loaded to the same C* value, however, a more complicated pattern occurs; depending on the material properties of the weldment constituents, the CT specimen with the intermediate size will either yield the highest or the lowest creep crack growth rate

  3. CT after transsphenoidal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazawa, Satoru

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and ten CT studies of 95 patients after transsphenoidal surgery were reviewed. Spheno-ethmoid opacificaiton, intrasellar hematoma and gas bubbles were noted within 2 weeks after surgery. Bone defect of the sellar floor and bone stent were seen on coronal scans in most cases. The packing material frequently disappeared on follow-up studies. Hormonal assessment of the functioning tumor, according to which the effect of treatment was evaluated, was correlated with CT findings. Because differentiation between postoperative changes and residual mass was difficult, there was no definite CT criteria to indicate residual functioning tumor except upward convexity of the diaphragma sellae on CT more than 3 months after surgery. Initial follow up CT study is recommended to be performed at about 3 months after surgery, at which time the immediate postoperative inflammatory changes have been disappeared. The incidence of recurrence was 3/47 (6%), which was shown on follow-up CT from 4 to 10 years after surgery. Therefore, subsequent CT study should be done in every year or two, taking the clinical symptoms and hormonal data into consideration. (author)

  4. CT of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Advances based upon the detector elements instead of X-ray film have greatly increased the power of X-ray imaging. Computed tomography (CT) creates cross sectional rather than projected images. Recently, high speed CT devices have been developed for cardiovascular studies. The Cine-CT scanner employs a scanning electron beam deflected on an extended tungsten target ring. Fast scans of 50 millisecond exposures at multiple levels can provide information concerning blood flow in vessels and tissues, myocardial wall motion, valve integrity, coronary bypass graft patency and proximal coronary artery anatomy. Cine-CT dynamic scanning can also provide volume imaging with small quantities (0.05 - 1.5 ml/kg) of contrast medium administered via peripheral vein injections. Cine-CT provides simultaneous measurements of cardiac dimensions and function and is rapidly becoming a new tool for quantitating myocardial blood flow, cardiac chamber volumes and wall mechanics. The future outlook is very promising for this three-dimensional cine-CT technique with high spatial resolution. High speed CT should provide unique diagnostic information and as the technology continues to improve at a rapid speed, this new imaging modality could be a challenge for angiography. (Auth.)

  5. CT after transsphenoidal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazawa, Satoru [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-03-01

    Two hundred and ten CT studies of 95 patients after transsphenoidal surgery were reviewed. Spheno-ethmoid opacificaiton, intrasellar hematoma and gas bubbles were noted within 2 weeks after surgery. Bone defect of the sellar floor and bone stent were seen on coronal scans in most cases. The packing material frequently disappeared on follow-up studies. Hormonal assessment of the functioning tumor, according to which the effect of treatment was evaluated, was correlated with CT findings. Because differentiation between postoperative changes and residual mass was difficult, there was no definite CT criteria to indicate residual functioning tumor except upward convexity of the diaphragma sellae on CT more than 3 months after surgery. Initial follow up CT study is recommended to be performed at about 3 months after surgery, at which time the immediate postoperative inflammatory changes have been disappeared. The incidence of recurrence was 3/47 (6%), which was shown on follow-up CT from 4 to 10 years after surgery. Therefore, subsequent CT study should be done in every year or two, taking the clinical symptoms and hormonal data into consideration. (author).

  6. ACQUISITIONS LIST, MAY 1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Education.

    THIS ACQUISITIONS LIST IS A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF MATERIAL ON VARIOUS ASPECTS OF EDUCATION. OVER 300 UNANNOTATED REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED FOR DOCUMENTS DATING MAINLY FROM 1960 TO 1966. BOOKS, JOURNALS, REPORT MATERIALS, AND UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPTS ARE LISTED UNDER THE FOLLOWING HEADINGS--(1) ACHIEVEMENT, (2) ADOLESCENCE, (3) CHILD DEVELOPMENT, (4)…

  7. MAST data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibaev, S.; Counsell, G.; Cunningham, G.; Manhood, S.J.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Waterhouse, J.

