WorldWideScience

Sample records for multi-tracer pet quantitation

  1. TU-AB-202-11: Tumor Segmentation by Fusion of Multi-Tracer PET Images Using Copula Based Statistical Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapuyade-Lahorgue, J; Ruan, S; Li, H; Vera, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multi-tracer PET imaging is getting more attention in radiotherapy by providing additional tumor volume information such as glucose and oxygenation. However, automatic PET-based tumor segmentation is still a very challenging problem. We propose a statistical fusion approach to joint segment the sub-area of tumors from the two tracers FDG and FMISO PET images. Methods: Non-standardized Gamma distributions are convenient to model intensity distributions in PET. As a serious correlation exists in multi-tracer PET images, we proposed a new fusion method based on copula which is capable to represent dependency between different tracers. The Hidden Markov Field (HMF) model is used to represent spatial relationship between PET image voxels and statistical dynamics of intensities for each modality. Real PET images of five patients with FDG and FMISO are used to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively our method. A comparison between individual and multi-tracer segmentations was conducted to show advantages of the proposed fusion method. Results: The segmentation results show that fusion with Gaussian copula can receive high Dice coefficient of 0.84 compared to that of 0.54 and 0.3 of monomodal segmentation results based on individual segmentation of FDG and FMISO PET images. In addition, high correlation coefficients (0.75 to 0.91) for the Gaussian copula for all five testing patients indicates the dependency between tumor regions in the multi-tracer PET images. Conclusion: This study shows that using multi-tracer PET imaging can efficiently improve the segmentation of tumor region where hypoxia and glucidic consumption are present at the same time. Introduction of copulas for modeling the dependency between two tracers can simultaneously take into account information from both tracers and deal with two pathological phenomena. Future work will be to consider other families of copula such as spherical and archimedian copulas, and to eliminate partial volume

  2. Application of separable parameter space techniques to multi-tracer PET compartment modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jeff L; Michael Morey, A; Kadrmas, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Multi-tracer positron emission tomography (PET) can image two or more tracers in a single scan, characterizing multiple aspects of biological functions to provide new insights into many diseases. The technique uses dynamic imaging, resulting in time-activity curves that contain contributions from each tracer present. The process of separating and recovering separate images and/or imaging measures for each tracer requires the application of kinetic constraints, which are most commonly applied by fitting parallel compartment models for all tracers. Such multi-tracer compartment modeling presents challenging nonlinear fits in multiple dimensions. This work extends separable parameter space kinetic modeling techniques, previously developed for fitting single-tracer compartment models, to fitting multi-tracer compartment models. The multi-tracer compartment model solution equations were reformulated to maximally separate the linear and nonlinear aspects of the fitting problem, and separable least-squares techniques were applied to effectively reduce the dimensionality of the nonlinear fit. The benefits of the approach are then explored through a number of illustrative examples, including characterization of separable parameter space multi-tracer objective functions and demonstration of exhaustive search fits which guarantee the true global minimum to within arbitrary search precision. Iterative gradient-descent algorithms using Levenberg–Marquardt were also tested, demonstrating improved fitting speed and robustness as compared to corresponding fits using conventional model formulations. The proposed technique overcomes many of the challenges in fitting simultaneous multi-tracer PET compartment models. (paper)

  3. Comparison of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake between PET from a simultaneously acquiring whole-body PET/MR hybrid scanner and PET from PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesmueller, Marco; Schmidt, Daniela; Beck, Michael; Kuwert, Torsten; Gall, Carl C. von; Quick, Harald H.; Navalpakkam, Bharath; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Ritt, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    PET/MR hybrid scanners have recently been introduced, but not yet validated. The aim of this study was to compare the PET components of a PET/CT hybrid system and of a simultaneous whole-body PET/MR hybrid system with regard to reproducibility of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake. A total of 46 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT scan 1 h after injection and an average of 88 min later a second scan using a hybrid PET/MR system. The radioactive tracers used were 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG), 18 F-ethylcholine (FEC) and 68 Ga-DOTATATE (Ga-DOTATATE). The PET images from PET/CT (PET CT ) and from PET/MR (PET MR ) were analysed for tracer-positive lesions. Regional tracer uptake in these foci was quantified using volumes of interest, and maximal and average standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV avg , respectively) were calculated. Of the 46 patients, 43 were eligible for comparison and statistical analysis. All lesions except one identified by PET CT were identified by PET MR (99.2 %). In 38 patients (88.4 %), the same number of foci were identified by PET CT and by PET MR . In four patients, more lesions were identified by PET MR than by PET CT , in one patient PET CT revealed an additional focus compared to PET MR . The mean SUV max and SUV avg of all lesions determined by PET MR were by 21 % and 11 % lower, respectively, than the values determined by PET CT (p CT and PET MR were minor, but statistically significant. Nevertheless, a more detailed study of the quantitative accuracy of PET MR and the factors governing it is needed to ultimately assess its accuracy in measuring tissue tracer concentrations. (orig.)

  4. Multi-contrast attenuation map synthesis for PET/MR scanners: assessment on FDG and Florbetapir PET tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, Ninon [University College London, Translational Imaging Group, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); Cardoso, M.J.; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien [University College London, Translational Imaging Group, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Thielemans, Kris; Dickson, John [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Schott, Jonathan M. [University College London, Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Arridge, Simon R. [University College London, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); Hutton, Brian F. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); University of Wollongong, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MR) scanners are expected to offer a new range of clinical applications. Attenuation correction is an essential requirement for quantification of PET data but MRI images do not directly provide a patient-specific attenuation map. Methods We further validate and extend a Computed Tomography (CT) and attenuation map (μ-map) synthesis method based on pre-acquired MRI-CT image pairs. The validation consists of comparing the CT images synthesised with the proposed method to the original CT images. PET images were acquired using two different tracers ({sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-florbetapir). They were then reconstructed and corrected for attenuation using the synthetic μ-maps and compared to the reference PET images corrected with the CT-based μ-maps. During the validation, we observed that the CT synthesis was inaccurate in areas such as the neck and the cerebellum, and propose a refinement to mitigate these problems, as well as an extension of the method to multi-contrast MRI data. Results With the improvements proposed, a significant enhancement in CT synthesis, which results in a reduced absolute error and a decrease in the bias when reconstructing PET images, was observed. For both tracers, on average, the absolute difference between the reference PET images and the PET images corrected with the proposed method was less than 2%, with a bias inferior to 1%. Conclusion With the proposed method, attenuation information can be accurately derived from MRI images by synthesising CT using routine anatomical sequences. MRI sequences, or combination of sequences, can be used to synthesise CT images, as long as they provide sufficient anatomical information. (orig.)

  5. Quantitative PET of liver functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro- D -galactose ( 18 F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value ( SUV ) from a static liver 18 F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11 C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [ N -methyl- 11 C]cholylsarcosine ( 11 C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood ( K 1 ; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion , SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18 F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET.

  6. Quantitative PET of liver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-galactose (18F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value (SUV) from a static liver 18F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [N-methyl-11C]cholylsarcosine (11C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood (K 1; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion, SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET. PMID:29755841

  7. Multi-tracer small animal PET imaging of the tumour response to the novel pan-Erb-B inhibitor CI-1033

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorow, Donna S.; Cullinane, Carleen; Conus, Nelly; Roselt, Peter; Binns, David; McCarthy, Timothy J.; McArthur, Grant A.; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed as ''proof of concept'' for a drug development model utilising multi-tracer serial small animal PET imaging to characterise tumour responses to molecularly targeted therapy. Mice bearing subcutaneous A431 human squamous carcinoma xenografts (n=6-8) were treated with the pan-Erb-B inhibitor CI-1033 or vehicle and imaged serially (days 0, 3 and 6 or 7) with [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose, [ 18 F]fluoro-L-thymidine, [ 18 F]fluoro-azoazomycinarabinoside or [ 18 F]fluoromisonidazole. Separate cohorts (n=3) were treated identically and tumours were assessed ex vivo for markers of glucose metabolism, proliferation and hypoxia. During the study period, mean uptake of all PET tracers generally increased for control tumours compared to baseline. In contrast, tracer uptake into CI-1033-treated tumours decreased by 20-60% during treatment. Expression of the glucose transporter Glut-1 and cell cycle markers was unchanged or increased in control tumours and generally decreased with CI-1033 treatment, compared to baseline. Thymidine kinase activity was reduced in all tumours compared to baseline at day 3 but was sevenfold higher in control versus CI-1033-treated tumours by day 6 of treatment. Uptake of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole was stable in control tumours but was severely reduced following 7 days of CI-1033 treatment. CI-1033 treatment significantly affects tumour metabolism, proliferation and hypoxia as determined by PET. The PET findings correlated well with ex vivo biomarkers for each of the cellular processes studied. These results confirm the utility of small animal PET for evaluation of the effectiveness of molecularly targeted therapies and simultaneously definition of specific cellular processes involved in the therapeutic response. (orig.)

  8. Quantitative dynamic ¹⁸FDG-PET and tracer kinetic analysis of soft tissue sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusten, Espen; Rødal, Jan; Revheim, Mona E; Skretting, Arne; Bruland, Oyvind S; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-08-01

    To study soft tissue sarcomas using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analog tracer [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)FDG), to investigate correlations between derived PET image parameters and clinical characteristics, and to discuss implications of dynamic PET acquisition (D-PET). D-PET images of 11 patients with soft tissue sarcomas were analyzed voxel-by-voxel using a compartment tracer kinetic model providing estimates of transfer rates between the vascular, non-metabolized, and metabolized compartments. Furthermore, standard uptake values (SUVs) in the early (2 min p.i.; SUVE) and late (45 min p.i.; SUVL) phases of the PET acquisition were obtained. The derived transfer rates K1, k2 and k3, along with the metabolic rate of (18)FDG (MRFDG) and the vascular fraction νp, was fused with the computed tomography (CT) images for visual interpretation. Correlations between D-PET imaging parameters and clinical parameters, i.e. tumor size, grade and clinical status, were calculated with a significance level of 0.05. The temporal uptake pattern of (18)FDG in the tumor varied considerably from patient to patient. SUVE peak was higher than SUVL peak for four patients. The images of the rate constants showed a systematic pattern, often with elevated intensity in the tumors compared to surrounding tissue. Significant correlations were found between SUVE/L and some of the rate parameters. Dynamic (18)FDG-PET may provide additional valuable information on soft tissue sarcomas not obtainable from conventional (18)FDG-PET. The prognostic role of dynamic imaging should be investigated.

  9. Quantitative assessment of dynamic PET imaging data in cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Mark; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Mankoff, David A; Doot, Robert K; Pierce, Larry A; Kurland, Brenda F; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    Clinical imaging in positron emission tomography (PET) is often performed using single-time-point estimates of tracer uptake or static imaging that provides a spatial map of regional tracer concentration. However, dynamic tracer imaging can provide considerably more information about in vivo biology by delineating both the temporal and spatial pattern of tracer uptake. In addition, several potential sources of error that occur in static imaging can be mitigated. This review focuses on the application of dynamic PET imaging to measuring regional cancer biologic features and especially in using dynamic PET imaging for quantitative therapeutic response monitoring for cancer clinical trials. Dynamic PET imaging output parameters, particularly transport (flow) and overall metabolic rate, have provided imaging end points for clinical trials at single-center institutions for years. However, dynamic imaging poses many challenges for multicenter clinical trial implementations from cross-center calibration to the inadequacy of a common informatics infrastructure. Underlying principles and methodology of PET dynamic imaging are first reviewed, followed by an examination of current approaches to dynamic PET image analysis with a specific case example of dynamic fluorothymidine imaging to illustrate the approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Authentically radiolabelled Mn(II) complexes as bimodal PET/MR tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanasschen, Christian; Brandt, Marie; Ermert, Johannes [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-5 - Nuclear Chemistry, Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany); Neumaier, Bernd [Institute for Radiochemistry and Experimental Molecular Imaging, Medical Clinics, University of Cologne (Germany); Coenen, Heinz H [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-5 - Nuclear Chemistry, Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    The development of small molecule bimodal PET/MR tracers is mainly hampered by the lack of dedicated preparation methods. Authentic radiolabelling of MR contrast agents ensures easy access to such probes: a ligand, chelating a paramagnetic metal ion (e.g. Mn2+) and the corresponding PET isotope (e.g. 52gMn), leads to a “cocktail mixture” where both imaging reporters exhibit the same pharmacokinetics. Paramagnetic [55Mn(CDTA)]2- shows an excellent compromise between thermodynamic stability, kinetic inertness and MR contrast enhancement. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop new PET/MR tracers by labelling CDTA ligands with paramagnetic manganese and the β+-emitter 52gMn. N.c.a. 52gMn (t1/2: 5.6 d; Eβ+: 575.8 keV (29.6%)) was produced by proton irradiation of a natCr target followed by cation-exchange chromatography. CDTA was radiolabelled with n.c.a. 52gMn2+ in NaOAc buffer (pH 6) at RT. The complex was purified by RP-HPLC and its stability tested in PBS and blood plasma at 37°C. The redox stability was assessed by monitoring the T1 relaxation (20 MHz) in HEPES buffer (pH 7.4). A functionalized CDTA ligand was synthesized in 5 steps. [52gMn(CDTA)]2- was quantitatively formed within 30 min at RT. The complex was stable for at least 6 days in PBS and blood plasma at 37°C and no oxidation occurred within 7 months storage at RT. Labelling CDTA with an isotopic 52g/55Mn2+ mixture led to the corresponding bimodal PET/MR tracer. Furthermore, a functionalized CDTA ligand was synthesized with an overall yield of 18-25%. [52g/55Mn(CDTA)]2-, the first manganese-based bimodal PET/MR tracer prepared, exhibits excellent stability towards decomplexation and oxidation. This makes the functionalized CDTA ligand highly suitable for designing PET/MR tracers with high relaxivity or targeting properties.

  11. Authentically radiolabelled Mn(II) complexes as bimodal PET/MR tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanasschen, Christian; Brandt, Marie; Ermert, Johannes; Neumaier, Bernd; Coenen, Heinz H

    2015-01-01

    The development of small molecule bimodal PET/MR tracers is mainly hampered by the lack of dedicated preparation methods. Authentic radiolabelling of MR contrast agents ensures easy access to such probes: a ligand, chelating a paramagnetic metal ion (e.g. Mn2+) and the corresponding PET isotope (e.g. 52gMn), leads to a “cocktail mixture” where both imaging reporters exhibit the same pharmacokinetics. Paramagnetic [55Mn(CDTA)]2- shows an excellent compromise between thermodynamic stability, kinetic inertness and MR contrast enhancement. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop new PET/MR tracers by labelling CDTA ligands with paramagnetic manganese and the β+-emitter 52gMn. N.c.a. 52gMn (t1/2: 5.6 d; Eβ+: 575.8 keV (29.6%)) was produced by proton irradiation of a natCr target followed by cation-exchange chromatography. CDTA was radiolabelled with n.c.a. 52gMn2+ in NaOAc buffer (pH 6) at RT. The complex was purified by RP-HPLC and its stability tested in PBS and blood plasma at 37°C. The redox stability was assessed by monitoring the T1 relaxation (20 MHz) in HEPES buffer (pH 7.4). A functionalized CDTA ligand was synthesized in 5 steps. [52gMn(CDTA)]2- was quantitatively formed within 30 min at RT. The complex was stable for at least 6 days in PBS and blood plasma at 37°C and no oxidation occurred within 7 months storage at RT. Labelling CDTA with an isotopic 52g/55Mn2+ mixture led to the corresponding bimodal PET/MR tracer. Furthermore, a functionalized CDTA ligand was synthesized with an overall yield of 18-25%. [52g/55Mn(CDTA)]2-, the first manganese-based bimodal PET/MR tracer prepared, exhibits excellent stability towards decomplexation and oxidation. This makes the functionalized CDTA ligand highly suitable for designing PET/MR tracers with high relaxivity or targeting properties.

  12. Conspicuity of FDG-aid osseous lesions on PET/MRI versus PET/CT: A quantitative and visual analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraum, Tyler J.; Fowler, Kathryn J.; Mcconathy, Jonathan [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Because standard MRI-based attenuation correction (AC) does not account for the attenuation of photons by cortical bone, PET/MRI may have reduced sensitivity for FDG-avid focal bone lesions (FFBLs). This study evaluates whether MRI-based AC compromises detection of FFBLs, by comparing their conspicuity both quantitatively and qualitatively on PET/MRI versus PET/CT. One hundred ninety general oncology patients underwent whole-body PET/CT followed by whole-body PET/MRI, utilizing the same FDG dose. Thirteen patients with a total of 50 FFBLs were identified. Using automated contouring software, a volumetric contour was generated for each FFBL. Adjacent regions of normal background bone (BB) were selected manually. For each contour, SUV-max and SUV-mean were determined. Lesion-to-background SUV ratios served as quantitative metrics of conspicuity. Additionally, two blinded readers evaluated the relative conspicuity of FFBLs on PET images derived from MRI-based AC versus CT-based AC. Visibility of an anatomic correlate for FFBLs on the corresponding CT and MR images was also assessed. SUV-mean was lower on PET/MRI for both FFBLs (-6.5 %, p = 0.009) and BB (-20.5 %, p < 0.001). SUV-max was lower on PET/MRI for BB (-14.2 %, p = 0.002) but not for FFBLs (-6.2 %, p = 0.068). The ratio of FFBL SUV-mean to BB SUV-mean was higher for PET/MRI (+29.5 %, p < 0.001). Forty of 50 lesions (80 %) were visually deemed to be of equal or greater conspicuity on PET images derived from PET/MRI. Thirty-five of 50 FFBLs (70 %) had CT correlates, while 40/50 FFBLs (80 %) had a correlate on at least one MRI sequence. The mean interval from tracer administration to imaging was longer (p < 0.001) for PET/MRI (127 v. 62 min). Both FFBLs and BB had lower mean SUVs on PET/MRI than PET/CT. This finding was likely in part due to differences in the handling of cortical bone by MRI-based AC versus CT-based AC. Despite this systematic bias, FFBLs had greater conspicuity on PET

  13. PET tracers for somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have shown rising incidence mainly due to higher clinical awareness and better diagnostic tools over the last 30 years. Functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with PET tracers is an evolving field that is continuously refining the affinity of new tracers in the search...... these PET tracers further....

  14. Radiation dose estimates for carbon-11-labelled PET tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aart, Jasper van der; Hallett, William A.; Rabiner, Eugenii A.; Passchier, Jan; Comley, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Carbon-11-labelled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers commonly used in biomedical research expose subjects to ionising radiation. Dosimetry is the measurement of radiation dose, but also commonly refers to the estimation of health risk associated with ionising radiation. This review describes radiation dosimetry of carbon-11-labelled molecules in the context of current PET research and the most widely used regulatory guidelines. Methods: A MEDLINE literature search returned 42 articles; 32 of these were based on human PET data dealing with radiation dosimetry of carbon-11 molecules. Radiation burden expressed as effective dose and maximum absorbed organ dose was compared between tracers. Results: All but one of the carbon-11-labelled PET tracers have an effective dose under 9 μSv/MBq, with a mean of 5.9 μSv/MBq. Data show that serial PET scans in a single subject are feasible for the majority of radiotracers. Conclusion: Although differing in approach, the two most widely used regulatory frameworks (those in the USA and the EU) do not differ substantially with regard to the maximum allowable injected activity per PET study. The predictive validity of animal dosimetry models is critically discussed in relation to human dosimetry. Finally, empirical PET data are related to human dose estimates based on homogenous distribution, generic models and maximum cumulated activities. Despite the contribution of these models to general risk estimation, human dosimetry studies are recommended where continued use of a new PET tracer is foreseen.

  15. Novel tracer for radiation treatment planning; Welche neuen PET-Tracer braucht die Strahlentherapie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.; Krause, B.J. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Herrmann, K.; Gaertner, F.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Klaesner, B. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2011-07-15

    PET and PET/CT with innovative tracers gain increasing importance in diagnosis and therapy management, and radiation treatment planning in radio-oncology besides the widely established FDG. The introduction of [{sup 18}F]Fluorothymidine ([{sup 18}F]FLT) as marker of proliferation, [{sup 18}F]Fluoromisonidazole ([{sup 18}F]FMISO) and [{sup 18}F]Fluoroazomycin-Arabinoside ([{sup 18}F]FAZA) as tracer of hypoxia, [{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyltyrosine ([{sup 18}F]FET) and [{sup 11}C]Methionine for brain tumour imaging, [{sup 68}Ga]DOTATOC for somatostatin receptor imaging, [{sup 18}F]FDOPA for dopamine synthesis and radioactively labeled choline derivatives for imaging phospholipid metabolism have opened novel approaches to tumour imaging. Some of these tracers have already been implemented into radio-oncology: Amino acid PET and PET/CT have the potential to optimise radiation treatment planning of brain tumours through accurate delineation of tumour tissue from normal tissue, necrosis and edema. Hypoxia represents a major therapeutic problem in radiation therapy. Hypoxia imaging is very attractive as it may allow to increase the dose in hypoxic tumours potentially allowing for a better tumour control. Advances in hybrid imaging, i.e. the introduction of MR/PET, may also have an impact in radio-oncology through synergies related to the combination of molecular signals of PET and a high soft tissue contrast of MRI as well as functional MRI capabilities. (orig.)

  16. Generalized whole-body Patlak parametric imaging for enhanced quantification in clinical PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Zhou, Yun; Lodge, Martin A.; Casey, Michael E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Zaidi, Habib; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-01-01

    We recently developed a dynamic multi-bed PET data acquisition framework to translate the quantitative benefits of Patlak voxel-wise analysis to the domain of routine clinical whole-body (WB) imaging. The standard Patlak (sPatlak) linear graphical analysis assumes irreversible PET tracer uptake,

  17. Dynamic dual-tracer PET reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Huafeng; Jian, Yiqiang; Shi, Pengcheng

    2009-01-01

    Although of important medical implications, simultaneous dual-tracer positron emission tomography reconstruction remains a challenging problem, primarily because the photon measurements from dual tracers are overlapped. In this paper, we propose a simultaneous dynamic dual-tracer reconstruction of tissue activity maps based on guidance from tracer kinetics. The dual-tracer reconstruction problem is formulated in a state-space representation, where parallel compartment models serve as continuous-time system equation describing the tracer kinetic processes of dual tracers, and the imaging data is expressed as discrete sampling of the system states in measurement equation. The image reconstruction problem has therefore become a state estimation problem in a continuous-discrete hybrid paradigm, and H infinity filtering is adopted as the estimation strategy. As H infinity filtering makes no assumptions on the system and measurement statistics, robust reconstruction results can be obtained for the dual-tracer PET imaging system where the statistical properties of measurement data and system uncertainty are not available a priori, even when there are disturbances in the kinetic parameters. Experimental results on digital phantoms, Monte Carlo simulations and physical phantoms have demonstrated the superior performance.

  18. Separation of input function for rapid measurement of quantitative CMRO2 and CBF in a single PET scan with a dual tracer administration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takuya; Iida, Hidehiro

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) images can be quantified using positron emission tomography (PET) by administrating 15 O-labelled water (H 15 2 O) and oxygen ( 15 O 2 ). Conventionally, those images are measured with separate scans for three tracers C 15 O for CBV, H 15 2 O for CBF and 15 O 2 for CMRO 2 , and there are additional waiting times between the scans in order to minimize the influence of the radioactivity from the previous tracers, which results in a relatively long study period. We have proposed a dual tracer autoradiographic (DARG) approach (Kudomi et al 2005), which enabled us to measure CBF, OEF and CMRO 2 rapidly by sequentially administrating H 15 2 O and 15 O 2 within a short time. Because quantitative CBF and CMRO 2 values are sensitive to arterial input function, it is necessary to obtain accurate input function and a drawback of this approach is to require separation of the measured arterial blood time-activity curve (TAC) into pure water and oxygen input functions under the existence of residual radioactivity from the first injected tracer. For this separation, frequent manual sampling was required. The present paper describes two calculation methods: namely a linear and a model-based method, to separate the measured arterial TAC into its water and oxygen components. In order to validate these methods, we first generated a blood TAC for the DARG approach by combining the water and oxygen input functions obtained in a series of PET studies on normal human subjects. The combined data were then separated into water and oxygen components by the present methods. CBF and CMRO 2 were calculated using those separated input functions and tissue TAC. The quantitative accuracy in the CBF and CMRO 2 values by the DARG approach did not exceed the acceptable range, i.e., errors in those values were within 5%, when the area under the curve in the input function of the second tracer

  19. Extracting a respiratory signal from raw dynamic PET data that contain tracer kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, P J; Thielemans, K; Marsden, P K

    2014-08-07

    Data driven gating (DDG) methods provide an alternative to hardware based respiratory gating for PET imaging. Several existing DDG approaches obtain a respiratory signal by observing the change in PET-counts within specific regions of acquired PET data. Currently, these methods do not allow for tracer kinetics which can interfere with the respiratory signal and introduce error. In this work, we produced a DDG method for dynamic PET studies that exhibit tracer kinetics. Our method is based on an existing approach that uses frequency-domain analysis to locate regions within raw PET data that are subject to respiratory motion. In the new approach, an optimised non-stationary short-time Fourier transform was used to create a time-varying 4D map of motion affected regions. Additional processing was required to ensure that the relationship between the sign of the respiratory signal and the physical direction of movement remained consistent for each temporal segment of the 4D map. The change in PET-counts within the 4D map during the PET acquisition was then used to generate a respiratory curve. Using 26 min dynamic cardiac NH3 PET acquisitions which included a hardware derived respiratory measurement, we show that tracer kinetics can severely degrade the respiratory signal generated by the original DDG method. In some cases, the transition of tracer from the liver to the lungs caused the respiratory signal to invert. The new approach successfully compensated for tracer kinetics and improved the correlation between the data-driven and hardware based signals. On average, good correlation was maintained throughout the PET acquisitions.

  20. (18)F-FDG dynamic PET/CT in patients with multiple myeloma: patterns of tracer uptake and correlation with bone marrow plasma cell infiltration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Mai, Elias K; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hillengass, Jens; Hose, Dirk; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-06-01

    The value of F-FDG PET in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM) remains incompletely elicited. Little is known about the kinetics of F-FDG in the bone marrow and extramedullary sites in MM. This study aimed to evaluate quantitative data on kinetics and distribution patterns of F-FDG in MM patients with regard to pelvic bone marrow plasma cell infiltration. The study included 40 patients with primary MM. Dynamic PET/CT scanning of the lower lumbar spine and pelvis was performed after the administration of F-FDG. Whole-body PET/CT studies were performed. Sites of focal increased tracer uptake were considered as highly suggestive of myelomatous involvement after taking into account the patient history and CT findings. Bone marrow of the os ilium without pathologic tracer accumulation served as reference. The evaluation of dynamic PET/CT studies was based in addition to the conventional visual (qualitative) assessment, on semiquantitative (SUV) calculations, as well as on absolute quantitative estimations after application of a 2-tissue compartment model and a noncompartmental approach. F-FDG quantitative information and corresponding distribution patterns were correlated with pelvic bone marrow plasma cell infiltration. Fifty-two myelomatous lesions were detected in the pelvis. All parameters in suspected MM lesions ranged in significantly higher levels than in reference tissue (P PET/CT imaging demonstrated 4 patterns of tracer uptake; these are as follows: negative, focal, diffuse, and mixed (focal/diffuse) tracer uptake. Patients with a mixed pattern of radiotracer uptake had the highest mean plasma cell infiltration rate in their bone marrow, whereas those with negative PET/CT scans demonstrated the lowest bone marrow plasma cell infiltration. In total, 265 focal myeloma-indicative F-FDG-avid lesions were detected, 129 of which correlated with low-dose CT osteolytic findings. No significant correlation between the number of focal lesions detected in PET

  1. Focuss algorithm application in kinetic compartment modeling for PET tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xinrui; Bao Shanglian

    2004-01-01

    dynamic data, comparing with the pre-existing data-led technique- spectral analysis. The results showed that our kinetic modeling technique for the quantitative analysis of dynamic in vivo radiotracer studies is a transparent data-driven modeling approach as it returns, not only macro parameter values, but also information on the underlying model structure. Furthermore, FOCUSS algorithm can avoid the over complete problems in spectral analysis and improve the error properties. Since this technique does not require a predefined compartmental structure and it can be used to characterize tracer kinetics in various tissue types or even mixtures of different tissue types, it provides a unique tool for image analysis of complex functional structures where image pixels may contain inhomogeneous tissue types. Moreover, it can make work m imaging probe, tracer and drug development, when their characteristic in vivo isn't known. Therefore, this kinetic modeling technique is of use for PET molecular imaging and drug development. (authors)

  2. Extracting a respiratory signal from raw dynamic PET data that contain tracer kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleyer, P J; Thielemans, K; Marsden, P K

    2014-01-01

    Data driven gating (DDG) methods provide an alternative to hardware based respiratory gating for PET imaging. Several existing DDG approaches obtain a respiratory signal by observing the change in PET-counts within specific regions of acquired PET data. Currently, these methods do not allow for tracer kinetics which can interfere with the respiratory signal and introduce error. In this work, we produced a DDG method for dynamic PET studies that exhibit tracer kinetics. Our method is based on an existing approach that uses frequency-domain analysis to locate regions within raw PET data that are subject to respiratory motion. In the new approach, an optimised non-stationary short-time Fourier transform was used to create a time-varying 4D map of motion affected regions. Additional processing was required to ensure that the relationship between the sign of the respiratory signal and the physical direction of movement remained consistent for each temporal segment of the 4D map. The change in PET-counts within the 4D map during the PET acquisition was then used to generate a respiratory curve. Using 26 min dynamic cardiac NH 3 PET acquisitions which included a hardware derived respiratory measurement, we show that tracer kinetics can severely degrade the respiratory signal generated by the original DDG method. In some cases, the transition of tracer from the liver to the lungs caused the respiratory signal to invert. The new approach successfully compensated for tracer kinetics and improved the correlation between the data-driven and hardware based signals. On average, good correlation was maintained throughout the PET acquisitions. (paper)

  3. A Comparative Uptake Study of Multiplexed PET Tracers in Mice with Turpentine-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Huang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential value of multiplexed positron emission tomography (PET tracers in mice with turpentine-induced inflammation was evaluated and compared with 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG for glucose metabolism imaging. These PET tracers included [18F]fluoromethylcholine ([18F]FCH for choline metabolism imaging, (S-[11C]methyl-D-cysteine ([11C]DMCYS for amino acid metabolism imaging, [11C]bis(zinc(II-dipicolylamine ([11C]DPA-Zn2+ for apoptosis imaging, 2-(4-N-[11C]-methylaminophenyl-6-hydroxybenzothiazole ([11C]PIB for β amyloid binding imaging, and [18F]fluoride (18F− for bone metabolism imaging. In mice with turpentine-induced inflammation mice, the biodistribution of all the tracers mentioned above at 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min postinjection was determined. Also, the time-course curves of the tracer uptake ratios for inflammatory thigh muscle (IM to normal uninflammatory thigh muscle (NM, IM to blood (BL, IM to brain (BR, and IM to liver (LI were acquired, respectively. Moreover, PET imaging with the tracers within 60 min postinjection on a clinical PET/CT scanner was also conducted. [18F]FDG and 18F− showed relatively higher uptake ratios for IM to NM, IM to BL, IM to BR, and IM to LI than [18F]FCH, [11C]DPA-Zn2+, [11C]DMCYS and [11C]PIB, which were highly consistent with the results delineated in PET images. The results demonstrate that 18F− seems to be a potential PET tracer for inflammation imaging. [18F]FCH and [11C]DMCYS, with lower accumulation in inflammatory tissue than [18F]FDG, are not good PET tracers for inflammation imaging. As a promising inflammatory tracer, the chemical structure of [11C]DPA-Zn2+ needs to be further optimized.

  4. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (~15-20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final Ki parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion study

  5. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (∼15–20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final K i parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion

  6. Positron emission tomography with additional γ-ray detectors for multiple-tracer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Tomonori; Okauchi, Takashi; Shigeta, Mika; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2017-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful imaging modality that quantifies the physiological distributions of radiolabeled tracers in vivo in humans and animals. However, this technique is unsuitable for multiple-tracer imaging because the annihilation photons used for PET imaging have a fixed energy regardless of the selection of the radionuclide tracer. This study developed a multi-isotope PET (MI-PET) system and evaluated its imaging performance. Our MI-PET system is composed of a PET system and additional γ-ray detectors. The PET system consists of pixelized gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) scintillation detectors and has a ring geometry that is 95 mm in diameter with an axial field of view of 37.5 mm. The additional detectors are eight bismuth germanium oxide (BGO) scintillation detectors, each of which is 50 × 50 × 30 mm 3 , arranged into two rings mounted on each side of the PET ring with a 92-mm-inner diameter. This system can distinguish between different tracers using the additional γ-ray detectors to observe prompt γ-rays, which are emitted after positron emission and have an energy intrinsic to each radionuclide. Our system can simultaneously acquire double- (two annihilation photons) and triple- (two annihilation photons and a prompt γ-ray) coincidence events. The system's efficiency for detecting prompt de-excitation γ-rays was measured using a positron-γ emitter, 22 Na. Dual-radionuclide ( 18 F and 22 Na) imaging of a rod phantom and a mouse was performed to demonstrate the performance of the developed system. Our system's basic performance was evaluated by reconstructing two images, one containing both tracers and the other containing just the second tracer, from list-mode data sets that were categorized by the presence or absence of the prompt γ-ray. The maximum detection efficiency for 1275 keV γ-rays emitted from 22 Na was approximately 7% at the scanner's center, and the minimum detection efficiency was 5.1% at the edge of

  7. Experience in qualitative and quantitative FDG PET in follow-up of patients with suspected recurrence from head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapela, M; Eigtved, A; Jyrkkiö, S

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated positron emission tomography (PET) with 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in the detection of recurrent head and neck cancer, and compared visual and quantitative interpretation of PET images for their accuracy in the identification of tumour recurrence. Sixty-two FDG PET...... studies were performed in 56 patients having a total of 81 lesions, which were clinically suspected for recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck. The PET images were interpreted visually, and tracer uptake was quantitated as the standardised uptake value adjusted to body weight (SUV). Sensitivity...

  8. Statistical dynamic imaging of RI-labeled tracer from list-mode PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Michiaki; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Oshiro, Osamu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used in physiological analysis to illustrate physiological states by visualizing the accumulation of radioisotope (RI)-labeled tracer in specific organs or tissues. PET obtains spatio-temporal statistics in the form of list-mode data. However, conventional imaging techniques, which sum up list-mode data over a given time period, cannot depict detailed temporal dynamics of the RI-labeled tracer. In this study, a spatio-temporal analysis approach was employed to visualize the temporal flow dynamics of RI-labeled tracer from the obtained list-mode data. Experiments to assess the visualization of simulated RI-labeled tracer dynamics as well as RI-labeled tracer dynamics in a vascular phantom showed that the proposed method successfully depicted detailed temporal flow dynamics that could not be visualized using conventional methods. (author)

  9. Multi institutional quantitative phantom study of yttrium-90 PET in PET/MRI: the MR-QUEST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Nichole M; Eldib, Mootaz; Faul, David; Conti, Maurizio; Elschot, Mattijs; Knešaurek, Karin; Leek, Francesca; Townsend, David; DiFilippo, Frank P; Jackson, Kimberly; Nekolla, Stephan G; Lukas, Mathias; Tapner, Michael; Parikh, Parag J; Laforest, Richard

    2018-04-04

    Yttrium-90 ( 90 Y) radioembolization involves the intra-arterial delivery of radioactive microspheres to treat hepatic malignancies. Though this therapy involves careful pre-treatment planning and imaging, little is known about the precise location of the microspheres once they are administered. Recently, there has been growing interest post-radioembolization imaging using positron-emission tomography (PET) for quantitative dosimetry and identifying lesions that may benefit from additional salvage therapy. In this study, we aim to measure the inter-center variability of 90 Y PET measurements as measured on PET/MRI in preparation for a multi-institutional prospective phase I/II clinical trial. Eight institutions participated in this study and followed a standardized phantom filling and imaging protocol. The NEMA NU2-2012 body phantom was filled with 3 GBq of 90 Y chloride solution. The phantom was imaged for 30 min in listmode on a Siemens Biograph mMR non-TOF PET/MRI scanner at five time points across 10 days (0.3-3.0 GBq). Raw PET data were sent to a central site for image reconstruction and data analysis. Images were reconstructed with optimal parameters determined from a previous study. Volumes of interest (VOIs) matching the known sphere diameters were drawn on the vendor-provided attenuation map and propagated to the PET images. Recovery coefficients (RCs) and coefficient of variation of the RCs (COV) were calculated from these VOIs for each sphere size and activity level. Mean RCs ranged from 14.5 to 75.4%, with the lowest mean RC coming from the smallest sphere (10 mm) on the last day of imaging (0.16 MBq/ml) and the highest mean RC coming from the largest sphere (37 mm) on the first day of imaging (2.16 MBq/ml). The smaller spheres tended to exhibit higher COVs. In contrast, the larger spheres tended to exhibit lower COVs. COVs from the 37 mm sphere were  25%. Post-radioembolization dosimetry of lesions or other VOIs ≥ 22 mm in diameter can

  10. Multi-atlas attenuation correction supports full quantification of static and dynamic brain PET data in PET-MR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida, Inés; Reilhac, Anthonin; Redouté, Jérôme; Heckemann, Rolf A.; Costes, Nicolas; Hammers, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    In simultaneous PET-MR, attenuation maps are not directly available. Essential for absolute radioactivity quantification, they need to be derived from MR or PET data to correct for gamma photon attenuation by the imaged object. We evaluate a multi-atlas attenuation correction method for brain imaging (MaxProb) on static [18F]FDG PET and, for the first time, on dynamic PET, using the serotoninergic tracer [18F]MPPF. A database of 40 MR/CT image pairs (atlases) was used. The MaxProb method synthesises subject-specific pseudo-CTs by registering each atlas to the target subject space. Atlas CT intensities are then fused via label propagation and majority voting. Here, we compared these pseudo-CTs with the real CTs in a leave-one-out design, contrasting the MaxProb approach with a simplified single-atlas method (SingleAtlas). We evaluated the impact of pseudo-CT accuracy on reconstructed PET images, compared to PET data reconstructed with real CT, at the regional and voxel levels for the following: radioactivity images; time-activity curves; and kinetic parameters (non-displaceable binding potential, BPND). On static [18F]FDG, the mean bias for MaxProb ranged between 0 and 1% for 73 out of 84 regions assessed, and exceptionally peaked at 2.5% for only one region. Statistical parametric map analysis of MaxProb-corrected PET data showed significant differences in less than 0.02% of the brain volume, whereas SingleAtlas-corrected data showed significant differences in 20% of the brain volume. On dynamic [18F]MPPF, most regional errors on BPND ranged from -1 to  +3% (maximum bias 5%) for the MaxProb method. With SingleAtlas, errors were larger and had higher variability in most regions. PET quantification bias increased over the duration of the dynamic scan for SingleAtlas, but not for MaxProb. We show that this effect is due to the interaction of the spatial tracer-distribution heterogeneity variation over time with the degree of accuracy of the attenuation maps. This

  11. Rapid dual-tracer PTSM+ATSM PET imaging of tumour blood flow and hypoxia: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, T C; Kadrmas, D J

    2006-01-01

    Blood flow and hypoxia are interrelated aspects of physiology that affect cancer treatment and response. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are related PET tracers for blood flow and hypoxia, and the ability to rapidly image both tracers in a single scan would bring several advantages over conventional single-tracer techniques. Using dynamic imaging with staggered injections, overlapping signals for multiple PET tracers may be recovered utilizing information from kinetics and radioactive decay. In this work, rapid dual-tracer PTSM+ATSM PET was simulated and tested as a function of injection delay, order and relative dose for several copper isotopes, and the results were compared relative to separate single-tracer data. Time-activity curves representing a broad range of tumour blood flow and hypoxia levels were simulated, and parallel dual-tracer compartment modelling was used to recover the signals for each tracer. The main results were tested further using a torso phantom simulation of PET tumour imaging. Using scans as short as 30 minutes, the dual-tracer method provided measures of blood flow and hypoxia similar to single-tracer imaging. The best performance was obtained by injecting PTSM first and using a somewhat higher dose for ATSM. Comparable results for different copper isotopes suggest that tracer kinetics with staggered injections play a more important role than radioactive decay in the signal separation process. Rapid PTSM+ATSM PET has excellent potential for characterizing both tumour blood flow and hypoxia in a single, fast scan, provided that technological hurdles related to algorithm development and routine use can be overcome

  12. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, Roger N; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E; Price, Julie C

    2015-01-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  13. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Roger N.; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E.; Price, Julie C.

    2015-11-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  14. Optimized MLAA for quantitative non-TOF PET/MR of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benoit, Didier; Ladefoged, Claes N.; Rezaei, Ahmadreza

    2016-01-01

    For quantitative tracer distribution in positron emission tomography, attenuation correction is essential. In a hybrid PET/CT system the CT images serve as a basis for generation of the attenuation map, but in PET/MR, the MR images do not have a similarly simple relationship with the attenuation...... map. Hence attenuation correction in PET/MR systems is more challenging. Typically either of two MR sequences are used: the Dixon or the ultra-short time echo (UTE) techniques. However these sequences have some well-known limitations. In this study, a reconstruction technique based on a modified...... and optimized non-TOF MLAA is proposed for PET/MR brain imaging. The idea is to tune the parameters of the MLTR applying some information from an attenuation image computed from the UTE sequences and a T1w MR image. In this MLTR algorithm, an [Formula: see text] parameter is introduced and optimized in order...

  15. Towards tracer dose reduction in PET studies: Simulation of dose reduction by retrospective randomized undersampling of list-mode data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Würslin, Christian; Seith, Ferdinand; Schäfer, Jürgen F; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F; Schmidt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of tracer dose regimes in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a trade-off between diagnostic image quality and radiation exposure. The challenge lies in defining minimal tracer doses that still result in sufficient diagnostic image quality. In order to find such minimal doses, it would be useful to simulate tracer dose reduction as this would enable to study the effects of tracer dose reduction on image quality in single patients without repeated injections of different amounts of tracer. The aim of our study was to introduce and validate a method for simulation of low-dose PET images enabling direct comparison of different tracer doses in single patients and under constant influencing factors. (18)F-fluoride PET data were acquired on a combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. PET data were stored together with the temporal information of the occurrence of single events (list-mode format). A predefined proportion of PET events were then randomly deleted resulting in undersampled PET data. These data sets were subsequently reconstructed resulting in simulated low-dose PET images (retrospective undersampling of list-mode data). This approach was validated in phantom experiments by visual inspection and by comparison of PET quality metrics contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), background-variability (BV) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of measured and simulated PET images for different activity concentrations. In addition, reduced-dose PET images of a clinical (18)F-FDG PET dataset were simulated using the proposed approach. (18)F-PET image quality degraded with decreasing activity concentrations with comparable visual image characteristics in measured and in corresponding simulated PET images. This result was confirmed by quantification of image quality metrics. CRC, SNR and BV showed concordant behavior with decreasing activity concentrations for measured and for corresponding simulated PET images. Simulation of dose

  16. New SPECT and PET dementia tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergote, J.; Chalon, S.; Emond, P.; Vercouillie, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Vergote, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Pappata, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are techniques to study in vivo neurotransmitter systems, neuro inflammation and amyloid deposits in normal human brain and in dementia. These methods used to explore the integrity of dopaminergic, cholinergic and serotonergic systems in Alzheimer's disease and in other dementias allowed to understand how the neurotransmission was modified in these disorders. Progress in the understanding of pathophysiological and clinical signs of dementia requires an evolution of the radioligands used to carry out an increasingly early and differential diagnosis in addition to monitoring the progression of disease and the effects of therapies. New emerging radiotracers for neuro inflammation or amyloid deposits are essential. In this article, new SPECT and PET tracers are presented. (authors)

  17. Biodistribution of [11C] methylaminoisobutyric acid, a tracer for PET studies on system A amino acid transport in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutinen, E.; Jyrkkioe, S.; Groenroos, T.; Haaparanta, M.; Lehikoinen, P.; Naagren, K.

    2001-01-01

    [N-methyl- 11 C]α-Methylaminoisobutyric acid ( 11 C-MeAIB) is a potentially useful tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) studies on hormonally regulated system A amino acid transport. 11 C-MeAIB is a metabolically stable amino acid analogue specific for system A amino acid transport. We evaluated the biodistribution of 11 C-MeAIB in rats and humans to estimate the usefulness of the tracer for in vivo human PET studies, for example, on regulation of system A amino acid transport and on tumour imaging. Healthy Sprague-Dawley rats (n=14) were killed 5, 20, 40 or 60 min after the injection of 11 C-MeAIB, and the tissue samples were weighed and counted for 11 C radioactivity. Ten lymphoma patients with relatively limited tumour burden underwent whole-body (WB) PET imaging with 11 C-MeAIB. In addition, three other patients had dynamic PET scanning of the head and neck area, and the tracer uptake was quantitated by calculating the kinetic influx constants (K i values) for the tracer. In animal studies, the highest activity was detected in the kidney, pancreas, adrenal gland and intestines. In humans, the highest activity was found in the salivary glands, and after that in the kidney and pancreas, similar to the results in animal studies. Rapid uptake was also detected in the skeletal muscle. In the graphical analysis, linear plots were obtained, and the mean fractional tracer uptake values (K i ) of the parotid glands (n=3) and cervical muscles (n=3) were 0.039±0.008 min -1 and 0.013±0.006 min -1 , respectively. The K i value of the tumour (n=1) was 0.064 min -1 . Higher uptake of 11 C-MeAIB into the tumour tissue was encountered. These results encourage further 11 C-MeAIB PET studies in humans on the physiology and pathology of system A amino acid transport and on tumour detection. (orig.)

  18. Metabolic imaging using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that myocardial metabolism plays a key role not only in ischaemic heart disease but also in a variety of diseases which involve myocardium globally, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Understanding myocardial metabolism in such diseases helps to elucidate the pathophysiology and assists in making therapeutic decisions. As well as providing information on regional changes, PET can deliver quantitative information about both regional and global changes in metabolism. This capability of quantitative measurement is one of the major advantages of PET along with physiological positron tracers, especially relevant in evaluating diseases which involve the whole myocardium. This review discusses major PET tracers for metabolic imaging and their clinical applications and contributions to research regarding ischaemic heart disease and other diseases such as heart failure and diabetic heart disease. Future applications of positron metabolic tracers for the detection of vulnerable plaque are also highlighted briefly. (orig.)

  19. Defining optimal tracer activities in pediatric oncologic whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Schaefer, Juergen F. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); La Fougere, Christian [University of Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To explore the feasibility of reducing administered tracer activities and to assess optimal activities for combined {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/MRI in pediatric oncology. 30 {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/MRI examinations were performed on 24 patients with known or suspected solid tumors (10 girls, 14 boys, age 12 ± 5.6 [1-18] years; PET scan duration: 4 min per bed position). Low-activity PET images were retrospectively simulated from the originally acquired data sets using randomized undersampling of list mode data. PET data of different simulated administered activities (0.25-2.5 MBq/kg body weight) were reconstructed with or without point spread function (PSF) modeling. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max}) as well as SUV variation (SUV{sub var}) were measured in physiologic organs and focal FDG-avid lesions. Detectability of organ structures and of focal {sup 18}F-FDG-avid lesions as well as the occurrence of false-positive PET lesions were assessed at different simulated tracer activities. Subjective image quality steadily declined with decreasing tracer activities. Compared to the originally acquired data sets, mean relative deviations of SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} were below 5 % at {sup 18}F-FDG activities of 1.5 MBq/kg or higher. Over 95 % of anatomic structures and all pathologic focal lesions were detectable at 1.5 MBq/kg {sup 18}F-FDG. Detectability of anatomic structures and focal lesions was significantly improved using PSF. No false-positive focal lesions were observed at tracer activities of 1 MBq/kg {sup 18}F-FDG or higher. Administration of {sup 18}F-FDG activities of 1.5 MBq/kg is, thus, feasible without obvious diagnostic shortcomings, which is equivalent to a dose reduction of more than 50 % compared to current recommendations. Significant reduction in administered {sup 18}F-FDG tracer activities is feasible in pediatric oncologic PET/MRI. Appropriate activities of {sup 18}F-FDG or other tracers for specific clinical

  20. [18F]Fluoroazabenzoxazoles as potential amyloid plaque PET tracers: synthesis and in vivo evaluation in rhesus monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostetler, Eric D.; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Fan Hong; Zeng, Zhizhen; Gammage, Linda; Miller, Patricia; O'Malley, Stacey; Connolly, Brett; Mulhearn, James; Harrison, Scott T.; Wolkenberg, Scott E.; Barrow, James C.; Williams, David L.; Hargreaves, Richard J.; Sur, Cyrille; Cook, Jacquelynn J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: An 18 F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for amyloid plaque is desirable for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, particularly to enable preventative treatment once effective therapeutics are available. Similarly, such a tracer would be useful as a biomarker for enrollment of patients in clinical trials for evaluation of antiamyloid therapeutics. Furthermore, changes in the level of plaque burden as quantified by an amyloid plaque PET tracer may provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of amyloid-targeted therapeutics. This work describes our approach to evaluate and select a candidate PET tracer for in vivo quantification of human amyloid plaque. Methods: Ligands were evaluated for their in vitro binding to human amyloid plaques, lipophilicity and predicted blood–brain barrier permeability. Candidates with favorable in vitro properties were radiolabeled with 18 F and evaluated in vivo. Baseline PET scans in rhesus monkey were conducted to evaluate the regional distribution and kinetics of each tracer using tracer kinetic modeling methods. High binding potential in cerebral white matter and cortical grey matter was considered an unfavorable feature of the candidate tracers. Results: [ 18 F]MK-3328 showed the most favorable combination of low in vivo binding potential in white matter and cortical grey matter in rhesus monkeys, low lipophilicity (Log D=2.91) and high affinity for human amyloid plaques (IC 50 =10.5±1.3 nM). Conclusions: [ 18 F]MK-3328 was identified as a promising PET tracer for in vivo quantification of amyloid plaques, and further evaluation in humans is warranted.

  1. New horizons in cardiac innervation imaging. Introduction of novel 18F-labeled PET tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Ryohei; Chen, Xinyu; Werner, Rudolf A.; Lapa, Constantin; Javadi, Mehrbod S.; Higuchi, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nervous activity can be uniquely visualized by non-invasive radionuclide imaging techniques due to the fast growing and widespread application of nuclear cardiology in the last few years. The norepinephrine analogue 123 I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) is a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracer for the clinical implementation of sympathetic nervous imaging for both diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure. Meanwhile, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has become increasingly attractive because of its higher spatial and temporal resolution compared to SPECT, which allows regional functional and dynamic kinetic analysis. Nevertheless, wider use of cardiac sympathetic nervous PET imaging is still limited mainly due to the demand of costly on-site cyclotrons, which are required for the production of conventional 11 C-labeled (radiological half-life, 20 min) PET tracers. Most recently, more promising 18 F-labeled (half-life, 110 min) PET radiopharmaceuticals targeting sympathetic nervous system have been introduced. These tracers optimize PET imaging and, by using delivery networks, cost less to produce. In this article, the latest advances of sympathetic nervous imaging using 18 F-labeled radiotracers along with their possible applications are reviewed. (orig.)

  2. PET imaging in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, Daniele de Paula; Copray, Sjef; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Dierckx, Rudi; de Vries, Erik

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive technique for quantitative imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in animals and humans. PET uses probes labeled with a radioactive isotope, called PET tracers, which can bind to or be converted by a specific biological target and thus

  3. [18F]Fluoroethylflumazenil: a novel tracer for PET imaging of human benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruender, G.; Lange-Asschenfeldt, C.; Vernaleken, I.; Lueddens, H.; Siessmeier, T.; Buchholz, H.-G.; Bartenstein, P.; Stoeter, P.; Drzezga, A.; Roesch, F.

    2001-01-01

    5-(2'-[ 18 F]Fluoroethyl)flumazenil ([ 18 F]FEF) is a fluorine-18 labelled positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for central benzodiazepine receptors. Compared with the established [ 11 C]flumazenil, it has the advantage of the longer half-life of the fluorine-18 label. After optimisation of its synthesis and determination of its in vitro receptor affinities, we performed first PET studies in humans. PET studies in seven healthy human volunteers were performed on a Siemens ECAT EXACT whole-body scanner after injection of 100-280 MBq [ 18 F]FEF. In two subjects, a second PET scan was conducted after pretreatment with unlabelled flumazenil (1 mg or 2.5 mg i.v., 3 min before tracer injection). A third subject was studied both with [ 18 F]FEF and with [ 11 C]flumazenil. Brain radioactivity was measured for 60-90 min p.i. and analysed with a region of interest-oriented approach and on a voxelwise basis with spectral analysis. Plasma radioactivity was determined from arterial blood samples and metabolites were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. In human brain, maximum radioactivity accumulation was observed 4±2 min p.i., with a fast clearance kinetics resulting in 50% and 20% of maximal activities at about 10 and 30 min, respectively. [ 18 F]FEF uptake followed the known central benzodiazepine receptor distribution in the human brain (occipital cortex >temporal cortex >cerebellum >thalamus >pons). Pretreatment with unlabelled flumazenil resulted in reduced tracer uptake in all brain areas except for receptor-free reference regions like the pons. Parametric images of distribution volume and binding potential generated on a voxelwise basis revealed two- to three-fold lower in vivo receptor binding of [ 18 F]FEF compared with [ 11 C]flumazenil, while relative uptake of [ 18 F]FEF was higher in the cerebellum, most likely owing to its relatively higher affinity for benzodiazepine receptors containing the α6 subunit. Metabolism of [ 18 F]FEF was very

  4. Dosimetry of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105, a PET tracer for uPAR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; El Ali, Henrik H.; Binderup, Tina

    2014-01-01

    64Cu-DOTA-AE105 is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer specific to the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). In preparation of using this tracer in humans, as a new promising method to distinguish between indolent and aggressive cancers, we have performed PET...... studies in mice to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution and estimate human dosimetry of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105. MethodsFive mice received iv tail injection of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 and were PET/CT scanned 1, 4.5 and 22h post injection. Volume-of-interest (VOI) were manually drawn on the following organs: heart, lung......Favorable dosimetry estimates together with previously reported uPAR PET data fully support human testing of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105....

  5. Design and utilisation of protocols to characterise dynamic PET uptake of two tracers using basis pursuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christopher; Puttick, Simon; Rose, Stephen; Smith, Jye; Thomas, Paul; Dowson, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Imaging using more than one biological process using PET could be of great utility, but despite previously proposed approaches to dual-tracer imaging, it is seldom performed. The alternative of performing multiple scans is often infeasible for clinical practice or even in research studies. Dual-tracer PET scanning allows for multiple PET radiotracers to be imaged within the same imaging session. In this paper we describe our approach to utilise the basis pursuit method to aid in the design of dual-tracer PET imaging experiments, and later in separation of the signals. The advantage of this approach is that it does not require a compartment model architecture to be specified or even that both signals are distinguishable in all cases. This means the method for separating dual-tracer signals can be used for many feasible and useful combinations of biology or radiotracer, once an appropriate scanning protocol has been decided upon. Following a demonstration in separating the signals from two consecutively injected radionuclides in a controlled experiment, phantom and list-mode mouse experiments demonstrated the ability to test the feasibility of dual-tracer imaging protocols for multiple injection delays. Increases in variances predicted for kinetic macro-parameters V D and K I in brain and tumoral tissue were obtained when separating the synthetically combined data. These experiments confirmed previous work using other approaches that injections delays of 10-20 min ensured increases in variance were kept minimal for the test tracers used. On this basis, an actual dual-tracer experiment using a 20 min delay was performed using these radio tracers, with the kinetic parameters (V D and K I) extracted for each tracer in agreement with the literature. This study supports previous work that dual-tracer PET imaging can be accomplished provided certain constraints are adhered to. The utilisation of basis pursuit techniques, with its removed need to specify a model

  6. Defining optimal tracer activities in pediatric oncologic whole-body "1"8F-FDG-PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Schaefer, Juergen F.; La Fougere, Christian

    2016-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of reducing administered tracer activities and to assess optimal activities for combined "1"8F-FDG-PET/MRI in pediatric oncology. 30 "1"8F-FDG-PET/MRI examinations were performed on 24 patients with known or suspected solid tumors (10 girls, 14 boys, age 12 ± 5.6 [1-18] years; PET scan duration: 4 min per bed position). Low-activity PET images were retrospectively simulated from the originally acquired data sets using randomized undersampling of list mode data. PET data of different simulated administered activities (0.25-2.5 MBq/kg body weight) were reconstructed with or without point spread function (PSF) modeling. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV_m_e_a_n and SUV_m_a_x) as well as SUV variation (SUV_v_a_r) were measured in physiologic organs and focal FDG-avid lesions. Detectability of organ structures and of focal "1"8F-FDG-avid lesions as well as the occurrence of false-positive PET lesions were assessed at different simulated tracer activities. Subjective image quality steadily declined with decreasing tracer activities. Compared to the originally acquired data sets, mean relative deviations of SUV_m_e_a_n and SUV_m_a_x were below 5 % at "1"8F-FDG activities of 1.5 MBq/kg or higher. Over 95 % of anatomic structures and all pathologic focal lesions were detectable at 1.5 MBq/kg "1"8F-FDG. Detectability of anatomic structures and focal lesions was significantly improved using PSF. No false-positive focal lesions were observed at tracer activities of 1 MBq/kg "1"8F-FDG or higher. Administration of "1"8F-FDG activities of 1.5 MBq/kg is, thus, feasible without obvious diagnostic shortcomings, which is equivalent to a dose reduction of more than 50 % compared to current recommendations. Significant reduction in administered "1"8F-FDG tracer activities is feasible in pediatric oncologic PET/MRI. Appropriate activities of "1"8F-FDG or other tracers for specific clinical questions have to be further established in selected

  7. Improved quantitation and reproducibility in multi-PET/CT lung studies by combining CT information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Beverley F; Cuplov, Vesna; Millner, Lynn; Endozo, Raymond; Maher, Toby M; Groves, Ashley M; Hutton, Brian F; Thielemans, Kris

    2018-06-05

    Matched attenuation maps are vital for obtaining accurate and reproducible kinetic and static parameter estimates from PET data. With increased interest in PET/CT imaging of diffuse lung diseases for assessing disease progression and treatment effectiveness, understanding the extent of the effect of respiratory motion and establishing methods for correction are becoming more important. In a previous study, we have shown that using the wrong attenuation map leads to large errors due to density mismatches in the lung, especially in dynamic PET scans. Here, we extend this work to the case where the study is sub-divided into several scans, e.g. for patient comfort, each with its own CT (cine-CT and 'snap shot' CT). A method to combine multi-CT information into a combined-CT has then been developed, which averages the CT information from each study section to produce composite CT images with the lung density more representative of that in the PET data. This combined-CT was applied to nine patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, imaged with dynamic 18 F-FDG PET/CT to determine the improvement in the precision of the parameter estimates. Using XCAT simulations, errors in the influx rate constant were found to be as high as 60% in multi-PET/CT studies. Analysis of patient data identified displacements between study sections in the time activity curves, which led to an average standard error in the estimates of the influx rate constant of 53% with conventional methods. This reduced to within 5% after use of combined-CTs for attenuation correction of the study sections. Use of combined-CTs to reconstruct the sections of a multi-PET/CT study, as opposed to using the individually acquired CTs at each study stage, produces more precise parameter estimates and may improve discrimination between diseased and normal lung.