    2006-01-01

    The data acquisition system of the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) presently collects up to 400 MB of data in about 3000 data items per shot, and subsequent fast growth is expected. Since the start of MAST operations (in 1999) the system has changed dramatically. Though we continue to use legacy CAMAC hardware, newer VME, PCI, and PXI based sub-systems collect most of the data now. All legacy software has been redesigned and new software has been developed. Last year a major system improvement was made-replacement of the message distribution system. The new message system provides easy connection of any sub-system independently of its platform and serves as a framework for many new applications. A new data acquisition controller provides full control of common sub-systems, central error logging, and data acquisition alarms for the MAST plant. A number of new sub-systems using Linux and Windows OSs on VME, PCI, and PXI platforms have been developed. A new PXI unit has been designed as a base sub-system accommodating any type of data acquisition and control devices. Several web applications for the real-time MAST monitoring and data presentation have been developed

  8. Data acquisition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Testing neutron generators and major subassemblies has undergone a transition in the past few years. Digital information is now used for storage and analysis. The key to the change is the availability of a high-speed digitizer system. The status of the Sandia Laboratory data acquisition and handling system as applied to this area is surveyed. 1 figure

  9. Surviving mergers & acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Diane L

    2002-01-01

    Mergers and acquisitions are never easy to implement. The health care landscape is a minefield of failed mergers and uneasy alliances generating great turmoil and pain. But some mergers have been successful, creating health systems that benefit the communities they serve. Five prominent leaders offer their advice on minimizing the difficulties of M&As.

  10. General image acquisition parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teissier, J.M.; Lopez, F.M.; Langevin, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The general parameters are of primordial importance to achieve image quality in terms of spatial resolution and contrast. They also play a role in the acquisition time for each sequence. We describe them separately, before associating them in a decision tree gathering the various options that are possible for diagnosis

  11. Decentralized Blended Acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of blending and deblending is reviewed, making use of traditional and dispersed source arrays. The network concept of distributed blended acquisition is introduced. A million-trace robot system is proposed, illustrating that decentralization may bring about a revolution in the way we

  12. MPS Data Acquisition System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiseman, S.E.; Miller, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the data acquisition system used with the multiparticle spectrometer facility at Brookhaven. Detailed information is provided on that part of the system which connects the detectors to the data handler; namely, the detector electronics, device controller, and device port optical isolator

  13. [Acquisition of arithmetic knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on contemporary research on the number counting and arithmetical competencies that emerge during infancy, the preschool years, and the elementary school. I provide a brief overview of the evolution of children's conceptual knowledge of arithmetic knowledge, the acquisition and use of counting and how they solve simple arithmetic problems (e.g. 4 + 3).

  14. Second Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Barry; Harrington, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A distinction is drawn between representational and processing models of second-language acquisition. The first approach is derived primarily from linguistics, the second from psychology. Both fields, it is argued, need to collaborate more fully, overcoming disciplinary narrowness in order to achieve more fruitful research. (GLR)

  15. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M. S.; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  16. Acquiring 4D thoracic CT scans using a multislice helical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, P J; Starkschall, G; Shukla, H; Forster, K M; Ortiz, V; Stevens, C W; Vedam, S S; George, R; Guerrero, T; Mohan, R

    2004-01-01

    Respiratory motion degrades anatomic position reproducibility during imaging, necessitates larger margins during radiotherapy planning and causes errors during radiation delivery. Computed tomography (CT) scans acquired synchronously with the respiratory signal can be used to reconstruct 4D CT scans, which can be employed for 4D treatment planning to explicitly account for respiratory motion. The aim of this research was to develop, test and clinically implement a method to acquire 4D thoracic CT scans using a multislice helical method. A commercial position-monitoring system used for respiratory-gated radiotherapy was interfaced with a third generation multislice scanner. 4D cardiac reconstruction methods were modified to allow 4D thoracic CT acquisition. The technique was tested on a phantom under different conditions: stationary, periodic motion and non-periodic motion. 4D CT was also implemented for a lung cancer patient with audio-visual breathing coaching. For all cases, 4D CT images were successfully acquired from eight discrete breathing phases, however, some limitations of the system in terms of respiration reproducibility and breathing period relative to scanner settings were evident. Lung mass for the 4D CT patient scan was reproducible to within 2.1% over the eight phases, though the lung volume changed by 20% between end inspiration and end expiration (870 cm 3 ). 4D CT can be used for 4D radiotherapy, respiration-gated radiotherapy, 'slow' CT acquisition and tumour motion studies