  8. Development of [18F]afatinib as new TKI-PET tracer for EGFR positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slobbe, Paul; Windhorst, Albert D.; Walsum, Marijke Stigter-van; Schuit, Robert C.; Smit, Egbert F.; Niessen, Heiko G.; Solca, Flavio; Stehle, Gerd; Dongen, Guus A.M.S. van; Poot, Alex J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Afatinib is an irreversible ErbB family blocker that was approved for the treatment of EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancer in 2013. Positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18 labeled afatinib provides a means to obtain improved understanding of afatinib tumor disposition in vivo. PET imaging with [ 18 F]afatinib may also provide a method to select treatment responsive patients. The aim of this study was to label afatinib with fluorine-18 and evaluate its potential as TKI-PET tracer in tumor bearing mice. Methods: A radiochemically novel coupling, using peptide coupling reagent BOP, was explored and optimized to synthesize [ 18 F]afatinib, followed by a metabolite analysis and biodistribution studies in two clinically relevant lung cancer cell lines, xenografted in nude mice. Results: A reliable [ 18 F]afatinib radiosynthesis was developed and the tracer could be produced in yields of 17.0 ± 2.5% calculated from [ 18 F]F − and >98% purity. The identity of the product was confirmed by co-injection on HPLC with non-labeled afatinib. Metabolite analysis revealed a moderate rate of metabolism, with >80% intact tracer in plasma at 45 min p.i. Biodistribution studies revealed rapid tumor accumulation and good retention for a period of at least 2 hours, while background tissues showed rapid clearance of the tracer. Conclusion: We have developed a method to synthesize [ 18 F]afatinib and related fluorine-18 labeled 4-anilinoquinazolines. [ 18 F]Afatinib showed good stability in vivo, justifying further evaluation as a TKI-PET tracer

  9. New horizons in cardiac innervation imaging. Introduction of novel {sup 18}F-labeled PET tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ryohei [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Nihon Medi-Physics Co., Ltd., Research Centre, Chiba (Japan); Chen, Xinyu [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Comprehensive Heart Failure Center, Wuerzburg (Germany); Werner, Rudolf A. [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Comprehensive Heart Failure Center, Wuerzburg (Germany); Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lapa, Constantin [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Javadi, Mehrbod S. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Higuchi, Takahiro [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Comprehensive Heart Failure Center, Wuerzburg (Germany); National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Department of Biomedical Imaging, Research Institute, Suita (Japan)

    2017-12-15

    Cardiac sympathetic nervous activity can be uniquely visualized by non-invasive radionuclide imaging techniques due to the fast growing and widespread application of nuclear cardiology in the last few years. The norepinephrine analogue {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) is a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracer for the clinical implementation of sympathetic nervous imaging for both diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure. Meanwhile, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has become increasingly attractive because of its higher spatial and temporal resolution compared to SPECT, which allows regional functional and dynamic kinetic analysis. Nevertheless, wider use of cardiac sympathetic nervous PET imaging is still limited mainly due to the demand of costly on-site cyclotrons, which are required for the production of conventional {sup 11}C-labeled (radiological half-life, 20 min) PET tracers. Most recently, more promising {sup 18}F-labeled (half-life, 110 min) PET radiopharmaceuticals targeting sympathetic nervous system have been introduced. These tracers optimize PET imaging and, by using delivery networks, cost less to produce. In this article, the latest advances of sympathetic nervous imaging using {sup 18}F-labeled radiotracers along with their possible applications are reviewed. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic Resonance-based Motion Correction for Quantitative PET in Simultaneous PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2017-07-01

    Motion degrades image quality and quantitation of PET images, and is an obstacle to quantitative PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a tool that can be used for correcting the motion in PET images by using anatomic information from MR imaging acquired concurrently. Motion correction can be performed by transforming a set of reconstructed PET images into the same frame or by incorporating the transformation into the system model and reconstructing the motion-corrected image. Several phantom and patient studies have validated that MR-based motion correction strategies have great promise for quantitative PET imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fundamentals of quantitative PET data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, ATM; van den Hoff, J

    2002-01-01

    Drug analysis and development with PET should fully exhaust the ability of this tomographic technique to quantify regional tracer concentrations in vivo. Data evaluation based on visual inspection or assessment of regional image contrast is not sufficient for this purpose since much of the

  12. Quantitative analysis of coronary endothelial function with generator-produced {sup 82}Rb PET: comparison with {sup 15}O-labelled water PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Photobiology, Division of Molecular/Cellular Imaging, Kita-Ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University of Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Katoh, Chietsugu [Hokkaido University of Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences, Sapporo (Japan); Chen, Li; Kemp, Robert A. de; Williams, Kathryn; Beanlands, Rob S.B. [University of Ottawa Heart Institute, National Cardiac PET Centre, Division of Cardiology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Klein, Ran [Hokkaido University of Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); University of Ottawa Heart Institute, National Cardiac PET Centre, Division of Cardiology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Naya, Masanao [Hokkaido University of Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Sapporo (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Endothelial dysfunction is the earliest abnormality in the development of coronary atherosclerosis. {sup 82}Rb is a generator-produced positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion tracer that is becoming more widely used. We aimed to (1) develop a method for quantitative assessment of coronary endothelial function using the myocardial blood flow (MBF) response during a cold pressor test (CPT) in smokers, measured using {sup 82}Rb PET, and (2) compare the results with those measured using {sup 15}O-water PET. MBF was assessed at rest and during the CPT with {sup 82}Rb and {sup 15}O-water in nine controls and ten smokers. A one-compartment model with tracer extraction correction was used to estimate MBF with both tracers. CPT response was calculated as the ratio of MBF during the CPT to MBF at rest. At rest, measurements of MBF for smokers vs controls were not different using {sup 15}O-water (0.86 {+-} 0.18 vs 0.70 {+-} 0.13, p = 0.426) than they were using {sup 82}Rb (0.83 {+-} 0.23 vs 0.62 {+-} 0.20, p = 0.051). Both methods showed a reduced CPT response in smokers vs controls ({sup 15}O-water, 1.03 {+-} 0.21 vs 1.42 {+-} 0.29, p = 0.006; {sup 82}Rb, 1.02 {+-} 0.28 vs 1.70 {+-} 0.52, p < 0.001). There was high reliability [intraclass correlation coefficients: 0.48 (0.07, 0.75)] of MBF measurement between {sup 82}Rb and {sup 15}O-water during the CPT. Using a CPT, {sup 82}Rb MBF measurements detected coronary endothelial dysfunctions in smokers. {sup 82}Rb MBF measurements were comparable to those made using the {sup 15}O-water approach. Thus, {sup 82}Rb PET may be applicable for risk assessments or evaluation of risk factor modification in subjects with coronary risk factors. (orig.)

  13. Development of a PET tracer for imaging EGFR tyrosine kinase: evaluation of the suitability of PKI166

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernchen, R.; Brust, P.; Krause, M.; Baumann, M.

    2002-01-01

    The suitability of PKI166 for the development of a PET tracer for imaging EGFR tyrosine kinase was investigated. Binding studies using EGFR positive tumour tissue and tritiated PKI166 as the radioligand indicated a low binding affinity of PKI166 to the target tissue. PKI166 is therefore not recommended for PET tracer development. (orig.)

  14. Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of [11C]PAQ as a PET imaging tracer for VEGFR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samen, Erik; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Thorell, Jan-Olov; Lu, Li; Tegnebratt, Tetyana; Holmgren, Lars

    2009-01-01

    R,S-N-(4-Bromo-2-fluorophenyl)-6-methoxy-7-((1-methyl-3-piperidinyl)methox y)-4-quinazolinamine (PAQ) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with high affinity for the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), which plays an important role in tumour angiogenesis. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate in mice the 11 C-labelled analogue as an in vivo tracer for VEGFR-2 expression in solid tumours. [ 11 C]PAQ was synthesized by an N-methylation of desmethyl-PAQ using [ 11 C]methyl iodide. The tracer's pharmacokinetic properties and its distribution in both subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumour models were evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET). [ 18 F]FDG was used as a reference tracer for tumour growth. PET results were corroborated by ex vivo and in vitro phosphor imaging and immunohistochemical analyses. In vitro assays and PET in healthy animals revealed low tracer metabolism, limited excretion over 60 min and a saturable and irreversible binding. Radiotracer uptake in subcutaneous tumour masses was low, while focal areas of high uptake (up to 8% ID/g) were observed in regions connecting the tumour to the host. Uptake was similarly high but more distributed in tumours growing within the peritoneum. The pattern of radiotracer uptake was generally different from that of the metabolic tracer [ 18 F]FDG and correlated well with variations in VEGFR-2 expression determined ex vivo by immunohistochemical analysis. These results suggest that [ 11 C]PAQ has potential as a noninvasive PET tracer for in vivo imaging of VEGFR-2 expression in angiogenic ''hot spots''. (orig.)

  15. Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of [(11)C]PAQ as a PET imaging tracer for VEGFR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samén, Erik; Thorell, Jan-Olov; Lu, Li; Tegnebratt, Tetyana; Holmgren, Lars; Stone-Elander, Sharon

    2009-08-01

    (R,S)-N-(4-Bromo-2-fluorophenyl)-6-methoxy-7-((1-methyl-3-piperidinyl)methoxy)-4-quinazolinamine (PAQ) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with high affinity for the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), which plays an important role in tumour angiogenesis. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate in mice the (11)C-labelled analogue as an in vivo tracer for VEGFR-2 expression in solid tumours. [(11)C]PAQ was synthesized by an N-methylation of desmethyl-PAQ using [(11)C]methyl iodide. The tracer's pharmacokinetic properties and its distribution in both subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumour models were evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET). [(18)F]FDG was used as a reference tracer for tumour growth. PET results were corroborated by ex vivo and in vitro phosphor imaging and immunohistochemical analyses. In vitro assays and PET in healthy animals revealed low tracer metabolism, limited excretion over 60 min and a saturable and irreversible binding. Radiotracer uptake in subcutaneous tumour masses was low, while focal areas of high uptake (up to 8% ID/g) were observed in regions connecting the tumour to the host. Uptake was similarly high but more distributed in tumours growing within the peritoneum. The pattern of radiotracer uptake was generally different from that of the metabolic tracer [(18)F]FDG and correlated well with variations in VEGFR-2 expression determined ex vivo by immunohistochemical analysis. These results suggest that [(11)C]PAQ has potential as a noninvasive PET tracer for in vivo imaging of VEGFR-2 expression in angiogenic "hot spots".

  16. Search for a non-metabolizable PET tracer for heart neuronal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, D.M.; Rosenspire, K.C.; Van Dort, M.E.; Haka, M.S.; Jung, Y.W.; Gildersleeve, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The tracer (1R,2S)-(-)-[ 11 C]-meta-hydroxyephedrine (MHED) is used successfully at the authors' institution to study neuronal heart diseases and neuroendocrine tumors. However, MHED is rapidly metabolized in humans, most likely to alpha-methylepinephrine and its 3-O-methyl ether by the initial action of liver microsomal hydroxylase. This presentation will describe efforts to develop a [ 11 C]-labelled neuronal tracer that is completely resistant to metabolism on the PET-imaging time scale

  17. A new PET tracer specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hui; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; Li, Zi-Bo; Kashefi, Amir; He, Lina; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2007-01-01

    Noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) expression could be a valuable tool for evaluation of patients with a variety of malignancies, and particularly for monitoring those undergoing antiangiogenic therapies that block VEGF/VEGFR-2 function. The aim of this study was to develop a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer. The D63AE64AE67A mutant of VEGF 121 (VEGF DEE ) was generated by recombinant DNA technology. VEGF 121 and VEGF DEE were purified and conjugated with DOTA for 64 Cu labeling. The DOTA conjugates were tested in vitro for VEGFR-2 specificity and functional activity. In vivo tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics of 64 Cu-labeled VEGF 121 and VEGF DEE were compared using an orthotopic 4T1 murine breast tumor model. Blocking experiments, biodistribution studies, and immunofluorescence staining were carried out to confirm the noninvasive imaging results. Cell binding assay demonstrated that VEGF DEE had about 20-fold lower VEGFR-1 binding affinity and only slightly lower VEGFR-2 binding affinity as compared with VEGF 121 . MicroPET imaging studies revealed that both 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 and 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE had rapid and prominent activity accumulation in VEGFR-2-expressing 4T1 tumors. The renal uptake of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE was significantly lower than that of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 as rodent kidneys expressed high levels of VEGFR-1 based on immunofluorescence staining. Blocking experiments and biodistribution studies confirmed the VEGFR specificity of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE . We have developed a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer, 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE . It has comparable tumor targeting efficacy to 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 but much reduced renal toxicity. This tracer may be translated into the clinic for imaging tumor angiogenesis and monitoring antiangiogenic treatment efficacy. (orig.)

  18. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirich, C.; Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L.; Byars, L.; Michel, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner

  19. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT: a dual-tracer and dual-scanner validation in patients with heart valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Kero, Tanja; Orndahl, Lovisa Holm; Kim, Won Yong; Bjerner, Tomas; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Wiggers, Henrik; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Sörensen, Jens

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated method for extracting forward stroke volume (FSV) using indicator dilution theory directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies for two different tracers and scanners. 35 subjects underwent a dynamic (11)C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint-64 PET/CT (scanner I). In addition, 10 subjects underwent both dynamic (15)O-water PET and (11)C-acetate PET scans on a GE Discovery-ST PET/CT (scanner II). The left ventricular (LV)-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic extrapolation of the downslope of the TAC. FSV was calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured using phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). FSVPET correlated highly with FSVCMR (r = 0.87, slope = 0.90 for scanner I, r = 0.87, slope = 1.65, and r = 0.85, slope = 1.69 for scanner II for (15)O-water and (11)C-acetate, respectively) although a systematic bias was observed for both scanners (p dynamic PET/CT and cluster analysis. Results are almost identical for (11)C-acetate and (15)O-water. A scanner-dependent bias was observed, and a scanner calibration factor is required for multi-scanner studies. Generalization of the method to other tracers and scanners requires further validation.

  20. Novel targets for positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical tracers for visualization of neuroinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepetkin, I.; Shvedova, M.; Anfinogenova, Y.; Litvak, M.; Atochin, D.

    2017-08-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging techniques can enhance diagnosis of neurological diseases to achieve their successful treatment. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can identify activated microglia and provide detailed functional information based on molecular biology. This imaging modality is based on detection of isotope labeled tracers, which emit positrons. The review summarizes the developments of various radiolabeled ligands for PET imaging of neuroinflammation.

  1. Semi-automatic synthesis and biological evaluation of 18F-FCH as an oncologic PET tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhanhong; Wang Shizhen; Zhou Qian; Fu Zhe; Qiu Feichan; Huo Li

    2005-01-01

    18 F-fluromethylcholine ( 18 F-FCH) as a PET tracer is synthesized. The semi-automatic synthesis assembly of 18 F-FCH is modified from CPCU(CTI). The radiochemical purity is measured by analytical HPLC. The radiochemical yield and the radiochemical purity of 18 F-FCH are 15% and >99%, respectively. The total radiosynthesis time is 55 min after EOB. The labeled product exhibited low toxicity. The biodistribution in normal mice and the toxicity are studied. PET imaging with 18 F-FCH is performed on tumor xenograft murine model. The semi-automatic synthesis assembly is promising to be used for routine clinic radiopharmaceutical preparation and preliminary study has shown the usefulness of 18 F-FCH as an oncologic PET tracer. (authors)

  2. [11C]UCB-A, a novel PET tracer for synaptic vesicle protein 2 A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, Sergio; Lubberink, Mark; Thibblin, Alf; Sprycha, Margareta; Buchanan, Tim; Mestdagh, Nathalie; Kenda, Benoit; Mercier, Joel; Provins, Laurent; Gillard, Michel; Tytgat, Dominique; Antoni, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Development of a selective and specific high affinity PET tracer, [ 11 C]UCB-A, for the in vivo study of SV2A expression in humans. Radiochemistry and preclinical studies in rats and pigs including development of a tracer kinetic model to determine V T . A method for the measurement of percent intact tracer in plasma was developed and the radiation dosimetry was determined in rats. Results: 3–5 GBq of [ 11 C]UCB-A could be produced with radiochemical purity exceeding 98% with a specific radioactivity of around 65 GBq/μmol. In vitro binding showed high selective binding towards SV2A. [ 11 C]UCB-A displayed a dose-dependent and reversible binding to SV2A as measured with PET in rats and pigs and the V T could be determined by Logan analysis. The dosimetry was favorable and low enough to allow multiple administrations of [ 11 C]UCB-A to healthy volunteers, and the metabolite analysis showed no sign of labeled metabolites in brain. Conclusions: We have developed the novel PET tracer, [ 11 C]UCB-A, that can be used to measure SV2A expression in vivo. The dosimetry allows up to 5 administrations of 400 MBq of [ 11 C]UCB-A in humans. Apart from measuring drug occupancy, as we have shown, the tracer can potentially be used to compare SV2A expression between individuals because of the rather narrow range of baseline V T values. This will have to be further validated in human studies.

  3. Multiphase CT scanning and different intravenous contrast media concentrations in combined F-18-FDG PET/CT: Effect on quantitative and clinical assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebiere, Marilou, E-mail: Marilou.Rebiere@rwth-aachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Verburg, Frederik A., E-mail: fverburg@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, P. Debeylaan 25, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Palmowski, Moritz, E-mail: mpalmowski@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Krohn, Thomas, E-mail: tkrohn@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus, E-mail: hubertus.pietsch@bayer.com [Contrast Media Research, Bayer Pharma AG, Muellerstr. 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Kuhl, Christiane K., E-mail: ckuhl@ukaachen.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M., E-mail: fmottaghy@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, P. Debeylaan 25, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Behrendt, Florian F., E-mail: fbehrendt@ukaachen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of multiphase CT scanning and different intravenous contrast media on contrast enhancement, attenuation correction and image quality in combined PET/CT. Material and methods: 140 patients were prospectively enrolled for F-18-FDG-PET/CT including a low-dose unenhanced, arterial and venous contrast enhanced CT. The first (second) 70 patients, received contrast medium with 370 (300) mg iodine/ml. The iodine delivery rate (1.3 mg/s) and total iodine load (44.4 g) were identical for both groups. Contrast enhancement and maximum and mean standardized FDG uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) were determined for the un-enhanced, arterial and venous PET/CT at multiple anatomic sites and PET reconstructions were visually evaluated. Results: Arterial contrast enhancement was significantly higher for the 300 mg/ml contrast medium compared to 370 mg I/ml at all anatomic sites. Venous enhancement was not different between the two contrast media. SUVmean and SUVmax were significantly higher for the contrast enhanced compared to the non-enhanced PET/CT at all anatomic sites (all P < 0.001). Tracer uptake was significantly higher in the arterial than in the venous PET/CT in the arteries using both contrast media (all P < 0.001). No differences in tracer uptake were found between the contrast media (all P > 0.05). Visual assessment revealed no relevant differences between the different PET reconstructions. Conclusions: There is no relevant qualitative influence on the PET scan from the use of different intravenous contrast media in its various phases in combined multiphase PET/CT. For quantitative analysis of tracer uptake it is required to use an identical PET/CT protocol.

  4. The effect of respiratory induced density variations on non-TOF PET quantitation in the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Beverley F.; Cuplov, Vesna; Hutton, Brian F.; Groves, Ashley M.; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-04-01

    Accurate PET quantitation requires a matched attenuation map. Obtaining matched CT attenuation maps in the thorax is difficult due to the respiratory cycle which causes both motion and density changes. Unlike with motion, little attention has been given to the effects of density changes in the lung on PET quantitation. This work aims to explore the extent of the errors caused by pulmonary density attenuation map mismatch on dynamic and static parameter estimates. Dynamic XCAT phantoms were utilised using clinically relevant 18F-FDG and 18F-FMISO time activity curves for all organs within the thorax to estimate the expected parameter errors. The simulations were then validated with PET data from 5 patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis who underwent PET/Cine-CT. The PET data were reconstructed with three gates obtained from the Cine-CT and the average Cine-CT. The lung TACs clearly displayed differences between true and measured curves with error depending on global activity distribution at the time of measurement. The density errors from using a mismatched attenuation map were found to have a considerable impact on PET quantitative accuracy. Maximum errors due to density mismatch were found to be as high as 25% in the XCAT simulation. Differences in patient derived kinetic parameter estimates and static concentration between the extreme gates were found to be as high as 31% and 14%, respectively. Overall our results show that respiratory associated density errors in the attenuation map affect quantitation throughout the lung, not just regions near boundaries. The extent of this error is dependent on the activity distribution in the thorax and hence on the tracer and time of acquisition. Consequently there may be a significant impact on estimated kinetic parameters throughout the lung.

  5. The effect of respiratory induced density variations on non-TOF PET quantitation in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Beverley F; Cuplov, Vesna; Hutton, Brian F; Groves, Ashley M; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Accurate PET quantitation requires a matched attenuation map. Obtaining matched CT attenuation maps in the thorax is difficult due to the respiratory cycle which causes both motion and density changes. Unlike with motion, little attention has been given to the effects of density changes in the lung on PET quantitation. This work aims to explore the extent of the errors caused by pulmonary density attenuation map mismatch on dynamic and static parameter estimates. Dynamic XCAT phantoms were utilised using clinically relevant 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FMISO time activity curves for all organs within the thorax to estimate the expected parameter errors. The simulations were then validated with PET data from 5 patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis who underwent PET/Cine-CT. The PET data were reconstructed with three gates obtained from the Cine-CT and the average Cine-CT. The lung TACs clearly displayed differences between true and measured curves with error depending on global activity distribution at the time of measurement. The density errors from using a mismatched attenuation map were found to have a considerable impact on PET quantitative accuracy. Maximum errors due to density mismatch were found to be as high as 25% in the XCAT simulation. Differences in patient derived kinetic parameter estimates and static concentration between the extreme gates were found to be as high as 31% and 14%, respectively. Overall our results show that respiratory associated density errors in the attenuation map affect quantitation throughout the lung, not just regions near boundaries. The extent of this error is dependent on the activity distribution in the thorax and hence on the tracer and time of acquisition. Consequently there may be a significant impact on estimated kinetic parameters throughout the lung. (paper)

  6. SPECT myocardial blood flow quantitation toward clinical use: a comparative study with {sup 13}N-Ammonia PET myocardial blood flow quantitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Bailing [University of Missouri-Columbia, Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, Columbia, Missouri (United States); Hu, Lien-Hsin; Yang, Bang-Hung; Ting, Chien-Hsin; Huang, Wen-Sheng [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei (China); Chen, Lung-Ching [Shin Kong Wu-Ho Su Memorial Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Taipei (China); Chen, Yen-Kung [Shin Kong Wu-Ho Su Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei (China); Hung, Guang-Uei [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changhua (China); Wu, Tao-Cheng [National Yang-Ming University, Cardiovascular Research Center, Taipei (China)

    2017-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantitation of {sup 99m}Tc-Sestamibi (MIBI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) compared with {sup 13}N-Ammonia (NH3) position emission tomography (PET) on the same cohorts. Recent advances of SPECT technologies have been applied to develop MBF quantitation as a promising tool to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) for areas where PET MBF quantitation is not available. However, whether the SPECT approach can achieve the same level of accuracy as the PET approach for clinical use still needs further investigations. Twelve healthy volunteers (HVT) and 16 clinical patients with CAD received both MIBI SPECT and NH3 PET flow scans. Dynamic SPECT images acquired with high temporary resolution were fully corrected for physical factors and processed to quantify K1 using the standard compartmental modeling. Human MIBI tracer extraction fraction (EF) was determined by comparing MIBI K1 and NH3 flow on the HVT group and then used to convert flow values from K1 for all subjects. MIBI and NH3 flow values were systematically compared to validate the SPECT approach. The human MIBI EF was determined as [1.0-0.816*exp(-0.267/MBF)]. Global and regional MBF and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) of MIBI SPECT and NH3 PET were highly correlated for all subjects (global R{sup 2}: MBF = 0.92, MFR = 0.78; regional R{sup 2}: MBF ≥ 0.88, MFR ≥ 0.71). No significant differences for rest flow, stress flow, and MFR between these two approaches were observed (All p ≥ 0.088). Bland-Altman plots overall revealed small bias between MIBI SPECT and NH3 PET (global: ΔMBF = -0.03Lml/min/g, ΔMFR = 0.07; regional: ΔMBF = -0.07 - 0.06, ΔMFR = -0.02 - 0.22). Quantitation with SPECT technologies can be accurate to measure myocardial blood flow as PET quantitation while comprehensive imaging factors of SPECT to derive the variability between these two approaches were fully addressed and corrected

  7. SPECT myocardial blood flow quantitation toward clinical use: a comparative study with "1"3N-Ammonia PET myocardial blood flow quantitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Bailing; Hu, Lien-Hsin; Yang, Bang-Hung; Ting, Chien-Hsin; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Lung-Ching; Chen, Yen-Kung; Hung, Guang-Uei; Wu, Tao-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantitation of "9"9"mTc-Sestamibi (MIBI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) compared with "1"3N-Ammonia (NH3) position emission tomography (PET) on the same cohorts. Recent advances of SPECT technologies have been applied to develop MBF quantitation as a promising tool to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) for areas where PET MBF quantitation is not available. However, whether the SPECT approach can achieve the same level of accuracy as the PET approach for clinical use still needs further investigations. Twelve healthy volunteers (HVT) and 16 clinical patients with CAD received both MIBI SPECT and NH3 PET flow scans. Dynamic SPECT images acquired with high temporary resolution were fully corrected for physical factors and processed to quantify K1 using the standard compartmental modeling. Human MIBI tracer extraction fraction (EF) was determined by comparing MIBI K1 and NH3 flow on the HVT group and then used to convert flow values from K1 for all subjects. MIBI and NH3 flow values were systematically compared to validate the SPECT approach. The human MIBI EF was determined as [1.0-0.816*exp(-0.267/MBF)]. Global and regional MBF and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) of MIBI SPECT and NH3 PET were highly correlated for all subjects (global R"2: MBF = 0.92, MFR = 0.78; regional R"2: MBF ≥ 0.88, MFR ≥ 0.71). No significant differences for rest flow, stress flow, and MFR between these two approaches were observed (All p ≥ 0.088). Bland-Altman plots overall revealed small bias between MIBI SPECT and NH3 PET (global: ΔMBF = -0.03Lml/min/g, ΔMFR = 0.07; regional: ΔMBF = -0.07 - 0.06, ΔMFR = -0.02 - 0.22). Quantitation with SPECT technologies can be accurate to measure myocardial blood flow as PET quantitation while comprehensive imaging factors of SPECT to derive the variability between these two approaches were fully addressed and corrected. (orig.)

  8. Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of [{sup 11}C]PAQ as a PET imaging tracer for VEGFR-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samen, Erik; Stone-Elander, Sharon [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Pharmacy, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Neurosciences, Stockholm (Sweden); Thorell, Jan-Olov [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Pharmacy, Stockholm (Sweden); Lu, Li [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Neurosciences, Stockholm (Sweden); Tegnebratt, Tetyana; Holmgren, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Cancer Center Karolinska, Oncology-Pathology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-08-15

    (R,S)-N-(4-Bromo-2-fluorophenyl)-6-methoxy-7-((1-methyl-3-piperidinyl)methoxy)-4-quinazolinamine (PAQ) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with high affinity for the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), which plays an important role in tumour angiogenesis. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate in mice the {sup 11}C-labelled analogue as an in vivo tracer for VEGFR-2 expression in solid tumours. [{sup 11}C]PAQ was synthesized by an N-methylation of desmethyl-PAQ using [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. The tracer's pharmacokinetic properties and its distribution in both subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumour models were evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET). [{sup 18}F]FDG was used as a reference tracer for tumour growth. PET results were corroborated by ex vivo and in vitro phosphor imaging and immunohistochemical analyses. In vitro assays and PET in healthy animals revealed low tracer metabolism, limited excretion over 60 min and a saturable and irreversible binding. Radiotracer uptake in subcutaneous tumour masses was low, while focal areas of high uptake (up to 8% ID/g) were observed in regions connecting the tumour to the host. Uptake was similarly high but more distributed in tumours growing within the peritoneum. The pattern of radiotracer uptake was generally different from that of the metabolic tracer [{sup 18}F]FDG and correlated well with variations in VEGFR-2 expression determined ex vivo by immunohistochemical analysis. These results suggest that [{sup 11}C]PAQ has potential as a noninvasive PET tracer for in vivo imaging of VEGFR-2 expression in angiogenic ''hot spots''. (orig.)

  9. Astrocytic tracer dynamics estimated from [1-11C]-acetate PET measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Andrea; Calvetti, Daniela; Gjedde, Albert

    2015-01-01

    We address the problem of estimating the unknown parameters of a model of tracer kinetics from sequences of positron emission tomography (PET) scan data using a statistical sequential algorithm for the inference of magnitudes of dynamic parameters. The method, based on Bayesian statistical...... inference, is a modification of a recently proposed particle filtering and sequential Monte Carlo algorithm, where instead of preassigning the accuracy in the propagation of each particle, we fix the time step and account for the numerical errors in the innovation term. We apply the algorithm to PET images...

  10. Measuring serotonin synthesis: from conventional methods to PET tracers and their (pre)clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Anniek K.D.; Waarde, Aren van; Willemsen, Antoon T.M. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Bosker, Fokko J. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Center of Psychiatry, Groningen (Netherlands); Luiten, Paul G.M. [University of Groningen, Center for Behavior and Neurosciences, Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Haren (Netherlands); Boer, Johan A. den [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Center of Psychiatry, Groningen (Netherlands); Kema, Ido P. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-03-15

    The serotonergic system of the brain is complex, with an extensive innervation pattern covering all brain regions and endowed with at least 15 different receptors (each with their particular distribution patterns), specific reuptake mechanisms and synthetic processes. Many aspects of the functioning of the serotonergic system are still unclear, partially because of the difficulty of measuring physiological processes in the living brain. In this review we give an overview of the conventional methods of measuring serotonin synthesis and methods using positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, more specifically with respect to serotonergic function in affective disorders. Conventional methods are invasive and do not directly measure synthesis rates. Although they may give insight into turnover rates, a more direct measurement may be preferred. PET is a noninvasive technique which can trace metabolic processes, like serotonin synthesis. Tracers developed for this purpose are {alpha}-[{sup 11}C]methyltryptophan ([{sup 11}C]AMT) and 5-hydroxy-L-[{beta}-{sup 11}C]tryptophan ([{sup 11}C]5-HTP). Both tracers have advantages and disadvantages. [{sup 11}C]AMT can enter the kynurenine pathway under inflammatory conditions (and thus provide a false signal), but this tracer has been used in many studies leading to novel insights regarding antidepressant action. [{sup 11}C]5-HTP is difficult to produce, but trapping of this compound may better represent serotonin synthesis. AMT and 5-HTP kinetics are differently affected by tryptophan depletion and changes of mood. This may indicate that both tracers are associated with different enzymatic processes. In conclusion, PET with radiolabelled substrates for the serotonergic pathway is the only direct way to detect changes of serotonin synthesis in the living brain. (orig.)

  11. The influence of biological and technical factors on quantitative analysis of amyloid PET: Points to consider and recommendations for controlling variability in longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mark E; Chiao, Ping; Klein, Gregory; Matthews, Dawn; Thurfjell, Lennart; Cole, Patricia E; Margolin, Richard; Landau, Susan; Foster, Norman L; Mason, N Scott; De Santi, Susan; Suhy, Joyce; Koeppe, Robert A; Jagust, William

    2015-09-01

    In vivo imaging of amyloid burden with positron emission tomography (PET) provides a means for studying the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's and related diseases. Measurement of subtle changes in amyloid burden requires quantitative analysis of image data. Reliable quantitative analysis of amyloid PET scans acquired at multiple sites and over time requires rigorous standardization of acquisition protocols, subject management, tracer administration, image quality control, and image processing and analysis methods. We review critical points in the acquisition and analysis of amyloid PET, identify ways in which technical factors can contribute to measurement variability, and suggest methods for mitigating these sources of noise. Improved quantitative accuracy could reduce the sample size necessary to detect intervention effects when amyloid PET is used as a treatment end point and allow more reliable interpretation of change in amyloid burden and its relationship to clinical course. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of a series of substituted 11C-phenethylamines as 5-HT (2A) agonist PET tracers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Hansen, Martin; Santini, Martin A

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors with agonist tracers holds promise for the selective labelling of 5-HT(2A) receptors in their high-affinity state. We have previously validated [(11)C]Cimbi-5 and found that it is a 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist PET tracer....... In an attempt to further optimize the target-to-background binding ratio, we modified the chemical structure of the phenethylamine backbone and carbon-11 labelling site of [(11)C]Cimbi-5 in different ways. Here, we present the in vivo validation of nine novel 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist PET tracers in the pig...

  13. Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of a series of substituted 11C-phenethylamines as 5-HT2A agonist PET tracers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Hansen, Martin; Santini, Martin A

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors with agonist tracers holds promise for the selective labelling of 5-HT(2A) receptors in their high-affinity state. We have previously validated [(11)C]Cimbi-5 and found that it is a 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist PET tracer....... In an attempt to further optimize the target-to-background binding ratio, we modified the chemical structure of the phenethylamine backbone and carbon-11 labelling site of [(11)C]Cimbi-5 in different ways. Here, we present the in vivo validation of nine novel 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist PET tracers in the pig...

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F amyloid PET tracers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Elizabeth; Chalkidou, Anastasia; Hammers, Alexander; Peacock, Janet; Summers, Jennifer; Keevil, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Imaging or tissue biomarker evidence has been introduced into the core diagnostic pathway for Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET using 18 F-labelled beta-amyloid PET tracers has shown promise for the early diagnosis of AD. However, most studies included only small numbers of participants and no consensus has been reached as to which radiotracer has the highest diagnostic accuracy. First, we performed a systematic review of the literature published between 1990 and 2014 for studies exploring the diagnostic accuracy of florbetaben, florbetapir and flutemetamol in AD. The included studies were analysed using the QUADAS assessment of methodological quality. A meta-analysis of the sensitivity and specificity reported within each study was performed. Pooled values were calculated for each radiotracer and for visual or quantitative analysis by population included. The systematic review identified nine studies eligible for inclusion. There were limited variations in the methods between studies reporting the same radiotracer. The meta-analysis results showed that pooled sensitivity and specificity values were in general high for all tracers. This was confirmed by calculating likelihood ratios. A patient with a positive ratio is much more likely to have AD than a patient with a negative ratio, and vice versa. However, specificity was higher when only patients with AD were compared with healthy controls. This systematic review and meta-analysis found no marked differences in the diagnostic accuracy of the three beta-amyloid radiotracers. All tracers perform better when used to discriminate between patients with AD and healthy controls. The sensitivity and specificity for quantitative and visual analysis are comparable to those of other imaging or biomarker techniques used to diagnose AD. Further research is required to identify the combination of tests that provides the highest sensitivity and specificity, and to identify the most suitable position for the tracer in the

  15. Dosimetry of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105, a PET tracer for uPAR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; El Ali, Henrik H.; Binderup, Tina

    2014-01-01

    64Cu-DOTA-AE105 is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer specific to the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). In preparation of using this tracer in humans, as a new promising method to distinguish between indolent and aggressive cancers, we have performed PET......, liver, kidney, spleen, intestine, muscle, bone and bladder. The activity concentrations in the mentioned organs [%ID/g] were used for the dosimetry calculation. The %ID/g of each organ at 1, 4.5 and 22h was scaled to human value based on a difference between organ and body weights. The scaled values...

  16. Quantitative myocardial blood flow with Rubidium-82 PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Christoffer E; Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1) identificat......Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1...... global MFR and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), and together with new diagnostic possibilities from measuring the longitudinal myocardial perfusion gradient, cardiac (82)Rb PET faces a promising clinical future. This article reviews current evidence on quantitative (82)Rb PET's ability...

  17. Quantitative PET of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using 64Cu-labeled cetuximab, a chimeric anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; He, Lina; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Koong, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the surface of cancer cells, was approved by the FDA to treat patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. It is currently also in advanced-stage development for the treatment of several other solid tumors. Here we report for the first time the quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using 64 Cu-labeled cetuximab. We conjugated cetuximab with macrocyclic chelating agent 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), labeled with 64 Cu, and tested the resulting 64 Cu-DOTA-cetuximab in seven xenograft tumor models. The tracer uptake measured by PET was correlated with the EGFR expression quantified by western blotting. The estimated human dosimetry based on the PET data in Sprague-Dawley rats was also calculated. MicroPET imaging showed that 64 Cu-DOTA-cetuximab had increasing tumor activity accumulation over time in EGFR-positive tumors but relatively low uptake in EGFR-negative tumors at all times examined ( 2 0.80) between the tracer uptake (measured by PET) and the EGFR expression level (measured by western blotting). Human dosimetry estimation indicated that the tracer may be safely administered to human patients for tumor diagnosis, with the dose-limiting organ being the liver. The success of EGFR-positive tumor imaging using 64 Cu-DOTA-cetuximab can be translated into the clinic to characterize the pharmacokinetics, to select the right population of patients for EGFR-targeted therapy, to monitor the therapeutic efficacy of anti-EGFR treatment, and to optimize the dosage of either cetuximab alone or cetuximab in combination with other therapeutic agents. (orig.)

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F amyloid PET tracers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Elizabeth; Chalkidou, Anastasia [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Technology Evaluation Centre, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Hammers, Alexander [St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Peacock, Janet; Summers, Jennifer [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Technology Evaluation Centre, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Health and Social Care Research, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Keevil, Stephen [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Technology Evaluation Centre, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Imaging or tissue biomarker evidence has been introduced into the core diagnostic pathway for Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET using {sup 18}F-labelled beta-amyloid PET tracers has shown promise for the early diagnosis of AD. However, most studies included only small numbers of participants and no consensus has been reached as to which radiotracer has the highest diagnostic accuracy. First, we performed a systematic review of the literature published between 1990 and 2014 for studies exploring the diagnostic accuracy of florbetaben, florbetapir and flutemetamol in AD. The included studies were analysed using the QUADAS assessment of methodological quality. A meta-analysis of the sensitivity and specificity reported within each study was performed. Pooled values were calculated for each radiotracer and for visual or quantitative analysis by population included. The systematic review identified nine studies eligible for inclusion. There were limited variations in the methods between studies reporting the same radiotracer. The meta-analysis results showed that pooled sensitivity and specificity values were in general high for all tracers. This was confirmed by calculating likelihood ratios. A patient with a positive ratio is much more likely to have AD than a patient with a negative ratio, and vice versa. However, specificity was higher when only patients with AD were compared with healthy controls. This systematic review and meta-analysis found no marked differences in the diagnostic accuracy of the three beta-amyloid radiotracers. All tracers perform better when used to discriminate between patients with AD and healthy controls. The sensitivity and specificity for quantitative and visual analysis are comparable to those of other imaging or biomarker techniques used to diagnose AD. Further research is required to identify the combination of tests that provides the highest sensitivity and specificity, and to identify the most suitable position for the tracer in the

  19. Determination of regional flow by use of intravascular PET tracers: microvascular theory and experimental validation for pig livers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Bass, L; Feng, H

    2003-01-01

    Today, the standard approach for the kinetic analysis of dynamic PET studies is compartment models, in which the tracer and its metabolites are confined to a few well-mixed compartments. We examine whether the standard model is suitable for modern PET data or whether theories including more...... physiologic realism can advance the interpretation of dynamic PET data. A more detailed microvascular theory is developed for intravascular tracers in single-capillary and multiple-capillary systems. The microvascular models, which account for concentration gradients in capillaries, are validated and compared...... with the standard model in a pig liver study. METHODS: Eight pigs underwent a 5-min dynamic PET study after (15)O-carbon monoxide inhalation. Throughout each experiment, hepatic arterial blood and portal venous blood were sampled, and flow was measured with transit-time flow meters. The hepatic dual...

  20. Preclinical tools in PET-tracer development : automatisation and biopharmaceutical evaluation with special emphasis on the adenosine A3 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusler, D. I. B.

    2010-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is the first choice technology for the visualization and quantification of receptors and transporters, enabling examination of e.g. neurological, psychiatric and oncological diseases on a molecular level. Therefore, new and innovative PET-radiopharmaceuticals need to be developed to get further insights into the biochemical mechanisms involved in pathological changes. PET-tracer development starts with the idea or modelling of the chemical structure of a (new) molecule with (hopefully) good binding characteristics to the desired target site. As next steps, the compound needs to be synthesized and radiolabelled with a suitable PET-nuclide. Then it has to be evaluated regarding its parameters in various preclinical experimental settings. Hence, two major tools are crucial in the development-process of new PET-tracers: 1) a fast and reliable production method, most desirable and optimal in an automated set-up, and 2) proof of tracer suitability (high affinity, high selectivity and specificity, beside low unspecific binding) through preclinical evaluation in an animal model, prior to human application. Both aspects, the radiochemical preparation and automatisation, as well as the biopharmaceutical evaluation are presented in the thesis in 5 different manuscripts. In detail, the development and preclinical evaluation of 4 different PET-tracers ([11C]DASB, [18F]FE SUPPY, [18F]FE SUPPY:2, and [18F]FE CIT) for 3 targets, the serotonin transporter (SERT), the adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and the dopamine transporter (DAT), respectively, are covered in the present thesis. The first manuscript presents a method for a fast, reliable and fully-automated radiosynthesis of [11C]DASB (a tracer for the imaging of the SERT in human brain in e.g. depression patients) will facilitate further clinical investigations (e.g. for the department of psychiatry and psychotherapy of the medical university of Vienna) with this tracer. [18F]FE SUPPY was

  1. STRATEGIES FOR QUANTIFYING PET IMAGING DATA FROM TRACER STUDIES OF BRAIN RECEPTORS AND ENZYMES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J.

    2001-04-02

    A description of some of the methods used in neuroreceptor imaging to distinguish changes in receptor availability has been presented in this chapter. It is necessary to look beyond regional uptake of the tracer since uptake generally is affected by factors other than the number of receptors for which the tracer has affinity. An exception is the infusion method producing an equilibrium state. The techniques vary in complexity some requiring arterial blood measurements of unmetabolized tracer and multiple time uptake data. Others require only a few plasma and uptake measurements and those based on a reference region require no plasma measurements. We have outlined some of the limitations of the different methods. Laruelle (1999) has pointed out that test/retest studies to which various methods can be applied are crucial in determining the optimal method for a particular study. The choice of method will also depend upon the application. In a clinical setting, methods not involving arterial blood sampling are generally preferred. In the future techniques for externally measuring arterial plasma radioactivity with only a few blood samples for metabolite correction will extend the modeling options of clinical PET. Also since parametric images can provide information beyond that of ROI analysis, improved techniques for generating such images will be important, particularly for ligands requiring more than a one-compartment model. Techniques such as the wavelet transform proposed by Turkheimer et al. (2000) may prove to be important in reducing noise and improving quantitation.

  2. Comparison of dual-biomarker PIB-PET and dual-tracer PET in AD diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Liping; Zhang, Jinming; Xu, Baixuan; Tian, Jiahe [General Hospital of the Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Beijing (China); Liu, Linwen; Fan, Yong [Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Laboratory of Pattern Recognition, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-15

    To identify the optimal time window for capturing perfusion information from early {sup 11}C-PIB imaging frames (perfusion PIB, {sup 11}C-pPIB) and to compare the performance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and ''dual biomarker'' {sup 11}C-PIB PET [{sup 11}C-pPIB and amyloid PIB ({sup 11}C-aPIB)] for classification of AD, MCI and CN subjects. Forty subjects (14 CN, 12 MCI and 14 AD patients) underwent {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-PIB PET studies. Pearson correlation between the {sup 18}F-FDG image and sum of early {sup 11}C-PIB frames was maximised to identify the optimal time window for {sup 11}C-pPIB. The classification power of imaging parameters was evaluated with a leave-one-out validation. A 7-min time window yielded the highest correlation between {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-pPIB. {sup 11}C-pPIB and {sup 18}F-FDG images shared a similar radioactive distribution pattern. {sup 18}F-FDG performed better than {sup 11}C-pPIB for the classification of both AD vs. CN and MCI vs. CN. {sup 11}C-pPIB + {sup 11}C-aPIB and {sup 18}F-FDG + {sup 11}C-aPIB yielded the highest classification accuracy for the classification of AD vs. CN, and {sup 18}F-FDG + {sup 11}C-aPIB had the best classification performance for the classification of MCI vs. CN. C-pPIB could serve as a useful biomarker of rCBF for measuring neural activity and improve the diagnostic power of PET for AD in conjunction with {sup 11}C-aPIB. {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-PIB dual-tracer PET examination could better detect MCI. (orig.)

  3. New PET tracers for cerebral dopamine: Should 6-[18f]fluoro-dopa be replaced?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firnau, G.; Chirakal, R.; Chen, J.J.; Murthy, D.; Nahmias, C.; Garnett, E.S.

    1993-01-01

    The visualization with PET of dopaminergic terminals in the human brain has been accomplished by a variety of approaches using β + -labelled substrates 1. for Aromatic L-Amino acid Decarboxylase, AADC, (6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-dopa, FD; 6-[ 18 F]fluoro-L-meta-tyrosine, FmT; L-[ 11 C]Dopa); and β + -labelled inhibitors 2. for reuptake transporter ([ 11 C]Cocain, [ 11 C]WIN 35,428); 3. for Monoamine Oxidase-B ([ 11 C]deprenyl); 4. for the Vesicular uptake site ([ 11 C]tetrabenzamine). The enzyme approach with FD has been particularly successful in providing important insights into Parkinson's disease and dystonias. The extraction of quantitative data from FD/PET studies in humans is complicated by the formation of O-methylFD in the periphery, which, like FD, also enters the brain. Following the suggestion by deJesus (1988) to use a labelled meta-tyrosine (substrate for AADC but not COMT) the authors have synthesized FmT, developed it into a radiopharmaceutical (toxicology and radiation dose in humans) and studied the intracerebral distribution in man and the metabolites in monkeys. They found that FmT's peripheral metabolite does not enter the brain. Unlike FD, FmT delineates with greater clarity the dopaminergic terminals and cells including those in the substantia nigra that, so far, could not be investigated with any other PET tracer. Thus, FmT appears to be superior to FD

  4. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew; Finger, Elizabeth; Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John; Pavlosky, William; Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith

    2015-01-01

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  5. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Finger, Elizabeth [Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Pavlosky, William [Diagnostic Imaging, St Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario (Canada); Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-18

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  6. Optimization of PET-MR Registrations for Nonhuman Primates Using Mutual Information Measures: A Multi-Transform Method (MTM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiego, Christine M.; Weinzimmer, David; Carson, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    An important step in PET brain kinetic analysis is the registration of functional data to an anatomical MR image. Typically, PET-MR registrations in nonhuman primate neuroreceptor studies used PET images acquired early post-injection, (e.g., 0–10 min) to closely resemble the subject’s MR image. However, a substantial fraction of these registrations (~25%) fail due to the differences in kinetics and distribution for various radiotracer studies and conditions (e.g., blocking studies). The Multi-Transform Method (MTM) was developed to improve the success of registrations between PET and MR images. Two algorithms were evaluated, MTM-I and MTM-II. The approach involves creating multiple transformations by registering PET images of different time intervals, from a dynamic study, to a single reference (i.e., MR image) (MTM-I) or to multiple reference images (i.e., MR and PET images pre-registered to the MR) (MTM-II). Normalized mutual information was used to compute similarity between the transformed PET images and the reference image(s) to choose the optimal transformation. This final transformation is used to map the dynamic dataset into the animal’s anatomical MR space, required for kinetic analysis. The chosen transformed from MTM-I and MTM-II were evaluated using visual rating scores to assess the quality of spatial alignment between the resliced PET and reference. One hundred twenty PET datasets involving eleven different tracers from 3 different scanners were used to evaluate the MTM algorithms. Studies were performed with baboons and rhesus monkeys on the HR+, HRRT, and Focus-220. Successful transformations increased from 77.5%, 85.8%, to 96.7% using the 0–10 min method, MTM-I, and MTM-II, respectively, based on visual rating scores. The Multi-Transform Methods proved to be a robust technique for PET-MR registrations for a wide range of PET studies. PMID:22926293

  7. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiza Barbosa, F. de; Delso, G.; Voert, E.E.G.W. ter; Huellner, M.W.; Herrmann, K.; Veit-Haibach, P.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies.

  8. Analysis of PET hypoxia imaging in the quantitative imaging for personalized cancer medicine program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Ivan; Driscoll, Brandon; Keller, Harald; Shek, Tina; Jaffray, David; Hedley, David

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative imaging is an important tool in clinical trials of testing novel agents and strategies for cancer treatment. The Quantitative Imaging Personalized Cancer Medicine Program (QIPCM) provides clinicians and researchers participating in multi-center clinical trials with a central repository for their imaging data. In addition, a set of tools provide standards of practice (SOP) in end-to-end quality assurance of scanners and image analysis. The four components for data archiving and analysis are the Clinical Trials Patient Database, the Clinical Trials PACS, the data analysis engine(s) and the high-speed networks that connect them. The program provides a suite of software which is able to perform RECIST, dynamic MRI, CT and PET analysis. The imaging data can be assessed securely from remote and analyzed by researchers with these software tools, or with tools provided by the users and installed at the server. Alternatively, QIPCM provides a service for data analysis on the imaging data according developed SOP. An example of a clinical study in which patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were studied with dynamic PET-FAZA for hypoxia measurement will be discussed. We successfully quantified the degree of hypoxia as well as tumor perfusion in a group of 20 patients in terms of SUV and hypoxic fraction. It was found that there is no correlation between bulk tumor perfusion and hypoxia status in this cohort. QIPCM also provides end-to-end QA testing of scanners used in multi-center clinical trials. Based on quality assurance data from multiple CT-PET scanners, we concluded that quality control of imaging was vital in the success in multi-center trials as different imaging and reconstruction parameters in PET imaging could lead to very different results in hypoxia imaging. (author)

  9. Improving PET Quantification of Small Animal [68Ga]DOTA-Labeled PET/CT Studies by Using a CT-Based Positron Range Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal-Gonzalez, Jacobo; Vaquero, Juan José; Herraiz, Joaquín L; Pérez-Liva, Mailyn; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Peña-Zalbidea, Santiago; Desco, Manuel; Udías, José Manuel

    2018-01-19

    Image quality of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers that emits high-energy positrons, such as Ga-68, Rb-82, or I-124, is significantly affected by positron range (PR) effects. PR effects are especially important in small animal PET studies, since they can limit spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of the images. Since generators accessibility has made Ga-68 tracers wide available, the aim of this study is to show how the quantitative results of [ 68 Ga]DOTA-labeled PET/X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of neuroendocrine tumors in mice can be improved using positron range correction (PRC). Eighteen scans in 12 mice were evaluated, with three different models of tumors: PC12, AR42J, and meningiomas. In addition, three different [ 68 Ga]DOTA-labeled radiotracers were used to evaluate the PRC with different tracer distributions: [ 68 Ga]DOTANOC, [ 68 Ga]DOTATOC, and [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE. Two PRC methods were evaluated: a tissue-dependent (TD-PRC) and a tissue-dependent spatially-variant correction (TDSV-PRC). Taking a region in the liver as reference, the tissue-to-liver ratio values for tumor tissue (TLR tumor ), lung (TLR lung ), and necrotic areas within the tumors (TLR necrotic ) and their respective relative variations (ΔTLR) were evaluated. All TLR values in the PRC images were significantly different (p DOTA-labeled PET/CT imaging of mice with neuroendocrine tumors, hence demonstrating that these techniques could also ameliorate the deleterious effect of the positron range in clinical PET imaging.

  10. Atmospheric tracer study of the emissions from the University of Michigan Cyclotron/PET Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scofield, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The University of Michigan (U of M) Cyclotron/Positron Emission Tomography (PET) facility consists of a cyclotron (Model CS-30, The Cyclotron Corporation), radiochemistry laboratory, and Pet scanner. Accelerator-produced radioactive materials, such as, carbon-11 and oxygen-15 are typically emitted from the Cyclotron/PET facility through short stacks located on the roof. This project studied the dispersion of emissions from the facility within the medical complex. To achieve this purpose, the research project had three phases: a physical modeling study; a preliminary field smoke release study; and, a field study using a tracer gas to simulate emission dispersion from the U of M Cyclotron/PET facility vault stack. The objective was to determine normalized concentrations, under selected wind directions and speeds, for use in establishing radionuclide concentrations at the air intakes of the Cyclotron/PET facility and surrounding buildings and at selected ground-level locations

  11. PET/MR imaging of bone lesions - implications for PET quantification from imperfect attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarin, Andrei; Burger, Cyrill; Crook, David W.; Burger, Irene A.; Schmid, Daniel T.; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Kuhn, Felix P.; Wollenweber, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate attenuation correction (AC) is essential for quantitative analysis of PET tracer distribution. In MR, the lack of cortical bone signal makes bone segmentation difficult and may require implementation of special sequences. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the need for accurate bone segmentation in MR-based AC for whole-body PET/MR imaging. In 22 patients undergoing sequential PET/CT and 3-T MR imaging, modified CT AC maps were produced by replacing pixels with values of >100 HU, representing mostly bone structures, by pixels with a constant value of 36 HU corresponding to soft tissue, thereby simulating current MR-derived AC maps. A total of 141 FDG-positive osseous lesions and 50 soft-tissue lesions adjacent to bones were evaluated. The mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) was measured in each lesion in PET images reconstructed once using the standard AC maps and once using the modified AC maps. Subsequently, the errors in lesion tracer uptake for the modified PET images were calculated using the standard PET image as a reference. Substitution of bone by soft tissue values in AC maps resulted in an underestimation of tracer uptake in osseous and soft tissue lesions adjacent to bones of 11.2 ± 5.4 % (range 1.5-30.8 %) and 3.2 ± 1.7 % (range 0.2-4 %), respectively. Analysis of the spine and pelvic osseous lesions revealed a substantial dependence of the error on lesion composition. For predominantly sclerotic spine lesions, the mean underestimation was 15.9 ± 3.4 % (range 9.9-23.5 %) and for osteolytic spine lesions, 7.2 ± 1.7 % (range 4.9-9.3 %), respectively. CT data simulating treating bone as soft tissue as is currently done in MR maps for PET AC leads to a substantial underestimation of tracer uptake in bone lesions and depends on lesion composition, the largest error being seen in sclerotic lesions. Therefore, depiction of cortical bone and other calcified areas in MR AC maps is necessary for accurate quantification of tracer uptake

  12. Progress of PET imaging in Schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Li; Gao Shuo

    2011-01-01

    PET is an important functional neuroimaging technique that can be used to assessment of cerebral metabolic activity and blood flow and identifies the distribution of important neurotransmitters in the human brain. Compared with other conventional imaging techniques, PET enables regional cerebral glucose metabolism, blood flow, dopaminergic and serotonergic receptor function to be assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. In recent years, PET increasingly being used greatly to advance our understanding of the neurobiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This review focuses on the use of PET tracers in identifying regional brain abnormalities and regions associated with cognitive functioning in schizophrenia. (authors)

  13. Quantitative PET of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using {sup 64}Cu-labeled cetuximab, a chimeric anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; He, Lina; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Koong, Albert [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the surface of cancer cells, was approved by the FDA to treat patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. It is currently also in advanced-stage development for the treatment of several other solid tumors. Here we report for the first time the quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of EGFR expression in xenograft-bearing mice using {sup 64}Cu-labeled cetuximab. We conjugated cetuximab with macrocyclic chelating agent 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), labeled with {sup 64}Cu, and tested the resulting {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab in seven xenograft tumor models. The tracer uptake measured by PET was correlated with the EGFR expression quantified by western blotting. The estimated human dosimetry based on the PET data in Sprague-Dawley rats was also calculated. MicroPET imaging showed that {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab had increasing tumor activity accumulation over time in EGFR-positive tumors but relatively low uptake in EGFR-negative tumors at all times examined (<5%ID/g). There was a good correlation (R {sup 2} = 0.80) between the tracer uptake (measured by PET) and the EGFR expression level (measured by western blotting). Human dosimetry estimation indicated that the tracer may be safely administered to human patients for tumor diagnosis, with the dose-limiting organ being the liver. The success of EGFR-positive tumor imaging using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab can be translated into the clinic to characterize the pharmacokinetics, to select the right population of patients for EGFR-targeted therapy, to monitor the therapeutic efficacy of anti-EGFR treatment, and to optimize the dosage of either cetuximab alone or cetuximab in combination with other therapeutic agents. (orig.)

  14. Validating PET segmentation of thoracic lesions-is 4D PET necessary?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. S.; Carl, J.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory-induced motions are prone to degrade the positron emission tomography (PET) signal with the consequent loss of image information and unreliable segmentations. This phantom study aims to assess the discrepancies relative to stationary PET segmentations, of widely used semiautomatic PET...... segmentation methods on heterogeneous target lesions influenced by motion during image acquisition. Three target lesions included dual F-18 Fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) tracer concentrations as high-and low tracer activities relative to the background. Four different tracer concentration arrangements were...... segmented using three SUV threshold methods (Max40%, SUV40% and 2.5SUV) and a gradient based method (GradientSeg). Segmentations in static 3D-PET scans (PETsta) specified the reference conditions for the individual segmentation methods, target lesions and tracer concentrations. The motion included PET...

  15. Impact of PET/CT image reconstruction methods and liver uptake normalization strategies on quantitative image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnert, Georg; Sterzer, Sergej; Kahraman, Deniz; Dietlein, Markus; Drzezga, Alexander; Kobe, Carsten [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Boellaard, Ronald [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Scheffler, Matthias; Wolf, Juergen [University Hospital of Cologne, Lung Cancer Group Cologne, Department I of Internal Medicine, Center for Integrated Oncology Cologne Bonn, Cologne (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    In oncological imaging using PET/CT, the standardized uptake value has become the most common parameter used to measure tracer accumulation. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate ultra high definition (UHD) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) PET/CT reconstructions for their potential impact on quantification. We analyzed 40 PET/CT scans of lung cancer patients who had undergone PET/CT. Standardized uptake values corrected for body weight (SUV) and lean body mass (SUL) were determined in the single hottest lesion in the lung and normalized to the liver for UHD and OSEM reconstruction. Quantitative uptake values and their normalized ratios for the two reconstruction settings were compared using the Wilcoxon test. The distribution of quantitative uptake values and their ratios in relation to the reconstruction method used were demonstrated in the form of frequency distribution curves, box-plots and scatter plots. The agreement between OSEM and UHD reconstructions was assessed through Bland-Altman analysis. A significant difference was observed after OSEM and UHD reconstruction for SUV and SUL data tested (p < 0.0005 in all cases). The mean values of the ratios after OSEM and UHD reconstruction showed equally significant differences (p < 0.0005 in all cases). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the SUV and SUL and their normalized values were, on average, up to 60 % higher after UHD reconstruction as compared to OSEM reconstruction. OSEM and HD reconstruction brought a significant difference for SUV and SUL, which remained constantly high after normalization to the liver, indicating that standardization of reconstruction and the use of comparable SUV measurements are crucial when using PET/CT. (orig.)

  16. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  17. Issues in quantification of registered respiratory gated PET/CT in the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuplov, Vesna; Holman, Beverley F.; McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Hutton, Brian F.; Thielemans, Kris

    2018-01-01

    PET/CT quantification of lung tissue is limited by several difficulties: the lung density and local volume changes during respiration, the anatomical mismatch between PET and CT and the relative contributions of tissue, air and blood to the PET signal (the tissue fraction effect). Air fraction correction (AFC) has been shown to improve PET image quantification in the lungs. Methods to correct for the movement and anatomical mismatch involve respiratory gating and image registration techniques. While conventional registration methods only account for spatial mismatch, the Jacobian determinant of the deformable registration transformation field can be used to estimate local volume changes and could therefore potentially be used to correct (i.e. Jacobian Correction, JC) the PET signal for changes in concentration due to local volume changes. This work aims to investigate the relationship between variations in the lung due to respiration, specifically density, tracer concentration and local volume changes. In particular, we study the effect of AFC and JC on PET quantitation after registration of respiratory gated PET/CT patient data. Six patients suffering from lung cancer with solitary pulmonary nodules underwent 18 F-FDG PET/cine-CT. The PET data were gated into six respiratory gates using displacement gating based on a real-time position management (RPM) signal and reconstructed with matched gated CT. The PET tracer concentration and tissue density were extracted from registered gated PET and CT images before and after corrections (AFC or JC) and compared to the values from the reference images. Before correction, we observed a linear correlation between the PET tracer concentration values and density. Across all gates and patients, the maximum relative change in PET tracer concentration before (after) AFC was found to be 16.2% (4.1%) and the maximum relative change in tissue density and PET tracer concentration before (after) JC was found to be 17.1% (5.5%) and 16

  18. Quantitation of regional cerebral blood flow corrected for partial volume effect using O-15 water and PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    IIda, H.; Law, I.; Pakkenberg, B.

    2000-01-01

    Limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) can cause significant underestimation in the observed regional radioactivity concentration (so-called partial volume effect or PVE) resulting in systematic errors in estimating quantitative physiologic parameters. The authors have...... formulated four mathematical models that describe the dynamic behavior of a freely diffusible tracer (H215O) in a region of interest (ROI) incorporating estimates of regional tissue flow that are independent of PVE. The current study was intended to evaluate the feasibility of these models and to establish...... a methodology to accurately quantify regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) corrected for PVE in cortical gray matter regions. Five monkeys were studied with PET after IV H2(15)O two times (n = 3) or three times (n = 2) in a row. Two ROIs were drawn on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and projected...

  19. Comparison of conventional and novel PET tracers for imaging mesothelioma in nude mice with subcutaneous and intrapleural xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Sogawa, Chizuru; Sugyo, Aya [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Sudo, Hitomi [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Toyohara, Jun [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, 206-8670 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Abe, Masaaki; Hino, Okio [Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Harada, Yoshi-nobu; Furukawa, Takako [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, Kazutoshi [Molecular Probe Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Saga, Tsuneo [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: saga@nirs.go.jp

    2009-05-15

    Introduction: Malignant mesothelioma is a highly aggressive tumor originating in the pleura, peritoneum and pericardium, and the prognosis of patients undergoing current treatment remains poor. To develop new therapies, it is important to have a noninvasive imaging system for evaluating the efficacy of such prospective treatments. We have established clinically relevant mouse models and evaluated conventional and novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracers. Methods: Epithelioid and sarcomatoid mesothelioma cells were inoculated subcutaneously and intrapleurally into nude mice. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were conducted by injecting [{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), 3'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-3'-doxythymidine (FLT) or 4'-methyl-[{sup 11}C]thiothymidine (S-dThd) into the mouse models. In vitro cellular uptake of [{sup 14}C]FDG and [{sup 3}H]FLT and thymidine kinase 1 (TK{sub 1}) activity in both cell lines were measured. Expression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) and Ki-67 in xenografted tumors was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Results: In epithelioid mesothelioma models, biodistribution experiments showed that tumor uptake of [{sup 11}C]S-dThd was significantly higher than that of [{sup 18}F]FDG. On the other hand, in sarcomatoid models, [{sup 18}F]FDG showed significantly higher accumulation than the other two tracers. These differential uptakes of the three tracers were confirmed by PET imaging. The cellular uptake of [{sup 14}C]FDG and [{sup 3}H]FLT and TK{sub 1} activity in sarcomatoid cells were higher than those of epithelioid cells. GLUT-1 protein was strongly expressed in sarcomatoid but not in epithelioid tumor. We observed a high percentage of Ki-67-positive cells in both epithelioid and sarcomatoid tumors. Conclusions: We established nude mouse models of epithelioid and sarcomatoid subtypes of mesothelioma. PET tracers applicable for the evaluation of epithelioid and sarcomatoid mesothelioma would vary

  20. Quantitation of cardiac sympathetic innervation in rabbits using 11C-hydroxyephedrine PET: relation to 123I-MIBG uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Kajinami, Kouji; Matsunari, Ichiro; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Yoshihiro; Matsuya, Takahiro; Chen, Wei-Ping; Taki, Junichi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nekolla, Stephan G.

    2006-01-01

    Although 11 C-hydroxyephedrine ( 11 C-HED) PET is used to map cardiac sympathetic innervation, no studies have shown the feasibility of quantitation of 11 C-HED PET in small- to medium-sized animals. Furthermore, its relation to 123 I-MIBG uptake, the most widely used sympathetic nervous tracer, is unknown. The aims of this study were to establish in vivo sympathetic nerve imaging in rabbits using 11 C-HED PET, and to compare the retention of 11 C-HED with that of 123 I-MIBG. Twelve rabbits were assigned to three groups; control (n=4), chemical denervation by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (n=4) and reserpine treated to inhibit vesicular uptake (n=4). After simultaneous injection of 11 C-HED and 123 I-MIBG, all animals underwent dynamic 11 C-HED PET for 40 min with arterial blood sampling. The 11 C-HED retention fraction and normalised 11 C-HED activity measured by tissue sampling were compared with those measured by PET. Both the 11 C-HED retention fraction and the normalised 11 C-HED activity measured by PET correlated closely with those measured by tissue sampling (R=0.96027, p 11 C-HED and 123 I-MIBG. Reserpine pretreatment reduced 11 C-HED retention by 50%, but did not reduce 123 I-MIBG retention at 40 min after injection. Non-invasive quantitation of cardiac sympathetic innervation using 11 C-HED PET is feasible and gives reliable estimates of cardiac sympathetic innervation in rabbits. Additionally, although both 11 C-HED and 123 I-MIBG are specific for sympathetic neurons, 11 C-HED may be more specific for intravesicular uptake than 123 I-MIBG in some situations, such as that seen in reserpine pretreatment. (orig.)

  1. Generalized PSF modeling for optimized quantitation in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Mohy-Ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Jha, Abhinav K; Casey, Michael E; Kadrmas, Dan J; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-21

    Point-spread function (PSF) modeling offers the ability to account for resolution degrading phenomena within the PET image generation framework. PSF modeling improves resolution and enhances contrast, but at the same time significantly alters image noise properties and induces edge overshoot effect. Thus, studying the effect of PSF modeling on quantitation task performance can be very important. Frameworks explored in the past involved a dichotomy of PSF versus no-PSF modeling. By contrast, the present work focuses on quantitative performance evaluation of standard uptake value (SUV) PET images, while incorporating a wide spectrum of PSF models, including those that under- and over-estimate the true PSF, for the potential of enhanced quantitation of SUVs. The developed framework first analytically models the true PSF, considering a range of resolution degradation phenomena (including photon non-collinearity, inter-crystal penetration and scattering) as present in data acquisitions with modern commercial PET systems. In the context of oncologic liver FDG PET imaging, we generated 200 noisy datasets per image-set (with clinically realistic noise levels) using an XCAT anthropomorphic phantom with liver tumours of varying sizes. These were subsequently reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with varying PSF modelled kernels. We focused on quantitation of both SUV mean and SUV max , including assessment of contrast recovery coefficients, as well as noise-bias characteristics (including both image roughness and coefficient of-variability), for different tumours/iterations/PSF kernels. It was observed that overestimated PSF yielded more accurate contrast recovery for a range of tumours, and typically improved quantitative performance. For a clinically reasonable number of iterations, edge enhancement due to PSF modeling (especially due to over-estimated PSF) was in fact seen to lower SUV mean bias in small tumours. Overall, the results indicate that exactly matched PSF

  2. Complementary roles of tumour specific PET tracer {sup 18}F-FAMT to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the assessment of bone metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Motoho [Gunma University Hospital, Department of General Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tokue, Azusa; Arisaka, Yukiko; Tsushima, Yoshito [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Achmad, Arifudin [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gadjah Mada University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2013-10-15

    The usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for bone metastasis evaluation has already been established. The amino acid PET tracer [{sup 18}F]-3-fluoro-alpha-methyl tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FAMT) has been reported to be highly specific for malignancy. We evaluated the additional value of {sup 18}F-FAMT PET/CT to complement {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastasis. This retrospective study included 21 patients with bone metastases of various cancers who had undergone both {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-FAMT PET/CT within 1 month of each other. {sup 18}F-FDG-avid bone lesions suspicious for malignancy were carefully selected based on the cut-off value for malignancy, and the SUVmax of the {sup 18}F-FAMT in the corresponding lesions were evaluated. A total of 72 {sup 18}F-FDG-positive bone lesions suspected to be metastases in the 21 patients were used as the reference standard. {sup 18}F-FAMT uptake was found in 87.5 % of the lesions. In the lesions of lung cancer origin, the uptake of the two tracers showed a good correlation (40 lesions, r = 0.68, P < 0.01). Bone metastatic lesions of oesophageal cancer showed the highest average of {sup 18}F-FAMT uptake. Bone metastatic lesions of squamous cell carcinoma showed higher {sup 18}F-FAMT uptake than those of adenocarcinoma. No significant difference in {sup 18}F-FAMT uptake was seen between osteoblastic and osteolytic bone metastatic lesions. The usefulness of {sup 18}F-FAMT PET/CT for bone metastasis detection regardless of the lesion phenotype was demonstrated. The fact that {sup 18}F-FAMT uptake was confirmed by {sup 18}F-FDG uptake suggests that {sup 18}F-FAMT PET/CT has the potential to complement {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of bone metastases. (orig.)

  3. The role of PET quantification in cardiovascular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Piotr; Berman, Daniel S; Alexanderson, Erick; Germano, Guido

    2014-08-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has several clinical and research applications in cardiovascular imaging. Myocardial perfusion imaging with PET allows accurate global and regional measurements of myocardial perfusion, myocardial blood flow and function at stress and rest in one exam. Simultaneous assessment of function and perfusion by PET with quantitative software is currently the routine practice. Combination of ejection fraction reserve with perfusion information may improve the identification of severe disease. The myocardial viability can be estimated by quantitative comparison of fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 FDG) and rest perfusion imaging. The myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve measurements are becoming routinely included in the clinical assessment due to enhanced dynamic imaging capabilities of the latest PET/CT scanners. Absolute flow measurements allow evaluation of the coronary microvascular dysfunction and provide additional prognostic and diagnostic information for coronary disease. Standard quantitative approaches to compute myocardial blood flow from kinetic PET data in automated and rapid fashion have been developed for 13 N-ammonia, 15 O-water and 82 Rb radiotracers. The agreement between software methods available for such analysis is excellent. Relative quantification of 82 Rb PET myocardial perfusion, based on comparisons to normal databases, demonstrates high performance for the detection of obstructive coronary disease. New tracers, such as 18 F-flurpiridaz may allow further improvements in the disease detection. Computerized analysis of perfusion at stress and rest reduces the variability of the assessment as compared to visual analysis. PET quantification can be enhanced by precise coregistration with CT angiography. In emerging clinical applications, the potential to identify vulnerable plaques by quantification of atherosclerotic plaque uptake of 18 FDG and 18 F-sodium fluoride tracers in carotids, aorta and coronary arteries

  4. Assessment of quantitative FDG PET data in primary colorectal tumours: which parameters are important with respect to tumour detection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Ludwig G.; Pan, Leyun; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Klippel, Sven; Schoenleben, Klaus; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    The impact of quantitative parameters on the differentiation of primary colorectal tumours from normal colon tissue was assessed. Dynamic PET data (DPET) were acquired, and compartment and non-compartment modelling applied. The discriminant power of single parameters and the combination of PET parameters was assessed. All lesions were confirmed by histology. FDG DPET studies were acquired in 22 patients with colorectal tumours prior to surgery. Five of these patients also had liver metastases at the time of the PET study. The SUV 56-60 min p.i. was included in the evaluation. A two-tissue compartment model was applied and the parameters k 1 -k 4 as well as the fractional blood volume (V B ) were obtained. The FDG influx was calculated from the compartment data. Non-compartment modelling was used to calculate the fractal dimension (FD) of the time-activity data. FD, SUV, influx and k 3 were the most important single parameters for lesion differentiation. The highest accuracy was achieved for FD (88.78%). The overall tracer uptake was mainly dependent on k 3 and not on k 1 or V B . The support vector machines (SVM) algorithm was used to predict the classification based on the combination of individual PET parameters. The overall accuracy was 97.3%, with only one false positive case and no false negative results. The analysis of the subgroup of five patients with primary tumours and synchronous metastases revealed no significant differences for the individual PET parameters. However, V B tended to be lower while k 1 and k 2 were higher in patients with synchronous metastases. The SVM classification analysis predicted the presence of metastases based on the PET data of the primary tumour in three of five patients. Quantitative FDG PET studies provide very accurate data for the differentiation of primary colorectal tumours from normal tissue. The use of quantitative data has the advantage that the detection of a colorectal tumour is not primarily dependent on the

  5. Development of a Widely Usable Amino Acid Tracer: ⁷⁶Br-α-Methyl-Phenylalanine for Tumor PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Yurika; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Watanabe, Shigeki; Uehara, Tomoya; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Ishioka, Noriko S; Tsushima, Yoshito; Endo, Keigo; Arano, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Radiolabeled amino acids are superior PET tracers for the imaging of malignant tumors, and amino acids labeled with (76)Br, an attractive positron emitter because of its relatively long half-life (16.2 h), could potentially be a widely usable tumor imaging tracer. In this study, in consideration of its stability and tumor specificity, we designed two (76)Br-labeled amino acid derivatives, 2-(76)Br-bromo-α-methyl-l-phenylalanine (2-(76)Br-BAMP) and 4-(76)Br-bromo-α-methyl-l-phenylalanine (4-(76)Br-BAMP), and investigated their potential as tumor imaging agents. Both (76)Br- and (77)Br-labeled amino acid derivatives were prepared. We performed in vitro and in vivo stability studies and cellular uptake studies using the LS180 colon adenocarcinoma cell line. Biodistribution studies in normal mice and in LS180 tumor-bearing mice were performed, and the tumors were imaged with a small-animal PET scanner. Both (77)Br-BAMPs were stable in the plasma and in the murine body. Although both (77)Br-BAMPs were taken up by LS180 cells and the uptake was inhibited by L-type amino acid transporter 1 inhibitors, 2-(77)Br-BAMP exhibited higher uptake than 4-(77)Br-BAMP. In the biodistribution studies, 2-(77)Br-BAMP showed more rapid blood clearance and lower renal accumulation than 4-(77)Br-BAMP. More than 90% of the injected radioactivity was excreted in the urine by 6 h after the injection of 2-(77)Br-BAMP. High tumor accumulation of 2-(77)Br-BAMP was observed in tumor-bearing mice, and PET imaging with 2-(76)Br-BAMP enabled clear visualization of the tumors. 2-(77)Br-BAMP exhibited preferred pharmacokinetics and high LS180 tumor accumulation, and 2-(76)Br-BAMP enabled clear visualization of the tumors by PET imaging. These findings suggest that 2-(76)Br-BAMP could constitute a potential new PET tracer for tumor imaging and may eventually enable the wider use of amino acid tracers. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  6. A multi-centre evaluation of eleven clinically feasible brain PET/MRI attenuation correction techniques using a large cohort of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes Nøhr; Law, Ian; Anazodo, Udunna

    2017-01-01

    in the robustness, outlier analysis, and clinical feasibility. Overall, the best performing methods were MR-ACBOSTON, MR-ACMAXPROB, MR-ACRESOLUTE and MR-ACUCL, ordered alphabetically. These methods all minimized the number of outliers, standard deviation, and average global and local error. The methods MR...... globally and regionally, with a special focus on robustness and outlier analysis.  Results: The average performance in PET tracer uptake was within ±5% of CT for all of the proposed methods, with the average±SD global percentage bias in PET FDG uptake for each method being: MR-ACDIXON (−11.3±3.5)%, MR......-ACMUNICH and MR-ACCAR-RiDR were both within acceptable quantitative limits, so these methods should be considered if processing time is a factor. The method MR-ACSEGBONE also demonstrates promising results, and performs well within the likely acceptable quantitative limits. For clinical routine scans where...

  7. Dual Tracer PET Imaging with FDG and FLT Differentiates Tuberculous Lymphadenopathy from Metastases in a Case of Carcinoma Cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram; Aland, Parag; Gemawat, Shilpa [Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre, Woril (India)

    2013-09-15

    A forty-year-old woman with a known case of carcinoma cervix underwent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography.computed tomography (18-FDG PET/CT) for evaluation of abdominal lymphadenopathy. Her treatment history included radical hysterectomy and radiotherapy 6 months ago. She complained of weight loss of 7 kg over last 5 months. The maximum intensity projection (MIP) image (Fig. 1a, arrows) revealed multiple areas of intense FDG uptake, which on CT and fused PET/CT images were localized to multiple lymph nodes in bilateral cervical region, right axilla, mediastinum and abdomen. The SUVmax of right axillary lymph nodes (most FDG avid of all lymph node groups) was 15.3. There was no evidence of metabolically active disease or CT demonstrable abnormality in rest of the body. Presence of metabolically active disease in extensive supradiaphramatic lymphadenopathy was unusual for a case of carcinoma cervix. This finding, along with history of significant weight loss and absence of extranodal disease, was suspicious for unrelated pathology like lymphoproliferative disorder or granulomatous disease. Mixed malignant and benign lymphadenopathy was also considered a possibility. To solve the conundrum, 18-fluoro-L-thymidine (FLT) PET/CT was performed on the next day. This scan was performed to assess the proliferation rate in various above-mentioned lymph nodes, and to plan the optimum site of biopsy. The FLT PET scan (Fig. 1b) showed physiological distribution of the tracer in bone marrow, liver, gall bladder and urinary bladder. There was minimal FLT uptake in the enlarged, FDG avid lymph nodes (Fig. 1c and d). SUVmax of FLT uptake in right axillary lymph nodes was 1.4 (SUVmax of FDG uptake = 15.8). The SUVmax of FLT uptake in cervical, mediastinal and abdominal lymph nodes were 1.3, 1.4 and 1.0 respectively. (SUVmax of FDG uptake 12.1, 12.7 and 11.9, respectively). Considering avidity for FDG and non-avidity of proliferation marker tracer (FLT), possibility of

  8. Correlation of Dynamic PET and Gene Array Data in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig G. Strauss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The results obtained with dynamic PET (dPET were compared to gene expression data obtained in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST. The primary aim was to assess the association of the dPET results and gene expression data. Material and Methods. dPET was performed following the injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG in 22 patients with GIST. All patients were examined prior to surgery for staging purpose. Compartment and noncompartment models were used for the quantitative evaluation of the dPET examinations. Gene array data were based on tumor specimen obtained by surgery after the PET examinations. Results. The data analysis revealed significant correlations for the dPET parameters and the expression of zinc finger genes (znf43, znf85, znf91, znf189. Furthermore, the transport of FDG (k1 was associated with VEGF-A. The cell cycle gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C was correlated with the maximum tracer uptake (SUVmax in the tumors. Conclusions. The data demonstrate a dependency of the tracer kinetics on genes associated with prognosis in GIST. Furthermore, angiogenesis and cell proliferation have an impact on the tracer uptake.

  9. PET and SPET tracers for mapping the cardiac nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Oliver; Halldin, Christer

    2002-01-01

    The human cardiac nervous system consists of a sympathetic and a parasympathetic branch with (-)-norepinephrine and acetylcholine as the respective endogenous neurotransmitters. Dysfunction of the cardiac nervous system is implicated in various types of cardiac disease, such as heart failure, myocardial infarction and diabetic autonomic neuropathy. In vivo assessment of the distribution and function of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic neurones with positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) can be achieved by means of a number of carbon-11-, fluorine-18-, bromine-76- and iodine-123-labelled tracer molecules. Available tracers for mapping sympathetic neurones can be divided into radiolabelled catecholamines, such as 6-[ 18 F]fluorodopamine, (-)-6-[ 18 F]fluoronorepinephrine and (-)-[ 11 C]epinephrine, and radiolabelled catecholamine analogues, such as [ 123 I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine, [ 11 C]meta-hydroxyephedrine, [ 18 F]fluorometaraminol, [ 11 C]phenylephrine and meta-[ 76 Br]bromobenzylguanidine. Resistance to metabolism by monoamine oxidase and catechol-O-methyl transferase simplifies the myocardial kinetics of the second group. Both groups of compounds are excellent agents for an overall assessment of sympathetic innervation. Biomathematical modelling of tracer kinetics is complicated by the complexity of the steps governing neuronal uptake, retention and release of these agents as well as by their high neuronal affinity, which leads to partial flow dependence of uptake. Mapping of cardiac parasympathetic neurones is limited by a low density and focal distribution pattern of these neurones in myocardium. Available tracers are derivatives of vesamicol, a molecule that binds to a receptor associated with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter. Compounds like (-)-[ 18 F]fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol display a high degree of non-specific binding in myocardium which restricts their utility for cardiac neuronal imaging. (orig.)

  10. MR-based attenuation correction for cardiac FDG PET on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner: comparison with standard CT attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vontobel, Jan; Liga, Riccardo; Possner, Mathias; Clerc, Olivier F.; Mikulicic, Fran; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Stehli, Julia; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Benz, Dominik C.; Graeni, Christoph; Gaemperli, Oliver; Herzog, Bernhard; Buechel, Ronny R.; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of attenuation correction (AC) for cardiac {sup 18}F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) using MR-based attenuation maps. We included 23 patients with no known cardiac history undergoing whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological indications on a PET/CT scanner using time-of-flight (TOF) and subsequent whole-body PET/MR imaging on an investigational hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Data sets from PET/MRI (with and without TOF) were reconstructed using MR AC and semi-quantitative segmental (20-segment model) myocardial tracer uptake (per cent of maximum) and compared to PET/CT which was reconstructed using CT AC and served as standard of reference. Excellent correlations were found for regional uptake values between PET/CT and PET/MRI with TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.913; p < 0.0001) with narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-8.5 to +12.6 %). Correlation coefficients were slightly lower between PET/CT and PET/MRI without TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.851; p < 0.0001) with broader Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-12.5 to +15.0 %). PET/MRI with and without TOF showed minimal underestimation of tracer uptake (-2.08 and -1.29 %, respectively), compared to PET/CT. Relative myocardial FDG uptake obtained from MR-based attenuation corrected FDG PET is highly comparable to standard CT-based attenuation corrected FDG PET, suggesting interchangeability of both AC techniques. (orig.)

  11. PET image reconstruction using multi-parametric anato-functional priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Belzunce, Martin A.; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios; Prieto, Claudia; Turkheimer, Federico; Hammers, Alexander; Reader, Andrew J.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the application of multi-parametric anato-functional (MR-PET) priors for the maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction of brain PET data in order to address the limitations of the conventional anatomical priors in the presence of PET-MR mismatches. In addition to partial volume correction benefits, the suitability of these priors for reconstruction of low-count PET data is also introduced and demonstrated, comparing to standard maximum-likelihood (ML) reconstruction of high-count data. The conventional local Tikhonov and total variation (TV) priors and current state-of-the-art anatomical priors including the Kaipio, non-local Tikhonov prior with Bowsher and Gaussian similarity kernels are investigated and presented in a unified framework. The Gaussian kernels are calculated using both voxel- and patch-based feature vectors. To cope with PET and MR mismatches, the Bowsher and Gaussian priors are extended to multi-parametric priors. In addition, we propose a modified joint Burg entropy prior that by definition exploits all parametric information in the MAP reconstruction of PET data. The performance of the priors was extensively evaluated using 3D simulations and two clinical brain datasets of [18F]florbetaben and [18F]FDG radiotracers. For simulations, several anato-functional mismatches were intentionally introduced between the PET and MR images, and furthermore, for the FDG clinical dataset, two PET-unique active tumours were embedded in the PET data. Our simulation results showed that the joint Burg entropy prior far outperformed the conventional anatomical priors in terms of preserving PET unique lesions, while still reconstructing functional boundaries with corresponding MR boundaries. In addition, the multi-parametric extension of the Gaussian and Bowsher priors led to enhanced preservation of edge and PET unique features and also an improved bias-variance performance. In agreement with the simulation results, the clinical results

  12. Development and automation of a novel NET-PET tracer: [11C]Me@APPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Christina; Bornatowicz, Birgit; Mitterhauser, Markus; Hendl, Matthias; Nics, Lukas; Haeusler, Daniela; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Berger, Michael L; Spreitzer, Helmut; Wadsak, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) is an important target for research in neurology and psychology and is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and attention deficient hyperactivity disorder. For visualization of NET abundance and deregulation, a novel PET tracer--[(11)C]Me@APPI--has been developed. For precursor synthesis, a 4-step synthesis starting from N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine was set up. Radiosynthesis was established and optimized using standard methods and subsequently automated in a GE TRACERlabFx C Pro synthesizer. Preclinical testing was performed comprising affinity and selectivity testing on human membranes as well as stability and blood-brain-barrier-penetration using in-vitro models. Precursor molecule (APPI:0) and reference compound (Me@APPI) were synthesized with 26.5% and 21.4% overall yield, respectively. So far, 1.25±0.72 GBq [(11)C]Me@APPI with 54.35±7.80 GBq/μmol specific activity were produced (n=11). Affinity of reference compounds was determined as 8.08±1.75 nM for Me@APPI and 19.31±2.91 nM for APPI:0, respectively (n≥9). IAM-chromatography experiments (n=3) revealed a P(m) value of 1.51±0.34 for Me@APPI. Stability testing using human liver microsomes revealed that 99.5% of the tracer was found to be still intact after 60 minutes (n=4). Present data indicate that [(11)C]Me@APPI has promising properties to become a clinically useful NET-PET-tracer. Further in-vitro and in-vivo evaluations are currently under way. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and automation of a novel NET-PET tracer: [11C]Me@APPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, Christina; Bornatowicz, Birgit; Mitterhauser, Markus; Hendl, Matthias; Nics, Lukas; Haeusler, Daniela; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Berger, Michael L.; Spreitzer, Helmut; Wadsak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The norepinephrine transporter (NET) is an important target for research in neurology and psychology and is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and attention deficient hyperactivity disorder. For visualization of NET abundance and deregulation, a novel PET tracer – [ 11 C]Me@APPI – has been developed. Methods: For precursor synthesis, a 4-step synthesis starting from N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine was set up. Radiosynthesis was established and optimized using standard methods and subsequently automated in a GE TRACERlabFx C Pro synthesizer. Preclinical testing was performed comprising affinity and selectivity testing on human membranes as well as stability and blood–brain-barrier-penetration using in-vitro models. Results: Precursor molecule (APPI:0) and reference compound (Me@APPI) were synthesized with 26.5% and 21.4% overall yield, respectively. So far, 1.25 ± 0.72 GBq [ 11 C]Me@APPI with 54.35 ± 7.80 GBq/μmol specific activity were produced (n = 11). Affinity of reference compounds was determined as 8.08 ± 1.75 nM for Me@APPI and 19.31 ± 2.91 nM for APPI:0, respectively (n ≥ 9). IAM-chromatography experiments (n = 3) revealed a P m value of 1.51 ± 0.34 for Me@APPI. Stability testing using human liver microsomes revealed that 99.5% of the tracer was found to be still intact after 60 minutes (n = 4). Conclusion: Present data indicate that [ 11 C]Me@APPI has promising properties to become a clinically useful NET-PET-tracer. Further in-vitro and in-vivo evaluations are currently under way

  14. FDG-PET in the clinical management of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Eigtved, Annika I; Specht, Lena

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a molecular functional imaging technique that provides qualitative and quantitative information about the localization and activity of pathophysiological processes. The most commonly used tracer for oncological purposes is 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG......). FDG-PET has within recent years become the most important nuclear medicine imaging modality in the management of lymphoma. This review summarizes the data published so far concerning the value of FDG-PET in staging, treatment monitoring, therapy planning, and follow-up of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). FDG...

  15. Reproducibility of Quantitative Brain Imaging Using a PET-Only and a Combined PET/MR System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin L; Muzik, Otto; Beyer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of migrating a quantitative brain imaging protocol from a positron emission tomography (PET)-only system to an integrated PET/MR system. Potential differences in both absolute radiotracer concentration as well as in the derived kinetic paramet...

  16. Quantitation of the critically ischemic zone at risk during acute coronary occlusion using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merhige, M.; Garza, D.; Sease, D.; Rowe, R.W.; Tewson, T.; Emran, A.; Bolomey, L.; Gould, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Critical myocardial ischemia has been defined experimentally during acute coronary occlusion as flow reduction of 50% or more since cellular ATP depletion begins to occur beyond this flow reduction threshold, placing tissue at risk of cellular injury. To test the hypothesis that critically ischemic fractional left ventricular mass can be measured noninvasively with PET, nine dogs were imaged in a multi-slice positron camera using the perfusion tracer 13N-ammonia, while radiolabeled microspheres were injected into the left atrium during acute coronary occlusion. Images were processed using a 50% threshold and the size of the resulting perfusion defect was expressed as a fraction of total left ventricular image volume. The critically ischemic left ventricular fraction determined in vitro from the microsphere perfusion data, ranged from 5% to 30% of the total left ventricular weight and correlated closely with that determined noninvasively by PET with r = 0.94 (y = 1.05X - 2.0%). The authors conclude that the fraction of left ventricular myocardium rendered critically ischemic during acute coronary occlusion can be measured accurately and noninvasively in vivo using perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography

  17. Dosimetry of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105, a PET tracer for uPAR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Morten; El Ali, Henrik H.; Binderup, Tina; Pfeifer, Andreas; Madsen, Jacob; Rasmussen, Palle; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    64 Cu-DOTA-AE105 is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer specific to the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). In preparation of using this tracer in humans, as a new promising method to distinguish between indolent and aggressive cancers, we have performed PET studies in mice to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution and estimate human dosimetry of 64 Cu-DOTA-AE105. Methods: Five mice received iv tail injection of 64 Cu-DOTA-AE105 and were PET/CT scanned 1, 4.5 and 22 h post injection. Volume-of-interest (VOI) were manually drawn on the following organs: heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, intestine, muscle, bone and bladder. The activity concentrations in the mentioned organs [%ID/g] were used for the dosimetry calculation. The %ID/g of each organ at 1, 4.5 and 22 h was scaled to human value based on a difference between organ and body weights. The scaled values were then exported to OLINDA software for computation of the human absorbed doses. The residence times as well as effective dose equivalent for male and female could be obtained for each organ. To validate this approach, of human projection using mouse data, five mice received iv tail injection of another 64 Cu-DOTA peptide-based tracer, 64 Cu-DOTA-TATE, and underwent same procedure as just described. The human dosimetry estimates were then compared with observed human dosimetry estimate recently found in a first-in-man study using 64 Cu-DOTA-TATE. Results: Human estimates of 64 Cu-DOTA-AE105 revealed the heart wall to receive the highest dose (0.0918 mSv/MBq) followed by the liver (0.0815 mSv/MBq), All other organs/tissue were estimated to receive doses in the range of 0.02–0.04 mSv/MBq. The mean effective whole-body dose of 64 Cu-DOTA-AE105 was estimated to be 0.0317 mSv/MBq. Relatively good correlation between human predicted and observed dosimetry estimates for 64 Cu-DOTA-TATE was found. Importantly, the effective whole body dose was predicted with very high

  18. Dosimetry of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105, a PET tracer for uPAR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Morten; El Ali, Henrik H; Binderup, Tina; Pfeifer, Andreas; Madsen, Jacob; Rasmussen, Palle; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 is a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer specific to the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). In preparation of using this tracer in humans, as a new promising method to distinguish between indolent and aggressive cancers, we have performed PET studies in mice to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution and estimate human dosimetry of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105. Five mice received iv tail injection of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 and were PET/CT scanned 1, 4.5 and 22 h post injection. Volume-of-interest (VOI) were manually drawn on the following organs: heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, intestine, muscle, bone and bladder. The activity concentrations in the mentioned organs [%ID/g] were used for the dosimetry calculation. The %ID/g of each organ at 1, 4.5 and 22 h was scaled to human value based on a difference between organ and body weights. The scaled values were then exported to OLINDA software for computation of the human absorbed doses. The residence times as well as effective dose equivalent for male and female could be obtained for each organ. To validate this approach, of human projection using mouse data, five mice received iv tail injection of another (64)Cu-DOTA peptide-based tracer, (64)Cu-DOTA-TATE, and underwent same procedure as just described. The human dosimetry estimates were then compared with observed human dosimetry estimate recently found in a first-in-man study using (64)Cu-DOTA-TATE. Human estimates of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 revealed the heart wall to receive the highest dose (0.0918 mSv/MBq) followed by the liver (0.0815 mSv/MBq), All other organs/tissue were estimated to receive doses in the range of 0.02-0.04 mSv/MBq. The mean effective whole-body dose of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 was estimated to be 0.0317 mSv/MBq. Relatively good correlation between human predicted and observed dosimetry estimates for (64)Cu-DOTA-TATE was found. Importantly, the effective whole body dose was predicted with very high precision

  19. Evaluation of [{sup 11}C]rofecoxib as PET tracer for cyclooxygenase 2 overexpression in rat models of inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Erik F.J. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: e.f.j.de.vries@ngmb.umcg.nl; Doorduin, Janine; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Waarde, Aren van [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-01-15

    Background: Overexpression of cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) is triggered by inflammatory stimuli, but it also plays a prominent role in the initiation and progression of various diseases. This study aims to investigate [{sup 11}C]rofecoxib as a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for COX-2 expression. Methods: [{sup 11}C]Rofecoxib was prepared by methylation of its sulphinate precursor. Regional brain distribution and specific binding of [{sup 11}C]rofecoxib in healthy rats was studied by ex vivo biodistribution and autoradiography. Regional brain distribution and PET imaging studies were also performed on rats with severe encephalitis, caused by nasal infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Finally, ex vivo biodistribution and blocking studies were carried in rats with a sterile inflammation, induced by intramuscular turpentine injection. Results: [{sup 11}C]rofecoxib brain uptake in control animals corresponded with the known distribution of COX-2. Pretreatment with NS398 significantly reduced tracer uptake in the cingulate/frontopolar cortex, whereas the reduction in hippocampus approached significance. Ex vivo autoradiography also revealed preferential tracer uptake in hippocampus and cortical areas that could be blocked by NS398. In HSV-infected animals, [{sup 11}C]rofecoxib uptake was moderately increased in all brain regions, but it could not be blocked with indomethacin. Yet, some PET images revealed increased tracer uptake in brain areas with microglia activation. In turpentine-injected animals, [{sup 11}C]rofecoxib uptake in inflamed muscle was not higher than in control muscle and could not be blocked with NS398. Indomethacin caused a slight reduction in muscle uptake. Conclusions: Despite the apparent correlation between [{sup 11}C]rofecoxib uptake and COX-2 distribution in healthy rats, [{sup 11}C]rofecoxib could not unambiguously detect COX-2 overexpression in two rat models of inflammation.

  20. Quantitative myocardial blood flow imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kero, Tanja; Nordström, Jonny; Harms, Hendrik J; Sörensen, Jens; Ahlström, Håkan; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The use of integrated PET-MR offers new opportunities for comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function. However, little is known on the quantitative accuracy of cardiac PET imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR. The aim of the present work was to validate the GE Signa PET-MR scanner for quantitative cardiac PET perfusion imaging. Eleven patients (nine male; mean age 59 years; range 46-74 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent 15 O-water PET scans at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia on a GE Discovery ST PET-CT and a GE Signa PET-MR scanner. PET-MR images were reconstructed using settings recommended by the manufacturer, including time-of-flight (TOF). Data were analysed semi-automatically using Cardiac VUer software, resulting in both parametric myocardial blood flow (MBF) images and segment-based MBF values. Correlation and agreement between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based MBF values for all three coronary artery territories were assessed using regression analysis and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to the cardiac PET-MR reconstruction protocol as recommended by the manufacturer, comparisons were made using a PET-CT resolution-matched reconstruction protocol both without and with TOF to assess the effect of time-of-flight and reconstruction parameters on quantitative MBF values. Stress MBF data from one patient was excluded due to movement during the PET-CT scanning. Mean MBF values at rest and stress were (0.92 ± 0.12) and (2.74 ± 1.37) mL/g/min for PET-CT and (0.90 ± 0.23) and (2.65 ± 1.15) mL/g/min for PET-MR (p = 0.33 and p = 0.74). ICC between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based regional MBF was 0.98. Image quality was improved with PET-MR as compared to PET-CT. ICC between PET-MR-based regional MBF with and without TOF and using different filter and reconstruction settings was 1.00. PET-MR-based MBF values correlated well with PET-CT-based MBF values and

  1. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  2. Whole-body direct 4D parametric PET imaging employing nested generalized Patlak expectation-maximization reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Casey, Michael E.; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body (WB) dynamic PET has recently demonstrated its potential in translating the quantitative benefits of parametric imaging to the clinic. Post-reconstruction standard Patlak (sPatlak) WB graphical analysis utilizes multi-bed multi-pass PET acquisition to produce quantitative WB images of the

  3. Anatomy assisted PET image reconstruction incorporating multi-resolution joint entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-01-01

    A promising approach in PET image reconstruction is to incorporate high resolution anatomical information (measured from MR or CT) taking the anato-functional similarity measures such as mutual information or joint entropy (JE) as the prior. These similarity measures only classify voxels based on intensity values, while neglecting structural spatial information. In this work, we developed an anatomy-assisted maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction algorithm wherein the JE measure is supplied by spatial information generated using wavelet multi-resolution analysis. The proposed wavelet-based JE (WJE) MAP algorithm involves calculation of derivatives of the subband JE measures with respect to individual PET image voxel intensities, which we have shown can be computed very similarly to how the inverse wavelet transform is implemented. We performed a simulation study with the BrainWeb phantom creating PET data corresponding to different noise levels. Realistically simulated T1-weighted MR images provided by BrainWeb modeling were applied in the anatomy-assisted reconstruction with the WJE-MAP algorithm and the intensity-only JE-MAP algorithm. Quantitative analysis showed that the WJE-MAP algorithm performed similarly to the JE-MAP algorithm at low noise level in the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) regions in terms of noise versus bias tradeoff. When noise increased to medium level in the simulated data, the WJE-MAP algorithm started to surpass the JE-MAP algorithm in the GM region, which is less uniform with smaller isolated structures compared to the WM region. In the high noise level simulation, the WJE-MAP algorithm presented clear improvement over the JE-MAP algorithm in both the GM and WM regions. In addition to the simulation study, we applied the reconstruction algorithms to real patient studies involving DPA-173 PET data and Florbetapir PET data with corresponding T1-MPRAGE MRI images. Compared to the intensity-only JE-MAP algorithm, the WJE

  4. Anatomy assisted PET image reconstruction incorporating multi-resolution joint entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-01-01

    A promising approach in PET image reconstruction is to incorporate high resolution anatomical information (measured from MR or CT) taking the anato-functional similarity measures such as mutual information or joint entropy (JE) as the prior. These similarity measures only classify voxels based on intensity values, while neglecting structural spatial information. In this work, we developed an anatomy-assisted maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction algorithm wherein the JE measure is supplied by spatial information generated using wavelet multi-resolution analysis. The proposed wavelet-based JE (WJE) MAP algorithm involves calculation of derivatives of the subband JE measures with respect to individual PET image voxel intensities, which we have shown can be computed very similarly to how the inverse wavelet transform is implemented. We performed a simulation study with the BrainWeb phantom creating PET data corresponding to different noise levels. Realistically simulated T1-weighted MR images provided by BrainWeb modeling were applied in the anatomy-assisted reconstruction with the WJE-MAP algorithm and the intensity-only JE-MAP algorithm. Quantitative analysis showed that the WJE-MAP algorithm performed similarly to the JE-MAP algorithm at low noise level in the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) regions in terms of noise versus bias tradeoff. When noise increased to medium level in the simulated data, the WJE-MAP algorithm started to surpass the JE-MAP algorithm in the GM region, which is less uniform with smaller isolated structures compared to the WM region. In the high noise level simulation, the WJE-MAP algorithm presented clear improvement over the JE-MAP algorithm in both the GM and WM regions. In addition to the simulation study, we applied the reconstruction algorithms to real patient studies involving DPA-173 PET data and Florbetapir PET data with corresponding T1-MPRAGE MRI images. Compared to the intensity-only JE-MAP algorithm, the WJE

  5. Validation of nonrigid registration for multi-tracer PET-CT treatment planning in rectal cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagmolen, Pieter; Roels, Sarah; Loeckx, Dirk; Haustermans, Karin; Maes, Frederik

    2009-02-01

    The goal of radiotherapy is to deliver maximal dose to the tumor and minimal dose to the surrounding tissue. This requires accurate target definition. In sites were the tumor is difficult to see on the CT images, such as for rectal cancer, PET-CT imaging can be used to better define the target. If the information from multiple PETCT images with different tracers needs to be combined, a nonrigid registration is indispensable to compensate for rectal tissue deformations. Such registration is complicated by the presence of different volumes of bowel gas in the images to be registered. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of different nonrigid registration approaches by looking at the overlap of manually delineated rectum contours after registration. Using a B-spline transformation model, the results for two similarity measures, sum of squared differences and mutual information, either calculated over the entire image or on a region of interest are compared. Finally, we also assess the effect of the registration direction. We show that the combination of MI with a region of interest is best able to cope with residual rectal contrast and differences in bowel filling. We also show that for optimal performance the registration direction should be chosen depending on the difference in bowel filling in the images to be registered.

  6. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  7. Imaging with PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    PET deals with biochemistry and metabolic changes that occur at molecular level. Hence, PET differs fundamentally from other imaging modalities. CT imaging is based on tissue density, whereas MRI conveys anatomic information based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. CT and MRI are useful in clinical diagnosis only when disease process has caused significant anatomic alterations. However, in most disease conditions chemical changes precede anatomic changes, that can be detected by PET technology. Thus, PET can provide earliest and unique information about ongoing disease process long before anatomic or structural changes take place. There is no other modality available at present that can replace PET technology. Although PET produces cross-sectional images like that obtained in MRI or CT, they represent circulation, function and metabolism, and not anatomic structure. PET is extremely sensitive measuring quantitatively concentration of tracers in nano to pico-molar range. Thus, PET enables merger of biochemistry and biology in medicine giving birth to molecular medicine that focuses on identifying the molecular errors of disease leading to developing molecular corrections including gene therapy. Molecular imaging with PET has been playing a role in examining the biological nature of a disease condition and its characterization to guide selection and evaluation of treatment. (author)

  8. Quantitative perfusion parameters in a cohort of patients with no known ischemic heart disease and normal myocardial perfusion imaging studied by 82Rb-PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Camilla; Balche, Abdallah; Majgaard, J

    Purpose 82Rb perfusion PET allows for visual as well as quantitative interpretation of myocardial function. Whereas visual interpretation relies on intra-individual redistribution of the tracer between rest and stress studies, quantitative interpretation of absolute flow values requires robust.......86 mL/g/min. Global coronary flow reserve (CFR) was 2.81 (±SD 0.71). EF at rest was 65.3% (±SD 10) and during stress 69% (±SD 12.3), yielding an EF reserve of 4.5%. TPD at rest and stress was 6% (±SD 4). Conclusion Based on a representative population of patients in which coronary artery disease...

  9. PET/CT studies of multiple myeloma using {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-NaF: comparison of distribution patterns and tracers' pharmacokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachpekidis, Christos [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Medical PET Group - Biological Imaging Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hose, Dirk [University of Heidelberg, Medical Clinic V, Heidelberg (Germany); National Center for Tumor Diseases Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate the combined use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) and fluorine-18 sodium fluoride ({sup 18}F-NaF) PET/CT in the skeletal assessment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and to compare the efficacy of these two PET tracers regarding detection of myeloma-indicative osseous lesions. The study includes 60 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) diagnosed according to standard criteria. All patients underwent dynamic (dPET/CT) scanning of the pelvis as well as whole body PET/CT studies with both tracers. The interval between the two exams was one day. Sites of focal increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were considered as highly suspicious of myelomatous involvement. The lesions detected on the {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT scans were then correlated with those detected on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, which served as a reference. Moreover, the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT results were also correlated with the low-dose CT findings. The evaluation of dPET/CT studies was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on a 2-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach. Whole body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT revealed approximately 343 focal lesions while {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT revealed 135 MM-indicative lesions (39 % correlation). CT demonstrated 150 lesions that correlated with those in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (44 % correlation). Six patients demonstrated a diffuse pattern of disease with {sup 18}F-FDG, while 15 of them had a mixed (diffuse and focal) pattern of skeletal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. A high number of degenerative, traumatic and arthritic disease lesions were detected with {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT. In three patients with multiple focal {sup 18}F-FDG-uptake, {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT failed to demonstrate any bone lesion. The dPET/CT scanning of the pelvic area with {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-NaF revealed 77 and 24 MM-indicative lesions, respectively. Kinetic analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG revealed the

  10. Quantitative measurement of maritime sediment movement using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makovski, E.; Grissener, G.

    1967-01-01

    The quantitative method described in the paper involves burying appropriate detectors over a given area of the sea bottom, the detectors being connected to recording equipment which is itself buried in the sediment or situated on the shore. Detectors arranged in this way are covered by a certain layer of radioactive sediment whose activity is proportional to its mass. Before the labelled sediments are removed, their initial activity is measured, and then, as the covering is removed, measurements are made of the gradual decrease in activity corresponding to loss of the surface layer of the bottom deposit area under investigation, expressed in g/cm 2 . The tracers used in the investigations discussed were natural ones such as sea with 31 Si and artificial ones such as activated fragments of sodium glass (with a 6.5% admixture of Fe 2 O 3 ) with 24 Na . The proportional dependence of activity on mass has been confirmed for both tracers; this is an essential point for a tracer intended for quantitative measurements. This proportionality is very well maintained if a sample of highly active sediment is introduced into a large mass of inactive sediments (10 -2 - 10 -3 ). The concluding section describes the advantages of this method as a possible way of using radioisotopes with a short half-life and a low total activity of the order of a few millicuries. (author)

  11. One registration multi-atlas-based pseudo-CT generation for attenuation correction in PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabi, Hossein; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of a detailed assessment of various strategies for atlas-based whole-body bone segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was exploited to select the optimal parameters and setting, with the aim of proposing a novel one-registration multi-atlas (ORMA) pseudo-CT generation approach. The proposed approach consists of only one online registration between the target and reference images, regardless of the number of atlas images (N), while for the remaining atlas images, the pre-computed transformation matrices to the reference image are used to align them to the target image. The performance characteristics of the proposed method were evaluated and compared with conventional atlas-based attenuation map generation strategies (direct registration of the entire atlas images followed by voxel-wise weighting (VWW) and arithmetic averaging atlas fusion). To this end, four different positron emission tomography (PET) attenuation maps were generated via arithmetic averaging and VWW scheme using both direct registration and ORMA approaches as well as the 3-class attenuation map obtained from the Philips Ingenuity TF PET/MRI scanner commonly used in the clinical setting. The evaluation was performed based on the accuracy of extracted whole-body bones by the different attenuation maps and by quantitative analysis of resulting PET images compared to CT-based attenuation-corrected PET images serving as reference. The comparison of validation metrics regarding the accuracy of extracted bone using the different techniques demonstrated the superiority of the VWW atlas fusion algorithm achieving a Dice similarity measure of 0.82 ± 0.04 compared to arithmetic averaging atlas fusion (0.60 ± 0.02), which uses conventional direct registration. Application of the ORMA approach modestly compromised the accuracy, yielding a Dice similarity measure of 0.76 ± 0.05 for ORMA-VWW and 0.55 ± 0.03 for ORMA-averaging. The results of quantitative PET analysis followed the same

  12. One registration multi-atlas-based pseudo-CT generation for attenuation correction in PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arabi, Hossein [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Southern Denmark, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark)

    2016-10-15

    The outcome of a detailed assessment of various strategies for atlas-based whole-body bone segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was exploited to select the optimal parameters and setting, with the aim of proposing a novel one-registration multi-atlas (ORMA) pseudo-CT generation approach. The proposed approach consists of only one online registration between the target and reference images, regardless of the number of atlas images (N), while for the remaining atlas images, the pre-computed transformation matrices to the reference image are used to align them to the target image. The performance characteristics of the proposed method were evaluated and compared with conventional atlas-based attenuation map generation strategies (direct registration of the entire atlas images followed by voxel-wise weighting (VWW) and arithmetic averaging atlas fusion). To this end, four different positron emission tomography (PET) attenuation maps were generated via arithmetic averaging and VWW scheme using both direct registration and ORMA approaches as well as the 3-class attenuation map obtained from the Philips Ingenuity TF PET/MRI scanner commonly used in the clinical setting. The evaluation was performed based on the accuracy of extracted whole-body bones by the different attenuation maps and by quantitative analysis of resulting PET images compared to CT-based attenuation-corrected PET images serving as reference. The comparison of validation metrics regarding the accuracy of extracted bone using the different techniques demonstrated the superiority of the VWW atlas fusion algorithm achieving a Dice similarity measure of 0.82 ± 0.04 compared to arithmetic averaging atlas fusion (0.60 ± 0.02), which uses conventional direct registration. Application of the ORMA approach modestly compromised the accuracy, yielding a Dice similarity measure of 0.76 ± 0.05 for ORMA-VWW and 0.55 ± 0.03 for ORMA-averaging. The results of quantitative PET analysis followed the same

  13. SPECT and PET in cerebrovascular diseases. SPECT und PET bei cerebrovaskulaeren Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, W.H. (Herzzentrum Nordrhein-Westfalen, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany). Inst. fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1993-02-01

    Investigations using recently emerged perfusion tracers for SPECT, Tc-99m-HMPAO in particular, and studies of local glucose metabolism and oxygen utilisation with PET have deepened our knowledge of the pathophysiology in development and in the sequel of stroke. Studies of local cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reserve capacity are indicated in case of neurological symptoms suspected to be caused by transient ischemic attacks or in case of significant narrowing of the cerebral arteries. PET investigations of local metabolism (at the present state) are indicated in patients with incompleted stroke or with infarction and extended ischemic border zone. The differential diagnosis between multi-infarct-dementia and primarily neurodegenerative dementias is facilitated, in some individuals, by the characteristic topography of reduced flow. (orig./MG).

  14. Analysis of metabolism of 6FDG: a PET glucose transport tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzic, Raymond F., E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Chandramouli, Visvanathan [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Huang, Hsuan-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Wu Chunying; Wang Yanming [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz [Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Introduction: We are developing {sup 18}F-labeled 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]6FDG) as a tracer of glucose transport. As part of this process it is important to characterize and quantify putative metabolites. In contrast to the ubiquitous positron emission tomography (PET) tracer {sup 18}F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]2FDG) which is phosphorylated and trapped intracellularly, the substitution of fluorine for a hydroxyl group at carbon-6 in [{sup 18}F]6FDG should prevent its phosphorylation. Consequently, [{sup 18}F]6FDG has the potential to trace the transport step of glucose metabolism without the confounding effects of phosphorylation and subsequent steps of metabolism. Herein the focus is to determine whether, and the degree to which, [{sup 18}F]6FDG remains unchanged following intravenous injection. Methods: Biodistribution studies were performed using 6FDG labeled with {sup 18}F or with the longer-lived radionuclides {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C. Tissues were harvested at 1, 6, and 24 h following intravenous administration and radioactivity was extracted from the tissues and analyzed using a combination of ion exchange columns, high-performance liquid chromatography, and chemical reactivity. Results: At the 1 h time-point, the vast majority of radioactivity in the liver, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and blood was identified as 6FDG. At the 6-h and 24-h time points, there was evidence of a minor amount of radioactive material that appeared to be 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-sorbitol and possibly 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-gluconic acid. Conclusion: On the time scale typical of PET imaging studies radioactive metabolites of [{sup 18}F]6FDG are negligible.

  15. SU-G-IeP4-13: PET Image Noise Variability and Its Consequences for Quantifying Tumor Hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueng, R [Division of Medical Radiation Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Manser, P; Fix, M K [Division of Medical Radiation Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Driscoll, B; Keller, H [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Stampanoni, M F M [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The values in a PET image which represent activity concentrations of a radioactive tracer are influenced by a large number of parameters including patient conditions as well as image acquisition and reconstruction. This work investigates noise characteristics in PET images for various image acquisition and image reconstruction parameters. Methods: Different phantoms with homogeneous activity distributions were scanned using several acquisition parameters and reconstructed with numerous sets of reconstruction parameters. Images from six PET scanners from different vendors were analyzed and compared with respect to quantitative noise characteristics. Local noise metrics, which give rise to a threshold value defining the metric of hypoxic fraction, as well as global noise measures in terms of noise power spectra (NPS) were computed. In addition to variability due to different reconstruction parameters, spatial variability of activity distribution and its noise metrics were investigated. Patient data from clinical trials were mapped onto phantom scans to explore the impact of the scanner’s intrinsic noise variability on quantitative clinical analysis. Results: Local noise metrics showed substantial variability up to an order of magnitude for different reconstruction parameters. Investigations of corresponding NPS revealed reconstruction dependent structural noise characteristics. For the acquisition parameters, noise metrics were guided by Poisson statistics. Large spatial non-uniformity of the noise was observed in both axial and radial direction of a PET image. In addition, activity concentrations in PET images of homogeneous phantom scans showed intriguing spatial fluctuations for most scanners. The clinical metric of the hypoxic fraction was shown to be considerably influenced by the PET scanner’s spatial noise characteristics. Conclusion: We showed that a hypoxic fraction metric based on noise characteristics requires careful consideration of the

  16. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Ford, Randall M; Baker, Robert C; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-04

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading production equipment, cleaning protocols, and finished product testing. However, no comprehensive or quantitative risk profile is available for pet foods, thus limiting the ability to establish safety standards and assess the effectiveness of current and proposed Salmonella control measures. This study sought to develop an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative microbial exposure assessment model to: 1) estimate pet and human exposure to Salmonella via dry pet food, and 2) assess the impact of industry and household-level mitigation strategies on exposure. Data on prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in pet food ingredients, production process parameters, bacterial ecology, and contact transfer in the household were obtained through literature review, industry data, and targeted research. A probabilistic Monte Carlo modeling framework was developed to simulate the production process and basic household exposure routes. Under the range of assumptions adopted in this model, human exposure due to handling pet food is null to minimal if contamination occurs exclusively before extrusion. Exposure increases considerably if recontamination occurs post-extrusion during coating with fat, although mean ingested doses remain modest even at high fat contamination levels, due to the low percent of fat in the finished product. Exposure is highly variable, with the distribution of doses ingested by adult pet owners spanning 3Log CFU per exposure event. Child exposure due to ingestion of 1g of pet food leads to significantly higher doses than adult doses associated with handling the food. Recontamination after extrusion and coating, e.g., via dust or equipment surfaces, may also lead to

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of GeoPET experiments: 3D images of tracer distributions (18F, 124I and 58Co) in Opalinus clay, anhydrite and quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Sauerzapf, Sophie; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2013-08-01

    Understanding conservative fluid flow and reactive tracer transport in soils and rock formations requires quantitative transport visualization methods in 3D+t. After a decade of research and development we established the GeoPET as a non-destructive method with unrivalled sensitivity and selectivity, with due spatial and temporal resolution by applying Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a nuclear medicine imaging method, to dense rock material. Requirements for reaching the physical limit of image resolution of nearly 1 mm are (a) a high-resolution PET-camera, like our ClearPET scanner (Raytest), and (b) appropriate correction methods for scatter and attenuation of 511 keV—photons in the dense geological material. The latter are by far more significant in dense geological material than in human and small animal body tissue (water). Here we present data from Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) reflecting selected GeoPET experiments. The MCS consider all involved nuclear physical processes of the measurement with the ClearPET-system and allow us to quantify the sensitivity of the method and the scatter fractions in geological media as function of material (quartz, Opalinus clay and anhydrite compared to water), PET isotope (18F, 58Co and 124I), and geometric system parameters. The synthetic data sets obtained by MCS are the basis for detailed performance assessment studies allowing for image quality improvements. A scatter correction method is applied exemplarily by subtracting projections of simulated scattered coincidences from experimental data sets prior to image reconstruction with an iterative reconstruction process.

  18. MRI-guided attenuation correction in whole-body PET/MR. Assessment of the effect of bone attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbarzadeh, A.; Ay, M.R.; Ahmadian, A.; Riahi Alam, N.; Zaidi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI presents many advantages in comparison with its counterpart PET/CT in terms of improved soft-tissue contrast, decrease in radiation exposure, and truly simultaneous and multi-parametric imaging capabilities. However, the lack of well-established methodology for MR-based attenuation correction is hampering further development and wider acceptance of this technology. We assess the impact of ignoring bone attenuation and using different tissue classes for generation of the attenuation map on the accuracy of attenuation correction of PET data. This work was performed using simulation studies based on the XCAT phantom and clinical input data. For the latter, PET and CT images of patients were used as input for the analytic simulation model using realistic activity distributions where CT-based attenuation correction was utilized as reference for comparison. For both phantom and clinical studies, the reference attenuation map was classified into various numbers of tissue classes to produce three (air, soft tissue and lung), four (air, lungs, soft tissue and cortical bones) and five (air, lungs, soft tissue, cortical bones and spongeous bones) class attenuation maps. The phantom studies demonstrated that ignoring bone increases the relative error by up to 6.8% in the body and up to 31.0% for bony regions. Likewise, the simulated clinical studies showed that the mean relative error reached 15% for lesions located in the body and 30.7% for lesions located in bones, when neglecting bones. These results demonstrate an underestimation of about 30% of tracer uptake when neglecting bone, which in turn imposes substantial loss of quantitative accuracy for PET images produced by hybrid PET/MRI systems. Considering bones in the attenuation map will considerably improve the accuracy of MR-guided attenuation correction in hybrid PET/MR to enable quantitative PET imaging on hybrid PET/MR technologies. (author)

  19. Quantitative myocardial perfusion by O-15-water PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Anders; Petersen, Henrik; Johansen, Allan

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Reporting of quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF) is typically performed in standard coronary territories. However, coronary anatomy and myocardial vascular territories vary among individuals, and a coronary artery may erroneously be deemed stenosed or not if territorial demarcation...... disease (CAD). METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-four patients with suspected CAD were included prospectively and underwent coronary CT-angiography and quantitative MBF assessment with O-15-water PET followed by invasive, quantitative coronary angiography, which served as reference. MBF was calculated...

  20. Joint reconstruction of activity and attenuation in Time-of-Flight PET: A Quantitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Ahmadreza; Deroose, Christophe M; Vahle, Thomas; Boada, Fernando; Nuyts, Johan

    2018-03-01

    Joint activity and attenuation reconstruction methods from time of flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) data provide an effective solution to attenuation correction when no (or incomplete/inaccurate) information on the attenuation is available. One of the main barriers limiting their use in clinical practice is the lack of validation of these methods on a relatively large patient database. In this contribution, we aim at validating the activity reconstructions of the maximum likelihood activity reconstruction and attenuation registration (MLRR) algorithm on a whole-body patient data set. Furthermore, a partial validation (since the scale problem of the algorithm is avoided for now) of the maximum likelihood activity and attenuation reconstruction (MLAA) algorithm is also provided. We present a quantitative comparison of the joint reconstructions to the current clinical gold-standard maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction with CT-based attenuation correction. Methods: The whole-body TOF-PET emission data of each patient data set is processed as a whole to reconstruct an activity volume covering all the acquired bed positions, which helps to reduce the problem of a scale per bed position in MLAA to a global scale for the entire activity volume. Three reconstruction algorithms are used: MLEM, MLRR and MLAA. A maximum likelihood (ML) scaling of the single scatter simulation (SSS) estimate to the emission data is used for scatter correction. The reconstruction results are then analyzed in different regions of interest. Results: The joint reconstructions of the whole-body patient data set provide better quantification in case of PET and CT misalignments caused by patient and organ motion. Our quantitative analysis shows a difference of -4.2% (±2.3%) and -7.5% (±4.6%) between the joint reconstructions of MLRR and MLAA compared to MLEM, averaged over all regions of interest, respectively. Conclusion: Joint activity and attenuation

  1. (18)F-alfatide II and (18)F-FDG dual-tracer dynamic PET for parametric, early prediction of tumor response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinxia; Guo, Ning; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Xie, Qingguo; Li, Quanzheng; Eden, Henry S; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A single dynamic PET acquisition using multiple tracers administered closely in time could provide valuable complementary information about a tumor's status under quasiconstant conditions. This study aimed to investigate the utility of dual-tracer dynamic PET imaging with (18)F-alfatide II ((18)F-AlF-NOTA-E[PEG4-c(RGDfk)]2) and (18)F-FDG for parametric monitoring of tumor responses to therapy. We administered doxorubicin to one group of athymic nude mice with U87MG tumors and paclitaxel protein-bound particles to another group of mice with MDA-MB-435 tumors. To monitor therapeutic responses, we performed dual-tracer dynamic imaging, in sessions that lasted 90 min, starting with injection via the tail vein catheters with (18)F-alfatide II, followed 40 min later by (18)F-FDG. To achieve signal separation of the 2 tracers, we fit a 3-compartment reversible model to the time-activity curve of (18)F-alfatide II for the 40 min before (18)F-FDG injection and then extrapolated to 90 min. The (18)F-FDG tumor time-activity curve was isolated from the 90-min dual-tracer tumor time-activity curve by subtracting the fitted (18)F-alfatide II tumor time-activity curve. With separated tumor time-activity curves, the (18)F-alfatide II binding potential (Bp = k3/k4) and volume of distribution (VD) and (18)F-FDG influx rate ((K1 × k3)/(k2 + k3)) based on the Patlak method were calculated to validate the signal recovery in a comparison with 60-min single-tracer imaging and to monitor therapeutic response. The transport and binding rate parameters K1-k3 of (18)F-alfatide II, calculated from the first 40 min of the dual-tracer dynamic scan, as well as Bp and VD correlated well with the parameters from the 60-min single-tracer scan (R(2) > 0.95). Compared with the results of single-tracer PET imaging, (18)F-FDG tumor uptake and influx were recovered well from dual-tracer imaging. On doxorubicin treatment, whereas no significant changes in static tracer uptake values of (18)F-alfatide II

  2. Augmenting Amyloid PET Interpretations With Quantitative Information Improves Consistency of Early Amyloid Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harn, Nicholas R; Hunt, Suzanne L; Hill, Jacqueline; Vidoni, Eric; Perry, Mark; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    Establishing reliable methods for interpreting elevated cerebral amyloid-β plaque on PET scans is increasingly important for radiologists, as availability of PET imaging in clinical practice increases. We examined a 3-step method to detect plaque in cognitively normal older adults, focusing on the additive value of quantitative information during the PET scan interpretation process. Fifty-five F-florbetapir PET scans were evaluated by 3 experienced raters. Scans were first visually interpreted as having "elevated" or "nonelevated" plaque burden ("Visual Read"). Images were then processed using a standardized quantitative analysis software (MIMneuro) to generate whole brain and region of interest SUV ratios. This "Quantitative Read" was considered elevated if at least 2 of 6 regions of interest had an SUV ratio of more than 1.1. The final interpretation combined both visual and quantitative data together ("VisQ Read"). Cohen kappa values were assessed as a measure of interpretation agreement. Plaque was elevated in 25.5% to 29.1% of the 165 total Visual Reads. Interrater agreement was strong (kappa = 0.73-0.82) and consistent with reported values. Quantitative Reads were elevated in 45.5% of participants. Final VisQ Reads changed from initial Visual Reads in 16 interpretations (9.7%), with most changing from "nonelevated" Visual Reads to "elevated." These changed interpretations demonstrated lower plaque quantification than those initially read as "elevated" that remained unchanged. Interrater variability improved for VisQ Reads with the addition of quantitative information (kappa = 0.88-0.96). Inclusion of quantitative information increases consistency of PET scan interpretations for early detection of cerebral amyloid-β plaque accumulation.

  3. Characterization of 3D PET systems for accurate quantification of myocardial blood flow

    OpenAIRE

    Renaud, Jennifer M.; Yip, Kathy; Guimond, Jean; Trottier, Mikaël; Pibarot, Philippe; Turcotte, Éric; Maguire, Conor; Lalonde, Lucille; Gulenchyn, Karen; Farncombe, Troy; Wisenberg, Gerald; Moody, Jonathan; Lee, Benjamin; Port, Steven C.; Turkington, Timothy G

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) mode imaging is the current standard for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) systems. Dynamic imaging for quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) with short-lived tracers, such as Rb-82- chloride (Rb-82), requires accuracy to be maintained over a wide range of isotope activities and scanner count-rates. We propose new performance standard measurements to characterize the dynamic range of PET systems for accurate quantitative...