  17. CT pelvimetry. La scanopelvimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicens, J.L.; Charles, G.; Le Berre, J.; Flageat, J. (Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Begin, 94 - Saint-Mande (FR))

    1989-01-01

    Pelvimetry aims at providing the obstetrician with information on the size and morphology of the female pelvis, thus enabling him to assess the obstetrical prognosis as accurately as possible. Computed tomography (CT) has several advantages, in particular the lower mother and fetus radiation dose. After a brief description of obstetrical anatomy, the usual CT exploration method is presented and its results are considered in terms of measurements, indices and morphological findings. If performed with a very strict exploration procedure, CT pelvimetry is a very reliable, fact and comfortable method of examination. All these advantages, combined with the minimized patient dose, should lead to an increasingly widespread use of this technique.

  18. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  19. NMR-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Katsumi; Sato, Kozo; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Sato, Masataka.

    1983-01-01

    A brief explanation is made on the imaging methods for a practical diagnostic NMR-CT scanner : A whole-body NMR-CT scanner utilizing a resistive magnet has been developed by Toshiba in cooperation with the Institute for Solid State Physics, the University of Tokyo. Typical NMR-CT images of volunteers and patients obtained in the clinical experiments using this device are presented. Detailed specifications are also shown about the practical NMR-CTs which are to be put on the market after obtaining the government approval. (author)

  20. Dual energy cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Patricia; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Granillo, Gastón

    2017-06-01

    Conventional single energy CT suffers from technical limitations related to the polychromatic nature of X-rays. Dual energy cardiac CT (DECT) shows promise to attenuate and even overcome some of these limitations, and might broaden the scope of patients eligible for cardiac CT towards the inclusion of higher risk patients. This might be achieved as a result of both safety (contrast reduction) and physiopathological (myocardial perfusion and characterization) issues. In this article, we will review the main clinical cardiac applications of DECT, that can be summarized in two core aspects: coronary artery evaluation, and myocardial evaluation.

  1. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierick, Manuel, E-mail: Manuel.Dierick@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Loo, Denis, E-mail: info@XRE.be [XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Masschaele, Bert [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van den Bulcke, Jan [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Acker, Joris, E-mail: Joris.VanAcker@UGent.be [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, Veerle, E-mail: Veerle.Cnudde@UGent.be [UGCT-SGIG, Department of Geology and Soil Science, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc, E-mail: Luc.VanHoorebeke@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV{sub max}) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  2. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Masschaele, Bert; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Van Acker, Joris; Cnudde, Veerle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV max ) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results

  3. Intraoperative CT with integrated navigation system in spinal neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zausinger, S.; Heigl, T.; Scheder, B.; Schnell, O.; Tonn, J.C.; Uhl, E.; Morhard, D.

    2007-01-01

    For spinal surgery navigational system images are usually acquired before surgery with patients positioned supine. The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively navigated procedures in spinal surgery with data acquisition by intraoperative computed tomography (iCT). CT data of 38 patients [thoracolumbar instability (n = 24), C1/2 instability (n = 6), cervicothoracic stabilization (n = 7), disk herniation (n = 1)] were acquired after positioning the patient in prone position. A sliding gantry 24 detector row CT was used for image acquisition. Data were imported to the frameless infrared-based neuronavigation station. A postprocedural CT was obtained to assess the extent of decompression and the accuracy of instrumentation. Intraoperative registration revealed computed accuracy 2 mm in 9/158 screws (5.6%), allowing immediate correction in five screws without any damage to vessels or nerves. There were three transient complications with clinical improvement in all patients. Intraoperative CT in combination with neuronavigation provides high accuracy of screw placement and thus safety for patients undergoing spinal stabilization. The procedure is rapid and easy to perform and - by replacing pre- and postoperative imaging-is not associated with additional exposure to radiation. (orig.)