  4. Novel tracer for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.; Krause, B.J.; Herrmann, K.; Gaertner, F.; Souvatzoglou, M.; Klaesner, B.

    2011-01-01

    PET and PET/CT with innovative tracers gain increasing importance in diagnosis and therapy management, and radiation treatment planning in radio-oncology besides the widely established FDG. The introduction of [ 18 F]Fluorothymidine ([ 18 F]FLT) as marker of proliferation, [ 18 F]Fluoromisonidazole ([ 18 F]FMISO) and [ 18 F]Fluoroazomycin-Arabinoside ([ 18 F]FAZA) as tracer of hypoxia, [ 18 F]Fluoroethyltyrosine ([ 18 F]FET) and [ 11 C]Methionine for brain tumour imaging, [ 68 Ga]DOTATOC for somatostatin receptor imaging, [ 18 F]FDOPA for dopamine synthesis and radioactively labeled choline derivatives for imaging phospholipid metabolism have opened novel approaches to tumour imaging. Some of these tracers have already been implemented into radio-oncology: Amino acid PET and PET/CT have the potential to optimise radiation treatment planning of brain tumours through accurate delineation of tumour tissue from normal tissue, necrosis and edema. Hypoxia represents a major therapeutic problem in radiation therapy. Hypoxia imaging is very attractive as it may allow to increase the dose in hypoxic tumours potentially allowing for a better tumour control. Advances in hybrid imaging, i.e. the introduction of MR/PET, may also have an impact in radio-oncology through synergies related to the combination of molecular signals of PET and a high soft tissue contrast of MRI as well as functional MRI capabilities. (orig.)

  5. Fluorine-18 labeled tracers for PET studies in the neurosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    This chapter focuses on fluorine-18, the positron emitter with the longest half-life, the lowest positron energy and probably, the most challenging chemistry. The incorporation of F-18 into organic compounds presents many challenges, including: the need to synthesize and purify the compound within a 2--3 hour time frame; the limited number of labeled precursor molecules; the need to work on a microscale; and the need to produce radiotracers which are chemically and radiochemically pure, sterile and pyrogen-free, and suitable for intravenous injection. The PET method and F-18 labeling of organic molecules are described followed by highlights of the applications of F-18 labeled compounds in the neurosciences and neuropharmacology. It is important to emphasize the essential and pivotal role that organic synthesis has played in the progression of the PET field over the past twenty years from one in which only a handful of institutions possessed the instrumentation and staff to carry out research to the present-day situation where there are more than 200 PET centers worldwide. During this period PET has become an important scientific tool in the neurosciences, cardiology and oncology. It is important to point out that PET is by no means a mature field. The fact that a hundreds of different F-18 labeled compounds have been developed but only a few possess the necessary selectivity and sensitivity in vivo to track a specific biochemical process illustrates this and underscores a major difficulty in radiotracer development, namely the selection of priority structures for synthesis and the complexities of the interactions between chemical compounds and living systems. New developments in rapid organic synthesis are needed in order to investigate new molecular targets and to improve the quantitative nature of PET experiments.

  6. Fluorine-18 labeled tracers for PET studies in the neurosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter focuses on fluorine-18, the positron emitter with the longest half-life, the lowest positron energy and probably, the most challenging chemistry. The incorporation of F-18 into organic compounds presents many challenges, including: the need to synthesize and purify the compound within a 2--3 hour time frame; the limited number of labeled precursor molecules; the need to work on a microscale; and the need to produce radiotracers which are chemically and radiochemically pure, sterile and pyrogen-free, and suitable for intravenous injection. The PET method and F-18 labeling of organic molecules are described followed by highlights of the applications of F-18 labeled compounds in the neurosciences and neuropharmacology. It is important to emphasize the essential and pivotal role that organic synthesis has played in the progression of the PET field over the past twenty years from one in which only a handful of institutions possessed the instrumentation and staff to carry out research to the present-day situation where there are more than 200 PET centers worldwide. During this period PET has become an important scientific tool in the neurosciences, cardiology and oncology. It is important to point out that PET is by no means a mature field. The fact that a hundreds of different F-18 labeled compounds have been developed but only a few possess the necessary selectivity and sensitivity in vivo to track a specific biochemical process illustrates this and underscores a major difficulty in radiotracer development, namely the selection of priority structures for synthesis and the complexities of the interactions between chemical compounds and living systems. New developments in rapid organic synthesis are needed in order to investigate new molecular targets and to improve the quantitative nature of PET experiments

  7. 64Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) Is a Promising New Angiogenesis PET Tracer: Correlation between Tumor Uptake and Integrin αvβ3 Expression in Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxbøl, Jytte; Schjøth-Eskesen, Christina; El Ali, Henrik H.

    2012-01-01

    727) were administered (64)Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) i.v. for study of biodistribution as well as for dynamic PET. Gene expression of angiogenesis markers integrin α(V), integrin β(3), and VEGF-A were analyzed using QPCR and correlated to the tracer uptake in the tumors (%ID/g). From biodistribution data......Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a new PET tracer (64)Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) for imaging of tumor angiogenesis using gene expression of angiogenesis markers as reference and to estimate radiation dosimetry for humans. Procedures. Nude mice with human neuroendocrine tumor xenografts (H...... was estimated to be 0.038 and 0.029 mSv/MBq for females and males, respectively, with highest absorbed dose in bladder wall. Conclusion. (64)Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) is a promising new angiogenesis PET tracer with potential for human use....

  8. Quantitative multimodality imaging in cancer research and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Abramson, Richard G; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-11-01

    Advances in hardware and software have enabled the realization of clinically feasible, quantitative multimodality imaging of tissue pathophysiology. Earlier efforts relating to multimodality imaging of cancer have focused on the integration of anatomical and functional characteristics, such as PET-CT and single-photon emission CT (SPECT-CT), whereas more-recent advances and applications have involved the integration of multiple quantitative, functional measurements (for example, multiple PET tracers, varied MRI contrast mechanisms, and PET-MRI), thereby providing a more-comprehensive characterization of the tumour phenotype. The enormous amount of complementary quantitative data generated by such studies is beginning to offer unique insights into opportunities to optimize care for individual patients. Although important technical optimization and improved biological interpretation of multimodality imaging findings are needed, this approach can already be applied informatively in clinical trials of cancer therapeutics using existing tools. These concepts are discussed herein.

  9. PET imaging of angiogenesis after myocardial infarction/reperfusion using a one-step labeled integrin-targeted tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haokao [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), Bethesda, MD (United States); Lang, Lixin; Guo, Ning; Quan, Qimeng; Hu, Shuo; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), Bethesda, MD (United States); Cao, Feng [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China)

    2012-04-15

    The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin represents a potential target for noninvasive imaging of angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel one-step labeled integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeting positron emission tomography (PET) probe, {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2, for angiogenesis imaging in a myocardial infarction/reperfusion (MI/R) animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 45-min transient left coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. The myocardial infarction was confirmed by ECG, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging, and cardiac ultrasound. In vivo PET imaging was used to determine myocardial uptake of {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 at different time points following reperfusion. The control peptide RAD was labeled with a similar procedure and used to confirm the specificity. Ex vivo autoradiographic analysis and CD31/CD61 double immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the PET results. Myocardial origin of the {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 accumulation was confirmed by {sup 18}F-FDG and autoradiography. PET imaging demonstrated increased focal accumulation of {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 in the infarcted area which started at day 3 (0.28 {+-} 0.03%ID/g, p < 0.05) and peaked between 1 and 3 weeks (0.59 {+-} 0.16 and 0.55 {+-} 0.13%ID/g, respectively). The focal accumulation decreased but still kept at a higher level than the sham group after 4 months of reperfusion (0.31 {+-} 0.01%ID/g, p < 0.05). Pretreatment with unlabeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide significantly decreased tracer uptake, indicating integrin specificity of this tracer. At 1 week after MI/R, uptake of the control tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-RAD that does not bind to integrin, in the infarcted area, was only 0.21 {+-} 0.01%ID/g. Autoradiographic imaging showed the same trend of uptake in the myocardial infarction area. The time course of focal tracer uptake was consistent with the pattern of vascular density and integrin {beta

  10. Comparison of two new angiogenesis PET tracers 68Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2 and 64Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2; in vivo imaging studies in human xenograft tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxbøl, Jytte; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Schjøth-Eskesen, Christina

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to synthesize and perform a side-by-side comparison of two new tumor-angiogenesis PET tracers (68)Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) and (64)Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) in vivo using human xenograft tumors in mice. Human radiation burden was estimated to evaluate...... potential for future use as clinical PET tracers for imaging of neo-angiogenesis. METHODS: A (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator was used for the synthesis of (68)Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2). (68)Ga and (64)Cu labeled NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) tracers were administrated in nude mice bearing either human glioblastoma (U87MG......) or human neuroendocrine (H727) xenograft tumors. PET/CT scans at 3 time points were used for calculating the tracer uptake in tumors (%ID/g), integrin αVβ3 target specificity was shown by blocking with cold NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2), and biodistribution in normal organs were also examined. From biodistribution...

  11. The application of PET and PET-CT in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jianmin; Pan Liping; Li Dongxue

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the common malignancies in woman, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET is a well-established method for detecting, staging, cancer recurrence, therapeutic response and prognosis of cervical cancer. PET-CT can accurately locate the anatomical sites of tracer uptake and improve the diagnostic accuraccy of PET. (authors)

  12. Early-Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography and PET Angiography for Endoleak Detection After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Robert; Gühne, Falk; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-06-01

    To propose a positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) protocol including early-dynamic and late-phase acquisitions to evaluate graft patency and aneurysm diameter, detect endoleaks, and rule out graft or vessel wall inflammation after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in one examination without intravenous contrast medium. Early-dynamic PET/CT of the endovascular prosthesis is performed for 180 seconds immediately after intravenous injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose. Data are reconstructed in variable time frames (time periods after tracer injection) to visualize the arterial anatomy and are displayed as PET angiography or fused with CT images. Images are evaluated in view of vascular abnormalities, graft configuration, and tracer accumulation in the aneurysm sac. Whole-body PET/CT is performed 90 to 120 minutes after tracer injection. This protocol for early-dynamic PET/CT and PET angiography has the potential to evaluate vascular diseases, including the diagnosis of complications after endovascular procedures.

  13. Reproducibility of Quantitative Brain Imaging Using a PET-Only and a Combined PET/MR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L. Lassen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of migrating a quantitative brain imaging protocol from a positron emission tomography (PET-only system to an integrated PET/MR system. Potential differences in both absolute radiotracer concentration as well as in the derived kinetic parameters as a function of PET system choice have been investigated. Five healthy volunteers underwent dynamic (R-[11C]verapamil imaging on the same day using a GE-Advance (PET-only and a Siemens Biograph mMR system (PET/MR. PET-emission data were reconstructed using a transmission-based attenuation correction (AC map (PET-only, whereas a standard MR-DIXON as well as a low-dose CT AC map was applied to PET/MR emission data. Kinetic modeling based on arterial blood sampling was performed using a 1-tissue-2-rate constant compartment model, yielding kinetic parameters (K1 and k2 and distribution volume (VT. Differences for parametric values obtained in the PET-only and the PET/MR systems were analyzed using a 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Comparison of DIXON-based AC (PET/MR with emission data derived from the PET-only system revealed average inter-system differences of −33 ± 14% (p < 0.05 for the K1 parameter and −19 ± 9% (p < 0.05 for k2. Using a CT-based AC for PET/MR resulted in slightly lower systematic differences of −16 ± 18% for K1 and −9 ± 10% for k2. The average differences in VT were −18 ± 10% (p < 0.05 for DIXON- and −8 ± 13% for CT-based AC. Significant systematic differences were observed for kinetic parameters derived from emission data obtained from PET/MR and PET-only imaging due to different standard AC methods employed. Therefore, a transfer of imaging protocols from PET-only to PET/MR systems is not straightforward without application of proper correction methods.Clinical Trial Registration:www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, identifier 2013-001724-19

  14. Measurement of cardiovascular function using a novel view-sharing PET reconstruction method and tracer kinetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Territo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advancements in PET instrumentation have made the non-invasive assessment of cardiovascular function in small animals a reality. The majority of small animal PET systems use stationary detector gantries, thus affording high temporal resolution imaging of cardiac function. Systems designed to maximize spatial resolution and detection sensitivity employing rotating gantry designs are suboptimal when high temporal resolution imaging is needed. To overcome this limitation, the current work developed a novel view-sharing data analysis scheme suitable for dynamic cardiac PET imaging using 18F-NaF as the tracer and tracer kinetic model analysis. This scheme was tested in a rat model of cardiovascular function where the relationship between direct transonic flow measures of cardiac output were highly correlated (f(x = 1.0216x − 24.233, R = 0.9158, p < 0.001 with the new model. Similarly, derived measures of stroke volume were also highly correlated (f(x = 0.9655x − 0.0428, R = 0.9453, p < 0.001 with the current approach. Administration of xylazine caused a statistically significant increase in stroke volume (0.32 ± 0.07 ml, p = 0.003, n = 4 and a significant decrease in both heart rate (−155 ± 7.1 beats/min, p < 0.001, n = 4 and cardiac output (−75.9 ± 23.0 ml/kg min, p = 0.01, n = 4. These findings suggest that the new sinogram binning and kinetic modeling methods produce reliable cardiac function measures suitable for longitudinal monitoring of cardiovascular function.

  15. Quantitation of regional cerebral blood flow corrected for partial volume effect using O-15 water and PET: I. Theory, error analysis, and stereologic comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lida, H; Law, I; Pakkenberg, B

    2000-01-01

    Limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) can cause significant underestimation in the observed regional radioactivity concentration (so-called partial volume effect or PVE) resulting in systematic errors in estimating quantitative physiologic parameters. The authors have...... formulated four mathematical models that describe the dynamic behavior of a freely diffusible tracer (H215O) in a region of interest (ROI) incorporating estimates of regional tissue flow that are independent of PVE. The current study was intended to evaluate the feasibility of these models and to establish...... a methodology to accurately quantify regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) corrected for PVE in cortical gray matter regions. Five monkeys were studied with PET after IV H2(15)O two times (n = 3) or three times (n = 2) in a row. Two ROIs were drawn on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and projected...

  16. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  17. New SPECT tracers: Example of tracers of proteoglycans and melanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachin, F.; Mestas, D.; Kelly, A.; Merlin, C.; Veyre, A.; Maublant, J.; Cachin, F.; Chezal, J.M.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Moins, N.; Auzeloux, P.; Vidal, A.; Bonnet-Duquennoy, M.; Boisgard, S.; D'Incan, M.; Madelmont, J.C.; Maublant, J.; Boisgard, S.; D'Incan, M.; Redini, F.; Filaire, M.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of research program on new radiopharmaceuticals turn to tracers used for positron emission tomography (PET). Only a few teams work on new non fluorine labeled tracers. However, the coming of SPECT/CT gamma cameras, the arrival of semi-conductors gamma cameras should boost the development of non-PET tracers. We exhibit in this article the experience acquired by our laboratory in the conception and design of two new non fluorine labelled compounds. The 99m Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 (N.T.P. 15-5 for N-[tri-ethyl-ammonium]-3-propyl-[15]ane-N5) which binds to proteoglycans could be used for the diagnosis and staging of osteoarthritis and chondrosarcoma. The iodo benzamides, specific to the melanin, are nowadays compared to 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose in a phase III clinical trial for the diagnosis and detection of melanoma metastasis. Our last development focus on N-[2-(diethyl-amino)ethyl]-4 and 2-iodo benzamides respectively B.Z.A. and B.Z.A.2 hetero-aromatic analogues usable for melanoma treatment. (authors)

  18. Biocompatible branched copolymer nanoparticles prepared by RAFT polymerization as MRI/PET bimodal tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chang-Tong [Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Tao, He; Jackson, Alexander W [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences, Agency for Science Technology and Research (Singapore); Chandrasekharan, Prashant [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science Technology and Research (Singapore); Padmanabhan, Parasuraman [Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer [Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-05-18

    Stable branched copolymer nanoparticles of varying size (Dh = 20 – 35 nm) have been developed and employed as MRI nano-sized contrast agents. RAFT polymerization has been employed to prepare these novel nanoparticles possessing DO3A macrocycles within their cores and succinimidyl ester benzoate functionalities within their coronas. It has been demonstrated that these nanoparticles can chelate gadolinium and in vitro cytotoxicity studies using HK-2 cells established their negligible toxicity profile. In vivo MRI experiments showed that these nanoparticles have a high relaxivity and a long blood retention time. Xenograft experiments further illustrated the ability of these nanoparticles to perfuse and passively accumulate in tumor cells, presumably through the enhanced EPR effect. The presence of the succinimidyl ester benzoate functionalities within the nanoparticle coronas will permit future surface modification with fluorophores or targeting moieties to generate nanoparticles to study opportunities for bimodal imaging nano-probes or active cell targeting contrast agents. The chelation with PET radioisotopes (68Ga(III) or 64Cu(II)) can afford various PET tracers.

  19. Biocompatible branched copolymer nanoparticles prepared by RAFT polymerization as MRI/PET bimodal tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chang-Tong; Tao, He; Jackson, Alexander W; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer

    2015-01-01

    Stable branched copolymer nanoparticles of varying size (Dh = 20 – 35 nm) have been developed and employed as MRI nano-sized contrast agents. RAFT polymerization has been employed to prepare these novel nanoparticles possessing DO3A macrocycles within their cores and succinimidyl ester benzoate functionalities within their coronas. It has been demonstrated that these nanoparticles can chelate gadolinium and in vitro cytotoxicity studies using HK-2 cells established their negligible toxicity profile. In vivo MRI experiments showed that these nanoparticles have a high relaxivity and a long blood retention time. Xenograft experiments further illustrated the ability of these nanoparticles to perfuse and passively accumulate in tumor cells, presumably through the enhanced EPR effect. The presence of the succinimidyl ester benzoate functionalities within the nanoparticle coronas will permit future surface modification with fluorophores or targeting moieties to generate nanoparticles to study opportunities for bimodal imaging nano-probes or active cell targeting contrast agents. The chelation with PET radioisotopes (68Ga(III) or 64Cu(II)) can afford various PET tracers.

  20. Synthesis of tracers using automated radiochemistry and robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannals, R.F.

    1992-07-01

    Synthesis of high specific activity radiotracers labeled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides for positron emission tomography (PET) often requires handling large initial quantities of radioactivity. High specific activities are required when preparing tracers for use in PET studies of neuroreceptors. A fully automated approach for tracer synthesis is highly desirable. This proposal involves the development of a system for the Synthesis of Tracers using Automated Radiochemistry and Robotics (STARR) for this purpose. While the long range objective of the proposed research is the development of a totally automated radiochemistry system for the production of major high specific activity 11 C-radiotracers for use in PET, the specific short range objectives are the automation of 11 C-methyl iodide ( 11 CH 3 I) production via an integrated approach using both radiochemistry modular labstations and robotics, and the extension of this automated capability to the production of several radiotracers for PET (initially, 11 C-methionine, 3-N-[ 11 C-methyl]spiperone, and [ 11 C]-carfentanil)

  1. Impact of high (131)I-activities on quantitative (124)I-PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braad, P E N; Hansen, Søren B.; Høilund-Carlsen, P F

    2015-01-01

    relevant [Formula: see text]I/[Formula: see text]I-activities were performed on a clinical PET/CT-system. Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) curves and quantitation accuracy were determined from repeated scans performed over several weeks on a decaying NEMA NU-2 1994 cylinder phantom initially filled...... [Formula: see text]I-activities was good and image quantification unaffected except at very high count rates. Quantitation accuracy and contrast recovery were uninfluenced at [Formula: see text]I-activities below 1000 MBq, whereas image noise was slightly increased. The NECR peaked at 550 MBq of [Formula......: see text]I, where it was 2.8 times lower than without [Formula: see text]I in the phantom. Quantitative peri-therapeutic [Formula: see text]I-PET is feasible....

  2. An update on novel quantitative techniques in the context of evolving whole-body PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Hess, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Since its foundation PET has established itself as one of the standard imaging modalities enabling the quantitative assessment of molecular targets in vivo. In the past two decades, quantitative PET has become a necessity in clinical oncology. Despite introduction of various measures for quantifi...

  3. Pet measurements of presynaptic sympathetic nerve terminals in the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaiger, M.; Hutchins, G.D.; Wieland, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    [ 18 F]Metaraminol (FMR) and [ 11 C]hydroxyephedrine (HED) are catecholamine analogues that have been developed at the University of Michigan for the noninvasive characterization of the sympathetic nervous system of the heart using positron emission tomography (PET). Pharmacological studies employing neurotoxins and uptake inhibitors have demonstrated that both FMR and HED specifically trace the uptake and storage of catecholamines in sympathetic nerve terminals with little nonspecific tracer accumulation. These compounds exhibit excellent qualitative imaging characteristics with heart-to-blood ratios exceeding 6:1 as early as 15 min after intravenous injection in both animals (HED and FMR) and humans (HED). Tracer kinetic modeling techniques have been employed for the quantitative assessment of neuronal catecholamine uptake and storage. Indices of neuronal function, such as the volume of tracer distribution derived from the kinetic models, have been employed in preliminary human studies. Comparison of the tissue distribution volume of HED between normal (control subjects) and denervated (recent transplant patients) cardiac tissue demonstrates a dynamic range of approximately 5:1. This distribution volume is reduced by 60% from normal in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, indicating dysfunction of the sympathetic system. These results show that HED used in combination with PET provides a sophisticated quantitative approach for studying the sympathetic nervous system of the normal and diseased human heart

  4. 11C-harmine as a potential PET tracer for ductal pancreas cancer: in vitro studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlin, G.; Persson, B.; Laangstroem, B.; Aspelin, P.; Bergstroem, M.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to find a tracer in diagnosing human pancreatic cancer using positron emission tomography (PET). For this purpose in vitro test of pancreatic tissues with autoradiography was used. Autoradiography was performed with 11 C-harmine (a MAO-A-inhibitor) with and without competitive inhibition. Tissue preparations were obtained from normal human pancreas and pancreatic cancer. The uptake was compared with rat brain or pig brain, tissues with high expression of MAO-A. Nine autoradiography studies on 16 samples from five different human pancreatic cancers gave a significant level of specific binding of 11 C-harmine in 13, and 3 samples did not give a significant level of specific binding of 11 C-harmine. All 16 samples were analysed with autoradiography. Compared with rat brain, the uptake in the human cancers varied between 9 and 43% except for one tissue preparation which had a too low value for measurement. This study shows expression of MAO-A in human pancreatic cancer. This is readily characterised in vitro. The potential use of 11 C-harmine in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer using PET might be limited, but further PET studies are necessary. (orig.)

  5. The use of radioactive tracers in medicine. Part 2. The development of devices for imaging radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Tracer techniques have been used in medical research for more that two centuries. The history of the measurement of radiotracer in vivo is presented starting with non-imaging, quantitative measurements, and continuing with gamma cameras through to PET scanners. The latest represent the state-of-the-art due to the combination of in-vivo use of tracers with medical tomographic imaging. Its ability to correct accurately for attenuation makes it potentially quantifiable in radioactivity concentration terms and from this follows the ability to determine biological parameters non-invasively. 8 refs., 1 tab. 3 figs

  6. TH-E-202-00: PET for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  7. TH-E-202-00: PET for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  8. Development of Input Function Measurement System for Small Animal PET Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Guk; Kim, Byung Su; Kim, Jin Su

    2010-01-01

    For quantitative measurement of radioactivity concentration in tissue and a validated tracer kinetic model, the high sensitive detection system has been required for blood sampling. With the accurate measurement of time activity curves (TACs) of labeled compounds in blood (plasma) enable to provide quantitative information on biological parameters of interest in local tissue. Especially, the development of new tracers for PET imaging requires knowledge of the kinetics of the tracer in the body and in arterial blood and plasma. Conventional approaches of obtaining an input function are to sample arterial blood sequentially by manual as a function of time. Several continuous blood sampling systems have been developed and used in nuclear medicine research field to overcome the limited temporal resolution in sampling by the conventional method. In this work, we developed the high sensitive and unique geometric design of GSO detector for small animal blood activity measurement

  9. Quantitative PET Imaging in Drug Development: Estimation of Target Occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganawa, Mika; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Rossano, Samantha; Carson, Richard E

    2017-12-11

    Positron emission tomography, an imaging tool using radiolabeled tracers in humans and preclinical species, has been widely used in recent years in drug development, particularly in the central nervous system. One important goal of PET in drug development is assessing the occupancy of various molecular targets (e.g., receptors, transporters, enzymes) by exogenous drugs. The current linear mathematical approaches used to determine occupancy using PET imaging experiments are presented. These algorithms use results from multiple regions with different target content in two scans, a baseline (pre-drug) scan and a post-drug scan. New mathematical estimation approaches to determine target occupancy, using maximum likelihood, are presented. A major challenge in these methods is the proper definition of the covariance matrix of the regional binding measures, accounting for different variance of the individual regional measures and their nonzero covariance, factors that have been ignored by conventional methods. The novel methods are compared to standard methods using simulation and real human occupancy data. The simulation data showed the expected reduction in variance and bias using the proper maximum likelihood methods, when the assumptions of the estimation method matched those in simulation. Between-method differences for data from human occupancy studies were less obvious, in part due to small dataset sizes. These maximum likelihood methods form the basis for development of improved PET covariance models, in order to minimize bias and variance in PET occupancy studies.

  10. Quantitative characterisation of clinically significant intra-prostatic cancer by prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression and cell density on PSMA-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domachevsky, Liran; Goldberg, Natalia; Bernstine, Hanna; Nidam, Meital; Groshar, David

    2018-05-30

    To quantitatively characterize clinically significant intra-prostatic cancer (IPC) by prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression and cell density on PSMA-11 positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR). Retrospective study approved by the institutional review board with informed written consent obtained. Patients with a solitary, biopsy-proven prostate cancer, Gleason score (GS) ≥7, presenting for initial evaluation by PET/computerised tomography (PET/CT), underwent early prostate PET/MR immediately after PSMA-11 tracer injection. PET/MR [MRI-based attenuation correction (MRAC)] and PET/CT [CT-based AC (CTAC)] maximal standardised uptake value (SUVmax) and minimal and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin, ADCmean; respectively) in normal prostatic tissue (NPT) were compared to IPC area. The relationship between SUVmax, ADCmin and ADCmean measurements was obtained. Twenty-two patients (mean age 69.5±5.0 years) were included in the analysis. Forty-four prostate areas were evaluated (22 IPC and 22 NPT). Median MRAC SUVmax of NPT was significantly lower than median MRAC SUVmax of IPC (p prostate cancer patients with GS ≥ 7. • PSMA PET/MR metrics differentiate between normal and tumoural prostatic tissue. • A multi-parametric approach combining molecular and anatomical information might direct prostate biopsy. • PSMA PET/MR metrics are warranted for radiomics analysis.

  11. Quantification of Single- and Multi-Phase Hydrodynamic Dispersion in Rocks Using Dynamic 3D PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, R.; Vandehey, N. T.; O'Neil, J.; Benson, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    We report results of an experimental investigation into the effects of small-scale (mm-cm) heterogeneities and hydrodynamic dispersion on miscible and immiscible displacements in a Berea Sandstone core. Pulse-radiotracer tests were carried out by measuring breakthrough curves at distinct flow rates and gas/water saturation ratios, while simultaneously imaging the internal displacement of the radioactive solution by [11C]PET. Dynamic multidimensional maps of the tracer concentration in the rock sample have been obtained with a spatial resolution of about 10 mm3 and provide evidence for significant macrodispersion effects caused by the presence of heterogeneities at the same scale. The numerical solution of the classic Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE) applied in 1D form fails to describe the measured breakthrough curves and significantly overestimates longitudinal dispersivity. An excellent agreement with the experiments is attained by explicitly accounting for permeability heterogeneity, while reducing the contribution of "Fickian" dispersivity. Heterogeneity was introduced in the model by discretising the rock sample into independent parallel streamlines, which were generated based on a previously determined 3D permeability map, and by solving the 1D ADE for each of them. The use of streamlines is supported by direct quantitative observations from the PET scans; remarkably, this approach leads to an accurate representation of both the temporal behaviour and spatial distribution of the tracer concentration in the sample. It is shown that when the length-scale of permeability variations is similar in order as the size of the sample, the effect of the former can be as significant as hydrodynamic dispersion. The presence of a second immiscible fluid phase further complicates the flow field and, accordingly, the interpretation of the experiments. The ability to decouple these effects leads to the estimation of dispersion coefficients that aren't sample specific and

  12. Other PET tracers for neuroendocrine tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Klaas Pieter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M

    In this article the applicability of (124)I-MIBG and (11)C-5-HTP PET for the detection of abdominal gastro-enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is discussed. (124)I-MIBG is a positron-emitting variant of (123)I-MIBG and therefore suited for PET imaging. Due to the better intrinsic characteristics

  13. Skeletal scintigraphy and quantitative tracer studies in metabolic bone disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelman, Ignac

    Bone scan imaging with the current bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals, the technetium-99m labelled diphosphonates, has dramatically improved our ability to evaluate skeletal pathology. In this thesis, chapter 1 presents a review of the history of bone scanning, summarises present concepts as to the mechanism of uptake of bone seeking agents and briefly illustrates the role of bone scanning in clinical practice. In chapter 2 the applications of bone scan imaging and quantitative tracer techniques derived from the bone scan in the detection of metabolic bone disease are discussed. Since skeletal uptake of Tc-99m diphosphonate depends upon skeletal metabolism one might expect that the bone scan would be of considerable value in the assessment of metabolic bone disease. However in these disorders the whole skeleton is often diffusely involved by the metabolic process and simple visual inspection of the scan image may not reveal the uniformly increased uptake of tracer. Certain patterns of bone scan abnormality have, however, been reported in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteo-dystrophy; the present studies extend these observations and introduce the concept of "metabolic features" which are often recognisable in conditions with generalised increased bone turnover. As an aid to systematic recognition of these features on a given bone scan image a semi-quantitative scoring system, the metabolic index, was introduced. The metabolic index allowed differentiation between various groups of patients with metabolic disorders and a control population. In addition, in a bone scan study of patients with acromegaly, it was found that the metabolic index correlated well with disease activity as measured by serum growth hormone levels. The metabolic index was, however, found to be a relatively insensitive means of identifying disease in individual patients. Patients with increased bone turnover will have an absolute increase in skeletal uptake of tracer. As a

  14. Quantitative PET Imaging of Tissue Factor Expression Using 18F-Labeled Active Site-Inhibited Factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Carsten H; Erlandsson, Maria; Jeppesen, Troels E; Jensen, Mette M; Kristensen, Lotte K; Madsen, Jacob; Petersen, Lars C; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is upregulated in many solid tumors, and its expression is linked to tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and prognosis. A noninvasive assessment of tumor TF expression status is therefore of obvious clinical relevance. Factor VII is the natural ligand to TF. Here we report the development of a new PET tracer for specific imaging of TF using an (18)F-labeled derivative of factor VII. Active site-inhibited factor VIIa (FVIIai) was obtained by inactivation with phenylalanine-phenylalanine-arginine-chloromethyl ketone. FVIIai was radiolabeled with N-succinimidyl 4-(18)F-fluorobenzoate and purified. The corresponding product, (18)F-FVIIai, was injected into nude mice with subcutaneous human pancreatic xenograft tumors (BxPC-3) and investigated using small-animal PET/CT imaging 1, 2, and 4 h after injection. Ex vivo biodistribution was performed after the last imaging session, and tumor tissue was preserved for molecular analysis. A blocking experiment was performed in a second set of mice. The expression pattern of TF in the tumors was visualized by immunohistochemistry and the amount of TF in tumor homogenates was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and correlated with the uptake of (18)F-FVIIai in the tumors measured in vivo by PET imaging. The PET images showed high uptake of (18)F-FVIIai in the tumor regions, with a mean uptake of 2.5 ± 0.3 percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) (mean ± SEM) 4 h after injection of 7.3-9.3 MBq of (18)F-FVIIai and with an average maximum uptake in the tumors of 7.1 ± 0.7 %ID/g at 4 h. In comparison, the muscle uptake was 0.2 ± 0.01 %ID/g at 4 h. At 4 h, the tumors had the highest uptake of any organ. Blocking with FVIIai significantly reduced the uptake of (18)F-FVIIai from 2.9 ± 0.1 to 1.4 ± 0.1 %ID/g (P < 0.001). The uptake of (18)F-FVIIai measured in vivo by PET imaging correlated (r = 0.72, P < 0.02) with TF protein level measured ex vivo. (18)F-FVIIai is a promising PET tracer for

  15. Multi-tracer investigation of river and groundwater interactions: a case study in Nalenggele River basin, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Su, Xiaosi; Dai, Zhenxue; Yang, Fengtian; Zhu, Pucheng; Huang, Yong

    2017-11-01

    Environmental tracers (such as major ions, stable and radiogenic isotopes, and heat) monitored in natural waters provide valuable information for understanding the processes of river-groundwater interactions in arid areas. An integrated framework is presented for interpreting multi-tracer data (major ions, stable isotopes (2H, 18O), the radioactive isotope 222Rn, and heat) for delineating the river-groundwater interactions in Nalenggele River basin, northwest China. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were undertaken to estimate the bidirectional water exchange associated with small-scale interactions between groundwater and surface water. Along the river stretch, groundwater and river water exchange readily. From the high mountain zone to the alluvial fan, groundwater discharge to the river is detected by tracer methods and end-member mixing models, but the river has also been identified as a losing river using discharge measurements, i.e. discharge is bidirectional. On the delta-front of the alluvial fan and in the alluvial plain, in the downstream area, the characteristics of total dissolved solids values, 222Rn concentrations and δ18O values in the surface water, and patterns derived from a heat-tracing method, indicate that groundwater discharges into the river. With the environmental tracers, the processes of river-groundwater interaction have been identified in detail for better understanding of overall hydrogeological processes and of the impacts on water allocation policies.

  16. Evaluation of Positron Emission Tomographic Tracers for Imaging of Papillomavirus-Induced Tumors in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Probst

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET/magnetic resonance (MR imaging was employed to evaluate the feasibility of the PET tracers 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG, 11C-choline, and 18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT to detect papillomavirus-induced tumors in an established rabbit model system. The combined PET/MR allowed the analysis of tracer uptake of the tumors using the morphologic information acquired by MR. New Zealand White rabbits were infected with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus genomes and were imaged for up to 10 months with a simultaneous PET/MR system during the course of infection. The uptake characteristics of the PET tracers 11C-choline and 18F-FLT of tumors and reference tissues were examined relative to the clinical standard, 18F-FDG. Tracer biodistribution of various organs was measured by gamma-counting after the last PET scan and compared to the in vivo PET/MR 18F-FDG uptake. Increased tracer uptake was found 2 months postinfection in primary tumors with 18F-FDG and 11C-choline, whereas 18F-FLT failed to detect the tumors at all measured time points. Our data show that the PET tracer 18F-FDG is superior for imaging papillomavirus-induced tumors in rabbits compared to 11C-choline and 18F-FLT. However, 11C-choline imaging, which has previously been applied to detect various tumor entities in patients, appears to be an alternative to 18F-FDG.

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Early Response to a Vascular-Disrupting Agent with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Niu, Gang; Li, Quanzheng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the early response of tumors to a vascular-disrupting agent (VDA) VEGF121/recombinant toxin gelonin (rGel) using dynamic [(18)F]FPPRGD2 positron emission tomography (PET) and kinetic parameter estimation. Two tumor xenograft models: U87MG (highly vascularized) and A549 (moderately vascularized), were selected, and both were randomized into treatment and control groups. Sixty-minute dynamic PET scans with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 that targets to integrin αvβ3 were performed at days 0 (baseline), 1, and 3 since VEGF121/rGel treatment started. Dynamic PET-derived binding potential (BPND) and parametric maps were compared with tumor uptake (%ID/g) and the static PET image at 1 h after the tracer administration. The growth of U87MG tumor was obviously delayed upon VEGF121/rGel treatment. A549 tumor was not responsive to the same treatment. BPND of treated U87MG tumors decreased significantly at day 1 (p dynamic PET with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 shows advantages in distinguishing effective from ineffective treatment during the course of VEGF121/rGel therapy at early stage and is therefore more sensitive in assessing therapy response than static PET.

  18. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity. (paper)

  19. Dual-Tracer PET Using Generalized Factor Analysis of Dynamic Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Georges El; Trott, Cathryn M.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bonab, Ali; Alpert, Nathaniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose With single-photon emission computed tomography, simultaneous imaging of two physiological processes relies on discrimination of the energy of the emitted gamma rays, whereas the application of dual-tracer imaging to positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been limited by the characteristic 511-keV emissions. Procedures To address this limitation, we developed a novel approach based on generalized factor analysis of dynamic sequences (GFADS) that exploits spatio-temporal differences between radiotracers and applied it to near-simultaneous imaging of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) (brain metabolism) and 11C-raclopride (D2) with simulated human data and experimental rhesus monkey data. We show theoretically and verify by simulation and measurement that GFADS can separate FDG and raclopride measurements that are made nearly simultaneously. Results The theoretical development shows that GFADS can decompose the studies at several levels: (1) It decomposes the FDG and raclopride study so that they can be analyzed as though they were obtained separately. (2) If additional physiologic/anatomic constraints can be imposed, further decomposition is possible. (3) For the example of raclopride, specific and nonspecific binding can be determined on a pixel-by-pixel basis. We found good agreement between the estimated GFADS factors and the simulated ground truth time activity curves (TACs), and between the GFADS factor images and the corresponding ground truth activity distributions with errors less than 7.3±1.3 %. Biases in estimation of specific D2 binding and relative metabolism activity were within 5.9±3.6 % compared to the ground truth values. We also evaluated our approach in simultaneous dual-isotope brain PET studies in a rhesus monkey and obtained accuracy of better than 6 % in a mid-striatal volume, for striatal activity estimation. Conclusions Dynamic image sequences acquired following near-simultaneous injection of two PET radiopharmaceuticals

  20. Fully automated synthesis of ¹¹C-acetate as tumor PET tracer by simple modified solid-phase extraction purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolan; Tang, Ganghua; Nie, Dahong

    2013-12-01

    Automated synthesis of (11)C-acetate ((11)C-AC) as the most commonly used radioactive fatty acid tracer is performed by a simple, rapid, and modified solid-phase extraction (SPE) purification. Automated synthesis of (11)C-AC was implemented by carboxylation reaction of MeMgBr on a polyethylene Teflon loop ring with (11)C-CO2, followed by acidic hydrolysis with acid and SCX cartridge, and purification on SCX, AG11A8 and C18 SPE cartridges using a commercially available (11)C-tracer synthesizer. Quality control test and animals positron emission tomography (PET) imaging were also carried out. A high and reproducible decay-uncorrected radiochemical yield of (41.0 ± 4.6)% (n=10) was obtained from (11)C-CO2 within the whole synthesis time about 8 min. The radiochemical purity of (11)C-AC was over 95% by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Quality control test and PET imaging showed that (11)C-AC injection produced by the simple SPE procedure was safe and efficient, and was in agreement with the current Chinese radiopharmaceutical quality control guidelines. The novel, simple, and rapid method is readily adapted to the fully automated synthesis of (11)C-AC on several existing commercial synthesis module. The method can be used routinely to produce (11)C-AC for preclinical and clinical studies with PET imaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 4D PET iterative deconvolution with spatiotemporal regularization for quantitative dynamic PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Charil, Arnaud; Wimberley, Catriona; Angelis, Georgios; Hamze, Hasar; Callaghan, Paul; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boisson, Frederic; Ryder, Will; Meikle, Steven R; Gregoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative measurements in dynamic PET imaging are usually limited by the poor counting statistics particularly in short dynamic frames and by the low spatial resolution of the detection system, resulting in partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we present a fast and easy to implement method for the restoration of dynamic PET images that have suffered from both PVE and noise degradation. It is based on a weighted least squares iterative deconvolution approach of the dynamic PET image with spatial and temporal regularization. Using simulated dynamic [(11)C] Raclopride PET data with controlled biological variations in the striata between scans, we showed that the restoration method provides images which exhibit less noise and better contrast between emitting structures than the original images. In addition, the method is able to recover the true time activity curve in the striata region with an error below 3% while it was underestimated by more than 20% without correction. As a result, the method improves the accuracy and reduces the variability of the kinetic parameter estimates calculated from the corrected images. More importantly it increases the accuracy (from less than 66% to more than 95%) of measured biological variations as well as their statistical detectivity. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Joint estimation of activity and attenuation for PET using pragmatic MR-based prior: application to clinical TOF PET/MR whole-body data for FDG and non-FDG tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sangtae; Cheng, Lishui; Shanbhag, Dattesh D.; Qian, Hua; Kaushik, Sandeep S.; Jansen, Floris P.; Wiesinger, Florian

    2018-02-01

    Accurate and robust attenuation correction remains challenging in hybrid PET/MR particularly for torsos because it is difficult to segment bones, lungs and internal air in MR images. Additionally, MR suffers from susceptibility artifacts when a metallic implant is present. Recently, joint estimation (JE) of activity and attenuation based on PET data, also known as maximum likelihood reconstruction of activity and attenuation, has gained considerable interest because of (1) its promise to address the challenges in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC), and (2) recent advances in time-of-flight (TOF) technology, which is known to be the key to the success of JE. In this paper, we implement a JE algorithm using an MR-based prior and evaluate the algorithm using whole-body PET/MR patient data, for both FDG and non-FDG tracers, acquired from GE SIGNA PET/MR scanners with TOF capability. The weight of the MR-based prior is spatially modulated, based on MR signal strength, to control the balance between MRAC and JE. Large prior weights are used in strong MR signal regions such as soft tissue and fat (i.e. MR tissue classification with a high degree of certainty) and small weights are used in low MR signal regions (i.e. MR tissue classification with a low degree of certainty). The MR-based prior is pragmatic in the sense that it is convex and does not require training or population statistics while exploiting synergies between MRAC and JE. We demonstrate the JE algorithm has the potential to improve the robustness and accuracy of MRAC by recovering the attenuation of metallic implants, internal air and some bones and by better delineating lung boundaries, not only for FDG but also for more specific non-FDG tracers such as 68Ga-DOTATOC and 18F-Fluoride.

  3. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Pelgrim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT, including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET. This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD, as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings.

  4. TH-E-202-03: PET for Tumor Response Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  5. TH-E-202-03: PET for Tumor Response Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W. [University of Maryland School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  6. Potential Applications of PET/MR Imaging in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman; Nkoulou, René

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in hybrid PET/MR imaging have opened new perspectives for cardiovascular applications. Although cardiac MR imaging has gained wider adoption for routine clinical applications, PET images remain the reference in many applications for which objective analysis of metabolic and physiologic parameters is needed. In particular, in cardiovascular diseases-more specifically, coronary artery disease-the use of quantitative and measurable parameters in a reproducible way is essential for the management of therapeutic decisions and patient follow-up. Functional MR images and dynamic assessment of myocardial perfusion from transit of intravascular contrast medium can provide useful criteria for identifying areas of decreased myocardial perfusion or for assessing tissue viability from late contrast enhancement of scar tissue. PET images, however, will provide more quantitative data on true tissue perfusion and metabolism. Quantitative myocardial flow can also lead to accurate assessment of coronary flow reserve. The combination of both modalities will therefore provide complementary data that can be expected to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of diagnostic procedures. But the true potential of hybrid PET/MR imaging may reside in applications beyond the domain of coronary artery disease. The combination of both modalities in assessment of other cardiac diseases such as inflammation and of other systemic diseases can also be envisioned. It is also predicted that the 2 modalities combined could help characterize atherosclerotic plaques and differentiate plaques with a high risk of rupture from stable plaques. In the future, the development of new tracers will also open new perspectives in evaluating myocardial remodeling and in assessing the kinetics of stem cell therapy in myocardial infarction. New tracers will also provide new means for evaluating alterations in cardiac innervation, angiogenesis, and even the assessment of reporter gene technologies

  7. PET/CT in renal, bladder and testicular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Physician, Chief; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/CT is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in uro-oncology as well. In both bladder and renal cancer there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with only limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced in these malignancies. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder and testicular cancer. PMID:26099672

  8. A fast chemoenzymatic synthesis of [11C]-N5,N10-methylenetetrahydrofolate as a potential PET tracer for proliferating cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, Muhammad; Tewson, Timothy J.; Erdahl, Colbin E.; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Thymidylate synthase and folate receptors are well-developed targets of cancer therapy. Discovery of a simple and fast method for the conversion of 11 CH 3 Ito[ 11 C]-formaldehyde ( 11 CH 2 O) encouraged us to label the co-factor of this enzyme. Preliminary studies conducted on cell lines have demonstrated a preferential uptake of [11- 14 C]-(R)-N 5 ,N 10 -methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate ( 14 CH 2 H 4 folate) by cancerous cell vs. normal cells from the same organ (Saeed M., Sheff D. and Kohen A. Novel positron emission tomography tracer distinguishes normal from cancerous cells. J Biol Chem 2011;286:33872–33878), pointing out 11 CH 2 H 4 folate as a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for cancer imaging. Herein we report the synthesis of 11 CH 2 H 4 folate, which may serve as a potential PET tracer. Methods: In a remotely controlled module, methyl iodide ( 11 CH 3 I) was bubbled into a reaction vial containing trimethylamine N-oxide in N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) and heated to 70°C for 2 min. Formaldehyde ( 11 CH 2 O) formed after the completion of reaction was then mixed with a solution of freshly prepared tetrahydrofolate (H 4 folate) by using a fast chemoenzymatic approach to accomplish synthesis of 11 CH 2 H 4 folate. Purification of the product was carried out by loading the crude reaction mixture on a SAX cartridge, washing with water to remove unbound impurities and finally eluting with a saline solution. Results: The synthesis and purification of 11 CH 2 H 4 folate were completed within 5 min. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the product after SAX purification indicates that more than 90% of the radioactivity that was retained on the SAX cartridge was in 11 CH 2 H 4 folate, with minor ( 11 CH 2 O. Conclusion: We present a fast (∼5 min) synthesis and purification of 11 CH 2 H 4 folate as a potential PET tracer. The final product is received in physiologically compatible buffer (100 mM sodium phosphate, pH 7

  9. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-07

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  10. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-01

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  11. Review on PET radiopharmaceuticals: from isotopes and molecules to medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seimbille, Yann

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging of living subjects is an emerging field that aims to study molecular and cellular events in the intact living animal and human. Unlike classical biology, molecular imaging allows to study biological processes with cells residing in their native environment in the living subjects. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is actually one of the preferred molecular imaging tool for its high sensitivity and its capability to non-invasively and quantitatively visualize in vivo cellular events in the non- or sub-pharmacologic concentration (nano to picomolar) without affecting biological processes. An overview of the principles of this imaging technique and a comparison with other imaging modalities will be presented. Combination of PET technology with conventional anatomical imaging (computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) or with another molecular imaging technique is getting more and more relevant, and such hybrid imaging is often best suited to answer specific biological or medical question. PET imaging requires the injection of a radioactive tracer, which is made of a positron-emitting isotope that allows signal detection and a chemically specific pharmacophore that interacts with the intended molecular target. Infrastructure, methods and regulation about the production of the different radionuclides of interest and the synthesis of PET tracers will be discussed. Recent novel radiolabelling strategies, as well as new technologies (i.e. micro fluidic), to generate libraries of PET radiopharmaceuticals will also be covered in this presentation

  12. Methodologic Considerations for Quantitative 18F-FDG PET/CT Studies of Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trägårdh, Malene; Møller, Niels; Sørensen, Michael

    2015-09-01

    PET with the glucose analog (18)F-FDG is used to measure regional tissue metabolism of glucose. However, (18)F-FDG may have affinities different from those of glucose for plasma membrane transporters and intracellular enzymes; the lumped constant (LC) can be used to correct these differences kinetically. The aims of this study were to investigate the feasibility of measuring human hepatic glucose metabolism with dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT and to determine an operational LC for (18)F-FDG by comparison with (3)H-glucose measurements. Eight healthy human subjects were included. In all studies, (18)F-FDG and (3)H-glucose were mixed in saline and coadministered. A 60-min dynamic PET recording of the liver was performed for 180 min with blood sampling from catheters in a hepatic vein and a radial artery (concentrations of (18)F-FDG and (3)H-glucose in blood). Hepatic blood flow was determined by indocyanine green infusion. First, 3 subjects underwent studies comparing bolus administration and constant-infusion administration of tracers during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping. Next, 5 subjects underwent studies comparing fasting and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping with tracer infusions. Splanchnic extraction fractions of (18)F-FDG (E*) and (3)H-glucose (E) were calculated from concentrations in blood, and the LC was calculated as ln(1 - E*)/ln(1 - E). Volumes of interest were drawn in the liver tissue, and hepatic metabolic clearance of (18)F-FDG (mL of blood/100 mL of liver tissue/min) was estimated. For bolus versus infusion, E* values were always negative when (18)F-FDG was administered as a bolus and were always positive when it was administered as an infusion. For fasting versus clamping, E* values were positive in 4 of 5 studies during fasting and were always positive during clamping. Negative extraction fractions were ascribed to the tracer distribution in the large volume of distribution in the prehepatic splanchnic bed. The LC ranged from 0.43 to 2

  13. Combined use of (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FMISO in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer patients planned for radiotherapy: a dynamic PET/CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Thieke, Christian; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Nicolay, Nils H; Huber, Peter E; Thomas, Michael; Dimitrakopoulou, Georgia; Debus, Juergen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate and compare, by means of dynamic and static PET/CT, the distribution patterns and pharmacokinetics of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and of fluorine-18-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients scheduled for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Thirteen patients suffering from inoperable stage III NSCLC underwent PET/CTs with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FMISO for tumor metabolism and hypoxia assessment accordingly. Evaluation of PET/CT studies was based on visual analysis, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculations and absolute quantitative estimations, after application of a two-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach. (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed all thirteen primary lung tumors as sites of increased (18)F-FDG uptake. Six patients demonstrated also in total 43 (18)F-FDG avid metastases; these patients were excluded from radiotherapy. (18)F-MISO PET/CT demonstrated 12/13 primary lung tumors with faint tracer uptake. Only one tumor was clearly (18)F-FMISO avid, (SUVaverage = 3.4, SUVmax = 5.0). Mean values for (18)F-FDG, as derived from dPET/CT data, were SUVaverage = 8.9, SUVmax = 15.1, K1 = 0.23, k2 = 0.53, k3 = 0.17, k4 = 0.02, influx = 0.05 and fractal dimension (FD) = 1.25 for the primary tumors. The respective values for (18)F-FMISO were SUVaverage = 1.4, SUVmax = 2.2, K1 = 0.26, k2 = 0.56, k3 = 0.06, k4 = 0.06, influx = 0.02 and FD = 1.14. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the two tracers. (18)F-FDG PET/CT changed therapy management in six patients, by excluding them from planned IMRT. (18)F-FMISO PET/CT revealed absence of significant tracer uptake in the majority of the (18)F-FDG avid NSCLCs. Lack of correlation between the two tracers' kinetics indicates that they reflect different molecular mechanisms and implies the discordance between increased glycolysis and hypoxia in the malignancy.

  14. Synthesis of 1-[11C]-D,L-homocysteine thiolactone: a potential tracer for myocardial ischemia using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamacher, K.; Hanus, J.

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of 1-[ 11 C]-D,L-homocysteine thiolactone, a potential tracer for PET imaging of ischemic heart regions, is described. The labelling is achieved by reaction of [ 11 C]carbon dioxide with α-lithiated S-(tetrahydro-pyran-2-yl)3-thiopropylisonitrile. Deprotection of the mercapto group and lactonisation of the resulting thioamino acid is accomplished in an acid catalysed reaction. The radiochemical yield obtained is 10 to 15% and the synthesis time, including the HPLC purification is about 45 min. (author)

  15. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  16. Regional quantitative analysis of cortical surface maps of FDG PET images

    CERN Document Server

    Protas, H D; Hayashi, K M; Chin Lung, Yu; Bergsneider, M; Sung Cheng, Huang

    2006-01-01

    Cortical surface maps are advantageous for visualizing the 3D profile of cortical gray matter development and atrophy, and for integrating structural and functional images. In addition, cortical surface maps for PET data, when analyzed in conjunction with structural MRI data allow us to investigate, and correct for, partial volume effects. Here we compared quantitative regional PET values based on a 3D cortical surface modeling approach with values obtained directly from the 3D FDG PET images in various atlas-defined regions of interest (ROIs; temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes). FDG PET and 3D MR (SPGR) images were obtained and aligned to ICBM space for 15 normal subjects. Each image was further elastically warped in 2D parameter space of the cortical surface, to align major cortical sulci. For each point within a 15 mm distance of the cortex, the value of the PET intensity was averaged to give a cortical surface map of FDG uptake. The average PET values on the cortical surface map were calcula...

  17. Dynamic and gated PET. Quantitative imaging of the heart revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekolla, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    This short overview focuses on the basic implementation as well as applications of cardiac PET studies acquired in dynamic and ECG triggered modes. Both acquisition modes are well suited for quantitative analysis and the advantages of such an approach are discussed. An outlook on the measurement of respiratory triggered studies and the new challenges this data presents is provided. In the context of modern PET/CT tomographs with the combination of high sensitivity and morphologic resolution, the promise of list mode acquisition is investigated. The before mentioned acquisition modes are ideal candidates for this technology the utility of which in a clinical setting is briefly discussed. The retrospective generation of dynamic and gated image data (and any combinations) is greatly facilitated with this approach. Finally, a novel presentation mode for the wealth of quantitative information generated by these systems is presented. (orig.)

  18. In vivo imaging of brain androgen receptors in rats: a [18F]FDHT PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayum, M.A.; Doorduin, J.; Antunes, I.F.; Kwizera, C.; Zijlma, R.; Boer, J.A. den; Dierckx, R.A.J.O.; Vries, E.F.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Steroid hormones like androgens play an important role in the development and maintenance of several brain functions. Androgens can act through androgen receptors (AR) in the brain. This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of positron emission tomography (PET) with 16β-[ 18 F]fluoro-5α-dihydrotestosterone ([ 18 F]FDHT) to image AR expression in the brain. Methods: Male Wistar rats were either orchiectomized to inhibit endogenous androgen production or underwent sham-surgery. Fifteen days after surgery, rats were subjected to a 90-min dynamic [ 18 F]FDHT PET scan with arterial blood sampling. In a subset of orchiectomized rats, 1 mg/kg dihydrotestosterone was co-injected with the tracer in order to saturate the AR. Plasma samples were analyzed for the presence of radioactive metabolites by radio-TLC. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed to quantify brain kinetics of the tracer. After the PET scan, the animals were terminated for ex-vivo biodistribution. Results: PET imaging and ex vivo biodistribution studies showed low [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in all brain regions, except pituitary. [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in the surrounding cranial bones was high and increased over time. [ 18 F]FDHT was rapidly metabolized in rats. Metabolism was significantly faster in orchiectomized rats than in sham-orchiectomized rats. Quantitative analysis of PET data indicated substantial spill-over of activity from cranial bones into peripheral brain regions, which prevented further analysis of peripheral brain regions. Logan graphical analysis and kinetic modeling using 1- and 2-tissue compartment models showed reversible and homogenously distributed tracer uptake in central brain regions. [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in the brain could not be blocked by endogenous androgens or administration of dihydrotestosterone. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that imaging of AR availability in rat brain with [ 18 F]FDHT PET is not feasible. The low AR expression in the brain, the

  19. Investigation of 6-[¹⁸F]-fluoromaltose as a novel PET tracer for imaging bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Gowrishankar

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the field of nuclear medicine, the imaging of bacterial infections has remained a challenge. The existing reagents suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity. In this study we investigate the potential of a novel PET (positron emission tomography tracer that overcomes these limitations.6-[¹⁸F]-fluoromaltose was synthesized. Its behavior in vitro was evaluated in bacterial and mammalian cultures. Detailed pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles for the tracer were obtained from a murine model.6-[¹⁸F]-fluoromaltose is taken up by multiple strains of pathogenic bacteria. It is not taken up by mammalian cancer cell lines. 6-[¹⁸F]-fluoromaltose is retained in infected muscles in a murine model of bacterial myositis. It does not accumulate in inflamed tissue.We have shown that 6-[¹⁸F]-fluoromaltose can be used to image bacterial infection in vivo with high specificity. We believe that this class of agents will have a significant impact on the clinical management of patients.

  20. Radiosynthesis and initial characterization of a PDE10A specific PET tracer [18 F]AMG 580 in non-human primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dah-Ren; Hu, Essa; Allen, Jennifer R.; Davis, Carl; Treanor, James; Miller, Silke; Chen, Hang; Shi, Bingzhi; Narayanan, Tanjorie K.; Barret, Olivier; Alagille, David; Yu, Zhigang; Slifstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is an intracellular enzyme responsible for the breakdown of cyclic nucleotides which are important second messengers for neurotransmission. Inhibition of PDE10A has been identified as a potential target for treatment of various neuropsychiatric disorders. To assist drug development, we have identified a selective PDE10A positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, AMG 580. We describe here the radiosynthesis of [ 18 F]AMG 580 and in vitro and in vivo characterization results. Methods: The potency and selectivity were determined by in vitro assay using [ 3 H]AMG 580 and baboon brain tissues. [ 18 F]AMG 580 was prepared by a 1-step [ 18 F]fluorination procedure. Dynamic brain PET scans were performed in non-human primates. Regions-of-interest were defined on individuals’ MRIs and transferred to the co-registered PET images. Data were analyzed using two tissue compartment analysis (2TC), Logan graphical (Logan) analysis with metabolite-corrected input function and the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) method. A PDE10A inhibitor and unlabeled AMG 580 were used to demonstrate the PDE10A specificity. K D was estimated by Scatchard analysis of high and low affinity PET scans. Results: AMG 580 has an in vitro K D of 71.9 pM. Autoradiography showed specific uptake in striatum. Mean activity of 121 ± 18 MBq was used in PET studies. In Rhesus, the baseline BP ND for putamen and caudate was 3.38 and 2.34, respectively, via 2TC, and 3.16, 2.34 via Logan, and 2.92, and 2.01 via SRTM. A dose dependent decrease of BP ND was observed by the pre-treatment with a PDE10A inhibitor. In baboons, 0.24 mg/kg dose of AMG 580 resulted in about 70% decrease of BP ND . The in vivo K D of [ 18 F]AMG 580 was estimated to be around 0.44 nM in baboons. Conclusion: [ 18 F]AMG 580 is a selective and potent PDE10A PET tracer with excellent specific striatal binding in non-human primates. It warrants further evaluation in humans

  1. [F-18]fluoro-meta-L-tyrosine is a better PET tracer than [F-18]fluoro-L-dopa for the delineation of dopaminergic structures in the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firnau, G.; Chirakal, R.; Nahmias, C.; Garnett, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-m-L-tyrosine (FmLtyr) and fluoro-L-Dopa (F-Dopa) have been synthesized, and the utility of FmLtyr for PET investigations of dopaminergic brain regions has been compared to that of F-dopa. Experimental results from both monkey and human studies indicate that FmLtyr gives better delineation of striatum, and is a better PET tracer than F-dopa

  2. Multi-layer cube sampling for liver boundary detection in PET-CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinxin; Yang, Jian; Song, Shuang; Song, Hong; Ai, Danni; Zhu, Jianjun; Jiang, Yurong; Wang, Yongtian

    2018-06-01

    Liver metabolic information is considered as a crucial diagnostic marker for the diagnosis of fever of unknown origin, and liver recognition is the basis of automatic diagnosis of metabolic information extraction. However, the poor quality of PET and CT images is a challenge for information extraction and target recognition in PET-CT images. The existing detection method cannot meet the requirement of liver recognition in PET-CT images, which is the key problem in the big data analysis of PET-CT images. A novel texture feature descriptor called multi-layer cube sampling (MLCS) is developed for liver boundary detection in low-dose CT and PET images. The cube sampling feature is proposed for extracting more texture information, which uses a bi-centric voxel strategy. Neighbour voxels are divided into three regions by the centre voxel and the reference voxel in the histogram, and the voxel distribution information is statistically classified as texture feature. Multi-layer texture features are also used to improve the ability and adaptability of target recognition in volume data. The proposed feature is tested on the PET and CT images for liver boundary detection. For the liver in the volume data, mean detection rate (DR) and mean error rate (ER) reached 95.15 and 7.81% in low-quality PET images, and 83.10 and 21.08% in low-contrast CT images. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is effective and robust for liver boundary detection.

  3. Simplified quantitative determination of cerebral perfusion reserve with H215O PET and acetazolamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arigoni, M.; Kneifel, S.; Burger, C.; Buck, A.; Fandino, J.; Khan, N.

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of regional cerebral blood from (rCBF) and perfusion reserve (PR) with H 2 15 O positron emission tomography (PET) and acetazolamide challenge is of importance in evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease and is thought to be useful in selecting patients for possible vascular surgery. Full quantitative assessment of rCBF with PET requires arterial blood sampling, which is inconvenient in a clinical setting. In this work, we present a simple non-invasive method with which to quantitatively evaluate PR in one PET session lasting no more than 30 min. In ten patients with cerebrovascular disease, rCBF was measured with H 2 15 O PET under the baseline condition and after administration of 1 g acetazolamide using a standard technique involving arterial blood sampling. The activity accumulated over 60 s was normalized to injected activity per kilogram body weight (nAA) and compared with rCBF in eight different brain regions. A high linear correlation was found for PR based on nAA (PR nAA ) and rCBF (PR rCBF ) (PR nAA =0.843 PR rCBF + 0.092, r=0.83, Pearson's correlation coefficient). Bland-Altman analyses further confirmed that PR nAA reflects PR in a quantitative manner. These results demonstrate that the method based on normalized counts allows the quantitative assessment of PR without blood sampling. (orig.)

  4. High-resolution multi-slice PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasillo, N.J.; Chintu Chen; Ordonez, C.E.; Kapp, O.H.; Sosnowski, J.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    This report evaluates the progress to test the feasibility and to initiate the design of a high resolution multi-slice PET system. The following specific areas were evaluated: detector development and testing; electronics configuration and design; mechanical design; and system simulation. The design and construction of a multiple-slice, high-resolution positron tomograph will provide substantial improvements in the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements of the distribution of activity concentrations in the brain. The range of functional brain research and our understanding of local brain function will be greatly extended when the development of this instrumentation is completed

  5. Design of Infusion Schemes for Neuroreceptor Imaging: Application to [11C]Flumazenil-PET Steady-State Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at developing a simulation system that predicts the optimal study design for attaining tracer steady-state conditions in brain and blood rapidly. Tracer kinetics was determined from bolus studies and used to construct the system. Subsequently, the system was used to design inputs for bolus infusion (BI or programmed infusion (PI experiments. Steady-state quantitative measurements can be made with one short scan and venous blood samples. The GABAA receptor ligand [C11]Flumazenil (FMZ was chosen for this purpose, as it lacks a suitable reference region. Methods. Five bolus [C11]FMZ-PET scans were conducted, based on which population-based PI and BI schemes were designed and tested in five additional healthy subjects. The design of a PI was assisted by an offline feedback controller. Results. The system could reproduce the measurements in blood and brain. With PI, [C11]FMZ steady state was attained within 40 min, which was 8 min earlier than the optimal BI (B/I ratio = 55 min. Conclusions. The system can design both BI and PI schemes to attain steady state rapidly. For example, subjects can be [C11]FMZ-PET scanned after 40 min of tracer infusion for 40 min with venous sampling and a straight-forward quantification. This simulation toolbox is available for other PET-tracers.

  6. Visualization of multiple organ amyloid involvement in systemic amyloidosis using {sup 11}C-PiB PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezawa, Naoki; Katoh, Nagaaki; Yoshinaga, Tsuneaki [Shinshu University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine (Neurology and Rheumatology), Nagano (Japan); Oguchi, Kazuhiro [Jisenkai Brain Imaging Research Center, Matsumoto (Japan); Yazaki, Masahide [Shinshu University School of Health Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Matsumoto (Japan); Shinshu University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Matsumoto (Japan); Sekijima, Yoshiki [Shinshu University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine (Neurology and Rheumatology), Nagano (Japan); Jisenkai Brain Imaging Research Center, Matsumoto (Japan); Shinshu University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Matsumoto (Japan)

    2018-03-15

    To investigate the utility of Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for evaluating whole-body amyloid involvement in patients with systemic amyloidosis. Whole-body {sup 11}C-PiB PET was performed in seven patients with systemic immunoglobulin light-chain (AL) amyloidosis, seven patients with hereditary transthyretin (ATTRm) amyloidosis, one asymptomatic TTR mutation carrier and three healthy controls. The correlations between clinical organ involvement, radiological {sup 11}C-PiB uptake and histopathological findings were analysed for each organ. Organ involvement on {sup 11}C-PiB PET imaging showed good correlations with the clinical findings for the heart and stomach. Abnormal tracer uptake was also observed in the spleen, lachrymal gland, submandibular gland, sublingual gland, lymph node, brain, scalp, extraocular muscles, nasal mucosa, pharynx, tongue and nuchal muscles, most of which were asymptomatic. Physiological tracer uptake was universally observed in the urinary tract (kidney, renal pelvis, ureter and bladder) and enterohepatic circulatory system (liver, gallbladder, bile duct and small intestine) in all participants. Most of the patients and one healthy control subject showed asymptomatic tracer uptake in the lung and parotid gland. The peripheral nervous system did not show any tracer uptake even in patients with apparent peripheral neuropathy. Histological amyloid deposition was confirmed in biopsied myocardium and gastric mucosa where abnormal {sup 11}C-PiB retention was observed. {sup 11}C-PiB PET imaging can be used clinically in the systemic evaluation of amyloid distribution in patients with AL and ATTRm amyloidosis. Quantitative analysis of {sup 11}C-PiB PET images may be useful in therapy evaluation and will reveal whether amyloid clearance is correlated with clinical response. (orig.)

  7. Quantitation of Maillard reaction products in commercially available pet foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.; Bosch, G.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Wierenga, P.A.; Alexander, L.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    During processing of pet food, the Maillard reaction occurs, which reduces the bioavailability of essential amino acids such as lysine and results in the formation of advanced Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The aim of this study was to quantitate MRPs (fructoselysine (FL), carboxymethyllysine

  8. Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of a series of substituted {sup 11}C-phenethylamines as 5-HT{sub 2A} agonist PET tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettrup, Anders; Santini, Martin A.; Palner, Mikael; Knudsen, Gitte M. [Copenhagen University Hospital, Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen (Denmark); Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (Cimbi), Copenhagen (Denmark); Hansen, Martin; Paine, James; Kristensen, Jesper; Begtrup, Mikael [University of Copenhagen, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Copenhagen (Denmark); Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (Cimbi), Copenhagen (Denmark); Gillings, Nic; Herth, Matthias M.; Madsen, Jacob [Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, PET and Cyclotron Unit, Copenhagen (Denmark); Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (Cimbi), Copenhagen (Denmark); Lehel, Szabolcs [Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, PET and Cyclotron Unit, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2011-04-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of serotonin 2A (5-HT{sub 2A}) receptors with agonist tracers holds promise for the selective labelling of 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors in their high-affinity state. We have previously validated [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-5 and found that it is a 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor agonist PET tracer. In an attempt to further optimize the target-to-background binding ratio, we modified the chemical structure of the phenethylamine backbone and carbon-11 labelling site of [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-5 in different ways. Here, we present the in vivo validation of nine novel 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor agonist PET tracers in the pig brain. Each radiotracer was injected intravenously into anaesthetized Danish Landrace pigs, and the pigs were subsequently scanned for 90 min in a high-resolution research tomography scanner. To evaluate 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor binding, cortical nondisplaceable binding potentials (BP{sub ND}) were calculated using the simplified reference tissue model with the cerebellum as a reference region. After intravenous injection, all compounds entered the brain and distributed preferentially into the cortical areas, in accordance with the known 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor distribution. The largest target-to-background binding ratio was found for [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-36 which also had a high brain uptake compared to its analogues. The cortical binding of [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-36 was decreased by pretreatment with ketanserin, supporting 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor selectivity in vivo. [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-82 and [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-21 showed lower cortical BP{sub ND}, while [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-27, [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-29, [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-31 and [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-88 gave rise to cortical BP{sub ND} similar to that of [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-5. [{sup 11}C]Cimbi-36 is currently the most promising candidate for investigation of 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor agonist binding in the living human brain with PET. (orig.)

  9. A gate evaluation of the sources of error in quantitative90 Y PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydhorst, Jared; Carlier, Thomas; Dieudonné, Arnaud; Conti, Maurizio; Buvat, Irène

    2016-10-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the dose delivered by 90 Y microspheres using a postembolization PET scan would permit the establishment of more accurate dose-response relationships for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with 90 Y. However, the quality of the PET data obtained is compromised by several factors, including poor count statistics and a very high random fraction. This work uses Monte Carlo simulations to investigate what impact factors other than low count statistics have on the quantification of 90 Y PET. PET acquisitions of two phantoms-a NEMA PET phantom and the NEMA IEC PET body phantom-containing either 90 Y or 18 F were simulated using gate. Simulated projections were created with subsets of the simulation data allowing the contributions of random, scatter, and LSO background to be independently evaluated. The simulated projections were reconstructed using the commercial software for the simulated scanner, and the quantitative accuracy of the reconstruction and the contrast recovery of the reconstructed images were evaluated. The quantitative accuracy of the 90 Y reconstructions were not strongly influenced by the high random fraction present in the projection data, and the activity concentration was recovered to within 5% of the known value. The contrast recovery measured for simulated 90 Y data was slightly poorer than that for simulated 18 F data with similar count statistics. However, the degradation was not strongly linked to any particular factor. Using a more restricted energy range to reduce the random fraction in the projections had no significant effect. Simulations of 90 Y PET confirm that quantitative 90 Y is achievable with the same approach as that used for 18 F, and that there is likely very little margin for improvement by attempting to model aspects unique to 90 Y, such as the much higher random fraction or the presence of bremsstrahlung in the singles data. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Assessment of glucose metabolism and cellular proliferation in multiple myeloma: a first report on combined 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, C; Goldschmidt, H; Kopka, K; Kopp-Schneider, A; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2018-04-10

    Despite the significant upgrading in recent years of the role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma (MM) diagnostics, there is a still unmet need for myeloma-specific radiotracers. 3'-Deoxy-3'-[ 18 F]fluorothymidine ( 18 F-FLT) is the most studied cellular proliferation PET agent, considered a potentially new myeloma functional imaging tracer. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate 18 F-FLT PET/CT in imaging of MM patients, in the context of its combined use with 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Eight patients, four suffering from symptomatic MM and four suffering from smoldering MM (SMM), were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT and 18 F-FLT PET/CT imaging by means of static (whole body) and dynamic PET/CT of the lower abdomen and pelvis (dPET/CT) in two consecutive days. The evaluation of PET/CT studies was based on qualitative evaluation, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculation, and quantitative analysis based on two-tissue compartment modeling. 18 F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated focal, 18 F-FDG avid, MM-indicative bone marrow lesions in five patients. In contrary, 18 F-FLT PET/CT showed focal, 18 F-FLT avid, myeloma-indicative lesions in only two patients. In total, 48 18 F-FDG avid, focal, MM-indicative lesions were detected with 18 F-FDG PET/CT, while 17 18 F-FLT avid, focal, MM-indicative lesions were detected with 18 F-FLT PET/CT. The number of myeloma-indicative lesions was significantly higher for 18 F-FDG PET/CT than for 18 F-FLT PET/CT. A common finding was a mismatch of focally increased 18 F-FDG uptake and reduced 18 F-FLT uptake (lower than the surrounding bone marrow). Moreover, 18 F-FLT PET/CT was characterized by high background activity in the bone marrow compartment, further complicating the evaluation of bone marrow lesions. Semi-quantitative evaluation revealed that both SUV mean and SUV max were significantly higher for 18 F-FLT than for 18 F-FDG in both MM lesions and reference tissue. SUV values were higher in MM lesions than in

  11. Fluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Olivier; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Luxen, Andre; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Rigo, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland

    2004-01-01

    2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of 18 F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes ''generalist'' tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of ''specific'' tracers for receptor expression (i.e. oestrogens or somatostatin), cell

  12. Pilot Study of 64CuCl2 for PET Imaging of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper(II ion (Cu2+ is the essential element for numerous pathophysiological processes in vivo. Copper transporter 1 (CTR1 is mainly responsible for maintaining Cu2+ accumulation in cells, which has been found to be over-expressed in inflammatory tissues. Therefore, we explored the potential application of 64CuCl2 for PET imaging of inflammation through targeting CTR1. The animal models of H2O2 induced muscle inflammation and lipopolysaccaharide induced lung inflammation were successfully established, then imaged by small animal PET (PET/CT post-injection of 64CuCl2, and PET images were quantitatively analyzed. H&E and immunohistochemical (IHC staining and western blot experiments were performed for evaluating CTR1 levels in the inflammatory and control tissues. Both inflammatory muscle and lungs can be clearly imaged by PET. PET image quantitative analysis revealed that the inflammatory muscle and lungs showed significantly higher 64Cu accumulation than the controls, respectively (p < 0.05. Furthermore, IHC staining and western blot analysis demonstrated that compared with the controls, CTR1 expression was increased in both the inflammatory muscle and lungs, which was consistent with the levels of 64Cu2+ accumulation in these tissues. 64CuCl2 can be used as a novel, simple, and highly promising PET tracer for CTR1 targeted imaging of inflammation.

  13. FDG PET/CT for therapeutic response monitoring in multi-site non-respiratory tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Tian; Yong Xiao; Bin Chen; Jun Xia; Hong Guan; Qunyi Deng

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) can produce positive signals during 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scanning. Until now, there has been no better method than clinical assessment to evaluate the therapeutic response of non-respiratory TB (NRTB). Purpose: To retrospectively assess the ability of FDG PET/CT to evaluate the response to anti-TB treatment in patients with NRTB. Material and Methods: Three patients with multi-site NRTB underwent repeat PET/CT scans during anti-TB treatment. Changes in maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the TB lesions on PET/CT images were analyzed between two scans. Initial PET/CT scans were performed before the start of anti-TB treatment, and later scans were performed after completion of the treatment. Results: Patient 1, a 63-year-old female, and patient 2, a 50-year-old male, were diagnosed as multi-site NRTB by biopsy. Patient 3, a 37-year-old male was diagnosed clinically. These patients demonstrated multiple FDG-avid lesions in whole body on initial PET/CT images. The highest SUVmax of patient 1, 2, and 3 were 13.6, 17.7, and 13.9 separately. After completion of the treatment, all positive signals of patient 1, 2, and 3 decreased to undetectable value on repeated PET/CT scans with intervals of 318 days, 258 days, and 182 days separately. Conclusion: FDG PET/CT scan may be useful for monitoring responses to anti-TB treatment in patients with NRTB

  14. Quantitative and Visual Assessments toward Potential Sub-mSv or Ultrafast FDG PET Using High-Sensitivity TOF PET in PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Spencer C; Bahroos, Emma; Hawkins, Randall A; Nardo, Lorenzo; Ravanfar, Vahid; Capbarat, Emily V; Seo, Youngho

    2018-06-01

    Newer high-performance time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) systems have the capability to preserve diagnostic image quality with low count density, while maintaining a high raw photon detection sensitivity that would allow for a reduction in injected dose or rapid data acquisition. To assess this, we performed quantitative and visual assessments of the PET images acquired using a highly sensitive (23.3 cps/kBq) large field of view (25-cm axial) silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based TOF PET (400-ps timing resolution) integrated with 3 T-MRI in comparison to PET images acquired on non-TOF PET/x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems. Whole-body 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) PET/CT was acquired for 15 patients followed by whole body PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an average injected dose of 325 ± 84 MBq. The PET list mode data from PET/MRI were reconstructed using full datasets (4 min/bed) and reduced datasets (2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 min/bed). Qualitative assessment between PET/CT and PET/MR images were made. A Likert-type scale between 1 and 5, 1 for non-diagnostic, 3 equivalent to PET/CT, and 5 superior quality, was used. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) of normal tissues and lesions detected were measured and compared. Mean visual assessment scores were 3.54 ± 0.32, 3.62 ± 0.38, and 3.69 ± 0.35 for the brain and 3.05 ± 0.49, 3.71 ± 0.45, and 4.14 ± 0.44 for the whole-body maximum intensity projections (MIPs) for 1, 2, and 4 min/bed PET/MR images, respectively. The SUV mean values for normal tissues were lower and statistically significant for images acquired at 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 min/bed on the PET/MR, with values of - 18 ± 28 % (p PET/MR datasets. High-sensitivity TOF PET showed comparable but still better visual image quality even at a much reduced activity in comparison to lower-sensitivity non-TOF PET. Our data translates to a seven times

  15. Fully automated synthesis of 11C-acetate as tumor PET tracer by simple modified solid-phase extraction purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xiaolan; Tang, Ganghua; Nie, Dahong

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Automated synthesis of 11 C-acetate ( 11 C-AC) as the most commonly used radioactive fatty acid tracer is performed by a simple, rapid, and modified solid-phase extraction (SPE) purification. Methods: Automated synthesis of 11 C-AC was implemented by carboxylation reaction of MeMgBr on a polyethylene Teflon loop ring with 11 C-CO 2 , followed by acidic hydrolysis with acid and SCX cartridge, and purification on SCX, AG11A8 and C18 SPE cartridges using a commercially available 11 C-tracer synthesizer. Quality control test and animals positron emission tomography (PET) imaging were also carried out. Results: A high and reproducible decay-uncorrected radiochemical yield of (41.0±4.6)% (n=10) was obtained from 11 C-CO 2 within the whole synthesis time about 8 min. The radiochemical purity of 11 C-AC was over 95% by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Quality control test and PET imaging showed that 11 C-AC injection produced by the simple SPE procedure was safe and efficient, and was in agreement with the current Chinese radiopharmaceutical quality control guidelines. Conclusion: The novel, simple, and rapid method is readily adapted to the fully automated synthesis of 11 C-AC on several existing commercial synthesis module. The method can be used routinely to produce 11 C-AC for preclinical and clinical studies with PET imaging. - Highlights: • A fully automated synthesis of 11 C-acetate by simple modified solid-phase extraction purification has been developed. • Typical non-decay-corrected yields were (41.0±4.6)% (n=10) • Radiochemical purity was determined by radio-HPLC analysis on a C18 column using the gradient program, instead of expensive organic acid column or anion column. • QC testing (RCP>99%)

  16. Towards quantitative PET/MRI: a review of MR-based attenuation correction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pichler, Bernd; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Beyer, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a fully quantitative technology for imaging metabolic pathways and dynamic processes in vivo. Attenuation correction of raw PET data is a prerequisite for quantification and is typically based on separate transmission measurements. In PET/CT attenuation correction, however, is performed routinely based on the available CT transmission data. Recently, combined PET/magnetic resonance (MR) has been proposed as a viable alternative to PET/CT. Current concepts of PET/MRI do not include CT-like transmission sources and, therefore, alternative methods of PET attenuation correction must be found. This article reviews existing approaches to MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). Most groups have proposed MR-AC algorithms for brain PET studies and more recently also for torso PET/MR imaging. Most MR-AC strategies require the use of complementary MR and transmission images, or morphology templates generated from transmission images. We review and discuss these algorithms and point out challenges for using MR-AC in clinical routine. MR-AC is work-in-progress with potentially promising results from a template-based approach applicable to both brain and torso imaging. While efforts are ongoing in making clinically viable MR-AC fully automatic, further studies are required to realize the potential benefits of MR-based motion compensation and partial volume correction of the PET data.

  17. Towards quantitative PET/MRI: a review of MR-based attenuation correction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pichler, Bernd; Schoelkopf, Bernhard; Beyer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a fully quantitative technology for imaging metabolic pathways and dynamic processes in vivo. Attenuation correction of raw PET data is a prerequisite for quantification and is typically based on separate transmission measurements. In PET/CT attenuation correction, however, is performed routinely based on the available CT transmission data. Recently, combined PET/magnetic resonance (MR) has been proposed as a viable alternative to PET/CT. Current concepts of PET/MRI do not include CT-like transmission sources and, therefore, alternative methods of PET attenuation correction must be found. This article reviews existing approaches to MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). Most groups have proposed MR-AC algorithms for brain PET studies and more recently also for torso PET/MR imaging. Most MR-AC strategies require the use of complementary MR and transmission images, or morphology templates generated from transmission images. We review and discuss these algorithms and point out challenges for using MR-AC in clinical routine. MR-AC is work-in-progress with potentially promising results from a template-based approach applicable to both brain and torso imaging. While efforts are ongoing in making clinically viable MR-AC fully automatic, further studies are required to realize the potential benefits of MR-based motion compensation and partial volume correction of the PET data. (orig.)

  18. Towards quantitative PET/MRI: a review of MR-based attenuation correction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Matthias [Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tuebingen (Germany); University of Tuebingen, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); University of Oxford, Wolfson Medical Vision Laboratory, Department of Engineering Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); Pichler, Bernd [University of Tuebingen, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Schoelkopf, Bernhard [Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tuebingen (Germany); Beyer, Thomas [University Hospital Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Cmi-Experts GmbH, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-03-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a fully quantitative technology for imaging metabolic pathways and dynamic processes in vivo. Attenuation correction of raw PET data is a prerequisite for quantification and is typically based on separate transmission measurements. In PET/CT attenuation correction, however, is performed routinely based on the available CT transmission data. Recently, combined PET/magnetic resonance (MR) has been proposed as a viable alternative to PET/CT. Current concepts of PET/MRI do not include CT-like transmission sources and, therefore, alternative methods of PET attenuation correction must be found. This article reviews existing approaches to MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). Most groups have proposed MR-AC algorithms for brain PET studies and more recently also for torso PET/MR imaging. Most MR-AC strategies require the use of complementary MR and transmission images, or morphology templates generated from transmission images. We review and discuss these algorithms and point out challenges for using MR-AC in clinical routine. MR-AC is work-in-progress with potentially promising results from a template-based approach applicable to both brain and torso imaging. While efforts are ongoing in making clinically viable MR-AC fully automatic, further studies are required to realize the potential benefits of MR-based motion compensation and partial volume correction of the PET data. (orig.)

  19. Bone formation rather than inflammation reflects Ankylosing Spondylitis activity on PET-CT: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Bruijnen, Stefan TG; van der Weijden, Mignon AC; Klein, Joannes P; Hoekstra, Otto S; Boellaard, Ronald; van Denderen, J Christiaan; Dijkmans, Ben AC; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; van der Laken, Conny J

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Positron Emission Tomography - Computer Tomography (PET-CT) is an interesting imaging technique to visualize Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) activity using specific PET tracers. Previous studies have shown that the PET tracers [18F]FDG and [11C](R)PK11195 can target inflammation (synovitis) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and may therefore be useful in AS. Another interesting tracer for AS is [18F]Fluoride, which targets bone formation. In a pilot setting, the potential of PET-CT in ima...

  20. Adapting MR-BrainPET scans for comparison with conventional PET: experiences with dynamic FET-PET in brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Herzog, Hans; Kops, Elena Rota; Stoffels, Gabriele; Filss, Christian [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Coenen, Heinrich H; Shah, N Jon; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Imaging results from subsequent measurements (preclinical 3T MR-BrainPET, HR+) are compared. O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) may exhibit non-uniform tracer uptake in gliomas. The aim was to analyse and adapt the physical properties of the scanners and study variations of biological tumour volume (BTV) in early and late FET-PET.

  1. [1-11C]octanoate as a PET tracer for studying ischemic stroke. Evaluation in a canine model of thromboembolic stroke with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuge, Yuji; Kawashima, Hidefumi; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Octanoate is taken up by the brain and converted in astrocytes to glutamine through the TCA cycle after β-oxidation. Consequently, [1- 11 C]octanoate might serve as a useful positron emission tomography (PET) probe for studying cerebral oxidative metabolism and/or astroglial functions. The present study attempted to evaluate the utility of using [1- 11 C]octanoate as a PET tracer for imaging and evaluating the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. We used a canine model of thromboembolic stroke. Five male beagle dogs were implanted with an indwelling catheter in the left internal carotid artery. A single autologous blood clot was injected into the left internal carotid artery through the catheter. The brain distribution of [1- 11 C]octanoate and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were determined 24 h after insult using a high resolution PET scanner. Post mortem brain regions unstained with 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) were defined as infarcts. In the region of an infarct, accumulation of [1- 11 C]octanoate decreased concurrently with CBF reduction. In contrast, normal accumulation of [1- 11 C]octanoate was observed in ischemic but vital regions, suggesting that an increased accumulation of [1- 11 C]octanoate relative to CBF takes place in these regions. In conclusion, [1- 11 C]octanoate accumulated in ischemic but vital regions, indicating that [1- 11 C]octanoate is a potentially useful PET tracer for imaging and evaluating the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. (author)

  2. PET and PET-CT. State of the art and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanti, Stefano; Franchi, Roberto; Battista, Giuseppe; Monetti, Nino; Canini, Romeo

    2005-01-01

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) enables the in vivo study of tissue metabolism, and thus is able to identify malignant tumours as hypermetabolic lesions by an increase in tracer uptake. Many papers have demonstrated both the relevant impact of FDG PET on staging of many cancers and the superior accuracy of the technique compared with conventional diagnostic methods for pre-treatment evaluation, therapy response evaluation and relapse identification. In particular PET was found useful in identifying lymph nodal and metastatic spread. thus altering patient management in more than 30% of cases. PET images, however, provide limited anatomical data, which in regions such as the head and neck, mediastinum and pelvic cavity is a significant drawback. The exact localization of lesions may also be difficult in some cases, on the basis of PET images alone. The introduction of combined PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners enables the almost simultaneous acquisition of transmission and emission images, thus obtaining optimal fusion images in a very short time. PET-CT fusion images enable lesions to be located, reducing false positive studies and increasing accuracy; the overall duration of examination may also be reduced. On the basis of both literature data and our experience we established the clinical indications when PET-CT may be particularly useful, in comparison with PET alone. It should also be underlined that the use of PET-CT is almost mandatory for new traces such as C-choline and C-methionine; these new tracers may be applied for studying tumours not assessable with FDG, such as prostate cancer. In conclusion PET-CT is at present the most advanced method for metabolic imaging, and is capable of precisely localizing and assessing tumours; fusion images reduce false positive and inconclusive studies, thus increasing diagnostic accuracy [it

  3. Ultra-low Dose CT for Attenuation Correction of 82Rb Cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Balshøj; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen

    Aim: Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using cardiac PET with tracers like 82Rb and 15O-water is substantially lower in radiation dose than classic MIBI-based SPECT. However, for cardiac PET, the dose contribution of CT for attenuation correction (CTAC) is typically 20-30% of the total dose....... To reduce the total radiation dose of cardiac PET further, we set out to examine if the use of ultra-low dose CTAC (UL-CTAC) would affect the accuracy of the quantitative parameters related to MPI. Furthermore, we examined whether the low quality of the UL-CTAC would affect the technologist’s ability...... to perform manual adjustment for misalignment between PET and CTAC. The CT reconstruction algorithm Q.AC was used to improve quality and consistency of the CTAC. Method: 23 consecutive clinical patients (BMI: 26.9 [range: 15.4-38.8]) referred for 82Rb PET rest and stress imaging were included in the study...

  4. Quantitative Evaluation of Atlas-based Attenuation Correction for Brain PET in an Integrated Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaewon; Jian, Yiqiang; Jenkins, Nathaniel; Behr, Spencer C; Hope, Thomas A; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel; Seo, Youngho

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To assess the patient-dependent accuracy of atlas-based attenuation correction (ATAC) for brain positron emission tomography (PET) in an integrated time-of-flight (TOF) PET/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system. Materials and Methods Thirty recruited patients provided informed consent in this institutional review board-approved study. All patients underwent whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) followed by TOF PET/MR imaging. With use of TOF PET data, PET images were reconstructed with four different attenuation correction (AC) methods: PET with patient CT-based AC (CTAC), PET with ATAC (air and bone from an atlas), PET with ATAC patientBone (air and tissue from the atlas with patient bone), and PET with ATAC boneless (air and tissue from the atlas without bone). For quantitative evaluation, PET mean activity concentration values were measured in 14 1-mL volumes of interest (VOIs) distributed throughout the brain and statistical significance was tested with a paired t test. Results The mean overall difference (±standard deviation) of PET with ATAC compared with PET with CTAC was -0.69 kBq/mL ± 0.60 (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET with ATAC boneless (-9.4% ± 3.7) was significantly worse than that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET with ATAC patientBone (-1.5% ± 1.5) improved over that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET/MR imaging achieves similar quantification accuracy to that from CTAC by means of atlas-based bone compensation. However, patient-specific anatomic differences from the atlas causes bone attenuation differences and misclassified sinuses, which result in patient-dependent performance variation of ATAC. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  5. [18F]FE rate at SUPPY: a suitable PET tracer for the adenosine A3 receptor? An in vivo study in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusler, Daniela; Zeilinger, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus; Mitterhauser, Markus; Kuntner, Claudia; Wanek, Thomas; Langer, Oliver; Nics, Lukas; Savli, Markus; Lanzenberger, Rupert R.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Shanab, Karem; Spreitzer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The adenosine A 3 receptor (A3R) is involved in cardiovascular, neurological and tumour-related pathologies and serves as an exceptional pharmaceutical target in the clinical setting. A3R antagonists are considered antiinflammatory, antiallergic and anticancer agents, and to have potential for the treatment of asthma, COPD, glaucoma and stroke. Hence, an appropriate A3R PET tracer would be highly beneficial for the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of these diseases. Therefore, in this preclinical in vivo study we evaluated the potential as a PET tracer of the A3R antagonist [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY. Rats were injected with [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY for baseline scans and blocking scans (A3R with MRS1523 or FE rate at SUPPY, P-gp with tariquidar; three animals each). Additionally, metabolism was studied in plasma and brain. In a preliminary experiment in a mouse xenograft model (mice injected with cells expressing the human A3R; three animals), the animals received [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY and [ 18 F]FDG. Dynamic PET imaging was performed (60 min in rats, 90 min in xenografted mice). In vitro stability of [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY in human and rat plasma was also evaluated. [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY showed high uptake in fat-rich regions and low uptake in the brain. Pretreatment with MRS1523 led to a decrease in [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY uptake (p = 0.03), and pretreatment with the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar led to a 1.24-fold increase in [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY uptake (p = 0.09) in rat brain. There was no significant difference in metabolites in plasma and brain in the treatment groups. However, plasma concentrations of [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY were reduced to levels similar to those in rat brain after blocking. In contrast to [ 18 F]FDG uptake (p = 0.12), the xenograft model showed significantly increased uptake of [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY in the tissue masses from CHO cells expressing the human A3R (p = 0.03). [ 18 F]FE rate at SUPPY was stable in human plasma. Selective and

  6. Test-retest reliability of {sup 11}C-ORM-13070 in PET imaging of α{sub 2C}-adrenoceptors in vivo in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehto, Jussi; Peltonen, Juha M.; Volanen, Iina; Scheinin, Mika [University of Turku, Clinical Research Services Turku CRST, Turku (Finland); TYKSLAB, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Turku (Finland); Virta, Jere R. [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku (Finland); Oikonen, Vesa; Roivainen, Anne; Luoto, Pauliina; Arponen, Eveliina; Helin, Semi; Virtanen, Kirsi [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Hietamaeki, Johanna; Holopainen, Aila; Rouru, Juha; Sallinen, Jukka [Orion Pharma, Turku (Finland); Kailajaervi, Marita [Turku Imanet, GE Healthcare, Turku (Finland); Rinne, Juha O. [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Clinical Research Services Turku CRST, Turku (Finland)

    2015-01-15

    α{sub 2C}-Adrenoceptors share inhibitory presynaptic functions with the more abundant α{sub 2A}-adrenoceptor subtype, but they also have widespread postsynaptic modulatory functions in the brain. Research on the noradrenergic system of the human brain has been hampered by the lack of suitable PET tracers targeted to the α{sub 2}-adrenoceptor subtypes. PET imaging with the specific α{sub 2C}-adrenoceptor antagonist tracer [{sup 11}C]ORM-13070 was performed twice in six healthy male subjects to investigate the test-retest reliability of tracer binding. The bound/free ratio of tracer uptake relative to nonspecific uptake into the cerebellum during the time interval of 5 - 30 min was most prominent in the dorsal striatum: 0.77 in the putamen and 0.58 in the caudate nucleus. Absolute test-retest variability in bound/free ratios of tracer ranged from 4.3 % in the putamen to 29 % in the hippocampus. Variability was also <10 % in the caudate nucleus and thalamus. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) ranged from 0.50 in the hippocampus to 0.89 in the thalamus (ICC >0.70 was also reached in the caudate nucleus, putamen, lateral frontal cortex and parietal cortex). The pattern of [{sup 11}C]ORM-13070 binding, as determined by PET, was in good agreement with receptor density results previously derived from post-mortem autoradiography. PET data analysis results obtained with a compartmental model fit, the simplified reference tissue model and a graphical reference tissue analysis method were convergent with the tissue ratio method. The results of this study support the use of [{sup 11}C]ORM-13070 PET in the quantitative assessment of α{sub 2C}-adrenoceptors in the human brain in vivo. Reliable assessment of specific tracer binding in the dorsal striatum is possible with the help of reference tissue ratios. (orig.)

  7. The 2D Hotelling filter - a quantitative noise-reducing principal-component filter for dynamic PET data, with applications in patient dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, Jan; Sörensen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we apply the principal-component analysis filter (Hotelling filter) to reduce noise from dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET) patient data, for a number of different radio-tracer molecules. We furthermore show how preprocessing images with this filter improves parametric images created from such dynamic sequence. We use zero-mean unit variance normalization, prior to performing a Hotelling filter on the slices of a dynamic time-series. The Scree-plot technique was used to determine which principal components to be rejected in the filter process. This filter was applied to [ 11 C]-acetate on heart and head-neck tumors, [ 18 F]-FDG on liver tumors and brain, and [ 11 C]-Raclopride on brain. Simulations of blood and tissue regions with noise properties matched to real PET data, was used to analyze how quantitation and resolution is affected by the Hotelling filter. Summing varying parts of a 90-frame [ 18 F]-FDG brain scan, we created 9-frame dynamic scans with image statistics comparable to 20 MBq, 60 MBq and 200 MBq injected activity. Hotelling filter performed on slices (2D) and on volumes (3D) were compared. The 2D Hotelling filter reduces noise in the tissue uptake drastically, so that it becomes simple to manually pick out regions-of-interest from noisy data. 2D Hotelling filter introduces less bias than 3D Hotelling filter in focal Raclopride uptake. Simulations show that the Hotelling filter is sensitive to typical blood peak in PET prior to tissue uptake have commenced, introducing a negative bias in early tissue uptake. Quantitation on real dynamic data is reliable. Two examples clearly show that pre-filtering the dynamic sequence with the Hotelling filter prior to Patlak-slope calculations gives clearly improved parametric image quality. We also show that a dramatic dose reduction can be achieved for Patlak slope images without changing image quality or quantitation. The 2D Hotelling-filtering of dynamic PET data is a computer

  8. Differentiation of Brain Tumor Recurrence from Post-Radiotherapy Necrosis with 11C-Methionine PET: Visual Assessment versus Quantitative Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryogo Minamimoto

    Full Text Available The aim of this multi-center study was to assess the diagnostic capability of visual assessment in L-methyl-11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET for differentiating a recurrent brain tumor from radiation-induced necrosis after radiotherapy, and to compare it to the accuracy of quantitative analysis.A total of 73 brain lesions (glioma: 31, brain metastasis: 42 in 70 patients who underwent MET-PET were included in this study. Visual analysis was performed by comparison of MET uptake in the brain lesion with MET uptake in one of four regions (around the lesion, contralateral frontal lobe, contralateral area, and contralateral cerebellar cortex. The concordance rate and logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate the diagnostic ability of visual assessment. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to compare visual assessment with quantitative assessment based on the lesion-to-normal (L/N ratio of MET uptake.Interobserver and intraobserver κ-values were highest at 0.657 and 0.714, respectively, when assessing MET uptake in the lesion compared to that in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. Logistic regression analysis showed that assessing MET uptake in the contralateral cerebellar cortex with brain metastasis was significantly related to the final result. The highest area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC with visual assessment for brain metastasis was 0.85, showing no statistically significant difference with L/Nmax of the contralateral brain (AUC = 0.89 or with L/Nmean of the contralateral cerebellar cortex (AUC = 0.89, which were the areas that were the highest in the quantitative assessment. For evaluation of gliomas, no specific candidate was confirmed among the four areas used in visual assessment, and no significant difference was seen between visual assessment and quantitative assessment.The visual assessment showed no significant difference from quantitative assessment of MET-PET

  9. Quantitative myocardial perfusion PET parametric imaging at the voxel-level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Rahmim, Arman; Lodge, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) PET has the potential to enhance detection of early stages of atherosclerosis or microvascular dysfunction, characterization of flow-limiting effects of coronary artery disease (CAD), and identification of balanced reduction of flow due to multivessel stenosis. We aim to enable quantitative MP-PET at the individual voxel level, which has the potential to allow enhanced visualization and quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve (MFR) as computed from uptake parametric images. This framework is especially challenging for the 82 Rb radiotracer. The short half-life enables fast serial imaging and high patient throughput; yet, the acquired dynamic PET images suffer from high noise-levels introducing large variability in uptake parametric images and, therefore, in the estimates of MBF and MFR. Robust estimation requires substantial post-smoothing of noisy data, degrading valuable functional information of physiological and pathological importance. We present a feasible and robust approach to generate parametric images at the voxel-level that substantially reduces noise without significant loss of spatial resolution. The proposed methodology, denoted physiological clustering, makes use of the functional similarity of voxels to penalize deviation of voxel kinetics from physiological partners. The results were validated using extensive simulations (with transmural and non-transmural perfusion defects) and clinical studies. Compared to post-smoothing, physiological clustering depicted enhanced quantitative noise versus bias performance as well as superior recovery of perfusion defects (as quantified by CNR) with minimal increase in bias. Overall, parametric images obtained from the proposed methodology were robust in the presence of high-noise levels as manifested in the voxel time-activity-curves. (paper)

  10. TH-E-202-02: The Use of Hypoxia PET Imaging for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  11. TH-E-202-02: The Use of Hypoxia PET Imaging for Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humm, J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  12. Amyloid PET in pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Cortés-Martínez, Ana; Pytel, Vanesa; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-07-01

    Pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis is a rare form of demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Positron emission tomography (PET) using amyloid-tracers has also been suggested as a marker of damage in white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis due to the nonspecific uptake of these tracers in white matter. We present the case of a 59 year-old woman with a pathological-confirmed pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis, who was studied with the amyloid tracer 18 F-florbetaben. The patient had developed word-finding difficulties and right hemianopia twelve years ago. In that time, MRI showed a lesion on the left hemisphere with an infiltrating aspect in frontotemporal lobes. Brain biopsy showed demyelinating areas and inflammation. During the following years, two new clinical relapses occurred. 18 F-florbetaben PET showed lower uptake in the white matter lesion visualized in the CT and MRI images. Decreased tracer uptake was also observed in a larger area of the left hemisphere beyond the lesions observed on MRI or CT. White matter lesion volume on FLAIR was 44.2mL, and tracer uptake change between damaged white matter and normal appearing white matter was - 40.5%. Standardized uptake value was inferior in the pseudotumoral lesion than in the other white matter lesions. We report the findings of amyloid PET in a patient with pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis. This case provides further evidence on the role of amyloid PET in the assessment of white matter and demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent and ancient recharge deciphered by multi-dating tracer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramaci, Shawan; Cook, Peter; Mccallum, Jimes; Purtchert, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Determining groundwater residence time from environmental tracer concentrations obtained from open bores or long screened intervals is fraught with difficulty because the sampled water represents variety of ages. Information on the distribution of groundwater age is commonly obtained by measuring more than one tracer. We examined the use of the multi-tracer technique representing different time frames (39Ar, 85Kr, 14C, 3H, CFC 11- CFC-12 CFC-113, SF6 and Cl,) to decipher the groundwater ages sampled from long screened bores in a regional aquifer in the Pilbara region of northwest Australia. We then applied a technique that assumes limited details of the form of the age distribution. Tracer concentrations suggest that groundwater samples are a mixture of young and old water - the former is inferred to represent localised recharge from an adjacent creek, and the latter to be diffuse recharge. Using our method, we were able to identify distinct age components in the groundwater. The results suggest the presence of four distinct age groups; zero and 20 years, 50 to 100 years, 100 to 600 years and approximately 1000 years old. These relatively high recharge events were consistent with local recharge sources (50-100 years) and confirmed by palaeo-climate record obtained from lake sediments. We found that although the ages of these components were well constrained, the relative proportions of each component was highly sensitive to errors of environmental tracer data. Our results show that the method we implemented can identify distinct age groups in groundwater samples without prior knowledge of the age distribution. The presence of distinct recharge times gives insight into groundwater flow conditions over long periods of time.

  14. Automatic monitoring of radial injection tracer tests using a novel multi-electrode resistivity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, R.S.; Sen, M.A.; Williams, G.M.; Jackson, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    A radial injection tracer test has been carried out in an unconfined fluvial sand and gravel aquifer underlain by low permeability clay. Sodium chloride has been used as an electrolyte tracer and breakthrough has been monitored using a newly developed automatic resistivity system (RESCAN) incorporating six fully penetrating resistivity probes each having 80 electrodes spaced at 5 cm intervals along their length. Each electrode is individually addressable under computer control to either carry current or measure potential. Any four electrodes can be selected in the traditional Wenner configuration to measure formation resistivity. Rapid measurement of changes in resistivity allows a very detailed picture of tracer migration to be obtained. The resistivity probes were placed at 1 and 2 m radii from the central fully-screened tracer injection well along three limbs at 120 degrees. Resistivity measurements were compared with adjacent multi-level samplers. An 8 x 8 m grid of 140 surface electrodes centred on the central well was also installed. The resistivity profiles measured prior to tracer injection were used to infer lithology, particularly layering. Detailed breakthrough curves were obtained at 77 positions along each of the six probes and compared with adjacent multi-level sampler breakthrough curves. The results showed that the aquifer was extremely heterogeneous even on this small scale. Because the system operates automatically without the need to extract and analyse large numbers of water samples, it opens up the possibility of carrying out lots of small scale injection tests within a larger domain likely to be invaded by a tracer or pollution plume. Such detailed information for determining aquifer properties can provide the data set necessary for characterisation of the aquifer to predict dispersion parameters appropriate to the large scale. (Author) (6 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.)

  15. Quantitative kinetic analysis of PET amyloid imaging agents [11C]BF227 and [18F]FACT in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shidahara, Miho; Watabe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Manabu; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Watanuki, Shoichi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arakawa, Yuma; Funaki, Yoshihito; Iwata, Ren; Gonda, Kohsuke; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare two amyloid imaging agents, [ 11 C]BF227 and [ 18 F]FACT (derivative from [ 11 C]BF227) through quantitative pharmacokinetics analysis in human brain. Methods: Positron emission tomography studies were performed on six elderly healthy control (HC) subjects and seven probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients with [ 11 C]BF227 and 10 HC subjects and 10 probable AD patients with [ 18 F]FACT. Data from nine regions of interest were analyzed by several approaches, namely non-linear least-squared fitting methods with arterial input functions (one-tissue compartment model(1TCM), two-tissue compartment model (2TCM)), Logan plot, and linearized methods with reference region (Reference Logan plot (RefLogan), MRTM0, MRTM2). We also evaluated SUV and SUVR for both tracers. The parameters estimated by several approaches were compared between two tracers for detectability of differences between HC and AD patients. Results: For [ 11 C]BF227, there were no significant difference of V T (2TCM, 1TCM) and SUV in all regions (Student t-test; p < 0.05) and significant differences in the DVRs (Logan, RefLogan, and MRTM2) and SUVRs in six neocortical regions (p < 0.05) between the HC and AD groups. For [ 18 F]FACT, significant differences in DVRs (RefLogan, MRTM0, and MRTM2) were observed in more than four neocortical regions between the HC and AD groups (p < 0.05), and the significant differences were found in SUVRs for two neocortical regions (inferior frontal coretex and lateral temporal coretex). Our results showed that both tracers can clearly distinguish between HC and AD groups although the pharmacokinetics and distribution patterns in brain for two tracers were substantially different. Conclusion: This study revealed that although the PET amyloid imaging agents [ 11 C]BF227 and [ 18 F]FACT have similar chemical and biological properties, they have different pharmacokinetics, and caution must be paid for usage of the

  16. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  17. A GATE evaluation of the sources of error in quantitative {sup 90}Y PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydhorst, Jared, E-mail: jared.strydhorst@gmail.com; Buvat, Irène [IMIV, U1023 Inserm/CEA/Université Paris-Sud and ERL 9218 CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, CEA/SHFJ, Orsay 91401 (France); Carlier, Thomas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nantes and CRCNA, Inserm U892, Nantes 44000 (France); Dieudonné, Arnaud [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hôpital Beaujon, HUPNVS, APHP and Inserm U1149, Clichy 92110 (France); Conti, Maurizio [Siemens Healthcare Molecular Imaging, Knoxville, Tennessee, 37932 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate reconstruction of the dose delivered by {sup 90}Y microspheres using a postembolization PET scan would permit the establishment of more accurate dose–response relationships for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with {sup 90}Y. However, the quality of the PET data obtained is compromised by several factors, including poor count statistics and a very high random fraction. This work uses Monte Carlo simulations to investigate what impact factors other than low count statistics have on the quantification of {sup 90}Y PET. Methods: PET acquisitions of two phantoms—a NEMA PET phantom and the NEMA IEC PET body phantom-containing either {sup 90}Y or {sup 18}F were simulated using GATE. Simulated projections were created with subsets of the simulation data allowing the contributions of random, scatter, and LSO background to be independently evaluated. The simulated projections were reconstructed using the commercial software for the simulated scanner, and the quantitative accuracy of the reconstruction and the contrast recovery of the reconstructed images were evaluated. Results: The quantitative accuracy of the {sup 90}Y reconstructions were not strongly influenced by the high random fraction present in the projection data, and the activity concentration was recovered to within 5% of the known value. The contrast recovery measured for simulated {sup 90}Y data was slightly poorer than that for simulated {sup 18}F data with similar count statistics. However, the degradation was not strongly linked to any particular factor. Using a more restricted energy range to reduce the random fraction in the projections had no significant effect. Conclusions: Simulations of {sup 90}Y PET confirm that quantitative {sup 90}Y is achievable with the same approach as that used for {sup 18}F, and that there is likely very little margin for improvement by attempting to model aspects unique to {sup 90}Y, such as the much higher random fraction or the presence of

  18. Development of PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals to study multi-drug resistance (MDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsififs, A.; Dikic, B.; Greguric, I.; Knott, R.; Mattner, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Cellular resistance or Multidrug Resistance (MDR) to cytotoxic agents is the major cause of treatment failure in many human cancers. P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a Mr 17,0000 transmembrane protein and Multi Resistance Protein (MRP) are two proteins that are over expressed and confer resistance to a large number of chemotherapeutic agents by enhancing their extracellular transport. P-glycoprotein is expressed at a relative high level in treated and untreated human malignant tumours, including renal, colonic, adrenal, hepatocellular carcinoma and a considerable percentage of breast carcinomas. 99m Tc-Sestamibi, a lipophilic cationic complex is a transport substrate for Pgp. In clinical studies of human neoplasms it was found that tumour uptake and clearance of this tracer correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of MDR. However, new tracers with better substrate specificity for Pgp and other drug transporters would greatly assist in optimising chemotherapeutic treatment and improving patient management by predicting tumour response to therapy and to assist in the development of antagonists, which may reverse or halt MDR. The aim of this project is therefore to develop PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals with improved affinity and selectivity for Pgp and MRP for the clinical evaluation of MDR in cancer patients. To optimise cellular transport characteristics, a number of chemical families that have been found to be substrates of Pgp and other drug efflux pumps, will be investigated. In the first instance, a series of drugs based on the flavonol natural product, Quercetin will be developed, screened for MDR and radiolabelled with PET and SPECT isotopes. Quercetin and related flavonol derivatives have been selected for this project because of their moderate to good affinity for Pgp. With the assistance of molecular modeling and in vitro studies, structural modification will be undertaken to improve the specificity and affinity for

  19. Demonstration of metabolic and cellular effects of portal vein ligation using multi-modal PET/MRI measurements in healthy rat liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Fülöp

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In the early recognition of portal vein ligation (PVL induced tumor progression, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI could improve diagnostic accuracy of conventionally used methods. It is unknown how PVL affects metabolic patterns of tumor free hepatic tissues. The aim of this preliminary study is to evaluate the effect of PVL on glucose metabolism, using PET/MRI imaging in healthy rat liver. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Wistar rats (n=30 underwent PVL. 2-deoxy-2-(18Ffluoro-D-glucose (FDG PET/MRI imaging (nanoScan PET/MRI and morphological/histological examination were performed before (Day 0 and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after PVL. Dynamic PET data were collected and the standardized uptake values (SUV for ligated and non-ligated liver lobes were calculated in relation to cardiac left ventricle (SUVVOI/SUVCLV and mean liver SUV (SUVVOI/SUVLiver. RESULTS: PVL induced atrophy of ligated lobes, while non-ligated liver tissue showed compensatory hypertrophy. Dynamic PET scan revealed altered FDG kinetics in both ligated and non-ligated liver lobes. SUVVOI/SUVCLV significantly increased in both groups of lobes, with a maximal value at the 2nd postoperative day and returned near to the baseline 7 days after the ligation. After PVL, ligated liver lobes showed significantly higher tracer uptake compared to the non-ligated lobes (significantly higher SUVVOI/SUVLiver values were observed at postoperative day 1, 2 and 3. The homogenous tracer biodistribution observed before PVL reappeared by 7th postoperative day. CONCLUSION: The observed alterations in FDG uptake dynamics should be taken into account during the assessment of PET data until the PVL induced atrophic and regenerative processes are completed.

  20. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of 18F-labeled 4-thia palmitate as a PET tracer of myocardial fatty acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrado, Timothy R.; Wang Shuyan; Holden, James E.; Nickles, R. Jerome; Taylor, Michael; Stone, Charles K.

    2000-01-01

    Interest remains strong for the development of a noninvasive technique for assessment of regional fatty acid oxidation rate in the myocardium. 18 F-labeled 4-thia palmitate (FTP, 16-[ 18 F]fluoro-4-thia-hexadecanoic acid) has been synthesized and preliminarily evaluated as a metabolically trapped probe of myocardial fatty acid oxidation for positron emission tomography (PET). The radiotracer is synthesized by Kryptofix 2.2.2/K 2 CO 3 assisted nucleophilic radiofluorination of an iodo-ester precursor, followed by alkaline hydrolysis and by purification by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Biodistribution studies in rats showed high uptake and long retention of FTP in heart, liver, and kidneys consistent with relatively high fatty acid oxidation rates in these tissues. Inhibition of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase-I caused an 80% reduction in myocardial uptake, suggesting the dependence of trapping on the transport of tracer into the mitochondrion. Experiments with perfused rat hearts showed that the estimates of the fractional metabolic trapping rate (FR) of FTP tracked inhibition of oxidation rate of palmitate with hypoxia, whereas the FR of the 6-thia analog 17-[ 18 F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid was insensitive to hypoxia. In vivo defluorination of FTP in the rat was evidenced by bone uptake of radioactivity. A PET imaging study with FTP in normal swine showed excellent myocardial images, prolonged myocardial retention, and no bone uptake of radioactivity up to 3 h, the last finding suggesting a species dependence for defluorination of the omega-labeled fatty acid. The results support further investigation of FTP as a potential PET tracer for assessing regional fatty acid oxidation rate in the human myocardium

  1. Predicting standard-dose PET image from low-dose PET and multimodal MR images using mapping-based sparse representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Jiliu; Zhang, Pei; An, Le; Ma, Guangkai; Kang, Jiayin; Shi, Feng; Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Xi; Lalush, David S; Lin, Weili

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical diagnosis for diseases and disorders. To obtain high-quality PET images requires a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) injection into the human body, which inevitably increases risk of radiation exposure. One possible solution to this problem is to predict the standard-dose PET image from its low-dose counterpart and its corresponding multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Inspired by the success of patch-based sparse representation (SR) in super-resolution image reconstruction, we propose a mapping-based SR (m-SR) framework for standard-dose PET image prediction. Compared with the conventional patch-based SR, our method uses a mapping strategy to ensure that the sparse coefficients, estimated from the multimodal MR images and low-dose PET image, can be applied directly to the prediction of standard-dose PET image. As the mapping between multimodal MR images (or low-dose PET image) and standard-dose PET images can be particularly complex, one step of mapping is often insufficient. To this end, an incremental refinement framework is therefore proposed. Specifically, the predicted standard-dose PET image is further mapped to the target standard-dose PET image, and then the SR is performed again to predict a new standard-dose PET image. This procedure can be repeated for prediction refinement of the iterations. Also, a patch selection based dictionary construction method is further used to speed up the prediction process. The proposed method is validated on a human brain dataset. The experimental results show that our method can outperform benchmark methods in both qualitative and quantitative measures. (paper)

  2. Impact of PET/CT system, reconstruction protocol, data analysis method, and repositioning on PET/CT precision: An experimental evaluation using an oncology and brain phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Syahir; Pfaehler, Elisabeth; Heijtel, Dennis; Lodge, Martin A; Boellaard, Ronald; Yaqub, Maqsood

    2017-12-01

    In longitudinal oncological and brain PET/CT studies, it is important to understand the repeatability of quantitative PET metrics in order to assess change in tracer uptake. The present studies were performed in order to assess precision as function of PET/CT system, reconstruction protocol, analysis method, scan duration (or image noise), and repositioning in the field of view. Multiple (repeated) scans have been performed using a NEMA image quality (IQ) phantom and a 3D Hoffman brain phantom filled with 18 F solutions on two systems. Studies were performed with and without randomly (PET/CT, especially in the case of smaller spheres (PET metrics depends on the combination of reconstruction protocol, data analysis methods and scan duration (scan statistics). Moreover, precision was also affected by phantom repositioning but its impact depended on the data analysis method in combination with the reconstructed voxel size (tissue fraction effect). This study suggests that for oncological PET studies the use of SUV peak may be preferred over SUV max because SUV peak is less sensitive to patient repositioning/tumor sampling. © 2017 The Authors. Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Somatostatin receptor PET in neuroendocrine tumours: 68Ga-DOTA0,Tyr3-octreotide versus 68Ga-DOTA0-lanreotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putzer, Daniel; Kroiss, Alexander; Waitz, Dietmar; Gabriel, Michael; Uprimny, Christian; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Virgolini, Irene Johanna; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Widmann, Gerlig

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 68 Ga-labelled DOTA 0 -lanreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN) on the diagnostic assessment of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients with low to moderate uptake on planar somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy or 68 Ga-labelled DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 -octreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC) positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed NET and clinical signs of progressive disease, who had not qualified for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on planar SSTR scintigraphy or 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET (n = 38) due to lack of tracer uptake, underwent 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN PET to evaluate a treatment option with 90 Y-labelled lanreotide according to the MAURITIUS trial. The included patients received 150 ± 30 MBq of each radiopharmaceutical intravenously. PET scans were acquired 60-90 min after intravenous bolus injection. Image results from both PET scans were compared head to head, focusing on the intensity of tracer uptake in terms of treatment decision. CT was used for morphologic correlation of tumour lesions. To further evaluate the binding affinities of each tracer, quantitative and qualitative values were calculated for target lesions. 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN and 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC both showed equivalent findings in 24/38 patients when fused PET/CT images were interpreted. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN in comparison to CT were 0.63, 0.5 and 0.62 (n = 53; p 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC in comparison to CT 0.78, 0.5 and 0.76 (n = 38; p 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC showed a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) regarding the primary tumour in 25 patients (p 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN. Corresponding values of both PET scans for tumour and liver did not show any significant correlation. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC revealed more tumour sites than 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN (106 vs 53). The tumour to background ratios for tumour and liver calculated from SUV max measurements were significantly higher for 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC than 68 Ga

  4. PET tracer for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a radiolabelled peptide-based compound for diagnostic imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). The compound may thus be used for diagnosis of malignant diseases. The compound is particularly useful for imaging of somatostatin overexpression in tumors, wherein the compound...... is capable of being imaged by PET when administered with a target dose in the range of 150-350 MBq, such as 150-250 MBq, preferable in the range of 191-210 MBq....

  5. A novel APD-based detector module for multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saoudi, A.; Lecomte, R.

    1999-01-01

    The lack of anatomical information in SPECT and PET images is one of the major factors limiting the ability to localize and accurately quantify radionuclide uptake in small regions of interest. This problem could be resolved by using multi-modality scanners having the capability to acquire anatomical and functional images simultaneously. The feasibility of a novel detector suitable for measuring high-energy annihilation radiation in PET, medium-energy γ-rays in SPECT and low-energy X-rays in transmission CT is demonstrated and its performance is evaluated for potential use in multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT imaging. The proposed detector consists of a thin CsI(Tl) scintillator sitting on top of a deep GSO/LSO pair read out by an avalanche photodiode. The GSO/LOS pair provides depth-of-interaction information for 511 keV detection in PET, while the thin CsI(Tl) that is essentially transparent to annihilation radiation is used for detecting lower energy X- and γ-rays. The detector performance is compared to that of an LSO/YSO phoswich. Although the implementation of the proposed GSO/LSO/CsI(Tl) detector raises special problems that increase complexity, it generally outperforms the LSO/YSO phoswich for simultaneous PET, SPECT and CT imaging

  6. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-01

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq 18F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  7. Bringing Physiology into PET of the Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Keiding, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Several physiologic features make interpretation of PET studies of liver physiology an exciting challenge. As with other organs, hepatic tracer kinetics using PET is quantified by dynamic recording of the liver after the administration of a radioactive tracer, with measurements of time–activity curves in the blood supply. However, the liver receives blood from both the portal vein and the hepatic artery, with the peak of the portal vein time–activity curve being delayed and dispersed compared...

  8. Evaluation of acetazolamine response in patients with cerebellar ataxia using dynamic quantitative F-18-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, M. H.; Lee, K. M.; Yeo, J. S.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    Cerebellar Ataxia (CA) usually shows dramatic response to acetazolamide treatment. But few cases of acetazolamide unresponse CA were reported recently. Using dynamic FDG PET, we tried to evaluate the metabolic abnormality and its drug response in CA. Quantitative F-18-FDG PET was performed prior and after treatment of acetazolamide (250 mg qid for 10 days) in two patient suspected episodic cerebellar ataxia. Using Model-based clustering method, the regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate (rCMRglu) was calculated. Two patients showed different treatment response to acetazolamide. In one patient who showed markedly reduced frequency of the ataxic attack after treatment. FDG PET showed that mean cerebellar glucose metabolism was increased after treatment (ΔrCMRglu:9%). However, in the other who showed poor response to acetazolamide, FDG PET showed the more decrease metabolism in cerebellar metabolism after treatment (ΔrCMRglu:-17%). The change of the cerebellar glucose metabolism on FDG PET reflected the symptomatic improvement after acetazolamide in these two CA patients. We could expected that FDG PET might be a very useful tool to quantitatively predict the treatment response in CA and other neurologic disorder

  9. A multi-atlas based method for automated anatomical rat brain MRI segmentation and extraction of PET activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancelot, Sophie; Roche, Roxane; Slimen, Afifa; Bouillot, Caroline; Levigoureux, Elise; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Zimmer, Luc; Costes, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical in vivo imaging requires precise and reproducible delineation of brain structures. Manual segmentation is time consuming and operator dependent. Automated segmentation as usually performed via single atlas registration fails to account for anatomo-physiological variability. We present, evaluate, and make available a multi-atlas approach for automatically segmenting rat brain MRI and extracting PET activies. High-resolution 7T 2DT2 MR images of 12 Sprague-Dawley rat brains were manually segmented into 27-VOI label volumes using detailed protocols. Automated methods were developed with 7/12 atlas datasets, i.e. the MRIs and their associated label volumes. MRIs were registered to a common space, where an MRI template and a maximum probability atlas were created. Three automated methods were tested: 1/registering individual MRIs to the template, and using a single atlas (SA), 2/using the maximum probability atlas (MP), and 3/registering the MRIs from the multi-atlas dataset to an individual MRI, propagating the label volumes and fusing them in individual MRI space (propagation & fusion, PF). Evaluation was performed on the five remaining rats which additionally underwent [18F]FDG PET. Automated and manual segmentations were compared for morphometric performance (assessed by comparing volume bias and Dice overlap index) and functional performance (evaluated by comparing extracted PET measures). Only the SA method showed volume bias. Dice indices were significantly different between methods (PF>MP>SA). PET regional measures were more accurate with multi-atlas methods than with SA method. Multi-atlas methods outperform SA for automated anatomical brain segmentation and PET measure's extraction. They perform comparably to manual segmentation for FDG-PET quantification. Multi-atlas methods are suitable for rapid reproducible VOI analyses.

  10. Systematic screening of imaging biomarkers for the Islets of Langerhans, among clinically available positron emission tomography tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Filip; Antonodimitrakis, Pantelis Clewemar; Eriksson, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Functional imaging could be utilized for visualizing pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Therefore, we present a stepwise algorithm for screening of clinically available positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for their use in imaging of the neuroendocrine pancreas in the context of diabetes. Methods: A stepwise procedure was developed for screening potential islet imaging agents. Suitable PET-tracer candidates were identified by their molecular mechanism of targeting. Clinical abdominal examinations were retrospectively analyzed for pancreatic uptake and retention. The target protein localization in the pancreas was assessed in silico by –omics approaches and the in vitro by binding assays to human pancreatic tissue. Results: Six putative candidates were identified and screened by using the stepwise procedure. Among the tested PET tracers, only [ 11 C]5-Hydroxy-tryptophan passed all steps. The remaining identified candidates were falsified as candidates and discarded following in silico and in vitro screening. Conclusions: Of the six clinically available PET tracers identified, [ 11 C]5-HTP was found to be a promising candidate for beta cell imaging, based on intensity of in vivo pancreatic uptake in humans, and islet specificity as assessed on human pancreatic cell preparations. The flow scheme described herein constitutes a methodology for evaluating putative islet imaging biomarkers among clinically available PET tracers

  11. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik

    Background: Dynamic PET can be used to extract forward stroke volume (FSV) by the indicator dilution principle. The technique employed can be automated and is in theory independent on the tracer used and may therefore be added to any dynamic cardiac PET protocol. The aim of this study...... was to validate automated methods for extracting FSV directly from dynamic PET studies for two different tracers and to examine potential scanner hardware bias. Methods: 21 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner (scanner I). In addition, 8...... subjects underwent a dynamic 6 min 15O-water PET scan followed by a 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a GE Discovery ST PET/CT scanner (scanner II). The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic...

  12. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, T.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  13. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, T. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  14. FDG PET/CT in infection and inflammation—current and emerging clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Patel, C.N.; Scarsbrook, A.F.; Chowdhury, F.U.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with the glucose analogue, 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), is an evolving hybrid imaging technique in the evaluation of an important and diverse group of pathological conditions, which are characterised by infection and aseptic inflammation. With a rapidly expanding body of evidence, it is being increasingly recognised that, in addition to its established role in oncological imaging, FDG PET/CT also has clinical utility in suspected infection and inflammation. The technique can identify the source of infection or inflammation in a timely fashion ahead of morphological changes on conventional anatomical imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), map the extent and severity of disease, identify sites for tissue sampling, and assess therapy response. FDG PET/CT exhibits distinct advantages over traditional radionuclide imaging techniques in terms of shorter duration of examination, higher spatial resolution, non-invasive nature of acquisition, ability to perform quantitative analyses, and the provision of a synergistic combination of functional and anatomical imaging. With the use of illustrative clinico-radiological cases, this article discusses the current and emerging evidence for the use of FDG PET/CT in a broad spectrum of disorders, such as fever of unknown origin, sarcoidosis, large vessel vasculitis, musculoskeletal infections, joint prosthesis or implant-related complications, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related infections, and miscellaneous indications, such as IgG4-related systemic disease. It will also briefly summarise the role of more novel tracers such as FDG-labelled leukocytes and gallium-68 PET tracers in this arena

  15. Improvement of semi-quantitative small-animal PET data with recovery coefficients: a phantom and rat study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aide, Nicolas; Louis, Marie-Hélène; Dutoit, Soizic; Labiche, Alexandre; Lemoisson, Edwige; Briand, Mélanie; Nataf, Valérie; Poulain, Laurent; Gauduchon, Pascal; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Montravers, Françoise

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of semi-quantitative small-animal PET data, uncorrected for attenuation, and then of the same semi-quantitative data corrected by means of recovery coefficients (RCs) based on phantom studies. A phantom containing six fillable spheres (diameter range: 4.4-14 mm) was filled with an 18F-FDG solution (spheres/background activity=10.1, 5.1 and 2.5). RCs, defined as measured activity/expected activity, were calculated. Nude rats harbouring tumours (n=50) were imaged after injection of 18F-FDG and sacrificed. The standardized uptake value (SUV) in tumours was determined with small-animal PET and compared to ex-vivo counting (ex-vivo SUV). Small-animal PET SUVs were corrected with RCs based on the greatest tumour diameter. Tumour proliferation was assessed with cyclin A immunostaining and correlated to the SUV. RCs ranged from 0.33 for the smallest sphere to 0.72 for the largest. A sigmoidal correlation was found between RCs and sphere diameters (r(2)=0.99). Small-animal PET SUVs were well correlated with ex-vivo SUVs (y=0.48x-0.2; r(2)=0.71) and the use of RCs based on the greatest tumour diameter significantly improved regression (y=0.84x-0.81; r(2)=0.77), except for tumours with important necrosis. Similar results were obtained without sacrificing animals, by using PET images to estimate tumour dimensions. RC-based corrections improved correlation between small-animal PET SUVs and tumour proliferation (uncorrected data: Rho=0.79; corrected data: Rho=0.83). Recovery correction significantly improves both accuracy of small-animal PET semi-quantitative data in rat studies and their correlation with tumour proliferation, except for largely necrotic tumours.

  16. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of {sup 18}F-labeled 4-thia palmitate as a PET tracer of myocardial fatty acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGrado, Timothy R. E-mail: trd@petsparc.mc.duke.edu; Wang Shuyan; Holden, James E.; Nickles, R. Jerome; Taylor, Michael; Stone, Charles K

    2000-04-01

    Interest remains strong for the development of a noninvasive technique for assessment of regional fatty acid oxidation rate in the myocardium. {sup 18}F-labeled 4-thia palmitate (FTP, 16-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-4-thia-hexadecanoic acid) has been synthesized and preliminarily evaluated as a metabolically trapped probe of myocardial fatty acid oxidation for positron emission tomography (PET). The radiotracer is synthesized by Kryptofix 2.2.2/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} assisted nucleophilic radiofluorination of an iodo-ester precursor, followed by alkaline hydrolysis and by purification by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Biodistribution studies in rats showed high uptake and long retention of FTP in heart, liver, and kidneys consistent with relatively high fatty acid oxidation rates in these tissues. Inhibition of carnitine palmitoyl-transferase-I caused an 80% reduction in myocardial uptake, suggesting the dependence of trapping on the transport of tracer into the mitochondrion. Experiments with perfused rat hearts showed that the estimates of the fractional metabolic trapping rate (FR) of FTP tracked inhibition of oxidation rate of palmitate with hypoxia, whereas the FR of the 6-thia analog 17-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid was insensitive to hypoxia. In vivo defluorination of FTP in the rat was evidenced by bone uptake of radioactivity. A PET imaging study with FTP in normal swine showed excellent myocardial images, prolonged myocardial retention, and no bone uptake of radioactivity up to 3 h, the last finding suggesting a species dependence for defluorination of the omega-labeled fatty acid. The results support further investigation of FTP as a potential PET tracer for assessing regional fatty acid oxidation rate in the human myocardium.

  17. PET applications in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulkin, B. L. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center (United States). Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Section

    1997-12-01

    This article summarizes the major PET studies which have been performed in pediatric patients to elucidate and characterize diseases and normal development. Issues special for the application of the technique in children, such as dosimetry, patient preparation, and image acquisition are discussed. Studies of central nervous system (CNS) development and pathology, including epilepsy, intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal asphyxia, tumors, and effects on the CNS from treatment of other tumors are reviewed. These have contributed information fundamental to their understanding of CNS development and pathology. PET investigations into the pathophysiology of congenital heart disease have begun and hold great promise to aid their understanding of these conditions. The second major area in which PET has been applied is the study of non CNS neoplasms. Neuroblastoma has been investigated with tracers which explore basic biochemical features which characterize this tumor, as well as with tracers which explore biochemical events relatively specific for this malignancy. Other common and uncommon tumors of childhood are discussed. The PET technique has been shown useful for answering questions of clinical relevance for the management of these uncommon neoplasms. PET is likely to continue to aid their understanding of many pediatric diseases and may gain more widespread clinical acceptance as the technology continues to disseminate rapidly.

  18. Clinical Investigation of the Dopaminergic System with PET and FLUORINE-18-FLUORO-L-DOPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Terrence Rayford

    1995-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a tool that provides quantitative physiological information. It is valuable both in a clinical environment, where information is sought for an individual, and in a research environment, to answer more fundamental questions about physiology and disease states. PET is particularly attractive compared to other nuclear medicine imaging techniques in cases where the anatomical regions of interest are small or when true metabolic rate constants are required. One example with both of these requirements is the investigation of Parkinson's Disease, which is characterized as a presynaptic motor function deficit affecting the striatum. As dopaminergic neurons die, the ability of the striatum to affect motor function decreases. The extent of functional neuronal damage in the small sub-structures may be ascertained by measuring the ability of the caudate and putamen to trap and store dopamine, a neurotransmitter. PET is able to utilize a tracer of dopamine activity, ^ {18}F- scL-DOPA, to quantitate the viability of the striatum. This thesis work deals with implementing and optimizing the many different elements that compose a PET study of the dopaminergic system, including: radioisotope production; conversion of aqueous ^{18}F ^-into [^ {18}F]-F2; synthesis of ^{18}F- scL -DOPA; details of the PET scan itself; measurements to estimate the radiation dosimetry; accurate measurement of a plasma input function; and the quantitation of dopaminergic activity in normal human subjects as well as in Parkinson's Disease patients.

  19. Quantitative analysis of 18F-NaF dynamic PET/CT cannot differentiate malignant from benign lesions in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Anwar, Hoda; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    A renewed interest has been recently developed for the highly sensitive bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical 18 F-NaF. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential utility of quantitative analysis of 18 F-NaF dynamic PET/CT data in differentiating malignant from benign degenerative lesions in multiple myeloma (MM). 80 MM patients underwent whole-body PET/CT and dynamic PET/CT scanning of the pelvis with 18 F-NaF. PET/CT data evaluation was based on visual (qualitative) assessment, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculations, and absolute quantitative estimations after application of a 2-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). In total 263 MM lesions were demonstrated on 18 F-NaF PET/CT. Semi-quantitative and quantitative evaluations were performed for 25 MM lesions as well as for 25 benign, degenerative and traumatic lesions. Mean SUV average for MM lesions was 11.9 and mean SUV max was 23.2. Respectively, SUV average and SUV max for degenerative lesions were 13.5 and 20.2. Kinetic analysis of 18 F-NaF revealed the following mean values for MM lesions: K 1 = 0.248 (1/min), k 3 = 0.359 (1/min), influx (K i ) = 0.107 (1/min), FD = 1.382, while the respective values for degenerative lesions were: K 1 = 0.169 (1/min), k 3 = 0.422 (1/min), influx (K i ) = 0.095 (1/min), FD = 1. 411. No statistically significant differences between MM and benign degenerative disease regarding SUV average , SUV max , K 1 , k 3 and influx (K i ) were demonstrated. FD was significantly higher in degenerative than in malignant lesions. The present findings show that quantitative analysis of 18 F-NaF PET data cannot differentiate malignant from benign degenerative lesions in MM patients, supporting previously published results, which reflect the limited role of 18 F-NaF PET/CT in the diagnostic workup of MM.

  20. Simple and rapid radiosynthesis of N-18F-labeled glutamic acid as a hepatocellular carcinoma PET tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Aixia; Liu, Shaoyu; Tang, Xiaolan; Nie, Dahong; Tang, Ganghua; Zhang, Zhanwen; Wen, Fuhua; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: We have reported that N-(2- 18 F-fluoropropionyl)-L-glutamate ( 18 F-FPGLU) showed good tumor-to-background contrast and 18 F-FPGLU was prepared via complex multi-step reaction sequence; here, it is synthesized by a facile two-step reaction sequence. The objectives of this study are to synthesize 18 F-FPGLU via a two-step reaction sequence and to evaluate the value of 18 F-FPGLU in nude mice bearing human hepatocellular carcinoma SMCC-7721 (HCC SMCC-7721). Methods: 18 F-FPGLU was synthetized from the precursor (2S)-dimethyl 2-(2-bromopropanamido)pentanedioate via the two-step on-column hydrolysis using a modified commercial FDG synthesizer. To investigate the transport mechanism of 18 F-FPGLU, we conducted a series of competitive inhibition experiments on HCC SMCC-7721 cells in the absence or presence of Na + and various types of inhibitors. Small-animal PET–CT imaging was performed on tumor-bearing nude mice using 18 F-FPGLU and 2- 18 F-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG). Results: The radiochemical yield of 18 F-FPGLU was up to 15 ± 5% (EOS, n = 10) in 35 min with the two-step procedure and the radiochemical purity was higher than 95% with a specific activity of 30–40 GBq/μmol. In vitro cell experiments show that 18 F-FPGLU is primarily transported through the Na + -dependent system X AG − and Na + -independent system X C −. PET imaging in a tumor model indicates that 18 F-FPGLU may be superior to 18 F-FDG for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) imaging. Conclusion: An optimized route to prepare 18 F-FPGLU was developed and 18 F-FPGLU was synthetized from the precursor ((2S)-dimethyl 2-(2-bromopropanamido)pentanedioate) via the two-step on-column hydrolysis. 18 F-FPGLU was a potential novel PET tracer for HCC imaging.

  1. VII. Boettstein Colloquium: PET-Radiopharmaceuticals at PSI: achievement and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubiger, P.A.; Beer, H.F.; Blaeuenstein, P.; Leenders, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    The three sessions of the 1993 Boettstein colloquium dealt with the following topics: - PET-radiopharmaceuticals, - PET-scanning: significance of tracer uptake, - clinical options using PET. 22 papers were presented. figs., refs

  2. VII. Boettstein Colloquium: PET-Radiopharmaceuticals at PSI: achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubiger, P.A.; Beer, H.F.; Blaeuenstein, P.; Leenders, K.E.

    1993-12-31

    The three sessions of the 1993 Boettstein colloquium dealt with the following topics: - PET-radiopharmaceuticals, - PET-scanning: significance of tracer uptake, - clinical options using PET. 22 papers were presented. figs., refs.

  3. VII. Boettstein Colloquium: PET-Radiopharmaceuticals at PSI: achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubiger, P A; Beer, H F; Blaeuenstein, P; Leenders, K E

    1994-12-31

    The three sessions of the 1993 Boettstein colloquium dealt with the following topics: - PET-radiopharmaceuticals, - PET-scanning: significance of tracer uptake, - clinical options using PET. 22 papers were presented. figs., refs.

  4. Re(CO)3([18F]FEDA), a novel 18F PET renal tracer: Radiosynthesis and preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowska, Malgorzata; Jarkas, Nashwa; Voll, Ronald J; Nye, Jonathon A; Klenc, Jeffrey; Goodman, Mark M; Taylor, Andrew T

    2018-03-01

    Our previous work demonstrated that the 99m Tc renal tracer, 99m Tc(CO) 3 (FEDA) ( 99m Tc-1), has a rapid clearance comparable in rats to that of 131 I-OIH, the radioactive gold standard for the measurement of effective renal plasma flow. The uncharged fluoroethyl pendant group of 99m Tc-1 provides a route to the synthesis of a structurally analogous rhenium-tricarbonyl 18 F renal imaging agent, Re(CO) 3 ([ 18 F]FEDA) ( 18 F-1). Our goal was to develop an efficient one-step method for the preparation of 18 F-1 and to compare its pharmacokinetic properties with those of 131 I-OIH in rats. 18 F-1 was prepared by the nucleophilic 18 F-fluorination of its tosyl precursor. The labeled compound was isolated by HPLC and subsequently evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats using 131 I-OIH as an internal control and by dynamic PET/CT imaging. Plasma protein binding (PPB) and erythrocyte uptake (RCB) were determined and the urine was analyzed for metabolites. 18 F-1 was efficiently prepared as a single species with high radiochemical purity (>99%) and it displayed high radiochemical stability in vitro and in vivo. PPB was 87% and RCB was 21%. Biodistribution studies confirmed rapid renal extraction and high specificity for renal excretion, comparable to that of 131 I-OIH, with minimal hepatic/gastrointestinal elimination. The activity in the urine, as a percentage of 131 I-OIH, was 92% and 95% at 10 and 60 min, respectively. All other organs (heart, spleen, lungs) showed a negligible tracer uptake (F-1 through the kidneys and into the bladder; there was no demonstrable activity in bone verifying the absence of free [ 18 F]fluoride. 18 F-1 exhibited a high specificity for the kidney, rapid renal excretion comparable to that of 131 I-OIH and high in vivo radiochemical stability. Not only is 18 F-1 a promising PET renal tracer, but it provides a route to the development of a pair of analogous 18 F/ 99m Tc renal imaging agents with almost identical structures and comparable

  5. Developing multi-tracer approaches to constrain the parameterisation of leaf and soil CO2 and H2O exchange in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogée, Jerome; Wehr, Richard; Commane, Roisin; Launois, Thomas; Meredith, Laura; Munger, Bill; Nelson, David; Saleska, Scott; Zahniser, Mark; Wofsy, Steve; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The net flux of carbon dioxide between the land surface and the atmosphere is dominated by photosynthesis and soil respiration, two of the largest gross CO2 fluxes in the carbon cycle. More robust estimates of these gross fluxes could be obtained from the atmospheric budgets of other valuable tracers, such as carbonyl sulfide (COS) or the carbon and oxygen isotope compositions (δ13C and δ18O) of atmospheric CO2. Over the past decades, the global atmospheric flask network has measured the inter-annual and intra-annual variations in the concentrations of these tracers. However, knowledge gaps and a lack of high-resolution multi-tracer ecosystem-scale measurements have hindered the development of process-based models that can simulate the behaviour of each tracer in response to environmental drivers. We present novel datasets of net ecosystem COS, 13CO2 and CO18O exchange and vertical profile data collected over 3 consecutive growing seasons (2011-2013) at the Harvard forest flux site. We then used the process-based model MuSICA (multi-layer Simulator of the Interactions between vegetation Canopy and the Atmosphere) to include the transport, reaction, diffusion and production of each tracer within the forest and exchanged with the atmosphere. Model simulations over the three years captured well the impact of diurnally and seasonally varying environmental conditions on the net ecosystem exchange of each tracer. The model also captured well the dynamic vertical features of tracer behaviour within the canopy. This unique dataset and model sensitivity analysis highlights the benefit in the collection of multi-tracer high-resolution field datasets and the developement of multi-tracer land surface models to provide valuable constraints on photosynthesis and respiration across scales in the near future.

  6. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in primary staging of prostate cancer: PSA and Gleason score predict the intensity of tracer accumulation in the primary tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Kendler, Dorota; Scarpa, Lorenza; Di Santo, Gianpaolo; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Maffey-Steffan, Johanna; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fritz, Josef [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-06-15

    Prostate cancer (PC) cells typically show increased expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which can be visualized by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT. The aim of this study was to assess the intensity of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in the primary tumour and metastases in patients with biopsy-proven PC prior to therapy, and to determine whether a correlation exists between the primary tumour-related {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation and the Gleason score (GS) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Ninety patients with transrectal ultrasound biopsy-proven PC (GS 6-10; median PSA: 9.7 ng/ml) referred for {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT were retrospectively analysed. PET images were analysed visually and semiquantitatively by measuring the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}). The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour and pathologic lesions suspicious for lymphatic or distant metastases were then compared to the physiologic background activity of normal prostate tissue and gluteal muscle. The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour was assessed in relation to both PSA level and GS. Eighty-two patients (91.1%) demonstrated pathologic tracer accumulation in the primary tumour that exceeded physiologic tracer uptake in normal prostate tissue (median SUV{sub max}: 12.5 vs. 3.9). Tumours with GS of 6, 7a (3+4) and 7b (4+3) showed significantly lower {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake, with median SUV{sub max} of 5.9, 8.3 and 8.2, respectively, compared to patients with GS >7 (median SUV{sub max}: 21.2; p < 0.001). PC patients with PSA ≥10.0 ng/ml exhibited significantly higher uptake than those with PSA levels <10.0 ng/ml (median SUV{sub max}: 17.6 versus 7.7; p < 0.001). In 24 patients (26.7%), 82 lymph nodes with pathologic tracer accumulation consistent with metastases were detected (median SUV{sub max}: 10.6). Eleven patients (12.2%) revealed 55 pathologic osseous lesions suspicious for bone metastases (median SUV{sub max}: 11.6). The GS and PSA level correlated with

  7. [18F]FE@SNAP—A new PET tracer for the melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1): Microfluidic and vessel-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Cécile; Ungersboeck, Johanna; Schirmer, Eva; Zdravkovic, Milica; Nics, Lukas; Zeilinger, Markus; Shanab, Karem; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Karanikas, Georgios; Spreitzer, Helmut; Viernstein, Helmut; Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the expression of the melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) are involved in a variety of pathologies, especially obesity and anxiety disorders. To monitor these pathologies in-vivo positron emission tomography (PET) is a suitable method. After the successful radiosynthesis of [11C]SNAP-7941—the first PET-Tracer for the MCHR1, we aimed to synthesize its [18F]fluoroethylated analogue: [18F]FE@SNAP. Therefore, microfluidic and vessel-based approaches were tested. [18F]fluoroethylation was conducted via various [18F]fluoroalkylated synthons and direct [18F]fluorination. Only the direct [18F]fluorination of a tosylated precursor using a flow-through microreactor was successful, affording [18F]FE@SNAP in 44.3 ± 2.6%. PMID:22921745

  8. Positron emission tomography (PET) for oncologic applications in oral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shozushima, Masanori; Terasaki, Kazunori

    2004-01-01

    A rapidly emerging clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is the detection of cancer with radionuclide tracer, because it provides information unavailable by ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The most commonly used radiotracer for PET oncologic imaging is fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Early studies show PET has potential value in viewing the region of the tumor, detecting, staging, grading, monitoring response to anticancer therapy, and differentiating recurrent or residual disease from post treatment changes. However, limitations of FDG-PET in the head and neck region, namely, physiological FDG uptake in the salivary glands and palatine tonsils, have been reported, increasing the false-positive rates in image interpretation. This review was designed to address these distinctions of oral cancer PET imaging: specialization of PET equipment, cancer cell metabolism, proliferation and tracers, clinical diagnosis of oral cancer with PET, pitfalls in oncologic diagnosis with FDG-PET imaging. (author)

  9. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: evaluation with phantom and patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Nelson, Linda D; Small, Gary W; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (Pdynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers.

  10. Preclinical FLT-PET and FDG-PET imaging of tumor response to the multi-targeted Aurora B kinase inhibitor, TAK-901

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullinane, Carleen; Waldeck, Kelly L.; Binns, David; Bogatyreva, Ekaterina; Bradley, Daniel P.; Jong, Ron de; McArthur, Grant A.; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Aurora kinases play a key role in mitosis and have recently been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the utility of 3′-[ 18 F]fluoro-3′-deoxythymidine (FLT) and 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) for assessment of tumor response to the multi-targeted Aurora B kinase inhibitor, TAK-901. Methods: Balb/c nude mice bearing HCT116 colorectal xenografts were treated with up to 30 mg/kg TAK 901 or vehicle intravenously twice daily for two days on a weekly cycle. Tumor growth was monitored by calliper measurements and PET imaging was performed at baseline, day 4, 8, 11 and 15. Tumors were harvested at time points corresponding to days of PET imaging for analysis of ex vivo markers of cell proliferation and metabolism together with markers of Aurora B kinase inhibition including phospho-histone H3 (pHH3) and senescence associated β-galactosidase. Results: Tumor growth was inhibited by 60% on day 12 of 30 mg/kg TAK-901 therapy. FLT uptake was significantly reduced by day 4 of treatment and this corresponded with reduction in bromodeoxyuridine and pHH3 staining by immunohistochemistry. All biomarkers rebounded towards baseline levels by the commencement of the next treatment cycle, consistent with release of Aurora B kinase suppression. TAK-901 therapy had no impact on glucose metabolism as assessed by FDG uptake and GLUT1 staining by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions: FLT-PET, but not FDG-PET, is a robust non-invasive imaging biomarker of early HCT116 tumor response to the on-target effects of the multi-targeted Aurora B kinase inhibitor, TAK-901. Advances in knowledge and implications for patient care: This is the first report to demonstrate the impact of the multi-targeted Aurora B kinase inhibitor, TAK-901 on tumor FLT uptake. The findings provide a strong rationale for the evaluation of FLT-PET as an early biomarker of tumor response in the early phase

  11. Quantitative relationship between coronary vasodilator reserve assessed by {sup 82}Rb PET imaging and coronary artery stenosis severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine/PET, Boston, MA (United States); Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Almonacid, Alexandra; Popma, Jeffrey J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, London (United Kingdom); El Fakhri, Georges [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine/PET, Boston, MA (United States); Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Cardiology, London (United Kingdom); Curillova, Zelmira; Dorbala, Sharmila; Di Carli, Marcelo F. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine/PET, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Sitek, Arkadiusz [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine/PET, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Roughton, Michael [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Cardiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    The relationship between myocardial blood flow (MBF) and stenosis severity has been determined previously using cyclotron-produced radiotracers such as {sup 15}O-H{sub 2}O and {sup 13}N-ammonia. An attractive alternative to overcome the limitations related to the use of cyclotron might be to use the generator-produced {sup 82}Rb as a flow tracer. The current study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between MBF and coronary vasodilator reserve (CVR) as measured by {sup 82}Rb positron emission tomography (PET) and the percent diameter stenosis as defined by quantitative coronary arteriography. We prospectively evaluated 22 individuals: 15 patients (60 {+-} 11 years of age) with angiographically documented coronary artery disease (CAD) and seven age-matched (56 {+-} 9 years) asymptomatic individuals without risk factors for CAD. Dynamic {sup 82}Rb PET was performed at rest and after dipyridamole vasodilation. MBF, CVR and an index of 'minimal coronary resistance' (MCR) were assessed in each of the three main coronary territories. Rest and stress MBF in regions subtended by vessels with less than 50% diameter stenosis was similar to that of the individuals with no risk factors for CAD. As a result, CVR was also similar in the two groups (1.9, interquartile [IQ] range from 1.7 to 2.7 vs. 2.2, IQ range from 2 to 3.4 respectively, p=0.09). CVR successfully differentiated coronary lesions with stenosis severity 70% to 89% from those with 50% to 69% stenosis (1, IQ range from 1 to 1.3 vs. 1.7, IQ range from 1.4 to 2), respectively, p=0.001. In addition, hyperaemic MBF (r{sup 2}=0.74, p<0.001), CVR (r {sup 2}=0.69, p<0.001) and MCR (r{sup 2}=0.78, p<0.001) measurements were inversely and non-linearly correlated to the percent diameter stenosis on angiography. MBF and CVR are inversely and non-linearly correlated to stenosis severity. Quantitative {sup 82}Rb PET can be a clinically useful tool for an accurate functional assessment of CAD. (orig.)

  12. Preclinical quantitative MicroPET imaging in evaluation of neuroprotective drug candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ji Yeon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Kyeong Min; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Using in vivo molecular imaging with microPET/SPECT has been expected to facilitate drug discovery and development. In this study, we applied quantitative microPET to the preclinical evaluation of the effects of two neuroprotective drug candidates to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal damage. Fifteen SD rats were divided into three groups. The rats of each group were orally administrated one of neuroprotective candidate; NeuProtec (100mg/kg bid) and SureCero (10mg/kg, qd) or normal saline (0.1ml, qd) for 3 weeks. 6-OHDA was sterotactically placed to the right striatum on eighth day after starting while continuing the medication for additional 14 days. [ 124 I]FP-ClT PET scans were obtained using microPET R4 scanner. The behavioral test by amphetamine-induced rotation and the histological examination after thyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemical staining were performed. Different uptake in the lesioned striatum among the groups were demonstrated on [ 124 I]FP-CIT PET images. The rats with NeuProtec showed higher binding in the lesion than controls. No differences were observed in SureCere groups. The FP-CIT uptake in the lesioned striatum was well correlated with the % reduction of TH(+) cells (rho =0.73, p=0.025), and also correlated with rotation test (rho =0.79, p=0.001) [ 124 I]FP-CIT animal PET depicted the neuroprotective effects of NeuProtec to the 6-OHDA neurotoxicity in the rat striatum. No demonstrable effect of SureCero might indicate that inadequate dosage was used in this study. MicroPET imaging with small animal could be a great tool in preclinical evaluation of drug efficacy

  13. Effects of regularisation priors on dynamic PET Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldeira, Liliana; Scheins, Juergen; Silva, Nuno da; Gaens, Michaela; Shah, N Jon

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic PET provides temporal information about tracer uptake. However, each PET frame has usually low statistics, resulting in noisy images. The goal is to study effects of prior regularisation on dynamic PET data. Quantification and noise in image-domain and time-domain as well as impact on parametric images is assessed.

  14. Early [18F]florbetaben and [11C]PiB PET images are a surrogate biomarker of neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiepolt, Solveig; Patt, Marianne; Luthardt, Julia; Barthel, Henryk; Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama; Schroeter, Matthias L.; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Weise, David; Gertz, Hermann-Josef

    2016-01-01

    [ 18 F]FDG is a commonly used neuronal injury biomarker for early and differential diagnosis of dementia. Typically, the blood supply to the brain is closely coupled to glucose consumption. Early uptake of the Aβ tracer [ 11 C]PiB on PET images is mainly determined by cerebral blood flow and shows a high correlation with [ 18 F]FDG uptake. Uptake data for 18 F-labelled Aβ PET tracers are, however, scarce. We investigated the value of early PET images using the novel Aβ tracer [ 18 F]FBB in the diagnosis of Alzhimers disease (AD). This retrospective analysis included 22 patients with MCI or dementia who underwent dual time-point PET imaging with either [ 11 C]PiB (11 patients) or [ 18 F]FBB (11 patients) in routine clinical practice. Images were acquired 1 - 9 min after administration of both tracers and 40 - 70 min and 90 - 110 min after administration of [ 11 C]PiB and [ 18 F]FBB, respectively. The patients also underwent [ 18 F]FDG brain PET imaging. PET data were analysed visually and semiquantitatively. Associations between early Aβ tracer uptake and dementia as well as brain atrophy were investigated. Regional visual scores of early Aβ tracer and [ 18 F]FDG PET images were significantly correlated (Spearman's ρ = 0.780, P < 0.001). Global brain visual analysis revealed identical results between early Aβ tracer and [ 18 F]FDG PET images. In a VOI-based analysis, the early Aβ tracer data correlated significantly with the [ 18 F]FDG data (r = 0.779, P < 0.001), but there were no differences between [ 18 F]FBB and [ 11 C]PiB. Cortical SUVRs in regions typically affected in AD on early Aβ tracer and [ 18 F]FDG PET images were correlated with MMSE scores (ρ = 0.458, P = 0.032, and ρ = 0.456, P = 0.033, respectively). A voxel-wise group-based search for areas with relatively higher tracer uptake on early Aβ tracer PET images compared with [ 18 F]FDG PET images revealed a small cluster in the midbrain/pons; no significant clusters were found for the

  15. Imaging with 124I in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: is PET/MRI superior to PET/CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binse, I.; Poeppel, T.D.; Ruhlmann, M.; Gomez, B.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J.; Umutlu, L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI for their usefulness in detecting and categorizing cervical iodine-positive lesions in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer using 124 I as tracer. The study group comprised 65 patients at high risk of iodine-positive metastasis who underwent PET/CT (low-dose CT scan, PET acquisition time 2 min; PET/CT 2 ) followed by PET/MRI of the neck 24 h after 124 I administration. PET images from both modalities were analysed for the numbers of tracer-positive lesions. Two different acquisition times were used for the comparisons, one matching the PET/CT 2 acquisition time (2 min, PET/MRI 2 ) and the other covering the whole MRI scan time (30 min, PET/MRI 30 ). Iodine-positive lesions were categorized as metastasis, thyroid remnant or inconclusive according to their location on the PET/CT images. Morphological information provided by MRI was considered for evaluation of lesions on PET/MRI and for volume information. PET/MRI 2 detected significantly more iodine-positive metastases and thyroid remnants than PET/CT 2 (72 vs. 60, p = 0.002, and 100 vs. 80, p = 0.001, respectively), but the numbers of patients with at least one tumour lesion identified were not significantly different (21/65 vs. 17/65 patients). PET/MRI 30 tended to detect more PET-positive metastases than PET/MRI 2 (88 vs. 72), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). Of 21 lesions classified as inconclusive on PET/CT, 5 were assigned to metastasis or thyroid remnant when evaluated by PET/MRI. Volume information was available in 34 % of iodine-positive metastases and 2 % of thyroid remnants on PET/MRI. PET/MRI of the neck was found to be superior to PET/CT in detecting iodine-positive lesions. This was attributed to the higher sensitivity of the PET component, Although helpful in some cases, we found no substantial advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT in categorizing iodine-positive lesions as either metastasis or thyroid remnant

  16. [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY: a suitable PET tracer for the adenosine A3 receptor? An in vivo study in rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusler, Daniela; Zeilinger, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus; Mitterhauser, Markus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Kuntner, Claudia; Wanek, Thomas; Langer, Oliver [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Biomedical Systems, Health and Environment Department, Seibersdorf (Austria); Nics, Lukas [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Savli, Markus; Lanzenberger, Rupert R. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Karagiannis, Panagiotis [King' s College London, Cutaneous Medicine and Immunotherapy, St. John' s Institute of Dermatology, Division of Genetics and Molecular Medicine King' s College London School of Medicine, Guy' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Shanab, Karem; Spreitzer, Helmut [University of Vienna, Department of Drug and Natural Product Synthesis, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-04-01

    The adenosine A{sub 3} receptor (A3R) is involved in cardiovascular, neurological and tumour-related pathologies and serves as an exceptional pharmaceutical target in the clinical setting. A3R antagonists are considered antiinflammatory, antiallergic and anticancer agents, and to have potential for the treatment of asthma, COPD, glaucoma and stroke. Hence, an appropriate A3R PET tracer would be highly beneficial for the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of these diseases. Therefore, in this preclinical in vivo study we evaluated the potential as a PET tracer of the A3R antagonist [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY. Rats were injected with [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY for baseline scans and blocking scans (A3R with MRS1523 or FE rate at SUPPY, P-gp with tariquidar; three animals each). Additionally, metabolism was studied in plasma and brain. In a preliminary experiment in a mouse xenograft model (mice injected with cells expressing the human A3R; three animals), the animals received [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY and [{sup 18}F]FDG. Dynamic PET imaging was performed (60 min in rats, 90 min in xenografted mice). In vitro stability of [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY in human and rat plasma was also evaluated. [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY showed high uptake in fat-rich regions and low uptake in the brain. Pretreatment with MRS1523 led to a decrease in [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY uptake (p = 0.03), and pretreatment with the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar led to a 1.24-fold increase in [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY uptake (p = 0.09) in rat brain. There was no significant difference in metabolites in plasma and brain in the treatment groups. However, plasma concentrations of [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY were reduced to levels similar to those in rat brain after blocking. In contrast to [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake (p = 0.12), the xenograft model showed significantly increased uptake of [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY in the tissue masses from CHO cells expressing the human A3R (p = 0.03). [{sup 18}F

  17. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of N-(2-[18F]fluoropropionyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine as a PET tracer for oncologic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Caihua; Nie, Dahong; Tang, Ganghua; Gao, Siyuan; Liu, Shaoyu; Wen, Fuhua; Tang, Xiaolan

    2017-07-01

    Several 11 C and 18 F labeled 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (l-DOPA) analogues have been used for neurologic and oncologic diseases, especially for brain tumors and neuroendocrine tumors PET imaging. However, 18 F-labeled N-substituted l-DOPA analogues have not been reported so far. In the current study, radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of a new 18 F-labeled l-DOPA analogue, N-(2-[ 18 F]fluoropropionyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine ([ 18 F]FPDOPA) for tumor PET imaging are performed. The synthesis of [ 18 F]FPDOPA was via a two-step reaction sequence from 4-nitrophenyl-2-[ 18 F]fluoropropionate ([ 18 F]NFP). The biodistribution of [ 18 F]FPDOPA was determined in normal Kunming mice. In vitro competitive inhibition and protein incorporation experiments were performed with SPC-A-1 lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. PET/CT studies of [ 18 F]FPDOPA were conducted in C6 rat glioma and SPC-A-1 human lung adenocarcinoma and H460 human large cell lung cancer-bearing nude mice. [ 18 F]FPDOPA was prepared with a decay-corrected radiochemical yield of 28±5% and a specific activity of 50±15GBq/μmol (n=10) within 125min. In vitro cell experiments showed that [ 18 F]FPDOPA uptake in SPC-A-1 cells was primarily transported through Na + -independent system L, with Na + -dependent system B 0,+ and system ASC partly involved in it. Biodistribution data in mice showed that renal-bladder route was the main excretory system of [ 18 F]FPDOPA. PET imaging demonstrated intense accumulation of [ 18 F]FPDOPA in several tumor xenografts, with (8.50±0.40)%ID/g in C6 glioma, (6.30±0.12)%ID/g in SPC-A-1 lung adenocarcinoma, and (6.50±0.10)%ID/g in H460 large cell lung cancer, respectively. A novel N-substituted 18 F-labeled L-DOPA analogue [ 18 F]FPDOPA is synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results support that [ 18 F]FPDOPA seems to be a potential PET tracer for tumor imaging, especially be a better potential PET tracer than [ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([ 18 F

  18. Initial evaluation of a practical PET respiratory motion correction method in clinical simultaneous PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian; Barnes, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; Arridge, Simon; O’Meara, Celia; Atkinson, David

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion during PET acquisitions can cause image artefacts, with sharpness and tracer quantification adversely affected due to count ‘smearing’. Motion correction by registration of PET gates becomes increasingly difficult with shorter scan times and less counts. The advent of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners allows the use of high spatial resolution MRI to capture motion states during respiration [1, 2]. In this work, we use a respiratory signal derived from the PET list-mode data [3, ], with no requirement for an external device or MR sequence modifications.

  19. Somatostatin receptor PET in neuroendocrine tumours: 68Ga-DOTA0,Tyr3-octreotide versus 68Ga-DOTA0-lanreotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, Daniel; Kroiss, Alexander; Waitz, Dietmar; Gabriel, Michael; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Uprimny, Christian; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Widmann, Gerlig; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of (68)Ga-labelled DOTA(0)-lanreotide ((68)Ga-DOTA-LAN) on the diagnostic assessment of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients with low to moderate uptake on planar somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy or (68)Ga-labelled DOTA(0),Tyr(3)-octreotide ((68)Ga-DOTA-TOC) positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed NET and clinical signs of progressive disease, who had not qualified for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on planar SSTR scintigraphy or (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET (n = 38) due to lack of tracer uptake, underwent (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN PET to evaluate a treatment option with (90)Y-labelled lanreotide according to the MAURITIUS trial. The included patients received 150 ± 30 MBq of each radiopharmaceutical intravenously. PET scans were acquired 60-90 min after intravenous bolus injection. Image results from both PET scans were compared head to head, focusing on the intensity of tracer uptake in terms of treatment decision. CT was used for morphologic correlation of tumour lesions. To further evaluate the binding affinities of each tracer, quantitative and qualitative values were calculated for target lesions. (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN and (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC both showed equivalent findings in 24/38 patients when fused PET/CT images were interpreted. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN in comparison to CT were 0.63, 0.5 and 0.62 (n = 53; p < 0.0001) and for (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC in comparison to CT 0.78, 0.5 and 0.76 (n = 38; p < 0.013), respectively. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC showed a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) regarding the primary tumour in 25 patients (p < 0.003) and regarding the liver in 30 patients (p < 0.009) compared to (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN. Corresponding values of both PET scans for tumour and liver did not show any significant correlation. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC revealed more tumour sites than (68)Ga

  20. Evaluation of registration strategies for multi-modality images of rat brain slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palm, Christoph; Vieten, Andrea; Salber, Dagmar; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    In neuroscience, small-animal studies frequently involve dealing with series of images from multiple modalities such as histology and autoradiography. The consistent and bias-free restacking of multi-modality image series is obligatory as a starting point for subsequent non-rigid registration procedures and for quantitative comparisons with positron emission tomography (PET) and other in vivo data. Up to now, consistency between 2D slices without cross validation using an inherent 3D modality is frequently presumed to be close to the true morphology due to the smooth appearance of the contours of anatomical structures. However, in multi-modality stacks consistency is difficult to assess. In this work, consistency is defined in terms of smoothness of neighboring slices within a single modality and between different modalities. Registration bias denotes the distortion of the registered stack in comparison to the true 3D morphology and shape. Based on these metrics, different restacking strategies of multi-modality rat brain slices are experimentally evaluated. Experiments based on MRI-simulated and real dual-tracer autoradiograms reveal a clear bias of the restacked volume despite quantitatively high consistency and qualitatively smooth brain structures. However, different registration strategies yield different inter-consistency metrics. If no genuine 3D modality is available, the use of the so-called SOP (slice-order preferred) or MOSOP (modality-and-slice-order preferred) strategy is recommended.

  1. Clinical usefulness of PET in the management of oral cancer. Comparison between FDG-PET and MET-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Saitoh, Masaaki; Nakamura, Mikiko

    2007-01-01

    Inductive chemoradiotherapy has played an important role in preserving organs and functions in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To determine whether a reduced form of surgery should be performed after chemoradiotherapy, accurate evaluation of residual tumor cells is essential. We investigated the clinical value of positron emission tomography with 18 F labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in the management of oral SCCs. Forty-five patients underwent two FDG-PET studies, one prior to and one at 6 weeks after the chemoradiotherapy. Pretreatment FDG-PET was useful in predicting the response to treatment. Posttreatment FDG-PET could evaluate residual viable cells and prognosis. Organ preservation may be feasible based on PET evaluation. Hence FDG-PET is a valuable tool in the treatment of oral cancer. 11 C-Methionine (MET) is another promising tracer for PET that can be used to assess metabolic demand for amino acids in cancer cells. A MET-PET and FDG-PET study was performed during the same period to investigate diagnostic accuracy in 40 oral malignancies. Sensitivity and positive predictive value of MET-PET were 95% and 100%, respectively, and were comparable with those of FDG-PET. Further study is required to determine the diagnostic significance of MET-PET in evaluating response to chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  2. Multi-modality image reconstruction for dual-head small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chang-Han; Chou, Cheng-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) or positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) has become routine practice in clinics. The applications of multi-modality imaging can also benefit research advances. Consequently, dedicated small-imaging system like dual-head small-animal PET (DHAPET) that possesses the advantages of high detection sensitivity and high resolution can exploit the structural information from CT or MRI. It should be noted that the special detector arrangement in DHAPET leads to severe data truncation, thereby degrading the image quality. We proposed to take advantage of anatomical priors and total variation (TV) minimization methods to reconstruct PET activity distribution form incomplete measurement data. The objective is to solve the penalized least-squares function consisted of data fidelity term, TV norm and medium root priors. In this work, we employed the splitting-based fast iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm to split smooth and non-smooth functions in the convex optimization problems. Our simulations studies validated that the images reconstructed by use of the proposed method can outperform those obtained by use of conventional expectation maximization algorithms or that without considering the anatomical prior information. Additionally, the convergence rate is also accelerated.

  3. THERANOSTICS: From Molecular Imaging Using Ga-68 Labeled Tracers and PET/CT to Personalized Radionuclide Therapy - The Bad Berka Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Richard P; Kulkarni, Harshad R

    2012-01-01

    The acronym THERANOSTICS epitomizes the inseparability of diagnosis and therapy, the pillars of medicine and takes into account personalized management of disease for a specific patient. Molecular phenotypes of neoplasms can be determined by molecular imaging with specific probes using positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or optical methods, so that the treatment is specifically targeted against the tumor and its environment. To meet these demands, we need to define the targets, ligands, coupling and labeling chemistry, the most appropriate radionuclides, biodistribution modifiers, and finally select the right patients for the personalized treatment. THERANOSTICS of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) using Ga-68 labeled tracers for diagnostics with positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT), and using Lu-177 or other metallic radionuclides for radionuclide therapy by applying the same peptide proves that personalized radionuclide therapy today is already a fact and not a fiction.

  4. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole body PET acquisition protocol of ~45min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6-min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (6 passes x 7 bed positions, each scanned for 45sec). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares (OLS) Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of 10 different clinically

  5. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  6. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ∼15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ∼45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different

  7. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  8. Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy is at risk to be missed in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET of PET/CT and PET/MRI: comparison with mpMRI integrated in simultaneous PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Martin T. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Radtke, Jan P. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Flechsig, Paul; Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Roethke, Matthias C.; Bonekamp, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, Boris A.; Hohenfellner, Markus [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Gleave, Martin [University of British Columbia, The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Vancouver (Canada); Kopka, Klaus; Eder, Matthias [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Heusser, Thorsten; Kachelriess, Marc [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wieczorek, Kathrin [University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Sachpekidis, Christos; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The positron emission tomography (PET) tracer {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11, targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is rapidly excreted into the urinary tract. This leads to significant radioactivity in the bladder, which may limit the PET-detection of local recurrence (LR) of prostate cancer (PC) after radical prostatectomy (RP), developing in close proximity to the bladder. Here, we analyze if there is additional value of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) compared to the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET-component of PET/CT or PET/MRI to detect LR. One hundred and nineteen patients with biochemical recurrence after prior RP underwent both hybrid {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET/CT{sub low-dose} (1 h p.i.) and -PET/MRI (2-3 h p.i.) including a mpMRI protocol of the prostatic bed. The comparison of both methods was restricted to the abdomen with focus on LR (McNemar). Bladder-LR distance and recurrence size were measured in axial T2w-TSE. A logistic regression was performed to determine the influence of these variables on detectability in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET. Standardized-uptake-value (SUV{sub mean}) quantification of LR was performed. There were 93/119 patients that had at least one pathologic finding. In addition, 18/119 Patients (15.1%) were diagnosed with a LR in mpMRI of PET/MRI but only nine were PET-positive in PET/CT and PET/MRI. This mismatch was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Detection of LR using the PET-component was significantly influenced by proximity to the bladder (p = 0.028). The PET-pattern of LR-uptake was classified into three types (1): separated from bladder; (2): fuses with bladder, and (3): obliterated by bladder. The size of LRs did not affect PET-detectability (p = 0.84), mean size was 1.7 ± 0.69 cm long axis, 1.2 ± 0.46 cm short-axis. SUV{sub mean} in nine men was 8.7 ± 3.7 (PET/CT) and 7.0 ± 4.2 (PET/MRI) but could not be quantified in the remaining nine cases (obliterated by bladder). The present study demonstrates

  9. Practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Lise; Larsen, Helle Jung; Pedersen, Kate

    2003-01-01

    Children are not just small adults-they differ in their psychology, normal physiology and pathophysiology, and various aspects should be considered when planning a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in a child. PET in children is a growing area, and this article describes the practical use...... and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre. It is intended to be of use to nuclear medicine departments implementing or starting to implement PET scans in children. Topics covered are: dealing with children, dosimetry, organisation within the department and relations with other departments......, preparation of the child (provision of information to the child and parents and the fasting procedure), the imaging procedure (resting, tracer injection, positioning, sedation and bladder emptying) and pitfalls in the interpretation of PET scans in children, including experiences with telemedicine....

  10. Practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgwardt, Lise; Larsen, Helle Jung; Pedersen, Kate; Hoejgaard, Liselotte

    2003-01-01

    Children are not just small adults - they differ in their psychology, normal physiology and pathophysiology, and various aspects should be considered when planning a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in a child. PET in children is a growing area, and this article describes the practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre. It is intended to be of use to nuclear medicine departments implementing or starting to implement PET scans in children. Topics covered are: dealing with children, dosimetry, organisation within the department and relations with other departments, preparation of the child (provision of information to the child and parents and the fasting procedure), the imaging procedure (resting, tracer injection, positioning, sedation and bladder emptying) and pitfalls in the interpretation of PET scans in children, including experiences with telemedicine. (orig.)

  11. Practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgwardt, Lise; Larsen, Helle Jung; Pedersen, Kate; Hoejgaard, Liselotte [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2003-10-01

    Children are not just small adults - they differ in their psychology, normal physiology and pathophysiology, and various aspects should be considered when planning a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in a child. PET in children is a growing area, and this article describes the practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre. It is intended to be of use to nuclear medicine departments implementing or starting to implement PET scans in children. Topics covered are: dealing with children, dosimetry, organisation within the department and relations with other departments, preparation of the child (provision of information to the child and parents and the fasting procedure), the imaging procedure (resting, tracer injection, positioning, sedation and bladder emptying) and pitfalls in the interpretation of PET scans in children, including experiences with telemedicine. (orig.)

  12. Bringing physiology into PET of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne

    2012-03-01

    Several physiologic features make interpretation of PET studies of liver physiology an exciting challenge. As with other organs, hepatic tracer kinetics using PET is quantified by dynamic recording of the liver after the administration of a radioactive tracer, with measurements of time-activity curves in the blood supply. However, the liver receives blood from both the portal vein and the hepatic artery, with the peak of the portal vein time-activity curve being delayed and dispersed compared with that of the hepatic artery. The use of a flow-weighted dual-input time-activity curve is of importance for the estimation of hepatic blood perfusion through initial dynamic PET recording. The portal vein is inaccessible in humans, and methods of estimating the dual-input time-activity curve without portal vein measurements are being developed. Such methods are used to estimate regional hepatic blood perfusion, for example, by means of the initial part of a dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT recording. Later, steady-state hepatic metabolism can be assessed using only the arterial input, provided that neither the tracer nor its metabolites are irreversibly trapped in the prehepatic splanchnic area within the acquisition period. This is used in studies of regulation of hepatic metabolism of, for example, (18)F-FDG and (11)C-palmitate.

  13. Imaging with {sup 124}I in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: is PET/MRI superior to PET/CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binse, I.; Poeppel, T.D.; Ruhlmann, M.; Gomez, B.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Umutlu, L. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI for their usefulness in detecting and categorizing cervical iodine-positive lesions in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer using {sup 124}I as tracer. The study group comprised 65 patients at high risk of iodine-positive metastasis who underwent PET/CT (low-dose CT scan, PET acquisition time 2 min; PET/CT{sub 2}) followed by PET/MRI of the neck 24 h after {sup 124}I administration. PET images from both modalities were analysed for the numbers of tracer-positive lesions. Two different acquisition times were used for the comparisons, one matching the PET/CT{sub 2} acquisition time (2 min, PET/MRI{sub 2}) and the other covering the whole MRI scan time (30 min, PET/MRI{sub 30}). Iodine-positive lesions were categorized as metastasis, thyroid remnant or inconclusive according to their location on the PET/CT images. Morphological information provided by MRI was considered for evaluation of lesions on PET/MRI and for volume information. PET/MRI{sub 2} detected significantly more iodine-positive metastases and thyroid remnants than PET/CT{sub 2} (72 vs. 60, p = 0.002, and 100 vs. 80, p = 0.001, respectively), but the numbers of patients with at least one tumour lesion identified were not significantly different (21/65 vs. 17/65 patients). PET/MRI{sub 30} tended to detect more PET-positive metastases than PET/MRI{sub 2} (88 vs. 72), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). Of 21 lesions classified as inconclusive on PET/CT, 5 were assigned to metastasis or thyroid remnant when evaluated by PET/MRI. Volume information was available in 34 % of iodine-positive metastases and 2 % of thyroid remnants on PET/MRI. PET/MRI of the neck was found to be superior to PET/CT in detecting iodine-positive lesions. This was attributed to the higher sensitivity of the PET component, Although helpful in some cases, we found no substantial advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT in categorizing iodine

  14. Transconvolution and the virtual positron emission tomograph—A new method for cross calibration in quantitative PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prenosil, George A.; Weitzel, Thilo; Hentschel, Michael; Klaeser, Bernd; Krause, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) measurements on small lesions are impaired by the partial volume effect, which is intrinsically tied to the point spread function of the actual imaging system, including the reconstruction algorithms. The variability resulting from different point spread functions hinders the assessment of quantitative measurements in clinical routine and especially degrades comparability within multicenter trials. To improve quantitative comparability there is a need for methods to match different PET/CT systems through elimination of this systemic variability. Consequently, a new method was developed and tested that transforms the image of an object as produced by one tomograph to another image of the same object as it would have been seen by a different tomograph. The proposed new method, termed Transconvolution, compensates for differing imaging properties of different tomographs and particularly aims at quantitative comparability of PET/CT in the context of multicenter trials. Methods: To solve the problem of image normalization, the theory of Transconvolution was mathematically established together with new methods to handle point spread functions of different PET/CT systems. Knowing the point spread functions of two different imaging systems allows determining a Transconvolution function to convert one image into the other. This function is calculated by convolving one point spread function with the inverse of the other point spread function which, when adhering to certain boundary conditions such as the use of linear acquisition and image reconstruction methods, is a numerically accessible operation. For reliable measurement of such point spread functions characterizing different PET/CT systems, a dedicated solid-state phantom incorporating 68 Ge/ 68 Ga filled spheres was developed. To iteratively determine and represent such point spread functions, exponential density functions in combination with a

  15. A multi-atlas based method for automated anatomical Macaca fascicularis brain MRI segmentation and PET kinetic extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballanger, Bénédicte; Tremblay, Léon; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique; Beaudoin-Gobert, Maude; Lavenne, Franck; Le Bars, Didier; Costes, Nicolas

    2013-08-15

    MRI templates and digital atlases are needed for automated and reproducible quantitative analysis of non-human primate PET studies. Segmenting brain images via multiple atlases outperforms single-atlas labelling in humans. We present a set of atlases manually delineated on brain MRI scans of the monkey Macaca fascicularis. We use this multi-atlas dataset to evaluate two automated methods in terms of accuracy, robustness and reliability in segmenting brain structures on MRI and extracting regional PET measures. Twelve individual Macaca fascicularis high-resolution 3DT1 MR images were acquired. Four individual atlases were created by manually drawing 42 anatomical structures, including cortical and sub-cortical structures, white matter regions, and ventricles. To create the MRI template, we first chose one MRI to define a reference space, and then performed a two-step iterative procedure: affine registration of individual MRIs to the reference MRI, followed by averaging of the twelve resampled MRIs. Automated segmentation in native space was obtained in two ways: 1) Maximum probability atlases were created by decision fusion of two to four individual atlases in the reference space, and transformation back into the individual native space (MAXPROB)(.) 2) One to four individual atlases were registered directly to the individual native space, and combined by decision fusion (PROPAG). Accuracy was evaluated by computing the Dice similarity index and the volume difference. The robustness and reproducibility of PET regional measurements obtained via automated segmentation was evaluated on four co-registered MRI/PET datasets, which included test-retest data. Dice indices were always over 0.7 and reached maximal values of 0.9 for PROPAG with all four individual atlases. There was no significant mean volume bias. The standard deviation of the bias decreased significantly when increasing the number of individual atlases. MAXPROB performed better when increasing the number of

  16. Site specific measurements of bone formation using [18F] sodium fluoride PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Glen M; Puri, Tanuj; Siddique, Musib; Frost, Michelle L; Moore, Amelia E B; Fogelman, Ignac

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with fluorine-18 labelled sodium fluoride ([ 18 F]NaF) allows the quantitative assessment of regional bone formation by measuring the plasma clearance of fluoride to bone at any site in the skeleton. Today, hybrid PET and computed tomography (CT) dual-modality systems (PET/CT) are widely available, and [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT offers a convenient non-invasive method of studying bone formation at the important osteoporotic fracture sites at the hip and spine, as well as sites of pure cortical or trabecular bone. The technique complements conventional measurements of bone turnover using biochemical markers or bone biopsy as a tool to investigate new therapies for osteoporosis, and has a potential role as an early biomarker of treatment efficacy in clinical trials. This article reviews methods of acquiring and analyzing dynamic [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT scan data, and outlines a simplified approach combining venous blood sampling with a series of short (3- to 5-minute) static PET/CT scans acquired at different bed positions to estimate [ 18 F]NaF plasma clearance at multiple sites in the skeleton with just a single injection of tracer.

  17. Multimodal 18F-Fluciclovine PET/MRI and Ultrasound-Guided Neurosurgery of an Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlberg, Anna; Berntsen, Erik Magnus; Johansen, Håkon; Myrthue, Mariane; Skjulsvik, Anne Jarstein; Reinertsen, Ingerid; Esmaeili, Morteza; Dai, Hong Yan; Xiao, Yiming; Rivaz, Hassan; Borghammer, Per; Solheim, Ole; Eikenes, Live

    2017-12-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic tissue sampling are routinely performed as part of the diagnostic workup for patients with glioma. Because of the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, there is a risk of undergrading caused by histopathologic sampling errors. MRI has limitations in identifying tumor grade and type, detecting diffuse invasive growth, and separating recurrences from treatment induced changes. Positron emission tomography (PET) can provide quantitative information of cellular activity and metabolism, and may therefore complement MRI. In this report, we present the first patient with brain glioma examined with simultaneous PET/MRI using the amino acid tracer 18 F-fluciclovine ( 18 F-FACBC) for intraoperative image-guided surgery. A previously healthy 60-year old woman was admitted to the emergency care with speech difficulties and a mild left-sided hemiparesis. MRI revealed a tumor that was suggestive of glioma. Before surgery, the patient underwent a simultaneous PET/MRI examination. Fused PET/MRI, T1, FLAIR, and intraoperative three-dimensional ultrasound images were used to guide histopathologic tissue sampling and surgical resection. Navigated, image-guided histopathologic samples were compared with PET/MRI image data to assess the additional value of the PET acquisition. Histopathologic analysis showed anaplastic oligodendroglioma in the most malignant parts of the tumor, while several regions were World Health Organization (WHO) grade II. 18 F-Fluciclovine uptake was found in parts of the tumor where regional WHO grade, cell proliferation, and cell densities were highest. This finding suggests that PET/MRI with this tracer could be used to improve accuracy in histopathologic tissue sampling and grading, and possibly for guiding treatments targeting the most malignant part of extensive and eloquent gliomas. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of flow systems, groundwater recharge and transmissivities using environmental tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adar, E M [Ben-Gurion Univ. of Negev, Sede Boker Campus (Israel). Water Resources Center

    1996-10-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic concepts and formulations on the compartmental (mixing-cell) approach for interpretation of isotope and natural tracer data to arrive at quantitative estimates related to groundwater systems. The theoretical basis of the models and the specific solution algorithms used are described. The application of this approach to field cases are described as illustrative examples. Results of sensitivity analyses of the model to different parameters are provided. (author). 81 refs, 13 figs, 8 tabs.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of flow systems, groundwater recharge and transmissivities using environmental tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adar, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic concepts and formulations on the compartmental (mixing-cell) approach for interpretation of isotope and natural tracer data to arrive at quantitative estimates related to groundwater systems. The theoretical basis of the models and the specific solution algorithms used are described. The application of this approach to field cases are described as illustrative examples. Results of sensitivity analyses of the model to different parameters are provided. (author). 81 refs, 13 figs, 8 tabs

  20. Quantitative PET Imaging of Tissue Factor Expression Using 18F-labled Active Site Inhibited Factor VII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten H; Erlandsson, Maria; Jeppesen, Troels E

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is up regulated in many solid tumors and its expression is linked to tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis and prognosis. A non-invasive assessment of tumor TF expression status is therefore of obvious clinical relevance. Factor VII (FVII) is the natural ligand to TF. Here we...... report the development of a new PET tracer for specific imaging of TF using an (18)F-labeled derivative of FVII. METHODS: Active site inhibited factor VIIa (FVIIai) was obtained by inactivation with phenylalanine-phenylalanine-arginine-chloromethyl ketone. FVIIai was radiolabeled with N-succinimidyl 4......-[(18)F]-fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) and purified. The corresponding product, [(18)F]FVIIai, was injected into nude mice with subcutaneous human pancreatic xenograft tumors (BxPC-3) and investigated using small animal PET/CT imaging 1, 2 and 4 hours after injection. Ex vivo biodistribution was performed...

  1. Model-based image reconstruction for four-dimensional PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianfang; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Xing Lei

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tonography (PET) is useful in diagnosis and radiation treatment planning for a variety of cancers. For patients with cancers in thoracic or upper abdominal region, the respiratory motion produces large distortions in the tumor shape and size, affecting the accuracy in both diagnosis and treatment. Four-dimensional (4D) (gated) PET aims to reduce the motion artifacts and to provide accurate measurement of the tumor volume and the tracer concentration. A major issue in 4D PET is the lack of statistics. Since the collected photons are divided into several frames in the 4D PET scan, the quality of each reconstructed frame degrades as the number of frames increases. The increased noise in each frame heavily degrades the quantitative accuracy of the PET imaging. In this work, we propose a method to enhance the performance of 4D PET by developing a new technique of 4D PET reconstruction with incorporation of an organ motion model derived from 4D-CT images. The method is based on the well-known maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. During the processes of forward- and backward-projection in the ML-EM iterations, all projection data acquired at different phases are combined together to update the emission map with the aid of deformable model, the statistics is therefore greatly improved. The proposed algorithm was first evaluated with computer simulations using a mathematical dynamic phantom. Experiment with a moving physical phantom was then carried out to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method and the increase of signal-to-noise ratio over three-dimensional PET. Finally, the 4D PET reconstruction was applied to a patient case

  2. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Bäumer, P; Kopka, K; Hadaschik, B A; Hohenfellner, M; Kopp-Schneider, A; Haberkorn, U; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2018-06-01

    The aims of this retrospective analysis were to compare 68 Ga-PSMA PET findings and low-dose CT findings (120 kV, 30 mA), and to obtain semiquantitative and quantitative 68 Ga-PSMA PET data in patients with prostate cancer (PC) bone metastases. In total, 152 PET/CT scans from 140 patients were evaluated. Of these patients, 30 had previously untreated primary PC, and 110 had biochemical relapse after treatment of primary PC. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT scanning of the pelvis and lower abdomen as well as whole-body PET/CT with 68 Ga-PSMA-11. The PET/CT scans were analysed qualitatively (visually), semiquantitatively (SUV), and quantitatively based on a two-tissue compartment model and a noncompartmental approach leading to the extraction of the fractal dimension. Differences were considered significant for p values PET-positive and CT-positive, 65 were only 68 Ga-PSMA-positive, and 10 were only CT-positive. The Yang test showed that there were significantly more 68 Ga-PSMA PET-positive lesions than CT-positive lesions. Association analysis showed that PSA plasma levels were significantly correlated with several 68 Ga-PSMA-11-associated parameters in bone metastases, including the degree of tracer uptake (SUV average and SUV max ), its transport rate from plasma to the interstitial/intracellular compartment (K 1 ), its rate of binding to the PSMA receptor and its internalization (k 3 ), its influx rate (K i ), and its distribution heterogeneity. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT is a useful diagnostic tool in the detection of bone metastases in PC. 68 Ga-PSMA PET visualizes more bone metastases than low-dose CT. PSA plasma levels are significantly correlated with several 68 Ga-PSMA PET parameters.

  3. Individualized quantification of brain β-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, Henryk; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg; Patt, Marianne; Sattler, Bernhard; Schildan, Andreas; Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Sabri, Osama; Hammerstein, Eva; Hartwig, Kristin; Gertz, Hermann-Josef; Eggers, Birk; Wolf, Henrike; Zimmermann, Torsten; Reischl, Joachim; Rohde, Beate; Reininger, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as β-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([ 18 F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel β-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched (≥ 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 μg. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain β-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be β-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa ≥ 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain β-amyloid load yielded the closest correlation with

  4. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E

    2014-01-01

    be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET......Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  5. Optimal time-point for 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT imaging in assessment of prostate cancer: feasibility of sterile cold-kit tracer preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Mohsen; Paymani, Zeinab; Brilhante, Joana; Geinitz, Hans; Gehring, Daniela; Leopoldseder, Thomas; Wouters, Ludovic; Pirich, Christian; Loidl, Wolfgang; Langsteger, Werner

    2018-07-01

    In this prospective study, we evaluated the optimal time-point for 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT acquisition in the assessment of prostate cancer. We also examined, for the first time the feasibility of tracer production using a PSMA-11 sterile cold-kit in the clinical workflow of PET/CT centres. Fifty prostate cancer patients (25 staging, 25 biochemical recurrence) were enrolled in this study. All patients received an intravenous dose of 2.0 MBq/kg body weight 68 Ga-PSMA-11 prepared using a sterile cold kit (ANMI SA, Liege, Belgium), followed by an early (20 min after injection) semi-whole-body PET/CT scan and a standard-delay (100 min after injection) abdominopelvic PET/CT scan. The detection rates with 68 Ga-PSMA-11 were compared between the two acquisitions. The pattern of physiological background activity and tumour to background ratio were also analysed. The total preparation time was reduced to 5 min using the PSMA-11 sterile cold kit, which improved the final radionuclide activity by about 30% per single 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator elution. Overall, 158 pathological lesions were analysed in 45 patients (90%) suggestive of malignancy on both (early and standard-delay) 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT images. There was a significant (p PET/CT imaging seems to provide a detection rate comparable with that of standard-delay imaging. Furthermore, the shorter preparation time using the 68 Ga-PSMA-11 sterile cold kit and promising value of early PET/CT scanning could allow tailoring of imaging protocols which may reduce the costs and improve the time efficiency in PET/CT centres.

  6. PET application in psychiatry and psychopharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    In the last few decades diagnostic and research tools in the medical field have made great advances, yet psychiatry has lacked sufficiently sensitive tools to measure the aberration of brain functions. Recently however, the development of Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques has made it possible to measure changes in neurochemical components in mental disorders and the effect of psychoactive drugs in living human brain. Most of the advancement in the psychiatric field has came from the development psychoactive drugs. Brain research involving identification of neurotransmission is largely based on compounds developed in psychopharmacology. Some of these compounds have been radiolabelled and used as radioligands for quantitative examination of neuroreceptors and other aspects of neurotransmission. Using PET, radioligand binding can now be examined in the human brain in vivo. PET techniques also allow examination of an unlabelled drug by examination of its interaction with a radioligand. So one potential of PET in psychiatry is to investigate the mechanism of psychoactive drugs. Antidepressants modulate serotonin transmission by inhibiting serotonin reuptake from the synaptic cleft. High affinity [{sup 3}H]imipramine binding sites in mammalian brain have been labelled to investigate serotonin transporters in living human brain by PET. Cyanoimipramine which is described as a potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was labelled with {sup 11}C. In a PET experiment with 6 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation of [{sup 11}C]cyanoimipramine was found in the thalamus and striatum and lowest accumulation was observed in the cerebellum, a region relatively void of serotonin transporters. The thalamus to cerebellum ratio was about 2 at 90 min after the injection of the tracer. Recently, [{sup 11}C]McN5652-X has been introduced as a better tracer for serotonin transporter imaging. Employing [{sup 11}C]McN5652-X in a PET study of 7 healthy human subjects, a high

  7. PET application in psychiatry and psychopharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhara, Tetsuya

    1999-01-01

    In the last few decades diagnostic and research tools in the medical field have made great advances, yet psychiatry has lacked sufficiently sensitive tools to measure the aberration of brain functions. Recently however, the development of Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques has made it possible to measure changes in neurochemical components in mental disorders and the effect of psychoactive drugs in living human brain. Most of the advancement in the psychiatric field has came from the development psychoactive drugs. Brain research involving identification of neurotransmission is largely based on compounds developed in psychopharmacology. Some of these compounds have been radiolabelled and used as radioligands for quantitative examination of neuroreceptors and other aspects of neurotransmission. Using PET, radioligand binding can now be examined in the human brain in vivo. PET techniques also allow examination of an unlabelled drug by examination of its interaction with a radioligand. So one potential of PET in psychiatry is to investigate the mechanism of psychoactive drugs. Antidepressants modulate serotonin transmission by inhibiting serotonin reuptake from the synaptic cleft. High affinity [ 3 H]imipramine binding sites in mammalian brain have been labelled to investigate serotonin transporters in living human brain by PET. Cyanoimipramine which is described as a potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was labelled with 11 C. In a PET experiment with 6 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation of [ 11 C]cyanoimipramine was found in the thalamus and striatum and lowest accumulation was observed in the cerebellum, a region relatively void of serotonin transporters. The thalamus to cerebellum ratio was about 2 at 90 min after the injection of the tracer. Recently, [ 11 C]McN5652-X has been introduced as a better tracer for serotonin transporter imaging. Employing [ 11 C]McN5652-X in a PET study of 7 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation was observed

  8. Preclinical dynamic 18F-FDG PET - tumor characterization and radiotherapy response assessment by kinetic compartment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roee, Kathrine; Aleksandersen, Thomas B.; Nilsen, Line B.; Hong Qu; Ree, Anne H.; Malinen, Eirik; Kristian, Alexandr; Seierstad, Therese; Olsen, Dag R.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Non-invasive visualization of tumor biological and molecular processes of importance to diagnosis and treatment response is likely to be critical in individualized cancer therapy. Since conventional static 18 F-FDG PET with calculation of the semi-quantitative parameter standardized uptake value (SUV) may be subject to many sources of variability, we here present an approach of quantifying the 18 F-FDG uptake by analytic two-tissue compartment modeling, extracting kinetic tumor parameters from dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. Further, we evaluate the potential of such parameters in radiotherapy response assessment. Material and methods. Male, athymic mice with prostate carcinoma xenografts were subjected to dynamic PET either untreated (n=8) or 24 h post-irradiation (7.5 Gy single dose, n=8). After 10 h of fasting, intravenous bolus injections of 10-15 MBq 18 F-FDG were administered and a 1 h dynamic PET scan was performed. 4D emission data were reconstructed using OSEM-MAP, before remote post-processing. Individual arterial input functions were extracted from the image series. Subsequently, tumor 18 F-FDG uptake was fitted voxel-by-voxel to a compartment model, producing kinetic parameter maps. Results. The kinetic model separated the 18 F-FDG uptake into free and bound tracer and quantified three parameters; forward tracer diffusion (k1), backward tracer diffusion (k2), and rate of 18 F-FDG phosphorylation, i.e. the glucose metabolism (k3). The fitted kinetic model gave a goodness of fit (r2) to the observed data ranging from 0.91 to 0.99, and produced parametrical images of all tumors included in the study. Untreated tumors showed homogeneous intra-group median values of all three parameters (k1, k2 and k3), whereas the parameters significantly increased in the tumors irradiated 24 h prior to 18 F-FDG PET. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a two-tissue compartment kinetic analysis of dynamic 18 F-FDG PET images. If validated, extracted

  9. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  10. Quantitative performance evaluation of 124I PET/MRI lesion dosimetry in differentiated thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierts, R.; Jentzen, W.; Quick, H. H.; Wisselink, H. J.; Pooters, I. N. A.; Wildberger, J. E.; Herrmann, K.; Kemerink, G. J.; Backes, W. H.; Mottaghy, F. M.

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the quantitative performance of 124I PET/MRI for pre-therapy lesion dosimetry in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Phantom measurements were performed on a PET/MRI system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare) using 124I and 18F. The PET calibration factor and the influence of radiofrequency coil attenuation were determined using a cylindrical phantom homogeneously filled with radioactivity. The calibration factor was 1.00  ±  0.02 for 18F and 0.88  ±  0.02 for 124I. Near the radiofrequency surface coil an underestimation of less than 5% in radioactivity concentration was observed. Soft-tissue sphere recovery coefficients were determined using the NEMA IEC body phantom. Recovery coefficients were systematically higher for 18F than for 124I. In addition, the six spheres of the phantom were segmented using a PET-based iterative segmentation algorithm. For all 124I measurements, the deviations in segmented lesion volume and mean radioactivity concentration relative to the actual values were smaller than 15% and 25%, respectively. The effect of MR-based attenuation correction (three- and four-segment µ-maps) on bone lesion quantification was assessed using radioactive spheres filled with a K2HPO4 solution mimicking bone lesions. The four-segment µ-map resulted in an underestimation of the imaged radioactivity concentration of up to 15%, whereas the three-segment µ-map resulted in an overestimation of up to 10%. For twenty lesions identified in six patients, a comparison of 124I PET/MRI to PET/CT was performed with respect to segmented lesion volume and radioactivity concentration. The interclass correlation coefficients showed excellent agreement in segmented lesion volume and radioactivity concentration (0.999 and 0.95, respectively). In conclusion, it is feasible that accurate quantitative 124I PET/MRI could be used to perform radioiodine pre-therapy lesion dosimetry in DTC.

  11. Comparison of analytical methods of brain [18F]FDG-PET after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Karine; Hesby, Sara; Poulsen, Ingrid; Fuglsang, Stefan; Graff, Jesper; Larsen, Karen B; Kammersgaard, Lars P; Law, Ian; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2017-11-01

    Loss of consciousness has been shown to reduce cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRglc) measured by brain [ 18 F]FDG-PET. Measurements of regional metabolic patterns by normalization to global cerebral metabolism or cerebellum may underestimate widespread reductions. The aim of this study was to compare quantification methods of whole brain glucose metabolism, including whole brain [18F]FDG uptake normalized to uptake in cerebellum, normalized to injected activity, normalized to plasma tracer concentration, and two methods for estimating CMRglc. Six patients suffering from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and ten healthy controls (HC) underwent a 10min static [ 18 F]FDG-PET scan and venous blood sampling. Except from normalizing to cerebellum, all quantification methods found significant lower level of whole brain glucose metabolism of 25-33% in TBI patients compared to HC. In accordance these measurements correlated to level of consciousness. Our study demonstrates that the analysis method of the [ 18 F]FDG PET data has a substantial impact on the estimated whole brain cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with severe TBI. Importantly, the SUVR method which is often used in a clinical setting was not able to distinguish patients with severe TBI from HC at the whole-brain level. We recommend supplementing a static [ 18 F]FDG scan with a single venous blood sample in future studies of patients with severe TBI or reduced level of consciousness. This can be used for simple semi-quantitative uptake values by normalizing brain activity uptake to plasma tracer concentration, or quantitative estimates of CMRglc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of lung cancer xenografts in nude mice using clinical PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying Yi; Wang, Kai; Xu, Zuo Yu; Song, Yan; Wang, Chu Nan; Zhang, Chong Qing; Sun, Xi Lin; Shen, Bao Zhong

    2017-08-08

    Considering the general application of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. To estimate the feasibility of using clinical PET/CT with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for high-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of cancer xenografts in nude mice. Dynamic clinical PET/CT scans were performed on xenografts for 60 min after injection with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Scans were reconstructed with or without SharpIR method in two phases. And mice were sacrificed to extracting major organs and tumors, using ex vivo γ-counting as a reference. Strikingly, we observed that the image quality and the correlation between the all quantitive data from clinical PET/CT and the ex vivo counting was better with the SharpIR reconstructions than without. Our data demonstrate that clinical PET/CT scanner with SharpIR reconstruction is a valuable tool for imaging small animals in preclinical cancer research, offering dynamic imaging parameters, good image quality and accurate data quatification.

  13. Bone formation rather than inflammation reflects ankylosing spondylitis activity on PET-CT: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnen, Stefan T G; van der Weijden, Mignon A C; Klein, Joannes P; Hoekstra, Otto S; Boellaard, Ronald; van Denderen, J Christiaan; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; van der Laken, Conny J

    2012-04-02

    Positron Emission Tomography - Computer Tomography (PET-CT) is an interesting imaging technique to visualize Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) activity using specific PET tracers. Previous studies have shown that the PET tracers [18F]FDG and [11C](R)PK11195 can target inflammation (synovitis) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and may therefore be useful in AS. Another interesting tracer for AS is [18F]Fluoride, which targets bone formation. In a pilot setting, the potential of PET-CT in imaging AS activity was tested using different tracers, with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and conventional radiographs as reference. In a stepwise approach different PET tracers were investigated. First, whole body [18F]FDG and [11C](R)PK11195 PET-CT scans were obtained of ten AS patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria. According to the BASDAI five of these patients had low and five had high disease activity. Secondly, an extra PET-CT scan using [18F]Fluoride was made of two additional AS patients with high disease activity. MRI scans of the total spine and sacroiliac joints were performed, and conventional radiographs of the total spine and sacroiliac joints were available for all patients. Scans and radiographs were visually scored by two observers blinded for clinical data. No increased [18F]FDG and [11C](R)PK11195 uptake was noticed on PET-CT scans of the first 10 patients. In contrast, MRI demonstrated a total of five bone edema lesions in three out of 10 patients. In the two additional AS patients scanned with [18F]Fluoride PET-CT, [18F]Fluoride depicted 17 regions with increased uptake in both vertebral column and sacroiliac joints. In contrast, [18F]FDG depicted only three lesions, with an uptake of five times lower compared to [18F]Fluoride, and again no [11C](R)PK11195 positive lesions were found. In these two patients, MRI detected nine lesions and six out of nine matched with the anatomical position of [18F]Fluoride uptake. Conventional radiographs showed structural

  14. THERANOSTICS: From Molecular Imaging Using Ga-68 Labeled Tracers and PET/CT to Personalized Radionuclide Therapy - The Bad Berka Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Baum, Harshad R. Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The acronym THERANOSTICS epitomizes the inseparability of diagnosis and therapy, the pillars of medicine and takes into account personalized management of disease for a specific patient. Molecular phenotypes of neoplasms can be determined by molecular imaging with specific probes using positron emission tomography (PET, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, or optical methods, so that the treatment is specifically targeted against the tumor and its environment. To meet these demands, we need to define the targets, ligands, coupling and labeling chemistry, the most appropriate radionuclides, biodistribution modifiers, and finally select the right patients for the personalized treatment. THERANOSTICS of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs using Ga-68 labeled tracers for diagnostics with positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT, and using Lu-177 or other metallic radionuclides for radionuclide therapy by applying the same peptide proves that personalized radionuclide therapy today is already a fact and not a fiction.

  15. 'Serial review on clinical PET tracers'. Application of health insurance of [15O]oxygen PET and [18F]FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Kanji

    2009-01-01

    As regards the application required for health insurance of PET, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare indicates the following procedures: first, request a permission to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for the clinical use of the automatic synthetic instrument for PET drug, approved according to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law. Second, put into practice the use of PET test, under the highly advanced medicine premises. Then, in case of gathered positive results, the health insurance is approved for this PET test. Thus, following the above mentioned procedures, first, the use of [ 15 O] oxygen PET was approved in April 1996. Second, the use of [ 18 F]FDG-PET was approved in 12 different diseases: epilepsy, ischemic heart disease and 10 different types of cancer, in April 2002. Third, in April 2006, a additional 3 types of cancer were approved. Now, we are in the process to get the health insurance of all kinds of malignant tumors (cancer and sarcoma) except for the early gastric cancer. (author)

  16. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo evaluation of [11C]SNAP-7941 – the first PET tracer for the melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, Cécile; Nics, Lukas; Zeilinger, Markus; Kuntner, Claudia; Wanek, Thomas; Mairinger, Severin; Shanab, Karem; Spreitzer, Helmut; Viernstein, Helmut; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Due to its involvement in a variety of pathologies (obesity, diabetes, gut inflammation and depression), the melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a new target for the treatment of these lifestyle diseases. We previously presented the radiosynthesis of [ 11 C]SNAP-7941, the first potential PET tracer for the MCHR1. Methods: We herein present its in vitro and in vivo evaluation, including binding affinity, plasma stability, stability against liver mircrosomes and carboxylesterase, lipohilicity, biodistribution, in vivo metabolism and small-animal PET. Results: [ 11 C]SNAP-7941 evinced high stability against liver microsomes, carboxylesterase and in human plasma. The first small-animal PET experiments revealed a 5 fold increased brain uptake after Pgp/BCRP inhibition. Therefore, it can be assumed that [ 11 C]SNAP-7941 is a Pgp/BCRP substrate. No metabolites were found in brain. Conclusion: On the basis of these experiments with healthy rats, the suitability of [ 11 C]SNAP-7941 for the visualisation of central and peripheral MCHR1 remains speculative

  17. Kinetic analysis of the cannabinoid-1 receptor PET tracer [18F]MK-9470 in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanabria-Bohorquez, Sandra Marina; Hamill, Terence G.; Burns, H.D.; Goffin, Karolien; Laere, Koen van; Lepeleire, Inge de; Bormans, Guy

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative imaging of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) opens perspectives for many neurological and psychiatric disorders. We characterized the kinetics and reproducibility of the CB1R tracer [ 18 F]MK-9470 in human brain. [ 18 F]MK-9470 data were analysed using reversible models and the distribution volume V T and V ND k 3 (V ND k 3 = K 1 k 2 ) were estimated. Tracer binding was also evaluated using irreversible kinetics and the irreversible uptake constant K i and fractional uptake rate (FUR) were estimated. The effect of blood flow on these parameters was evaluated. Additionally, the possibility of determining the tracer plasma kinetics using a reduced number of blood samples was also examined. A reversible two-tissue compartment model using a global k 4 value was necessary to describe brain kinetics. Both V T and V ND k 3 were estimated satisfactorily and their test-retest variability was between 10% and 30%. Irreversible methods adequately described brain kinetics and FUR values were equivalent to K i . The linear relationship between K i and V ND k 3 demonstrated that K i or FUR and thus the simple measure of tracer brain uptake provide CB1R availability information. The test-retest variability of K i and FUR was 18 F]MK-9470 specific binding can be accurately determined using FUR values requiring a short scan 90 to 120 min after tracer administration. Our results suggest that [ 18 F]MK-9470 plasma kinetics can be assessed using a few venous samples. (orig.)

  18. T156. IN VIVO CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FIRST AGONIST DOPAMINE D1 RECEPTORS PET IMAGING TRACER [18F]MNI-968 IN HUMAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagnan, Gilles; Barret, Olivier; Alagille, David; Carroll, Vincent; Madonia, Jennifer; Constantinescu, Cristian; SanDiego, Christine; Papin, Caroline; Morley, Thomas; Russell, David; McCarthy, Timothy; Zhang, Lei; Gray, David; Villalobos, Anna; Lee, Chewah; Chen, Jianqing; Seibyl, John; Marek, Kenneth

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background D1 receptors, which couple to inhibitory G-proteins, have been shown to regulate neuronal growth and development, mediate some behavioral responses. Its function has been shown to be altered in both neurologic and psychiatric disorders. To date, there is a lack of agonist PET tracers for the D1 receptors labeled with 18F with relevance in clinical studies. We report the evaluation in non-human primates of [18F]MNI-968 (PF-06730110), a novel PET radiotracer of the D1 receptors Methods Four brain PET studies, 2 baselines and 2 blockade studies using PF-2562, a D1 partial agonist compound, were conducted for 90 min in two rhesus monkeys with [18F]MNI-968 (169 ± 31 MBq). [18F]PF-06730110 was administered at the same dose level for both monkeys as a bolus followed by a 2-hour infusion, with [18F]MNI-968 administered 30 min into the infusion. Additionally, six brain PET studies were conducted over 180 min (317 ± 49 MBq) in 6 healthy human volunteers (3 test/retest and 3 test). PET data were modeled with 2-tissue compartmental model (2T), Logan graphical analysis (LGA), and non-invasive Logan graphical analysis (NI-LGA) with cerebellar cortex as reference region to estimate total distribution volume VT, and binding potential BPND. For the blockade studies in rhesus monkeys, occupancy was estimated from BPND at baseline and post blockade. Results In rhesus monkeys, [18F]MNI-968 (PF-06730110), penetrated the brain with a peak whole-brain uptake up to ~3% of the injected dose at ~ 6 min post injection and showed a fast washout. The highest signal was found in the caudate, putamen, with moderate extrastriatal uptake. The lowest signal was in the cerebellum. BPND values were up to ~1.4 in the putamen. All three quantification methods (2T, LGA and NI-LGA) were in excellent agreement, with a similar estimated D1 receptors occupancy of PF-06730110 of ~40% for both monkeys in the caudate and putamen. In human, [18F]MNI-968 kinetics appeared to be faster

  19. Feasibility of quantitative PET/CT dosimetry for proton therapy using polymer gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, O A; Hsi, W C; Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O; Sriprisan, S I; Meeks, S L; Kupelian, P A; Li, Z; Palta, J R, E-mail: lenatirpak@gmail.co

    2010-11-01

    A feasibility study of proton beam PET/CT off-line quantitative dosimetry using polymer gels is presented. A newly developed proton-sensitive polymer gel dosimeter (BANG( (registered)) 3-Pro2) is used as a dosimeter and a tissue-equivalent phantom medium for this study. We explore a new approach to correlating measured proton 3-dimensional (3D) dose distributions directly to measured positron emission from in the gel medium using PET/CT imaging. A large cylindrical volume (2.2 Litres) of the gel was irradiated with a clinical modulated proton beam using irregular-shaped aperture geometry. The gel was imaged in a nearby PET/CT unit immediately (<3 min) after irradiation. Dose distribution in the gel was generated using an optical tomography scanning system. Direct 3D spatial comparison of dose and positron emission distributions was then performed. Profiles along the beam path show that the distal fall-off of the dose is nearly 2 cm deeper than the activity profile which is comparable to previous studies with plastic phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations of activity distributions. Planar PET and dose distributions at depth and perpendicular to beam axis show a strong one-to-one spatial correlation. This phantom study demonstrates that the gel medium could be potentially useful for quantifying various physical factors that can influence the PET activity range verification method in patients.

  20. PetIGA-MF: a multi-field high-performance toolbox for structure-preserving B-splines spaces

    KAUST Repository

    Sarmiento, Adel

    2016-10-01

    We describe a high-performance solution framework for isogeometric discrete differential forms based on B-splines: PetIGA-MF. Built on top of PetIGA, an open-source library we have built and developed over the last decade, PetIGA-MF is a general multi-field discretization tool. To test the capabilities of our implementation, we solve different viscous flow problems such as Darcy, Stokes, Brinkman, and Navier-Stokes equations. Several convergence benchmarks based on manufactured solutions are presented assuring optimal convergence rates of the approximations, showing the accuracy and robustness of our solver.

  1. Individualized quantification of brain {beta}-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Henryk; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg; Patt, Marianne; Sattler, Bernhard; Schildan, Andreas; Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Hammerstein, Eva; Hartwig, Kristin; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Eggers, Birk [Arzneimittelforschung Leipzig GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); University of Zurich, Department of Psychiatry, Zurich (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Torsten; Reischl, Joachim; Rohde, Beate; Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Healthcare, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as {beta}-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([{sup 18}F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel {beta}-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched ({>=} 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 {mu}g. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain {beta}-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be {beta}-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa {>=} 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain

  2. Quantitation of PET signal as an adjunct to visual interpretation of florbetapir imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontecorvo, Michael J.; Arora, Anupa K.; Devine, Marybeth; Lu, Ming; Galante, Nick; Siderowf, Andrew; Devadanam, Catherine; Joshi, Abhinay D.; Heun, Stephen L.; Teske, Brian F.; Truocchio, Stephen P.; Krautkramer, Michael; Devous, Michael D.; Mintun, Mark A. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals (a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly and Company), Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    This study examined the feasibility of using quantitation to augment interpretation of florbetapir PET amyloid imaging. A total of 80 physician readers were trained on quantitation of florbetapir PET images and the principles for using quantitation to augment a visual read. On day 1, the readers completed a visual read of 96 scans (46 autopsy-verified and 50 from patients seeking a diagnosis). On day 2, 69 of the readers reinterpreted the 96 scans augmenting their interpretation with quantitation (VisQ method) using one of three commercial software packages. A subset of 11 readers reinterpreted all scans on day 2 based on a visual read only (VisVis control). For the autopsy-verified scans, the neuropathologist's modified CERAD plaque score was used as the truth standard for interpretation accuracy. Because an autopsy truth standard was not available for scans from patients seeking a diagnosis, the majority VisQ interpretation of the three readers with the best accuracy in interpreting autopsy-verified scans was used as the reference standard. Day 1 visual read accuracy was high for both the autopsy-verified scans (90%) and the scans from patients seeking a diagnosis (87.3%). Accuracy improved from the visual read to the VisQ read (from 90.1% to 93.1%, p < 0.0001). Importantly, access to quantitative information did not decrease interpretation accuracy of the above-average readers (>90% on day 1). Accuracy in interpreting the autopsy-verified scans also increased from the first to the second visual read (VisVis group). However, agreement with the reference standard (best readers) for scans from patients seeking a diagnosis did not improve with a second visual read, and in this cohort the VisQ group was significantly improved relative to the VisVis group (change 5.4% vs. -1.1%, p < 0.0001). These results indicate that augmentation of visual interpretation of florbetapir PET amyloid images with quantitative information obtained using commercially available

  3. Quantitation of PET signal as an adjunct to visual interpretation of florbetapir imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontecorvo, Michael J.; Arora, Anupa K.; Devine, Marybeth; Lu, Ming; Galante, Nick; Siderowf, Andrew; Devadanam, Catherine; Joshi, Abhinay D.; Heun, Stephen L.; Teske, Brian F.; Truocchio, Stephen P.; Krautkramer, Michael; Devous, Michael D.; Mintun, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using quantitation to augment interpretation of florbetapir PET amyloid imaging. A total of 80 physician readers were trained on quantitation of florbetapir PET images and the principles for using quantitation to augment a visual read. On day 1, the readers completed a visual read of 96 scans (46 autopsy-verified and 50 from patients seeking a diagnosis). On day 2, 69 of the readers reinterpreted the 96 scans augmenting their interpretation with quantitation (VisQ method) using one of three commercial software packages. A subset of 11 readers reinterpreted all scans on day 2 based on a visual read only (VisVis control). For the autopsy-verified scans, the neuropathologist's modified CERAD plaque score was used as the truth standard for interpretation accuracy. Because an autopsy truth standard was not available for scans from patients seeking a diagnosis, the majority VisQ interpretation of the three readers with the best accuracy in interpreting autopsy-verified scans was used as the reference standard. Day 1 visual read accuracy was high for both the autopsy-verified scans (90%) and the scans from patients seeking a diagnosis (87.3%). Accuracy improved from the visual read to the VisQ read (from 90.1% to 93.1%, p < 0.0001). Importantly, access to quantitative information did not decrease interpretation accuracy of the above-average readers (>90% on day 1). Accuracy in interpreting the autopsy-verified scans also increased from the first to the second visual read (VisVis group). However, agreement with the reference standard (best readers) for scans from patients seeking a diagnosis did not improve with a second visual read, and in this cohort the VisQ group was significantly improved relative to the VisVis group (change 5.4% vs. -1.1%, p < 0.0001). These results indicate that augmentation of visual interpretation of florbetapir PET amyloid images with quantitative information obtained using commercially available

  4. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2003-01-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test

  5. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test.

  6. [{sup 11}C]FMAU and [{sup 18}F]FHPG as PET tracers for herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase enzyme activity and human cytomegalovirus infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Erik F.J. de E-mail: e.f.j.de.vries@pet.azg.nl; Waarde, Aren van; Harmsen, Marco C.; Mulder, Nanno H.; Vaalburg, Willem; Hospers, Geke A.P

    2000-02-01

    [{sup 11}C]-2'-Fluoro-5-methyl-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil ([{sup 11}C]FMAU) and [{sup 18}F]-9-[(3-fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine ([{sup 18}F]FHPG), radiolabeled representatives of two classes of antiviral agents, were evaluated as tracers for measuring herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) enzyme activity after gene transfer and as tracers for localization of active human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. In vitro accumulation experiments revealed that both [{sup 11}C]FMAU and [{sup 18}F]FHPG accumulated significantly more in HSV-tk expressing cells than they did in control cells. [{sup 18}F]FHPG uptake in HSV-tk expressing cells, however, was found to depend strongly on the cell line used, which might be due to cell type dependent membrane transport or cell type dependent substrate specific susceptibility of the enzyme. In vitro, both tracers exhibited a good selectivity for accumulation in HCMV-infected human umbilical vein endothelial cells over uninfected cells. In contrast to [{sup 18}F]FHPG, [{sup 11}C]FMAU uptake in control cells was relatively high due to phosphorylation of the tracer by host kinases. Therefore, [{sup 18}F]FHPG appears to be the more selective tracer not only to predict HSV-tk gene therapy outcome, but also to localize active HCMV infections with PET.

  7. 18F-FET-PET in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, Martin; Kjær, Andreas; Bennedbæk, Finn Noe

    2016-01-01

    -isotope parathyroid subtraction single photon emission computed tomography had determined the exact location of the parathyroid adenoma. A dynamic FET PET/CT scan was performed with subsequent visual evaluation and calculation of target-to-background (TBR; parathyroid vs. thyroid). The maximum TBR in the two patients......Preoperative localisation of the diseased parathyroid gland(s) in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) is a prerequisite for subsequent minimally invasive surgery. Recently, as alternatives to conventional sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy, the (11)C-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracers...... methionine and choline have shown promise for this purpose. We evaluated the feasibility of using the (18)F-based PET tracer fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET), as the longer half-life of (18)F makes it logistically more favourable. As a proof-of-concept study, we included two patients with PHP in which dual...

  8. Comparison of multiple tau-PET measures as biomarkers in aging and Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maass, Anne [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg (Germany); Landau, Susan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Baker, Suzanne L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Horng, Andy [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lockhart, Samuel N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); La Joie, Renaud [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rabinovici, Gil D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Jagust, William J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-06-03

    The recent development of tau-specific positron emission tomography (PET) tracers enables in vivo quantification of regional tau pathology, one of the key lesions in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau PET imaging may become a useful biomarker for clinical diagnosis and tracking of disease progression but there is no consensus yet on how tau PET signal is best quantified. The goal of the current paper was to evaluate multiple whole-brain and region-specific approaches to detect clinically relevant tau PET signal. Two independent cohorts of cognitively normal adults and amyloid-positive (Aβ+) patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD-dementia underwent [18F]AV-1451 PET. Methods for tau tracer quantification included: (i) in vivo Braak staging, (ii) regional uptake in Braak composite regions, (iii) several whole-brain measures of tracer uptake, (iv) regional uptake in AD-vulnerable voxels, and (v) uptake in a priori defined regions. Receiver operating curves characterized accuracy in distinguishing Aβ- controls from AD/MCI patients and yielded tau positivity cutoffs. Clinical relevance of tau PET measures was assessed by regressions against cognition and MR imaging measures. Key tracer uptake patterns were identified by a factor analysis and voxel-wise contrasts. Braak staging, global and region-specific tau measures yielded similar diagnostic accuracies, which differed between cohorts. While all tau measures were related to amyloid and global cognition, memory and hippocampal/entorhinal volume/thickness were associated with regional tracer retention in the medial temporal lobe. Key regions of tau accumulation included medial temporal and inferior/middle temporal regions, retrosplenial cortex, and banks of the superior temporal sulcus. Finally, our data indicate that whole-brain tau PET measures might be adequate biomarkers to detect AD-related tau pathology. However, regional measures covering AD-vulnerable regions may

  9. Comparison of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT with [18F]NaF PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in metastatic prostate cancer patients prior to radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprimny, Christian; Svirydenka, Anna; Fritz, Josef; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Nilica, Bernhard; Decristoforo, Clemens; Haubner, Roland; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Buxbaum, Sabine; Horninger, Wolfgang; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2018-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in metastatic prostate cancer (PC) patients scheduled for radionuclide therapy in comparison to [ 18 F]sodium fluoride ( 18 F-NaF) PET/CT. Sixteen metastatic PC patients with known skeletal metastases, who underwent both 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT and 18 F-NaF PET/CT for assessment of metastatic burden prior to radionuclide therapy, were analysed retrospectively. The performance of both tracers was calculated on a lesion-based comparison. Intensity of tracer accumulation of pathologic bone lesions on 18 F-NaF PET and 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET was measured with maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) and compared to background activity of normal bone. In addition, SUV max values of PET-positive bone lesions were analysed with respect to morphologic characteristics on CT. Bone metastases were either confirmed by CT or follow-up PET scan. In contrast to 468 PET-positive lesions suggestive of bone metastases on 18 F-NaF PET, only 351 of the lesions were also judged positive on 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET (75.0%). Intensity of tracer accumulation of pathologic skeletal lesions was significantly higher on 18 F-NaF PET compared to 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET, showing a median SUV max of 27.0 and 6.0, respectively (p PET, with a median SUV max of 1.0 in comparison to 2.7 on 18 F-NaF PET; however, tumour to background ratio was significantly higher on 18 F-NaF PET (9.8 versus 5.9 on 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET; p = 0.042). Based on morphologic lesion characterisation on CT, 18 F-NaF PET revealed median SUV max values of 23.6 for osteosclerotic, 35.0 for osteolytic, and 19.0 for lesions not visible on CT, whereas on 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET median SUV max values of 5.0 in osteosclerotic, 29.5 in osteolytic, and 7.5 in lesions not seen on CT were measured. Intensity of tracer accumulation between 18 F-NaF PET and 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET was significantly higher in osteosclerotic (p PET

  10. PET imaging of focal demyelination and remyelination in a rat model of multiple sclerosis: comparison of [{sup 11}C]MeDAS, [{sup 11}C]CIC and [{sup 11}C]PIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula Faria, Daniele de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Neuroscience, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Center of Nuclear Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Copray, Sjef [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Neuroscience, Groningen (Netherlands); Sijbesma, Jurgen W.A.; Willemsen, Antoon T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Vries, Erik F.J. de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Buchpiguel, Carlos A. [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Center of Nuclear Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, we compared the ability of [{sup 11}C]CIC, [{sup 11}C]MeDAS and [{sup 11}C]PIB to reveal temporal changes in myelin content in focal lesions in the lysolecithin rat model of multiple sclerosis. Pharmacokinetic modelling was performed to determine the best method to quantify tracer uptake. Sprague-Dawley rats were stereotactically injected with either 1 % lysolecithin or saline into the corpus callosum and striatum of the right brain hemisphere. Dynamic PET imaging with simultaneous arterial blood sampling was performed 7 days after saline injection (control group), 7 days after lysolecithin injection (demyelination group) and 4 weeks after lysolecithin injection (remyelination group). The kinetics of [{sup 11}C]CIC, [{sup 11}C]MeDAS and [{sup 11}C]PIB was best fitted by Logan graphical analysis, suggesting that tracer binding is reversible. Compartment modelling revealed that all tracers were fitted best with the reversible two-tissue compartment model. Tracer uptake and distribution volume in lesions were in agreement with myelin status. However, the slow kinetics and homogeneous brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]CIC make this tracer less suitable for in vivo PET imaging. [{sup 11}C]PIB showed good uptake in the white matter in the cerebrum, but [{sup 11}C]PIB uptake in the cerebellum was low, despite high myelin density in this region. [{sup 11}C]MeDAS distribution correlated well with myelin density in different brain regions. This study showed that PET imaging of demyelination and remyelination processes in focal lesions is feasible. Our comparison of three myelin tracers showed that [{sup 11}C]MeDAS has more favourable properties for quantitative PET imaging of demyelinated and remyelinated lesions throughout the CNS than [{sup 11}C]CIC and [{sup 11}C]PIB. (orig.)

  11. Carbon-11 and Fluorine-18 Labeled Amino Acid Tracers for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aixia; Liu, Xiang; Tang, Ganghua

    2017-12-01

    Tumor cells have an increased nutritional demand for amino acids(AAs) to satisfy their rapid proliferation. Positron-emitting nuclide labeled AAs are interesting probes and are of great importance for imaging tumors using positron emission tomography (PET). Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled AAs include the [1-11C] amino acids, labeling alpha-C- amino acids, the branched-chain of amino acids and N-substituted carbon-11 labeled amino acids. These tracers target protein synthesis or amino acid(AA) transport, and their uptake mechanism mainly involves AA transport. AA PET tracers have been widely used in clinical settings to image brain tumors, neuroendocrine tumors, prostate cancer, breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and hepatocellular carcinoma. This review focuses on the fundamental concepts and the uptake mechanism of AAs, AA PET tracers and their clinical applications.

  12. Comparison of PET/CT and whole-mount histopathology sections of the human prostate: a new strategy for voxel-wise evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, F; Fechter, T; Zamboglou, C; Chirindel, A; Salman, N; Jilg, C A; Drendel, V; Werner, M; Meyer, P T; Grosu, A-L; Mix, M

    2017-08-17

    Implementation of PET/CT in diagnosis of primary prostate cancer (PCa) requires a profound knowledge about the tracer, preferably from a quantitative evaluation. Direct visual comparison of PET/CT slices to whole prostate sections is hampered by considerable uncertainties from imperfect coregistration and fundamentally different image modalities. In the current study, we present a novel method for advanced voxel-wise comparison of histopathology from excised prostates to pre-surgical PET. Resected prostates from eight patients who underwent PSMA-PET/CT were scanned (ex vivo CT) and thoroughly pathologically prepared. In vivo and ex vivo CT including histopathology were coregistered with three different methods (manual, semi-/automatic). Spatial overlap after CT-based registration was evaluated with dice similarity (DSC). Furthermore, we constructed 3D cancer distribution models from histopathologic information in various slices. Subsequent smoothing reflected the intrinsically limited spatial resolution of PSMA-PET. The resulting histoPET models were used for quantitative analysis of spatial histopathology-PET pattern agreement focusing on p values and coefficients of determination (R 2 ). We examined additional rigid mutual information (MI) coregistration directly based on PSMA-PET and histoPET. Mean DSC for the three different methods (ManReg, ScalFactReg, and DefReg) were 0.79 ± 0.06, 0.82 ± 0.04, and 0.90 ± 0.02, respectively, while quantification of PET-histopathology pattern agreement after CT-based registration revealed R 2 45.7, 43.2, and 41.3% on average with p PET-based MI coregistration yielded R 2 61.3, 55.9, and 55.6%, respectively, while implying anatomically plausible transformations. Creating 3D histoPET models based on thorough histopathological preparation allowed sophisticated quantitative analyses showing highly significant correlations between histopathology and (PSMA-)PET. We recommend manual CT-based coregistration followed by a PET

  13. New SPECT tracers: Example of tracers of proteoglycans and melanin; Nouveaux traceurs TEMP: exemple des traceurs des proteoglycanes et de la melanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachin, F.; Mestas, D.; Kelly, A.; Merlin, C.; Veyre, A.; Maublant, J. [CRLCC Jean-Perrin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cachin, F.; Chezal, J.M.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Moins, N.; Auzeloux, P.; Vidal, A.; Bonnet-Duquennoy, M.; Boisgard, S.; D' Incan, M.; Madelmont, J.C.; Maublant, J. [Universite d' Auvergne, EA 4231, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Boisgard, S. [CHRU Gabriel-Montpied, Service d' Orthopedie, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); D' Incan, M. [CHRU Gabriel-Montpied, Service de Dermatologie, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Redini, F. [Inserm, U957-EA3822, Faculte de Medecine, 44 - Nantes (France); Filaire, M. [Universite d' Auvergne, Lab. d' Anatomie, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2009-02-15

    The majority of research program on new radiopharmaceuticals turn to tracers used for positron emission tomography (PET). Only a few teams work on new non fluorine labeled tracers. However, the coming of SPECT/CT gamma cameras, the arrival of semi-conductors gamma cameras should boost the development of non-PET tracers. We exhibit in this article the experience acquired by our laboratory in the conception and design of two new non fluorine labelled compounds. The {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 (N.T.P. 15-5 for N-[tri-ethyl-ammonium]-3-propyl-[15]ane-N5) which binds to proteoglycans could be used for the diagnosis and staging of osteoarthritis and chondrosarcoma. The iodo benzamides, specific to the melanin, are nowadays compared to {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose in a phase III clinical trial for the diagnosis and detection of melanoma metastasis. Our last development focus on N-[2-(diethyl-amino)ethyl]-4 and 2-iodo benzamides respectively B.Z.A. and B.Z.A.2 hetero-aromatic analogues usable for melanoma treatment. (authors)

  14. In vivo PET imaging of the neuroinflammatory response in rat spinal cord injury using the TSPO tracer [18F]GE-180 and effect of docosahexaenoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremoleda, J.L.; Thau-Zuchman, O.; Davies, M.; Vadivelu, K.C.; Yip, P.K.; Michael-Titus, A.T.; Foster, J.; Sosabowski, J.; Khan, I.; Trigg, W.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition which affects millions of people worldwide causing major disability and substantial socioeconomic burden. There are currently no effective treatments. Modulating the neuroinflammatory (NI) response after SCI has evolved as a major therapeutic strategy. PET can be used to detect the upregulation of the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), a hallmark of activated microglia in the CNS. We investigated whether PET imaging using the novel TSPO tracer [ 18 F]GE-180 can be used as a clinically relevant biomarker for NI in a contusion SCI rat model, and we present data on the modulation of NI by the lipid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A total of 22 adult male Wistar rats were subjected to controlled spinal cord contusion at the T10 spinal cord level. Six non-injured and ten T10 laminectomy only (LAM) animals were used as controls. A subset of six SCI animals were treated with a single intravenous dose of 250 nmol/kg DHA (SCI-DHA group) 30 min after injury; a saline-injected group of six animals was used as an injection control. PET and CT imaging was carried out 7 days after injury using the [ 18 F]GE-180 radiotracer. After imaging, the animals were killed and the spinal cord dissected out for biodistribution and autoradiography studies. In vivo data were correlated with ex vivo immunohistochemistry for TSPO. In vivo dynamic PET imaging revealed an increase in tracer uptake in the spinal cord of the SCI animals compared with the non-injured and LAM animals from 35 min after injection (P < 0.0001; SCI vs. LAM vs. non-injured). Biodistribution and autoradiography studies confirmed the high affinity and specific [ 18 F]GE-180 binding in the injured spinal cord compared with the binding in the control groups. Furthermore, they also showed decreased tracer uptake in the T10 SCI area in relation to the non-injured remainder of the spinal cord in the SCI-DHA group compared with the SCI-saline group (P < 0.05), supporting

  15. Two anti-angiogenic TKI-PET tracers, [11C]axitinib and [11C]nintedanib: Radiosynthesis, in vivo metabolism and initial biodistribution studies in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slobbe, Paul; Poot, Alex J.; Haumann, Rianne; Schuit, Robert C.; Windhorst, Albert D.; Dongen, Guus A.M.S. van

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are very attractive targeted drugs, although a large portion of patients remains unresponsive. PET imaging with EGFR targeting TKIs ([ 11 C]erlotinib and [ 18 F]afatinib) showed promise in identifying treatment sensitive tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize two anti-angiogenic TKI tracers, [ 11 C]axitinib and [ 11 C]nintedanib, and to evaluate their potential for PET. Methods: Following successful tracer synthesis, biodistribution studies in VU-SCC-OE and FaDu xenograft bearing mice were performed. Furthermore, tracer stability studies in mice were performed employing (radio-)HPLC and LC–MS/MS techniques. For [ 11 C]nintedanib an LC–MS/MS method was developed to detect the primary carboxylic acid metabolite, resulting from methylester cleavage, in plasma and tumors, because this metabolite is postulated to be important for nintedanib efficacy. LC–MS/MS was also explored to assess the metabolic fate of [ 11 C]axitinib in vivo, since axitinib has an isomerizable double bond. Results: [ 11 C]axitinib and [ 11 C]nintedanib were successfully synthesized with 10.5 ± 2.6% and 25.6 ± 3.3% radiochemical yield (corrected for decay), respectively. Biodistribution studies only demonstrated tumor uptake of [ 11 C]nintedanib in FaDu xenografts of 1.66 ± 0.02% ID/g at 60 min p.i. In vivo stability analysis of [ 11 C]axitinib at 45 min p.i. revealed the formation of predominantly non-polar metabolites (36.6 ± 6.8% vs 47.1 ± 8.4% of parent tracer and 16.3 ± 2.1% of polar metabolites), while for [ 11 C]nintedanib mostly polar metabolites were found (70.9 ± 4.1 vs 26.7 ± 3.9% of parent tracer and only 2.4 ± 1.6 of a non-polar metabolites). No isomerization of [ 11 C]axtinib was observed in vivo; however, a sulfoxide metabolite could be detected using LC–MS/MS. For [ 11 C]nintedanib, LC–MS/MS revealed formation of the reported primary carboxylic acid metabolite when in vitro plasma incubations were performed

  16. Determination of tumour hypoxia with the PET tracer [18F]EF3: improvement of the tumour-to-background ratio in a mouse tumour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, Nicolas; Bol, Anne; Bast, Marc de; Labar, Daniel; Lee, John; Mahy, Pierre; Gregoire, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    The 2-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)-N-(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)acetamide (EF3) is a 2-nitroimidazole derivative which undergoes bioreductive activation under hypoxic conditions. Using the PET tracer [ 18 F]EF3 in mice, tumour-to-muscle ratios ranging from 1.3 to 3.5 were observed. This study investigated the impact of various interventions aimed at increasing [ 18 F]EF3 elimination, thus potentially increasing the tumour-to-noise ratio in mice, by increasing the renal filtration rate (spironolactone, furosemide), decreasing tubular re-absorption (metronidazole, ornidazole, amino acid solution) or stimulating gastro-intestinal elimination (phenobarbital). C3H mice were injected i.v. with an average of 12.95 MBq of [ 18 F]EF3. Drugs were injected i.v. 15 min before the tracer or daily 4 days prior to the experiment (phenobarbital). Anaesthetised mice were imaged from 30 to 300 min with a dedicated animal PET (Mosaic, Philips). Regions of interest were delineated around the tumour, bladder, heart, liver and leg muscle. Radioactivity was expressed as a percentage of injected activity per gram of tissue. Ornidazole decreased the urinary excretion and increased the liver uptake of [ 18 F]EF3, but without causing any changes in the other organs. Phenobarbital significantly increased the liver concentration and decreased radioactivity in blood and muscle without affecting the tracer uptake in tumour. Consequently, a small but non-significant increase in tumour-to-noise ratio was observed. Although some effects were observed with other drugs, they did not modify the tumour-to-noise ratio. Only phenobarbital induced a trend toward an increased tumour-to-noise ratio that could possibly be tested in the clinical situation. (orig.)

  17. A tracer liquid image velocimetry for multi-layer radial flow in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Bao; Liang, Jiu-Xing; Luo, Yu-Xi; Yan, Jia

    2015-02-13

    This paper presents a Tracer Liquid Image Velocimetry (TLIV) for multi-layer radial flow in bioreactors used for cells cultivation of tissue engineering. The goal of this approach is to use simple devices to get good measuring precision, specialized for the case in which the uniform level of fluid shear stress was required while fluid velocity varied smoothly. Compared to the widely used Particles Image Velocimetry (PIV), this method adopted a bit of liquid as tracer, without the need of laser source. Sub-pixel positioning algorithm was used to overcome the adverse effects of the tracer liquid deformation. In addition, a neighborhood smoothing algorithm was used to restrict the measurement perturbation caused by diffusion. Experiments were carried out in a parallel plates flow chamber. And mathematical models of the flow chamber and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation were separately employed to validate the measurement precision of TLIV. The mean relative error between the simulated and measured data can be less than 2%, while in similar validations using PIV, the error was around 8.8%. TLIV avoided the contradiction between the particles' visibility and following performance with tested fluid, which is difficult to overcome in PIV. And TLIV is easier to popularize for its simple experimental condition and low cost.

  18. Is metal artefact reduction mandatory in cardiac PET/CT imaging in the presence of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafarian, Pardis [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghamiri, S.M.R. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammad R. [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Schindler, Thomas H. [Geneva University, Cardiovascular Center, Nuclear Cardiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Ratib, Osman [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    Cardiac PET/CT imaging is often performed in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads. However, metallic implants usually produce artefacts on CT images which might propagate to CT-based attenuation-corrected (CTAC) PET images. The impact of metal artefact reduction (MAR) for CTAC of cardiac PET/CT images in the presence of pacemaker, ICD and ECG leads was investigated using both qualitative and quantitative analysis in phantom and clinical studies. The study included 14 patients with various leads undergoing perfusion and viability examinations using dedicated cardiac PET/CT protocols. The PET data were corrected for attenuation using both artefactual CT images and CT images corrected using the MAR algorithm. The severity and magnitude of metallic artefacts arising from these leads were assessed on both linear attenuation coefficient maps ({mu}-maps) and attenuation-corrected PET images. CT and PET emission data were obtained using an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and a dedicated heart phantom made in-house incorporating pacemaker and ICD leads attached at the right ventricle of the heart. Volume of interest-based analysis and regression plots were performed for regions related to the lead locations. Bull's eye view analysis was also performed on PET images corrected for attenuation with and without the MAR algorithm. In clinical studies, the visual assessment of PET images by experienced physicians and quantitative analysis did not reveal erroneous interpretation of the tracer distribution or significant differences when PET images were corrected for attenuation with and without MAR. In phantom studies, the mean differences between tracer uptake obtained without and with MAR were 10.16{+-}2.1% and 6.86{+-}2.1% in the segments of the heart in the vicinity of metallic ICD or pacemaker leads, and were 4.43{+-}0.5% and 2.98{+-}0.5% in segments far from the leads. Although the MAR algorithm was able to effectively improve

  19. Quantitative estimation of brain atrophy and function with PET and MRI two-dimensional projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Reiko; Uemura, Koji; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of atrophy and the decline in brain function objectively and quantitatively. Two-dimensional (2D) projection images of three-dimensional (3D) transaxial images of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were made by means of the Mollweide method which keeps the area of the brain surface. A correlation image was generated between 2D projection images of MRI and cerebral blood flow (CBF) or 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images and the sulcus was extracted from the correlation image clustered by K-means method. Furthermore, the extent of atrophy was evaluated from the extracted sulcus on 2D-projection MRI and the cerebral cortical function such as blood flow or glucose metabolic rate was assessed in the cortex excluding sulcus on 2D-projection PET image, and then the relationship between the cerebral atrophy and function was evaluated. This method was applied to the two groups, the young and the aged normal subjects, and the relationship between the age and the rate of atrophy or the cerebral blood flow was investigated. This method was also applied to FDG-PET and MRI studies in the normal controls and in patients with corticobasal degeneration. The mean rate of atrophy in the aged group was found to be higher than that in the young. The mean value and the variance of the cerebral blood flow for the young are greater than those of the aged. The sulci were similarly extracted using either CBF or FDG PET images. The purposed method using 2-D projection images of MRI and PET is clinically useful for quantitative assessment of atrophic change and functional disorder of cerebral cortex. (author)

  20. Innovative Approaches to Enhance Safety and Radiation Protection on a PET RI/RF Producing Facility for Occupationally Exposed Personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila-Sobarzo, M.J.; Tenreiro, C.; Sadeghi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The explosive demand for positron emission tomography (PET) and, recently introduced, fusion technology (PET/CT and soon commercially available PET/MRI) as non-invasive diagnostic tools of choice for clinical imaging, results on a world wide PET centers and PET RI/RF production facilities remarkably increment . A charged particle accelerator when operated for PET radionuclides production produces ionizing radiation. The multi curies radionuclides from the accelerator and the radiopharmaceuticals synthesized are ionizing radiations emitters open sources. Therefore, the probability of unexpected radiation exposure is always present along full production line, from target loading for irradiation to final dose dispensing.Improving safety working conditions requires permanent radiological risks assessment associated with the production process for accelerator operators, radio chemist and hot cell assistants as well as other occupationally exposed personnel.In this work we present some of the experimental improvements added to our Cyclone 18/9 operation and routinely 18 FDG production process to improve personnel radioprotection. These approaches apply for professionals working on other accelerator field such as non-destructive analytical and tracer technicians at research and industrial levels with charged particle accelerators

  1. PET imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma with {sup 18}F-fluoroethylcholine and {sup 11}C-choline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Tenley, Nathan [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States); Corn, David J.; Wu, Chunying; Tian, Haibin; Wang, Yanming [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lee, Zhenghong [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States); University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Choline-based radiotracers have been studied for PET imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using an {sup 18}F-labeled choline analog, instead of the {sup 11}C-labeled native choline, would facilitate its widespread use in the clinic. In this study, PET with {sup 18}F-fluoroethylcholine (FEC) and {sup 11}C-choline (CHOL) were compared using an animal model of HCC. The effects of fasting on the performance of choline-based tracers were also investigated. A woodchuck model of HCC was used to compare the two tracers, which were administered and imaged in sequence during the same imaging session. Dynamic PET images were generated spanning 50 min starting from tracer injection. Time-activity curves and tracer contrast were calculated in liver regions with tracer accumulation, and the contrast at a late time-point with the two tracers, and between fasted and nonfasted states, were compared. Foci of HCC with increased uptake ranged in size from 1.0 to 1.6 cm, with mean tumor-to-background contrast of 1.3 with FEC and 1.5 with CHOL at 50 min after injection. The tracers show similar patterns of uptake immediately following administration, and both activities plateaued at 10 min after injection. No significant differences in uptake dynamics or final contrast were observed between the fasted and nonfasted states. PET imaging of HCC is possible with both CHOL and FEC. Fasting was not found to affect accumulation of either tracer. These results encourage further investigation into the clinical utility of FEC for HCC imaging. (orig.)

  2. Contourlet-based active contour model for PET image segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, M.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Zaidi, H.

    Purpose: PET-guided radiation therapy treatment planning, clinical diagnosis, assessment of tumor growth, and therapy response rely on the accurate delineation of the tumor volume and quantification of tracer uptake. Most PET image segmentation techniques proposed thus far are suboptimal in the

  3. Preliminary validation of varicella zoster virus thymidine kinase as a novel reporter gene for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deroose, Christophe M.; Chitneni, Satish K.; Gijsbers, Rik; Vermaelen, Peter; Ibrahimi, Abdelilah; Balzarini, Jan; Baekelandt, Veerle; Verbruggen, Alfons; Nuyts, Johan; Debyser, Zeger; Bormans, Guy M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Imaging of gene expression with positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research during the last decade. The prototypical herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) PET reporter gene (PRG) is widely used and many other PRGs have also been validated. We investigated varicella zoster virus thymidine kinase (VZV-tk) as new PRG with radiolabeled bicyclic nucleoside analogues (BCNAs) as PET tracers. Methods: The uptake and washout of four different radiolabeled BCNAs was evaluated in cells expressing VZV-tk after lentiviral vector (LV) transduction and in control cells. Metabolism of the tracers was assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mice bearing VZV-TK expressing xenografts were imaged with PET. Results: High uptake in VZV-tk expressing cells was seen for 3 of the 4 tracers tested. The uptake of the tracers could be blocked by the presence of excess thymidine in the incubation solution. Cellular retention was variable, with one tracer showing an acceptable half-life of ∼ 1 hour. The amount of intracellular tracer correlated with the titer of LV used to transduce the cells. VZV-TK dependent conversion into metabolites was shown by HPLC. No specific accumulation was observed in cells expressing a fusion protein containing an HSV1-TK moiety. VZV-tk expression in xenografts resulted in a 60% increase in uptake in vivo as measured with PET. Conclusions: We have validated the combination of VZV-tk and radiolabeled BCNAs as new PRG/PRP system. Further optimization of the PRPs and the PRG are warranted to increase the signal.

  4. Carbon-11 choline or FDG-PET for staging of oesophageal cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, P.L.; Que, T.H.; Vaalburg, W.; Pruim, J.; Elsinga, P.; Plukker, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using carbon-11 choline (CHOL) positron emission tomography (PET) for the staging of oesophageal cancer, in comparison with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, using histopathological findings as the gold standard. Eighteen patients were studied: 16 patients with cancer of the oesophagus or gastro-oesophageal junction and two with in situ carcinoma/high-grade dysplasia. PET imaging was performed 5 min (CHOL) or 90 min (FDG) after injection of 370 MBq of the tracer. PET images were analysed by two independent and blinded physicians using visual and standardised uptake value (SUV) analysis. PET results were compared with surgical and histopathological findings. FDG-PET was able to detect all (100%) of the 16 malignant primary lesions, while CHOL-PET detected 73%. In situ carcinoma (n=1) and high-grade dysplasia (n=1) were not visualised with either tracer. Diffuse uptake of the tracers was noted in areas of Barrett's oesophagitis. Twelve patients had locoregional metastases (N1) that were not detected with either FDG or CHOL. Six patients had additional distant nodal (M1a) metastases; four of six (66%) were visualised by FDG, and three of five (60%) by CHOL-PET. On a lesion basis, FDG-PET detected 10/12 non-regional metastases (sensitivity 83%), while CHOL-PET detected 5/12 (sensitivity 42%). Haematogenous distant metastases (M1b) were positive on FDG-PET in three of four patients, and on CHOL-PET in two of four. SUV values were significantly higher for FDG (FDG 6.6±3.5, CHOL 5.5±2.5, P=0.04). CHOL-PET is able to visualise oesophageal carcinoma and its metastases, but appears to be inferior to FDG-PET. Presumably this is the result of lower tumoural uptake and considerable non-specific uptake of CHOL in liver, stomach wall, pancreas and small intestine. Further studies are needed to confirm these data. (orig.)

  5. Carbon-11 choline or FDG-PET for staging of oesophageal cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, P.L.; Que, T.H.; Vaalburg, W.; Pruim, J.; Elsinga, P. [PET Centre, Groningen Univ. Hospital (Netherlands); Plukker, J.T. [Dept. of Surgical Oncology, Groningen University Hospital (Netherlands)

    2001-12-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using carbon-11 choline (CHOL) positron emission tomography (PET) for the staging of oesophageal cancer, in comparison with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, using histopathological findings as the gold standard. Eighteen patients were studied: 16 patients with cancer of the oesophagus or gastro-oesophageal junction and two with in situ carcinoma/high-grade dysplasia. PET imaging was performed 5 min (CHOL) or 90 min (FDG) after injection of 370 MBq of the tracer. PET images were analysed by two independent and blinded physicians using visual and standardised uptake value (SUV) analysis. PET results were compared with surgical and histopathological findings. FDG-PET was able to detect all (100%) of the 16 malignant primary lesions, while CHOL-PET detected 73%. In situ carcinoma (n=1) and high-grade dysplasia (n=1) were not visualised with either tracer. Diffuse uptake of the tracers was noted in areas of Barrett's oesophagitis. Twelve patients had locoregional metastases (N1) that were not detected with either FDG or CHOL. Six patients had additional distant nodal (M1a) metastases; four of six (66%) were visualised by FDG, and three of five (60%) by CHOL-PET. On a lesion basis, FDG-PET detected 10/12 non-regional metastases (sensitivity 83%), while CHOL-PET detected 5/12 (sensitivity 42%). Haematogenous distant metastases (M1b) were positive on FDG-PET in three of four patients, and on CHOL-PET in two of four. SUV values were significantly higher for FDG (FDG 6.6{+-}3.5, CHOL 5.5{+-}2.5, P=0.04). CHOL-PET is able to visualise oesophageal carcinoma and its metastases, but appears to be inferior to FDG-PET. Presumably this is the result of lower tumoural uptake and considerable non-specific uptake of CHOL in liver, stomach wall, pancreas and small intestine. Further studies are needed to confirm these data. (orig.)

  6. A Multi-tracer Dopaminergic PET Study of Young-Onset Parkinsonian Patients With and Without Parkin Gene Mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, M.J.; Thobois, St.; Broussolle, E.; Lohmann, E.; Lesage, S.; Dubois, B.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A.; Lohmann, E.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A.; Lohmann, E.; Lesage, S.; Dubois, B.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A.; Tezenas du Montcel, S.; Tezenas du Montcel, S.; Pelissolo, A.; Dubois, B.; Mallet, L.; Pollak, P.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A.; Remy, Ph.; Remy, Ph.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of parkin gene mutations on nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration is not well established. The purpose of this study was to characterize by PET using 18 F-fluoro-L-3, 4- dihydroxyphenylalanine ( 18 F-fluoro-L-DOPA), 11 C-PE2I, and 11 C-raclopride the pattern of dopaminergic lesions in young-onset Parkinson disease (YOPD) patients with or without mutations of the parkin gene and to correlate the clinical and neuro-psychologic characteristics of these patients with PET results. Methods: A total of 35 YOPD patients were enrolled (16 with parkin mutation, 19 without). The uptake constant (K i ) of 18 F-fluoro- L-DOPA and the binding potential (BP) of 11 C-PE2I (BPDAT) and of 11 C-raclopride (BPD2) were calculated in the striatum. Comparisons were made between the 2 groups of YOPD and between controls and patients. For each radiotracer, parametric images were obtained, and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis using a voxel-by-voxel statistical t test was performed. Correlations between the cognitive and motor status and PET results were analyzed. Results: In YOPD patients, 18 F-fluoro-L-DOPA K i values were reduced to 68% (caudate) and 40% (putamen) of normal values (P ≤ 0.0001). This decrease was symmetric and comparable for non-parkin and parkin patients. No correlation was found between the K i values and cognitive or motor status. 11 C-PE2I BPDAT values in YOPD patients were decreased to 56% (caudate) and 41% (putamen) of normal values (P ≤ 0.0001) and did not differ between the 2 YOPD populations. The mean 11 C-raclopride BPD2 values were reduced to 72% (caudate) and 84% (putamen) of the normal values (P ≤ 0.02) and did not differ between non-parkin and parkin patients. SPM analyses showed in patients an additional decrease of 11 C-raclopride in the frontal cortex and a decrease of 18 F-fluoro-L-DOPA and 11 C-PE2I uptake in the substantia nigra bilaterally (P ≤ 0.05, false-discovery rate-corrected). Conclusion: Carriers of parkin

  7. Somatostatin receptor PET in neuroendocrine tumours: {sup 68}Ga-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide versus {sup 68}Ga-DOTA{sup 0}-lanreotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putzer, Daniel; Kroiss, Alexander; Waitz, Dietmar; Gabriel, Michael; Uprimny, Christian; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Vienna Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Widmann, Gerlig [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of {sup 68}Ga-labelled DOTA{sup 0}-lanreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN) on the diagnostic assessment of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients with low to moderate uptake on planar somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy or {sup 68}Ga-labelled DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC) positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed NET and clinical signs of progressive disease, who had not qualified for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on planar SSTR scintigraphy or {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET (n = 38) due to lack of tracer uptake, underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN PET to evaluate a treatment option with {sup 90}Y-labelled lanreotide according to the MAURITIUS trial. The included patients received 150 {+-} 30 MBq of each radiopharmaceutical intravenously. PET scans were acquired 60-90 min after intravenous bolus injection. Image results from both PET scans were compared head to head, focusing on the intensity of tracer uptake in terms of treatment decision. CT was used for morphologic correlation of tumour lesions. To further evaluate the binding affinities of each tracer, quantitative and qualitative values were calculated for target lesions. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN and {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC both showed equivalent findings in 24/38 patients when fused PET/CT images were interpreted. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in comparison to CT were 0.63, 0.5 and 0.62 (n = 53; p < 0.0001) and for {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in comparison to CT 0.78, 0.5 and 0.76 (n = 38; p < 0.013), respectively. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC showed a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) regarding the primary tumour in 25 patients (p < 0.003) and regarding the liver in 30 patients (p < 0.009) compared to {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN. Corresponding values of both PET scans for tumour and liver did not show any significant correlation. {sup 68}Ga

  8. A custom-built PET phantom design for quantitative imaging of printed distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, P J; Angelis, G I; Kotasidis, F; Green, M; Matthews, J C; Lionheart, W R; Reader, A J

    2011-01-01

    This note presents a practical approach to a custom-made design of PET phantoms enabling the use of digital radioactive distributions with high quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution. The phantom design allows planar sources of any radioactivity distribution to be imaged in transaxial and axial (sagittal or coronal) planes. Although the design presented here is specially adapted to the high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the presented methods can be adapted to almost any PET scanner. Although the presented phantom design has many advantages, a number of practical issues had to be overcome such as positioning of the printed source, calibration, uniformity and reproducibility of printing. A well counter (WC) was used in the calibration procedure to find the nonlinear relationship between digital voxel intensities and the actual measured radioactive concentrations. Repeated printing together with WC measurements and computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plates (IP) were used to evaluate the reproducibility and uniformity of such printing. Results show satisfactory printing uniformity and reproducibility; however, calibration is dependent on the printing mode and the physical state of the cartridge. As a demonstration of the utility of using printed phantoms, the image resolution and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed HRRT images are assessed. There is very good quantitative agreement in the calibration procedure between HRRT, CR and WC measurements. However, the high resolution of CR and its quantitative accuracy supported by WC measurements made it possible to show the degraded resolution of HRRT brain images caused by the partial-volume effect and the limits of iterative image reconstruction. (note)

  9. Standardization and quantification in FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging and restaging of malignant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina; Pino-Sorroche, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing interest in using quantification in FDG-PET/CT in oncology, especially for evaluating response to therapy. Complex full quantitative procedures with blood sampling and dynamic scanning have been clinically replaced by the use of standardized uptake value measurements that provide an index of regional tracer uptake normalized to the administered dose of FDG. Some approaches have been proposed for assessing quantitative metabolic response, such as EORTC and PERCIST criteria in solid tumors. When using standardized uptake value in clinical routine and multicenter trials, standardization of protocols and quality control procedures of instrumentation is required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Attenuation Correction on Regional Quantification Between PET/MR and PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teuho, Jarmo; Johansson, Jarkko; Linden, Jani

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A spatial bias in brain PET/MR exists compared with PET/CT, because of MR-based attenuation correction. We performed an evaluation among 4 institutions, 3 PET/MR systems, and 4 PET/CT systems using an anthropomorphic brain phantom, hypothesizing that the spatial bias would be minimized....../MR systems, CTAC was applied as the reference method for attenuation correction. RESULTS: With CTAC, visual and quantitative differences between PET/MR and PET/CT systems were minimized. Intersystem variation between institutions was +3.42% to -3.29% in all VOIs for PET/CT and +2.15% to -4.50% in all VOIs...... for PET/MR. PET/MR systems differed by +2.34% to -2.21%, +2.04% to -2.08%, and -1.77% to -5.37% when compared with a PET/CT system at each institution, and these differences were not significant (P ≥ 0.05). CONCLUSION: Visual and quantitative differences between PET/MR and PET/CT systems can be minimized...

  11. Kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knittel, B.

    1983-12-01

    Our goal is to quantify regional physiological processes such as blood flow and metabolism by means of tracer kinetic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental models are one way of characterizing the behavior of tracers in physiological systems. This paper describes a general method of estimating compartmental model rate constants from measurements of the concentration of tracers in blood and tissue, taken at multiple time intervals. A computer program which applies the method is described, and examples are shown for simulated and actual data acquired from the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph.

  12. Kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knittel, B.

    1983-12-01

    Our goal is to quantify regional physiological processes such as blood flow and metabolism by means of tracer kinetic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental models are one way of characterizing the behavior of tracers in physiological systems. This paper describes a general method of estimating compartmental model rate constants from measurements of the concentration of tracers in blood and tissue, taken at multiple time intervals. A computer program which applies the method is described, and examples are shown for simulated and actual data acquired from the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph

  13. Kinetic Modelling of Infection Tracers [18F]FDG, [68Ga]Ga-Citrate, [11C]Methionine, and [11C]Donepezil in a Porcine Osteomyelitis Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Jensen, Svend Borup; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly applied for infection imaging using [18F]FDG as tracer, but uptake is unspecific. The present study compares the kinetics of [18F]FDG and three other PET tracers with relevance for infection imaging. Methods. A juvenile porcine...... osteomyelitis model was used. Eleven pigs underwent PET/CT with 60-minute dynamic PET imaging of [18F]FDG, [68Ga]Ga-citrate, [11C]methionine, and/or [11C]donepezil, along with blood sampling. For infectious lesions, kinetic modelling with one- and two-tissue-compartment models was conducted for each tracer...... for the analysis. Conclusions. The kinetics of the four studied tracers in infection was characterized. For clinical applications, [18F]FDG remains the first-choice PET tracer. [11C]methionine may have a potential for detecting soft tissue infections. [68Ga]Ga-citrate and [11C]donepezil were not found useful...

  14. A new dynamic myocardial phantom for evaluation of SPECT and PET quantitation in systolic and diastolic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreuille, O. de; Bendriem, B.; Riddell, C.

    1996-01-01

    We present a new dynamic myocardial phantom designed to evaluate SPECT and PET imaging in systolic and diastolic conditions. The phantom includes a thoracic attenuating media and the myocardial wall thickness varying during the scan can be performed. In this study the phantom was used with three different wall thickness characteristic of a systolic, end-diastolic and pathologic end-diastolic condition. The myocardium was filled with 99m Tc, 18 F and Gd and imaged by SPECT, PET and MRI. SPECT attenuation correction was performed using a modified PET transmission. A bull's eyes image was obtained for all data and wall ROI were then drawn for analysis. Using MRI as a reference, error from PET, SPECT and attenuation corrected SPECT were calculated. Systolic PET performances agree with MRI. Quantitation loss due to wall thickness reduction compared to the systole. Attenuation correction in SPECT leads to significant decrease of the error both in systole (from 29% to 14%) and diastole (35% to 22%). This is particularly sensitive for septum and inferior walls. SPECT residual errors (14% in systole and 22% in pathologic end-diastole) are likely caused by scatter, noise and depth dependent resolution effect. The results obtained with this dynamical phantom demonstrate the quantitation improvement achieved in SPECT with attenuation correction and also reinforce the need for variable resolution correction in addition to attenuation correction

  15. Quantitative myocardial perfusion PET combined with coronary anatomy derived from CT angiography. Validation of a new fusion and visualisation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, Harald; Weise, Reiner; Burchert, Wolfgang; Fricke, Eva; Elsner, Andreas; Bolte, Matthias; Domik, Gitta; Hoff, Joerg van den

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Dynamic perfusion PET offers a clinical relevant advantage over myocardial perfusion scintigraphy due to its ability to measure myocardial blood flow quantitatively. This leads to an improved detection of multivessel disease and the possibility to assess not only the culprit lesion but lower grade stenoses as well. For appropriate revascularization, perfusion defects must be matched to coronary lesions. It has been shown that image fusion of morphological and functional images is superior to side-by-side analysis. Still, software for quantitative perfusion PET combined with CT angiography is rare. In this paper we present a new software tool for image fusion and visualization of quantitative perfusion PET and coronary morphology derived from CT angiography. Methods: In our software, a PET uptake image is used for manual co-registration. Co-registration results are then applied to the functional data derived from compartment modelling. To evaluate the reproducibility of the manual co-registration, we calculated the deviation between a series of manual co-registrations performed on nine pairs of unregistered PET and CT datasets by five trained participants. Two dimensional transfer functions were used to highlight the coronary arteries from the CT study in the combined data sets. Results: The average Euclidian distances for three references points were between 3.7 and 4.1 mm. The maximum distance was 10.6 mm. By the use of the two dimensional transfer functions, coronary anatomy could be easily visualised either by user-interaction or automatically by use of neuronal networks. Conclusions: With this approach it is possible to combine quantitative perfusion PET with coronary anatomy derived from CT angiography. Our first experiences indicate that manual image fusion with our tool is reproducible and that visualisation of the combined datasets is achieved within short time. (orig.)

  16. In vivo PET imaging of neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Julien; Sarazin, Marie; Bottlaender, Michel

    2018-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of many neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD). Molecular imaging by PET may be a useful tool to assess neuroinflammation in vivo, thus helping to decipher the complex role of inflammatory processes in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and providing a potential means of monitoring the effect of new therapeutic approaches. For this objective, the main target of PET studies is the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), as it is overexpressed by activated microglia. In the present review, we describe the most widely used PET tracers targeting the TSPO, the methodological issues in tracer quantification and summarize the results obtained by TSPO PET imaging in AD, as well as in neurodegenerative disorders associated with AD, in psychiatric disorders and ageing. We also briefly describe alternative PET targets and imaging modalities to study neuroinflammation. Lastly, we question the meaning of PET imaging data in the context of a highly complex and multifaceted role of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases. This overview leads to the conclusion that PET imaging of neuroinflammation is a promising way of deciphering the enigma of the pathophysiology of AD and of monitoring the effect of new therapies.

  17. Solitary pulmonary nodules: Impact of quantitative contrast-enhanced CT on the cost-effectiveness of FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comber, L.A.; Keith, C.J.; Griffiths, M.; Miles, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact of quantitative contrast-enhanced computed tomography (QECT) on the cost-effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for the assessment of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four diagnostic strategies were evaluated using decision tree analysis: conventional CT alone; conventional CT followed by QECT; conventional CT followed positron emission tomography (PET); and conventional CT followed by QECT and PET (QECT+PET). The average cost per patient, accuracy of management and incremental cost:accuracy ratio (ICAR) were determined for each strategy. Although baseline assumptions reflected the Australian setting, sensitivity analysis was used to extrapolate the results to the UK. RESULTS: At the baseline prevalence of malignancy (54%) and cost of PET relative to surgery (16%), the QECT strategy incurs the least cost ($5560/patient) but the QECT+PET strategy is the most cost-effective (ICAR $12059/patient). At reported levels of disease prevalence (68.5%) and cost of PET relative to surgery (29.9%) in the UK, the QECT strategy is the most cost-effective. CONCLUSION: QECT offers a cost-effective approach to evaluation of SPNs. Whether QECT is used alone or in combination with PET will depend upon local availability and regional values for prior probability of malignancy within SPNs and the cost of PET relative to surgery

  18. Regional specific binding of [11C]RO 15 1788 to central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain: quantitative evaluation by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappata, S.; Samson, Y.; Chavoix, C.; Prenant, C.; Maziere, M.; Baron, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The central type benzodiazepine receptors were studied in 17 healthy human subjects with 11 C-RO 15 1788 and positron emission tomography (PET). The brain regional distribution of the tracer in eight control studies performed after injection of trace doses of 11 C-RO 15 1788 was consistent with that of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation studies with co-injected cold RO 15 1788 in the remaining subjects showed a dose-dependent decrease of brain radiotracer until full inhibition of specific binding was achieved with doses above 0.1 mg/kg (four studies). Based on the results, a simple method to estimate the specifically bound 11 C-RO 15 1788 regionally in a single PET study is proposed, using the data from the full-saturation studies as a stable estimate of the nondisplaceable radioligand concentration. Using this method, it was found that quasiequilibrium between the estimated specifically bound and nondisplaceable components was achieved at times equal to or longer than 20 min after tracer administration. The validity of this method was partly supported by further results, showing a good agreement between the regional specific binding so calculated and postmortem data of receptor density

  19. Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ben; Ewart, Paul [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Wang, Xiaowei; Stone, Richard [Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Ma, Hongrui; Walmsley, Harold; Cracknell, Roger [Shell Global Solutions (UK), Shell Research Centre Thornton, P. O. Box 1, Chester, CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Stevens, Robert; Richardson, David; Fu, Huiyu; Wallace, Stan [Jaguar Cars, Engineering Centre, Abbey Road, Whitley, Coventry, CV3 4LF (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    A study of in-cylinder fuel-air mixing distributions in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine is reported using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. A multi-component fuel synthesised from three pairs of components chosen to simulate light, medium and heavy fractions was seeded with one of three tracers, each chosen to co-evaporate with and thus follow one of the fractions, in order to account for differential volatility of such components in typical gasoline fuels. In order to make quantitative measurements of fuel-air ratio from PLIF images, initial calibration was by recording PLIF images of homogeneous fuel-air mixtures under similar conditions of in-cylinder temperature and pressure using a re-circulation loop and a motored engine. This calibration method was found to be affected by two significant factors. Firstly, calibration was affected by variation of signal collection efficiency arising from build-up of absorbing deposits on the windows during firing cycles, which are not present under motored conditions. Secondly, the effects of residual exhaust gas present in the firing engine were not accounted for using a calibration loop with a motored engine. In order to account for these factors a novel method of PLIF calibration is presented whereby 'bookend' calibration measurements for each tracer separately are performed under firing conditions, utilising injection into a large upstream heated plenum to promote the formation of homogeneous in-cylinder mixtures. These calibration datasets contain sufficient information to not only characterise the quantum efficiency of each tracer during a typical engine cycle, but also monitor imaging efficiency, and, importantly, account for the impact of exhaust gas residuals (EGR). By use of this method EGR is identified as a significant factor in quantitative PLIF for fuel mixing diagnostics in firing engines. The effects of cyclic variation in fuel concentration on burn rate are analysed for

  20. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2001-01-01

    examined. GABA has been predominantly studied by PET in epilepsy by using the GABA receptor tracer [ 11 C]flumazenil and there have been reports on [ 123 I]iomazenil SPECT in panic disorder. Abnormal GABA/benzodiazepine receptors have been hypothesized to be related to schizophrenia, although insufficient evidence has been accumulated to verify it. The acetylcholinesterase tracer [ 11 C]N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate, has been used to investigate changes in acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease, and another study used [ 11 C]N-methyl-4-piperidylbenzilate to determine the relationship between muscarinic receptor occupancy by biperiden and its blood concentration. Because of the many disadvantages associated with [ 11 C]nicotine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor tracer, a more useful tracer needs to be developed. Glutamic acid is thought to be related to mental disorders. Two types of PET legands selective for NMDA receptor sub-units have been developed very recently. (K.H.)

  1. Comparison of PET/CT with Sequential PET/MRI Using an MR-Compatible Mobile PET System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakamoto, Yuji; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Kido, Aki; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-05-01

    The current study tested a newly developed flexible PET (fxPET) scanner prototype. This fxPET system involves dual arc-shaped detectors based on silicon photomultipliers that are designed to fit existing MRI devices, allowing us to obtain fused PET and MR images by sequential PET and MR scanning. This prospective study sought to evaluate the image quality, lesion detection rate, and quantitative values of fxPET in comparison with conventional whole-body (WB) PET and to assess the accuracy of registration. Methods: Seventeen patients with suspected or known malignant tumors were analyzed. Approximately 1 h after intravenous injection of 18 F-FDG, WB PET/CT was performed, followed by fxPET and MRI. For reconstruction of fxPET images, MRI-based attenuation correction was applied. The quality of fxPET images was visually assessed, and the number of detected lesions was compared between the 2 imaging methods. SUV max and maximum average SUV within a 1 cm 3 spheric volume (SUV peak ) of lesions were also compared. In addition, the magnitude of misregistration between fxPET and MR images was evaluated. Results: The image quality of fxPET was acceptable for diagnosis of malignant tumors. There was no significant difference in detectability of malignant lesions between fxPET and WB PET ( P > 0.05). However, the fxPET system did not exhibit superior performance to the WB PET system. There were strong positive correlations between the 2 imaging modalities in SUV max (ρ = 0.88) and SUV peak (ρ = 0.81). SUV max and SUV peak measured with fxPET were approximately 1.1-fold greater than measured with WB PET. The average misregistration between fxPET and MR images was 5.5 ± 3.4 mm. Conclusion: Our preliminary data indicate that running an fxPET scanner near an existing MRI system provides visually and quantitatively acceptable fused PET/MR images for diagnosis of malignant lesions. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  2. A Multi-tracer Dopaminergic PET Study of Young-Onset Parkinsonian Patients With and Without Parkin Gene Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M.J. [CEA, I2BM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Thobois, St.; Broussolle, E. [University of Lyon, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Neurological Hospital, Lyon (France); Lohmann, E.; Lesage, S.; Dubois, B.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A. [INSERM, Paris (France); Lohmann, E.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A. [Department of the Nervous System Disorders, AP-HP, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Lohmann, E.; Lesage, S.; Dubois, B.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A. [UPMC University of Paris, Paris (France); Tezenas du Montcel, S. [Unit of de Biostatistics and Medical Information and Unit of Medical Research, AP-HP, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Tezenas du Montcel, S. [Modelisation in Clinical Research, UPMC University of Paris, Paris (France); Pelissolo, A. [Department of Psychiatry, AP-HP, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Dubois, B. [Centre de Reference sur la Maladie de Pick, AP-HP, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Mallet, L. [Behaviour, Emotion and Basal Ganglia, Center of Clinical Investigation, INSERM Avenir Group, Paris (France); Pollak, P. [Department of Clinical and Biological Neurosciences, University Hospital of Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Agid, Y. [Clinical Investigation Center, AP-HP, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Brice, A. [Department of Genetics and Cytogenetics, AP-HP, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Remy, Ph. [CEA, I2BM, MIRCEN, URA CEA-CNRS 2210, Orsay (France); Remy, Ph. [CHU Henri Mondor, AP-HP and Faculte de Medecine Paris 12, Creteil (France)

    2009-07-01

    The impact of parkin gene mutations on nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration is not well established. The purpose of this study was to characterize by PET using {sup 18}F-fluoro-L-3, 4- dihydroxyphenylalanine ({sup 18}F-fluoro-L-DOPA), {sup 11}C-PE2I, and {sup 11}C-raclopride the pattern of dopaminergic lesions in young-onset Parkinson disease (YOPD) patients with or without mutations of the parkin gene and to correlate the clinical and neuro-psychologic characteristics of these patients with PET results. Methods: A total of 35 YOPD patients were enrolled (16 with parkin mutation, 19 without). The uptake constant (K{sub i}) of {sup 18}F-fluoro- L-DOPA and the binding potential (BP) of {sup 11}C-PE2I (BPDAT) and of {sup 11}C-raclopride (BPD2) were calculated in the striatum. Comparisons were made between the 2 groups of YOPD and between controls and patients. For each radiotracer, parametric images were obtained, and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis using a voxel-by-voxel statistical t test was performed. Correlations between the cognitive and motor status and PET results were analyzed. Results: In YOPD patients, {sup 18}F-fluoro-L-DOPA K{sub i} values were reduced to 68% (caudate) and 40% (putamen) of normal values (P {<=} 0.0001). This decrease was symmetric and comparable for non-parkin and parkin patients. No correlation was found between the K{sub i} values and cognitive or motor status. {sup 11}C-PE2I BPDAT values in YOPD patients were decreased to 56% (caudate) and 41% (putamen) of normal values (P {<=} 0.0001) and did not differ between the 2 YOPD populations. The mean {sup 11}C-raclopride BPD2 values were reduced to 72% (caudate) and 84% (putamen) of the normal values (P {<=} 0.02) and did not differ between non-parkin and parkin patients. SPM analyses showed in patients an additional decrease of {sup 11}C-raclopride in the frontal cortex and a decrease of {sup 18}F-fluoro-L-DOPA and {sup 11}C-PE2I uptake in the substantia nigra bilaterally

  3. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal tumors with dynamic 18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hua; Heichel, T.O.; Lehner, B.; Bernd, L.; Ewerbeck, V.; Burger, C.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate bone lesions using fluorodeoxyglucose (FIX;) PET and explore if dynamic and quantitative PET data may help to differentiate benign lesions from malignant masses. Methods: A group of forty patients with primary bone lesions were studied. The final diagnosis was confirmed with histopathology. A dynamic acquisition of FDG PET with the duration over 60 min was undertaken in all subjects. From the dynamic PET images the indexes such as average and maximal standardized uptake value ( SUV ), tumor SUV-to-muscle SUV ratios ( T/M ), and SUV at 60 min-to-SUV at 30 min ratio (SUV aver60/30main and SUV max60/30min ) were produced. Patlak graphical analysis were used to obtain influx constant ( K i ) and metabolic rate of FDG (MR-FDG) was thus calculated. Based on the receiver operation characteristic curve the sensitivity and specificity for each parameter in differentiation between malignant and benign lesions was evaluated. Results: The histologic results revealed there were 21 cases with malignant tumors and 19 with benign lesions in this group. The MRFDG and SUV indexes in malignant lesions were significantly higher than those in benign lesions. However, each index showed a considerable overlap between benign and malignant type. Average SUV positively correlated with MR-FDG (r = 0.67). When use of a 1.8 cutoff for average SUV, the sensitivity and specificity for discrimination of malignancy from benignity were 85.0% and 82.4%, respectively. MRFDG showed a similar sensitivity (82.4%) and a better specificity (92.9%). When evaluated with a cutoff from the combination of average SUV (1.8) and SUV aver60/3Omin (1.1), the specificity was improved to 93.3% with a small reduction of sensitivity (81.3%) compared with using SUV exclusively. Conclusions: The results indicate that detectable difference in glucose metabolism exists between malignant and benign skeletal lesions. It may not be feasible to use exclusively the static FDG uptake indexes to achieve a

  4. Nonlinear spatio-temporal filtering of dynamic PET data using a four-dimensional Gaussian filter and expectation-maximization deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floberg, J M; Holden, J E

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for denoising dynamic PET data, spatio-temporal expectation-maximization (STEM) filtering, that combines four-dimensional Gaussian filtering with EM deconvolution. The initial Gaussian filter suppresses noise at a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies and EM deconvolution quickly restores the frequencies most important to the signal. We aim to demonstrate that STEM filtering can improve variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images without introducing significant bias. We evaluate STEM filtering with a dynamic phantom study, and with simulated and human dynamic PET studies of a tracer with reversible binding behaviour, [C-11]raclopride, and a tracer with irreversible binding behaviour, [F-18]FDOPA. STEM filtering is compared to a number of established three and four-dimensional denoising methods. STEM filtering provides substantial improvements in variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images generated with a number of kinetic analysis techniques while introducing little bias. STEM filtering does bias early frames, but this does not affect quantitative parameter estimates. STEM filtering is shown to be superior to the other simple denoising methods studied. STEM filtering is a simple and effective denoising method that could be valuable for a wide range of dynamic PET applications. (paper)

  5. Rubidium-82 PET-CT for quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow: validation in a canine model of coronary artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautamaeki, Riikka; Higuchi, Takahiro; Merrill, Jennifer; Voicu, Corina; Bengel, Frank M.; George, Richard T.; Kitagawa, Kakuya; DiPaula, Anthony; Lima, Joao A.C.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Lardo, Albert C.

    2009-01-01

    Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow expands the diagnostic potential of PET for assessment of coronary artery disease. 82 Rb has significantly contributed to increasing utilization of PET; however, clinical studies are still mostly analysed qualitatively. The aim of this study was to reevaluate the feasibility of 82 Rb for flow quantification, using hybrid PET-CT in an animal model of coronary stenosis. Nine dogs were prepared with experimental coronary artery stenosis. Dynamic PET was performed for 8 min after 82 Rb(1480-1850 MBq) injection during adenosine-induced vasodilation. Microspheres were injected simultaneously for reference flow measurements. CT angiography was used to determine the myocardial regions related to the stenotic vessel. Two methods for flow calculation were employed: a two-compartment model including a spill-over term, and a simplified retention index. The two-compartment model data were in good agreement with microsphere flow (y=0.84x+0.20; r=0.92, p 82 Rb. A simplified approach based on tracer retention is practicable in the physiological flow range. These results encourage further testing of the robustness and usefulness in the clinical context of cardiac hybrid imaging. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of quantitative methods on FDG PET/CT for treatment response evaluation of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Ji In; Paeng, Jin Chul; Park, So Hyun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-06-15

    FDG PET is effective in treatment response evaluation of cancer. However, there is no standard method for quantitative evaluation of FDG PET, particularly regarding cytostatic drugs. We compared various FDG PET quantitative methods in terms of response determination. A total of 39 refractory metastatic colorectal cancer patients who received a multikinase inhibitor treatment were included. Baseline and posttreatment FDG PET/CT scans were performed before and two cycles after treatment. Standardized uptake value (SUV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) values using various margin thresholds (30–70 % of maximum SUV with increment 10 %, twice mean SUV of blood pool, SUV 3.0, and SUV 4.0) were measured, with measurement target of the hottest lesion or a maximum of five hottest lesions. Treatment response by the PERCIST criteria was also determined. Predictive values of the PET indexes were evaluated in terms of the treatment response determined by the RECIST 1.1 criteria. The agreement rate was 38 % between response determined by the PERCIST and the RECIST criteria (κ = 0.381). When patients were classified into disease control group (PR, SD) and non-control group (PD) by the RECIST criteria, percent changes of TLG with various margin thresholds (particularly, 30–50 % of maximum SUV) exhibited significant differences between the two groups, and high diagnostic power for the response by the RECIST criteria. TLG-based criteria, which used a margin threshold of 50 % of maximum SUV, exhibited a high agreement with the RECIST criteria compared with the PERCIST criteria (κ = 0.606). In metastatic colorectal cancer, FDG PET/CT could be effective for treatment response evaluation by using TLG measured by margin thresholds of 30–50 % of maximum SUV. Further studies are warranted regarding the optimal cutoff values for this method.

  7. Silicon Photomultipliers and Monolithic Scintillators for Time-of-Flight PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, S.

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging modality. Its aim is to visualize the 3-dimensional distribution of a radiopharmaceutical (also called the tracer) within a patient (clinical PET) or test-animal (in case of preclinical investigations). The information that can be

  8. Comparison of PET/CT and PET/MRI hybrid systems using a 68Ga-labelled PSMA ligand for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar-Oromieh, A.; Haberkorn, U.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Fenchel, M.; Roethke, M.; Eder, M.; Eisenhut, M.; Hadaschik, B.A.; Kopp-Schneider, A.

    2014-01-01

    68 Ga-labelled HBED-CC-PSMA is a highly promising tracer for imaging recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The intention of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI with this tracer. Twenty patients underwent PET/CT 1 h after injection of the 68 Ga-PSMA ligand followed by PET/MRI 3 h after injection. Data from the two investigations were first analysed separately and then compared with respect to tumour detection rate and radiotracer uptake in various tissues. To evaluate the quantification accuracy of the PET/MRI system, differences in SUVs between PET/CT and corresponding PET/MRI were compared with differences in SUVs between PET/CT 1 h and 3 h after injection in another patient cohort. This cohort was investigated using the same PET/CT system. With PET/MRI, different diagnostic sequences, higher contrast of lesions and higher resolution of MRI enabled a subjectively easier evaluation of the images. In addition, four unclear findings on PET/CT could be clarified as characteristic of PCa metastases by PET/MRI. However, in PET images of the PET/MRI, a reduced signal was observed at the level of the kidneys (in 11 patients) and around the urinary bladder (in 15 patients). This led to reduced SUVs in six lesions. SUV mean values provided by the PET/MRI system were different in muscles, blood pool, liver and spleen. PCa was detected more easily and more accurately with Ga-PSMA PET/MRI than with PET/CT and with lower radiation exposure. Consequently, this new technique could clarify unclear findings on PET/CT. However, scatter correction was challenging when the specific 68 Ga-PSMA ligand was used. Moreover, direct comparison of SUVs from PET/CT and PET/MR needs to be conducted carefully. (orig.)

  9. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [ 18 F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  10. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  11. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

    2013-05-01

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

  12. PET Imaging Stability Measurements During Simultaneous Pulsing of Aggressive MR Sequences on the SIGNA PET/MR System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Timothy W; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jansen, Floris P; Glover, Gary H

    2018-01-01

    The recent introduction of simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanners has enabled new research taking advantage of the complementary information obtainable with PET and MRI. One such application is kinetic modeling, which requires high levels of PET quantitative stability. To accomplish the required PET stability levels, the PET subsystem must be sufficiently isolated from the effects of MR activity. Performance measurements have previously been published, demonstrating sufficient PET stability in the presence of MR pulsing for typical clinical use; however, PET stability during radiofrequency (RF)-intensive and gradient-intensive sequences has not previously been evaluated for a clinical whole-body scanner. In this work, PET stability of the GE SIGNA PET/MR was examined during simultaneous scanning of aggressive MR pulse sequences. Methods: PET performance tests were acquired with MR idle and during simultaneous MR pulsing. Recent system improvements mitigating RF interference and gain variation were used. A fast recovery fast spin echo MR sequence was selected for high RF power, and an echo planar imaging sequence was selected for its high heat-inducing gradients. Measurements were performed to determine PET stability under varying MR conditions using the following metrics: sensitivity, scatter fraction, contrast recovery, uniformity, count rate performance, and image quantitation. A final PET quantitative stability assessment for simultaneous PET scanning during functional MRI studies was performed with a spiral in-and-out gradient echo sequence. Results: Quantitation stability of a 68 Ge flood phantom was demonstrated within 0.34%. Normalized sensitivity was stable during simultaneous scanning within 0.3%. Scatter fraction measured with a 68 Ge line source in the scatter phantom was stable within the range of 40.4%-40.6%. Contrast recovery and uniformity were comparable for PET images acquired simultaneously with multiple MR conditions. Peak noise equivalent count

  13. False Positive Uptake in Bilateral Gynecomastia on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Nair, Bindu P; Pillai, M R A; Madhavan, Jayaprakash

    2017-09-01

    A 66-year-old man on hormonal therapy with prostate cancer was referred for Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan for biochemical recurrence. Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan detected moderate heterogeneous tracer concentration in bilateral breast parenchyma, in addition to the abnormal tracer concentration in enlarged prostate gland, right external iliac lymph node, and sclerotic lesion in L4 vertebra. On clinical examination, he was found to have bilateral gynecomastia. Abnormal concentration of Ga-PSMA in breast cancer is now well known, and in this context, it is important to know that tracer localization can occur in gynecomastia as well, as evidenced in this case.

  14. The impact of PET-CT in suspected recurrent ovarian cancer: A prospective multi-centre study as part of the Australian PET Data Collection Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulham, M J; Carter, J; Baldey, A; Hicks, R J; Ramshaw, J E; Gibson, M

    2009-03-01

    To assess the impact of FDG PET-CT on the management of patients with suspected recurrent ovarian cancer and to determine the incremental information provided by PET-CT. This was a prospective, multi-centre, cohort study. Ninety women (mean age 59.9 years; age range 35-85 years) with a previous history of treated epithelial ovarian carcinoma and suspected recurrence based on elevated CA-125, anatomical imaging or clinical symptoms were studied with FDG PET-CT across two States. Referring doctors were asked to specify a management plan pre-PET, if management was altered after PET-CT and, the impact (rated - none, low, medium, high) of PET-CT on patient management. The pre-PET management plan could include radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery, and 'other' including observation. Patients were followed at 6 and 12 months and clinical status, evidence of recurrence and progression were recorded. Patients were referred by 34 individual specialists. At least 168 additional sites of disease in 61 patients (68%), not identified by conventional imaging were identified by PET-CT. In 77% the additional lesions were located below the diaphragm and most were nodal or peritoneal. PET-CT affected management in 60% (49% high, 11% medium impact). Patients where more disease was detected with PET-CT were more likely to progress in the following 12 months. For women with previously treated ovarian carcinoma with recurrent disease, PET-CT can: a) alter management in close to 60% of patients, b) detect more sites of disease than abdominal and pelvic CT, c) is superior in the detection of nodal, peritoneal and subcapsular liver disease and d) offers the opportunity for technology replacement in this setting.

  15. Kinetic analysis of the cannabinoid-1 receptor PET tracer [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanabria-Bohorquez, Sandra Marina; Hamill, Terence G.; Burns, H.D. [Merck Research Laboratories, Imaging, West Point, PA (United States); Goffin, Karolien; Laere, Koen van [University Hospital and K.U. Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Lepeleire, Inge de [Merck Research Laboratories, Brussels (Belgium); Bormans, Guy [K.U. Leuven, Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Quantitative imaging of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) opens perspectives for many neurological and psychiatric disorders. We characterized the kinetics and reproducibility of the CB1R tracer [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 in human brain. [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 data were analysed using reversible models and the distribution volume V{sub T} and V{sub ND} k{sub 3} (V{sub ND} k{sub 3} = K{sub 1} k{sub 2}) were estimated. Tracer binding was also evaluated using irreversible kinetics and the irreversible uptake constant K{sub i} and fractional uptake rate (FUR) were estimated. The effect of blood flow on these parameters was evaluated. Additionally, the possibility of determining the tracer plasma kinetics using a reduced number of blood samples was also examined. A reversible two-tissue compartment model using a global k{sub 4} value was necessary to describe brain kinetics. Both V{sub T} and V{sub ND} k{sub 3} were estimated satisfactorily and their test-retest variability was between 10% and 30%. Irreversible methods adequately described brain kinetics and FUR values were equivalent to K{sub i}. The linear relationship between K{sub i} and V{sub ND} k{sub 3} demonstrated that K{sub i} or FUR and thus the simple measure of tracer brain uptake provide CB1R availability information. The test-retest variability of K{sub i} and FUR was <10% and estimates were independent of blood flow. Brain uptake can be used as a receptor availability index, albeit at the expense of potential bias due to between-subject differences in tracer plasma kinetics. [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 specific binding can be accurately determined using FUR values requiring a short scan 90 to 120 min after tracer administration. Our results suggest that [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 plasma kinetics can be assessed using a few venous samples. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of PET/CT and PET/MRI hybrid systems using a {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Schlemmer, H.P.; Fenchel, M.; Roethke, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, M.; Eisenhut, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, B.A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, A. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    {sup 68}Ga-labelled HBED-CC-PSMA is a highly promising tracer for imaging recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The intention of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI with this tracer. Twenty patients underwent PET/CT 1 h after injection of the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand followed by PET/MRI 3 h after injection. Data from the two investigations were first analysed separately and then compared with respect to tumour detection rate and radiotracer uptake in various tissues. To evaluate the quantification accuracy of the PET/MRI system, differences in SUVs between PET/CT and corresponding PET/MRI were compared with differences in SUVs between PET/CT 1 h and 3 h after injection in another patient cohort. This cohort was investigated using the same PET/CT system. With PET/MRI, different diagnostic sequences, higher contrast of lesions and higher resolution of MRI enabled a subjectively easier evaluation of the images. In addition, four unclear findings on PET/CT could be clarified as characteristic of PCa metastases by PET/MRI. However, in PET images of the PET/MRI, a reduced signal was observed at the level of the kidneys (in 11 patients) and around the urinary bladder (in 15 patients). This led to reduced SUVs in six lesions. SUV{sub mean} values provided by the PET/MRI system were different in muscles, blood pool, liver and spleen. PCa was detected more easily and more accurately with Ga-PSMA PET/MRI than with PET/CT and with lower radiation exposure. Consequently, this new technique could clarify unclear findings on PET/CT. However, scatter correction was challenging when the specific {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand was used. Moreover, direct comparison of SUVs from PET/CT and PET/MR needs to be conducted carefully. (orig.)

  17. Determination of tumour hypoxia with the PET tracer [{sup 18}F]EF3: improvement of the tumour-to-background ratio in a mouse tumour model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Nicolas; Bol, Anne; Bast, Marc de; Labar, Daniel; Lee, John; Mahy, Pierre; Gregoire, Vincent [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Center for Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy, Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    The 2-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)-N-(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)acetamide (EF3) is a 2-nitroimidazole derivative which undergoes bioreductive activation under hypoxic conditions. Using the PET tracer [{sup 18}F]EF3 in mice, tumour-to-muscle ratios ranging from 1.3 to 3.5 were observed. This study investigated the impact of various interventions aimed at increasing [{sup 18}F]EF3 elimination, thus potentially increasing the tumour-to-noise ratio in mice, by increasing the renal filtration rate (spironolactone, furosemide), decreasing tubular re-absorption (metronidazole, ornidazole, amino acid solution) or stimulating gastro-intestinal elimination (phenobarbital). C3H mice were injected i.v. with an average of 12.95 MBq of [{sup 18}F]EF3. Drugs were injected i.v. 15 min before the tracer or daily 4 days prior to the experiment (phenobarbital). Anaesthetised mice were imaged from 30 to 300 min with a dedicated animal PET (Mosaic, Philips). Regions of interest were delineated around the tumour, bladder, heart, liver and leg muscle. Radioactivity was expressed as a percentage of injected activity per gram of tissue. Ornidazole decreased the urinary excretion and increased the liver uptake of [{sup 18}F]EF3, but without causing any changes in the other organs. Phenobarbital significantly increased the liver concentration and decreased radioactivity in blood and muscle without affecting the tracer uptake in tumour. Consequently, a small but non-significant increase in tumour-to-noise ratio was observed. Although some effects were observed with other drugs, they did not modify the tumour-to-noise ratio. Only phenobarbital induced a trend toward an increased tumour-to-noise ratio that could possibly be tested in the clinical situation. (orig.)

  18. Dynamics and mechanics of bed-load tracer particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanics of bed load at the flood scale is necessary to link hydrology to landscape evolution. Here we report on observations of the transport of coarse sediment tracer particles in a cobble-bedded alluvial river and a step-pool bedrock tributary, at the individual flood and multi-annual timescales. Tracer particle data for each survey are composed of measured displacement lengths for individual particles, and the number of tagged particles mobilized. For single floods we find that measured tracer particle displacement lengths are exponentially distributed; the number of mobile particles increases linearly with peak flood Shields stress, indicating partial bed load transport for all observed floods; and modal displacement distances scale linearly with excess shear velocity. These findings provide quantitative field support for a recently proposed modeling framework based on momentum conservation at the grain scale. Tracer displacement is weakly negatively correlated with particle size at the individual flood scale; however cumulative travel distance begins to show a stronger inverse relation to grain size when measured over many transport events. The observed spatial sorting of tracers approaches that of the river bed, and is consistent with size-selective deposition models and laboratory experiments. Tracer displacement data for the bedrock and alluvial channels collapse onto a single curve – despite more than an order of magnitude difference in channel slope – when variations of critical Shields stress and flow resistance between the two are accounted for. Results show how bed load dynamics may be predicted from a record of river stage, providing a direct link between climate and sediment transport.

  19. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    been developed, and serotonin transporters have recently begun to be examined. GABA has been predominantly studied by PET in epilepsy by using the GABA receptor tracer [{sup 11}C]flumazenil and there have been reports on [{sup 123}I]iomazenil SPECT in panic disorder. Abnormal GABA/benzodiazepine receptors have been hypothesized to be related to schizophrenia, although insufficient evidence has been accumulated to verify it. The acetylcholinesterase tracer [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate, has been used to investigate changes in acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease, and another study used [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-4-piperidylbenzilate to determine the relationship between muscarinic receptor occupancy by biperiden and its blood concentration. Because of the many disadvantages associated with [{sup 11}C]nicotine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor tracer, a more useful tracer needs to be developed. Glutamic acid is thought to be related to mental disorders. Two types of PET legands selective for NMDA receptor sub-units have been developed very recently. (K.H.)

  20. Four-layer depth-of-interaction PET detector for high resolution PET using a multi-pixel S8550 avalanche photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko, E-mail: funis@nirs.go.j [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Inadama, Naoko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Oda, Ichiro [Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1 Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Shibuya, Kengo; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kitamura, Keishi [Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1 Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are being used as photodetectors in positron emission tomography (PET) because they have many advantages over photomultipliers (PMTs) typically used in PET detectors. We have developed a PET detector that consists of a multi-pixel APD and a 6x6x4 array of 1.46x1.46 mm{sup 2}x4.5 m LYSO crystals for a small animal PET scanner. The detector can identify four-layer depth of interaction (DOI) with a position-sensitive APD coupled to the backside of a crystal array by just an optimized reflector arrangement. Since scintillation lights are shared among many pixels by the method, weaker signals in APD pixels far from the interacting crystals are affected by noise. To evaluate the performance of the four-layer DOI detector with the APD and the influence of electrical noise on our method, we constructed a prototype DOI detector and tested its performance. We found, except for crystal elements on the edge of the crystal array, all crystal elements could be identified from the 2D position histogram. An energy resolution of 16.9% was obtained for the whole crystal array of the APD detector. The results of noise dependence of detector performances indicated that the DOI detector using the APD could achieve sufficient performance even when using application-specific integrated circuits.

  1. Four-layer depth-of-interaction PET detector for high resolution PET using a multi-pixel S8550 avalanche photodiode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Oda, Ichiro; Shibuya, Kengo; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga; Kitamura, Keishi; Murayama, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are being used as photodetectors in positron emission tomography (PET) because they have many advantages over photomultipliers (PMTs) typically used in PET detectors. We have developed a PET detector that consists of a multi-pixel APD and a 6x6x4 array of 1.46x1.46 mm 2 x4.5 m LYSO crystals for a small animal PET scanner. The detector can identify four-layer depth of interaction (DOI) with a position-sensitive APD coupled to the backside of a crystal array by just an optimized reflector arrangement. Since scintillation lights are shared among many pixels by the method, weaker signals in APD pixels far from the interacting crystals are affected by noise. To evaluate the performance of the four-layer DOI detector with the APD and the influence of electrical noise on our method, we constructed a prototype DOI detector and tested its performance. We found, except for crystal elements on the edge of the crystal array, all crystal elements could be identified from the 2D position histogram. An energy resolution of 16.9% was obtained for the whole crystal array of the APD detector. The results of noise dependence of detector performances indicated that the DOI detector using the APD could achieve sufficient performance even when using application-specific integrated circuits.

  2. Direct reconstruction of parametric images for brain PET with event-by-event motion correction: evaluation in two tracers across count levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Mary; Gallezot, Jean-Dominque; Yan, Jianhua; Carson, Richard E.

    2017-07-01

    Parametric images for dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) are typically generated by an indirect method, i.e. reconstructing a time series of emission images, then fitting a kinetic model to each voxel time activity curve. Alternatively, ‘direct reconstruction’, incorporates the kinetic model into the reconstruction algorithm itself, directly producing parametric images from projection data. Direct reconstruction has been shown to achieve parametric images with lower standard error than the indirect method. Here, we present direct reconstruction for brain PET using event-by-event motion correction of list-mode data, applied to two tracers. Event-by-event motion correction was implemented for direct reconstruction in the Parametric Motion-compensation OSEM List-mode Algorithm for Resolution-recovery reconstruction. The direct implementation was tested on simulated and human datasets with tracers [11C]AFM (serotonin transporter) and [11C]UCB-J (synaptic density), which follow the 1-tissue compartment model. Rigid head motion was tracked with the Vicra system. Parametric images of K 1 and distribution volume (V T  =  K 1/k 2) were compared to those generated by the indirect method by regional coefficient of variation (CoV). Performance across count levels was assessed using sub-sampled datasets. For simulated and real datasets at high counts, the two methods estimated K 1 and V T with comparable accuracy. At lower count levels, the direct method was substantially more robust to outliers than the indirect method. Compared to the indirect method, direct reconstruction reduced regional K 1 CoV by 35-48% (simulated dataset), 39-43% ([11C]AFM dataset) and 30-36% ([11C]UCB-J dataset) across count levels (averaged over regions at matched iteration); V T CoV was reduced by 51-58%, 54-60% and 30-46%, respectively. Motion correction played an important role in the dataset with larger motion: correction increased regional V T by 51% on average in the [11C

  3. Evaluation of in vivo quantification accuracy of the Ingenuity-TF PET/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hofheinz, Frank; Oehme, Liane; Lougovski, Alexandr; Petr, Jan; Platzek, Ivan; Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina; Steinbach, Jörg; Kotzerke, Jörg; van den Hoff, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    The quantitative accuracy of standardized uptake values (SUVs) and tracer kinetic uptake parameters in patient investigations strongly depends on accurate determination of regional activity concentrations in positron emission tomography (PET) data. This determination rests on the assumption that the given scanner calibration is valid in vivo. In a previous study, we introduced a method to test this assumption. This method allows to identify discrepancies in quantitative accuracy in vivo by comparison of activity concentrations of urine samples measured in a well-counter with activity concentrations extracted from PET images of the bladder. In the present study, we have applied this method to the Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR since at the present stage, absolute quantitative accuracy of combined PET/MR systems is still under investigation. Twenty one clinical whole-body F18-FDG scans were included in this study. The bladder region was imaged as the last bed position and urine samples were collected afterward. PET images were reconstructed including MR-based attenuation correction with and without truncation compensation and 3D regions-of-interest (ROIs) of the bladder were delineated by three observers. To exclude partial volume effects, ROIs were concentrically shrunk by 8-10 mm. Then, activity concentrations were determined in the PET images for the bladder and for the urine by measuring the samples in a calibrated well-counter. In addition, linearity measurements of SUV vs singles rate and measurements of the stability of the coincidence rate of "true" events of the PET/MR system were performed over a period of 4 months. The measured in vivo activity concentrations were significantly lower in PET/MR than in the well-counter with a ratio of the former to the latter of 0.756 ± 0.060 (mean ± std. dev.), a range of 0.604-0.858, and a P value of 3.9 ⋅ 10(-14). While the stability measurements of the coincidence rate of "true" events showed no relevant deviation over

  4. Evaluation of in vivo quantification accuracy of the Ingenuity-TF PET/MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maus, Jens, E-mail: j.maus@hzdr.de; Schramm, Georg; Hofheinz, Frank; Lougovski, Alexandr; Petr, Jan; Steinbach, Jörg [PET Center, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oehme, Liane; Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina; Kotzerke, Jörg [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Platzek, Ivan [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Hoff, Jörg van den [PET Center, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden, Germany and Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The quantitative accuracy of standardized uptake values (SUVs) and tracer kinetic uptake parameters in patient investigations strongly depends on accurate determination of regional activity concentrations in positron emission tomography (PET) data. This determination rests on the assumption that the given scanner calibration is valid in vivo. In a previous study, we introduced a method to test this assumption. This method allows to identify discrepancies in quantitative accuracy in vivo by comparison of activity concentrations of urine samples measured in a well-counter with activity concentrations extracted from PET images of the bladder. In the present study, we have applied this method to the Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR since at the present stage, absolute quantitative accuracy of combined PET/MR systems is still under investigation. Methods: Twenty one clinical whole-body F18-FDG scans were included in this study. The bladder region was imaged as the last bed position and urine samples were collected afterward. PET images were reconstructed including MR-based attenuation correction with and without truncation compensation and 3D regions-of-interest (ROIs) of the bladder were delineated by three observers. To exclude partial volume effects, ROIs were concentrically shrunk by 8–10 mm. Then, activity concentrations were determined in the PET images for the bladder and for the urine by measuring the samples in a calibrated well-counter. In addition, linearity measurements of SUV vs singles rate and measurements of the stability of the coincidence rate of “true” events of the PET/MR system were performed over a period of 4 months. Results: The measured in vivo activity concentrations were significantly lower in PET/MR than in the well-counter with a ratio of the former to the latter of 0.756 ± 0.060 (mean ± std. dev.), a range of 0.604–0.858, and a P value of 3.9 ⋅ 10{sup −14}. While the stability measurements of the coincidence rate of

  5. SPECT og PET i neurobiologien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, O.B.; Lassen, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) are isotopic methods in which the distribution is registered of radiolabelled tracers given in such small amounts that they are without effect on the organism or the organism's disposal of them. Thus, a series...

  6. Towards enhanced PET quantification in clinical oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaidi, Habib; Karakatsanis, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    is still a matter of debate. Quantitative PET has advanced elegantly during the last two decades and is now reaching the maturity required for clinical exploitation, particularly in oncology where it has the capability to open many avenues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment...... and therapy planning. Therefore, the preservation and further enhancement of the quantitative features of PET imaging is crucial to ensure that the full clinical value of PET imaging modality is utilized in clinical oncology. Recent advancements in PET technology and methodology have paved the way for faster...... PET acquisitions of enhanced sensitivity to support the clinical translation of highly quantitative 4D parametric imaging methods in clinical oncology. In this report, we provide an overview of recent advances and future trends in quantitative PET imaging in the context of clinical oncology. The pros...

  7. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  8. The establishment of the Rossendorf PET Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, B.; Steinbach, J.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the newly established Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Center at the Institut of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry in Rossendorf are described, referring to medical research, development of tracers and radiochemicals developments, biochemistry and future prospects of PET in Rossendorf. The layout of the center is also described considering the cyclotron and targetry, the transport system, the radiopharmaceutical laboratories and the tomograph. A schedule for project development is going. (BBR)

  9. Quantitative PET of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor with 64Cu-DOTA-AE105

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Madsen, Jacob; Østergaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Expression levels of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) represent an established biomarker for poor prognosis in a variety of human cancers. The objective of the present study was to explore whether noninvasive PET can be used to perform a quantitative assessment of expressi...

  10. PET/CT和MSCT联合应用在孤立性肺结节诊断中的价值%PET-CT with multi-slice spiral CT in the diagnosis of SPN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪世存; 方雷; 潘博; 展凤麟; 谢强; 谢吉奎

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨18F-脱氧葡萄糖正电子发射显像/电子计算机断层扫描成像(18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography /computer tomography 18F-FDG PET/CT)和多排CT( multi-slice spiral CT,MSCT)联合应用在孤立性肺结节(SPN)诊断中的价值.方法 87例SPN患者均行PET/CT及肺部病灶MSCT检查,影像诊断结果 与病理对照,进行统计分析.结果 87例SPN中,MSCT诊断正确64例,误诊23例,误诊率26.4%.PET/CT诊断正确70例,误诊17例,误诊率19.5%.MSCT和PET/CT联合诊断,80例诊断正确,7例误诊,误诊率8.0%.MSCT、PET/CT及两者联合诊断的敏感性、特异性和准确性分别为87.2%、68.1%、79.8%;89.5%、61.3%、81.4%和97.7%、74.2%、91.5%.MSCT和PET/CT单独诊断SPN的准确性无统计学意义(χ2=0.625,P=0.239),MSCT、PET/CT与两者联合应用诊断SPN的准确性均有统计学意义(χ2=7.762和5.318,P=0.005和0.021).结论 SPN的MSCT和PET/CT影像特征均有一定的重叠.单独采用MSCT或PET/CT诊断肺结节无明显统计学差异,MSCT和PET-CT协同诊断的准确性高于MSCT或PET/CT单独诊断.%Aim To evaluate the value of a combination of 18F-FDG PET-CT with multi-slice spiral CT in the diagnosis of SPN.Methods 18F-FDG PET-CT and multi-slice spiral CT were performed in 87 patients with SPN.The pathologically-proved findings were compared with findings diagnosed by MSCT and retrospectively analyzed.Results In 87 cases,the numbers of correct diagnosis and misdiagnosis with MSCT were 64 and 23 respectively,the misdiagnosis rate 26.4%,while the numbers of correct diagnosis and misdiagnosis with PET/CT were 70 and 17,the misdiagnosis rate 19.5%,but 50 cases were correctly diagnosed and 7 cases were misdiagnosed by combining 18F-FDG PET-CT with MSCT,the misdiagnosis rate 8.0%.The sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value,negative predictive value,and accuracy of MSCT,PET/CT,and MSCT combined with PET /CT were 87.2%,68.1%,79.8%;89.5%,61.3%,81.4% and 97

  11. Hypoxia positron emission tomography imaging: combining information on perfusion and tracer retention to improve hypoxia specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Morten; Munk, Ole L; Jakobsen, Steen S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Static positron emission tomography (PET) allows mapping of tumor hypoxia, but low resolution and slow tracer retention/clearance results in poor image contrast and the risk of missing areas where hypoxic cells and necrosis are intermixed. Fully dynamic PET may improve accuracy but scan...

  12. Prediction of standard-dose brain PET image by using MRI and low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jiayin [School of Electronics Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lianyungang, Jiangsu 222005, China and IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Gao, Yaozong [IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shi, Feng [IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lalush, David S. [Joint UNC-NCSU Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Lin, Weili [MRI Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [IDEA Laboratory, Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technology that produces 3D images reflecting tissue metabolic activity in human body. PET has been widely used in various clinical applications, such as in diagnosis of brain disorders. High-quality PET images play an essential role in diagnosing brain diseases/disorders. In practice, in order to obtain high-quality PET images, a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) needs to be used and injected into a living body. As a result, it will inevitably increase the patient’s exposure to radiation. One solution to solve this problem is predicting standard-dose PET images using low-dose PET images. As yet, no previous studies with this approach have been reported. Accordingly, in this paper, the authors propose a regression forest based framework for predicting a standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by using a low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image and its corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image. Methods: The authors employ a regression forest for predicting the standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET image by low-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET and MRI images. Specifically, the proposed method consists of two main steps. First, based on the segmented brain tissues (i.e., cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter) in the MRI image, the authors extract features for each patch in the brain image from both low-dose PET and MRI images to build tissue-specific models that can be used to initially predict standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images. Second, an iterative refinement strategy, via estimating the predicted image difference, is used to further improve the prediction accuracy. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm on a brain dataset, consisting of 11 subjects with MRI, low-dose PET, and standard-dose PET images, using leave-one-out cross-validations. The proposed algorithm gives promising results with well-estimated standard-dose brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET

  13. Prediction of standard-dose brain PET image by using MRI and low-dose brain ["1"8F]FDG PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jiayin; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technology that produces 3D images reflecting tissue metabolic activity in human body. PET has been widely used in various clinical applications, such as in diagnosis of brain disorders. High-quality PET images play an essential role in diagnosing brain diseases/disorders. In practice, in order to obtain high-quality PET images, a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) needs to be used and injected into a living body. As a result, it will inevitably increase the patient’s exposure to radiation. One solution to solve this problem is predicting standard-dose PET images using low-dose PET images. As yet, no previous studies with this approach have been reported. Accordingly, in this paper, the authors propose a regression forest based framework for predicting a standard-dose brain ["1"8F]FDG PET image by using a low-dose brain ["1"8F]FDG PET image and its corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image. Methods: The authors employ a regression forest for predicting the standard-dose brain ["1"8F]FDG PET image by low-dose brain ["1"8F]FDG PET and MRI images. Specifically, the proposed method consists of two main steps. First, based on the segmented brain tissues (i.e., cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter) in the MRI image, the authors extract features for each patch in the brain image from both low-dose PET and MRI images to build tissue-specific models that can be used to initially predict standard-dose brain ["1"8F]FDG PET images. Second, an iterative refinement strategy, via estimating the predicted image difference, is used to further improve the prediction accuracy. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm on a brain dataset, consisting of 11 subjects with MRI, low-dose PET, and standard-dose PET images, using leave-one-out cross-validations. The proposed algorithm gives promising results with well-estimated standard-dose brain ["1"8F]FDG PET image and substantially

  14. Follicular thyroid cancer avid on C-11 Methionine PET/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Jochumsen, Mads Ryø; Iversen, Peter; Arveschoug, Anne Kirstine

    2018-01-01

    Summary A case of follicular thyroid cancer with intense focal Methionine uptake on 11C-Methionine PET/CT is reported here. The use of 11C-Methionine PET in differentiated thyroid cancer is currently being investigated as a surrogate tracer compared to the more widely used 18F-FDG PET. This case illustrates the potential incremental value of this modality, not only in the localizing of parathyroid adenoma, but also indicating that 11C-Methionine PET might have a potential of increasing the pr...

  15. Multiple Time-Point 68Ga-PSMA I&T PET/CT for Characterization of Primary Prostate Cancer: Value of Early Dynamic and Delayed Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Mamach, Martin; Wilke, Florian; von Klot, Christoph A; Henkenberens, Christoph; Thackeray, James T; Sohns, Jan M; Geworski, Lilli; Ross, Tobias L; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Christiansen, Hans; Bengel, Frank M; Derlin, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to gain mechanistic insights into prostate cancer biology using dynamic imaging and to evaluate the usefulness of multiple time-point Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) I&T PET/CT for the assessment of primary prostate cancer before prostatectomy. Twenty patients with prostate cancer underwent Ga-PSMA I&T PET/CT before prostatectomy. The PET protocol consisted of early dynamic pelvic imaging, followed by static scans at 60 and 180 minutes postinjection (p.i.). SUVs, time-activity curves, quantitative analysis based on a 2-tissue compartment model, Patlak analysis, histopathology, and Gleason grading were compared between prostate cancer and benign prostate gland. Primary tumors were identified on both early dynamic and delayed imaging in 95% of patients. Tracer uptake was significantly higher in prostate cancer compared with benign prostate tissue at any time point (P ≤ 0.0003) and increased over time. Consequently, the tumor-to-nontumor ratio within the prostate gland improved over time (2.8 at 10 minutes vs 17.1 at 180 minutes p.i.). Tracer uptake at both 60 and 180 minutes p.i. was significantly higher in patients with higher Gleason scores (P dynamic and static delayed Ga-PSMA ligand PET images. The tumor-to-nontumor ratio in the prostate gland improves over time, supporting a role of delayed imaging for optimal visualization of prostate cancer.

  16. A combined positron emission tomography (PET)-electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) system: initial evaluation of a prototype scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseytlin, Mark; Stolin, Alexander V.; Guggilapu, Priyaankadevi; Bobko, Andrey A.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Tseytlin, Oxana; Raylman, Raymond R.

    2018-05-01

    The advent of hybrid scanners, combining complementary modalities, has revolutionized the application of advanced imaging technology to clinical practice and biomedical research. In this project, we investigated the melding of two complementary, functional imaging methods: positron emission tomography (PET) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). PET radiotracers can provide important information about cellular parameters, such as glucose metabolism. While EPR probes can provide assessment of tissue microenvironment, measuring oxygenation and pH, for example. Therefore, a combined PET/EPRI scanner promises to provide new insights not attainable with current imagers by simultaneous acquisition of multiple components of tissue microenvironments. To explore the simultaneous acquisition of PET and EPR images, a prototype system was created by combining two existing scanners. Specifically, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based PET scanner ring designed as a portable scanner was combined with an EPRI scanner designed for the imaging of small animals. The ability of the system to obtain simultaneous images was assessed with a small phantom consisting of four cylinders containing both a PET tracer and EPR spin probe. The resulting images demonstrated the ability to obtain contemporaneous PET and EPR images without cross-modality interference. Given the promising results from this initial investigation, the next step in this project is the construction of the next generation pre-clinical PET/EPRI scanner for multi-parametric assessment of physiologically-important parameters of tissue microenvironments.

  17. High Dose MicroCT Does Not Contribute Toward Improved MicroPET/CT Image Quantitative Accuracy and Can Limit Longitudinal Scanning of Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. McDougald

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining accurate quantitative measurements in preclinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT imaging is of paramount importance in biomedical research and helps supporting efficient translation of preclinical results to the clinic. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1 to investigate the effects of different CT acquisition protocols on PET/CT image quality and data quantification; and (2 to evaluate the absorbed dose associated with varying CT par