  4. New frontiers in CT imaging of airway disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Philippe A.; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise; Brauner, Michel W.; Lenoir, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    Combining helical volumetric CT acquisition and thin-slice thickness during breath hold provides an accurate assessment of both focal and diffuse airway diseases. With multiple detector rows, compared with single-slice helical CT, multislice CT can cover a greater volume, during a simple breath hold, and with better longitudinal and in-plane spatial resolution and improved temporal resolution. The result in data set allows the generation of superior multiplanar and 3D images of the airways, including those obtained from techniques developed specifically for airway imaging, such as virtual bronchography and virtual bronchoscopy. Complementary CT evaluation at suspended or continuous full expiration is mandatory to detect air trapping that is a key finding for depicting an obstruction on the small airways. Indications for CT evaluation of the airways include: (a) detection of endobronchial lesions in patients with an unexplained hemoptysis; (b) evaluation of extent of tracheobronchial stenosis for planning treatment and follow-up; (c) detection of congenital airway anomalies revealed by hemoptysis or recurrent infection; (d) detection of postinfectious or postoperative airway fistula or dehiscence; and (e) diagnosis and assessment of extent of bronchiectasis and small airway disease. Improvement in image analysis technique and the use of spirometrically control of lung volume acquisition have made possible accurate and reproducible quantitative assessment of airway wall and lumen areas and lung density. This contributes to better insights in physiopathology of obstructive lung disease, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. (orig.)

  5. Multiaxial Creep-Fatigue and Creep-Ratcheting Failures of Grade 91 and Haynes 230 Alloys Toward Addressing Design Issues of Gen IV Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Tasnim [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Lissenden, Cliff [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Carroll, Laura [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The proposed research will develop systematic sets of uniaxial and multiaxial experimental data at a very high temperature (850-950°C) for Alloy 617. The loading histories to be prescribed in the experiments will induce creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting failure mechanisms. These experimental responses will be scrutinized in order to quantify the influences of temperature and creep on fatigue and ratcheting failures. A unified constitutive model (UCM) will be developed and validated against these experimental responses. The improved UCM will be incorporated into the widely used finite element commercial software packages ANSYS. The modified ANSYS will be validated so that it can be used for evaluating the very high temperature ASME-NH design-by-analysis methodology for Alloy 617 and thereby addressing the ASME-NH design code issues.

  6. Experimental study and simulation of transformation induced plasticity, and multiphase behaviour of the 16MND5 vessel steel under aniso-thermal multiaxial loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coret, M.

    2001-01-01

    This work deals with the aniso-thermal multiphase behaviour of the French vessel steel and more specially about the transformation plasticity in the cases of multiaxial non-proportional loadings paths. The first part of this report is devoted to the presentation of a high temperature tension-torsion experimental device enable of obtaining a large range of cooling rate. This experimental set-up is used to explore the transformation plasticity under proportional or non-proportional loading paths, during austenitic, bainitic and martensitic transformations. The results of the tests are compared to the Leblond's model. In the last part, we propose a two-scale behaviour model in which the type of each phase behaviour can be different. This meso-model is finally used to simulate two real tests on structures. (author) [fr

  7. Multiaxial Creep-Fatigue and Creep-Ratcheting Failures of Grade 91 and Haynes 230 Alloys Toward Addressing Design Issues of Gen IV Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Tasnim; Lissenden, Cliff; Carroll, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The proposed research will develop systematic sets of uniaxial and multiaxial experimental data at a very high temperature (850-950°C) for Alloy 617. The loading histories to be prescribed in the experiments will induce creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting failure mechanisms. These experimental responses will be scrutinized in order to quantify the influences of temperature and creep on fatigue and ratcheting failures. A unified constitutive model (UCM) will be developed and validated against these experimental responses. The improved UCM will be incorporated into the widely used finite element commercial software packages ANSYS. The modified ANSYS will be validated so that it can be used for evaluating the very high temperature ASME-NH design-by-analysis methodology for Alloy 617 and thereby addressing the ASME-NH design code issues.

  8. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  9. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T-H; Liang, C-H; Wu, J-K; Lien, C-Y; Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S; Huang, Y-H

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  10. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K; Hansen, D; Rit, S; Belka, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  11. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Hansen, D [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Jutland (Denmark); Rit, S [University Lyon, Lyon, Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes (France); Belka, C [LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  12. Study on data acquisition circuit used in SSPA linear array detector X-ray detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wei Biao; Che Zhen Ping

    2002-01-01

    After SSPA used as X-ray array detector is developed, the authors take a research on the data acquisition circuit applied to the detector. The experiment designed has verified the feasibility of application of this array detector and its data acquisition circuit to X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). The preliminary test results indicate that the method of the X-ray detection is feasible for industry X-CT nondestructive testing, which brings about advantage for detecting and measuring with high resolution, good efficiency and low cost

  13. Detectability index of differential phase contrast CT compared with conventional CT: a preliminary channelized Hotelling observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2013-03-01

    Under the framework of model observer with signal and background exactly known (SKE/BKE), we investigate the detectability of differential phase contrast CT compared with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT. Using the channelized Hotelling observer and the radially symmetric difference-of-Gaussians channel template , we investigate the detectability index and its variation over the dimension of object and detector cells. The preliminary data show that the differential phase contrast CT outperforms the conventional attenuation-based CT significantly in the detectability index while both the object to be detected and the cell of detector used for data acquisition are relatively small. However, the differential phase contrast CT's dominance in the detectability index diminishes with increasing dimension of either object or detector cell, and virtually disappears while the dimension of object or detector cell approaches a threshold, respectively. It is hoped that the preliminary data reported in this paper may provide insightful understanding of the differential phase contrast CT's characteristic in the detectability index and its comparison with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT.

  14. SU-F-T-427: Utilization and Evaluation of Diagnostic CT Imaging with MAR Technique for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, M; Foster, R; Parks, H; Pankuch, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to utilize and evaluate diagnostic CT-MAR technique for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: A Toshiba-diagnostic-CT acquisition with SEMAR(Single-energy-MAR)-algorism was performed to make the metal-artifact-reduction (MAR) for patient treatment planning. CT-imaging datasets with and without SEMAR were taken on a Catphan-phantom. Two sets of CT-numbers were calibrated with the relative electron densities (RED). A tissue characterization phantom with Gammex various simulating material rods was used to establish the relationship between known REDs and corresponding CT-numbers. A GE-CT-sim acquisition was taken on the Catphan for comparison. A patient with bilateral hip arthroplasty was scanned in the radiotherapy CT-sim and the diagnostic SEMAR-CT on a flat panel. The derived SEMAR images were used as a primary CT dataset to create contours for the target, critical-structures, and for planning. A deformable registration was performed with VelocityAI to track voxel changes between SEMAR and CT-sim images. The SEMAR-CT images with minimal artifacts and high quality of geometrical and spatial integrity were employed for a treatment plan. Treatment-plans were evaluated based on deformable registration of SEMAR-CT and CT-sim dataset with assigned CT-numbers in the metal artifact regions in Eclipse v11 TPS. Results: The RED and CT-number relationships were consistent for the datasets in CT-sim and CT’s with and without SEMAR. SEMAR datasets with high image quality were used for PTV and organ delineation in the treatment planning process. For dose distribution to the PTV through the DVH analysis, the plan using CT-sim with the assigned CT-number showed a good agreement to those on deformable CT-SEMAR. Conclusion: A diagnostic-CT with MAR-algorithm can be utilized for radiotherapy treatment planning with CT-number calibrated to the RED. Treatment planning comparison and DVH shows a good agreement in the PTV and critical organs between

  15. Computed tomography: acquisition process, technology and current state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Javier Espitia Mendoza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography is a noninvasive scan technique widely applied in areas such as medicine, industry, and geology. This technique allows the three-dimensional reconstruction of the internal structure of an object which is lighted with an X-rays source. The reconstruction is formed with two-dimensional cross-sectional images of the object. Each cross-sectional is obtained from measurements of physical phenomena, such as attenuation, dispersion, and diffraction of X-rays, as result of their interaction with the object. In general, measurements acquisition is performed with methods based on any of these phenomena and according to various architectures classified in generations. Furthermore, in response to the need to simulate acquisition systems for CT, software dedicated to this task has been developed. The objective of this research is to determine the current state of CT techniques, for this, a review of methods, different architectures used for the acquisition and some of its applications is presented. Additionally, results of simulations are presented. The main contributions of this work are the detailed description of acquisition methods and the presentation of the possible trends of the technique.

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ... information is needed to determine the extent of soft tissue of the tumor, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is reduced. Though the scanning itself causes no pain, there may be some discomfort from having to ... time staying still, are claustrophobic, or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is reduced. Though the scanning itself causes no pain, there may be some discomfort from having to ... time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wear during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ...