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Sample records for multi-photon fluorescence excitation

  1. Multi-photon excited luminescence of magnetic FePt core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, K M; Kuhn, B

    2014-07-01

    We present magnetic FePt nanoparticles with a hydrophilic, inert, and biocompatible silico-tungsten oxide shell. The particles can be functionalized, optically detected, and optically manipulated. To show the functionalization the fluorescent dye NOPS was bound to the FePt core-shell nanoparticles with propyl-triethoxy-silane linkers and fluorescence of the labeled particles were observed in ethanol (EtOH). In aqueous dispersion the NOPS fluorescence is quenched making them invisible using 1-photon excitation. However, we observe bright luminescence of labeled and even unlabeled magnetic core-shell nanoparticles with multi-photon excitation. Luminescence can be detected in the near ultraviolet and the full visible spectral range by near infrared multi-photon excitation. For optical manipulation, we were able to drag clusters of particles, and maybe also single particles, by a focused laser beam that acts as optical tweezers by inducing an electric dipole in the insulated metal nanoparticles. In a first application, we show that the luminescence of the core-shell nanoparticles is bright enough for in vivo multi-photon imaging in the mouse neocortex down to cortical layer 5.

  2. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  3. Fluorescent nano-particles for multi-photon thermal sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaque, D., E-mail: daniel.jaque@uam.es [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Maestro, L.M.; Escudero, E. [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Rodriguez, E. Martin; Capobianco, J.A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, QC, Canada H4B 1R6 (Canada); Vetrone, F. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Universite du Quebec, Varennes, QC, Canada J3X 1S2 (Canada); Juarranz de la Fuente, A.; Sanz-Rodriguez, F. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Iglesias-de la Cruz, M.C. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, C/Arzobispo Morcillo s/n, 29029 Madrid (Spain); Jacinto, C.; Rocha, U. [Grupo de Fotonica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceio, Alagoas (Brazil); Garcia Sole, J. [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    In this work we report on the ability of Er/Yb co-doped NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals and CdTe Quantum Dots as two-photon excited fluorescent nano-thermometers. The basic physical phenomena causing the thermal sensitivity of the two-photon excited emission bands have been discussed and the maximum thermal resolution achievable in each case has been estimated. The practical application of both systems for thermal sensing at the micro-scale in biological systems is demonstrated. In particular, they have been used to evaluate the thermal loading induced by tightly focused laser beams in both living cells and fluids. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two-photon-excited optical probes capable of thermal sensing are introduced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The physics at the basis of thermal sensing is identified for each case. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical nano-thermometers are used to determine laser induced heating in cells and fluids.

  4. Multi-photon excitation microscopy for advanced biomedical imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, B.M.; Haeften, T.W. van; Bavel, Kees van; Valentijn, Jack A.

    Fluorescence microscopy (FM) is a technique traditionally used for determining biological structures [33]; its basic concept is summarised in Figure 1a. The biological specimen under examination is labelled with one or more fluorescent probes before being placed in the microscope. A single photon

  5. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system

  6. Rapid creation of distant entanglement by multi-photon resonant fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Guy Z.; Sham, L. J.

    2014-03-01

    We study a simple, effective and robust method for entangling two separate stationary quantum dot spin qubits with high fidelity using multi-photon Gaussian state. The fluorescence signals from the two dots interfere at a beam splitter. The bosonic nature of photons leads, in analogy with the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect, to selective pairing of photon holes (photon absences in the fluorescent signals). By the HOM effect, two photon holes with the same polarization end up at the same beam splitter output. As a result, two odd photon number detections at the outgoing beams, which must correspond to two photon holes with different polarizations, herald entanglement creation. The robustness of the Gaussian states is evidenced by the ability to compensate for photon absorption and noise by a moderate increase in the number of photons at the input. We calculate the entanglement generation rate in the ideal, non-ideal and near-ideal detector regimes and find substantial improvement over single-photon schemes in all three regimes. Fast and efficient spin-spin entanglement creation can form the basis for a scalable quantum dot quantum computing network. Our predictions can be tested using current experimental capabilities. This research was supported by the U.S. Army Research Office MURI award W911NF0910406, by NSF grant PHY-1104446 and by ARO (IARPA, W911NF-08-1-0487). The authors thank D. G. Steel for useful discussions.

  7. Multi-Photon Absorption Spectra: A Comparison Between Transmittance Change and Fluorescence Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0134 multi-photon absorption spectra Cleber Mendonca INSTITUTO DE FISICA DE SAO CARLOS Final Report 05/21/2015 DISTRIBUTION A...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos - Universidade de Sao Paulo Av

  8. Melanin fluorescence spectra by step-wise three photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2012-03-01

    Melanin is the characteristic chromophore of human skin with various potential biological functions. Kerimo discovered enhanced melanin fluorescence by stepwise three-photon excitation in 2011. In this article, step-wise three-photon excited fluorescence (STPEF) spectrum between 450 nm -700 nm of melanin is reported. The melanin STPEF spectrum exhibited an exponential increase with wavelength. However, there was a probability of about 33% that another kind of step-wise multi-photon excited fluorescence (SMPEF) that peaks at 525 nm, shown by previous research, could also be generated using the same process. Using an excitation source at 920 nm as opposed to 830 nm increased the potential for generating SMPEF peaks at 525 nm. The SMPEF spectrum peaks at 525 nm photo-bleached faster than STPEF spectrum.

  9. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: Excitation and Suppression of the Brain Waves by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS-team Team

    2017-10-01

    The novel study of the laser excitation-suppression of the brain waves is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated multi-photon fiber-laser interaction with the brain parvalbumin (PV) neurons. The repetition frequency matches the low frequency brain waves (5-100 Hz); enabling the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the PV neurons (the generators of the brain wave activity). The tunable fiber laser frequencies are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling the monitoring of the PV neuron-DNA, within the 10s of milliseconds. In medicine, the method can be used as an ``instantaneous-on-off anesthetic.'' Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  10. Diamond-like-carbon nanoparticle production and agglomeration following UV multi-photon excitation of static naphthalene/helium gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, A. J.; Ruth, A. A., E-mail: a.ruth@ucc.ie [Physics Department and Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333-CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-07-14

    We report the formation of nanoparticles with significant diamond character after UV multi-photon laser excitation of gaseous naphthalene, buffered in static helium gas, at room temperature. The nanoparticles are identified in situ by their absorption and scattering spectra between 400 and 850 nm, which are modeled using Mie theory. Comparisons of the particles’ spectroscopic and optical properties with those of carbonaceous materials indicate a sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} hybridization ratio of 8:1 of the particles formed. The particle extinction in the closed static (unstirred) gas-phase system exhibits a complex and quasi-oscillatory time dependence for the duration of up to several hours with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes. The extinction dynamics of the system is based on a combination of transport features and particle interaction, predominantly agglomeration. The relatively long period of agglomeration allows for a unique analysis of the agglomeration process of diamond-like carbon nanoparticles in situ.

  11. MULTI-PHOTON PHOSPHOR FEASIBILITY RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Graham; W. Chow

    2003-05-01

    Development of multi-photon phosphor materials for discharge lamps represents a goal that would achieve up to a doubling of discharge (fluorescent) lamp efficacy. This report reviews the existing literature on multi-photon phosphors, identifies obstacles in developing such phosphors, and recommends directions for future research to address these obstacles. To critically examine issues involved in developing a multi-photon phosphor, the project brought together a team of experts from universities, national laboratories, and an industrial lamp manufacturer. Results and findings are organized into three categories: (1) Multi-Photon Systems and Processes, (2) Chemistry and Materials Issues, and (3) Concepts and Models. Multi-Photon Systems and Processes: This category focuses on how to use our current understanding of multi-photon phosphor systems to design new phosphor systems for application in fluorescent lamps. The quickest way to develop multi-photon lamp phosphors lies in finding sensitizer ions for Gd{sup 3+} and identifying activator ions to red shift the blue emission from Pr{sup 3+} due to the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 1}I{sub 6} transition associated with the first cascading step. Success in either of these developments would lead to more efficient fluorescent lamps. Chemistry and Materials Issues: The most promising multi-photon phosphors are found in fluoride hosts. However, stability of fluorides in environments typically found in fluorescent lamps needs to be greatly improved. Experimental investigation of fluorides in actual lamp environments needs to be undertaken while working on oxide and oxyfluoride alternative systems for backup. Concepts and Models: Successful design of a multi-photon phosphor system based on cascading transitions of Gd{sup 3+} and Pr{sup 3+} depends critically on how the former can be sensitized and the latter can sensitize an activator ion. Methods to predict energy level diagrams and Judd-Ofelt parameters of multi-photon

  12. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  13. Nonlinear excitation fluorescence microscopy: source considerations for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokosin, David L.

    2008-02-01

    Ultra-short-pulse solid-state laser sources have improved contrast within fluorescence imaging and also opened new windows of investigation in biological imaging applications. Additionally, the pulsed illumination enables harmonic scattering microscopy which yields intrinsic structure, symmetry and contrast from viable embryos, cells and tissues. Numerous human diseases are being investigated by the combination of (more) intact dynamic tissue imaging of cellular function with gene-targeted specificity and electrophysiology context. The major limitation to more widespread use of multi-photon microscopy has been the complete system cost and added complexity above and beyond commercial camera and confocal systems. The current status of all-solid-state ultrafast lasers as excitation sources will be reviewed since these lasers offer tremendous potential for affordable, reliable, "turnkey" multiphoton imaging systems. This effort highlights the single box laser systems currently commercially available, with defined suggestions for the ranges for individual laser parameters as derived from a biological and fluorophore limited perspective. The standard two-photon dose is defined by 800nm, 10mW, 200fs, and 80Mhz - at the sample plane for tissue culture cells, i.e. after the full scanning microscope system. Selected application-derived excitation wavelengths are well represented by 700nm, 780nm, ~830nm, ~960nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. Many of the one-box lasers have fixed or very limited excitation wavelengths available, so the lasers will be lumped near 780nm, 800nm, 900nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. The following laser parameter ranges are discussed: average power from 200mW to 2W, pulse duration from 70fs to 700fs, pulse repetition rate from 20MHz to 200MHz, with the laser output linearly polarized with an extinction ratio at least 100:1.

  14. Fluorescence anisotropy of tyrosinate anion using one-, two- and three-photon excitation: tyrosinate anion fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdaszuk, Borys

    2013-03-01

    We examined the emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy of tyrosinate anion fluorescence with one-photon (250-310 nm), two-photon (570-620 nm) and three-photon (750-930 nm) excitation. Similar emission spectra of the neutral (pH 7.2) and anionic (pH 13) forms of N-acetyl-L-tyrosinamide (NATyrA) (pKa 10.6) were observed for all modes of excitation, with the maxima at 302 and 352 nm, respectively. Two-photon excitation (2PE) and three-photon excitation (3PE) spectra of the anionic form were the same as that for one-photon excitation (1PE). In contrast, 2PE spectrum from the neutral form showed ~30-nm shift to shorter wavelengths relative to 1PE spectrum (λmax 275 nm) at two-photon energy (550 nm), the latter being overlapped with 3PE spectrum, both at two-photon energy (550 nm). Two-photon cross-sections for NATyrA anion at 565-580 nm were 10 % of that for N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATrpA), and increased to 90 % at 610 nm, while for the neutral form of NATyrA decreased from 2 % of that for NATrpA at 570 nm to near zero at 585 nm. Surprisingly, the fundamental anisotropy of NATyrA anion in vitrified solution at -60 °C was ~0.05 for 2PE at 610 nm as compared to near 0.3 for 1PE at 305 nm, and wavelength-dependence appears to be a basic feature of its anisotropy. In contrast, the 3PE anisotropy at 900 nm was about 0.5, and 3PE and 1PE anisotropy values appear to be related by the cos(6) θ to cos(2) θ photoselection factor (approx. 10/6) independently of excitation wavelength. Attention is drawn to the possible effect of tyrosinate anions in proteins on their multi-photon induced fluorescence emission and excitation spectra as well as excitation anisotropy spectra.

  15. High multi-photon visible upconversion emissions of Er3+ singly doped BiOCl microcrystals: A photon avalanche of Er3+ induced by 980 nm excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yongjin; Song, Zhiguo; Li, Chen; Wan, Ronghua; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Under 980 nm excitation, high multi-photon upconversion (UC) emission from the 2 H 11/2 / 4 S 3/2 (green) and 4 F 9/2 (red) levels of Er 3+ ions were observed from Er 3+ singly doped BiOCl microcrystals. These high-energy excited states were populated by a three to ten photon UC process conditionally, which depended on the pump power density and the Er 3+ ion doping concentration, characterizing as a hetero-looping enhanced energy transfer avalanche UC process. UC emission lifetime and Raman analysis suggest that the unusual UC phenomena are initiated by the new and intense phonon vibration modes of BiOCl lattices due to Er 3+ ions doping

  16. High multi-photon visible upconversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals: A photon avalanche of Er{sup 3+} induced by 980 nm excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongjin; Song, Zhiguo, E-mail: songzg@kmust.edu.cn; Li, Chen; Wan, Ronghua; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Qi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2013-12-02

    Under 980 nm excitation, high multi-photon upconversion (UC) emission from the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}/{sup 4}S{sub 3/2} (green) and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} (red) levels of Er{sup 3+} ions were observed from Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals. These high-energy excited states were populated by a three to ten photon UC process conditionally, which depended on the pump power density and the Er{sup 3+} ion doping concentration, characterizing as a hetero-looping enhanced energy transfer avalanche UC process. UC emission lifetime and Raman analysis suggest that the unusual UC phenomena are initiated by the new and intense phonon vibration modes of BiOCl lattices due to Er{sup 3+} ions doping.

  17. Multi-Photon Entanglement and Quantum Teleportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shih, Yanhua

    1999-01-01

    The project 'Multi-Photon Entanglement and Quantum Teleportation' concerns a series of experimental and theoretical investigations on multi-photon entangled states and the applications, for example...

  18. Fluorescent excitation of interstellar H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Black, J.H.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared emission spectrum of H2 excited by ultraviolet absorption, followed by fluorescence, was investigated using comprehensive models of interstellar clouds for computing the spectrum and to assess the effects on the intensity to various cloud properties, such as density, size, temperature,

  19. Use of multi-photon laser-scanning microscopy to describe the distribution of xenobiotic chemicals in fish early life stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornung, Michael W.; Cook, Philip M.; Flynn, Kevin M.; Lothenbach, Doug B.; Johnson, Rodney D.; Nichols, John W.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms by which persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs) produce toxicity during fish early life stages (ELS), dose-response relationships need to be understood in relation to the dynamic distribution of chemicals in sensitive tissues. In this study, a multi-photon laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) was used to determine the multi-photon excitation spectra of several polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to describe chemical distribution among tissues during fish ELS. The multi-photon excitation spectra revealed intense fluorescent signal from the model fluorophore, pentamethyl-difluoro-boro-indacene (BODIPY[reg], less signal from benzo[a]pyrene and fluoranthene, and no detectable signal from pyrene. The imaging method was tested by exposing newly fertilized medaka (Oryzias latipes) eggs to BODIPY[reg] or fluoranthene for 6 h, followed by transfer to clean media. Embryos and larvae were then imaged through 5 days post-hatch. The two test chemicals partitioned similarly throughout development and differences in fluorescence intensity among tissues were evident to a depth of several hundred microns. Initially, the most intense signal was observed in the oil droplet within the yolk, while a moderate signal was seen in the portion of the yolk containing the yolk-platelets. As embryonic development progressed, the liver biliary system, gall bladder, and intestinal tract accumulated strong fluorescent signal. After hatch, once the gastrointestinal tract was completely developed, most of the fluorescent signal was cleared. The MPLSM is a useful tool to describe the tissue distribution of fluorescent PBTs during fish ELS

  20. Saturated excitation of Fluorescence to quantify excitation enhancement in aperture antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Aouani, Heykel

    2012-07-23

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used to probe the electromagnetic intensity amplification on optical antennas, yet measuring the excitation intensity amplification is a challenge, as the detected fluorescence signal is an intricate combination of excitation and emission. Here, we describe a novel approach to quantify the electromagnetic amplification in aperture antennas by taking advantage of the intrinsic non linear properties of the fluorescence process. Experimental measurements of the fundamental f and second harmonic 2f amplitudes of the fluorescence signal upon excitation modulation are used to quantify the electromagnetic intensity amplification with plasmonic aperture antennas. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  1. Saturated excitation of Fluorescence to quantify excitation enhancement in aperture antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Aouani, Heykel; Hostein, Richard; Mahboub, Oussama; Devaux, Eloï se; Rigneault, Hervé ; Ebbesen, Thomas W.; Wenger, Jé rô me

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used to probe the electromagnetic intensity amplification on optical antennas, yet measuring the excitation intensity amplification is a challenge, as the detected fluorescence signal is an intricate combination of excitation and emission. Here, we describe a novel approach to quantify the electromagnetic amplification in aperture antennas by taking advantage of the intrinsic non linear properties of the fluorescence process. Experimental measurements of the fundamental f and second harmonic 2f amplitudes of the fluorescence signal upon excitation modulation are used to quantify the electromagnetic intensity amplification with plasmonic aperture antennas. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  2. One color multi-photon ionization of the Gadolinium atom in near UV region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Tae; Yi, Jong Hoon; Lhee, Yong Joo; Lee, Jong Min

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the states of the gadolinium atom in near ultra-violet (UV) region (∼410 nm) using single photon excitation using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). Around 70 transitions among observed 180 single color multi-photon ionization signals have been assigned. Most of the multi-photon processes of the assigned ion signals are through single photon resonant three photon ionization and through two photon resonant three photon ionization. (author)

  3. Two-photon excited UV fluorescence for protein crystal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, Jeremy T.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2011-01-01

    Complementary measurements using SONICC and TPE-UVF allow the sensitive and selective detection of protein crystals. Two-photon excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF) microscopy is explored for sensitive protein-crystal detection as a complement to second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC). Like conventional ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF), TPE-UVF generates image contrast based on the intrinsic fluorescence of aromatic residues, generally producing higher fluorescence emission within crystals than the mother liquor by nature of the higher local protein concentration. However, TPE-UVF has several advantages over conventional UVF, including (i) insensitivity to optical scattering, allowing imaging in turbid matrices, (ii) direct compatibility with conventional optical plates and windows by using visible light for excitation, (iii) elimination of potentially damaging out-of-plane UV excitation, (iv) improved signal to noise through background reduction from out-of-plane excitation and (v) relatively simple integration into instrumentation developed for SONICC

  4. Coherent beam control through inhomogeneous media in multi-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Hari Prasad

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has become a primary tool for high-resolution deep tissue imaging because of its sensitivity to ballistic excitation photons in comparison to scattered excitation photons. The imaging depth of multi-photon microscopes in tissue imaging is limited primarily by background fluorescence that is generated by scattered light due to the random fluctuations in refractive index inside the media, and by reduced intensity in the ballistic focal volume due to aberrations within the tissue and at its interface. We built two multi-photon adaptive optics (AO) correction systems, one for combating scattering and aberration problems, and another for compensating interface aberrations. For scattering correction a MEMS segmented deformable mirror (SDM) was inserted at a plane conjugate to the objective back-pupil plane. The SDM can pre-compensate for light scattering by coherent combination of the scattered light to make an apparent focus even at a depths where negligible ballistic light remains (i.e. ballistic limit). This problem was approached by investigating the spatial and temporal focusing characteristics of a broad-band light source through strongly scattering media. A new model was developed for coherent focus enhancement through or inside the strongly media based on the initial speckle contrast. A layer of fluorescent beads under a mouse skull was imaged using an iterative coherent beam control method in the prototype two-photon microscope to demonstrate the technique. We also adapted an AO correction system to an existing in three-photon microscope in a collaborator lab at Cornell University. In the second AO correction approach a continuous deformable mirror (CDM) is placed at a plane conjugate to the plane of an interface aberration. We demonstrated that this "Conjugate AO" technique yields a large field-of-view (FOV) advantage in comparison to Pupil AO. Further, we showed that the extended FOV in conjugate AO is maintained over a

  5. Two-photon excited fluorescence emission from hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiqi; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-03-01

    Hemoglobin, one of the most important proteins in blood, is responsible for oxygen transportation in almost all vertebrates. Recently, we discovered two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence and achieved label-free microvascular imaging based on the hemoglobin fluorescence. However, the mechanism of its fluorescence emission still remains unknown. In this work, we studied the two-photon excited fluorescence properties of the hemoglobin subunits, heme/hemin (iron (II)/(III) protoporphyrin IX) and globin. We first studied the properties of heme and the similar spectral and temporal characteristics of heme and hemoglobin fluorescence provide strong evidence that heme is the fluorophore in hemoglobin. Then we studied the fluorescence properties of hemin, globin and methemoglobin, and found that the hemin may have the main effect on the methemoglobin fluorescence and that globin has tryptophan fluorescence like other proteins. Finally, since heme is a centrosymmetric molecule, that the Soret band fluorescence of heme and hemoglobin was not observed in the single photon process in the previous study may be due to the parity selection rule. The discovery of heme two-photon excited fluorescence may open a new window for heme biology research, since heme as a cofactor of hemoprotein has many functions, including chemical catalysis, electron transfer and diatomic gases transportation.

  6. A portable tube exciting X-ray fluorescence analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qiang; Lai Wanchang; Ge Liangquan

    2009-01-01

    Article introduced a portable tube exciting X-ray fluorescence analysis system which is based on arm architecture. Also, we designed Tube control circuit and finished preliminary application. The energy and the intensity of the photon can be adjusted continuously by using the tube. Experiments show that high excitation efficiency obtained by setting the appropriate parameters of the tube for the various elements. (authors)

  7. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  8. Graphene oxide from silk cocoon: a novel magnetic fluorophore for multi-photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Manas; Kusurkar, Tejas Sanjeev; Maurya, Sandeep Kumar; Meena, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Sushil Kumar; Sethy, Niroj; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sharma, Raj Kishore; Goswami, Debabrata; Sarkar, Sabyasachi; Das, Mainak

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we synthesized graphene oxide from silk cocoon embarking its new dimension as a magnetic fluorophore when compared with its present technical status, which at best is for extracting silk as a biomaterial for tissue engineering applications. We produced graphene oxide by pyrolysing the silk cocoon in an inert atmosphere. The collected raw carbon is oxidized by nitric acid that readily produces multilayer graphene oxide with nano carbon particulates. Structural properties of the graphene oxide were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The oxidized sample shows remarkable fluorescence, multi-photon imaging and magnetic properties. On increasing the excitation wavelength, the fluorescence emission intensity of the graphene oxide also increases and found maximum emission at 380 nm excitation wavelength. On studying the two photon absorption (TPA) property of aqueous graphene oxide using Z-scan technique, we found significant TPA activity at near infrared wavelength. In addition, the graphene oxide shows ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. The observed fluorescence and magnetic property were attributed to the defects caused in the graphene oxide structure by introducing oxygen containing hydrophilic groups during the oxidation process. Previously silk cocoon has been used extensively in deriving silk-based tissue engineering materials and as gas filter. Here we show a novel application of silk cocoon by synthesizing graphene oxide based magnetic-fluorophore for bio-imaging applications.

  9. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bixler, Joel N; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU.

  10. Light emitting diode excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sean J; JiJi, Renée D

    2002-12-01

    An excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence instrument has been developed using a linear array of light emitting diodes (LED). The wavelengths covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum: 370-640 nm. Using an LED array to excite fluorescence emission at multiple excitation wavelengths is a low-cost alternative to an expensive high power lamp and imaging spectrograph. The LED-EEM system is a departure from other EEM spectroscopy systems in that LEDs often have broad excitation ranges which may overlap with neighboring channels. The LED array can be considered a hybrid between a spectroscopic and sensor system, as the broad LED excitation range produces a partially selective optical measurement. The instrument has been tested and characterized using fluorescent dyes: limits of detection (LOD) for 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)-anthracene and rhodamine B were in the mid parts-per-trillion range; detection limits for the other compounds were in the low parts-per-billion range (LED-EEMs were analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which allowed the mathematical resolution of the individual contributions of the mono- and dianion fluorescein tautomers a priori. Correct identification and quantitation of six fluorescent dyes in two to six component mixtures (concentrations between 12.5 and 500 ppb) has been achieved with root mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) of less than 4.0 ppb for all components.

  11. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies

  12. Fluorescence study of some xanthine dyes under stepped laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkova, L.V.; Ketsle, G.A.; Ermagambetov, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Paper is devoted to definition of triplet state in molecules of xanthine dyes and study of intramolecular energy circulation. Stepped two-quanta excitation of dyes has been carried out with help of experimental unit. Intensive luminescence activated by excitation of triplet molecules of dyes within triplet-triplet band with wave length of 1060 nm was registered for eosin. Given luminescence spectrally coincides with fast fluorescence. 5 refs., 6 figs

  13. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-01-01

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup

  14. Continuous excitation chlorophyll fluorescence parameters: a review for practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    This review introduces, defines and critically reviews a number of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters with specific reference to those derived from continuous excitation chlorophyll fluorescence. A number of common issues and criticisms are addressed. The parameters fluorescence origin (F0) and the performance indices (PI) are discussed as examples. This review attempts to unify definitions for the wide range of parameters available for measuring plant vitality, facilitating their calculation and use. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gredel, R.; Dishoeck, van E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination

  16. Choice of excitation source for determination of rare earth elements with radioisotope excited X ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Quanshi; Chang Yongfu

    2000-01-01

    The comparisons of two radioisotope source ( 241 Am and 238 Pu) which are the most available in the radioisotope excited X Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis technique and two characteristic X ray series (KX and LX) analyzed for the determination of the rare-earth (RE) elements were investigated in detail. According to the principle of emission and detection of X ray , the relative excitation efficiencies were calculated by the some fundamental physical parameters including the photoelectric mass attenuation coefficient, the fluorescent yield, the absorption jump factor, the emission probability of the detected fluorescent line with reference to other liens of the same series etc., The advantages and disadvantages of the two conditions are discussed. These results may determine the optimal excitation and detection conditions for different rare-earth elements. The experimental results with nine rare-earth elements (Ce, Nd, Sm, Tb, Tm, Ho, Er, Yb and Lu) are in agreement with the results of theoretical calculations

  17. Polarization control of multi-photon absorption under intermediate femtosecond laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Wenjing; Liang Guo; Wu Ping; Liu Pei; Jia Tianqing; Sun Zhenrong; Zhang Shian

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that the femtosecond laser polarization modulation is a very simple and well-established method to control the multi-photon absorption process by the light–matter interaction. Previous studies mainly focused on the multi-photon absorption control in the weak field. In this paper, we further explore the polarization control behavior of multi-photon absorption process in the intermediate femtosecond laser field. In the weak femtosecond laser field, the second-order perturbation theory can well describe the non-resonant two-photon absorption process. However, the higher order nonlinear effect (e.g., four-photon absorption) can occur in the intermediate femtosecond laser field, and thus it is necessary to establish new theoretical model to describe the multi-photon absorption process, which includes the two-photon and four-photon transitions. Here, we construct a fourth-order perturbation theory to study the polarization control behavior of this multi-photon absorption under the intermediate femtosecond laser field excitation, and our theoretical results show that the two-photon and four-photon excitation pathways can induce a coherent interference, while the coherent interference is constructive or destructive that depends on the femtosecond laser center frequency. Moreover, the two-photon and four-photon transitions have the different polarization control efficiency, and the four-photon absorption can obtain the higher polarization control efficiency. Thus, the polarization control efficiency of the whole excitation process can be increased or decreased by properly designing the femtosecond laser field intensity and laser center frequency. These studies can provide a clear physical picture for understanding and controlling the multi-photon absorption process in the intermediate femtosecond laser field, and also can provide a theoretical guidance for the future experimental realization. (paper)

  18. Scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junpeng Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the combination of a reflective blazed grating and a reflective phase-only diffractive spatial light modulator (SLM, scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy (SMTM-MPM was achieved. The SLM shaped an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:sapphire laser beam into an excitation pattern with addressable shapes and sizes that matched the samples of interest in the field of view. Temporal and spatial focusing were simultaneously realized by combining an objective lens and a blazed grating. The fluorescence signal from illuminated areas was recorded by a two-dimensional sCMOS camera. Compared with a conventional temporal focusing multiphoton microscope, our microscope achieved effective use of the laser power and decreased photodamage with higher axial resolution.

  19. Fluorescence excitation studies of molecular photoionization in external electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Leroi, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Using molecular nitrogen as an example, we show that fluorescence excitation spectroscopy can be used to measure partial photoionization cross sections of free molecules in external electric fields. The production of the N 2 + (B 2 Σ/sub u/ + ) state was studied and the threshold for this process was found to shift linearly with the square root of the applied field. This behavior is compared with the hydrogenic case and with previously studied systems

  20. Lettuce flavonoids screening and phenotyping by chlorophyll fluorescence excitation ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivcak, Marek; Brückova, Klaudia; Sytar, Oksana; Brestic, Marian; Olsovska, Katarina; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2017-06-01

    Environmentally induced variation and the genotypic differences in flavonoid and phenolic content in lettuce can be reliably detected using the appropriate parameters derived from the records of rapid non-invasive fluorescence technique. The chlorophyll fluorescence excitation ratio method was designed as a rapid and non-invasive tool to estimate the content of UV-absorbing phenolic compounds in plants. Using this technique, we have assessed the dynamics of accumulation of flavonoids related to developmental changes and environmental effects. Moreover, we have tested appropriateness of the method to identify the genotypic differences and fluctuations in total phenolics and flavonoid content in lettuce. Six green and two red genotypes of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown in pots were exposed to two different environments for 50 days: direct sunlight (UV-exposed) and greenhouse conditions (low UV). The indices based on the measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence after red, green and UV excitation indicated increase of the content of UV-absorbing compounds and anthocyanins in the epidermis of lettuce leaves. In similar, the biochemical analyses performed at the end of the experiment confirmed significantly higher total phenolic and flavonoid content in lettuce plants exposed to direct sun compared to greenhouse conditions and in red compared to green genotypes. As the correlation between the standard fluorescence indices and the biochemical records was negatively influenced by the presence of red genotypes, we proposed the use of a new parameter named Modified Flavonoid Index (MFI) taking into an account both absorbance changes due to flavonol and anthocyanin content, for which the correlation with flavonoid and phenolic content was relatively good. Thus, our results confirmed that the fluorescence excitation ratio method is useful for identifying the major differences in phenolic and flavonoid content in lettuce plants and it can be used for high-throughput pre

  1. Cutaneous porphyrins exhibit anti-stokes fluorescence that is detectable in sebum (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Giselle; Zeng, Haishan; Zhao, Jianhua; Wu, Zhenguo; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Lui, Harvey; Mclean, David I.

    2016-02-01

    Porphyrins produced by Propionibacterium acnes represent the principal fluorophore associated with acne, and appear as orange-red luminescence under the Wood's lamp. Assessment of acne based on Wood's lamp (UV) or visible light illumination is limited by photon penetration depth and has limited sensitivity for earlier stage lesions. Inducing fluorescence with near infrared (NIR) excitation may provide an alternative way to assess porphyrin-related skin disorders. We discovered that under 785 nm CW laser excitation PpIX powder exhibits fluorescence emission in the shorter wavelength range of 600-715 nm with an intensity that is linearly dependent on the excitation power. We attribute this shorter wavelength emission to anti-Stokes fluorescence. Similar anti-Stokes fluorescence was also detected focally in all skin-derived samples containing porphyrins. Regular (Stokes) fluorescence was present under UV and visible light excitation on ex vivo nasal skin and sebum from uninflamed acne, but not on nose surface smears or sebum from inflamed acne. Co-registered CW laser-excited anti-Stokes fluorescence and fs laser-excited multi-photon fluorescence images of PpIX powder showed similar features. In the skin samples because of the anti-Stokes effect, the NIR-induced fluorescence was presumably specific for porphyrins since there appeared to be no anti-Stokes emission signals from other typical skin fluorophores such as lipids, keratins and collagen. Anti-Stokes fluorescence under NIR CW excitation is more sensitive and specific for porphyrin detection than UV- or visible light-excited regular fluorescence and fs laser-excited multi-photon fluorescence. This approach also has higher image contrast compared to NIR fs laser-based multi-photon fluorescence imaging. The anti-Stokes fluorescence of porphyrins within sebum could potentially be applied to detecting and targeting acne lesions for treatment via fluorescence image guidance.

  2. Laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing was applied to investigate the local fields and interactions of paramagnetic ions in oxide glasses. Studies included the site dependence of energy levels, radiative and nonradiative transition probabilities, homogeneous line broadening, and ion--ion energy transfer of rare earth ions. These results and the experimental techniques are reviewed briefly; the use of paramagnetic ions other than the rare earths is also considered. Recently, laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy was used to investigate modifications in the local structure of lithium borate glass caused by compositional changes and phase separation and the site dependence of nonradiative relaxation of paramagnetic ions by multiphonon processes. These results and their implications are discussed. 6 figures

  3. Polymer filters for ultraviolet-excited integrated fluorescence sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandin, Marc; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Optical filters for blocking ultraviolet (UV) light were fabricated by doping various polymer hosts with a UV absorbing chromophore. The polymers were polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a silicone elastomer frequently used in microfluidics, SU-8, a photopatternable epoxy, and Humiseal 1B66, an acrylic coating used for moisture protection of integrated circuits. The chromophore was 2-(2′-hydroxy-5′-methylphenyl) benzotriazole (BTA), which has a high extinction coefficient between 300 nm and 400 nm. We demonstrate filters 5 µm thick that exhibit high ultraviolet rejection (nearly −40 dB at 342 nm) yet pass visible light (near 0 dB above 400 nm), making them ideal for ultraviolet-excited fluorescence sensing within microsystems. The absorbance of the BTA depended on the host polymer. These filters are promising for integrated fluorescence spectroscopy in bioanalytical platforms because they can be patterned by dry etching, molding or exposure to ultraviolet light. (paper)

  4. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  5. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gredel, R.; Van Dishoeck, E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles. 70 references

  6. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredel, Roland; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Black, John H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles.

  7. Colorectal cancer detection by hyperspectral imaging using fluorescence excitation scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Deal, Joshua; Hill, Shante; Martin, Will A.; Lall, Malvika; Lopez, Carmen; Rider, Paul F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technologies have shown great promise for biomedical applications. These techniques have been especially useful for detection of molecular events and characterization of cell, tissue, and biomaterial composition. Unfortunately, hyperspectral imaging technologies have been slow to translate to clinical devices - likely due to increased cost and complexity of the technology as well as long acquisition times often required to sample a spectral image. We have demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging approaches which scan the fluorescence excitation spectrum can provide increased signal strength and faster imaging, compared to traditional emission-scanning approaches. We have also demonstrated that excitation-scanning approaches may be able to detect spectral differences between colonic adenomas and adenocarcinomas and normal mucosa in flash-frozen tissues. Here, we report feasibility results from using excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging to screen pairs of fresh tumoral and nontumoral colorectal tissues. Tissues were imaged using a novel hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning microscope, sampling a wavelength range of 360-550 nm, at 5 nm increments. Image data were corrected to achieve a NIST-traceable flat spectral response. Image data were then analyzed using a range of supervised and unsupervised classification approaches within ENVI software (Harris Geospatial Solutions). Supervised classification resulted in >99% accuracy for single-patient image data, but only 64% accuracy for multi-patient classification (n=9 to date), with the drop in accuracy due to increased false-positive detection rates. Hence, initial data indicate that this approach may be a viable detection approach, but that larger patient sample sizes need to be evaluated and the effects of inter-patient variability studied.

  8. Effects of multi-photon interferences from internally generated fields in strongly resonant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Lu; Payne, Marvin G.; Garrett, William R.

    2006-01-01

    In studies of various nonlinear optical phenomena, strong resonant features in the atomic or molecular response to multi-photon driven processes have been used to greatly enhance the visibility of otherwise weak higher-order processes. However, there are well defined circumstances where a multi-photon-resonant response of a target system leads to the generation of one or more new electromagnetic fields that can drastically change the overall system response from what would be expected from the imposed laser fields alone. New effects can occur and dominate some aspects of the nonlinear optical response because of the constructive or destructive interference between transition amplitudes along multiple excitation pathways between a given set of optically coupled states, where one of the pathways involve internally generated field(s). Under destructive interference some resonant enhancements can become completely canceled (suppressed). This review focuses on the class of optical interference effects associated with internally generated fields, that have been found to be capable of influencing a very significant number of basic physical phenomena in gas or vapor phase systems. It provides a historical overview of experimental and theoretical developments and a modern understanding of the underlying physics and its various manifestations that include: suppression of multi-photon excitation processes, suppression of stimulated emissions (Raman, hyper-Raman, and optically pumped stimulated emissions), saturation of parametric wave-mixing, pressure and beam-geometry dependent shifting of multi-photon-resonant absorption lines, and the suppression of Autler-Townes splitting and ac-stark shifts. Additionally, optical interference effects in some modern contexts, such as achieving multi-photon induced transparency, establishing single-photon self-interference based induced transparency, and generating entangled single photon states, are reviewed

  9. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.; Elshenawy, M. M.; Takahashi, Masateru; Whitman, B. H.; Walter, N. G.; Hamdan, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation

  10. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven C; Mayo, Michael W; Chang, Richard K

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths (EEM spectra) was measured for different species of bacteria, biochemical constituents of cells, pollens, and vegetation...

  11. A Compact Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation-Emission Spectrometer (FLEXEMS) for Detecting Trace Organics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort, Leiden Measurement Technology (LMT) proposes to design and build the Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation...

  12. A Compact Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation-Emission Spectrometer (FLEXEMS) for Detecting Trace Organics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort, Leiden Measurement Technology (LMT) proposes to design and build the Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation...

  13. Resonance Enhanced Multi-photon Spectroscopy of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligare, Marshall Robert

    For over 50 years DNA has been studied to better understand its connection to life and evolution. These past experiments have led to our understanding of its structure and function in the biological environment but the interaction of DNA with UV radiation at the molecular level is still not very well understood. Unique mechanisms in nucleobase chromaphores protect us from adverse chemical reactions after UV absorption. Studying these processes can help develop theories for prebiotic chemistry and the possibility of alternative forms of DNA. Using resonance enhanced multi-photon spectroscopic techniques in the gas phase allow for the structure and dynamics of individual nucleobases to be studied in detail. Experiments studying different levels of structure/complexity with relation to their biological function are presented. Resonant IR multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular mechanics and DFT calculations are used to determine gas phase structures of anionic nucleotide clusters. A comparison of the identified structures with known biological function shows how the hydrogen bonding of the nucleotides and their clusters free of solvent create favorable structures for quick incorporation into enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy techniques such as resonant two photon ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance are used to further elucidate the structure and excited state dynamics of the bare nucleobases thymine and uracil. Both exhibit long lived excited electronic states that have been implicated in DNA photolesions which can ultimately lead to melanoma and carcinoma. Our experimental data in comparison with many quantum chemical calculations suggest a new picture for the dynamics of thymine and uracil in the gas phase. A high probability of UV absorption from a vibrationally hot ground state to the excited electronic state shows that the stability of thymine and uracil comes from

  14. Time gated fluorescence lifetime imaging and micro-volume spectroscopy using two-photon excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sytsma, J.; Vroom, J.M.; de Grauw, C.J.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    A scanning microscope utilizing two-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence lifetime contrast is presented. The microscope makes use of a tunable femtosecond titanium:sapphire laser enabling the two-photon excitation of a broad range of fluorescent molecules, including UV probes.

  15. Polarization control of intermediate state absorption in resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shuwu; Yao, Yunhua; Jia, Tianqing; Ding, Jingxin; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Huang, Yunxia

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the control of the intermediate state absorption in an (n + m) resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process by the polarization-modulated femtosecond laser pulse. An analytical solution of the intermediate state absorption in a resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process is obtained based on the time-dependent perturbation theory. Our theoretical results show that the control efficiency of the intermediate state absorption by the polarization modulation is independent of the laser intensity when the transition from the intermediate state to the final state is coupled by the single-photon absorption, but will be affected by the laser intensity when this transition is coupled by the non-resonant multi-photon absorption. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed via a two-photon fluorescence control in (2 + 1) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of Coumarin 480 dye and a single-photon fluorescence control in (1 + 2) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of IR 125 dye. (paper)

  16. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  17. Optimization of tube parameters in a tube excited X-ray fluorescence (TEXRF) system using secondary fluorescers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, A.; Biswas, S.K.

    1995-12-01

    A study of the optimization of excitation parameters in a tube excited X-ray fluorescence system (TEXRF) having Mo as the primary target has been carried out for biological matrix. Fe, Zn and Mo were used as the secondary fluorecers. For the present investigation a cellulose based synthetic standard containing K, Cr, Ni, Zn, Se and Y was excited with the TEXRF system. All experiments were carried out under the same experimental conditions except the tube potential. For each fluorescer the minimum detection limits (MDL) of excited elements were calculated for the corresponding tube voltage. The MDLs were found to be increasing with decreasing atomic number and it was also observed that the maximum sensitivity with Fe and Zn secondary fluorescers for elements analyzed occurred around 35 kV of the excitation potential. For Mo secondary fluorescer maximum sensitivity was found at higher excitation potential. In most cases MDLs were minimum at 40-45 kV of the excitation potential. 5 refs., 12 figs

  18. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  19. vuv fluorescence from selective high-order multiphoton excitation of N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffee, Ryan N.; Gibson, George N.

    2004-01-01

    Recent fluorescence studies suggest that ultrashort pulse laser excitation may be highly selective. Selective high-intensity laser excitation holds important consequences for the physics of multiphoton processes. To establish the extent of this selectivity, we performed a detailed comparative study of the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence resulting from the interaction of N 2 and Ar with high-intensity infrared ultrashort laser pulses. Both N 2 and Ar reveal two classes of transitions, inner-valence ns ' l ' . From their pressure dependence, we associate each transition with either plasma or direct laser excitation. Furthermore, we qualitatively confirm such associations with the time dependence of the fluorescence signal. Remarkably, only N 2 presents evidence of direct laser excitation. This direct excitation produces ionic nitrogen fragments with inner-valence (2s) holes, two unidentified transitions, and one molecular transition, the N 2 + :X 2 Σ g + 2 Σ u + . We discuss these results in the light of a recently proposed model for multiphoton excitation

  20. Study on excitation and fluorescence spectrums of Japanese citruses to construct machine vision systems for acquiring fluorescent images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Md. Abdul; Kondo, Naoshi; Kuramoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Yuichi; Shigi, Tomoo

    2011-06-01

    Research was conducted to acquire knowledge of the ultraviolet and visible spectrums from 300 -800 nm of some common varieties of Japanese citrus, to investigate the best wave-lengths for fluorescence excitation and the resulting fluorescence wave-lengths and to provide a scientific background for the best quality fluorescent imaging technique for detecting surface defects of citrus. A Hitachi U-4000 PC-based microprocessor controlled spectrophotometer was used to measure the absorption spectrum and a Hitachi F-4500 spectrophotometer was used for the fluorescence and excitation spectrums. We analyzed the spectrums and the selected varieties of citrus were categorized into four groups of known fluorescence level, namely strong, medium, weak and no fluorescence.The level of fluorescence of each variety was also examined by using machine vision system. We found that around 340-380 nm LEDs or UV lamps are appropriate as lighting devices for acquiring the best quality fluorescent image of the citrus varieties to examine their fluorescence intensity. Therefore an image acquisition device was constructed with three different lighting panels with UV LED at peak 365 nm, Blacklight blue lamps (BLB) peak at 350 nm and UV-B lamps at peak 306 nm. The results from fluorescent images also revealed that the findings of the measured spectrums worked properly and can be used for practical applications such as for detecting rotten, injured or damaged parts of a wide variety of citrus.

  1. Optical chromatography using a photonic crystal fiber with on-chip fluorescence excitation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ashok, AC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the realization of integrated optical chromatography, in conjunction with on-chip fluorescence excitation, in a monolithically fabricated poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip. The unique endlessly-single-mode guiding...

  2. Fluorescence image excited by a scanning UV-LED light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    An optical scanning system using UV-LED light to induced fluorescence technology can enhance a fluorescence image significantly in a short period. It has several advantages such as lower power consumption, no scattering effect in skins, and multilayer images can be obtained to analyze skin disease. From the experiment results, the light intensity increases with increase spot size and decrease scanning speed, but the image resolution is oppositely. Moreover, the system could be widely used in clinical diagnosis and photodynamic therapy for skin disease because even the irradiated time of fluorescence substance is short but it will provide accurately positioning of fluorescence object.

  3. Induction of the 'in vivo' chlorophyll fluorescence excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhidov, Eh.A.; Zakhidov, M.A.; Kasymdzhanov, M.A.; Khabibullaev, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    Inductional changes of fluorescence of the native chlorophyll molecules in plant leaves excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation are studied. The opportunity of controlling of the photosynthesis efficiency through fluorescence response at different rates of the electron flow in charge transfer chain of the photosynthetic apparatus of plant is shown. (author). 13 refs.; 4 refs

  4. Combined Raman and continuous-wave-excited two-photon fluorescence cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uzunbajakava, N.; Otto, Cornelis

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a confocal optical microscope that combines cw two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy with confocal Raman microscopy. With this microscope fast image acquisition with fluorescence imaging can be used to select areas of interest for subsequent chemical analysis with spontaneous

  5. Laser excited fluorescence spectrum of Ho3+:SrF2 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Bansi; Ramachandra Rao, D.

    1980-01-01

    The fluorescence spectrum of Ho 3+ : SrF 2 single crystal excited by the various lines of an Ar + laser, is reported. The three fluorescence groups recorded in the region 5300-7700 A, correspond to the transitions from ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 8 , 5 F 5 to 5 I 8 , 5 F 3 to 5 I 7 and ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 7 . Marked changes in the total integrated intensity of the various fluorescence groups with the change in the exciting wavelength are observed. (author)

  6. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  7. Plant Cell Imaging Based on Nanodiamonds with Excitation-Dependent Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Jiao, Zhen; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Despite extensive work on fluorescence behavior stemming from color centers of diamond, reports on the excitation-dependent fluorescence of nanodiamonds (NDs) with a large-scale redshift from 400 to 620 nm under different excitation wavelengths are so far much fewer, especially in biological applications. The fluorescence can be attributed to the combined effects of the fraction of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms among the surface of the fine diamond nanoparticles and the defect energy trapping states on the surface of the diamond. The excitation-dependent fluorescent NDs have been applied in plant cell imaging for the first time. The results reported in this paper may provide a promising route to multiple-color bioimaging using NDs.

  8. Plant Cell Imaging Based on Nanodiamonds with Excitation-Dependent Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Jiao, Zhen; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Despite extensive work on fluorescence behavior stemming from color centers of diamond, reports on the excitation-dependent fluorescence of nanodiamonds (NDs) with a large-scale redshift from 400 to 620 nm under different excitation wavelengths are so far much fewer, especially in biological applications. The fluorescence can be attributed to the combined effects of the fraction of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms among the surface of the fine diamond nanoparticles and the defect energy trapping states on the surface of the diamond. The excitation-dependent fluorescent NDs have been applied in plant cell imaging for the first time. The results reported in this paper may provide a promising route to multiple-color bioimaging using NDs.

  9. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy application for ex vivo investigation of ocular fundus samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2011-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of ocular tissue has recently become a promising tool in ophthalmology for diagnostic and research purposes. The feasibility and the advantages of TPEF imaging, namely deeper tissue penetration and improved high-resolution imaging of microstructures, have been demonstrated lately using human ocular samples. The autofluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ocular fundus tissue are well known from spectrophotometric analysis. But fluorophores, especially when it comes to fluorescence lifetime, typically display a dependence of their fluorescence properties on local environmental parameters. Hence, a more detailed investigation of ocular fundus autofluorescence ideally in vivo is of utmost interest. The aim of this study is to determine space-resolved the stationary and time-resolved fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ex vivo porcine ocular fundus samples by means of two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum and lifetime imaging microscopy (FSIM/FLIM). By our first results, we characterized the autofluorescence of individual anatomical structures of porcine retina samples excited at 760 nm. The fluorescence properties of almost all investigated retinal layers are relatively homogenous. But as previously unknown, ganglion cell bodies show a significantly shorter fluorescence lifetime compared to the adjacent mueller cells. Since all retinal layers exhibit bi-exponential autofluorescence decays, we were able to achieve a more precise characterization of fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores compared to a present in vivo FLIM approach by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO).

  10. Cine: Line excitation by infrared fluorescence in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-03-01

    CINE is a Python module for calculating infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. Excitation by solar radiation of vibrational bands followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state is one of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets. This code calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Line transitions are queried from the latest version of the HITRAN spectroscopic repository using the astroquery affiliated package of astropy. Molecular data are obtained from the LAMDA database. These coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  11. Spectrum of acetylene fluorescence excited by single XUV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The spectrum of visible emission from photofragments of acetylene excited by single 16.85 eV photons has been recorded for the first time. The spectrum is dominated by the Swan and Deslandres-d'Azambuja bands of C 2 and the 431.5 nm band of CH. The yields of these emissions are of the order 10 -3 photons per absorbed incident photon. The experimental conditions suggest that the emission results from primary C* 2 and CH* photofragments

  12. Diagnostics of MCF plasmas using Lyman-α fluorescence excited by one or two photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1998-11-01

    Laser-induced Lyman-α fluorescence of the hydrogen isotopes is investigated with regard to diagnostic applications in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. A formal analysis is presented for two excitation schemes: one-photon and Doppler-free two-photon excitation. The analysis includes estimates of the expected experimental errors arising from the photon noise and from the sensitivity of the observed fluorescence signals to variations of the plasma and laser parameters. Both excitation schemes are suitable primarily for application in the plasma edge, but even in the plasma bulk of large machines they can still be applied in combination with a diagnostic neutral beam. The two-photon excitation scheme is particularly attractive because it involves absorption spectra that are resolved within the Doppler width. This implies a large diagnostic potential and in particular offers a way to measure the deuterium-tritium fuel mix in fusion reactors. (author)

  13. Multi-photon microscope driven by novel green laser pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marti, Dominik; Djurhuus, Martin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2016-01-01

    Multi-photon microscopy is extensively used in research due to its superior possibilities when compared to other microscopy modalities. The technique also has the possibility to advance diagnostics in clinical applications, due to its capabilities complementing existing technology in a multimodal...

  14. Fluorescence enhancing under UV-NIR simultaneous-excitation in ZnS:Cu,Mn phosphors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Xie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescence properties of a long-lasting phosphor, ZnS:Cu,Mn was studied for the first time under simultaneously excitation of both UV and NIR light. Up to 20% fluorescence enhancement of the phosphor was observed. In the present simultaneously-excitation process, broad-band NIR light was absorbed and converted to visible photons via a single-photon upconversion path. We propose that a novel kind of spectral-conversion material with the unique ability to simultaneously convert both UV and NIR photons can be developed and is promising in the application of enhancing the EQE of solar cells.

  15. Differentiation of ocular fundus fluorophores by fluorescence lifetime imaging using multiple excitation and emission wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Schweitzer, D.; Schenke, S.; Becker, W.; Bergmann, A.

    2006-10-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently. It is in use for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age - related macular degeneration (AMD). But other fluorophores may be of interest too: The redox pair FAD - FADH II provides information on the retinal energy metabolism, advanced glycation end products (AGE) indicate protein glycation associated with pathologic processes in diabetes as well as AMD, and alterations in the fluorescence of collagen and elastin in connective tissue give us the opportunity to observe fibrosis by fluorescence imaging. This, however, needs techniques able to differentiate particular fluorophores despite limited permissible ocular exposure as well as excitation wavelength (limited by the transmission of the human ocular lens to >400 nm). We present an ophthalmic laser scanning system (SLO), equipped with picosecond laser diodes (FWHM 100 ps, 446 nm or 468 nm respectively) and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) in two emission bands (500 - 560 nm and 560 - 700 nm). The decays were fitted by a bi-exponential model. Fluorescence spectra were measured by a fluorescence spectrometer fluorolog. Upon excitation at 446 nm, the fluorescence of AGE, FAD, and lipofuscin were found to peak at 503 nm, 525 nm, and 600 nm respectively. Accordingly, the statistical distribution of the fluorescence decay times was found to depend on the different excitation wavelengths and emission bands used. The use of multiple excitation and emission wavelengths in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging allows us to discriminate between intrinsic fluorophores of the ocular fundus. Taken together with our knowledge on the anatomical structure of the fundus, these findings suggest an association of the short, middle and long fluorescence decay time to the retinal pigment epithelium, the retina, and connective tissue respectively.

  16. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  17. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  18. Bulky Counterions: Enhancing the Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence of Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorelle, Franck; Moulin, Christophe; Soleilhac, Antonin; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Dugourd, Philippe; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Brevet, Pierre-François; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-01-19

    Increasing fluorescence quantum yields of ligand-protected gold nanoclusters has attracted wide research interest. The strategy consisting in using bulky counterions has been found to dramatically enhance the fluorescence. In this Communication, we push forward this concept to the nonlinear optical regime. We show that by an appropriate choice of bulky counterions and of solvent, a 30-fold increase in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal at ≈600 nm for gold nanoclusters can be obtained. This would correspond to a TPEF cross-section in the range of 0.1 to 1 GM. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Dual fluorescence excitation spectra of methyl salicylate in a free jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbrook, Lou Ann; Kenny, Jonathan E.; Kohler, Bryan E.; Scott, Gary W.

    1981-11-01

    Separate fluorescence excitation spectra of the blue- and UV-emitting forms of methyl salicylate cooled in a free-jet expansion are reported. This study represents the first observation of the detailed vibrational structure of these transitions. The two excitation spectra have no features in common, and their intensity patterns are very different. Many individual lines are ˜2 cm-1 wide (nearly laser limited), although in the excitation spectrum of the UV emission, spectral congestion persists at high energies despite the high degree of cooling. (AIP)

  20. Oral cancer detection based on fluorescence polarization of blood plasma at excitation wavelength 405 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Manoharan, Yuvaraj; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    During metabolism the metabolites such as hormones, proteins and enzymes were released in to the blood stream by the cells. These metabolites reflect any change that occurs due to any disturbances in normal metabolic function of the human system. This was well observed with the altered spectral signatures observed with fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Previously many have reported on the significance of native fluorescence spectroscopic method in the diagnosis of cancer. As fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive and simple, it has complementary techniques such as excitation-emission matrix, synchronous and polarization. The fluorescence polarization measurement provides details about any association or binding reactions and denaturing effects that occurs due to change in the micro environment of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt in the diagnosis of oral cancer at 405 nm excitation using fluorescence polarization measurement. The fluorescence anisotropic values calculated from polarized fluorescence spectral data of normal and oral cancer subjects yielded a good accuracy when analyzed with linear discriminant analysis based artificial neural network. The results will be discussed in detail.

  1. Analysis of River sediments from the Tigre river (Venezuela) by radioisotope excited x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Rosales, P.A.; Schorin, H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes qualitative elemental scans by both energy dispersive (radioisotope excited) and conventional wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence of different grain size fractions of river sediments. An internal standard thin-film technique was used. The precision of Rb, Sr, Y and Zr determination for SY-3 standard reference rock and one real sample for five independently prepared samples is demonstrated

  2. Determination of uranium in geologic materials by laser-excited fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A laser-excited fluorescence method is described for the determination of trace amounts of uranium in rocks and soils. The limit of detection is less than 1 ppm, and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2.6 to 12.5%. The method was evaluated by using known geological reference samples

  3. Fluorescence, Absorption, and Excitation Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Figueroa, A. M.; Ramazan, K. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of the interplay between absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is conducted. The study of five PAH displays the correlation of the above-mentioned properties along with the associated molecular changes.

  4. Determination of heavy metals in polar snow and ice by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, M.A.; Boutron, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    The new laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry technique offers unrivalled sensitivity for the determination of trace metals in a wide variety of samples. This has allowed the direct determination of Pb, Cd and Bi in Antarctic and Greenland snow and ice down to the sub pg/g level. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  5. Excitation of fluorescent nanoparticles by channel plasmon polaritons propagating in V-grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Irene Fernandez; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been proven that light can be squeezed into metallic channels with subwavelength lateral dimensions. Here, we present the study of the propagation of channel plasmon polaritons confined in gold V-grooves, filled with fluorescent particles. In this way, channel plasmon polaritons......-diameter beads, we show the possibility of individual excitation, what may have applications to develop very sensitive biosensors....

  6. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, A.

    1964-01-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, β and α emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K α lines of 3. period elements excited by 55 Fe, 3 H/Zr and 210 Po sources; for the 2. period the K α spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the α particles of 210 Po. (author) [fr

  7. Ultratrace determination of lead in whole blood using electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, E P; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1996-09-15

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence has been used to detect lead that was electrothermally atomized from whole blood in a graphite furnace. A 9 kHz repetition rate copper vapor laser pumped dye laser was used to excite the lead at 283.3 nm, and the resulting atomic fluorescence was detected at 405.8 nm. No matrix modification was used other than a 1:21 dilution of the whole blood with high-purity water. Using the atomic fluorescence peak area as the analytical measure and a background correction technique based upon a simultaneous measurement of the transmitted laser intensity, excellent agreement for NIST and CDC certified whole blood reference samples was obtained with aqueous standards. A limit of detection in blood of 10 fg/mL (100 ag absolute) was achieved.

  8. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  9. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2013-01-01

    ' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2......-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) and diffusion coefficients of distinct fluorescence probes (raster imaging correlation spectroscopy) can be obtained from different regions of the tissue. Comparative studies of different tissue strata, but also between equivalent regions of normal and abnormal......This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes...

  10. Test and Control System for Chlorophyll Fluorescence Parameters Using LED as Excitation Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Qiuying

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme on test and control system for chlorophyll fluorescence is presented in this work, which uses light-emitting diode (LED excitation by means of measuring the fluorescence parameter fpsII. The system takes programmable power supply as LEDs illumination drive power with high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. MINIPAM is used to measure fluorescence parameter fpsII and keeps communication with upper PC by serial port. The upper PC can control the power supply and process the data received from MINIPAM by software which is programmed in VB6. The results show that the system has a lot of advantages such as high accuracy and convenience. The effect of environmental factors on fluorescence parameters is analyzed comprehensively. It will be a practical measurement and control system for photosynthetic ability and have wide application foreground.

  11. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał; Kijak, Michał; Piwonski, Hubert Marek; Herbich, Jerzy; Waluk, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  12. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał

    2017-02-03

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  13. Effects of fluorescence excitation geometry on the accuracy of DNA fragment sizing by flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Larson, Erica J. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Goodwin, Peter M. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Ambrose, W. Patrick [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Keller, Richard A. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)

    2000-06-01

    We report on various excitation geometries used in ultrasensitive flow cytometry that yield a linear relation between the fluorescence intensity measured from individual strained DNA fragments and the lengths of the fragments (in base pairs). This linearity holds for DNA samples that exhibit a wide range of conformations. The variety of DNA conformations leads to a distribution of dipole moment orientations for the dye molecules intercalated into the DNA. It is consequently important to use an excitation geometry such that all dye molecules are detected with similar efficiency. To estimate the conformation and the extent of elongation of the strained fragments in the flow, fluorescence polarization anisotropy and autocorrelation measurements were performed. Significant extension was observed for DNA fragments under the flow conditions frequently used for DNA fragment sizing. Classical calculations of the fluorescence emission collected over a finite solid angle are in agreement with the experimental measurements and have confirmed the relative insensitivity to DNA conformation of an orthogonal excitation geometry. Furthermore, the calculations suggested a modified excitation geometry that has increased our sizing resolution. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  14. Effects of fluorescence excitation geometry on the accuracy of DNA fragment sizing by flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, James H.; Larson, Erica J.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Keller, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    We report on various excitation geometries used in ultrasensitive flow cytometry that yield a linear relation between the fluorescence intensity measured from individual strained DNA fragments and the lengths of the fragments (in base pairs). This linearity holds for DNA samples that exhibit a wide range of conformations. The variety of DNA conformations leads to a distribution of dipole moment orientations for the dye molecules intercalated into the DNA. It is consequently important to use an excitation geometry such that all dye molecules are detected with similar efficiency. To estimate the conformation and the extent of elongation of the strained fragments in the flow, fluorescence polarization anisotropy and autocorrelation measurements were performed. Significant extension was observed for DNA fragments under the flow conditions frequently used for DNA fragment sizing. Classical calculations of the fluorescence emission collected over a finite solid angle are in agreement with the experimental measurements and have confirmed the relative insensitivity to DNA conformation of an orthogonal excitation geometry. Furthermore, the calculations suggested a modified excitation geometry that has increased our sizing resolution. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America

  15. Excited-state absorption and fluorescence dynamics of Er3+:KY3F10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, C.; Doualan, J. L.; Moncorgé, R.; Braud, A.; Camy, P.

    2018-05-01

    We report here on a complete investigation of the excited-state absorption and fluorescence dynamics of Er3+ doped KY3F10 single crystals versus dopant concentrations and optical excitation conditions. Radiative and effective (including non-radiative relaxations) emission lifetimes and branching ratios are determined from a Judd-Ofelt analysis of the absorption spectra and via specific fluorescence experiments using wavelength selective laser excitations. Excited-state absorption and emission spectra are registered within seven spectral domains, i.e. 560 nm, 650 nm, 710 nm, 810 nm, 970 nm, 1550 nm and 2750 nm. A maximum gain cross-section of 0.93 × 10-21 cm2 is determined at the potential laser wavelength of 2.801 μm for a population ratio of 0.48. Saturation of fluorescence intensities and variations of population ratios versus pumping rates are registered and confronted with a rate equation model to derive the rates of the most important up-conversion and cross-relaxation energy transfers occurring at high dopant concentrations.

  16. Role of excited state solvent fluctuations on time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tanping, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu; Kumar, Revati, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We explore the connection between the solvation dynamics of a chromophore upon photon excitation and equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent. Using molecular dynamics simulations, fluorescence Stokes shift for the tryptophan in Staphylococcus nuclease was examined using both nonequilibrium calculations and linear response theory. When the perturbed and unperturbed surfaces exhibit different solvent equilibrium fluctuations, the linear response approach on the former surface shows agreement with the nonequilibrium process. This agreement is excellent when the perturbed surface exhibits Gaussian statistics and qualitative in the case of an isomerization induced non-Gaussian statistics. However, the linear response theory on the unperturbed surface breaks down even in the presence of Gaussian fluctuations. Experiments also provide evidence of the connection between the excited state solvent fluctuations and the total fluorescence shift. These observations indicate that the equilibrium statistics on the excited state surface characterize the relaxation dynamics of the fluorescence Stokes shift. Our studies specifically analyze the Gaussian fluctuations of the solvent in the complex protein environment and further confirm the role of solvent fluctuations on the excited state surface. The results are consistent with previous investigations, found in the literature, of solutes dissolved in liquids.

  17. Multiphoton-Excited Fluorescence of Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higbie, J. M.; Perreault, J. D.; Acosta, V. M.; Belthangady, C.; Lebel, P.; Kim, M. H.; Nguyen, K.; Demas, V.; Bajaj, V.; Santori, C.

    2017-05-01

    Silicon-vacancy color centers in nanodiamonds are promising as fluorescent labels for biological applications, with a narrow, nonbleaching emission line at 738 nm. Two-photon excitation of this fluorescence offers the possibility of low-background detection at significant tissue depth with high three-dimensional spatial resolution. We measure the two-photon fluorescence cross section of a negatively charged silicon vacancy (Si -V- ) in ion-implanted bulk diamond to be 0.74 (19 )×10-50 cm4 s /photon at an excitation wavelength of 1040 nm. Compared to the diamond nitrogen-vacancy center, the expected detection threshold of a two-photon excited Si -V center is more than an order of magnitude lower, largely due to its much narrower linewidth. We also present measurements of two- and three-photon excitation spectra, finding an increase in the two-photon cross section with decreasing wavelength, and we discuss the physical interpretation of the spectra in the context of existing models of the Si -V energy-level structure.

  18. Comparison of conventional and total reflection excitation geometry for fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy on droplet samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkenberg, G.; Pepponi, G.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments in fluorescence mode have been performed in total reflection excitation geometry and conventional 45 deg. /45 deg. excitation/detection geometry for comparison. The experimental results have shown that XAFS measurements are feasible under normal total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) conditions, i.e. on droplet samples, with excitation in grazing incidence and using a TXRF experimental chamber. The application of the total reflection excitation geometry for XAFS measurements increases the sensitivity compared to the conventional geometry leading to lower accessible concentration ranges. However, XAFS under total reflection excitation condition fails for highly concentrated samples because of the self-absorption effect

  19. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomin, Vladimir I.; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  20. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  1. Fluorescence fluctuation of Rhodamine 6G dye for high repetition rate laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Patel, Hemant K.; Dixit, S.K.; Vora, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fluorescence from Rhodamine 6G dye for stationary and flowing liquid medium, excited by copper vapor laser, operating at 6 kHz pulse repetition frequency, was investigated. Large fluctuations in spectral width (about 5 nm) and spectral intensity in the fluorescence from stationary dye solution were observed, while fluctuations in the spectral width diminish in a flowing dye medium. However, this increases spectral intensity and slightly red shifts the fluorescence peak emission wavelength. Theoretical analysis was carried out to explain the observed results by incorporating the temperature induced refractive index, beam deflection and spectral variation in stationary dye solution. Numerical analysis of thermal load and contour of temperature in the optical pumped region inside the dye cell in stationary, 0.2 and 1.5 m/s flow velocity was also investigated to support our analysis. - Highlights: ► High repetition rate excitation generates inhomogeneity in the gain medium. ► Fluorescence of Rhodamine 6G in stationary and flowing medium was carried out. ► Fluorescence fluctuations lessen in flowing medium in contrast to stationary medium. ► Our theoretical and numerical analysis enlightens the experimented outcome trend.

  2. Multimodal optical coherence tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging with interleaved excitation sources for simultaneous endogenous and exogenous fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sebina; Serafino, Michael J; Rico-Jimenez, Jesus; Park, Jesung; Chen, Xi; Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Walton, Brian L; Jo, Javier A; Applegate, Brian E

    2016-09-01

    Multimodal imaging probes a variety of tissue properties in a single image acquisition by merging complimentary imaging technologies. Exploiting synergies amongst the data, algorithms can be developed that lead to better tissue characterization than could be accomplished by the constituent imaging modalities taken alone. The combination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) provides access to detailed tissue morphology and local biochemistry. The optical system described here merges 1310 nm swept-source OCT with time-domain FLIM having excitation at 355 and 532 nm. The pulses from 355 and 532 nm lasers have been interleaved to enable simultaneous acquisition of endogenous and exogenous fluorescence signals, respectively. The multimodal imaging system was validated using tissue phantoms. Nonspecific tagging with Alexa Flour 532 in a Watanbe rabbit aorta and active tagging of the LOX-1 receptor in human coronary artery, demonstrate the capacity of the system for simultaneous acquisition of OCT, endogenous FLIM, and exogenous FLIM in tissues.

  3. Comparison of sensitivities and detection limits between direct excitation and secondary excitation modes in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artz, B.E.; Short, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison was made between the direct tube excitation mode and the secondary target excitation mode using a Kevex 0810 energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence system. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined with two system configurations. The first configuration used a standard, high power, x-ray fluorescence tube to directly excite the specimen. Several x-ray tubes, including chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten, both filtered and not filtered, were employed. The second configuration consisted of using the x-ray tube to excite a secondary target which in turn excited the specimen. Appropriate targets were compared to the direct excitation results. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined for K-series lines for elements from magnesium to barium contained in a low atomic number matrix and in a high atomic number matrix

  4. Spatial distribution of fluorescent light emitted from neon and nitrogen excited by low energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.

    2006-01-01

    Side-view intensity profiles of fluorescent light were measured for neon and nitrogen excited with 12 keV electron beams at gas pressures from 250 to 1400 hPa. The intensity profiles were compared with theoretical profiles calculated using the CASINO program which performs Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering. It was assumed that the spatial distribution of fluorescent intensity is directly proportional to the spatial distribution of energy loss by primary electrons. The comparison shows good correlation of experimental data and the results of numeric simulations

  5. Theoretical study on X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis: Contribution of the self-excitation phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAKOTONDRAJAONA, H.N.J.L.

    1999-01-01

    This work consist in setting up, firstly, fluorescence intensities due to the contribution of secondary and tertiary excitation phenomena which settle among the elements of the same sample during the analysis through X fluorescence, inspired by Sherman calculations. Secondly, we have experimentally checked these expression from the analysis of twelve samples; containing all the following elements: Iron, Copper and Zinc. The difference between the theoretical results and the experimental results has been valued from the formula of the test of χ 2 . We consider that this difference is noticeable compared to other errors due to analysis method. [fr

  6. Fluorescence excited in a thunderstorm atmosphere by relativistic runaway electron avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.

    2017-05-01

    The spectrum and spatiotemporal evolution of the fluorescence of an atmospheric discharge developing in the regime of relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) generation have been calculated without involving the relativistic feedback. The discharges generating narrow bipolar pulses, along with the discharges responsible for terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, are shown to be relatively dark. Nevertheless, the fluorescence excited by a discharge involving RREAs can be recorded with cameras used to record high-altitude optical phenomena. A possible connection between a certain class of optical phenomena observed at the tops of thunderclouds and RREA emission is pointed out.

  7. Studies of the fluorescent excited state of impurities in ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romestain, Robert

    1972-01-01

    The author of this research thesis first presents experimental methods used in this research: principles (recall on the optical spectrum of an impurity in a solid, use of fluorescence polarization) and techniques (sample preparation, liquid helium cryostat, application of a disturbance, optical detection). Then, he reports the study of the Mn ++ ion in a tetrahedron crystalline field, the study of the Jahn Teller effect on the excited state of the F + centre in CaO, and the study by double resonance of a specific excited state of this same centre in CaO

  8. Plastic lab-on-a-chip for fluorescence excitation with integrated organic semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Klinkhammer, Sönke; Lemmer, Uli; Mappes, Timo

    2011-04-25

    Laser light excitation of fluorescent markers offers highly sensitive and specific analysis for bio-medical or chemical analysis. To profit from these advantages for applications in the field or at the point-of-care, a plastic lab-on-a-chip with integrated organic semiconductor lasers is presented here. First order distributed feedback lasers based on the organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) doped with the laser dye 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyril)-4H-pyrane (DCM), deep ultraviolet induced waveguides, and a nanostructured microfluidic channel are integrated into a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. A simple and parallel fabrication process is used comprising thermal imprint, DUV exposure, evaporation of the laser material, and sealing by thermal bonding. The excitation of two fluorescent marker model systems including labeled antibodies with light emitted by integrated lasers is demonstrated.

  9. Increased fluorescence of PbS quantum dots in photonic crystals by excitation enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Carlo; Roder, Sebastian; Brodoceanu, Daniel; Kraus, Tobias; Hammerschmidt, Martin; Burger, Sven; Becker, Christiane

    2017-07-01

    We report on the enhanced fluorescence of lead sulfide quantum dots interacting with leaky modes of slab-type silicon photonic crystals. The photonic crystal slabs were fabricated, supporting leaky modes in the near infrared wavelength range. Lead sulfite quantum dots which are resonant in the same spectral range were prepared in a thin layer above the slab. We selectively excited the leaky modes by tuning the wavelength and angle of incidence of the laser source and measured distinct resonances of enhanced fluorescence. By an appropriate experiment design, we ruled out directional light extraction effects and determined the impact of enhanced excitation. Three-dimensional numerical simulations consistently explain the experimental findings by strong near-field enhancements in the vicinity of the photonic crystal surface. Our study provides a basis for systematic tailoring of photonic crystals used in biological applications such as biosensing and single molecule detection, as well as quantum dot solar cells and spectral conversion applications.

  10. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-05-05

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community.

  11. Analysis of Spectral Features of Seawaterbiooptical Components Fluorescence from the Excitation-emission Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyuk, P. A.; Nagorny, I. G.

    The paper presents the method for processing of excitation-emission matrix of sea water and the allocation of the spectral characteristics of different types of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and phytoplankton cells in seawater. The method consists of identification of regularly observed fluorescence peaks of CDOM in marine waters of different type and definition of the spectral ranges, where the predominant influence of these peaks are observed.

  12. Influence of different environments on the excited-state proton transfer and dual fluorescence of fisetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, Jayanti; Dennison, S. Moses; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    1999-05-01

    The influence of different protic and aprotic solvent environments on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) leading to a dual fluorescence behaviour of a biologically important, naturally occurring, polyhydroxyflavone, fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), has been investigated. The normal fluorescence band, in particular, is extremely sensitive to solvent polarity with νmax shifting from 24 510 cm -1 in dioxane ( ET(30)=36.0) to 20 790 cm -1 in methanol ( ET(30)=55.5). This is rationalized in terms of solvent dipolar relaxation process, which also accounts for the red edge excitation shifts (REES) observed in viscous environments such as glycerol at low temperatures. Significant solvent dependence of the tautomer fluorescence properties ( νmax, yield and decay kinetics) reveals the influence of external hydrogen bonding perturbation on the internal hydrogen bond of the molecule. These excited-state relaxation phenomena and their relevant parameters have been used to probe the microenvironment of fisetin in a membrane mimetic system, namely AOT reverse micelles in n-heptane at different water/surfactant molar ratio ( w0).

  13. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  14. Fluorescence detection of glutathione and oxidized glutathione in blood with a NIR-excitable cyanine probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-hui; Qi, Feng-pei; Wen, Fu-bin; Long, Li-ping; Liu, Ai-juan; Yang, Rong-hua

    2018-04-01

    Cyanine has been widely utilized as a near infrared (NIR) fluorophore for detection of glutathione (GSH). However, the excitation of most of the reported cyanine-based probes was less than 800 nm, which inevitably induce biological background absorption and lower the sensitivity, limiting their use for detection of GSH in blood samples. To address this issue, here, a heptamethine cyanine probe (DNIR), with a NIR excitation wavelength at 804 nm and a NIR emission wavelength at 832 nm, is employed for the detection of GSH and its oxidized form (GSSG) in blood. The probe displays excellent selectivity for GSH over GSSG and other amino acids, and rapid response to GSH, in particular a good property for indirect detection of GSSG in the presence of enzyme glutathione reductase and the reducing agent nicotinamideadenine dinucleotide phosphate, without further separation prior to fluorescent measurement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to explore NIR fluorescent approach for the simultaneous assay of GSH and GSSG in blood. As such, we expect that our fluorescence sensors with both NIR excitation and NIR emission make this strategy suitable for the application in complex physiological systems.

  15. Simulation of Far-Field Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging with Two-Color One-Photon Excitation of Reversible Photoactivatable Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chen; Qiao Ling-Ling; Mao Zheng-Le

    2011-01-01

    We propose to achieve far-field super-resolution imaging by using offset two-color one-photon (2C1P) excitation of reversible photoactivatable fluorescence proteins. Due to the distinctive photoswitching performance of the proteins, such as dronpa, the fluorescence emission will only come from the overlapped region of activation beam and excitation beam. The analysis solution of rate equation shows that the resolution of offset 2C1P microscope is 'engineered' by laser power of excitation and activation beams and the power ratio between them. Superior lateral and transverse resolution is theoretically demonstrated compared with conventional fluorescence scanning microscopy. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  16. Excited state fluorescence quenching of the U O2++ ion by monovalent anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarine, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The reactions of the Uranyl ion U O 2 ++ in the excited state with the monovalent inorganic ions N O 3 - and I O 3 - in aqueous solutions at normal temperature were studied, using three techniques: Fluorescence in the steady state - Flash photolysis - Fluorescence decay after excitation. With increasing concentration of these ions it was observed a decrease in the normalized intensity and a decrease in the decay time of the fluorescence of the Uranyl ion in the solution and a corresponding appearance of the radicals N O 3 . or I O 3 . . In each case the radical was identified by its optical absorption spectrum. These results suggest that the quenching of fluorescence of the Uranyl ion in each case is owing to an electron transfer reaction. In the case of the Nitrate ion the transfer may occur after the formation of an ionic par (U O 2 + ...N O 3 ) in the ground state. Evidence for static quenching in the system Uranyl iodate was not forthcoming. A mechanism for the determination of the velocity constant (probability per ion pair per unit time) is proposed for each of the systems. (author)

  17. Excited state hydrogen bonding fluorescent probe: Role of structure and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Debarati, E-mail: debaratidey07@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Vidyasagar College, 39 Sankar Ghosh Lane, Kolkata 700006 (India); Sarangi, Manas Kumar [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ray, Angana; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay [Computational Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Maity, Dilip Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science and Technology, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2016-05-15

    An environment sensitive fluorescent probe, 11-benzoyl-dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (BDBPZ), has been synthesized and characterized that acts via excited state hydrogen bonding (ESHB). On interaction with hydrogen bond donating solvents the fluorescence intensity of BDBPZ increases abruptly with a concomitant bathochromic shift. The extent of fluorescence increment and the red-shift of λ{sub max} depend on hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent associated. ESHB restricts the free rotation of the benzoyl group and hence blocks the non-radiative deactivation pathway. BDBPZ forms an exciplex with organic amine in nonpolar medium that readily disappears on increasing the polarity of the solvent. In polar environment the fluorescence of both the free molecule and excited state hydrogen bonded species are quenched on addition of amine unlike its parent dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (DBPZ), that remains very much inaccessible towards the solvent as well as quencher molecules due to its structure. This newly synthesized derivative BDBPZ is much more interactive due to the benzoyl group that is flanked outside the skeletal aromatic rings of DBPZ, which helps to sense the environment properly and thus shows better ESHB capacity than DBPZ.

  18. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar; Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Pasquardini, Laura; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Daldosso, Nicola; Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Quercioli, Franco; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  19. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar [Nanobiotechnology for Diagnostics Group (Nb4Dg), IQAC-CSIC, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo [ICFO-Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Castelldefels, 08860 Barcelona (Spain); Pasquardini, Laura [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Lunelli, Lorenzo [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); IBF-CNR, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Pederzolli, Cecilia [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Daldosso, Nicola [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Farnesi, Daniele [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Berneschi, Simone [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Righini, Giancarlo C. [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-INO National Institute of Optics, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Soria, Silvia, E-mail: s.soria@ifac.cnr.it [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  20. Сomparative Analysis of 0.266 and 0.355 µm Fluorescence Excitation Wavelengths for Laser Fluores-Cence Monitoring of Oil Pollution Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Belov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The on-line detection of pipeline spillage is really essential for the fast oil spill response to the ecological and economical consequences. However existing on-line pipelines spillage detection systems have a sensibility of 0.2 – 1 % of pipe flow and do not detect the smaller-sized spillages.For unpeopled or sparsely populated regions an advanced technique for detection of pipeline spillages (including low-intensity ones is to monitor oil pollution (petroleum spills on the earth surface along the pipeline using, for example, an air drone.The laser remote sensing method is an effective method to detect the pipelines spillage.The paper is dedicated to development of laser fluorescence detection method of oil pollution. The remote sensing laser method to monitor oil pollution is based on the fluorescence excitation of oil in UV spectral band and on the data record of the earth surface laser-induced fluorescence radiation.For laser fluorescence method of monitoring oil pollution the paper presents a comparative analysis  of 0.266 and 0.355 µm wavelengths of the fluorescence excitation in terms of earth atmosphere propagation, eye-safety, laser characteristics, and petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency.It is shown that in terms of eye-safety, laser characteristics, and propagation in the earth atmosphere a 0.355 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has a sure advantage.In the context of petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency a 0.266 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has the advantage, but this advantage depends heavily on the petroleum base. For low-sulfur (sweet oil for instance,  it is not that big.At large, in solving the task of oil pollution detection because of the oil pipeline spillages the 0.355 µm wavelength of fluorescence excitation ought to be preferable. However, when creating a monitoring system for the pipeline with a specific petroleum base the irreversible decision depends on the

  1. Multi-photon microscope driven by novel green laser pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Dominik; Djurhuus, Martin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    2016-03-01

    Multi-photon microscopy is extensively used in research due to its superior possibilities when compared to other microscopy modalities. The technique also has the possibility to advance diagnostics in clinical applications, due to its capabilities complementing existing technology in a multimodal system. However, translation is hindered due to the high cost, high training demand and large footprint of a standard setup. We show in this article that minification of the setup, while also reducing cost and complexity, is indeed possible without compromising on image quality, by using a novel diode laser replacing the commonly used conventional solid state laser as the pump for the femtosecond system driving the imaging.

  2. Fluorescence Intrinsic Characterization of Excitation-Emission Matrix Using Multi-Dimensional Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chien Hsiao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-emission matrix (EEM fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive method for tissue diagnosis and has become important in clinical use. However, the intrinsic characterization of EEM fluorescence remains unclear. Photobleaching and the complexity of the chemical compounds make it difficult to distinguish individual compounds due to overlapping features. Conventional studies use principal component analysis (PCA for EEM fluorescence analysis, and the relationship between the EEM features extracted by PCA and diseases has been examined. The spectral features of different tissue constituents are not fully separable or clearly defined. Recently, a non-stationary method called multi-dimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition (MEEMD was introduced; this method can extract the intrinsic oscillations on multiple spatial scales without loss of information. The aim of this study was to propose a fluorescence spectroscopy system for EEM measurements and to describe a method for extracting the intrinsic characteristics of EEM by MEEMD. The results indicate that, although PCA provides the principal factor for the spectral features associated with chemical compounds, MEEMD can provide additional intrinsic features with more reliable mapping of the chemical compounds. MEEMD has the potential to extract intrinsic fluorescence features and improve the detection of biochemical changes.

  3. Comparison of fluorescence rejection methods of baseline correction and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhijian; Zou, Wenlong; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been extensively used in biochemical tests, explosive detection, food additive and environmental pollutants. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to the applications of portable Raman spectrometer. Currently, baseline correction and shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) methods are the most prevailing fluorescence suppressing methods. In this paper, we compared the performances of baseline correction and SERDS methods, experimentally and simulatively. Through the comparison, it demonstrates that the baseline correction can get acceptable fluorescence-removed Raman spectrum if the original Raman signal has good signal-to-noise ratio, but it cannot recover the small Raman signals out of large noise background. By using SERDS method, the Raman signals, even very weak compared to fluorescence intensity and noise level, can be clearly extracted, and the fluorescence background can be completely rejected. The Raman spectrum recovered by SERDS has good signal to noise ratio. It's proved that baseline correction is more suitable for large bench-top Raman system with better quality or signal-to-noise ratio, while the SERDS method is more suitable for noisy devices, especially the portable Raman spectrometers.

  4. Multi-photon ionization of atoms in intense short-wavelength radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The unprecedented characteristics of XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) have stimulated numerous investigations focusing on the detailed understanding of fundamental photon-matter interactions in atoms and molecules. In particular, the high intensities (up to 106 W/cm2) giving rise to non-linear phenomena in the short wavelength regime. The basic phenomenology involves the production of highly charged ions via electron emission to which both sequential and direct multi-photon absorption processes contribute. The detailed investigation of the role and relative weight of these processes under different conditions (wavelength, pulse duration, intensity) is the key element for a comprehensive understanding of the ionization dynamics. Here the results of recent investigations are presented, performed at the FELs in Hamburg (FLASH) and Trieste (FERMI) on atomic systems with electronic structures of increasing complexity (Ar, Ne and Xe). Mainly, electron spectroscopy is used to obtain quantitative information about the relevance of various multi-photon ionization processes. For the case of Ar, a variety of processes including above threshold ionization (ATI) from 3p and 3s valence shells, direct 2p two-photon ionization and resonant 2p-4p two-photon excitations were observed and their role was quantitatively determined comparing the experimental ionization yields to ab-initio calculations of the cross sections for the multi-photon processes. Using Ar as a benchmark to prove the reliability of the combined experimental and theoretical approach, the more complex and intriguing case of Xe was studied. Especially, the analysis of the two-photon ATI from the Xe 4d shell reveals new insight into the character of the 4d giant resonance, which was unresolved in the linear one-photon regime. Finally, the influence of intense XUV radiation to the relaxation dynamics of the Ne 2s-3p resonance was investigated by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, especially be observing

  5. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge with excitation of high current and microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp: Ca atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhen-bin; Liang, Feng; Yang, Peng-yuan; Jin, Qin-han; Huang, Ben-li

    2002-02-01

    A system of atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch (MPT) discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL) has been developed. The operation conditions for Ca atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry have been optimized. Compared with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in argon microwave induced plasma (MIP) and MPT with the excitation of direct current and conventional pulsed HCL, the system with HCMP HCL excitation can improve AFS and ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) detection limits in MPT atomizer and ionizer. Detection limits (3 sigma) with HCMP HCL-MPT-AFS/IFS are 10.1 ng.mL-1 for Ca I 422.7 nm, 14.6 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 393.4 nm, and 37.4 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 396.8 nm, respectively.

  6. Comment on ’Single Pentacene Molecules Detected by Fluorescence Excitation in a P-Terphenyl Crystal’

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-10

    8217 NO 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Comment on "Single Pentacene Molecules Detected by Fluorescence Excitation in a p-Terphenyl Crystal" 12...8217 {Continue on reverse it necessary and identify by block numboer) Using h--,Ihly efficient Fluorescence excitation spectroscov of individual pentacene ...molecular impurities in p-terphenvl crystals, we have observed that some pentacene defects exhibit spcntaneous spectral jumps in their resonance frequency at

  7. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, J.E.; Valsaraj, K.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores. ?? 2010.

  8. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J; Jarvis, Lesley A; Pogue, Brian W

    2016-05-21

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  9. Adapting a compact confocal microscope system to a two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaspro, A; Corosu, M; Ramoino, P; Robello, M

    1999-11-01

    Within the framework of a national National Institute of Physics of Matter (INFM) project, we have realised a two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope based on a new generation commercial confocal scanning head. The core of the architecture is a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser (Tsunami 3960, Spectra Physics Inc., Mountain View, CA) pumped by a high-power (5 W, 532 nm) laser (Millennia V, Spectra Physics Inc.) and an ultracompact confocal scanning head, Nikon PCM2000 (Nikon Instruments, Florence, Italy) using a single-pinhole design. Three-dimensional point-spread function has been measured to define spatial resolution performances. The TPE microscope has been used with a wide range of excitable fluorescent molecules (DAPI, Fura-2, Indo-1, DiOC(6)(3), fluoresceine, Texas red) covering a single photon spectral range from UV to green. An example is reported on 3D imaging of the helical structure of the sperm head of the Octopus Eledone cirrhosa labelled with an UV excitable dye, i.e., DAPI. The system can be easily switched for operating both in conventional and two-photon mode. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vankan, P.J.W.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Döbele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has

  11. Single excitation-emission fluorescence spectrum (EEF) for determination of cetane improver in diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insausti, Matías; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2015-04-05

    A highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate in diesel fuel. Usually, this compound is used as an additive in order to improve cetane number. The analytical method consists in building the chemometric model as a first step. Then, it is possible to quantify the analyte with only recording a single excitation-emission fluorescence spectrum (EEF), whose data are introduced in the chemometric model above mentioned. Another important characteristic of this method is that the fuel sample was used without any pre-treatment for EEF. This work provides an interest improvement to fluorescence techniques using the rapid and easily applicable EEF approach to analyze such complex matrices. Exploding EEF was the key to a successful determination, obtaining a detection limit of 0.00434% (v/v) and a limit of quantification of 0.01446% (v/v). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thin coating thickness determination using radioisotope-excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Castillo, Lorena A.; Calix, Virginia S.

    2001-01-01

    Three different approaches on thin coating thickness determination using a radioisotope-excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometry were demonstrated and results were compared. A standard of thin layer of gold (Au) on a nickel (Ni) substrate from the US National Bureau of Standards (with a nominal thickness of 0.300505 microns of at least 99.9% Au electrodeposited over 2 nils of Ni) on low carbon steel (1010) was analyzed using a Cd 109-excited XRF system. Au thickness computations were done using the (a) thin standard approach, (b) thick standard approach, and (c) x-ray absorption method (ASTM A754-79 1982). These three methods yielded results within the limit set by the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), which is +/-3%. Of the three methods, the thick standard yielded the best result with 0.124% error. (Author)

  13. Portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer of high sensitivity using X-ray tube excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, E.; Ando, L.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the three main methods of X-ray fluorescence analysis and their problems is given. The attainable accuracy and effectiveness of each method are discussed. The main properties of portable X-ray analyzers required by the industry are described. The results and experiences of R and D activities in ATOMKI (Debrecen, Hungary) for developing portable X-ray analyzers are presented. The only way for increasing the accuracy and decreasing the measuring time is the application of X-ray tube excitation instead of radioactive sources. The new ATOMKI equipment presently under construction and patenting uses X-ray tube excitation; it will increase the accuracy of concentration determination by one order of magnitude. (D.Gy.)

  14. Laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal tube atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, J A; Leong, M B; Stevenson, C L; Petrucci, G; Winefordner, J D

    1989-12-01

    The performance of graphite-tube electrothermal atomizers is evaluated for laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry for several elements. Three pulsed laser systems are used to pump tunable dye lasers which subsequently are used to excite Pb, Ga, In, Fe, Ir, and Tl atoms in the hot graphite tube. The dye laser systems used are pumped by nitrogen, copper vapour and Nd:YAG lasers. Detection limits in the femtogram and subfemtogram range are typically obtained for all elements. A commercial graphite-tube furnace is important for the successful utilization of the laser-based method when the determination of trace elements is intended, especially when complicated matrices may be present.

  15. Fluorescence-based calculus detection using a 405-nm excitation wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, O.; Schelle, F.; Krueger, S.; Oehme, B.; Dehn, C.; Frentzen, M.; Braun, A.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the difference of fluorescence signals of cement and calculus using a 405 nm excitation wavelength. A total number of 20 freshly extracted teeth was used. The light source used for this study was a blue LED with a wavelength of 405nm. For each tooth the spectra of calculus and cementum were measured separately. Fluorescence light was collimated into an optical fibre and spectrally analyzed using an echelle spectrometer (aryelle 200, Lasertechnik Berlin, Germany) with an additionally bandpass (fgb 67, Edmund Industrial Optics, Karlsruhe, Germany). From these 40 measurements the median values were calculated over the whole spectrum, leading to two different median spectra, one for calculus and one for cementum. For further statistical analysis we defined 8 areas of interest (AOI) in wavelength regions, showing remarkable differences in signal strength. In 7 AOIs the intensity of the calculus spectrum differed statistically significant from the intensity of the cementum spectrum (p calculus and cement between 600nm and 700nm. Thus, we can conclude that fluorescence of calculus shows a significant difference to the fluorescence of cement. A differentiation over the intensity is possible as well as over the spectrum. Using a wavelength of 405nm, it is possible to distinguish between calculus and cement. These results could be used for further devices to develop a method for feedback controlled calculus removal.

  16. Mapping the local organization of cell membranes using excitation-polarization-resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Alla; Wang, Xiao; Ranchon, Hubert; Savatier, Julien; Rigneault, Hervé; Ferrand, Patrick; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-07-02

    Fluorescence anisotropy and linear dichroism imaging have been widely used for imaging biomolecular orientational distributions in protein aggregates, fibrillar structures of cells, and cell membranes. However, these techniques do not give access to complete orientational order information in a whole image, because their use is limited to parts of the sample where the average orientation of molecules is known a priori. Fluorescence anisotropy is also highly sensitive to depolarization mechanisms such as those induced by fluorescence energy transfer. A fully excitation-polarization-resolved fluorescence microscopy imaging that relies on the use of a tunable incident polarization and a nonpolarized detection is able to circumvent these limitations. We have developed such a technique in confocal epifluorescence microscopy, giving access to new regions of study in the complex and heterogeneous molecular organization of cell membranes. Using this technique, we demonstrate morphological changes at the subdiffraction scale in labeled COS-7 cell membranes whose cytoskeleton is perturbed. Molecular orientational order is also seen to be affected by cholesterol depletion, reflecting the strong interplay between lipid-packing regions and their nearby cytoskeleton. This noninvasive optical technique can reveal local organization in cell membranes when used as a complement to existing methods such as generalized polarization. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Laser-excited Fluorescence And Electron-spin Resonance Of Er3+ In Polycrystalline Alcl3

    OpenAIRE

    Ceotto G.; Pires M.A.; Sanjurjo J.A.; Rettori C.; Barberis G.E.

    1990-01-01

    The green fluorescence transitions among the levels corresponding to the 4S3/2 and 4I15/2 configurations of Er3+ diluted in AlCl3 have been measured using laser excitation. The data allow us to determine the crystalline-field splittings of these levels and, in turn, the spin-Hamiltonian parameters. The electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectrum observed at low temperatures is in good agreement with that expected from these parameters. © 1990 The American Physical Society.

  18. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy for degradation monitoring of machinery lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovski, Oleg; Suresh, Pooja; Dudelzak, Alexander E.; Green, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    Lubrication oil is a vital component of heavy rotating machinery defining the machine's health, operational safety and effectiveness. Recently, the focus has been on developing sensors that provide real-time/online monitoring of oil condition/lubricity. Industrial practices and standards for assessing oil condition involve various analytical methods. Most these techniques are unsuitable for online applications. The paper presents the results of studying degradation of antioxidant additives in machinery lubricants using Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) Spectroscopy and Machine Learning techniques. EEM Spectroscopy is capable of rapid and even standoff sensing; it is potentially applicable to real-time online monitoring.

  19. Simple fibre based dispersion management for two-photon excited fluorescence imaging through an endoscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Marti, Dominik; Andersen, Peter E.

    2018-01-01

    We want to implement two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) into endoscopes, since TPEFM can provide relevant biomarkers for cancer staging and grading in hollow organs, endoscopically accessible through natural orifices. However, many obstacles must be overcome, among others...... the delivery of short laser pulses to the distal end of the endoscope. To this avail, we present imaging results using an all-fibre dispersion management scheme in a TPEFM setup. The scheme has been conceived by Jespersen et al. in 20101 and relies on the combination of a single mode fibre with normal...

  20. Fluorescence detection of single molecules using pulsed near-field optical excitation and time correlated photon counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Martin, J.C.; Keller, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Pulsed excitation, time correlated single photon counting and time gated detection are used in near-field optical microscopy to enhance fluorescence images and measure the fluorescence lifetimes of single molecules of Rhodamine 6G on silica surfaces. Time gated detection is used to reject prompt scattered background and to improve the image signal to noise ratio. The excited state lifetime of a single Rhodamine 6G molecule is found to depend on the position of the near-field probe. We attribute the lifetime variations to spontaneous emission rate alterations by the fluorescence reflected from and quenching by the aluminum coated probe

  1. Multi-color imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds in living HeLa cells using direct electron-beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu; Fang, Chia-Yi; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-03-17

    Multi-color, high spatial resolution imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in living HeLa cells has been performed with a direct electron-beam excitation-assisted fluorescence (D-EXA) microscope. In this technique, fluorescent materials are directly excited with a focused electron beam and the resulting cathodoluminescence (CL) is detected with nanoscale resolution. Green- and red-light-emitting FNDs were employed for two-color imaging, which were observed simultaneously in the cells with high spatial resolution. This technique could be applied generally for multi-color immunostaining to reveal various cell functions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  3. Impact of laser excitation intensity on deep UV fluorescence detection in microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Philipp; Ludwig, Martin; Belder, Detlev

    2008-12-01

    A high intensity 266 nm continuous wave (cw-) laser developed for material processing was utilised as an excitation source for sensitive native fluorescence detection of unlabelled compounds in MCE. This 120 mW laser was attached via an optical fibre into a commercial epifluorescence microscope. With this MCE set-up we evaluated the impact of laser power on the S/N of aromatic compounds as well as of proteins. Compared with a previous work which used a 4 mW pulsed laser for excitation, improved S/N for small aromatics and to a lesser extent for proteins could be attained. The LOD of the system was determined down to 24 ng/mL for serotonin (113 nM), 24 ng/mL for propranolol (81 nM), 80 ng/mL for tryptophan (392 nM) and 80 ng/mL for an aromatic diol (475 nM). Sensitive protein detection was obtained at concentrations of 5 microg/mL for lysocyme, trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen (340, 208 and 195 nM, respectively). Finally, a comparison of the cw- with a pulsed 266 nm laser, operating at the same average power, showed a higher attainable sensitivity of the cw-laser. This can be attributed to fluorescence saturation and photobleaching effects of the pulsed laser at high pulse energies.

  4. Polarized X-ray excitation for scatter reduction in X-ray fluorescence computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernekohl, Don; Tzoumas, Stratis; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Lei

    2018-05-25

    X-ray fluorescence computer tomography (XFCT) is a new molecular imaging modality which uses X-ray excitation to stimulate the emission of fluorescent photons in high atomic number contrast agents. Scatter contamination is one of the main challenges in XFCT imaging which limits the molecular sensitivity. When polarized X-rays are used, it is possible to reduce the scatter contamination significantly by placing detectors perpendicular to the polarization direction. This study quantifies scatter contamination for polarized and unpolarized X-ray excitation and determines the advantages of scatter reduction. The amount of scatter in preclinical XFCT is quantified in Monte Carlo simulations. The fluorescent X-rays are emitted isotropically, while scattered X-rays propagate in polarization direction. The magnitude of scatter contamination is studied in XFCT simulations of a mouse phantom. In this study, the contrast agent gold is examined as an example but a scatter reduction from polarized excitation is also expected for other elements. The scatter reduction capability is examined for different polarization intensities with a monoenergetic X-ray excitation energy of 82 keV. The study evaluates two different geometrical shapes of CZT detectors which are modeled with an energy resolution of 1 keV FWHM at an X-ray energy of 80 keV. Benefits of a detector placement perpendicular to the polarization direction are shown in iterative and analytic image reconstruction including scatter correction. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and the normalized mean square error (NMSE) are analyzed and compared for the reconstructed images. A substantial scatter reduction for common detector sizes was achieved for 100% and 80% linear polarization while lower polarization intensities provide a decreased scatter reduction. By placing the detector perpendicular to the polarization direction, a scatter reduction by factor up to 5.5 can be achieved for common detector sizes. The image

  5. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by two photon excited fluorescence combined with lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shunping; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Liu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Yuan; Qu, Junle

    2014-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human skin cancer. The traditional diagnostic procedure of BCC is histological examination with haematoxylin and eosin staining of the tissue biopsy. In order to reduce complexity of the diagnosis procedure, a number of noninvasive optical methods have been applied in skin examination, for example, multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this study, we explored two-photon optical tomography of human skin specimens using two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging and FLIM. There are a number of naturally endogenous fluorophores in skin sample, such as keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin, flavin and porphyrin. Confocal microscopy was used to obtain structures of the sample. Properties of epidermic and cancer cells were characterized by fluorescence emission spectra, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging. Our results show that two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging can provide accurate optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and is potentially a quantitative optical diagnostic method in skin cancer diagnosis.

  6. Compact 3D printed module for fluorescence and label-free imaging using evanescent excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vikas; Gupta, Shalini; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is widely used for selective excitation and high-resolution imaging of fluorophores, and more recently label-free nanosized objects, with high vertical confinement near a liquid-solid interface. Traditionally, high numerical aperture objectives (>1.4) are used to simultaneously generate evanescent waves and collect fluorescence emission signals which limits their use to small area imaging (filters to prevent specular reflection within the objective lenses. We have developed a compact 3D module called cTIRF that can generate evanescent waves in microscope glass slides via a planar waveguide illumination. The module can be attached as a fixture to any existing optical microscope, converting it into a TIRF and enabling high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) fluorescence imaging using any magnification objective. As the incidence optics is perpendicular to the detector, label-free evanescent scattering-based imaging of submicron objects can also be performed without using emission filters. SNR is significantly enhanced in this case as compared to cTIRF alone, as seen through our model experiments performed on latex beads and mammalian cells. Extreme flexibility and the low cost of our approach makes it scalable for limited resource settings.

  7. An excited-state intramolecular photon transfer fluorescence probe for localizable live cell imaging of cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wen; Liu, Si-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Small molecule probes suitable for selective and specific fluorescence imaging of some important but low-concentration intracellular reactive sulfur species such as cysteine (Cys) pose a challenge in chemical biology. We present a readily available, fast-response fluorescence probe CHCQ-Ac, with 2-(5‧-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-6-chloro-4(3 H)-quinazolinone (CHCQ) as the fluorophore and acrylate group as the functional moiety, that enables high-selectivity and high-sensitivity for detecting Cys in both solution and biological system. After specifically reacted with Cys, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and released the fluorophore CHCQ with excited-state intramolecular photon transfer effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was then formed to facilitate high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. The results showed that probe CHCQ-Ac affords a remarkably large Stokes shift and can detect Cys under physiological pH condition with no interference from other analytes. Moreover, this probe was proved to have excellent chemical stability, low cytotoxicity and good cell permeability. Our design of this probe provides a novel potential tool to visualize and localize cysteine in bioimaging of live cells that would greatly help to explore various Cys-related physiological and pathological cellular processes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  8. Application of radionuclide sources for excitation in energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is in broad application in many fields of science where elemental determinations are necessary. Solid and liquid samples are analyzed by this method. Solids are introduced in thin or thick samples as melted glass, pellets, powders or as original specimen. The excitation of X-ray spectra can be performed by specific and polychromic radiation of X-ray tubes, by protons, deuterons, α-particles, heavy ions and synchrotron radiation from accelerators and by α-particles, X- and γ-rays and by bremsstrahlung generated by β - -particles from radionuclide sources. The radionuclides are devided into groups with respect to their decay mode and the energy of the emitted radiation. The broad application of radionuclides in XRF excitation is shown in examples as semi-quantitative analysis of glasses, as quantitative analysis of coarse ceramics and as quantitative determination of heavy elements (mainly actinides) in solutions. The advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide excitation in XRF analysis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Visible to near-IR fluorescence from single-digit detonation nanodiamonds: excitation wavelength and pH dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineck, Philipp; Lau, Desmond W M; Wilson, Emma R; Nunn, Nicholas; Shenderova, Olga A; Gibson, Brant C

    2018-02-06

    Detonation nanodiamonds are of vital significance to many areas of science and technology. However, their fluorescence properties have rarely been explored for applications and remain poorly understood. We demonstrate significant fluorescence from the visible to near-infrared spectral regions from deaggregated, single-digit detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water produced via post-synthesis oxidation. The excitation wavelength dependence of this fluorescence is analyzed in the spectral region from 400 nm to 700 nm as well as the particles' absorption characteristics. We report a strong pH dependence of the fluorescence and compare our results to the pH dependent fluorescence of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results significantly contribute to the current understanding of the fluorescence of carbon-based nanomaterials in general and detonation nanodiamonds in particular.

  10. Study on discrimination of oral cancer from normal using blood plasma based on fluorescence steady and excited state at excitation wavelength 280 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Pachaiappan; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Many research works based on fluorescence spectroscopy have proven its potential in the diagnosis of various diseases using the spectral signatures of the native key fluorophores such as tryptophan, tyrosine, collagen, NADH, FAD and porphyrin. These fluorophores distribution, concentration and their conformation may be changed depending upon the pathological and metabolic conditions of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt to characterize the blood plasma of normal subject and oral cancer patients by native fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm excitation. Further, the fluorescence data were analyzed by employing the multivariate statistical method - linear discriminant analyses (LDA) using leaves one out cross validation method. The results illustrate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy technique in the diagnosis of oral cancer using blood plasma.

  11. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated ......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals.......Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated...

  12. Study on germ toxicity of exciting energy resource 147Pm of fluorescent paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Lun Minyue; Tao Feng

    1993-02-01

    The germ toxicity of exciting energy resource 147 Pm of fluorescent paint was studied. It was shown that the placenta was a barrier for 147 Pm entering into the fetus. The retention T 1/2 was 105 days in testes. The retention value of 147 Pm in testis was high and hardly to excrete. The results showed that 147 Pm can induce abnormal sperms, most of them were non-hock sperms. The chromosome aberrations in germ cells also can be induced. Among the type of chromosome aberrations of spermatogonia, chromatid breakage was predominant. The 147 Pm can cause the chromosome fragment and translocations of primary spermatocytes, and increasing of lethality. The dominant skeletal aberrations in offspring is proportional to the accumulated radioactivity of 147 Pm in tests

  13. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals....

  14. Investigation of the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence of gaseous xenon under optical excitation in an extended wavelength region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodmann, R.; Zimmerer, G.; Hamburg Univ.; Hahn, U.

    1976-02-01

    The fluorescence of Xe at a pressure of 10 Torr has been excited by monochromatic light in the wavelength region from 1,040 A to 1,500 A. Besides the well known first and second continuum additional emission bands appear at 1,192 A and 1,300 A. They are ascribed to an atomic transition 5d(3/2) 1 → 1 S 0 and a molecular transition O + sub(u)(6s'(1/2) + 1 S 0 ) → O + sub(g)( 1 S 0 + 1 S 0 ). The excitation spectra of the first and second continuum yield high fluorescence efficiency if higher Rydberg states are excited. Excitation of the first resonance line of Xe results in a low fluorescence intensity. Obviously the formation of highly excited molecules Xe** and intramolecular relaxation play an important role for the population of the vibrationally relaxed excited states (O + sub(u), 1sub(u)) of the Xe* 2 molecule. (orig.) [de

  15. Effect of Solvation on Electron Detachment and Excitation Energies of a Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Samik; Chakrabarty, Suman; Ghosh, Debashree

    2016-05-19

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is applied to the fluorinated green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore (DFHBDI) in its deprotonated form to understand the solvatochromic shifts in its vertical detachment energy (VDE) and vertical excitation energy (VEE). This variant of the GFP chromophore becomes fluorescent in an RNA environment and has a wide range of applications in biomedical and biochemical fields. From microsolvation studies, we benchmark (with respect to full QM) the accuracy of our QM/MM calculations with effective fragment potential (EFP) as the MM method of choice. We show that while the solvatochromic shift in the VEE is minimal (0.1 eV blue shift) and its polarization component is only 0.03 eV, the effect of the solvent on the VDE is quite large (3.85 eV). We also show by accurate calculations on the solvatochromic shift of the VDE that polarization accounts for ∼0.23 eV and therefore cannot be neglected. The effect of the counterions on the VDE of the deprotonated chromophore in solvation is studied in detail, and a charge-smearing scheme is suggested for charged chromophores.

  16. Electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aucelio, R.Q.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A dye laser pumped by a high-repetition-rate copper vapor laser was used as the excitation source to determine indium at parts-per-trillion level by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS). A comparison was made between wall atomization, in pyrolytic and nonpyrolytic graphite tubes, and platform atomization. The influence of several chemical modifiers either in solution or precoated in the graphite tube was evaluated. The influence of several acids and NaOH in the analyte solution was also studied. Optimization of the analytical conditions was carried out to achieve the best signal-to-background ratio and consequently an absolute limit of detection of 1 fg. Some possible interferents of the method were evaluated. The method was evaluated by determining indium in blood, urine, soil, and urban dust samples. Recoveries between 99.17 and 109.17% are reported. A precision of 4.1% at the 10 ng g -1 level in water standards was achieved. copyright 1998 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  17. Dissecting multi-photon resonances at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allanach, B.C. [University of Cambridge, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bhatia, D.; Iyer, Abhishek M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mumbai (India)

    2017-09-15

    We examine the phenomenology of the production, at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC), of a heavy resonance X, which decays via other new on-shell particles n into multi-(i.e. three or more) photon final states. In the limit that n has a much smaller mass than X, the multi-photon final state may dominantly appear as a two-photon final state because the γs from the n decay are highly collinear and remain unresolved. We discuss how to discriminate this scenario from X → γγ: rather than discarding non-isolated photons, it is better to relax the isolation criteria and instead form photon jets substructure variables. The spins of X and n leave their imprint upon the distribution of pseudo-rapidity gap Δη between the apparent two-photon states. Depending on the total integrated luminosity, this can be used in many cases to claim discrimination between the possible spin choices of X and n, although the case where X and n are both scalar particles cannot be discriminated from the direct X → γγ decay in this manner. Information on the mass of n can be gained by considering the mass of each photon jet. (orig.)

  18. X-ray fluorescence in some medium-Z elements excited by 59.5 keV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, I.; Shahin, M.; Demir, L.; Narmanli, E.

    2010-01-01

    K X-ray fluorescence parameters cross sections and average shell fluorescence yields) for selected ten elements in the atomic range 42 ≤ Z ≤ 66 have been experimentally determined at photon excitation energy of 59.5 keV. K X-rays emitted from the samples have been counted by a Si (Li) detector. The K spectra for investigated elements have been derived from the measured K shell X-ray spectra by peak fitting process. Experimental results of K X-ray fluorescence parameters have been compared with theory. In general there is an agreement within the standard uncertainties of the experimental and theoretical values

  19. Silver content determination in mining and ore dressing using radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, B.; George, R.; Ratnikow, W.

    1989-01-01

    A laborsaving method based on radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence is described for the determination of silver in mining and ore dressing. Detection limits reached under operation conditions and measuring errors are discussed and compared with results from chemical analyses

  20. Environment-sensitive quinolone demonstrating long-lived fluorescence and unusually slow excited-state intramolecular proton transfer kinetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zamotaiev, O. M.; Shvadchak, Volodymyr; Sych, T. P.; Melnychuk, N. A.; Yushchenko, Dmytro A.; Mely, Y.; Pivovarenko, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2016), č. článku 034004. ISSN 2050-6120 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : quinolone * fluorescent probes * local polarity * hydration * excited-state intramolecular proton transfer * kinetics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2016

  1. Stratum corneum lipid organization as observed by atomic force, confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlén, Lars; Plasencia Gil, Maria Inés; Bagatolli, Luis

    2008-01-01

    -related biophysical techniques (e.g. atomic force microscopy and confocal/two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy), it was recently shown that reconstituted membranes composed of extracted decontaminated human stratum corneum lipids do not form a fluid phase, but exclusively a single-gel phase that segregates...

  2. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankan, P.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D.C.; Doebele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has a bandwith of 0.15 cm -1 . The wavelength of the laser radiation is calibrated by simultaneous recording of the two-photon laser induced fluorescence spectrum of nitric oxide. The excited hydrogen populations are calibrated on the basis of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements. A population distribution is measured in the shock region of a pure hydrogen plasma expansion. The higher rotational levels (J>5) show overpopulation compared to a Boltzmann distribution determined from the lower rotational levels (J≤5)

  3. Intramolecular evolution from a locally excited state to an excimer-like state in a multichromophoric dendrimer evidenced by a femtosecond fluorescence upconversion study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karni, Y.; Jordens, S.; Belder, G. De; Schweitzer, G.; Hofkens, J.; Gensch, T.; Maus, M.; Schryver, F.C. De; Herrmann, A.; Müllen, K.

    1999-01-01

    A time-resolved fluorescence upconversion study on a polyphenylene dendrimer with eight peryleneimide chromophores on the surface and on a monochromophoric model compound is reported. The time-dependent fluorescence spectra of the dendrimer show that the initial excitation is into a locally excited

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  5. Photo-induced changes of silicate glasses optical parameters at multi-photon laser radiation absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, O.M.; Glebov, L.B.; Mekryukov, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigations of the mechanisms of photo-induced changes of alkali-silicate (crown) and lead-silicate (flint) glasses optical parameters upon the exposure to the intense laser radiation, and the basic regularities of these processes are reported. These investigations were performed in Research Center open-quotes S. I. Vavilov State Optical Instituteclose quotes during last 15 years. The kinetics of stable and unstable CC formation and decay, the effect of widely spread impurity ions on these processes, the characteristics of fundamental and impure luminescence, the kinetics of refractive index change under conditions of multi-photon glass matrix excitation, and other properties are considered. On the basis of analysis of received regularities it was shown that the nonlinear coloration of alkali-silicate glasses (the fundamental absorption edge is nearly 6 eV) takes place only as a result of two-photon absorption. Important efforts were aimed at the detection of three- or more photon matrix ionization of these glasses, but they were failed. However it was established that in the lead silicate glasses the long-wave carriers mobility boundary (> 5.6 eV) is placed considerably higher the fundamental absorption edge (∼ 3.5 eV) of material matrix. This results in that the linear color centers formation in the lead silicate glasses is not observed. The coloration of these glasses arises only from the two- or three-photon matrix ionization, and the excitation occurs through virtual states that are placed in the fundamental absorption region. In the report the available mechanisms of photo-induced changes of glasses optical parameters, and some applied aspects of this problem are discussed

  6. Two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging of melanin in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to detect early melanoma non-invasively would improve clinical outcome and reduce mortality. Recent advances in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in vivo microscopy offer a powerful tool in early malignant melanoma diagnostics. The goal of this work was to develop a TPEF optical index for measuring relative concentrations of eumelanin and pheomelanin since ex vivo studies show that changes in this ratio have been associated with malignant transformation. We acquired TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin from several specimens, including human hair, malignant melanoma cell lines, and normal melanocytes and keratinocytes in different skin layers (epidermis, papillary dermis) in five healthy volunteers in vivo. We found that the pheomelanin emission peaks at around 620 nm and is blue-shifted from the eumelanin with broad maximum at 640-680nm. We defined "optical melanin index" (OMI) as a ratio of fluorescence signal intensities measured at 645 nm and 615nm. The measured OMI for a melanoma cell line MNT-1 was 1.6+/-0.2. The MNT-46 and MNT-62 lines (Mc1R gene knockdown) showed an anticipated change in melanins production ratio and had OMI of 0.55+/-0.05 and 0.17+/-0.02, respectively, which strongly correlated with HPLC data obtained for these lines. Average OMI measured for basal cells layers (melanocytes and keratinocytes) in normal human skin type I, II-III (not tanned and tanned) in vivo was 0.5, 1.05 and 1.16 respectively. We could not dependably detect the presence of pheomelanin in highly pigmented skin type V-VI. These data suggest that a non-invasive TPEF index could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo, including pigmented lesions.

  7. Some secrets of fluorescent proteins: distinct bleaching in various mounting fluids and photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at YFP-excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkani, Naila; Schmid, Johannes A

    2011-04-07

    The use of spectrally distinct variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) such as cyan or yellow mutants (CFP and YFP, respectively) is very common in all different fields of life sciences, e.g. for marking specific proteins or cells or to determine protein interactions. In the latter case, the quantum physical phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is exploited by specific microscopy techniques to visualize proximity of proteins. When we applied a commonly used FRET microscopy technique--the increase in donor (CFP)-fluorescence after bleaching of acceptor fluorophores (YFP), we obtained good signals in live cells, but very weak signals for the same samples after fixation and mounting in commercial microscopy mounting fluids. This observation could be traced back to much faster bleaching of CFP in these mounting media. Strikingly, the opposite effect of the mounting fluid was observed for YFP and also for other proteins such as Cerulean, TFP or Venus. The changes in photostability of CFP and YFP were not caused by the fixation but directly dependent on the mounting fluid. Furthermore we made the interesting observation that the CFP-fluorescence intensity increases by about 10-15% after illumination at the YFP-excitation wavelength--a phenomenon, which was also observed for Cerulean. This photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at the YFP-excitation can cause false-positive signals in the FRET-microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of a yellow FRET acceptor. Our results show that photostability of fluorescent proteins differs significantly for various media and that CFP bleaches significantly faster in commercial mounting fluids, while the opposite is observed for YFP and some other proteins. Moreover, we show that the FRET microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of the YFP is prone to artifacts due to photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins under these conditions.

  8. System and method for controlling depth of imaging in tissues using fluorescence microscopy under ultraviolet excitation following staining with fluorescing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Richard; Demos, Stavros

    2018-05-08

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a thin tissue sample and adapted to be supported on a slide. The tissue sample may be placed on a slide and exposed to one or more different exogenous fluorophores excitable in a range of about 300 nm-200 nm, and having a useful emission band from about 350 nm-900 nm, and including one or more fluorescent dyes or fluorescently labeled molecular probes that accumulate in tissue or cellular components. The fluorophores may be excited with a first wavelength of UV light between about 200 nm-290 nm. An optical system collects emissions from the fluorophores at a second wavelength, different from the first wavelength, which are generated in response to the first wavelength of UV light, to produce an image for analysis.

  9. Focused fluorescence excitation with time-reversed ultrasonically encoded light and imaging in thick scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Puxiang; Suzuki, Yuta; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-01-01

    Scattering dominates light propagation in biological tissue, and therefore restricts both resolution and penetration depth in optical imaging within thick tissue. As photons travel into the diffusive regime, typically 1 mm beneath human skin, their trajectories transition from ballistic to diffusive due to the increased number of scattering events, which makes it impossible to focus, much less track, photon paths. Consequently, imaging methods that rely on controlled light illumination are ineffective in deep tissue. This problem has recently been addressed by a novel method capable of dynamically focusing light in thick scattering media via time reversal of ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) diffused light. Here, using photorefractive materials as phase conjugate mirrors, we show a direct visualization and dynamic control of optical focusing with this light delivery method, and demonstrate its application for focused fluorescence excitation and imaging in thick turbid media. These abilities are increasingly critical for understanding the dynamic interactions of light with biological matter and processes at different system levels, as well as their applications for biomedical diagnosis and therapy. (letter)

  10. High sensitivity detection of selenium by laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry using electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, U.; Hese, A.; Schoknecht, G.; Gries, W.

    1995-01-01

    The high sensitivity detection of the trace element selenium is reported. The analytical method applied is Laser Excited Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry using Electrothermal Atomization within a graphite furnace atomizer. For the production of tunable laser radiation in the VUV spectral region a laser system was developed which consists of two dye lasers pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. The laser radiations are subsequently frequency doubled and sum frequency mixed by nonlinear optical KDP or BBO crystals, respectively. The system works with a repetition rate of 20 Hz and provides output energies of up to 100 μJ in the VUV at a pulse duration of 5 ns. The analytical investigations were focused on the detection of selenium in aqueous solutions and samples of human whole blood. From measurements on aqueous standards detection limits of 1.5 ng/l for selenium were obtained, with corresponding absolute detected masses of only 15 fg. The linear dynamic range spanned six orders of magnitude and good precision was achieved. In case of human whole blood samples the recovery was found to be within the range of 96% to 104%. The determination of the selenium content yielded medians of [119.5 ± 17.3] μg/l for 200 frozen blood samples taken in 1988 and [109.1 ± 15.6] μg/l for 103 fresh blood samples. (author)

  11. Excitation and deexcitation of N2 molecular levels. Induced fluorescence by electrons and laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Fernandez-Mayoralas, A.

    1989-01-01

    The electron impact excitation followed by fluorescence induced by N 2 -laser absorption was used to study the lifetime of the lowest vibrational level of the B 3 π g electronic state of N 2 . The experimental result of this work is 13 + 1 μs. To measure the lifetime of B 3 π g (v=2,3,5,6,7,8) levels the delayed coincidence method by electron impact was use. The lifetime values were compared with recent experimental and theoretical results. The relative intensi-ties of 3 π g --- A 3 Σ Ω + system bands, in the range (6540-10500 A o ) was measured using a hollow cathode lamp as spectral source. The relative transition moments and its dependence versus the r-centroid was obtained. Total cross sections for electron scattering by N molecules in the range 600 - 5000 eV have been obtained from measurements of the attenuation of a linear electron beam. The results have been compared with available experimental cross sections and with theoretical calculations based on the first Born approximation. (Author)

  12. Multi-photon entanglement and applications in quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Christian I.T.

    2008-05-30

    In this thesis, two new linear optics networks are introduced and their application for several quantum information tasks is presented. Spontaneous parametric down conversion, is used in different configurations to provide the input states for the networks. The first network is a new design of a controlled phase gate which is particularly interesting for applications in multi-photon experiments as it constitutes an improvement of former realizations with respect to stability and reliability. This is explicitly demonstrated by employing the gate in four-photon experiments. In this context, a teleportation and entanglement swapping protocol is performed in which all four Bell states are distinguished by means of the phase gate. A similar type of measurement applied to the subsystem parts of two copies of a quantum state, allows further the direct estimation of the state's entanglement in terms of its concurrence. Finally, starting from two Bell states, the controlled phase gate is applied for the observation of a four photon cluster state. The analysis of the results focuses on measurement based quantum computation, the main usage of cluster states. The second network, fed with the second order emission of non-collinear type ii spontaneous parametric down conversion, constitutes a tunable source of a whole family of states. Up to now the observation of one particular state required one individually tailored setup. With the network introduced here many different states can be obtained within the same arrangement by tuning a single, easily accessible experimental parameter. These states exhibit many useful properties and play a central role in several applications of quantum information. Here, they are used for the solution of a four-player quantum Minority game. It is shown that, by employing four-qubit entanglement, the quantum version of the game clearly outperforms its classical counterpart. Experimental data obtained with both networks are utilized to

  13. Multi-photon entanglement and applications in quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Christian I.T.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, two new linear optics networks are introduced and their application for several quantum information tasks is presented. Spontaneous parametric down conversion, is used in different configurations to provide the input states for the networks. The first network is a new design of a controlled phase gate which is particularly interesting for applications in multi-photon experiments as it constitutes an improvement of former realizations with respect to stability and reliability. This is explicitly demonstrated by employing the gate in four-photon experiments. In this context, a teleportation and entanglement swapping protocol is performed in which all four Bell states are distinguished by means of the phase gate. A similar type of measurement applied to the subsystem parts of two copies of a quantum state, allows further the direct estimation of the state's entanglement in terms of its concurrence. Finally, starting from two Bell states, the controlled phase gate is applied for the observation of a four photon cluster state. The analysis of the results focuses on measurement based quantum computation, the main usage of cluster states. The second network, fed with the second order emission of non-collinear type ii spontaneous parametric down conversion, constitutes a tunable source of a whole family of states. Up to now the observation of one particular state required one individually tailored setup. With the network introduced here many different states can be obtained within the same arrangement by tuning a single, easily accessible experimental parameter. These states exhibit many useful properties and play a central role in several applications of quantum information. Here, they are used for the solution of a four-player quantum Minority game. It is shown that, by employing four-qubit entanglement, the quantum version of the game clearly outperforms its classical counterpart. Experimental data obtained with both networks are utilized to demonstrate

  14. Sub-threshold excited Cl Kβ (K-V) x-ray fluorescence from CF3Cl molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Cowan, P.L.; Lindle, D.W.; LaVilla, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    With the availability of tunable synchrotron radiation sources, unoccupied molecular orbits (below vacuum level) can be selectively populated producing highly excited neutral molecules. X-ray fluorescence spectra from molecules were obtained with excitation below the ionization threshold and were observed to have significant intensity changes, absolute and relative energy position shifts and line width changes as compared to fluorescence spectra excited above the threshold. As an example, the Cl Kβ (K-V) emission spectra from CF 3 Cl vapor are presented. The energy shifts and intensity changes are explained in terms of perturbation effects due to the presence of an electron in an unoccupied molecular orbital. The narrow line widths obtained in the spectra excited below threshold are explained in terms of the ''effective'' hole production region in a core state limited by the broadening of the unoccupied level. The change in line widths as a function of below-threshold excitation energy is proposed as a novel technique to study the localized properties and reorganization effects of a hole in a core level. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Fluorescence and Auger Decay Properties of the Core-Excited F-Like Ions from Ne to Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiang-Li; Dong Chen-Zhong; Su Mao-Gen; Koike Fumihiro

    2012-01-01

    We systematically study the decay properties of the K-shell excited F-like ions with 10≤Z≤36 based on the multiconfiguration Dirac—Fock method. The Breit interaction, the QED corrections and the nuclear finite mass effects are also considered as perturbation. Auger transition rates, radiative, Auger and natural widths, as well as fluorescence and Auger yields for K-shell excited F-like ions are presented. It is shown by means of concrete figures that the decay properties change significantly with the increase of the atomic number Z; the Auger rate is overtaken at Z = 30 by the radiative decay rate. Several fitting formulae for the radiative and Auger widths and the fluorescence yields have been evaluated which is expected to be useful in plasma analysis and plasma modeling. (atomic and molecular physics)

  16. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    OpenAIRE

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on ...

  17. Fluorescence from colours used for japanese painting under N_2 laser excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Tadaki

    1988-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra have been measured for various colours used for Japanese painting in order to identify the pigments in paintings. Fluorescence was observed in various natural and synthetic colours. The fluorescence intensities of these colours are generally weaker than those of oil colours.

  18. Fluorescence and picosecond induced absorption from the lowest singlet excited states of quercetin in solutions and polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, S. L.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Buganov, O. V.; Knyukshto, V. N.; Raichenok, T. F.

    2017-03-01

    The spectroscopic and photophysical properties of the biologically important plant antioxidant quercetin in organic solvents, polymer films of polyvinyl alcohol, and a buffer solution at pH 7.0 are studied by stationary luminescence and femtosecond laser spectroscopy at room temperature and 77 K. The large magnitude of the dipole moment of the quercetin molecule in the excited Franck-Condon state μ e FC = 52.8 C m indicates the dipolar nature of quercetin in this excited state. The transient induced absorption spectra S 1→ S n in all solvents are characterized by a short-wave band at λ abs max = 460 nm with exponential decay times in the range of 10.0-20.0 ps. In the entire spectral range at times of >100 ps, no residual induced absorption was observed that could be attributed to the triplet-triplet transitions T 1 → T k in quercetin. In polar solvents, two-band fluorescence was also recorded at room temperature, which is due to the luminescence of the initial enol form of quercetin ( 415 nm) and its keto form with a transferred proton (550 nm). The short-wave band is absent in nonpolar 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF). The spectra of fluorescence and fluorescence excitation exhibit a low dependence on the wavelength of excitation and detection, which may be related to the solvation and conformational changes in the quercetin molecule. Decreasing the temperature of a glassy-like freezing quercetin solution in ethanol and 2-MTHF to 77 K leads to a strong increase in the intensity (by a factor of 100) of both bands. The energy circuits for the proton transfer process are proposed depending on the polarity of the medium. The main channel for the exchange of electronic excitation energy in the quercetin molecule at room temperature is the internal conversion S 1 ⇝ S 0, induced by the state with a proton transfer.

  19. Water-Soluble Triarylborane Chromophores for One- and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Imaging of Mitochondria in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbeck, Stefanie; Zhang, Zuolun; Gutmann, Marcus; Lühmann, Tessa; Edkins, Robert M; Clermont, Guillaume; Lazar, Adina N; Haehnel, Martin; Edkins, Katharina; Eichhorn, Antonius; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Meinel, Lorenz; Marder, Todd B

    2016-10-04

    Three water-soluble tetracationic quadrupolar chromophores comprising two three-coordinate boron π-acceptor groups bridged by thiophene-containing moieties were synthesised for biological imaging applications. Compound 3 containing the bulkier 5-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 )-2,2'-(C4 H2 S)2 -5'-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 ) bridge is stable over a long period of time, exhibits a high fluorescence quantum yield and strong one- and two-photon absorption (TPA), and has a TPA cross section of 268 GM at 800 nm in water. Confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy studies in live cells indicated localisation of the chromophore at the mitochondria; moreover, cytotoxicity measurements proved biocompatibility. Thus, chromophore 3 has excellent potential for one- and two-photon-excited fluorescence imaging of mitochondrial function in cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione studied by ultrafast absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Verma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We employ transient absorption from the deep-UV to the visible region and fluorescence upconversion to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer dynamics in a biologically relevant drug molecule, 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione. The molecule is a ß-diketone which in the electronic ground state exists as exocyclic enol with an intramolecular H-bond. Upon electronic excitation at 300 nm, the first excited state of the exocyclic enol is initially populated, followed by ultrafast proton transfer (≈160 fs to form the vibrationally hot endocyclic enol. Subsequently, solvent-induced vibrational relaxation takes place (≈10 ps followed by decay (≈390 ps to the corresponding ground state.

  1. Two-photon excitation with pico-second fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect nuclear association of flavanols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene, E-mail: i.mueller-harvey@reading.ac.uk [Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory, Food Production and Quality Research Division, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, P O Box 236, Reading RG6 6AT (United Kingdom); Feucht, Walter, E-mail: walter.feucht@gmail.com [Department of Plant Sciences, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Polster, Juergen, E-mail: j.polster@wzw.tum.de [Department of Physical Biochemistry, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Trnkova, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.trnkova@uhk.cz [University of Hradec Kralove, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Rokitanskeho 62, 50003 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Burgos, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.burgos@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Parker, Anthony W., E-mail: tony.parker@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Botchway, Stanley W., E-mail: stan.botchway@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique for flavanols overcomes autofluorescence interference in cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plant flavanols differed in their lifetimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dissolved and bound flavanols revealed contrasting lifetime changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique will allow studying of flavanol trafficking in live cells. - Abstract: Two-photon excitation enabled for the first time the observation and measurement of excited state fluorescence lifetimes from three flavanols in solution, which were {approx}1.0 ns for catechin and epicatechin, but <45 ps for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The shorter lifetime for EGCG is in line with a lower fluorescence quantum yield of 0.003 compared to catechin (0.015) and epicatechin (0.018). In vivo experiments with onion cells demonstrated that tryptophan and quercetin, which tend to be major contributors of background fluorescence in plant cells, have sufficiently low cross sections for two-photon excitation at 630 nm and therefore do not interfere with detection of externally added or endogenous flavanols in Allium cepa or Taxus baccata cells. Applying two-photon excitation to flavanols enabled 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and showed that added EGCG penetrated the whole nucleus of onion cells. Interestingly, EGCG and catechin showed different lifetime behaviour when bound to the nucleus: EGCG lifetime increased from <45 to 200 ps, whilst catechin lifetime decreased from 1.0 ns to 500 ps. Semi-quantitative measurements revealed that the relative ratios of EGCG concentrations in nucleoli associated vesicles: nucleus: cytoplasm were ca. 100:10:1. Solution experiments with catechin, epicatechin and histone proteins provided preliminary evidence, via the appearance of a second lifetime ({tau}{sub 2} = 1.9-3.1 ns), that both flavanols may be interacting with histone proteins. We conclude that there

  2. Quantum interference between multi photon absorption pathways in organic solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebane, A.; Christensson, N.; Drobizhev, M.; Stepanenko, Y.; Spangler, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate spatial interference fringe pattern by simultaneous one- and three-photon absorption of UV and near-IR femtosecond pulses in thin film organic solid at room temperature. We use organic dendrimers that are specially designed to have strong fluorescence and very large three-photon absorption cross-section. High fringe visibility allows the quantum interference to be observed by eye

  3. The fluorescence action spectra of some saturated hydrocarbon liquids for excitation energies above and below their ionization thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostafin, A.E.; Lipsky, S.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence action spectra have been obtained for the neat liquids, cis-decalin, trans-decalin, bicyclohexyl, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, isobutylcyclohexane, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, 3-methylhexane, 3-methylpentane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane at excitation energies, ε, ranging from their absorption onsets (at ca. 7 eV) to 10.3 eV. For all compounds, with the exception of cis-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield is observed to monotonically decline with increasing ε, reaching a minimum value at an energy, ε m (a few tenths of an eV above the liquid phase ionization threshold, ε l ) followed by a slow increase. In the case of cis-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield remains constant over the entire range of excitation energies studied, permitting its use as a quantum counter replacing the standard sodium salicylate, at least over a spectral range from 185 to 120 nm. The recovery of the fluorescence quantum yield for ε>ε m is attributed to an increasing probability for electron ejection followed by e - +RH + geminate recombination, to produce an excited state of RH with energy less than ε l . From a simple analysis of the action spectrum, a lower bound estimate of the electron ejection probability, φ ± , is obtained as a function of ε. In the case of cyclohexane, where φ ± has been obtained by other techniques at ε congruent 10 eV, the lower bound estimate agrees with the experimental value. From this agreement, arguments are presented to make plausible the conjecture that in all these liquids, the initially produced e - +RH + geminate ion pair first rapidly internally converts to an ion-pair state ca

  4. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting.

  5. A reagentless enzymatic fluorescent biosensor for glucose based on upconverting glasses, as excitation source, and chemically modified glucose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Barrio, Melisa; Cases, Rafael; Cebolla, Vicente; Hirsch, Thomas; de Marcos, Susana; Wilhelm, Stefan; Galbán, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Upon near-infrared excitation Tm(3+)+Yb(3+) doped fluorohafnate glasses present upconversion properties and emit visible light. This property permits to use these glasses (UCG) as excitation sources for fluorescent optical biosensors. Taking this into account, in this work a fluorescent biosensor for glucose determination is designed and evaluated. The biosensor combines the UCG and the fluorescence of the enzyme glucose oxidase chemically modified with a fluorescein derivative (GOx-FS), whose intensity is modified during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. Optical parameters have been optimized and a mathematical model describing the behavior of the analytical signal is suggested. Working in FIA mode, the biosensor responds to glucose concentrations up to, at least, 15mM with a limit of detection of 1.9mM. The biosensor has a minimum lifetime of 9 days and has been applied to glucose determination in drinks. The applicability of the sensor was tested by glucose determination in two fruit juices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In situ detection of atomic and molecular iodine using Resonance and Off-Resonance Fluorescence by Lamp Excitation: ROFLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Gómez Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a new instrument for in situ detection of atmospheric iodine atoms and molecules based on atomic and molecular resonance and off-resonance ultraviolet fluorescence excited by lamp emission. The instrument combines the robustness, light weight, low power consumption and efficient excitation of radio-frequency discharge light sources with the high sensitivity of the photon counting technique. Calibration of I2 fluorescence is achieved via quantitative detection of the molecule by Incoherent Broad Band Cavity-enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy. Atomic iodine fluorescence signal is calibrated by controlled broad band photolysis of known I2 concentrations in the visible spectral range at atmospheric pressure. The instrument has been optimised in laboratory experiments to reach detection limits of 1.2 pptv for I atoms and 13 pptv for I2, for S/N = 1 and 10 min of integration time. The ROFLEX system has been deployed in a field campaign in northern Spain, representing the first concurrent observation of ambient mixing ratios of iodine atoms and molecules in the 1–350 pptv range.

  7. Analysis of Indium Tin Oxide Film Using Argon Fluroide (ArF) Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence of Ablated Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sut Kam; Garcia, Dario Machado

    2017-04-01

    A two-pulse laser-excited atomic fluorescence (LEAF) technique at 193 nm wavelength was applied to the analysis of indium tin oxide (ITO) layer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. Fluorescence emissions from analytes were induced from plumes generated by first laser pulse. Using this approach, non-selective LEAF can be accomplished for simultaneous multi-element analysis and it overcomes the handicap of strict requirement for laser excitation wavelength. In this study, experimental conditions including laser fluences, times for gating and time delay between pulses were optimized to reveal high sensitivity with minimal sample destruction and penetration. With weak laser fluences of 100 and 125 mJ/cm 2 for 355 and 193 nm pulses, detection limits were estimated to be 0.10% and 0.43% for Sn and In, respectively. In addition, the relation between fluorescence emissions and number of laser shots was investigated; reproducible results were obtained for Sn and In. It shows the feasibility of depth profiling by this technique. Morphologies of samples were characterized at various laser fluences and number of shots to examine the accurate penetration. Images of craters were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate the imperceptible destructiveness of film after laser shot. With such weak laser fluences and minimal destructiveness, this LEAF technique is suitable for thin-film analysis.

  8. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoya, Kaoru; Chen, Pisin

    1989-03-01

    The final electron energy spectrum under multi-photon beamstrahlung process is derived analytically in the classical and the intermediate regimes. The maximum disruption angle from the low energy tail of the spectrum is also estimated. The results are then applied to the TLC and the CLIC parameters. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Evaluation of an inductively-coupled plasma with an extended-sleeve torch as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, M A; Uchida, H; Winefordner, J D

    1983-05-01

    An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) with an extended-sleeve torch has been evaluated as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry. Limits of detection for 20 lines are given. The detection power is almost equivalent to that obtained by excitation with a hollow-cathode lamp. Interelement effects and spectral interferences are discussed.

  10. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum......, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based...... on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved...

  11. Long-lived visible luminescence of UV LEDs and impact on LED excited time-resolved fluorescence applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, D; Connally, R; Piper, J

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of a detailed study of the spectral and temporal properties of visible emission from three different GaN-based ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (UV LEDs). The primary UV emission in the 360-380 nm band decays rapidly (less than 1 μs) following switch-off; however, visible luminescence (470-750 nm) with a decay lifetime of tens of microseconds was observed at approximately 10 -4 of the UV intensity. For applications of UV LEDs in time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) employing lanthanide chelates, the visible luminescence from the LEDs competes with the target Eu 3+ or Tb 3+ fluorescence in both spectral and temporal domains. A UV band-pass filter (Schott UG11 glass) was therefore used to reduce the visible luminescence of the UV LEDs by three orders of magnitude relative to UV output to yield a practical excitation source for TRF

  12. Fluorescence lifetime selectivity in excitation-emission matrices for qualitative analysis of a two-component system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millican, D.W.; McGown, L.B.

    1989-01-01

    Steady-state fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and phase-resolved EEMs (PREEMs) collected at modulation frequencies of 6, 18, and 30 MHz, were used for qualitative analysis of mixtures of benzo[k]fluoranthene (τ = 8 ns) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (τ = 29 ns) in ethanol. The EEMs of the individual components were extracted from mixture EEMs by means of wavelength component vector-gram (WCV) analysis. Phase resolution was found to be superior to steady-state measurements for extraction of the component spectra, for mixtures in which the intensity contributions from the two components are unequal

  13. Application of laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation into atomic hydrogen density measurement in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiwara, Toshinori; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Hee Je; Park, Won Zoo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Density profiles of hydrogen atoms in reactive plasmas of hydrogen and methane gases were measured, for the first time, using the laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation of Lyman beta transition and observation at the Balmer alpha radiation. Absolute density determinations showed atomic densities of around 3 x 10 17 m -3 , or the degree of dissociation to be 10 -4 . Densities along the axis perpendicular to the RF electrode showed peaked profiles, which were due to the balance of atomic hydrogen production by electron impact on molecules against diffusion loss to the walls. (author)

  14. Mapping the Local Organization of Cell Membranes Using Excitation-Polarization-Resolved Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kress, Alla; Wang, Xiao; Ranchon, Hubert; Savatier, Julien; Rigneault, Hervé; Ferrand, Patrick; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Fluorescence anisotropy and linear dichroism imaging have been widely used for imaging biomolecular orientational distributions in protein aggregates, fibrillar structures of cells, and cell membranes. However, these techniques do not give access to complete orientational order information in a whole image, because their use is limited to parts of the sample where the average orientation of molecules is known a priori. Fluorescence anisotropy is also highly sensitive t...

  15. Magnetic-Field Induced Enhancement in the Fluorescence Yield Spectrum of Doubly Excited States in Helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroem, Magnus; Saathe, Conny; Agaaker, Marcus; Soederstroem, Johan; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Stranges, Stefano; Richter, Robert; Alagia, Michele; Gorczyca, T. W.; Robicheaux, F.

    2006-01-01

    An influence of static magnetic fields on the fluorescence yield spectrum of He in the vicinity of the N=2 thresholds has been observed. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with predictions based on multichannel quantum defect theory, and it is demonstrated that the Rydberg electron l mixing due to the diamagnetic interaction is essential for the description of the observed fluorescence yield intensity enhancement

  16. Excitation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons by Fluorescent Light from Organic Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Jozefowski, Leszek; Kawalec, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    -coherent excitation indicates its prospect for future integrated systems. To support our experimental results, we investigate the proposed geometries by analytical calculations and finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) modelling. The experimentally obtained angular leakage radiation peak positions can readily...... be predicted by our analytical calculations. Nevertheless, the experimental results exhibit a distinct asymmetry in the peak intensities. In agreement with our FDTD calculations, we address this asymmetrical SPP excitation to the nanofiber molecular orientation. The proposed structure’s high flexibility...

  17. Fluorescence enhancement and quenching of Eu(TTFA)3 by Ag nanoparticles at different excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingru; Shi, Qiang; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Wenjun; Zheng, Shiling

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of Eu(TTFA) 3 complex in presence of silver nanoparticles were investigated at three excitation wavelengths of 350 nm, 383 nm and 463 nm, respectively. Luminescence quenching and enhancement were both observed at three different excitation and emission wavelengths. Luminescence at 612 nm, 578 nm, 590 nm and 650 nm were enhanced at excitation wavelength of 350 nm, and quenched at excitation wavelength of 383 nm. The enhancement factor reached to 1.6 and the quench factor was about 0.65. For 463 nm excitation, the luminescence at 612 nm was quenched, and the quench factor reached to 0.85. Luminescence at other three emission wavelengths (578 nm, 590 nm, and 650 nm) was enhanced, with the greatest enhancement factor of ∼5. - Highlights: • The luminescence enhancement and quenching were both obtained by using the Ag nanoparticles. • The luminescence enhancement and quenching highly depends on the excitation and emission wavelengths. • The enhancement factor of luminescence also has a great relationship with the intrinsic quantum yield

  18. Spatial discrimination against background with different optical systems for collection of fluorescence in laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a graphite tube electrothermal atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzefovsky, A I; Lonardo, R F; Michel, R G

    1995-07-01

    A single 90 degrees off-axis ellipsoidal mirror fragment was used in a dispersive detection system for electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The performance of the new optical arrangement was compared with those of optical arrangements that employed a plane mirror in combination with biconvex or plano-convex lenses. All the optical arrangements collected fluorescence in a scheme called front surface illustration. BEAM-4, an optical ray tracing program, was used for calculations of spatial ray distributions and optical collection efficiency for the various optical configurations. Experimentally, the best collection efficiency was obtained by use of the ellipsoidal mirror, in qualitative agreement with simulations done by use of the BEAM-4 software. The best detection limit for cobalt with the new optical arrangement was 20 fg, which was a factor of 5 better than that obtained with conventional optical arrangements with otherwise the same instrumentation. The signal-to-background ratio and the fluorescence collection efficiency were also studied as a function of position of the optical components for the various optical arrangements. For both cobalt and phosphorus, the signal-to-background ratio with the new optical arrangement remained stable within 10-20% during +/- 8 mm shifts in the position of the detection system from the focal plane of the optics. Overall, the new optical arrangement offered high collection efficiency, excellent sensitivity, and facile optical alignment due to efficient spatial separation between the fluorescence signal and the background radiation. The advantages of the new optical arrangement were particularly important during measurements in the presence of high levels of blackbody radiation.

  19. Fluorescence excitation analysis by two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy: a new method to identify fluorescent nanoparticles on histological tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn E

    2012-10-01

    spectra unmixing to localize fluorescent nanoparticles in tissue samples.Keywords: FAMIS, spectral excitation sequences, Texas Red, tunable excitation, unmixing

  20. Characterization of CDOM of river waters in China using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and regional integration techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Shang, Yingxin; Shao, Tiantian; Wen, Zhidan; Lv, Lili

    2017-08-01

    The spatial characteristics of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) components in river waters in China were first examined by excitation-emission matrix spectra and fluorescence regional integration (FRI) with the data collected during September to November between 2013 and 2015. One tyrosine-like (R1), one tryptophan-like (R2), one fulvic-like (R3), one microbial protein-like (R4), and one humic-like (R5) components have been identified by FRI method. Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted to assess variations in the five FDOM components (FRί (ί = 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5)) and the humification index for all 194 river water samples. The average fluorescence intensities of the five fluorescent components and the total fluorescence intensities FSUM differed under spatial variation among the seven major river basins (Songhua, Liao, Hai, Yellow and Huai, Yangtze, Pearl, and Inflow Rivers) in China. When all the river water samples were pooled together, the fulvic-like FR3 and the humic-like FR5 showed a strong positive linear relationship (R2 = 0.90, n = 194), indicating that the two allochthonous FDOM components R3 and R5 may originate from similar sources. There is a moderate strong positive correlation between the tryptophan-like FR2 and the microbial protein-like FR4 (R2 = 0.71, n = 194), suggesting that parts of two autochthonous FDOM components R2 and R4 are likely from some common sources. However, the total allochthonous substance FR(3+5) and the total autochthonous substances FR(1+2+4) exhibited a weak correlation (R2 = 0.40, n = 194). Significant positive linear relationships between FR3 (R2 = 0.69, n = 194), FR5 (R2 = 0.79, n = 194), and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) absorption coefficient a(254) were observed, which demonstrated that the CDOM absorption was dominated by the allochthonous FDOM components R3 and R5.

  1. Time-resolved UV-excited microarray reader for fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Adelina; Hokkanen, Ari P.; Pastinen, Tomi; Takkinen, Kristina; Soderlund, Hans

    2001-05-01

    Analytical systems based on immunochemistry are largely used in medical diagnostics and in biotechnology. There is a significant pressure to develop the present assay formats to become easier to use, faster, and less reagent consuming. Further developments towards high density array--like multianalyte measurement systems would be valuable. To this aim we have studied the applicability of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer in immunoassays on microspots and in microwells. We have used engineered recombinant antibodies detecting the pentameric protein CRP as a model analyte system, and tested different assay formats. We describe also the construction of a time-resolved scanning epifluorometer with which we could measure the FRET interaction between the slow fluorescence decay from europium chelates and its energy transfer to the rapidly decaying fluorophore Cy5.

  2. Determination of mercury in microwave-digested soil by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, S T; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1994-12-01

    A sample digestion procedure was developed which employs microwave heating of soil and sediment in concentrated nitric acid in a high-pressure closed vessel. Complete dissolution of mercury into the sample solution occurs within 5 min at 59 W/vessel without loss of analyte through overpressurization. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization (LEAFS-ETA) was used as the detection method. The scheme uses a two-step excitation, with lambda(1) = 253.7 nm and lambda(2) = 435.8 nm. Direct line fluorescence was measured at 546.2 nm. The absolute instrumental limit of detection was 14 fg; 1.4 pg/ml with a 10 mul sample injection. The recoveries of mercury in two spiked samples were 94 and 98%. The SRM 8406 (Mercury in River Sediment) was digested and analyzed for mercury, and the results (58.4 +/- 1.8 ng/g) agreed well with the reference value of 60 ng/g. The results obtained by LEAFS-ETA with microwave sample digestion are in good agreement with those found by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with EPA Series Method 245.5 sample digestion, which is one of the most commonly used methods for the determination of mercury in soil.

  3. Imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry for determination of mercury in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Alain; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-06-15

    In this study, direct determination of mercury at the nanogram per liter level in the complex seawater matrix by imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ITR-ETA-LEAFS) is described. In the case of mercury, the use of a nonresonant line for fluorescence detection with only one laser excitation is not possible. For measurements at the 253.652 nm resonant line, scattering phenomena have been minimized by eliminating the simultaneous vaporization of salts and by using temporal resolution and the imaging mode of the camera. Electrothermal conditions (0.1 M oxalic acid as matrix modifier, low atomization temperature) have been optimized in order to suppress chemical interferences and to obtain a good separation of specific signal and seawater background signal. For ETA-LEAFS, a specific response has been obtained for Hg with the use of time resolution. Moreover, an important improvement of the detection limit has been obtained by selecting, from the furnace image, pixels collecting the lowest number of scattered photons. Using optimal experimental conditions, a detection limit of 10 ng L(-1) for 10 μL of sample, close to the lowest concentration level of total Hg in the open ocean, has been obtained.

  4. Development of an electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry procedure for direct measurements of arsenic in diluted serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, D J; Simeonsson, J B

    1999-11-01

    A procedure for the direct determination of arsenic in diluted serum by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS) is reported. Laser radiation needed to excite As at 193.696 and 197.197 nm is generated as the second anti-Stokes stimulated Raman scattering output of a frequency-doubled dye laser operating near 230.5 and 235.5 nm, respectively. Two different LEAFS schemes have been utilized and provide limits of detection of 200-300 fg for As in aqueous standards. When measurements of serum samples diluted 1:10 with deionized water are performed, a stable background signal is observed that can be accounted for by taking measurements with the laser tuned off-wavelength. No As is detected in any of the bovine or human serum samples analyzed. Measurements of 100 pg/mL standard additions of As to a diluted bovine serum sample utilizing either inorganic or organic As species demonstrate a linear relationship of the fluorescence signal to As spike concentration, but exhibit a sensitivity of approximately half that observed in pure aqueous standards. The limit of detection for As in 1:10 diluted serum samples is 65 pg/mL or 650 fg absolute mass, which corresponds to 0.65 ng/mL As in undiluted serum. To our knowledge, the ETA-LEAFS procedure is currently the only one capable of directly measuring As in diluted serum at these levels.

  5. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp-europium atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Z; Liang, F; Yang, P; Jin, Q; Huang, B

    1999-06-01

    Eu atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL-MPT AFS/IFS) was studied. Operating conditions were optimized. The best detection limits for AFS and IFS obtained with a desolvated ultrasonic nebulization system were 42.0 ng/mL for Eu I 462.7 nm and 21.8 ng/mL for Eu II 381.97 nm, respectively, both were better than those given by the instruction manual of a Baird ICP AFS-2000 spectrometer using pneumatic concentric nebulizer with desolvation for AFS, but were significantly higher than those obtained by using the Baird spectrometer with a mini-monochromator and a ultrasonic nebulzer system.

  6. Ultrafast excited and ground-state dynamics of the green fluorescent protein chromophore in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vengris, M.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; He, X.; Bell, A.F.; Tonge, P.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Larsen, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrafast dispersed pump-dump-probe spectroscopy was applied to HBDI (4′-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone), a model green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore in solution with different protonation states. The measured three-dimensional data was analyzed using a global analysis method

  7. X-ray fluorescence in some rare earth and high Z elements excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    section and X-ray fluorescence yield values for different elements at various photoion- ization energies ... In the present method, the K-shell vacancies are created by photons and filled by outer electrons leading to ... The well type detector pro-.

  8. TRACE ANALYSIS BY LASER-EXCITED ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE WITH ATOMIZATION IN A PULSED PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Lunyov , O.; Oshemkov , S.; Petrov , A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of plasma atomization for laser fluorescence trace analysis are discussed. Pulsed hot hollow cathode discharge was used for analysis of solutions and powdered samples. The high voltage spark and laser-induced breakdown (laser spark) were used as atomizers of metal-containing atmospheric aerosols. Detection limits were improved by means of temporal background selection.

  9. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence determination of cadmium in uranium matrix using Cd Kα line excited by continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhara, Sangita; Misra, N.L.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for determination of cadmium (Cd) in uranium (U) matrix using continuum source of excitation was developed. Calibration and sample solutions of cadmium, with and without uranium were prepared by mixing different volumes of standard solutions of cadmium and uranyl nitrate, both prepared in suprapure nitric acid. The concentration of Cd in calibration solutions and samples was in the range of 6 to 90 μg/mL whereas the concentration of Cd with respect to U ranged from 90 to 700 μg/g of U. From the calibration solutions and samples containing uranium, the major matrix uranium was selectively extracted using 30% tri-n-butyl phosphate in dodecane. Fixed volumes (1.5 mL) of aqueous phases thus obtained were taken directly in specially designed in-house fabricated leak proof Perspex sample cells for the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence measurements and calibration plots were made by plotting Cd Kα intensity against respective Cd concentration. For the calibration solutions not having uranium, the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra were measured without any extraction and Cd calibration plots were made accordingly. The results obtained showed a precision of 2% (1σ) and the results deviated from the expected values by < 4% on average.

  10. Characterizing multi-photon quantum interference with practical light sources and threshold single-photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Álvaro; Wang, Wenyuan; Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos

    2018-04-01

    The experimental characterization of multi-photon quantum interference effects in optical networks is essential in many applications of photonic quantum technologies, which include quantum computing and quantum communication as two prominent examples. However, such characterization often requires technologies which are beyond our current experimental capabilities, and today's methods suffer from errors due to the use of imperfect sources and photodetectors. In this paper, we introduce a simple experimental technique to characterize multi-photon quantum interference by means of practical laser sources and threshold single-photon detectors. Our technique is based on well-known methods in quantum cryptography which use decoy settings to tightly estimate the statistics provided by perfect devices. As an illustration of its practicality, we use this technique to obtain a tight estimation of both the generalized Hong‑Ou‑Mandel dip in a beamsplitter with six input photons and the three-photon coincidence probability at the output of a tritter.

  11. Single- and multi-photon ionization studies of organosulfur species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yu -San [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Accurate ionization energies (IE`s) for molecular species are used for prediction of chemical reactivity and are of fundamental importance to chemists. The IE of a gaseous molecule can be determined routinely in a photoionization or a photoelectron experiment. IE determinations made in conventional photoionization and photoelectron studies have uncertainties in the range of 3--100 meV (25--250 cm-1). In the past decade, the most exciting development in the field of photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy has been the availability of high resolution, tunable ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser sources. The laser pulsed field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) scheme is currently the state-of-the-art photoelectron spectroscopic technique and is capable of providing photoelectron energy resolution close to the optical resolution. The author has focused attention on the photoionization processes of some sulfur-containing species. The studies of the photoionization and photodissociation on sulfur-containing compounds [such as CS2, CH3SH, CH3SSCH3, CH3CH2SCH2CH3, HSCH2CH2SH and C4H4S (thiophene) and sulfur-containing radicals, such as HS, CS, CH3S, CH3CH2S and CH3SS], have been the major subjects in the group because sulfur is an important species contributing to air pollution in the atmosphere. The modeling of the combustion and oxidation of sulfur compounds represents important steps for the control of both the production and the elimination of sulfur-containing pollutants. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of the thesis. Chapters 2 and 6 contain five papers published in, or accepted for publication in, academic periodicals. In Chapter 7, the progress of the construction in the laboratory of a new vacuum ultraviolet laser system equipped with a reflectron mass

  12. Multi-photon transitions and Rabi resonance in continuous wave EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiko, Alexander P; Fedaruk, Ryhor; Markevich, Siarhei A

    2015-10-01

    The study of microwave-radiofrequency multi-photon transitions in continuous wave (CW) EPR spectroscopy is extended to a Rabi resonance condition, when the radio frequency of the magnetic-field modulation matches the Rabi frequency of a spin system in the microwave field. Using the non-secular perturbation theory based on the Bogoliubov averaging method, the analytical description of the response of the spin system is derived for all modulation frequency harmonics. When the modulation frequency exceeds the EPR linewidth, multi-photon transitions result in sidebands in absorption EPR spectra measured with phase-sensitive detection at any harmonic. The saturation of different-order multi-photon transitions is shown to be significantly different and to be sensitive to the Rabi resonance. The noticeable frequency shifts of sidebands are found to be the signatures of this resonance. The inversion of two-photon lines in some spectral intervals of the out-of-phase first-harmonic signal is predicted under passage through the Rabi resonance. The inversion indicates the transition from absorption to stimulated emission or vice versa, depending on the sideband. The manifestation of the primary and secondary Rabi resonance is also demonstrated in the time evolution of steady-state EPR signals formed by all harmonics of the modulation frequency. Our results provide a theoretical framework for future developments in multi-photon CW EPR spectroscopy, which can be useful for samples with long spin relaxation times and extremely narrow EPR lines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Study the multi-photon absorption process in two types of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-azawi, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the multi-photon absorption process in two types of molecules; spherical top such as SF 6 molecules and assymetric top such as CHOOH and C 2 H 4 molecules. This work also aimed to study the effect of buffer gas pressure (Ar), which is transparent to the infrared (IR) laser on the multiphoton absorption of both types of molecules. A pulsed (TEA) CO 2 laser was used as a source which generates multi-lines in the IR-region of the spectrum and an optoacoustic detector was used to detect the energy absorbed by the molecules. In this study, the relaxation process was found to be faster in the heavy molecules than that in the light ones. A limit in the Ar pressure was observed. Below this limit, the gas acted as an active buffer gas and above it, the multi-photon absorption process was quenched. This work also aimed to study the multi-photon absorption spectrum for the CHOOH molecules in the range (1067-1090 cm -1 ). This spectrum was found to be consistent with the linear absorption spectrum obtained for the same range. The density of the vibrational states as a function of the vibrational energy was studied for the molecules SF 6 , CHOOH and C 2 H 4 . The results were used to interpret (i) the difference in the energy absorbed by difference molecules at the same energy density and (ii) the non-linearity in the multi-photon absorption for CHOOH molecules. 1 tab.; 40 figs.; 70 refs

  14. Yield and enrichment studies of C-13 isotope by multi-photon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Multi-photon dissociation of Freon-22 (CF2HCl) at low temperatures has been carried out to separate the C-13 isotope using a TEA CO2 laser. Yield and enrichment of C-13 isotope in the product C2F4 are studied at 9P(22) laser line as a function of temperature (–50°C to 30°C). It is observed that at a given fluence ...

  15. Fano Description of Single-Hydrocarbon Fluorescence Excited by a Scanning Tunneling Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Jörg; Doppagne, Benjamin; Scheurer, Fabrice; Schull, Guillaume

    2018-06-13

    The detection of fluorescence with submolecular resolution enables the exploration of spatially varying photon yields and vibronic properties at the single-molecule level. By placing individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules into the plasmon cavity formed by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a NaCl-covered Ag(111) surface, molecular light emission spectra are obtained that unravel vibrational progression. In addition, light spectra unveil a signature of the molecule even when the tunneling current is injected well separated from the molecular emitter. This signature exhibits a distance-dependent Fano profile that reflects the subtle interplay between inelastic tunneling electrons, the molecular exciton and localized plasmons in at-distance as well as on-molecule fluorescence. The presented findings open the path to luminescence of a different class of molecules than investigated before and contribute to the understanding of single-molecule luminescence at surfaces in a unified picture.

  16. Some dispersive X-ray fluorescence applications in energies with radioisotopic excitation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelfang, P.; Vazquez, C.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work is based on the use of interelemental correction coefficients which are calculated through fundamental parameters. To this purpose, it is necessary to know about the physical constants for each element including the absorption coefficient values and fluorescence yield, the incidence radiation energy, geometric and instrumental parameters. Besides, a special application of the program for the determination of a Nd-La mixed crystal formula is included. (Author) [es

  17. Acetone photophysics at 282 nm excitation at elevated pressure and temperature. II: Fluorescence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason; Raju, Mandhapati; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2017-07-01

    This is the second in a series of two papers that presents an updated fluorescence model and compares with the new experimental data reported in the first paper, as well as the available literature data, to extend the range of acetone photophysics to elevated pressure and temperature conditions. This work elucidates the complete acetone photophysical model in terms of each and every competing radiative and non-radiative rate. The acetone fluorescence model is then thoroughly examined and optimized based on disparity with recently conducted elevated pressure and temperature photophysical calibration experiments. The current work offers insight into the competition between non-radiative and vibrational energy decay rates at elevated temperature and pressure and proposes a global optimization of model parameters from the photophysical model developed by Thurber (Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence for Temperature and Multiparameter Imaging in Gaseous Flows. PhD thesis, Stanford University Mechanical Engineering Department, 1999). The collisional constants of proportionality, which govern vibrational relaxation, are shown to be temperature dependent at elevated pressures. A new oxygen quenching rate is proposed which takes into account collisions with oxygen as well as the oxygen-assisted intersystem crossing component. Additionally, global trends in ketone photophysics are presented and discussed.

  18. Detection and Interpretation of Fluorescence Signals Generated by Excitable Cells and Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Anthony J.

    Part 1: High-Sensitivity Amplifiers for Detecting Fluorescence . Monitoring electrical activity and Cai 2+ transients in biological tissues and individual cells increasingly utilizes optical sensors based on voltage-dependent and Cai 2+-dependent fluorescent dyes. However, achieving satisfactory signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) often requires increased illumination intensities and/or dye concentrations, which results in photo-toxicity, photo-bleaching and other adverse effects limiting the utility of optical recordings. The most challenging are the recordings from individual cardiac myocytes and neurons. Here we demonstrate that by optimizing a conventional transimpedance topology one can achieve a 10-20 fold increase of sensitivity with photodiode-based recording systems (dependent on application). We provide a detailed comparative analysis of the dynamic and noise characteristics of different transimpedance amplifier topologies as well as the example(s) of their practical implementation. Part 2: Light-Scattering Models for Interpretation of Fluorescence Data. Current interest in understanding light transport in cardiac tissue has been motivated in part by increased use of voltage-sensitive and Ca i2+-sensitive fluorescent probes to map electrical impulse propagation and Cai2+-transients in the heart. The fluorescent signals are recorded using such probes represent contributions from different layers of myocardial tissue and are greatly affected by light scattering. The interpretation of these signals thus requires deconvolution which would not be possible without detailed models of light transport in the respective tissue. Which involves the experimental measurements of the absorption, scattering, and anisotropy coefficients, mua, mu s, and g respectively. The aim of the second part of our thesis was to derive a new method for deriving these parameters from high spatial resolution measurements of forward-directed flux (FDF). To this end, we carried out high spatial

  19. In-focal-plane characterization of excitation distribution for quantitative fluorescence microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Klaus; Brülisauer, Martina; ćaǧin, Emine; Bertsch, Dietmar; Lüthi, Stefan; Heeb, Peter; Stärker, Ulrich; Bernard, André

    2017-06-01

    The applications of fluorescence microscopy span medical diagnostics, bioengineering and biomaterial analytics. Full exploitation of fluorescent microscopy is hampered by imperfections in illumination, detection and filtering. Mainly, errors stem from deviations induced by real-world components inducing spatial or angular variations of propagation properties along the optical path, and they can be addressed through consistent and accurate calibration. For many applications, uniform signal to noise ratio (SNR) over the imaging area is required. Homogeneous SNR can be achieved by quantifying and compensating for the signal bias. We present a method to quantitatively characterize novel reference materials as a calibration reference for biomaterials analytics. The reference materials under investigation comprise thin layers of fluorophores embedded in polymer matrices. These layers are highly homogeneous in their fluorescence response, where cumulative variations do not exceed 1% over the field of view (1.5 x 1.1 mm). An automated and reproducible measurement methodology, enabling sufficient correction for measurement artefacts, is reported. The measurement setup is equipped with an autofocus system, ensuring that the measured film quality is not artificially increased by out-of-focus reduction of the system modulation transfer function. The quantitative characterization method is suitable for analysis of modified bio-materials, especially through patterned protein decoration. The imaging method presented here can be used to statistically analyze protein patterns, thereby increasing both precision and throughput. Further, the method can be developed to include a reference emitter and detector pair on the image surface of the reference object, in order to provide traceable measurements.

  20. A disordered polaron model for polarized fluorescence excitation spectra of LH1 and LH2 bacteriochlorophyll antenna aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinkunas, Gediminas; Freiberg, Arvi

    2006-01-01

    Excitonic polarons in antenna complexes are subject to static lattice disorder. A model has been developed to analyze polarized fluorescence excitation spectra of circular light-harvesting complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria containing bacteriochlorophyll as the main photoactive pigment that includes both diagonal (energetic) and off-diagonal (structural) disorders. Essential differences of disorder realizations seem to exist between the core LH1 and peripheral LH2 complexes from the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The disorder in LH1 appears to be dominated by the structural disorder, while that in LH2, by energetic one. These differences may be due to relatively bigger size of the LH1 complex and, consequently, with its enhanced structural flexibility

  1. Improvement of detection limits in the annular 241Am radioisotope-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis for minor elements of environmental sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai My Phe; Ngo Quang Huy; Nguyen Van Suc; Tran Van Luyen; Nguyen Van Mai; Dao Van Hoang; Trinh Thi Bich

    2003-01-01

    The improvement of limit detection to elements Pb, Sr, Zr, Nd, and Ba in mud samples is presented. Two ways for reducing background radiation are: 1/ choosing the optimum γ-ray-excited X-ray assembly such as scattering angle (θ), filter for primary beam, excited holder, collimator for fluorescent lines, etc; 2/ using the chemical separation method to remove major composition for matrix reduction. (NHA)

  2. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements; Contribution a l'analyse des elements legers par fluorescence x excitee au moyen de radioelements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, {beta} and {alpha} emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K{sub {alpha}} lines of 3. period elements excited by {sup 55}Fe, {sup 3}H/Zr and {sup 210}Po sources; for the 2. period the K{sub {alpha}} spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the {alpha} particles of {sup 210}Po. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier les possibilites d'emploi de sources radioactives a l'analyse par fluorescence X des elements legers, on presente apres rappel de notions generales sur la fluorescence X, le principe de l'excitation de ce phenomene par emission X, {beta}, {alpha} de radioelements. Le fonctionnement et l'utilisation du compteur proportionnel a gaz a la detection du rayonnement X est developpe. Un dispositif permettant l'analyse des elements des 2eme et 3eme periodes de la classification de Mendeleev est etudie. Il permet l'excitation de la fluorescence par source radioactive emettrice de rayons X ou de particules {alpha}; le rayonnement X de fluorescence penetre dans un compteur proportionnel depourvu de fenetre, ceci est rendu possible en creant un champ electrique auxiliaire au voisinage de l'echantillon. On definit une pression du gaz de detection pour un rendement de detection maximal

  3. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements; Contribution a l'analyse des elements legers par fluorescence x excitee au moyen de radioelements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, {beta} and {alpha} emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K{sub {alpha}} lines of 3. period elements excited by {sup 55}Fe, {sup 3}H/Zr and {sup 210}Po sources; for the 2. period the K{sub {alpha}} spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the {alpha} particles of {sup 210}Po. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier les possibilites d'emploi de sources radioactives a l'analyse par fluorescence X des elements legers, on presente apres rappel de notions generales sur la fluorescence X, le principe de l'excitation de ce phenomene par emission X, {beta}, {alpha} de radioelements. Le fonctionnement et l'utilisation du compteur proportionnel a gaz a la detection du rayonnement X est developpe. Un dispositif permettant l'analyse des elements des 2eme et 3eme periodes de la classification de Mendeleev est etudie. Il permet l'excitation de la fluorescence par source radioactive emettrice de rayons X ou de particules {alpha}; le rayonnement X de fluorescence penetre dans un compteur proportionnel depourvu de fenetre, ceci est rendu possible en creant un champ electrique auxiliaire au voisinage de l'echantillon. On definit une pression du gaz de detection

  4. Design considerations for highly effective fluorescence excitation and detection optical systems for molecular diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Axel; Van Hille, Herbert; Kuk, Sola

    2018-02-01

    Modern instruments for molecular diagnostics are continuously optimized for diagnostic accuracy, versatility and throughput. The latest progress in LED technology together with tailored optics solutions allows developing highly efficient photonics engines perfectly adapted to the sample under test. Super-bright chip-on-board LED light sources are a key component for such instruments providing maximum luminous intensities in a multitude of narrow spectral bands. In particular the combination of white LEDs with other narrow band LEDs allows achieving optimum efficiency outperforming traditional Xenon light sources in terms of energy consumption, heat dissipation in the system, and switching time between spectral channels. Maximum sensitivity of the diagnostic system can only be achieved with an optimized optics system for the illumination and imaging of the sample. The illumination beam path must be designed for optimum homogeneity across the field while precisely limiting the angular distribution of the excitation light. This is a necessity for avoiding spill-over to the detection beam path and guaranteeing the efficiency of the spectral filtering. The imaging optics must combine high spatial resolution, high light collection efficiency and optimized suppression of excitation light for good signal-to-noise ratio. In order to achieve minimum cross-talk between individual wells in the sample, the optics design must also consider the generation of stray light and the formation of ghost images. We discuss what parameters and limitations have to be considered in an integrated system design approach covering the full path from the light source to the detector.

  5. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved by 39% compared to that of the Xenon flash lamp based unit, due to the LEDs narrower emission spectrum and longer pulse width. Key parameters of the LED system are discussed to further optimize the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-background, and hence the sensitivity of the instrument.

  6. Mercury effects on Thalassiosira weissflogii: Applications of two-photon excitation chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging and flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yun; Zeng Yan; Qu, Jianan Y.; Wang Wenxiong

    2012-01-01

    The toxic effects of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] and methylmercury (MeHg) on the photosynthesis and population growth in a marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii were investigated using two methods: two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and flow cytometry (FCM). For photosynthesis, Hg(II) exposure increased the average chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime, whereas such increment was not found under MeHg stress. This may be caused by the inhibitory effect of Hg(II) instead of MeHg on the electron transport chain. For population growth, modeled specific growth rate data showed that the reduction in population growth by Hg(II) mainly resulted from an increased number of injured cells, while the live cells divided at the normal rates. However, MeHg inhibitory effects on population growth were contributed by the reduced division rates of all cells. Furthermore, the cell images and the FCM data reflected the morphological changes of diatom cells under Hg(II)/MeHg exposure vividly and quantitatively. Our results demonstrated that the toxigenicity mechanisms between Hg(II) and MeHg were different in the algal cells.

  7. Green analytical determination of emerging pollutants in environmental waters using excitation-emission photoinduced fluorescence data and multivariate calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Sánchez, María Del Carmen; Lozano, Valeria A; Rodríguez-Cáceres, María Isabel; Durán-Merás, Isabel; Escandar, Graciela M

    2015-03-01

    An eco-friendly strategy for the simultaneous quantification of three emerging pharmaceutical contaminants is presented. The proposed analytical method, which involves photochemically induced fluorescence matrix data combined with second-order chemometric analysis, was used for the determination of carbamazepine, ofloxacin and piroxicam in water samples of different complexity without the need of chromatographic separation. Excitation-emission photoinduced fluorescence matrices were obtained after UV irradiation, and processed with second-order algorithms. Only one of the tested algorithms was able to overcome the strong spectral overlapping among the studied pollutants and allowed their successful quantitation in very interferent media. The method sensitivity in superficial and underground water samples was enhanced by a simple solid-phase extraction with C18 membranes, which was successful for the extraction/preconcentration of the pollutants at trace levels. Detection limits in preconcentrated (1:125) real water samples ranged from 0.04 to 0.3 ng mL(-1). Relative prediction errors around 10% were achieved. The proposed strategy is significantly simpler and greener than liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods, without compromising the analytical quality of the results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterizing fluorescent dissolved organic matter in a membrane bioreactor via excitation-emission matrix combined with parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tahir; Quang, Viet Ly; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we successfully tracked the dynamic changes in different constitutes of bound extracellular polymeric substances (bEPS), soluble microbial products (SMP), and permeate during the operation of bench scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Three fluorescent groups were identified, including two protein-like (tryptophan-like C1 and tyrosine-like C2) and one microbial humic-like components (C3). In bEPS, protein-like components were consistently more dominant than C3 during the MBR operation, while their relative abundance in SMP depended on aeration intensities. C1 of bEPS exhibited a linear correlation (R(2)=0.738; pbEPS amounts in sludge, and C2 was closely related to the stability of sludge. The protein-like components were more greatly responsible for membrane fouling. Our study suggests that EEM-PARAFAC can be a promising monitoring tool to provide further insight into process evaluation and membrane fouling during MBR operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Volumetric label-free imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea based on two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen; Geng, Yang; Ye, Qing

    2013-01-01

    The visualization of the delicate structure and spatial relationship of intracochlear sensory cells has relied on the laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy is advantageous for its high resolution and deep penetration depth, yet disadvantageous due to the necessity of exogenous labeling. In this study, we present the volumetric imaging of rat cochlea without exogenous dyes using a near-infrared femtosecond laser as the excitation mechanism and endogenous two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) as the contrast mechanism. We find that TPEF exhibits strong contrast, allowing cellular and even subcellular resolution imaging of the cochlea, differentiating cell types, visualizing delicate structures and the radial nerve fiber. Our results further demonstrate that 3D reconstruction rendered with z-stacks of optical sections enables better revealment of fine structures and spatial relationships, and easily performed morphometric analysis. The TPEF-based optical biopsy technique provides great potential for new and sensitive diagnostic tools for hearing loss or hearing disorders, especially when combined with fiber-based microendoscopy. (paper)

  10. Alpha particle excited x-ray fluorescence analysis for trace elements in cervical spinal cords of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Iwata, Shiro; Sasajima, Kazuhisa; Yase, Yoshio; Yoshida, Shohei.

    1980-01-01

    The mean contents of trace elements in anterior gray horn section of cervical spinal cords of six amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases were relatively determined against those of six control cases by α-particle excited X-ray fluorescence analysis. The anterior gray horn section of cervical spinal cord samples were excited by 1.6 MeV α-particle beam of 2 mm diameter accelerated with a Van de Graaff accelerator, and characteristic X-ray spectra were measured with a Si(Li) detector. From the peak areas on the X-ray spectra, the relative mean contents of the trace elements in cervical spinal cords of ALS and control cases were determined. As a result, the X-ray peaks of Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn were detected. The contents of Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, V, Mn and Fe in ALS cases were higher than those in control cases. The contents of S, Cl, K, Cu and Zn in ALS and in control cases were equal to each other within standard deviation. The precipitation mechanisms of Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, V, Mn and Fe into cervical spinal cord of ALS cases are discussed on the basis of the previous studies. (author)

  11. Investigation of excited states populations density of Hall thruster plasma in three dimensions by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoruchko, D. D.; Skrylev, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article deals with investigation of the excited states populations distribution of a low-temperature xenon plasma in the thruster with closed electron drift at 300 W operating conditions were investigated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) over the 350-1100 nm range. Seven xenon ions (Xe II) transitions were analyzed, while for neutral atoms (Xe I) just three transitions were explored, since the majority of Xe I emission falls into the ultraviolet or infrared part of the spectrum and are difficult to measure. The necessary spontaneous emission probabilities (Einstein coefficients) were calculated. Measurements of the excited state distribution were made for points (volume of about 12 mm3) all over the plane perpendicular to thruster axis in four positions on it (5, 10, 50 and 100 mm). Measured LIF signal intensity have differences for each location of researched point (due to anisotropy of thruster plume), however the structure of states populations distribution persisted at plume and is violated at the thruster exit plane and cathode area. Measured distributions show that for describing plasma of Hall thruster one needs to use a multilevel kinetic model, classic model can be used just for far plume region or for specific electron transitions.

  12. Dynamics of NO2 dissociation. Study by resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionisation of energy distribution and of anisotropies in fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mons, Michel

    1988-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author reports the use of laser resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization and of time-of-flight mass spectrometry for a detailed characterization of fragments produced by a photo-dissociation process. The author more particularly addressed the case of a NO 2 molecule excited at low energies above the dissociation threshold. In the first part, the author discusses issues and problems related to molecular photo-dissociation. In the second part, he presents the developed method and shows that the combined use of both techniques allows a precise characterisation of photo-fragments in terms of internal or translational energies as well as in terms of angle distributions. Finally, the author presents and discusses results obtained in the case of NO 2 [fr

  13. Radioisotopic-excited x-ray fluorescent system for PPM measurement of toxic heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leddicotte, G.W.; Tolea, F.; Hansen, J.S.

    1974-01-01

    In agricultural research there is a continual awareness of the need to determine the role trace elements have as micronutrients in soil-plant systems. Similarly, these agronomic needs have a strong relationship to the concern other life sciences researchers have about the roles and effects of toxic trace elements on the natural environment and the physiological well-being of man and animals. However, in order for these interest areas to carry out more effective study efforts, more practical and precise analytical methodology and devices need to be developed. This report describes a research effort to develop an analytical system for micronutient as well as toxic elements based on x-ray fluorescence

  14. Instrumental aspects of tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.; Nullens, H.; Espen, P. van

    1983-01-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is an attractive and widely used method for sensitive multi-element analysis. The method suffers from the extreme density of spectral components in a rather limited energy range which implies the need for computer based spectrum analysis. The method of iterative least squares analysis is the most powerful tool for this. It requires a systematic and accurate description of the spectral features. Other important necessities for accurate analysis are the calibration of the spectrometer and the correction for matrix absorption effects in the sample; they can be calculated from available physical constants. Ours and similar procedures prove that semi-automatic analyses are possible with an accuracy of the order of 5%. (author)

  15. Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence and Ionization in a Graphite Furnace for the Determination of Metals and Nonmetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, David James

    1990-01-01

    Here is reported novel instrumentation for atomic spectrometry that combined the use of a pulsed laser system as the light source and an electrothermal atomizer as the atom cell. The main goal of the research was to develop instrumentation that was more sensitive for elemental analysis than commercially available instruments and could be used to determine elements in real sample matrices. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) in an electrothermal atomizer (ETA) was compared to ETA atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the determination of thallium, manganese, and lead in food and agricultural standard reference materials (SRMs). Compared to ETA AAS, ETA LEAFS has a longer linear dynamic range (LDR) (5-7 orders of magnitude compared to 2-3 orders of magnitude) and higher sensitivity (10 ^{-16} to 10^{ -14} g as compared to 10^{ -13} to 10^{-11} g). Consequently, ETA LEAFS allows elemental analysis to be done over a wider range of concentrations with less dilution steps. Thallium was accurately determined in biological samples by ETA LEAFS at amounts five to one hundred times below the ETA AAS detection limit. ETA AAS and ETA LEAFS were compared for the determination of lead and manganese, and in general, the accuracies and precisions of ETA AAS were the same, with typical precisions between 3% and 6%. Fluorine was determined using laser excited molecular fluorescence spectrometry (LEMOFS) in an ETA. Molecular fluorescence from magnesium fluoride was collected, and the detection limit of 0.3 pg fluorine was two to six orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods commonly used for the determination of fluorine. Significant interferences from ions were observed, but the sensitivity was high enough that fluorine could be determined in freeze dried urine SRMs by diluting the samples by a factor of one hundred to remove the interferences. Laser enhanced ionization (LEI) in an ETA was used for the determination of metals. For thallium, indium

  16. Improving the efficiency of a fluorescent Xe dielectric barrier light source using short pulse excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beleznai, Sz; Mihajlik, G; Richter, P; Maros, I; Balazs, L

    2008-01-01

    Operation of a Xe dielectric barrier discharge lamp producing 147-172 nm VUV radiation is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Xe gas pressure varies between 100 and 300 mbar, and the glass body of the lamp is coated with LAP (green) phosphor to convert radiation into the visible part of the spectrum. Simulation results predict improved discharge efficiencies reaching 67% when excited by a fast rise-time, short pulse (∼200 ns) driving waveform. In this case most power deposited into the plasma efficiently produces Xe 2 * excimers, while other energy dissipation processes (ion heating, e-Xe elastic collision) are kept at a low rate. Simulation and experimental results are compared in terms of discharge efficacy and show good agreement. A lamp efficacy value as high as 80 lm W -1 is demonstrated experimentally

  17. Energy dispersive soft X-ray fluorescence analysis by radioisotopic α-particle excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1977-01-01

    A Si(Li) X-ray detector system and 210 Po α-particle excitation source are combined to form a spectrometer for low energy X-rays. Its response in terms of Ksub(α) X-ray rate is shown for thick targets of elements from fluorine to copper. Potential applications of the equipment to useful quantitative elemental analysis of geological, biological and organic materials are explored. The results of analyses for oxygen and silicon in rocks and potassium in vegetation samples are included. A semi-empirical method of correcting for absorption and enhancement effects is employed. This is based upon X-ray production and photon absorption cross-sections taken from the literature and upon a minimal number of experimentally derived coefficients. (Auth.)

  18. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  19. Fluorescence from gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a near-UV dye laser. [Decay time,quenching rate,room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetti, P [Pavia Univ. (Italy); Cubeddu, R; Sacchi, C A; Svelto, O; Zaraga, F [Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    1976-06-01

    Preliminary data are reported on the visible fluorescence of gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a dye laser at 374 nm. A decay time of 500 ns at p = 0 and a quenching rate of 5.7 x 10/sup -12/cm/sup 3/molec/sup -1/s/sup -1/ have been measured at room temperature.

  20. Waveguide-integrated single- and multi-photon detection at telecom wavelengths using superconducting nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Simone; Kahl, Oliver; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate single- and multi-photon detection regimes of superconducting nanowire detectors embedded in silicon nitride nanophotonic circuits. At near-infrared wavelengths, simultaneous detection of up to three photons is observed for 120 nm wide nanowires biased far from the critical current, while narrow nanowires below 100 nm provide efficient single photon detection. A theoretical model is proposed to determine the different detection regimes and to calculate the corresponding internal quantum efficiency. The predicted saturation of the internal quantum efficiency in the single photon regime agrees well with plateau behavior observed at high bias currents

  1. Waveguide-integrated single- and multi-photon detection at telecom wavelengths using superconducting nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Simone; Kahl, Oliver [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe 76132 (Germany); Kovalyuk, Vadim [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe 76132 (Germany); Department of Physics, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Goltsman, Gregory N. [Department of Physics, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, 20 Myasnitskaya Ulitsa, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Korneev, Alexander [Department of Physics, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow 141700 (Russian Federation); Pernice, Wolfram H. P., E-mail: wolfram.pernice@kit.edu [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe 76132 (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2015-04-13

    We investigate single- and multi-photon detection regimes of superconducting nanowire detectors embedded in silicon nitride nanophotonic circuits. At near-infrared wavelengths, simultaneous detection of up to three photons is observed for 120 nm wide nanowires biased far from the critical current, while narrow nanowires below 100 nm provide efficient single photon detection. A theoretical model is proposed to determine the different detection regimes and to calculate the corresponding internal quantum efficiency. The predicted saturation of the internal quantum efficiency in the single photon regime agrees well with plateau behavior observed at high bias currents.

  2. Multi photon ionization mass spectrometry of carbamate pesticides, herbicides and fungicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grun, Carsten; Koenig, Marcelle; Grotemeyer, Juergen

    2001-01-01

    Pesticides and herbicides are useful for a wide range of applications today. The determination of these substances either in the pure form or in complex matrices is of high analytical interest. Especially since these substances can by found in every day products. The combination of multi photon ionization (MUPI) and time of flight laser mass spectrometry may be a powerful tool for achieving fast well interpretable mass spectra for analytical purposes. In this paper we will discuss the mass spectra of several pesticides and herbicides accessed by MUPI-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The influence of the laser pulse duration on the mass spectra are discussed

  3. Impulsive IR-multiphoton dissociation of acrolein: observation of non-statistical product vibrational excitation in CO ( v=1-12) by time resolved IR fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, P. K.

    2000-10-01

    On IR-multiphoton excitation, vibrationally highly excited acrolein molecules undergo concerted dissociation generating CO and ethylene. The vibrationally excited products, CO and ethylene, are detected immediately following the CO 2 laser pulse by observing IR fluorescence at 4.7 and 3.2 μm, respectively. The nascent CO is formed with significant vibrational excitation, with a Boltzmann population distribution for v=1-12 levels corresponding to T v=12 950±50 K. The average vibrational energy in the product CO is found to be 26 kcal mol -1, in contrast to its statistical share of 5 kcal mol -1, available from the product energy distribution. The nascent vibrationally excited ethylene either dissociates by absorbing further infrared laser photons from the tail of the CO 2 laser pulse or relaxes by collisional deactivation. Ethylene IR-fluorescence excitation spectrum showed a structure in the quasi-continuum, with a facile resonance at 10.53 μm corresponding to the 10P(14) CO 2 laser line, which explains the higher acetylene yield observed at a higher pressure. A hydrogen atom transfer mechanism followed by C-C impulsive break in the acrolein transition state may be responsible for such non-statistical product energy distribution.

  4. [Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of CDOM from Yundang Lagoon and its indication for organic pollution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jian-Fu; Guo, Wei-Dong; Deng, Xun; Zhang, Zhi-Ying; Xu, Jing; Huang, Ling-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) combined with absorption spectroscopy were applied to study the optical properties of CDOM samples from highly-polluted Yundang Lagoon in Xiamen in order to demonstrate the feasibility of using these spectral properties as a tracer of the degree of organic pollution in similar polluted coastal waters. Surface water samples were collected from 13 stations 4 times during April and May, 2008. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model was used to resolve the EEMs of CDOM. Five separate fluorescent components were identified, including two humic-like components (C1: 240, 325/422 nm; C5: 260, 380/474 nm), two protein-like components (C2: 225, 275/350 nm; C4: 240, 300/354 nm) and one xenobiotic-like component (C3: 225/342 nm), which could be used as a good tracer for the input of the anthropogenic organic, pollutants. The concentrations of component C3 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are much higher near the inlet of sewage discharge, demonstrating that the discharge of surrounding sewage is a major source of organic pollutants in Yundang Lagoon. CDOM absorption coefficient alpha (280) and the score of humic-like component C1 showed significant linear relationships with COD(Mn), and a strong positive correlation was also found between the score of protein-like component C2 and BOD5. This suggested that the optical properties of CDOM may provide a fast in-situ way to monitor the variation of the water quality in Yundang Lagoon and that of similar polluted coastal waters.

  5. Multi-photon creation and single-photon annihilation of electron-positron pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Huayu

    2011-04-27

    In this thesis we study multi-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production in a trident process, and singlephoton e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation in a triple interaction. The pair production is considered in the collision of a relativistic electron with a strong laser beam, and calculated within the theory of laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics. A regularization method is developed systematically for the resonance problem arising in the multi-photon process. Total production rates, positron spectra, and relative contributions of different reaction channels are obtained in various interaction regimes. Our calculation shows good agreement with existing experimental data from SLAC, and adds further insights into the experimental findings. Besides, we study the process in a manifestly nonperturbative domain, whose accessibility to future all-optical experiments based on laser acceleration is shown. In the single-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation, the recoil momentum is absorbed by a spectator particle. Various kinematic configurations of the three incoming particles are examined. Under certain conditions, the emitted photon exhibits distinct angular and polarization distributions which could facilitate the detection of the process. Considering an equilibrium relativistic e{sup +}e{sup -} plasma, it is found that the single-photon process becomes the dominant annihilation channel for plasma temperatures above 3 MeV. Multi-particle correlation effects are therefore essential for the e{sup +}e{sup -} dynamics at very high density. (orig.)

  6. Multi-photon creation and single-photon annihilation of electron-positron pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Huayu

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis we study multi-photon e + e - pair production in a trident process, and singlephoton e + e - pair annihilation in a triple interaction. The pair production is considered in the collision of a relativistic electron with a strong laser beam, and calculated within the theory of laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics. A regularization method is developed systematically for the resonance problem arising in the multi-photon process. Total production rates, positron spectra, and relative contributions of different reaction channels are obtained in various interaction regimes. Our calculation shows good agreement with existing experimental data from SLAC, and adds further insights into the experimental findings. Besides, we study the process in a manifestly nonperturbative domain, whose accessibility to future all-optical experiments based on laser acceleration is shown. In the single-photon e + e - pair annihilation, the recoil momentum is absorbed by a spectator particle. Various kinematic configurations of the three incoming particles are examined. Under certain conditions, the emitted photon exhibits distinct angular and polarization distributions which could facilitate the detection of the process. Considering an equilibrium relativistic e + e - plasma, it is found that the single-photon process becomes the dominant annihilation channel for plasma temperatures above 3 MeV. Multi-particle correlation effects are therefore essential for the e + e - dynamics at very high density. (orig.)

  7. Effect of anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols on chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra in apple fruit: signature analysis, assessment, modelling, and relevance to photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlyak, Mark N; Melø, Thor Bernt; Naqvi, K Razi

    2008-01-01

    Whole apple fruit (Malus domestica Borkh.) widely differing in pigment content and composition has been examined by recording its chlorophyll fluorescence excitation and diffuse reflection spectra in the visible and near UV regions. Spectral bands sensitive to the pigment concentration have been identified, and linear models for non-destructive assessment of anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols via chlorophyll fluorescence measurements are put forward. The adaptation of apple fruit to high light stress involves accumulation of these protective pigments, which absorb solar radiation in broad spectral ranges extending from UV to the green and, in anthocyanin-containing cultivars, to the red regions of the spectrum. In ripening apples the protective effect in the blue region could be attributed to extrathylakoid carotenoids. A simple model, which allows the simulation of chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra in the visible range and a quantitative evaluation of competitive absorption by anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols, is described. Evidence is presented to support the view that anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols play, in fruit with low-to-moderate pigment content, the role of internal traps (insofar as they compete with chlorophylls for the absorption of incident light in specific spectral bands), affecting thereby the shape of the chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum.

  8. Fluorescence excitation involving multiple electron transition states of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.Y.R.; Chen, F.Z.; Hung, T.; Judge, D.L. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The electronic states and electronic structures of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the 8-50 eV energy region have been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically. In the energy region higher than 25 eV there exists many electronic states including multiple electron transition (MET) states which are responsible for producing most of the dissociative photoionization products. The electronic states at energies higher than 50 eV have been mainly determined by Auger spectroscopy, double charge transfer, photofragment spectroscopy and ion-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The absorption and ionization spectra of these molecules at energies higher than 50 eV mainly show a monotonic decrease in cross section values and exhibit structureless features. The decay channels of MET and Rydberg (or superexcited) states include autoionization, ionization, dissociative ionization, predissociation, and dissociation while those of single ion and multiple ion states may involve predissociation. and dissociation processes. The study of fluorescence specifically probes electronically excited species resulting from the above-mentioned decay channels and provides information for understanding the competition among these channels.

  9. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy for rapid identification and quality evaluation of cell culture media components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boyan; Ryan, Paul W; Shanahan, Michael; Leister, Kirk J; Ryder, Alan G

    2011-11-01

    The application of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy to the quantitative analysis of complex, aqueous solutions of cell culture media components was investigated. These components, yeastolate, phytone, recombinant human insulin, eRDF basal medium, and four different chemically defined (CD) media, are used for the formulation of basal and feed media employed in the production of recombinant proteins using a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell based process. The comprehensive analysis (either identification or quality assessment) of these materials using chromatographic methods is time consuming and expensive and is not suitable for high-throughput quality control. The use of EEM in conjunction with multiway chemometric methods provided a rapid, nondestructive analytical method suitable for the screening of large numbers of samples. Here we used multiway robust principal component analysis (MROBPCA) in conjunction with n-way partial least squares discriminant analysis (NPLS-DA) to develop a robust routine for both the identification and quality evaluation of these important cell culture materials. These methods are applicable to a wide range of complex mixtures because they do not rely on any predetermined compositional or property information, thus making them potentially very useful for sample handling, tracking, and quality assessment in biopharmaceutical industries.

  10. The multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments and its applications to the analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao Qiong; Wang, Xue; Li Xu, Min; Zhai, Hong Lin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Jin Jin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy with an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) is a fast and inexpensive technique and has been applied to the detection of a very wide range of analytes. However, serious scattering and overlapping signals hinder the applications of EEM spectra. In this contribution, the multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments was investigated in depth and applied to the analysis of two EEM data sets (data set 1 consisted of valine-tyrosine-valine, tryptophan-glycine and phenylalanine, and data set 2 included vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6) for the first time. By means of the Tchebichef moments with different orders, the different information in the EEM spectra can be represented. It is owing to this multi-resolution capability that the overlapping problem was solved, and the information of chemicals and scatterings were separated. The obtained results demonstrated that the Tchebichef moment method is very effective, which provides a promising tool for the analysis of EEM spectra. It is expected that the applications of Tchebichef moment method could be developed and extended in complex systems such as biological fluids, food, environment and others to deal with the practical problems (overlapped peaks, unknown interferences, baseline drifts, and so on) with other spectra.

  11. Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortrud Uckermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of CNS resident microglia and invasion of external macrophages plays a central role in spinal cord injuries and diseases. Multiphoton microscopy based on intrinsic tissue properties offers the possibility of label-free imaging and has the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed cellular structures displaying endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF in the pathologic spinal cord. It was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to Iba1 and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in two models: rat spinal cord injury and mouse encephalomyelitis. The extent of tissue damage was retrieved by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS and second harmonic generation imaging. The pattern of CD68-positive cells representing postinjury activated microglia/macrophages was colocalized to the TPEF signal. Iba1-positive microglia were found in areas lacking any TPEF signal. In peripheral areas of inflammation, we found similar numbers of CD68-positive microglia/macrophages and TPEF-positive structures while the number of Iba1-positive cells was significantly higher. Therefore, we conclude that multiphoton imaging of unstained spinal cord tissue enables retrieving the extent of microglia activation by acquisition of endogenous TPEF. Future application of this technique in vivo will enable monitoring inflammatory responses of the nervous system allowing new insights into degenerative and regenerative processes.

  12. Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckermann, Ortrud; Galli, Roberta; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim-Hakan; Later, Robert; Leipnitz, Elke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CNS resident microglia and invasion of external macrophages plays a central role in spinal cord injuries and diseases. Multiphoton microscopy based on intrinsic tissue properties offers the possibility of label-free imaging and has the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed cellular structures displaying endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in the pathologic spinal cord. It was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to Iba1 and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in two models: rat spinal cord injury and mouse encephalomyelitis. The extent of tissue damage was retrieved by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation imaging. The pattern of CD68-positive cells representing postinjury activated microglia/macrophages was colocalized to the TPEF signal. Iba1-positive microglia were found in areas lacking any TPEF signal. In peripheral areas of inflammation, we found similar numbers of CD68-positive microglia/macrophages and TPEF-positive structures while the number of Iba1-positive cells was significantly higher. Therefore, we conclude that multiphoton imaging of unstained spinal cord tissue enables retrieving the extent of microglia activation by acquisition of endogenous TPEF. Future application of this technique in vivo will enable monitoring inflammatory responses of the nervous system allowing new insights into degenerative and regenerative processes. PMID:26355949

  13. Monitoring the Behavior of Emerging Contaminants in Wastewater-Impacted Rivers Based on the Use of Fluorescence Excitation Emission Matrixes (EEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgroi, Massimiliano; Roccaro, Paolo; Korshin, Gregory V; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2017-04-18

    This study investigated the applicability of fluorescence indexes based on the interpretation of excitation emission matrices (EEMs) by PARAFAC analysis and by selecting fluorescence intensities at a priori defined excitation/emission pairs as surrogates for monitoring the behavior of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in two catchment basins impacted by wastewater discharges. Relevant EOC and EEM data were obtained for a 90 km stretch of the Simeto River, the main river in Sicily, and the smaller San Leonardo River, which was investigated for a 17 km stretch. The use of fluorescence indexes developed by these two different approaches resulted in similar observations. Changes of the fluorescence indexes that correspond to a group of humic-like fluorescing species were determined to be highly correlated with the concentrations of recalcitrant contaminants such as sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine, which are typical wastewater markers in river water. Changes of the fluorescence indexes related to tyrosine-like substances were well correlated with the concentrations of ibuprofen and caffeine, anthropogenic indicators of untreated wastewater discharges. Chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were correlated with humic-like fluorescence indexes. The observed correlations were site-specific and characterized by different regression parameters for every collection event. Caffeine and carbamazepine showed correlations with florescence indexes in the San Leonardo River and in the alluvial plain stretch of the Simeto River, whereas sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and ibuprofen have always been well correlated in all the investigated river stretches. However, when data of different collection events from river stretches where correlations were observed were combined, good linear correlations were obtained for data sets generated via the normalization of the measured concentrations by the average value for the corresponding collection event

  14. Correlation between the number of quantum-statistical modes of the exciting field and the number of lines in the resonance fluorescence spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryzhanovskii, Boris V; Sokolov, G B

    2000-01-01

    The quasi-energy wave functions of a two-level atom in an electromagnetic field, the state of which represents a superposition of coherent states, were found. The fluorescence spectrum of an atom excited by such a field was investigated. It was shown that a spectral fluorescence mode corresponds to each mode of the quantum-statistical distribution of the field incident on the atom. This means that the number of statistical modes of the incident field may be recorded as the number of data bits of the information carried by the light pulse. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Design, Fabrication and Computational Characterization of a 3D Micro-Valve Built by Multi-Photon Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stratos Galanopoulos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on the design, modeling and fabrication by multi-photon polymerization of a complex medical fluidic device. The physical dimensions of the built micro-valve prototype are compared to those of its computer-designed model. Important fabrication issues such as achieving high dimensional resolution and ability to control distortion due to shrinkage are presented and discussed. The operational performance of both multi-photon and CAD-created models under steady blood flow conditions was evaluated and compared through computational fluid dynamics analysis.

  16. Multi-photon UV photolysis of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Extinction spectra and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, A. J.; Gash, E. W.; Mansfield, M. W. D. [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Ruth, A. A. [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2013-08-07

    The extinction spectra of static naphthalene and static biphenylene vapor, each buffered with a noble gas at room temperature, were measured as a function of time in the region between 390 and 850 nm after UV multi-photon laser photolysis at 308 nm. Employing incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS), the spectra were found to be unstructured with a general lack of isolated features suggesting that the extinction was not solely based on absorption but was in fact dominated by scattering from particles formed in the photolysis of the respective polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Following UV multi-photon photolysis, the extinction dynamics of the static (unstirred) closed gas-phase system exhibits extraordinary quasi-periodic and complex oscillations with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes, persisting for up to several hours. Depending on buffer gas type and pressure, several types of dynamical responses could be generated (classified as types I, II, and III). They were studied as a function of temperature and chamber volume for different experimental conditions and possible explanations for the oscillations are discussed. A conclusive model for the observed phenomena has not been established. However, a number of key hypotheses have made based on the measurements in this publication: (a) Following the multi-photon UV photolysis of naphthalene (or biphenylene), particles are formed on a timescale not observable using IBBCEAS. (b) The observed temporal behavior cannot be described on basis of a chemical reaction scheme alone. (c) The pressure dependence of the system's responses is due to transport phenomena of particles in the chamber. (d) The size distribution and the refractive indices of particles are time dependent and evolve on a timescale of minutes to hours. The rate of particle coagulation, involving coalescent growth and particle agglomeration, affects the observed oscillations. (e) The walls of the chamber act as a

  17. Two-photon excited fluorescence from higher electronic states of chlorophylls in photosynthetic antenna complexes a new approach to detect strong excitonic chlorophyll a/b coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, D; Ehlert, J; Irrgang, K D; Renger, G; Lokstein, H

    2002-01-01

    Stepwise two-photon excitation of chlorophyll a and b in the higher plant main light-harvesting complex (LHC II) and the minor complex CP29 (as well as in organic solution) with 100-fs pulses in the Q/sub y/ region results in a weak blue fluorescence. The dependence of the spectral shape of the blue fluorescence on excitation wavelength offers a new approach to elucidate the long-standing problem of the origin of spectral "chlorophyll forms" in pigment-protein complexes, in particular the characterization of chlorophyll a/b-heterodimers. As a first result we present evidence for the existence of strong chlorophyll a/b-interactions (excitonically coupled transitions at 650 and 680 nm) in LHC II at ambient temperature. In comparison with LHC II, the experiments with CP29 provide further evidence that the lowest energy chlorophyll a transition (at ~680 nm) is not excitonically coupled to chlorophyll b. (22 refs).

  18. Preparatory studies for the on-line determination of zinc content in zinc ore slurries by radioisotope excited X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donhoffer, D.K.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory tests were carried out to prove the feasibility of determination of Zn-content in zinc ore slurries by isotope excited x-ray fluorescence. Matrix effects were investigated on dry samples. A slurry testloop was built and measurements on slurries were made. The results indicated that the measurement on Zn in ore slurries can be made with a precision of 0,05% Zn. A working equation for interpretation of the measurements is derived. (author)

  19. Fluorescence Excitation Models of Ammonia and Amidogen Radical (NH2) in Comets: Application to Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH2 -- a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH3/H2O is 0.46% +/- 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH2 observations (0.31% -- 0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH3 could be the sole parent of NH2 in this comet.

  20. FLUORESCENCE EXCITATION MODELS OF AMMONIA AND AMIDOGEN RADICAL (NH2) IN COMETS: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 μm wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 μm wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH 2 -a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 μm wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH 3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH 3 /H 2 O is 0.46% ± 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH 2 observations (0.31%-0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH 3 could be the sole parent of NH 2 in this comet.

  1. Measurements of excited-state-to-excited-state transition probabilities and photoionization cross-sections using laser-induced fluorescence and photoionization signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.L.; Sahoo, A.C.; Pulhani, A.K.; Gupta, G.P.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M.S.; Suri, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced photoionization and fluorescence signals were simultaneously observed in atomic samarium using Nd:YAG-pumped dye lasers. Two-color, three-photon photoionization and two-color fluorescence signals were recorded simultaneously as a function of the second-step laser power for two photoionization pathways. The density matrix formalism has been employed to analyze these signals. Two-color laser-induced fluorescence signal depends on the laser powers used for the first and second-step transitions as well as the first and second-step transition probability whereas two-color, three-photon photoionization signal depends on the third-step transition cross-section at the second-step laser wavelength along with the laser powers and transition probability for the first and second-step transitions. Two-color laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure the second-step transition probability. The second-step transition probability obtained was used to infer the photoionization cross-section. Thus, the methodology combining two-color, three-photon photoionization and two-color fluorescence signals in a single experiment has been established for the first time to measure the second-step transition probability as well as the photoionization cross-section. - Highlights: • Laser-induced photoionization and fluorescence signals have been simultaneously observed. • The density matrix formalism has been employed to analyze these signals. • Two-color laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure the second-step transition probability. • The second-step transition probability obtained was used to infer the photoionization cross-section. • Transition probability and photoionization cross-section have been measured in a single experiment

  2. Effect of detergents on the physico-chemical properties of skin stratum corneum: A two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Pashkovski, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Understanding the structural and dynamical features of skin is critical for advancing innovation in personal care and drug discovery. Synthetic detergent mixtures used in commercially available body wash products are thought to be less aggressive towards the skin barrier when compared...... to conventional detergents. The aim of this work is to comparatively characterize the effect of a mild synthetic cleanser mixture (SCM) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) on the hydration state of the intercellular lipid matrix and on proton activity of excised skin stratum corneum (SC). METHOD: Experiments were...... performed using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescent images of fluorescence reporters sensitive to proton activity and hydration of SC were obtained in excised skin and examined in presence and absence of SCM and SDS detergents. RESULTS: Hydration of the intercellular lipid matrix...

  3. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangiarotti, Alessio; Sona, Pietro; Ballestrero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are establi...

  4. Generation of a multi-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state with linear optical elements and photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, X B; Pahlke, K; Mathis, W

    2005-01-01

    We present a scheme to generate a multi-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state by using single-photon sources, linear optical elements and photon detectors. Such a maximum entanglement has wide applications in the demonstration of quantum nonlocality and quantum information processing

  5. Simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging: A method for aligning an AFM-tip with an excitation beam using a 2D galvanometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, A. N.; Cadby, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    Correlative fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is a highly attractive technique for use in biological imaging, enabling force and mechanical measurements of particular structures whose locations are known due to the specificity of fluorescence imaging. The ability to perform these two measurements simultaneously (rather than consecutively with post-processing correlation) is highly valuable because it would allow the mechanical properties of a structure to be tracked over time as changes in the sample occur. We present an instrument which allows simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging by aligning an incident fluorescence excitation beam with an AFM-tip. Alignment was performed by calibrating a 2D galvanometer present in the excitation beam path and using it to reposition the incident beam. Two programs were developed (one manual and one automated) which correlate sample features between the AFM and fluorescence images, calculating the distance required to translate the incident beam towards the AFM-tip. Using this method, we were able to obtain beam-tip alignment (and therefore field-of-view alignment) from an offset of >15 μm to within one micron in two iterations of the program. With the program running alongside data acquisition for real-time feedback between AFM and optical images, this offset was maintained over a time period of several hours. Not only does this eliminate the need to image large areas with both techniques to ensure that fields-of-view overlap, but it also raises the possibility of using this instrument for tip-enhanced fluorescence applications, a technique in which super-resolution images have previously been achieved.

  6. Insight into the heterogeneous adsorption of humic acid fluorescent components on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenghu; Liu, Yangzhi; Cen, Qiulin; Zhu, Yaxian; Zhang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption behavior of commercial humic acid (HA) on pristine and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor (EEM- PARAFAC) analysis. The kinetics, isotherms, thermodynamics and mechanisms of adsorption of HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs were the focus of the present study. Three humic-like fluorescent components were distinguished, including one carboxylic-like fluorophore C1 (λ ex /λ em = (250, 310) nm/428nm), and two phenolic-like fluorophores, C2 (λ ex /λ em = (300, 460) nm/552nm) and C3 (λ ex /λ em = (270, 375) nm/520nm). The Lagergren pseudo-second-order model can be used to describe the adsorption kinetics of the HA fluorescent components. In addition, both the Freundlich and Langmuir models can be suitably employed to describe the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs with significantly high correlation coefficients (R 2 > 0.94, Padsorption affinity (K d ) and nonlinear adsorption degree from the HA fluorescent components to MWCNTs was clearly observed. The adsorption mechanism suggested that the π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction played an important role in the interaction between HA fluorescent components and the three MWCNTs. Furthermore, the values of the thermodynamic parameters, including the Gibbs free energy change (ΔG°), enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), showed that the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components on MWCNTs was spontaneous and exothermic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E.; Redding, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  8. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chuji [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 39759 (United States); Pan, Yong-Le, E-mail: yongle.pan.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Redding, Brandon [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  9. Micellar Enhanced Three-Dimensional Excitation-Emission Matrix Fluorescence for Rapid Determination of Antihypertensives in Human Plasma with Aid of Second-Order Calibration Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive three-dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence method was proposed to determine antihypertensives including valsartan and amlodipine besylate in human plasma with the aid of second-order calibration methods based on parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC and alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD algorithms. Antihypertensives with weak fluorescent can be transformed into a strong fluorescent property by changing microenvironment in samples using micellar enhanced surfactant. Both the adopted algorithms with second-order advantage can improve the resolution and directly attain antihypertensives concentration even in the presence of potential strong intrinsic fluorescence from human plasma. The satisfactory results can be achieved for valsartan and amlodipine besylate in complicated human plasma. Furthermore, some statistical parameters and figures of merit were evaluated to investigate the performance of the proposed method, and the accuracy and precision of the proposed method were also validated by the elliptical joint confidence region (EJCR test and repeatability analysis of intraday and interday assay. The proposed method could not only light a new avenue to directly determine valsartan or amlodipine besylate in human plasma, but also hold great potential to be extended as a promising alternative for more practical applications in the determination of weak fluorescent drugs.

  10. Extending the fundamental imaging-depth limit of multi-photon microscopy by imaging with photo-activatable fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhixing; Wei, Lu; Zhu, Xinxin; Min, Wei

    2012-08-13

    It is highly desirable to be able to optically probe biological activities deep inside live organisms. By employing a spatially confined excitation via a nonlinear transition, multiphoton fluorescence microscopy has become indispensable for imaging scattering samples. However, as the incident laser power drops exponentially with imaging depth due to scattering loss, the out-of-focus fluorescence eventually overwhelms the in-focal signal. The resulting loss of imaging contrast defines a fundamental imaging-depth limit, which cannot be overcome by increasing excitation intensity. Herein we propose to significantly extend this depth limit by multiphoton activation and imaging (MPAI) of photo-activatable fluorophores. The imaging contrast is drastically improved due to the created disparity of bright-dark quantum states in space. We demonstrate this new principle by both analytical theory and experiments on tissue phantoms labeled with synthetic caged fluorescein dye or genetically encodable photoactivatable GFP.

  11. [Study on optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in rainwater by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and absorbance spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan-yue; Guo, Wei-dong; Long, Ai-min; Chen, Shao-yong

    2010-09-01

    The optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were determined in rain samples collected in Xiamen Island, during a rainy season in 2007, using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy associated with UV-Vis absorbance spectra. Results showed that the absorbance spectra of CDOM in rain samples decreased exponentially with wavelength. The absorbance coefficient at 300 nm [a(300)] ranged from 0.27 to 3.45 m(-1), which would be used as an index of CDOM abundance, and the mean value was 1.08 m(-1). The content of earlier stage of precipitation events was higher than that of later stage of precipitation events, which implied that anthropogenic sources or atmospheric pollution or air mass types were important contributors to CDOM levels in precipitation. EEMs spectra showed 4 types of fluorescence signals (2 humic-like fluorescence peaks and 2 protein-like fluorescence peaks) in rainwater samples, and there were significant positive correlations of peak A with C and peak B with S, showing their same sources or some relationship of the two humic-like substance and the two protein-like substance. The strong positive correlations of the two humic-like fluorescence peaks with a(300), suggested that the chromophores responsible for absorbance might be the same as fluorophores responsible for fluorescence. Results showed that the presence of highly absorbing and fluorescing CDOM in rainwater is of significant importance in atmospheric chemistry and might play a previously unrecognized role in the wavelength dependent spectral attenuation of solar radiation by atmospheric waters.

  12. On the chlorophill a fluorescence yield in chloroplasts upon excitation with twin turnover flashes (TTF) and high frequency flash trains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.; Prasil, O.; Durchan, M.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence is routinely taken as a quantifiable measure of the redox state of the primary quinone acceptor QA of PSII. The variable fluorescence in thylakoids increases in a single turnover flash (STF) from its low dark level F o towards a maximum F mSTF when QA becomes reduced. We

  13. Details of the Collagen and Elastin Architecture in the Human Limbal Conjunctiva, Tenon's Capsule and Sclera Revealed by Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choul Yong; Marando, Catherine M; Liao, Jason A; Lee, Jimmy K; Kwon, Jiwon; Chuck, Roy S

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the architecture and distribution of collagen and elastin in human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera. The limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera of human donor corneal buttons were imaged with an inverted two-photon excited fluorescence microscope. No fixation process was necessary. The laser (Ti:sapphire) was tuned at 850 nm for two-photon excitation. Backscatter signals of second harmonic generation (SHG) and autofluorescence (AF) were collected through a 425/30-nm and a 525/45-nm emission filter, respectively. Multiple, consecutive, and overlapping (z-stack) images were acquired. Collagen signals were collected with SHG, whereas elastin signals were collected with AF. The size and density of collagen bundles varied widely depending on depth: increasing from conjunctiva to sclera. In superficial image planes, collagen bundles were image planes (episclera and superficial sclera), collagen bundles were thicker (near 100 μm in width) and densely packed. Comparatively, elastin fibers were thinner and sparse. The orientation of elastin fibers was independent of collagen fibers in superficial layers; but in deep sclera, elastin fibers wove through collagen interbundle gaps. At the limbus, both collagen and elastin fibers were relatively compact and were distributed perpendicular to the limbal annulus. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy has enabled us to understand in greater detail the collagen and elastin architecture of the human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera.

  14. Solid phase excitation-emission fluorescence method for the classification of complex substances: Cortex Phellodendri and other traditional Chinese medicines as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yao; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2012-09-13

    A novel, simple and direct fluorescence method for analysis of complex substances and their potential substitutes has been researched and developed. Measurements involved excitation and emission (EEM) fluorescence spectra of powdered, complex, medicinal herbs, Cortex Phellodendri Chinensis (CPC) and the similar Cortex Phellodendri Amurensis (CPA); these substances were compared and discriminated from each other and the potentially adulterated samples (Caulis mahoniae (CM) and David poplar bark (DPB)). Different chemometrics methods were applied for resolution of the complex spectra, and the excitation spectra were found to be the most informative; only the rank-ordering PROMETHEE method was able to classify the samples with single ingredients (CPA, CPC, CM) or those with binary mixtures (CPA/CPC, CPA/CM, CPC/CM). Interestingly, it was essential to use the geometrical analysis for interactive aid (GAIA) display for a full understanding of the classification results. However, these two methods, like the other chemometrics models, were unable to classify composite spectral matrices consisting of data from samples of single ingredients and binary mixtures; this suggested that the excitation spectra of the different samples were very similar. However, the method is useful for classification of single-ingredient samples and, separately, their binary mixtures; it may also be applied for similar classification work with other complex substances.

  15. Bright blue-shifted fluorescent proteins with Cys in the GAF domain engineered from bacterial phytochromes: fluorescence mechanisms and excited-state dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hontani, Yusaku; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Zhu, Jingyi; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes (BphPs) are of great interest for in vivo imaging. They utilize biliverdin (BV) as a chromophore, which is a heme degradation product, and therefore they are straightforward to use in mammalian tissues. Here, we

  16. Two-photon excitation in chip electrophoresis enabling label-free fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, David; Belder, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    One of the most commonly employed detection methods in microfluidic research is fluorescence detection, due to its ease of integration and excellent sensitivity. Many analytes though do not show luminescence when excited in the visible light spectrum, require suitable dyes. Deep-ultraviolet (UV) excitation (electrophoresis of small aromatic compounds. Various polymers, such as poly(methyl methacrylate), cyclic olefin polymer, and copolymer as well as poly(dimethylsiloxane) were investigated and compared with respect to achievable LOD and ruggedness against photodamage. To demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the method was also applied to the determination of serotonin and tryptamine in fruit samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Characterization of CDOM from urban waters in Northern-Northeastern China using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Li, Sijia; Ma, Jianhang; Wen, Zhidan

    2016-08-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) plays an important role in aquatic systems, but high concentrations of organic materials are considered pollutants. The fluorescent component characteristics of CDOM in urban waters sampled from Northern and Northeastern China were examined by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) to investigate the source and compositional changes of CDOM on both space and pollution levels. One humic-like (C1), one tryptophan-like component (C2), and one tyrosine-like component (C3) were identified by PARAFAC. Mean fluorescence intensities of the three CDOM components varied spatially and by pollution level in cities of Northern and Northeastern China during July-August, 2013 and 2014. Principal components analysis (PCA) was conducted to identify the relative distribution of all water samples. Cluster analysis (CA) was also used to categorize the samples into groups of similar pollution levels within a study area. Strong positive linear relationships were revealed between the CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R (2) = 0.89, p CDOM components can be applied to monitor water quality in real time compared to that of traditional approaches. These results demonstrate that EEM-PARAFAC is useful to evaluate the dynamics of CDOM fluorescent components in urban waters from Northern and Northeastern China and this method has potential applications for monitoring urban water quality in different regions with various hydrological conditions and pollution levels.

  18. Characterization of DOM adsorption of CNTs by using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and multiway analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingguo; Li, Huajie; Li, Dongdong; Du, Erdeng; Li, Zhihong

    2017-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were utilized to adsorb DOM in micro-polluted water. The characteristics of DOM adsorption on CNTs were investigated based on UV 254 , TOC, and fluorescence spectrum measurements. Based on PARAFAC (parallel factor) analysis, four fluorescent components were extracted, including one protein-like component (C4) and three humic acid-like components (C1, C2, and C3). The adsorption isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of DOM adsorption on CNTs were further investigated. A Freundlich isotherm model fit the adsorption data well with high values of correlation. As a type of macro-porous and meso-porous adsorbent, CNTs preferably adsorb humic acid-like substances rather than protein-like substances. The increasing temperature will speed up the adsorption process. The self-organizing map (SOM) analysis further explains the fluorescent properties of water samples. The results provide a new insight into the adsorption behaviour of DOM fluorescent components on CNTs.

  19. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  20. Manipulation of multi-photon-entanglement. Applications in quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, Alexander Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Over the last twenty years the field of quantum information processing (QIP) has attracted the attention of many scientists, due to the promise of impressive improvements in the areas of computational speed, communication security and the ability to simulate nature on the micro scale. This thesis describes an experimental work on the physics of multi-photon entanglement and its application in the field of QIP. We have thoroughly developed the necessary techniques to generate multipartite entanglement between up to six photons. By exploiting the developed six-photon interferometer, in this thesis we report for the first time the experimental quantum teleportation of a two-qubit composite system, the realization of multi-stage entanglement swapping, the implementation of a teleportation-based controlled-NOT gate for fault-tolerant quantum computation, the first generation of entanglement in sixpartite photonic graph states and the realization of 'one-way' quantum computation with two-photon four-qubit cluster states. The methods developed in these experiments are of great significance both for exploring the field of QIP and for future experiments on the fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. (orig.)

  1. Manipulation of multi-photon-entanglement. Applications in quantum information processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, Alexander Matthias

    2008-07-16

    Over the last twenty years the field of quantum information processing (QIP) has attracted the attention of many scientists, due to the promise of impressive improvements in the areas of computational speed, communication security and the ability to simulate nature on the micro scale. This thesis describes an experimental work on the physics of multi-photon entanglement and its application in the field of QIP. We have thoroughly developed the necessary techniques to generate multipartite entanglement between up to six photons. By exploiting the developed six-photon interferometer, in this thesis we report for the first time the experimental quantum teleportation of a two-qubit composite system, the realization of multi-stage entanglement swapping, the implementation of a teleportation-based controlled-NOT gate for fault-tolerant quantum computation, the first generation of entanglement in sixpartite photonic graph states and the realization of 'one-way' quantum computation with two-photon four-qubit cluster states. The methods developed in these experiments are of great significance both for exploring the field of QIP and for future experiments on the fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. (orig.)

  2. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M.

    1997-01-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state

  3. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  4. Controlling the transmitted information of a multi-photon interacting with a single-Cooper pair box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadry, Heba, E-mail: hkadry1@yahoo.com; Abdel-Aty, Abdel-Haleem, E-mail: hkadry1@yahoo.com; Zakaria, Nordin, E-mail: hkadry1@yahoo.com [Computer and Information Science Department, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Cheong, Lee Yen [Fundamental and Applied Science Department, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    We study a model of a multi-photon interaction of a single Cooper pair box with a cavity field. The exchange of the information using this system is studied. We quantify the fidelity of the transmitted information. The effect of the system parameters (detuning parameter, field photons, state density and mean photon number) in the fidelity of the transmitted information is investigated. We found that the fidelity of the transmitted information can be controlled using the system parameters.

  5. Controlling the transmitted information of a multi-photon interacting with a single-Cooper pair box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadry, Heba; Abdel-Aty, Abdel-Haleem; Zakaria, Nordin; Cheong, Lee Yen

    2014-01-01

    We study a model of a multi-photon interaction of a single Cooper pair box with a cavity field. The exchange of the information using this system is studied. We quantify the fidelity of the transmitted information. The effect of the system parameters (detuning parameter, field photons, state density and mean photon number) in the fidelity of the transmitted information is investigated. We found that the fidelity of the transmitted information can be controlled using the system parameters

  6. Electronically tunable femtosecond all-fiber optical parametric oscillator for multi-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Tim; Brinkmann, Maximilian; Fallnich, Carsten

    2018-02-01

    We present a femtosecond fiber-based optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) for multiphoton microscopy with wavelength tuning by electronic repetition rate tuning in combination with a dispersive filter in the FOPO cavity. The all-spliced, all-fiber FOPO cavity is based on polarization-maintaining fibers and a broadband output coupler, allowing to get access to the resonant signal pulses as well as the idler pulses simultaneously. The system was pumped by a gain-switched fiber-coupled laser diode emitting pulses at a central wavelength of 1030 nm and an electronically tunable repetition frequency of about 2 MHz. The pump pulses were amplified in an Ytterbium fiber amplifier system with a pulse duration after amplification of 13 ps. Tuning of the idler (1140 nm - 1300 nm) and signal wavelengths (850 nm - 940 nm) was achieved by changing the repetition frequency of the pump laser by about 4 kHz. The generated signal pulses reached a pulse energy of up to 9.2 nJ at 920 nm and were spectrally broadened to about 6 nm in the FOPO by a combination of self-phase and cross-phase modulation. We showed external compression of the idler pulses at 920 nm to about 430 fs and appleid them to two-photon excitation microscopy with green fluorescent dyes. The presented system constitutes an important step towards a fully fiber-integrated all-electronically tunable and, thereby, programmable light source and already embodies a versatile and flexible light source for applications, e.g., for smart microscopy.

  7. Characteristics of the fluorescent substances in the Yodo River system by three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy; Sanjigen reiki/keiko kodoho ni yoru yodogawa suikeichu no keiko busshitsu no tokucho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Nakaguchi, Y.; Hiraki, K.; Kudo, M.; Kimura, M.; Nagao, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Organic substances in the river water in Yodo River system were analyzed by three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy. Fluorescent substances were taken as an index of organic substances. The amount of fluorescent substances varied widely depending on the environment of river basin. It is suggested that the fluorescent substances are composed of organic substances which is not directly originated from biological activity. It is suggested that the fluorescent substances were produced by leaching of river bottom sediment. The fluorescent substances in Yodo River system consists of fulvic acid-like substances and protein. The analysis of fluorescent substances in river water by three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy can be useful means for estimation of variation and origin of fluorescent substances. For better understanding of features of fluorescent substances in the surface water into which various kinds of substances enter, it is necessary to determine the exact sampling points based on the consideration of different sources and to make a database of peak positions for identification of fluorescent substances from fluorescence intensity peak. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A study on the determination of Ca/P molar ratio in calcium-hydroxyapatite by alpha excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Iwata, Shiro.

    1979-01-01

    Nondestructive powdery calcium-hydroxyapatite (HAp) target was prepared by electrodeposition method. The powdery HAp was deposited on the copper electrode plate of cathode in the electrodeposition solution such as ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, etc. The experiments were carried out as functions of different electrodeposition solution, ethyl alcohol concentration, distance between anode and cathode, electrodeposition time and HAp amount added in bath, and distribution of HAp on the copper electrode plate obtained from each experiment was investigated by alpha excited X-ray fluorescence analysis. Ca/P molar ratio of thin HAp target prepared with this method was determined by alpha excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The nondestructive HAp targets of thickness in the range of 5 mu g/cm 2 to 10 mg/cm 2 were easily prepared with comparatively simple apparatus. The HAp on the copper electrode plate was uniform thickness over 15 x 20 mm copper plate within 5%. The Ca/P molar ratio of HAp was 1.64 +- 0.05, which agreed well with stoichiometric value of 1.67 in HAp within standard deviation. (author)

  9. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  10. A study of the fluorescence of the rare gases excited by nuclear particles. Use of the principle for the detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.

    1959-12-01

    In the first part is studied the properties of atoms excited by the passage of α particles through the various rare gases at atmospheric pressure. A spectral analysis of the emitted light showed that certain impurities play an important part in producing the fluorescence, and it has led to the conclusion that the light emission contains at least two components - one very short - lived due to the direct deexcitation of the rare gas, the other relatively slower due to the energy transfers to the impurity. The measurement of the life-time of the excited states has confirmed this foregoing hypothesis, the rapid part of the impulse is extremely short: less than 2,25.10 -9 s in the case of xenon; the slower part has a life-time depending directly on the nitrogen concentration, nitrogen being the impurity giving the largest effect in all cases. The study of rare gases under the influence of an electric field has made it possible to show that the amount of light produced by an α particle can be multiplied (by 60, for example, in a field of 600 V:cm) so that the luminescent efficiency is greater than in the case of INaTI. In the second part the characteristics of the rare gases acting as scintillators is examined, the most important property being the absence of fluorescence saturation when the intensity of the excitation incident on the gas is very large. This, together with the very short time of scintillation has made it possible to study a certain number of nuclear physical applications (heavy particle energy-measurements, kinetic studies on nuclear reactors, neutron spectroscopy). (author) [fr

  11. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging using violet LEDs as excitation sources for fecal matter contaminate identification on spinach leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food safety in the production of fresh produce for human consumption is a worldwide issue and needs to be addressed to decrease foodborne illnesses and resulting costs. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for detection of fecal contaminates on spina...

  12. Seasonal characterization of CDOM for lakes in semiarid regions of Northeast China using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Wen, Zhidan; Li, Lin; Zang, Shuying; Shao, Tiantian; Li, Sijia; Du, Jia

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal characteristics of fluorescent components in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) for lakes in the semiarid region of Northeast China were examined by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Two humic-like (C1 and C2) and protein-like (C3 and C4) components were identified using PARAFAC. The average fluorescence intensity of the four components differed under seasonal variation from June and August 2013 to February and April 2014. Components 1 and 2 exhibited a strong linear correlation (R2 = 0.628). Significantly positive linear relationships between CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R2 = 0.72, 0.46, p DOC). However, almost no obvious correlation was found between salinity and EEM-PARAFAC-extracted components except for C3 (R2 = 0.469). Results from this investigation demonstrate that the EEM-PARAFAC technique can be used to evaluate the seasonal dynamics of CDOM fluorescent components for inland waters in the semiarid regions of Northeast China, and to quantify CDOM components for other waters with similar environmental conditions.

  13. Three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy with regional integration analysis for assessing waste sludge hydrolysis treated with multi-enzyme and thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Lu, Mingmin; Li, Qianqian; Zhang, Jiawen; Zong, Yan; She, Zonglian

    2014-11-01

    The hydrolysis effect of waste sludge after multi-enzyme and thermophilic bacteria pretreatments is investigated using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) in this study. The compositional characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and dissolved organic matters (DOM) were analyzed to evaluate the sludge disintegration. The EPS and cell wall in sludge were disrupted after hydrolysis which led to carbohydrate, protein and soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of DOM increasing in sludge supernatant. The bio-degradability level in the extracted fractions of EPS and DOM depending on the fluorescence zones was found after hydrolysis. The highest proportion of percent fluorescence response (Pi,n) in EPS and DOM was soluble microbial by-product and humic acid-like organics. A significant increase of humic acid-like organics in DOM after thermophilic bacteria hydrolysis was obtained. The assessment of hydrolysis using EEM coupled with FRI provided a new insight toward the bio-utilization process of waste sludge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Obstruction of photoinduced electron transfer from excited porphyrin to graphene oxide: a fluorescence turn-on sensing platform for iron (III ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong De Liu

    Full Text Available A comparative research of the assembly of different porphyrin molecules on graphene oxide (GO and reduced graphene oxide (RGO was carried out, respectively. Despite the cationic porphyrin molecules can be assembled onto the surfaces of graphene sheets, including GO and RGO, to form complexes through electrostatic and π-π stacking interactions, the more obvious fluorescence quenching and the larger red-shift of the Soret band of porphyrin molecule in RGO-bound states were observed than those in GO-bound states, due to the difference of molecular flattening in degree. Further, more interesting finding was that the complexes formed between cationic porphyrin and GO, rather than RGO sheets, can facilitate the incorporation of iron (III ions into the porphyrin moieties, due to the presence of the oxygen-contained groups at the basal plane of GO sheets served as auxiliary coordination units, which can high-efficiently obstruct the electron transfer from excited porphyrin to GO sheets and result in the occurrence of fluorescence restoration. Thus, a fluorescence sensing platform has been developed for iron (III ions detection in this contribution by using the porphyrin/GO nanohybrids as an optical probe, and our present one exhibited rapid and sensitive responses and high selectivity toward iron (III ions.

  15. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraja, Jana; Suresh Kumar, H M; Inamdar, S R; Wari, M N

    2016-02-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π→π⁎ transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μ(e)). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μ(e)) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Characterization of phosphates and phosphogypsum by x-ray fluorescence with radioisotopic excitation sources of 55 Fe, 238 Pu and 109 Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parreira, Paulo S.; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F.

    1999-01-01

    Using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique (ED-XRF), with radioisotopic sources of 55 Fe, 238 Pu e 109 Cd samples excitation, a qualitative study was carried out in a phosphogypsum and phosphate samples from different origin. The objective was to verify the excitation responses from different sources and to establish the analytical conditions of the technique for these kind of matrices. Besides the P and Ca, characteristic macro elements of this of matrix, it was also observed the elements Si, S, K, matrix, it was also observed the elements Si, S, K, Ti, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Sr, Y, Zr and Nb. With different sources could be observed different groups of elements, since the emission response of the characteristic X-rays are associated to the excitation energy, in other words to the radioactive source. From the nutrients of major interest in this kind of matrix (P, S and Ca), the P and S elements showed small analytical sensibilities to the 109 Cd source. Greater intensities of characteristics X-ray emissions for the mainly elements of interest, was observed with the 55 Fe source and with the 238 Pu and 109 Cd sources analysis could be done showing trace elements which are present in those sort of samples. (author)

  17. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) variability in Barataria Basin using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shatrughan; D'Sa, Eurico J; Swenson, Erick M

    2010-07-15

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) variability in Barataria Basin, Louisiana, USA,was examined by excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). CDOM optical properties of absorption and fluorescence at 355nm along an axial transect (36 stations) during March, April, and May 2008 showed an increasing trend from the marine end member to the upper basin with mean CDOM absorption of 11.06 + or - 5.01, 10.05 + or - 4.23, 11.67 + or - 6.03 (m(-)(1)) and fluorescence 0.80 + or - 0.37, 0.78 + or - 0.39, 0.75 + or - 0.51 (RU), respectively. PARAFAC analysis identified two terrestrial humic-like (component 1 and 2), one non-humic like (component 3), and one soil derived humic acid like (component 4) components. The spatial variation of the components showed an increasing trend from station 1 (near the mouth of basin) to station 36 (end member of bay; upper basin). Deviations from this increasing trend were observed at a bayou channel with very high chlorophyll-a concentrations especially for component 3 in May 2008 that suggested autochthonous production of CDOM. The variability of components with salinity indicated conservative mixing along the middle part of the transect. Component 1 and 4 were found to be relatively constant, while components 2 and 3 revealed an inverse relationship for the sampling period. Total organic carbon showed increasing trend for each of the components. An increase in humification and a decrease in fluorescence indices along the transect indicated an increase in terrestrial derived organic matter and reduced microbial activity from lower to upper basin. The use of these indices along with PARAFAC results improved dissolved organic matter characterization in the Barataria Basin. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The reactivities of furocoumarin excited states with DNA in solution. A laser flash photolysis and fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, P C; Parsons, B J; Navaratnam, S; Phillips, G O; Allen, J C

    1980-07-29

    The effect of DNA on both the fluorescence emission spectra and yields and lifetimes of the triplet stae of psoralen and 8-methoxypsoralen in aqueous solution has been determined. The changes in the fluorescence spectra are similar in nature for both of these furocoumarins and are attributed to binding of the drug to DNA. The yield of the 8-methoxypsoralen triplet state when bound to DNA was found to be similar, if not identical, to that measured in the absence of DNA. This contrasts sharply with data obtained for psoralen from which it is concluded that either the yield of bound psoralen triplet states is very low, if not zero, or that the lifetime of such species is less than 50 ns. The relevance of this data to the molecular basis of skin photosensitisation by furocoumarins is discussed.

  19. Determination of Cr2O3 in chrome-tanned leather by radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melich, M.; Palagyi, S.; Kern, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary results on the determination of Cr 2 O 3 in chrome-tanned leather by measuring the content of Cr by means of radionuclide-excited XRF analysis are reported. For excitation a 3.7 GBq 238 Pu source was used and the characteristic K X-rays of Cr were detected with a planar Si(Li) detector. Both smooth and rough sides of the leather were analyzed directly or with a pair of V/Ti balanced filters. A fairly good correlation was found between Cr Kx counts of the rough side and the Cr 2 O 3 concentrations determined chemically in the range of 3.5 to 6.0% Cr 2 O 3 . The method renders possible a rapid and non-destructive determination of Cr 2 O 3 in various leather samples. (author)

  20. Rapid qualitative determination of main components in archeological samples by radioisotope-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenberg, C.; Boazi, M.

    1975-01-01

    Archeological specimen were examined by the radioisotope-excited X-ray method to determine their chemical composition. Individual K and L X-rays of Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Mo, Ag, In, Sn and Ba were induced by using 241 Am - I and 241 Am- Tm source- target assemblies. A lithium drifted silicone diode coupled to a 400-channel analyzer was used for detection. No sample preparation was required and all the elements were measured simultaneously in 40 min counting time. The use of different targets coupled with only one primary source makes this technique simple, versatile and economical. The target materials are suitable for exciting K and L X-rayd from potassium to uranium. In addition, the targets, as monoenergetic secondary sources, minimize the background effect. (T.G.)

  1. Seasonal characterization of CDOM for lakes in semi-arid regions of Northeast China using excitation-emission matrices fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Song, K.; Wen, Z.; Li, L.; Zang, S.; Shao, T.; Li, S.; Du, J.

    2015-04-01

    The seasonal characteristics of fluorescence components in CDOM for lakes in the semi-arid region of Northeast China were examined by excitation-emission matrices fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC). Two humic-like peaks C1 (Ex/Em = 230, 300/425 nm) and C2 (Ex/Em = 255, 350/460 nm) and two protein-like B (Ex/Em = 220, 275/320 nm) and T (Ex/Em = 225, 290/360 nm) peaks were identified using PARAFAC. The average fluorescence intensity of the four components differed with seasonal variation from June and August 2013 to February and April 2014. The total fluorescence intensity significantly varied from 2.54 ± 0.68 nm-1 in June to the mean value 1.93 ± 0.70 nm-1 in August 2013, and then increased to 2.34 ± 0.92 nm-1 in February and reduced to the lowest 1.57 ± 0.55 nm-1 in April 2014. In general, the fluorescence intensity was dominated by peak C1, indicating that most part of CDOM for inland waters being investigated in this study was originated from phytoplankton degradation. The lowest C2 represents only a small portion of CDOM from terrestrial imported organic matter to water bodies through rainwash and soil leaching. The two protein-like intensities (B and T) formed in situ through microbial activity have almost the same intensity. Especially, in August 2013 and February 2014, the two protein-like peaks showed obviously difference from other seasons and the highest C1 (1.02 nm-1) was present in February 2014. Components 1 and 2 exhibited strong linear correlation (R2 = 0.633). There were significantly positive linear relationships between CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R2 = 0.72, 0.46, p DOC. However, almost no obvious correlation was found between salinity and EEM-PARAFAC extracted components except for C3 (R2 = 0.469). Results from this investigation demonstrate that the EEM-PARAFAC technique can be used to evaluate the seasonal dynamics of CDOM fluorescence components for inland waters in semi-arid regions of Northeast China.

  2. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichard, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when ℎω > I p : it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with ℎω p : new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  3. Fluorescence F 0 of photosystems II and I in developing C3 and C 4 leaves, and implications on regulation of excitation balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Richard B; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Bichele, Irina; Dall'Osto, Luca; Laisk, Agu

    2014-10-01

    This work addresses the question of occurrence and function of photosystem II (PSII) in bundle sheath (BS) cells of leaves possessing NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 photosynthesis (Zea mays). Although no requirement for PSII activity in the BS has been established, several component proteins of PSII have been detected in BS cells of developing maize leaves exhibiting O2-insensitive photosynthesis. We used the basal fluorescence emissions of PSI (F 0I) and PSII (F 0II) as quantitative indicators of the respective relative photosystem densities. Chl fluorescence induction was measured simultaneously at 680 and 750 nm. In mature leaves, the F m(680)/F 0(680) ratio was 10.5 but less in immature leaves. We propose that the lower ratio was caused by the presence of a distinct non-variable component, F c, emitting at 680 and 750 nm. After F c was subtracted, the fluorescence of PSI (F 0I) was detected as a non-variable component at 750 nm and was undetectably low at 680 nm. Contents of Chls a and b were measured in addition to Chl fluorescence. The Chl b/(a + b) was relatively stable in developing sunflower leaves (0.25-0.26), but in maize it increased from 0.09 to 0.21 with leaf tissue age. In sunflower, the F 0I/(F 0I + F 0II) was 0.39 ± 0.01 independent of leaf age, but in maize, this parameter was 0.65 in young tissue of very low Chl content (20-50 mg m(-2)) falling to a stable level of 0.53 ± 0.01 at Chl contents >100 mg m(-2). The values of F 0I/(F 0I + F 0II) showed that in sunflower, excitation was partitioned between PSII and PSI in a ratio of 2:1, but the same ratio was 1:1 in the C4 plant. The latter is consistent with a PSII:PSI ratio of 2:1 in maize mesophyll cells and PSI only in BS cells (2:1:1 distribution). We suggest, moreover, that redox mediation of Chl synthesis, rather than protein accumulation, regulates photosystem assembly to ensure optimum excitation balance between functional PSII and PSI. Indeed, the apparent necessity for two

  4. PS II model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield measured on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana after excitation with light flashes of different energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2011-02-01

    Our recently presented PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008) was improved in order to permit a consistent simulation of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) traces that were earlier measured by Steffen et al. (2005) on whole leaves of Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana at four different energies of the actinic flash. As the essential modification, the shape of the actinic flash was explicitly taken into account assuming that an exponentially decaying rate simulates the time dependent excitation of PS II by the 10 ns actinic flash. The maximum amplitude of this excitation exceeds that of the measuring light by 9 orders of magnitude. A very good fit of the SFITFY data was achieved in the time domain from 100 ns to 10s for all actinic flash energies (the maximum energy of 7.5 × 10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash) is set to 100%, the relative energies of weaker actinic flashes were of ∼8%, 4%, ∼1%). Our model allows the calculation and visualization of the transient PS II redox state populations ranging from the dark adapted state, via excitation energy and electron transfer steps induced by pulse excitation, followed by final relaxation into the stationary state eventually attained under the measuring light. It turned out that the rate constants of electron transfer steps are invariant to intensity of the actinic laser flash. In marked contrast, an increase of the actinic flash energy by more than two orders of magnitude from 5.4×10¹⁴ photons/(cm²flash) to 7.5×10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash), leads to an increase of the extent of fluorescence quenching due to carotenoid triplet (³Car) formation by a factor of 14 and of the recombination reaction between reduced primary pheophytin (Phe(-)) and P680(+) by a factor of 3 while the heat dissipation in the antenna complex remains virtually constant. The modified PS II model offers new opportunities to compare electron transfer and dissipative parameters for different species (e.g. for the green algae and the

  5. Nonlinear spectral imaging of human normal skin, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S. Y.; Yang, J. G.; Zhuang, J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we use nonlinear spectral imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for analyzing the morphology of collagen and elastin and their biochemical variations in basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin tissue. It was found in this work that there existed apparent differences among BCC, SCC and normal skin in terms of their thickness of the keratin and epithelial layers, their size of elastic fibers, as well as their distribution and spectral characteristics of collagen. These differences can potentially be used to distinguish BCC and SCC from normal skin, and to discriminate between BCC and SCC, as well as to evaluate treatment responses.

  6. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation for detection of hydrogen atoms in a periphery region of high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee-Je; Kajiwara, Toshinori; Motoyama, Sumio; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    For measurements of atomic hydrogen density in the periphery region of high temperature plasmas, laser fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS) by two-photon excitation (1s-3s, 3d) was developed. Based upon the theoretical estimates for laser source requirements, which indicated the laser energy and spectral width to be more than 10 mJ (assuming the pulse duration of 10 ns) and several tens of picometers around the wavelength of 205.1 nm, respectively, the first Stokes generation in deuterium gas of ArF laser output was adopted and shown to have the necessary performance. Through the LFS experiment employing the laser source, the minimum detectable limit of atomic hydrogen, normalized by a laser power and an observing solid angle, was demonstrated to be 1 x 10 14 [m -3 · MW · sr], which is usually sufficient for the above purpose, and the accuracy of the density determination was shown to be within a factor 2. (author)

  7. New developments in the analysis and measurement of thicknesses by excitation of the fluorescent lines by means of β particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, P.

    1960-01-01

    The process for analysing and measuring the thickness of deposits by β-X fluorescence which we have already described has undergone further development. The use of promethium-147 and krypton-85 sources makes it possible to reduce the background noise which is observed with strontium-90. We present the results obtained for various measurements of the thickness of metallic coatings and the continuous measurement of calcium and of iron in ore samples. We describe the tests carried out with a view to analysing the X-rays by means of a crystal. (author) [fr

  8. Manipulating the Electronic Excited State Energies of Pyrimidine-Based Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitters To Realize Efficient Deep-Blue Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Ryutaro; Ohsawa, Tatsuya; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Nakao, Kohei; Hayasaka, Yuya; Kido, Junji

    2017-02-08

    The development of efficient and robust deep-blue emitters is one of the key issues in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) for environmentally friendly, large-area displays or general lighting. As a promising technology that realizes 100% conversion from electrons to photons, thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters have attracted considerable attention. However, only a handful of examples of deep-blue TADF emitters have been reported to date, and the emitters generally show large efficiency roll-off at practical luminance over several hundreds to thousands of cd m -2 , most likely because of the long delayed fluorescent lifetime (τ d ). To overcome this problem, we molecularly manipulated the electronic excited state energies of pyrimidine-based TADF emitters to realize deep-blue emission and reduced τ d . We then systematically investigated the relationships among the chemical structure, properties, and device performances. The resultant novel pyrimidine emitters, called Ac-XMHPMs (X = 1, 2, and 3), contain different numbers of bulky methyl substituents at acceptor moieties, increasing the excited singlet (E S ) and triplet state (E T ) energies. Among them, Ac-3MHPM, with a high E T of 2.95 eV, exhibited a high external quantum efficiency (η ext,max ) of 18% and an η ext of 10% at 100 cd m -2 with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.16, 0.15). These efficiencies are among the highest values to date for deep-blue TADF OLEDs. Our molecular design strategy provides fundamental guidance to design novel deep-blue TADF emitters.

  9. Probing temporal aspects of high-order harmonic pulses via multi-colour, multi-photon ionization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauritsson, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Johnsson, P [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, PO Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Lopez-Martens, R [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, PO Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Varju, K [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, PO Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); L' Huillier, A [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, PO Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Gaarde, M B [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Schafer, K J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2005-07-14

    High-order harmonics generated through the interaction of atoms and strong laser fields are a versatile, laboratory-scale source of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation on a femtosecond or even attosecond time-scale. In order to be a useful experimental tool, however, this radiation has to be well characterized, both temporally and spectrally. In this paper we discuss how multi-photon, multi-colour ionization processes can be used to completely characterize either individual harmonics or attosecond pulse trains. In particular, we discuss the influence of the intensity and duration of the probe laser, and how these parameters effect the accuracy of the XUV characterization.

  10. Probing temporal aspects of high-order harmonic pulses via multi-colour, multi-photon ionization processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauritsson, J; Johnsson, P; Lopez-Martens, R; Varju, K; L'Huillier, A; Gaarde, M B; Schafer, K J

    2005-01-01

    High-order harmonics generated through the interaction of atoms and strong laser fields are a versatile, laboratory-scale source of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation on a femtosecond or even attosecond time-scale. In order to be a useful experimental tool, however, this radiation has to be well characterized, both temporally and spectrally. In this paper we discuss how multi-photon, multi-colour ionization processes can be used to completely characterize either individual harmonics or attosecond pulse trains. In particular, we discuss the influence of the intensity and duration of the probe laser, and how these parameters effect the accuracy of the XUV characterization

  11. Dual fluorescence of excited state intra-molecular proton transfer of HBFO: mechanistic understanding, substituent and solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Xuebo

    2014-03-07

    A combined approach of the multiconfigurational perturbation theory with the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus methodology has been employed to calculate the minimum potential energy profiles and the rates of excited state intra-molecular proton transfer (ESIPT) for the WOLED material molecule of HBFO and its four meta- or para-substituted compounds in gas phase, acetonitrile and cyclohexane solvents. The kinetic control for these reactions is quantitatively determined and extensively studied on the basis of the accurate potential energy surfaces when the thermodynamic factor associated with the free energy change becomes negligible in the case of the existence of a significant barrier in the ESIPT process. These computational efforts contribute to a deep understanding of the ESIPT mechanism, dual emission characteristics, kinetic controlling factor, substituent and solvent effects for these material molecules. The white light emission is generated by the establishment of dynamic equilibrium between enol and keto forms in the charge transfer excited SCT((1)ππ*) state. The performance of white light emission is quantitatively demonstrated to be mainly sensitive to the molecular tailoring approach of the electronic properties of meta- or para- substituents by the modulation of the forward/backward ESIPT rate ratio. The quality of white light emission is slightly tunable through its surrounding solvent environment. These computational results will provide a useful strategy for the molecular design of OLED and WOLED materials.

  12. Detection of Copper (II) and Cadmium (II) binding to dissolved organic matter from macrophyte decomposition by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra combined with parallel factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Dong-hai; Guo, Xu-jing; Wen, Li; He, Lian-sheng; Wang, Jing-gang; Li, Jun-qi

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from macrophyte decomposition, and to study its complexation with Cu (II) and Cd (II). Both the protein-like and the humic-like components showed a marked quenching effect by Cu (II). Negligible quenching effects were found for Cd (II) by components 1, 5 and 6. The stability constants and the fraction of the binding fluorophores for humic-like components and Cu (II) can be influenced by macrophyte decomposition of various weight gradients in aquatic plants. Macrophyte decomposition within the scope of the appropriate aquatic phytomass can maximize the stability constant of DOM-metal complexes. A large amount of organic matter was introduced into the aquatic environment by macrophyte decomposition, suggesting that the potential risk of DOM as a carrier of heavy metal contamination in macrophytic lakes should not be ignored. - Highlights: • Macrophyte decomposition increases fluorescent DOM components in the upper sediment. • Protein-like components are quenched or enhanced by adding Cu (II) and Cd (II). • Macrophyte decomposition DOM can impact the affinity of Cu (II) and Cd (II). • The log K M and f values showed a marked change due to macrophyte decomposition. • Macrophyte decomposition can maximize the stability constant of DOM-Cu (II) complexes. - Macrophyte decomposition DOM can influence on the binding affinity of metal ions in macrophytic lakes

  13. Heterogeneous adsorption behavior of landfill leachate on granular activated carbon revealed by fluorescence excitation emission matrix (EEM)-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonmin; Hur, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous adsorption behavior of landfill leachate on granular activated carbon (GAC) was investigated by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The equilibrium adsorption of two leachates on GAC was well described by simple Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. More nonlinear isotherm and a slower adsorption rate were found for the leachate with the higher values of specific UV absorbance and humification index, suggesting that the leachate containing more aromatic content and condensed structures might have less accessible sites of GAC surface and a lower degree of diffusive adsorption. Such differences in the adsorption behavior were found even within the bulk leachate as revealed by the dissimilarity in the isotherm and kinetic model parameters between two identified PARAFAC components. For both leachates, terrestrial humic-like fluorescence (C1) component, which is likely associated with relatively large sized and condensed aromatic structures, exhibited a higher isotherm nonlinearity and a slower kinetic rate for GAC adsorption than microbial humic-like (C2) component. Our results were consistent with size exclusion effects, a well-known GAC adsorption mechanism. This study demonstrated the promising benefit of using EEM-PARAFAC for GAC adsorption processes of landfill leachate through fast monitoring of the influent and treated leachate, which can provide valuable information on optimizing treatment processes and predicting further environmental impacts of the treated effluent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid determination of trace phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, bromine and iodine by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis with monochromatic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakisaka, Tatsushi; Morita, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Tadashi; Nakahara, Taketoshi

    1998-01-01

    A useful and rapid procedure is described for the determination of trace phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, and iodine by means of an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDXRF) with monochromatic excitations. Using monochromatic excitations, the detection limits for phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine (Cr-Kα, 5.41 keV), bromine (Mo-Kα, 17.44 keV), and iodine (W-continuum, 40 keV) were found to be 4.6, 1.7, 0.7, 0.09 and 0.5 μg g -1 , respectively. The relative standard deviations in five replicate measurements were 0.9-1.3%. The proposed method was applied to the direct determination of sulfur in the NIST Residual Fuel Oil, and others. The results obtained by the proposed method were in good agreement with the certified values. Bromine in a seawater sample, as well as iodine and bromine in a brine sample were determined by the proposed method. The obtained results were in good agreement with those obtained by ion chromatography. (author)

  15. Analysis of trace in Rhododendron ferrigineum leaves for monitoring of urban atmospheric pollution by x-ray fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation Excitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Jefferson F.; Simabuco, Silvana M.; Jesus, E.F.O. de

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work was perform the biomonitoring of the atmospheric pollution in Campinas City (SP), applying the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation Excitation technique. For this were performed the elemental analysis of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se and Pb in Rhododendron ferrigineum leaves, employed here as bioindicator from environmental pollution in order to evaluate the effects of spatial and climatic contribution on the elemental concentration on the vegetable. Urban and rural sites were sampling in different seasons. The collected leaves were divided in two parts, one of them was washed by detergent and deionized water, in order to quantify the losses due the washing, and the second one was not washed, following the both parts of material were dried in stove, crushed and so the samples were submitted to an nitric-perchloric digestion. The samples were preconcentrated with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC), and the suspension was separated by filtration in cellulose membrane, then the samples were analyzed with X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation excitations. The results obtained shown that the vehicle flow can be associated to the distribution of the elements in the Rhododendrom ferrigineum leaves therefore the climatic contribution was not conclusive. (author)

  16. Novel Organic Materials for Multi-photon Photopolymerization and Photografting: Powerful Tools for Precise Microfabracation and Functionalization in 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.

    2013-07-01

    benzylidene ketone-based 2PIs containing double bonds and dialkylamino groups were synthesized in one step via classical aldol condensation reactions. The results of quantum-chemical calculations and experimental tests indicated that the size of the central ring significantly affected the excited state energetics and emission quantum yields as well as the two-photon initiation efficiency. 4-methylcyclohexanone-based initiator M2CMK is far more efficient than its counterparts with a central five-membered ring. The ideal processing windows of M2CMK are as broad as those of B3FL but with much simpler synthesis. Straightforward synthesis combined with high 2PA initiation efficiency makes the novel initiator a promising candidate for commercialization. Based on the efficient core structures of cyclic benzylidene ketone, carboxylic acid sodium salts as water-borne functionalities were incorporated in order to expand the application range of 2PP to biofabrication. Those novel water-soluble 2PIs were applied to microfabrication at a writing speed as high as 100 mm/s within hydrophilic photopolymers with up to 50 wt% of water. Preliminary dark-cytotoxicity tests of the 2PIs were performed and the obtained results were compared to those of Irgacure 2959, the most commonly used photoinitiator in cell encapsulation. The second part of the thesis concerned on the novel arylazide used for multi-photon induced photografting (MPG), a powerful tool for 3D site-specific functionalization. As a proof-of-concept, commercial aromatic azide BAC-M was successfully grafted within the 3D matrix with high resolution under three-photon excitation. In order to enhance the grafting efficiency and reduce the required energies, we designed and synthesized a series of novel 2PA active fluoroaryl azides containing 'push-pull' structures. Desired functionalities, such as alkene and alkyne groups, were introduced at the terminal amino groups for post-modification after two-photon photografting. (author

  17. Characterizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter in Lake Tianmuhu and its catchment basin using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Yin, Yan; Feng, Longqing; Zhu, Guangwei; Shi, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yuanzhi

    2011-10-15

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is an important optically active substance that transports nutrients, heavy metals, and other pollutants from terrestrial to aquatic systems and is used as a measure of water quality. To investigate how the source and composition of CDOM changes in both space and time, we used chemical, spectroscopic, and fluorescence analyses to characterize CDOM in Lake Tianmuhu (a drinking water source) and its catchment in China. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) identified three individual fluorophore moieties that were attributed to humic-like and protein-like materials in 224 water samples collected between December 2008 and September 2009. The upstream rivers contained significantly higher concentrations of CDOM than did the lake water (a(350) of 4.27±2.51 and 2.32±0.59 m(-1), respectively), indicating that the rivers carried a substantial load of organic matter to the lake. Of the three main rivers that flow into Lake Tianmuhu, the Pingqiao River brought in the most CDOM from the catchment to the lake. CDOM absorption and the microbial and terrestrial humic-like components, but not the protein-like component, were significantly higher in the wet season than in other seasons, indicating that the frequency of rainfall and runoff could significantly impact the quantity and quality of CDOM collected from the catchment. The different relationships between the maximum fluorescence intensities of the three PARAFAC components, CDOM absorption, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration in riverine and lake water indicated the difference in the composition of CDOM between Lake Tianmuhu and the rivers that feed it. This study demonstrates the utility of combining excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and PARAFAC to study CDOM dynamics in inland waters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-organising maps and correlation analysis as a tool to explore patterns in excitation-emission matrix data sets and to discriminate dissolved organic matter fluorescence components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejarque-Gonzalez, Elisabet; Butturini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex mixture of organic compounds, ubiquitous in marine and freshwater systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy, by means of Excitation-Emission Matrices (EEM), has become an indispensable tool to study DOM sources, transport and fate in aquatic ecosystems. However the statistical treatment of large and heterogeneous EEM data sets still represents an important challenge for biogeochemists. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOM) has been proposed as a tool to explore patterns in large EEM data sets. SOM is a pattern recognition method which clusterizes and reduces the dimensionality of input EEMs without relying on any assumption about the data structure. In this paper, we show how SOM, coupled with a correlation analysis of the component planes, can be used both to explore patterns among samples, as well as to identify individual fluorescence components. We analysed a large and heterogeneous EEM data set, including samples from a river catchment collected under a range of hydrological conditions, along a 60-km downstream gradient, and under the influence of different degrees of anthropogenic impact. According to our results, chemical industry effluents appeared to have unique and distinctive spectral characteristics. On the other hand, river samples collected under flash flood conditions showed homogeneous EEM shapes. The correlation analysis of the component planes suggested the presence of four fluorescence components, consistent with DOM components previously described in the literature. A remarkable strength of this methodology was that outlier samples appeared naturally integrated in the analysis. We conclude that SOM coupled with a correlation analysis procedure is a promising tool for studying large and heterogeneous EEM data sets.

  19. Homogeneous immunoassay for the cancer marker alpha-fetoprotein using single wavelength excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and fluorescent dyes as labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinjie; Liu, Heng; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2016-01-01

    The article describes sensitive and selective homogeneous immunoassays for the liver cancer biomarker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in human serum by using single wavelength excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (SW-FCCS). Both competitive and sandwich immunoassay modes were applied, and AFP served as a model analyte. Fluorescent CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (with a 655 nm emission peak) and the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 488 (520 nm emission) were chosen to label the antibodies in the sandwich mode, and the antibody and the antigen in the competitive mode. Under optimized conditions, the sandwich assay has a linear dynamic range that covers the 20 pM to 5.0 nM concentration range. The competitive assay, in turn, extends from 180 pM to 15.0 nM. The respective detection limits are 20 pM and 180 pM. The method was successfully applied to directly determine AFP in (spiked) clinical samples, and results were in good agreement with data obtained via ELISAs. (author)

  20. 3D Printer Generated Tissue iMolds for Cleared Tissue Using Single- and Multi-Photon Microscopy for Deep Tissue Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sean J; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2017-01-01

    Pathological analyses and methodology has recently undergone a dramatic revolution. With the creation of tissue clearing methods such as CLARITY and CUBIC, groups can now achieve complete transparency in tissue samples in nano-porous hydrogels. Cleared tissue is then imagined in a semi-aqueous medium that matches the refractive index of the objective being used. However, one major challenge is the ability to control tissue movement during imaging and to relocate precise locations post sequential clearing and re-staining. Using 3D printers, we designed tissue molds that fit precisely around the specimen being imaged. First, images are taken of the specimen, followed by importing and design of a structural mold, then printed with affordable plastics by a 3D printer. With our novel design, we have innovated tissue molds called innovative molds (iMolds) that can be generated in any laboratory and are customized for any organ, tissue, or bone matter being imaged. Furthermore, the inexpensive and reusable tissue molds are made compatible for any microscope such as single and multi-photon confocal with varying stage dimensions. Excitingly, iMolds can also be generated to hold multiple organs in one mold, making reconstruction and imaging much easier. Taken together, with iMolds it is now possible to image cleared tissue in clearing medium while limiting movement and being able to relocate precise anatomical and cellular locations on sequential imaging events in any basic laboratory. This system provides great potential for screening widespread effects of therapeutics and disease across entire organ systems.

  1. Multi-photon resonant effects in strong-field ionization: origin of the dip in experimental longitudinal momentum distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnaser, A S; Maharjan, C M; Wang, P; Litvinyuk, I V

    2006-01-01

    We studied ionization of neon and argon by intense linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses of different wavelengths (400 nm and 800 nm) and peak intensities, and by measuring momentum distributions of singly charged positive ions in the direction parallel to laser polarization. For Ne the momentum distributions exhibited a characteristic dip at zero momentum at 800 nm and a complex multipeak structure at 400 nm. Similarly, for Ar the momentum distributions evolved from a complex multipeak structure with a pronounced dip in the centre at 400 nm, to a smooth distribution characteristic of pure tunneling ionization (800 nm, high intensities). In the intermediate regime (800 nm, medium to low intensities), for both atoms we observed recoil ion momentum distributions modulated by quasi-periodic structures usually seen in the photoelectron energy spectra in a multi-photon regime (ATI spectra). Ne did show a characteristic 'dip' at low momentum, while the longitudinal momentum distribution for Ar exhibited a spike at zero momentum instead. The spectra did dramatically change at 400 nm, where both ions show the pronounced dip near zero momentum. Based on our results, we conclude that the structures observed in Ne and Ar momentum distributions reflect the specifics of atomic structure of the two targets and should not be attributed to effects of electron recollision, as was suggested earlier. Instead, as our results indicate, they are due to the effects of multi-photon resonant enhancement of strong-field ionization. (letter to the editor)

  2. The translated conceptual survey of physics / stablization of the focal plane in two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Asma

    As a reflection of my career to be an effective college physics teacher, my thesis is in two parts. The first is in education research, the focus of this part is to have a tool to evaluate pedagogies I have learned at the school and plan to apply in my classrooms back home. Consequently, this resulted in the development of the translated conceptual survey of physics ( TCSP). (TCSP) was designed by combining some questions from the Force Conceptual Inventory (FCI), and the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) to assess student's understanding of basic concepts of Newtonian mechanics and electricity and magnetism in introductory physics. The idea of developing this questionnaire is to use it in classrooms back home as a part of a long term objective to implement what has been realized in the area of education research to improve the quality of teaching physics there. The survey was initially written in English, validated with interviews with native English speakers, translated into Arabic, and then validated via an interview with a native Arabic speaker. We then administered the survey to two different English-speaking intro physics courses and analyzed the results for consistency. The objective of the second part in my thesis is to expand my knowledge in an area of physics that I have interest in, and getting involved in a scientific research to develop skills I need as a teacher. My research is in optical physics, in particular, I am working on one of the challenges in implementing two photon excitation luorescence (TPEF) microscopy in imaging living systems. (TPEF) microscopy has been shown to be an invaluable tool for investigating biological structure and function in living organisms. The utility of (TPEF) imaging for this application arises from several important factors including it's ability to image deep within tissue, and to do so without harming the organism. Both of these advantages arise from the fact that (TPEF) imaging is done with

  3. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence on argon intermediate pressure microwave discharges : measuring the depopulation rates of the 4p and 5p excited levels as induced by electron and atom collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palomares Linares, J.M.; Graef, W.A.A.D.; Hubner, S.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar is explored by means of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) experiments using the combination of high rep-rate YAG–Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable surfatron induced plasma setup. The high rep-rate favors the photon

  4. [Characterizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in Lake Honghu, Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu using excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yun-Lin; Niu, Cheng; Wang, Ming-Zhu

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about DOM characteristics in medium to large sized lakes located in the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River, like Lake Honghu, Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu. Absorption, fluorescence and composition characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are presented using the absorption spectroscopy, the excitation-emission ma trices (EEMs) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model based on the data collected in Sep-Oct. 2007 including 15, 9 and 10 samplings in Lake Honghu, Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu, respectively. CDOM absorption coefficient at 350 nm a(350) coefficient in Lake Honghu was significantly higher than those in Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu (t-test, pCDOM spectral slope in the wavelength range of 280-500 nm (S280-500) and a(350) (R2 =0. 781, p<0. 001). The mean value of S280-500 in Lake Honghu was significantly lower than those in Lake Donghu (t-test, pfluorescent components (C3, C4) were identified by PARAFAC model, among which significant positive correlations were found between C1 and C2 (R2 =0. 884, p<0. 001), C3 and C4 (R2 =0. 677, p<0.001), respectively, suggesting that the sources of the two humic-like components as well as the two protein-like components were similar. However, no significant correlation has been found between those 4 fluorescent components and DOC concentration. Th e fluorescenceindices of FI255 (HIX), Fl265, FI310 (BIX) and Fl370 in Lake Donghu were all significantly higher than those in Lake Liangzihu (t-test, p <0.05) and Lake Honghu (t-test, p<0. 01), indicating that the eutrophication status in Lake Donghu was higher than Lake Honghu and Lake Liangzihu.

  5. Encapsulation of 3-hydroxyflavone and fisetin in β-cyclodextrins: Excited state proton transfer fluorescence and molecular mechanics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anwesha; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    2006-06-01

    Excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) and dual emission properties (emission profile, anisotropy and decay kinetics) of 3-hydroxyflavone (a synthetic, model flavonol) and fisetin (3,7,3',4'-OH-flavone, a therapeutically active plant flavonol) have been exploited to study their encapsulation in nano-cavities comprising of natural and chemically modified β-cyclodextrins. In the presence of β-CDs, both the flavonols show significantly enhanced relative yields (along with changes in other emission parameters) of the tautomer emission. In addition, for fisetin, large blue shifts are observed for the normal emission (which has significant charge transfer character). From these we infer that the flavonols are encaged in predominantly hydrophobic micro-environments, where external hydrogen bonding perturbations (interfering with the intrinsic ESIPT), and dipolar relaxation effects, are minimized. This is further explained from results of molecular mechanics calculations which indicate selectivity in orientation of the encapsulated flavonols. Moreover, chemical modification of the β-CDs is found to profoundly influence the binding affinities of the guest flavonols.

  6. A study of the fluorescence of the rare gases excited by nuclear particles. Use of the principle for the detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation; Etude de la fluorescence des gaz rares excites par des particules nucleaires. Utilisation pour la detection des rayonnements nucleaires par scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-12-15

    In the first part is studied the properties of atoms excited by the passage of {alpha} particles through the various rare gases at atmospheric pressure. A spectral analysis of the emitted light showed that certain impurities play an important part in producing the fluorescence, and it has led to the conclusion that the light emission contains at least two components - one very short - lived due to the direct deexcitation of the rare gas, the other relatively slower due to the energy transfers to the impurity. The measurement of the life-time of the excited states has confirmed this foregoing hypothesis, the rapid part of the impulse is extremely short: less than 2,25.10{sup -9} s in the case of xenon; the slower part has a life-time depending directly on the nitrogen concentration, nitrogen being the impurity giving the largest effect in all cases. The study of rare gases under the influence of an electric field has made it possible to show that the amount of light produced by an {alpha} particle can be multiplied (by 60, for example, in a field of 600 V:cm) so that the luminescent efficiency is greater than in the case of INaTI. In the second part the characteristics of the rare gases acting as scintillators is examined, the most important property being the absence of fluorescence saturation when the intensity of the excitation incident on the gas is very large. This, together with the very short time of scintillation has made it possible to study a certain number of nuclear physical applications (heavy particle energy-measurements, kinetic studies on nuclear reactors, neutron spectroscopy). (author) [French] On etudie dans la premiere partie les proprietes des atomes excites par le passage de particules {alpha} dans les differents gaz rares a la pression atmospherique. L'etude spectrale de la lumiere emise a montre que certaines impuretes jouent un role considerable dans la fluorescence et on a ete amene a penser que l'emission de lumiere comporte au moins deux

  7. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  8. Label-free imaging of brain and brain tumor specimens with combined two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Wu, Zanyi; Du, Huiping; Wang, Shu; Li, Lianhuang; Fang, Na; Lin, Peihua; Chen, Jianxin; Kang, Dezhi; Zhuo, Shuangmu

    2017-10-01

    Label-free imaging techniques are gaining acceptance within the medical imaging field, including brain imaging, because they have the potential to be applied to intraoperative in situ identifications of pathological conditions. In this paper, we describe the use of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in combination for the label-free detection of brain and brain tumor specimens; gliomas. Two independently detecting channels were chosen to subsequently collect TPEF/SHG signals from the specimen to increase TPEF/SHG image contrasts. Our results indicate that the combined TPEF/SHG microscopic techniques can provide similar rat brain structural information and produce a similar resolution like conventional H&E staining in neuropathology; including meninges, cerebral cortex, white-matter structure corpus callosum, choroid plexus, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellar cortex. It can simultaneously detect infiltrating human brain tumor cells, the extracellular matrix collagen fiber of connective stroma within brain vessels and collagen depostion in tumor microenvironments. The nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio and collagen content can be extracted as quantitative indicators for differentiating brain gliomas from healthy brain tissues. With the development of two-photon fiberscopes and microendoscope probes and their clinical applications, the combined TPEF and SHG microcopy may become an important multimodal, nonlinear optical imaging approach for real-time intraoperative histological diagnostics of residual brain tumors. These occur in various brain regions during ongoing surgeries through the method of simultaneously identifying tumor cells, and the change of tumor microenvironments, without the need for the removal biopsies and without the need for tissue labelling or fluorescent markers.

  9. Optical monitoring of Disinfection By-product Precursors with Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping (F-EEM): Practical Application Issues for Drinking, Waste and Reuse Water Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Drinking water, wastewater and reuse plants must deal with regulations associated with bacterial contamination and halogen disinfection procedures that can generate harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HOAAs) and other compounds. The natural fluorescent chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is regulated as the major DBP precursor. This study outlines the advantages and current limitations associated with optical monitoring of water treatment processes using tcontemporary Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping (F-EEM). The F-EEM method coupled with practical peak indexing and multi-variate analyses is potentially superior in terms of cost, speed and sensitivity over conventional total organic carbon (TOC) meters and specific UV-absorbance (SUVA) measurements. Hence there is strong interest in developing revised environmental regulations around the F-EEM technique instruments which can incidentally simultaneously measure the SUVA and DOC parameters. Importantly, the F-EEM technique, compared to the single-point TOC and SUVA signals can resolve CDOM classes distinguishing those that strongly cause DBPs. The F-EEM DBP prediction method can be applied to surface water sources to evaluate DBP potential as a function of the point sources and reservoir depth profiles. It can also be applied in-line to rapidly adjust DOC removal processes including sedimentation-flocculation, microfiltration, reverse-osmosis, and ozonation. Limitations and interferences for F-EEMs are discussed including those common to SUVA and TOC in contrast to the advantages including that F-EEMs are less prone to interferences from inorganic carbon and metal contaminations and require little if any chemical preparation. In conclusion, the F-EEM method is discussed in terms of not only the DBP problem but also as a means of predicting (concurrent to DBP monitoring) organic membrane fouling in water-reuse and desalination plants.

  10. Enhanced Emission from Single Isolated Gold Quantum Dots Investigated Using Two-Photon-Excited Fluorescence Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyasinghe, Neranga; Kumar, Santosh; Sun, Kai; Mansfield, John F; Jin, Rongchao; Goodson, Theodore

    2016-12-21

    New approaches in molecular nanoscopy are greatly desired for interrogation of biological, organic, and inorganic objects with sizes below the diffraction limit. Our current work investigates emergent monolayer-protected gold quantum dots (nanoclusters, NCs) composed of 25 Au atoms by utilizing two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) at single NC concentrations. Here, we demonstrate an approach to synthesize and isolate single NCs on solid glass substrates. Subsequent investigation of the NCs using TPEF NSOM reveals that, even when they are separated by distances of several tens of nanometers, we can excite and interrogate single NCs individually. Interestingly, we observe an enhanced two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section for single Au 25 NCs that can be attributed to few-atom local field effects and to local field-induced microscopic cascading, indicating their potential for use in ultrasensitive sensing, disease diagnostics, cancer cell therapy, and molecular computers. Finally, we report room-temperature aperture-based TPEF NSOM imaging of these NCs for the first time at 30 nm point resolution, which is a ∼5-fold improvement compared to the previous best result for the same technique. This report unveils the unique combination of an unusually large TPA cross section and the high photostability of Au NCs to (non-destructively) investigate stable isolated single NCs using TPEF NSOM. This is the first reported optical study of monolayer-protected single quantum clusters, opening some very promising opportunities in spectroscopy of nanosized objects, bioimaging, ultrasensitive sensing, molecular computers, and high-density data storage.

  11. Up-Conversion Intersystem Crossing Rates in Organic Emitters for Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence: Impact of the Nature of Singlet vs Triplet Excited States

    KAUST Repository

    Samanta, Pralok Kumar

    2017-02-28

    The rates for up-conversion intersystem crossing (UISC) from the T1 state to the S1 state are calculated for a series of organic emitters with an emphasis on thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials. Both the spin-orbit coupling and the energy difference between the S1 and T1 states (ΔEST) are evaluated, at the density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT levels. The calculated UISC rates and ΔEST values are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. Our results underline that small ΔEST values and sizable spin-orbit coupling matrix elements have to be simultaneously realized in order to facilitate UISC and ultimately TADF. Importantly, the spatial separation of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of the emitter, a widely accepted strategy for the design of TADF molecules, does not necessarily lead to a sufficient reduction in ΔEST; in fact, either a significant charge-transfer (CT) contribution to the T1 state or a minimal energy difference between the local-excitation and charge-transfer triplet states is required to achieve a small ΔEST. Also, having S1 and T1 states of a different nature is found to strongly enhance spin-orbit coupling, which is consistent with the El-Sayed rule for ISC rates. Overall, our results indicate that having either similar energies for the local-excitation and charge-transfer triplet states or the right balance between a substantial CT contribution to T1 and somewhat different natures of the S1 and T1 states, paves the way toward UISC enhancement and thus TADF efficiency improvement.

  12. Kinetics and comparison of δ-aminolevulinic-acid-induced endogenous protoporphyrin-IX in single cell by steady state and multiphoton fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Elangovan, Masilamani; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic Therapy has emerged as a new modality in the treatment of various nonmalignant and malignant diseases. It involves the systemic administration of tumor specific photo-sensitizers with the subsequent application of visible light. This combination causes the generation of cytotoxic species, which damage sensitive targets, producing cell injury and tumor destruction. Although, photofrin is the only photosensitizer currently approved for PDT and tumor detection, its concomitant cutaneous photosensitization poses a significant problem. Hence, δ-aminoleuvulinic acid (δ-ALA) a precursor for the endogenous production of Protoporphyrin IX, through heme biosynthesis pathway, has gained significant importance in the Photodynamic Therapy. Though δ-ALA is present naturally in the cells, exogenous δ-ALA helps to synthesis more of PpIX in the tumor cells, as the fast growing tumor cells take up the administered δ-ALA more than the normal cells. Based on these facts, many invasive studies have been reported on the kinetics of δ-ALA at cellular level by chemical extraction of PpIX from the cells. In the present study we have studied the kinetics of δ-ALA induced PpIX fluorescence from Hela cells by perchloric/Methanol extraction method. However, the amount of PpIX synthesized in the cells at different point of incubation time by noninvasive methods has not been reported. Hence we have also used a noninvasive technique of measuring the kinetics δ-ALA induced PPIX fluorescence from Hela, an epithelial cell derived from human cervical cancer by both single photon (steady state) and multi photon excitation. From the studies it is observed that the δ-ALA induced PpIX is more at 2 hours incubation time for 2 mM of δ-ALA concentration. Further, it is observed that with steady state fluorescence imaging method, the excitation light itself cause the Photodynamic damage, due to the prolonged exposure of the cells than in multi photon excitation, leading to the rounding

  13. In vivo, label-free, three-dimensional quantitative imaging of liver surface using multi-photon microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu, E-mail: shuangmuzhuo@gmail.com, E-mail: hanry-yu@nuhs.edu.sg [Biosystems and Micromechanics IRG, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, #04-13/14 Enterprise Wing, 138602 Singapore (Singapore); Institute of Laser and Optoelectronics Technology, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Yan, Jie [Biosystems and Micromechanics IRG, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, #04-13/14 Enterprise Wing, 138602 Singapore (Singapore); Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, 31 Biopolis Way, #04-01, 138669 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 14 Medical Drive, MD 11 #04-01A, 117599 Singapore (Singapore); Kang, Yuzhan [Biosystems and Micromechanics IRG, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, #04-13/14 Enterprise Wing, 138602 Singapore (Singapore); Xu, Shuoyu [Biosystems and Micromechanics IRG, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, #04-13/14 Enterprise Wing, 138602 Singapore (Singapore); Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, 31 Biopolis Way, #04-01, 138669 Singapore (Singapore); Computation and System Biology Program, Singapore-MIT Alliance, 4 Engineering Drive 3, E4-04-10, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Peng, Qiwen [Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, 31 Biopolis Way, #04-01, 138669 Singapore (Singapore); Computation and System Biology Program, Singapore-MIT Alliance, 4 Engineering Drive 3, E4-04-10, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Mechanobiology Institute, 5A Engineering Drive 1, T-Lab #05-01, 117411 Singapore (Singapore); and others

    2014-07-14

    Various structural features on the liver surface reflect functional changes in the liver. The visualization of these surface features with molecular specificity is of particular relevance to understanding the physiology and diseases of the liver. Using multi-photon microscopy (MPM), we have developed a label-free, three-dimensional quantitative and sensitive method to visualize various structural features of liver surface in living rat. MPM could quantitatively image the microstructural features of liver surface with respect to the sinuosity of collagen fiber, the elastic fiber structure, the ratio between elastin and collagen, collagen content, and the metabolic state of the hepatocytes that are correlative with the pathophysiologically induced changes in the regions of interest. This study highlights the potential of this technique as a useful tool for pathophysiological studies and possible diagnosis of the liver diseases with further development.

  14. Measuring techniques for Compton, Rayleigh and fluorescence cross-sections excited by keV photons. Potential use for various applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji [University of Tsukuba, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Akatsuka, Takao [Yamagata University, Faculty of Engineering, Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan); Seltzer, Stephen M.; Hubbell, John H. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Ionizing Radiation Division, Photon and Charged Particle Data Center, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio [Universita di Sassari, Istituto di Matematica e Fisica, Sassari (Italy); Gigante, Giovanni E. [Universita di Rome, Dipartimento di Fisica, ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy)

    2002-08-01

    Compton, Rayleigh and fluorescence cross-sections for low, medium and high Z atoms are measured at low photon energies (<100 keV) using an X-ray tube with secondary target. A new approach is developed to estimate the solid angle approximation and geometrical efficiency for a system with experimental arrangement using X-ray tube and secondary target as excitation source. Using this arrangement basic interaction cross-section measurements are performed in vacuum and reasonable monochromacy is achieved. Our motivation is mainly based on fundamental radiation interactions and radiology in mind. The present X-ray system considering the geometrical effects of the measuring system is more advantageous as far as the reduction of incoherently scattered background and improvement of monochromacy is concerned. The variation of the solid angle is studied by changing the radius and length of the collimators towards and away from the source and sample. From these values the variation of the solid angle and geometrical efficiency is deduced and the optimum value is used for the experimental work. The experimental system is very simple in design, compact and economical. Experimental results based on these systems are compared with theoretical estimates and good agreement is observed in between them. (author)

  15. Fluorescence ratiometric sensing of polyols by phenylboronic acid complexes with ligands exhibiting excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in aqueous micellar media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trejo-Huizar, Karla Elisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, Arturo; Martínez-Aguirre, Mayte A.; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K., E-mail: anatoli@unam.mx

    2016-11-15

    2-Phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone possessing dual fluorescence due to excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) forms stable complex with phenylboronic acid with blue shifted emission maximum in micellar medium of a cationic surfactant even though the compound lacks required for complexation with boronic acids cis-diol structure. No complexation is observed in the presence of neutral or anionic surfactants. Titrations of this complex with polyols including sugars and nucleotides at pH 8 displace free quinolone showing ratiometric response, which allows determination of polyols with detection limits 0.05–1 mM and unusually wide linear dynamic ranges. Another ESIPT dye 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)−1H-benzimidazole also lacking cis-diol structure forms equally stable complex with phenylboronic acid and allows ratiometric determination of polyols with similar characteristics. The results of this study demonstrate that blocking ESIPT of signaling molecule by complexation of the receptor with the proton donor group eliminates the low energy emission from tautomeric form but strongly enhances the high energy emission typical for “normal” form of signaling molecule creating a possibility of ratiometric sensing.

  16. Ethanol- and trifluoroethanol-induced changes in phase states of DPPC membranes. Prodan emission-excitation fluorescence spectroscopy supported by PARAFAC analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horochowska, Martyna; Cieślik-Boczula, Katarzyna; Rospenk, Maria

    2018-03-01

    It has been shown that Prodan emission-excitation fluorescence spectroscopy supported by Parallel Factor (PARAFAC) analysis is a fast, simple and sensitive method used in the study of the phase transition from the noninterdigitated gel (Lβ‧) state to the interdigitated gel (LβI) phase, triggered by ethanol and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) molecules in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholines (DPPC) membranes. The relative contribution of lipid phases with spectral characteristics of each pure phase component has been presented as a function of an increase in alcohol concentration. It has been stated that both alcohol molecules can induce a formation of the LβI phase, but TFE is over six times stronger inducer of the interdigitated phase in DPPC membranes than ethanol molecules. Moreover, in the TFE-mixed DPPC membranes, the transition from the Lβ‧ to LβI phase is accompanied by a formation of the fluid phase, which most probably serves as a boundary phase between the Lβ‧ and LβI regions. Contrary to the three phase-state model of TFE-mixed DPPC membranes, in ethanol-mixed DPPC membranes only the two phase-state model has been detected.

  17. Assessment on the leakage hazard of landfill leachate using three-dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence and parallel factor analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongwei; Lei, Hongjun; Liu, Xin; Wei, Huaibin; Liu, Shufang

    2017-09-01

    A large number of simple and informal landfills exist in developing countries, which pose as tremendous soil and groundwater pollution threats. Early warning and monitoring of landfill leachate pollution status is of great importance. However, there is a shortage of affordable and effective tools and methods. In this study, a soil column experiment was performed to simulate the pollution status of leachate using three-dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence (3D-EEMF) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) models. Sum of squared residuals (SSR) and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to determine the optimal components for PARAFAC. A one-way analysis of variance showed that the component scores of the soil column leachate were significant influenced by landfill leachate (plandfill to that of natural soil could be used to evaluate the leakage status of landfill leachate. Furthermore, a hazard index (HI) and a hazard evaluation standard were established. A case study of Kaifeng landfill indicated a low hazard (level 5) by the use of HI. In summation, HI is presented as a tool to evaluate landfill pollution status and for the guidance of municipal solid waste management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of multi-step excitation schemes for detection of actinides and lanthanides in solutions by luminescence/chemiluminescence laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izosimov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot Curie 6, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    The use of laser radiation with tunable wavelength allows the selective excitation of actinide/lanthanide species with subsequent registration of luminescence/chemiluminescence for their detection. This work is devoted to applications of the time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy and time-resolved laser-induced chemiluminescence spectroscopy for the detection of lanthanides and actinides. Results of the experiments on U, Eu, and Sm detection by TRLIF (Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence) method in blood plasma and urine are presented. Data on luminol chemiluminescence in solutions containing Sm(III), U(IV), and Pu(IV) are analyzed. It is shown that appropriate selectivity of lanthanide/actinide detection can be reached when chemiluminescence is initiated by transitions within 4f- or 5f-electron shell of lanthanide/actinide ions corresponding to the visible spectral range. In this case chemiluminescence of chemiluminogen (luminol) arises when the ion of f element is excited by multi-quantum absorption of visible light. The multi-photon scheme of chemiluminescence excitation makes chemiluminescence not only a highly sensitive but also a highly selective tool for the detection of lanthanide/actinide species in solutions. (author)

  19. Simulation of multi-photon emission isotopes using time-resolved SimSET multiple photon history generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Lin, Chang-Shiun; Chuang, Keh-Shih [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-HuaUniversity, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Jan, Meei-Ling [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-01

    Abstract-Multiple-photon emitters, such as In-111 or Se-75, have enormous potential in the field of nuclear medicine imaging. For example, Se-75 can be used to investigate the bile acid malabsorption and measure the bile acid pool loss. The simulation system for emission tomography (SimSET) is a well-known Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) code in nuclear medicine for its high computational efficiency. However, current SimSET cannot simulate these isotopes due to the lack of modeling of complex decay scheme and the time-dependent decay process. To extend the versatility of SimSET for simulation of those multi-photon emission isotopes, a time-resolved multiple photon history generator based on SimSET codes is developed in present study. For developing the time-resolved SimSET (trSimSET) with radionuclide decay process, the new MCS model introduce new features, including decay time information and photon time-of-flight information, into this new code. The half-life of energy states were tabulated from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) database. The MCS results indicate that the overall percent difference is less than 8.5% for all simulation trials as compared to GATE. To sum up, we demonstrated that time-resolved SimSET multiple photon history generator can have comparable accuracy with GATE and keeping better computational efficiency. The new MCS code is very useful to study the multi-photon imaging of novel isotopes that needs the simulation of lifetime and the time-of-fight measurements. (authors)

  20. Single and multi-photon events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for single and multi-photon events with missing energy is performed using data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 161 GeV and 172 GeV for a total of 20.9 pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The results obtained are used to derive the value for the $\

  1. Complicated Fermi-type vibronic resonance: Untangling of the single-site quasi-line fluorescence excitation spectra of a methylated dibenzoporphin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabei, S.M.; Kuzmitsky, V.A.; Solovyov, K.N.

    2008-01-01

    The quasi-line low-temperature (4.2 K) fluorescence excitation spectra of 2,3,12,13-tetramethyldibenzo[g,q]porphin introduced into an n-octane matrix have been measured in the range of the S 2 0 electronic transition at selective fluorescence monitoring for the two main types of impurity centers (sites). A characteristic feature of these spectra is that a conglomerate of quasi-lines - a structured complex band - is observed instead of one 0-0 quasi-line of the S 2 0 transition. In this band, the intensity distributions for the two main sites considerably differ from each other. The occurrence of such conglomerates is interpreted as a result of nonadiabatic vibrational-electronic interaction between the vibronic S 2 and S 1 states (the complex vibronic analogue of the Fermi resonance). The frequencies and intensities of individual transitions determined from the deconvolution of complex conglomerates are used as the initial data for solving the inverse spectroscopic problem: the determination of the unperturbed electronic and vibrational levels of states involved in the resonance and the vibronic-interaction matrix elements between them. This problem is solved with a method developed previously. The experimental results and their analysis are compared to the analogous data obtained earlier for meso-tetraazaporphin and meso-tetrapropylporphin. The energy intervals between the S 2 and S 1 electronic levels (ΔE S 2 S 1 ) of the two main types of impurity centers formed by molecules of a given porphyrin in the crystal matrix are found to significantly differ from each other, the values of this difference (δΔE S 2 S 1 ) being considerably greater for tetramethyldibenzoporphin, δΔE S 2 S 1 =228cm -1 , than for the two other porphyrins. At the same time, the energies of the unperturbed vibrational states of the S 1 electronic level participating in the resonance are very close to each other for these two sites

  2. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  3. Proton and electron impact on molecular and atomic oxygen: I. High resolution fluorescence spectra in the visible and VUV spectral range and emission cross-sections for dissociative ionisation and excitation of O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, O.; Schartner, K.H.

    2000-01-01

    For pt.II see ibid., vol.11, p.45-58, 2000. Molecular oxygen O 2 was dissociated in collisions with protons and electrons in the intermediate velocity range (p + -energies: 17-800 keV, e - -energies: 0.2-2 keV). Fluorescence from excited atomic and singly ionised fragments and from singly ionised molecules was detected in the VUV and in the visible and near UV spectral range. Highly resolved spectra are presented for the VUV (46-131 nm) and the near UV/visible (340-605 nm) spectral range. Absolute emission cross-sections have been determined for dissociative ionisation and excitation leading to fluorescence in the VUV. Results are compared with published data. (orig.)

  4. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati, Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: abd@iasbs.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-10

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation–Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability. - Highlights: • Novel pH-sensitive carbon dots with strong FL changes towards pH are reported. • Ratiometric FL pH-sensors for both acidic and basic ranges of pH are constructed. • Multivariate calibration methods were used to calibrate a broad range of pH. • Using EEM of carbon dots and ANN, pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. • The pH prediction is stable even at high ionic strength up to 2 M NaCl.

  5. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barati, Ali; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation–Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability. - Highlights: • Novel pH-sensitive carbon dots with strong FL changes towards pH are reported. • Ratiometric FL pH-sensors for both acidic and basic ranges of pH are constructed. • Multivariate calibration methods were used to calibrate a broad range of pH. • Using EEM of carbon dots and ANN, pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. • The pH prediction is stable even at high ionic strength up to 2 M NaCl.

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmutov, D.; Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined.

  8. Multi-photon microscopy with a low-cost and highly efficient Cr:LiCAF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakadić, Sava; Demirbas, Umit; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Moore, Anna; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Boas, David A.; Sennaroglu, Alphan; Kartner, Franz X.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-photon microscopy (MPM) is a powerful tool for biomedical imaging, enabling molecular contrast and integrated structural and functional imaging on the cellular and subcellular level. However, the cost and complexity of femtosecond laser sources that are required in MPM are significant hurdles to widespread adoption of this important imaging modality. In this work, we describe femtosecond diode pumped Cr:LiCAF laser technology as a low cost alternative to femtosecond Ti:Sapphire lasers for MPM. Using single mode pump diodes which cost only $150 each, a diode pumped Cr:LiCAF laser generates ~70-fs duration, 1.8-nJ pulses at ~800 nm wavelengths, with a repetition rate of 100 MHz and average output power of 180 mW. Representative examples of MPM imaging in neuroscience, immunology, endocrinology and cancer research using Cr:LiCAF laser technology are presented. These studies demonstrate the potential of this laser source for use in a broad range of MPM applications. PMID:19065223

  9. Physics of the Brain. Prevention of the Epileptic Seizures by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS Team

    The novel study of the epileptogenesis mechanisms is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated (amplitude modulation) multi-photon (frequency modulation) fiber-laser interaction with the brain epilepsy-topion (the epilepsy onset area), so as to prevent the excessive electrical discharge (epileptic seizure) in the brain. The repetition frequency, Ω, matches the low frequency (epileptic) phonon waves in the brain. The laser repetition frequency (5-100 pulses per second) enables the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the phonon (possible epileptic-to-be) activity in the brain. The tunable fiber laser frequencies, Δω (multi photon operation), are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling monitoring of the electrical charge imbalance (within the 10s of milliseconds), and the DNA-corruption in the epilepsy-topion, as the possible cause of the disease. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  10. Automated evaluation of liver fibrosis in thioacetamide, carbon tetrachloride, and bile duct ligation rodent models using second-harmonic generation/two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Chen, Long; Rao, Hui-Ying; Teng, Xiao; Ren, Ya-Yun; Lu, Yan-Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Nan; Liu, Fang-Fang; Wei, Lai

    2017-01-01

    Animal models provide a useful platform for developing and testing new drugs to treat liver fibrosis. Accordingly, we developed a novel automated system to evaluate liver fibrosis in rodent models. This system uses second-harmonic generation (SHG)/two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy to assess a total of four mouse and rat models, using chemical treatment with either thioacetamide (TAA) or carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), and a surgical method, bile duct ligation (BDL). The results obtained by the new technique were compared with that using Ishak fibrosis scores and two currently used quantitative methods for determining liver fibrosis: the collagen proportionate area (CPA) and measurement of hydroxyproline (HYP) content. We show that 11 shared morphological parameters faithfully recapitulate Ishak fibrosis scores in the models, with high area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) performance. The AUC values of 11 shared parameters were greater than that of the CPA (TAA: 0.758-0.922 vs 0.752-0.908; BDL: 0.874-0.989 vs 0.678-0.966) in the TAA mice and BDL rat models and similar to that of the CPA in the TAA rat and CCl 4 mouse models. Similarly, based on the trends in these parameters at different time points, 9, 10, 7, and 2 model-specific parameters were selected for the TAA rats, TAA mice, CCl 4 mice, and BDL rats, respectively. These parameters identified differences among the time points in the four models, with high AUC accuracy, and the corresponding AUC values of these parameters were greater compared with those of the CPA in the TAA rat and mouse models (rats: 0.769-0.894 vs 0.64-0.799; mice: 0.87-0.93 vs 0.739-0.836) and similar to those of the CPA in the CCl 4 mouse and BDL rat models. Similarly, the AUC values of 11 shared parameters and model-specific parameters were greater than those of HYP in the TAA rats, TAA mice, and CCl 4 mouse models and were similar to those of HYP in the BDL rat models. The automated

  11. Controlling the optical bistability beyond the multi-photon resonance condition in a three-level closed-loop atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Nozari, Narges; Vafafard, Azar; Sahrai, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the optical bistability behavior of a three-level closed-loop atomic system beyond the multi-photon resonance condition. Using the Floquet decomposition, we solve the time-dependent equations of motion, beyond the multi-photon resonance condition. By identifying the different scattering processes contributing to the medium response, it is shown that in general the optical bistability behavior of the system is not phase-dependent. The phase dependence is due to the scattering of the driving and coupling fields into the probe field at a frequency, which, in general, differs from the probe field frequency. - Highlights: → We investigate optical bistability of a three-level closed-loop atomic system, beyond the multi-photon resonance condition. → By applying Floquet decomposition to the equation of motion, the different scattering processes contributing to the medium response are determined. → It is shown that the phase dependence of optical bistability arises from the scattering of the driving and coupling fields into the probe field frequency.

  12. The chlorophyll a fluorescence induction pattern in chloroplasts upon repetitive single turnover excitations: Accumulation and function of QB-nonreducing centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.; Kasalicky, V.; Durchan, M.; Prasil, O.

    2006-01-01

    The increase of chlorophyll fluorescence yield in chloroplasts in a 12.5 Hz train of saturating single turnover flashes and the kinetics of fluorescence yield decay after the last flash have been analyzed. The approximate twofold increase in Fm relative to Fo, reached after 30-40 flashes, is

  13. Stoke's and anti-Stoke's characteristics of anaerobic and aerobic bacterias at excitation of fluorescence by low-intensity red light: I. Research of anaerobic bacterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masychev, Victor I.; Alexandrov, Michail T.

    2000-04-01

    Biopsy or photo dynamic therapy of tumors are usually investigated by fluorescent diagnostics methods. Information on modified method of fluorescence diagnostics of inflammatory diseases is represented in this research. Anaerobic micro organisms are often the cause of these pathological processes. These micro organisms also accompany disbiotic processes in intestines.

  14. Fluorescent multiplex cell flow systems and methods

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen; Abuelela, Ayman F.; Mohammad, Amal Jehad

    2017-01-01

    scanning system emits multiple electromagnetic wavelengths simultaneously it cause multiple fluorescent labels having different excitation wavelength maximums to fluoresce. The system can simultaneously capture real-time fluorescence images from at least

  15. Serum albumin binding sites properties in donors and in schizophrenia patients: the study of fluorescence decay of the probe K-35 using S-60 synchrotron pulse excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryzunov, Y.A. E-mail: grysunov@sci.lebedev.ru; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Komarova, M.N.; Misionzhnik, E.Yu.; Uzbekov, M.G.; Molodetskich, A.V.; Dobretsov, G.E.; Yakimenko, M.N

    2000-06-21

    The properties of serum albumin obtained from donors and from paranoid schizophrenia patients were studied with the fluorescent probe K-35 (N-carboxyphenylimide of dimethylaminonaphthalic acid) and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on the SR beam station of the S-60 synchrotron of the Lebedev Physical Institute. The mean fluorescence quantum yield of K-35 in patients serum was decreased significantly by 25-60% comparing with donors. The analysis of pre-exponential factors of fluorescence decay using 'amplitude standard' method has shown that in patient sera the fraction of K-35 molecules bound with albumin and inaccessible to fluorescence quenchers ('bright' K-35 molecules with {tau}{sub 1}=8.0{+-}0.4 ns) is 1.2-3 times less than in the donor sera. The fraction of K-35 molecules with partly quenched fluorescence ({tau}{sub 2}=1.44{+-}0.22 ns) was significantly increased in schizophrenia patients. The results obtained suggest that the properties of binding region in serum albumin molecules of acute paranoid schizophrenia patients change significantly.

  16. Serum albumin binding sites properties in donors and in schizophrenia patients: the study of fluorescence decay of the probe K-35 using S-60 synchrotron pulse excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryzunov, Y.A.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Komarova, M.N.; Misionzhnik, E.Yu.; Uzbekov, M.G.; Molodetskich, A.V.; Dobretsov, G.E.; Yakimenko, M.N.

    2000-01-01

    The properties of serum albumin obtained from donors and from paranoid schizophrenia patients were studied with the fluorescent probe K-35 (N-carboxyphenylimide of dimethylaminonaphthalic acid) and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on the SR beam station of the S-60 synchrotron of the Lebedev Physical Institute. The mean fluorescence quantum yield of K-35 in patients serum was decreased significantly by 25-60% comparing with donors. The analysis of pre-exponential factors of fluorescence decay using 'amplitude standard' method has shown that in patient sera the fraction of K-35 molecules bound with albumin and inaccessible to fluorescence quenchers ('bright' K-35 molecules with τ 1 =8.0±0.4 ns) is 1.2-3 times less than in the donor sera. The fraction of K-35 molecules with partly quenched fluorescence (τ 2 =1.44±0.22 ns) was significantly increased in schizophrenia patients. The results obtained suggest that the properties of binding region in serum albumin molecules of acute paranoid schizophrenia patients change significantly

  17. Serum albumin binding sites properties in donors and in schizophrenia patients: the study of fluorescence decay of the probe K-35 using S-60 synchrotron pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryzunov, Yu. A.; Syrejshchikova, T. I.; Komarova, M. N.; Misionzhnik, E. Yu; Uzbekov, M. G.; Molodetskich, A. V.; Dobretsov, G. E.; Yakimenko, M. N.

    2000-06-01

    The properties of serum albumin obtained from donors and from paranoid schizophrenia patients were studied with the fluorescent probe K-35 (N-carboxyphenylimide of dimethylaminonaphthalic acid) and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on the SR beam station of the S-60 synchrotron of the Lebedev Physical Institute. The mean fluorescence quantum yield of K-35 in patients serum was decreased significantly by 25-60% comparing with donors. The analysis of pre-exponential factors of fluorescence decay using "amplitude standard" method has shown that in patient sera the fraction of K-35 molecules bound with albumin and inaccessible to fluorescence quenchers ("bright" K-35 molecules with τ1=8.0±0.4 ns) is 1.2-3 times less than in the donor sera. The fraction of K-35 molecules with partly quenched fluorescence ( τ2=1.44±0.22 ns) was significantly increased in schizophrenia patients. The results obtained suggest that the properties of binding region in serum albumin molecules of acute paranoid schizophrenia patients change significantly.

  18. Fluorescence and excitation spectra of Bk3+, Cf3+, and Es3+ ions in single crystals of LaCl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessler, J.P.; Caird, J.A.; Carnall, W.T.; Crosswhite, H.M.; Sjoblom, R.K.; Wagner, F. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Dye laser techniques have been used to study the energy level structure of the heavier actinides in single crystals of lanthanum chloride. In the case of einsteinium, fluorescence was detected and measured from the following manifolds: J = 5 at 0.984 μm -1 , J = 4 at 1.572 μm -1 , J = 6 at 2.930 μm -1 . This fluorescence was observed to the five lowest manifolds: J = 8, 5, 7, 2, 6. For californium, fluorescence has been detected from the manifolds: J = 11/2 at 1.190 μm -1 , J = 7/2 at 1.389 μm -1 , J = 5/2 at 1.977 μm -1 . This fluorescence was observed to the three lowest manifolds: J = 15/2, 9/2, 11/2. The fluorescence manifolds of berkelium are J = 6 at 1.540 μm -1 , and J = 4 at 1.953 μm -1 . The three lowest manifolds, J = 6, 5, and 4, have been observed in fluorescence. Absorption spectra data have yielded crystal-field splitting measurements in the higher manifolds of Es + . The location of the manifolds in general confirmed earlier approximate free-ion level structure calculations based on assumed regularities in the energy level parameters derived from spectra of the actinide ions through Cf + . 2 figures

  19. A comparative study on total reflection X-ray fluorescence determination of low atomic number elements in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using different excitation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, N. L.; Kanrar, Buddhadev; Aggarwal, S. K.; Wobrauschek, Peter; Rauwolf, M.; Streli, Christina

    2014-09-01

    A comparison of trace element determinations of low atomic number (Z) elements Na, Mg, Al, P, K and Ca in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using W Lβ1, Mo Kα and Cr Kα excitations has been made. For Mo Kα and W Lβ1 excitations a Si (Li) detector with beryllium window was used and measurements were performed in air and helium atmospheres. For Cr Kα excitation, a Si (Li) detector with an ultra thin polymer window (UTW) was used and measurements were made in vacuum and air atmospheres. The sensitivities of the elemental X-ray lines were determined using TXRF spectra of standard solutions and processing them by IAEA QXAS program. The elemental concentrations of the elements in other solutions were determined using their TXRF spectra and pre-determined sensitivity values. The study suggests that, using the above experimental set up, Mo Kα excitation is not suited for trace determination of low atomic number element. Excitation by WLβ1 and helium atmosphere, the spectrometer can be used for the determination of elements with Z = 15 (P) and above with fairly good detection limits whereas Cr Kα excitation with ultra thin polymer window and vacuum atmosphere is good for the elements having Z = 11 (Na) and above. The detection limits using this set up vary from 7048 pg for Na to 83 pg for Ti.

  20. Multi-photon entanglements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniell, M.L.

    2000-09-01

    The motivation of this thesis was to create higher-order entanglements. The first experimental observation of a four-photon entanglement was presented in the experiment of this thesis. And the visibility of this entanglement was 0.79+-0.06, which is sufficient to make claims of the nonlocality of quantum mechanics. This therefore lays a foundation for experiments showing the nonlocality of teleportation, and the purification of entanglement. The work of this thesis brings together a lot of earlier work done by the Zeilinger Group, and lays a foundation for future experiments. Earlier experiments such as teleportation together with entanglement swapping, which are 'complete teleportation' in as much as the state teleported is entirely undefined, can be combined and re-done with this four-photon entanglement. This result would be the first demonstration of complete, nonlocal teleportation. Also this experiment can be slightly modified and used to perform the first experimental quantum purification of entanglement, which is of vital importance to the fields of quantum information, and also is interesting for fundamental experiments on entanglement. Another direct application of this experiment is to perform the first 'event-ready' testing of Bell's Inequality. Here the four-photon entanglement can be used as a source of entangled photons, whereby the photons have no common source. This would enable an even more stringent testing of Bells theorem. Finally this experiment can be used for the demonstration and investigation of many practical, directly applicable quantum information schemes. For instance quantum cryptography, error correction, and computing. (author)

  1. On the biphoton excitation of the fluorescence of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules of purple photosynthetic bacteria by powerful near IR femto-picosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, A. Yu., E-mail: borissov@belozersky.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Belozersky Institute of Physicochemical Biology (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    The authors of a number of experimental works detected nonresonance biphoton excitation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, which represent the main pigment in the light-absorbing natural 'antenna' complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm). They believe that IR quanta excite hypothetic forbidden levels of the pigments of these bacteria in the double frequency range 625-750 nm. We propose and ground an alternative triplet mechanism to describe this phenomenon. According to our hypothesis, the mechanism of biphoton excitation of molecules by IR quanta can manifest itself specifically, through high triplet levels of molecules in the high fields induced by femtosecond-picosecond laser pulses.

  2. On the sub-maximal yield and photo-electric stimulation of chlorophyll a fluorescence in single turnover excitations in plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.; Rensen, van J.J.S.; Rodrigues, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    A set of expressions is derived which quantifies the chlorophyll fluorescence yield in terms of rate constants of primary light reactions of PSII, the fraction of open and semi-open RCs and of the electric field sensed by the RC in the thylakoid membrane. The decay kinetics of the chlorophyll

  3. Up-Conversion Intersystem Crossing Rates in Organic Emitters for Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence: Impact of the Nature of Singlet vs Triplet Excited States

    KAUST Repository

    Samanta, Pralok Kumar; Kim, Dongwook; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    The rates for up-conversion intersystem crossing (UISC) from the T1 state to the S1 state are calculated for a series of organic emitters with an emphasis on thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials. Both the spin-orbit coupling

  4. Multiway analysis methods applied to the fluorescence excitation-emission dataset for the simultaneous quantification of valsartan and amlodipine in tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç, Erdal; Ertekin, Zehra Ceren; Büker, Eda

    2017-09-01

    In this study, excitation-emission matrix datasets, which have strong overlapping bands, were processed by using four different chemometric calibration algorithms consisting of parallel factor analysis, Tucker3, three-way partial least squares and unfolded partial least squares for the simultaneous quantitative estimation of valsartan and amlodipine besylate in tablets. In analyses, preliminary separation step was not used before the application of parallel factor analysis Tucker3, three-way partial least squares and unfolded partial least squares approaches for the analysis of the related drug substances in samples. Three-way excitation-emission matrix data array was obtained by concatenating excitation-emission matrices of the calibration set, validation set, and commercial tablet samples. The excitation-emission matrix data array was used to get parallel factor analysis, Tucker3, three-way partial least squares and unfolded partial least squares calibrations and to predict the amounts of valsartan and amlodipine besylate in samples. For all the methods, calibration and prediction of valsartan and amlodipine besylate were performed in the working concentration ranges of 0.25-4.50 μg/mL. The validity and the performance of all the proposed methods were checked by using the validation parameters. From the analysis results, it was concluded that the described two-way and three-way algorithmic methods were very useful for the simultaneous quantitative resolution and routine analysis of the related drug substances in marketed samples.

  5. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  6. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) for quick and pseudo-quantitative determination of protein- and humic-like substances in full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquin, Céline; Lesage, Geoffroy; Traber, Jacqueline; Pronk, Wouter; Heran, Marc

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this study is to help filling the research gaps linked to the on-line application of fluorescence spectroscopy in wastewater treatment and data processing tools suitable for rapid correction and extraction of data contained in three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM) for real-time studies. 3DEEM was evaluated for direct quantification of Effluent Organic Matter (EfOM) fractions in full-scale MBR bulk supernatant and permeate samples. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate possible correlations between conventional Lowry and Dubois methods, Liquid Chromatography coupled to Organic Carbon and Organic Nitrogen Detection (LC-OCD-OND) and 3DEEM. 3DEEM data were analyzed using the volume of fluorescence (Φ) parameter from the Fluorescence Regional Integration (FRI) method. Two mathematical correlations were established between LC-OCD-OND and 3DEEM data to quantify protein-like and humic-like substances. These correlations were validated with supplementary data from the initial full-scale MBR, and were checked with samples from other systems (a second full-scale MBR, a full-scale conventional activated sludge (CAS) and a laboratory-scale MBR). While humic-like correlation showed satisfactory prediction for a second full-scale MBR and a CAS system, further studies are required for protein-like estimation in other systems. This new approach offers interesting perspectives for the on-line application of 3DEEM for EfOM quantification (protein-like and humic-like substances), fouling prediction and MBR process control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic field effect in fluorescence of excited fluorophore equilibrated with exciplex that reversibly dissociates into radical-ion pair undergoing the spin conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodin, Dmitry V; Ivanov, Anatoly I; Burshtein, Anatoly I

    2012-07-14

    The fluorescence of the photoexcited electron acceptor, (1)A∗, and the exciplex, (1)[D(+δ)A(-δ)] formed at contact of (1)A∗ with an electron donor (1)D, is known to be very sensitive to a magnetic field, assisting the spin conversion in the resulting geminate radical ion pair (RIP), (1, 3)[D(+)...A(-)]. The relative increase of the fluorescence in the highest magnetic field compared to the lowest one, known as the magnetic field effect, crucially depends on the dielectric constant of the solvent, ɛ. This phenomenon first studied experimentally is at first reproduced here theoretically by means of the so called integral encounter theory. It was shown to be very sensitive to the position of the exciplex energy level relative to the levels of exciplex precursors and the charged products of its dissociation. The results obtained strongly depend on the dielectric properties of the solvents as well as on the exciplex and RIP formation rates.

  8. Equilibrium constants in aqueous lanthanide and actinide chemistry from time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy: The role of ground and excited state reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard, I.; Luetzenkirchen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Equilibrium constants for aqueous reactions between lanthanide or actinide ions and (in-) organic ligands contain important information for various radiochemical problems, such as nuclear reprocessing or the migration of radioelements in the geosphere. We study the conditions required to determine equilibrium constants by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Based on a simulation study it is shown that the possibility to determine equilibrium constants depends upon the reaction rates in the photoexcited states of the lanthanide or actinide ions. (orig.)

  9. Multi-photon vertical cross-sectional imaging with a dynamically-balanced thin-film PZT z-axis microactuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongsoo; Duan, Xiyu; Li, Haijun; Wang, Thomas D; Oldham, Kenn R

    2017-10-01

    Use of a thin-film piezoelectric microactuator for axial scanning during multi-photon vertical cross-sectional imaging is described. The actuator uses thin-film lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) to generate upward displacement of a central mirror platform, micro-machined from a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer to dimensions compatible with endoscopic imaging instruments. Device modeling in this paper focuses on existence of frequencies near device resonance producing vertical motion with minimal off-axis tilt even in the presence of multiple vibration modes and non-uniformity in fabrication outcomes. Operation near rear resonance permits large stroke lengths at low voltages relative to other vertical microactuators. Highly uniform vertical motion of the mirror platform is a key requirement for vertical cross-sectional imaging in the remote scan architecture being used for multi-photon instrument prototyping. The stage is installed in a benchtop testbed in combination with an electrostatic mirror that performs in-plane scanning. Vertical sectional images are acquired from 15 μm diameter beads and excised mouse colon tissue.

  10. Rapid methods for multi-elemental X-ray fluorescence analysis using excitation isotope sources and Si(Li)-semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravleva, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Some rapid methods using an unique calibration curve have been developed for multi-elemental X-ray fluorescence analysis of thin and thick layers of various samples having low contents of heavy elements. The matrix absorption effect in thick samples is taken into account according to the scattered radiation.The similar method using a unique calibration curve for determination of low contents of trace elements in thin layers without account of matrix effect is proposed. The results on the intercomposition run soil-5 are in good agreement with the data obtained in different laboratories. The errors of the method are 10 %; in a case of peak superposition - 15 %

  11. Spectral photoluminescence for the characterization of excitation states in semiconductors and fluorescence solar collectors with manipulation of the in and out coupling of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knabe, Sebastian

    2011-05-20

    In this thesis results of different experiments are presented (e.g. angular dependent photoluminescence) to characterize the propagation of electro-magnetic radiation inside and out of absorbers using the examples of crystalline silicon and fluorescence collectors with and without manipulation of the in- and out-coupling of the radiation by photonic structures (opal and edge filters). Experimental results were compared with results from simulations of the propagation of radiation, which are based on the fundamental equations for the properties of electro-magnetic radiation like reflection, transmission, absorption or phase accumulation.

  12. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence on argon intermediate pressure microwave discharges: Measuring the depopulation rates of the 4p and 5p excited levels as induced by electron and atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares, J.M., E-mail: j.m.palomares-linares@tue.nl; Graef, W.A.A.D.; Hübner, S.; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der, E-mail: jjamvandermullen@gmail.com

    2013-10-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar is explored by means of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) experiments using the combination of high rep-rate YAG–Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable surfatron induced plasma setup. The high rep-rate favors the photon statistics while the low energy per pulse avoids intrusive plasma laser interactions. An analysis shows that, despite the low energy per pulse, saturation can still be achieved even when the geometrical overlap and spectral overlap are optimal. Out of the various studies that can be performed with this setup we confine the current paper to the study of the direct responses to the laser pump action of three 4p and one 5p levels of the Ar system. By changing the plasma in a controlled way one gets for these levels the rates of electron and atom quenching and therewith the total destruction rates of electron and atom collisions. Comparison with literature shows that the classical hard sphere collision rate derived for hydrogen gives a good description for the observed electron quenching (e-quenching) in Ar whereas for heavy particle quenching (a-quenching) this agreement was only found for the 5p level. An important parameter in the study of electron excitation kinetics is the location of the boundary in the atomic system for which the number of electron collisions per radiative life time equals unity. It is observed that for the Ar system this boundary is positioned lower than what is expected on grounds of H-like formulas. - Highlights: • Time resolved laser induced fluorescence at high repetition rate • Decay times as function of pressure, electron density and temperature • Measurement of total electron atom depopulation rates • Reasonable agreement of electron total rates with hard sphere approximations.

  13. On the mechanism of non-radiative decay of blue fluorescent protein chromophore: New insight from the excited-state molecular dynamics simulations and potential energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Liu, Jian-Yong; Zhou, Pan-Wang

    2017-11-01

    A detailed theoretical investigation based on the ab initio on-the-fly surface hopping dynamics simulations and potential energy surfaces calculations has been performed to unveil the mechanism of the photoinduced non-adiabatic relaxation process of the isolated blue fluorescent protein (BFP) chromophore in gas phase. The data analysis presents that the dominant reaction coordinate of the BFP chromophore is driven by a rotation motion around the CC double bridging bond, which is in remarkable difference with a previous result which supports a Hula-Twist rotation pattern. Such behavior is consistent with the double bond rotation pattern of the GFP neutral chromophore. In addition, the dynamics simulations give an estimated decay time of 1.1 ps for the S1 state, which is agrees well with the experimental values measured in proteins. The present work offers a straightforward understanding for the decay mechanism of the BFP chromophore and suggestions of the photochemical properties of analogous protein chromophores. We hope the current work would be helpful for further exploration of the BFP photochemical and photophysical properties in various environments, and can provide guidance and prediction for rational design of the fluorescent proteins catering for different demands.

  14. Simultaneous determination of umbelliferone and scopoletin in Tibetan medicine Saussurea laniceps and traditional Chinese medicine Radix angelicae pubescentis using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence coupled with second-order calibration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Wu, Hai-Long; Yin, Xiao-Li; Hu, Yong; Gu, Hui-Wen; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2017-01-01

    A chemometrics-assisted excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence method is presented for simultaneous determination of umbelliferone and scopoletin in Tibetan medicine Saussurea laniceps (SL) and traditional Chinese medicine Radix angelicae pubescentis (RAP). Using the strategy of combining EEM fluorescence data with second-order calibration method based on the alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) algorithm, the simultaneous quantification of umbelliferone and scopoletin in the two different complex systems was achieved successfully, even in the presence of potential interferents. The pretreatment is simple due to the "second-order advantage" and the use of "mathematical separation" instead of awkward "physical or chemical separation". Satisfactory results have been achieved with the limits of detection (LODs) of umbelliferone and scopoletin being 0.06 ng mL- 1 and 0.16 ng mL- 1, respectively. The average spike recoveries of umbelliferone and scopoletin are 98.8 ± 4.3% and 102.5 ± 3.3%, respectively. Besides, HPLC-DAD method was used to further validate the presented strategy, and t-test indicates that prediction results of the two methods have no significant differences. Satisfactory experimental results imply that our method is fast, low-cost and sensitive when compared with HPLC-DAD method.

  15. A Comparative Study of the Application of Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrices Combined with Parallel Factor Analysis and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization in the Analysis of Zn Complexation by Humic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Boguta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was the application of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices (EEMs combined with two decomposition methods: parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF to study the interaction mechanisms between humic acids (HAs and Zn(II over a wide concentration range (0–50 mg·dm−3. The influence of HA properties on Zn(II complexation was also investigated. Stability constants, quenching degree and complexation capacity were estimated for binding sites found in raw EEM, EEM-PARAFAC and EEM-NMF data using mathematical models. A combination of EEM fluorescence analysis with one of the proposed decomposition methods enabled separation of overlapping binding sites and yielded more accurate calculations of the binding parameters. PARAFAC and NMF processing allowed finding binding sites invisible in a few raw EEM datasets as well as finding totally new maxima attributed to structures of the lowest humification. Decomposed data showed an increase in Zn complexation with an increase in humification, aromaticity and molecular weight of HAs. EEM-PARAFAC analysis also revealed that the most stable compounds were formed by structures containing the highest amounts of nitrogen. The content of oxygen-functional groups did not influence the binding parameters, mainly due to fact of higher competition of metal cation with protons. EEM spectra coupled with NMF and especially PARAFAC processing gave more adequate assessments of interactions as compared to raw EEM data and should be especially recommended for modeling of complexation processes where the fluorescence intensities (FI changes are weak or where the processes are interfered with by the presence of other fluorophores.

  16. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  17. Stimulated emission depletion following two photon excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, R. J.; Armoogum, D. A.; Bain, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The technique of stimulated emission depletion of fluorescence (STED) from a two photon excited molecular population is demonstrated in the S, excited state of fluorescein in ethylene glycol and methanol. Two photon excitation (pump) is achieved using the partial output of a regeneratively amplified Ti:Sapphire laser in conjunction with an optical parametric amplifier whose tuneable output provides a synchronous depletion (dump) pulse. Time resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy measu...

  18. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and cavity ring-down (CRD) absorption spectroscopy of oil-contaminated jet fuel using fiber-optic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Hengameh; Barnes, Jack A; Dudelzak, Alexander E; Loock, Hans-Peter; Waechter, Helen

    2012-06-21

    Excitation emission matrix (EEM) and cavity ring-down (CRD) spectral signatures have been used to detect and quantitatively assess contamination of jet fuels with aero-turbine lubricating oil. The EEM spectrometer has been fiber-coupled to permit in situ measurements of jet turbine oil contamination of jet fuel. Parallel Factor (PARAFAC) analysis as well as Principal Component Analysis and Regression (PCA/PCR) were used to quantify oil contamination in a range from the limit of detection (10 ppm) to 1000 ppm. Fiber-loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy using a pulsed 355 nm laser was used to quantify the oil contamination in the range of 400 ppm to 100,000 ppm. Both methods in combination therefore permit the detection of oil contamination with a linear dynamic range of about 10,000.

  19. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  20. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an unus......Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  1. Microwave ionization and excitation of Ba Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichmann, U.; Dexter, J.L.; Xu, E.Y.; Gallagher, T.F.

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated ionization and excitation of the Ba 6sn s 1 S 0 and 6snd 1,3 D 2 series in strong microwave fields. The observed microwave ionization threshold fields, scaling as 0.28 n -5 , and the state mixing fields cannot be completely explained in terms of a single cycle Landau-Zener model. However, by taking into account multiphoton resonant transitions driven by many cycles of the microwave field we have been able to interpret the data. In particular multi-photon transitions have been found to be responsible for apparent resonance structures and for the unexpectedly low mixing fields. Not surprisingly, doubly excited valence states introduce irregularities into both the microwave ionization and the state mixing field values. (orig.)

  2. Specificity and kinetics of alpha-synuclein binding to model membranes determined with fluorescent excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvadchak, Volodymyr V; Falomir-Lockhart, Lisandro J; Yushchenko, Dmytro A; Jovin, Thomas M

    2011-04-15

    Parkinson disease is characterized cytopathologically by the deposition in the midbrain of aggregates composed primarily of the presynaptic neuronal protein α-synuclein (AS). Neurotoxicity is currently attributed to oligomeric microaggregates subjected to oxidative modification and promoting mitochondrial and proteasomal dysfunction. Unphysiological binding to membranes of these and other organelles is presumably involved. In this study, we performed a systematic determination of the influence of charge, phase, curvature, defects, and lipid unsaturation on AS binding to model membranes using a new sensitive solvatochromic fluorescent probe. The interaction of AS with vesicular membranes is fast and reversible. The protein dissociates from neutral membranes upon thermal transition to the liquid disordered phase and transfers to vesicles with higher affinity. The binding of AS to neutral and negatively charged membranes occurs by apparently different mechanisms. Interaction with neutral bilayers requires the presence of membrane defects; binding increases with membrane curvature and rigidity and decreases in the presence of cholesterol. The association with negatively charged membranes is much stronger and much less sensitive to membrane curvature, phase, and cholesterol content. The presence of unsaturated lipids increases binding in all cases. These findings provide insight into the relation between membrane physical properties and AS binding affinity and dynamics that presumably define protein localization in vivo and, thereby, the role of AS in the physiopathology of Parkinson disease.

  3. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Radtke, M.; Vincze, L.; Rackwitz, V.; Reuter, D.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  4. Coulomb excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, F.K.; Stelson, P.H.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of Coulomb excitation and a brief review of pertinent treatments of the Coulomb excitation process that are useful for the analysis of experiments are given. Examples demonstrating the scope of nuclear structure information obtainable from gamma spectroscopy are presented. Direct Elambda excitation of 232 Th is discussed in terms of the one phonon octupole vibrational spectrum. B(MI) reduced transition probabilities resulting from Coulomb excitation of odd-A deformed nuclei with heavy ions are presented as a test of the rotational model. The use of gamma ray coincidence and particle-gamma coincidence as tools for investigating Coulomb excitation is discussed. (U.S.)

  5. Electrically excited hot-electron dominated fluorescent emitters using individual Ga-doped ZnO microwires via metal quasiparticle film decoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Mingming; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Li, Binghui; Zhao, Haifeng; Shan, Chongxin; Shen, Dezhen

    2018-03-28

    The generation of hot electrons from metal nanostructures through plasmon decay provided a direct interfacial charge transfer mechanism, which no longer suffers from the barrier height restrictions observed for metal/semiconductor interfaces. Metal plasmon-mediated energy conversion with higher efficiency has been proposed as a promising alternative to construct novel optoelectronic devices, such as photodetectors, photovoltaic and photocatalytic devices, etc. However, the realization of the electrically-driven generation of hot electrons, and the application in light-emitting devices remain big challenges. Here, hybrid architectures comprising individual Ga-doped ZnO (ZnO:Ga) microwires via metal quasiparticle film decoration were fabricated. The hottest spots could be formed towards the center of the wires, and the quasiparticle films were converted into physically isolated nanoparticles by applying a bias onto the wires. Thus, the hot electrons became spatially localized towards the hottest regions, leading to a release of energy in the form of emitting photons. By adjusting the sputtering times and appropriate alloys, such as Au and Ag, wavelength-tunable emissions could be achieved. To exploit the EL emission characteristics, metal plasmons could be used as active elements to mediate the generation of hot electrons from metal nanostructures, which are located in the light-emitting regions, followed by injection into ZnO:Ga microwire-channels; thus, the production of plasmon decay-induced hot-electrons could function as an efficient approach to dominate emission wavelengths. Therefore, by introducing metal nanostructure decoration, individual ZnO:Ga microwires can be used to construct wavelength-tunable fluorescent emitters. The hybrid architectures of metal-ZnO micro/nanostructures offer a fantastic candidate to broaden the potential applications of semiconducting optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaic devices, photodetectors, optoelectronic sensors, etc.

  6. Comparison of three-way and four-way calibration for the real-time quantitative analysis of drug hydrolysis in complex dynamic samples by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Li; Gu, Hui-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Lu; Zhang, Shan-Hui; Wu, Hai-Long

    2018-03-05

    Multiway calibration in combination with spectroscopic technique is an attractive tool for online or real-time monitoring of target analyte(s) in complex samples. However, how to choose a suitable multiway calibration method for the resolution of spectroscopic-kinetic data is a troubling problem in practical application. In this work, for the first time, three-way and four-way fluorescence-kinetic data arrays were generated during the real-time monitoring of the hydrolysis of irinotecan (CPT-11) in human plasma by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence. Alternating normalization-weighted error (ANWE) and alternating penalty trilinear decomposition (APTLD) were used as three-way calibration for the decomposition of the three-way kinetic data array, whereas alternating weighted residual constraint quadrilinear decomposition (AWRCQLD) and alternating penalty quadrilinear decomposition (APQLD) were applied as four-way calibration to the four-way kinetic data array. The quantitative results of the two kinds of calibration models were fully compared from the perspective of predicted real-time concentrations, spiked recoveries of initial concentration, and analytical figures of merit. The comparison study demonstrated that both three-way and four-way calibration models could achieve real-time quantitative analysis of the hydrolysis of CPT-11 in human plasma under certain conditions. However, it was also found that both of them possess some critical advantages and shortcomings during the process of dynamic analysis. The conclusions obtained in this paper can provide some helpful guidance for the reasonable selection of multiway calibration models to achieve the real-time quantitative analysis of target analyte(s) in complex dynamic systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of three-way and four-way calibration for the real-time quantitative analysis of drug hydrolysis in complex dynamic samples by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Li; Gu, Hui-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Lu; Zhang, Shan-Hui; Wu, Hai-Long

    2018-03-01

    Multiway calibration in combination with spectroscopic technique is an attractive tool for online or real-time monitoring of target analyte(s) in complex samples. However, how to choose a suitable multiway calibration method for the resolution of spectroscopic-kinetic data is a troubling problem in practical application. In this work, for the first time, three-way and four-way fluorescence-kinetic data arrays were generated during the real-time monitoring of the hydrolysis of irinotecan (CPT-11) in human plasma by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence. Alternating normalization-weighted error (ANWE) and alternating penalty trilinear decomposition (APTLD) were used as three-way calibration for the decomposition of the three-way kinetic data array, whereas alternating weighted residual constraint quadrilinear decomposition (AWRCQLD) and alternating penalty quadrilinear decomposition (APQLD) were applied as four-way calibration to the four-way kinetic data array. The quantitative results of the two kinds of calibration models were fully compared from the perspective of predicted real-time concentrations, spiked recoveries of initial concentration, and analytical figures of merit. The comparison study demonstrated that both three-way and four-way calibration models could achieve real-time quantitative analysis of the hydrolysis of CPT-11 in human plasma under certain conditions. However, it was also found that both of them possess some critical advantages and shortcomings during the process of dynamic analysis. The conclusions obtained in this paper can provide some helpful guidance for the reasonable selection of multiway calibration models to achieve the real-time quantitative analysis of target analyte(s) in complex dynamic systems.

  8. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence on argon intermediate pressure microwave discharges: Measuring the depopulation rates of the 4p and 5p excited levels as induced by electron and atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, J. M.; Graef, W. A. A. D.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2013-10-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar is explored by means of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) experiments using the combination of high rep-rate YAG-Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable surfatron induced plasma setup. The high rep-rate favors the photon statistics while the low energy per pulse avoids intrusive plasma laser interactions. An analysis shows that, despite the low energy per pulse, saturation can still be achieved even when the geometrical overlap and spectral overlap are optimal. Out of the various studies that can be performed with this setup we confine the current paper to the study of the direct responses to the laser pump action of three 4p and one 5p levels of the Ar system. By changing the plasma in a controlled way one gets for these levels the rates of electron and atom quenching and therewith the total destruction rates of electron and atom collisions. Comparison with literature shows that the classical hard sphere collision rate derived for hydrogen gives a good description for the observed electron quenching (e-quenching) in Ar whereas for heavy particle quenching (a-quenching) this agreement was only found for the 5p level. An important parameter in the study of electron excitation kinetics is the location of the boundary in the atomic system for which the number of electron collisions per radiative life time equals unity. It is observed that for the Ar system this boundary is positioned lower than what is expected on grounds of H-like formulas.

  9. Multi-photon production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    The process e+e- to gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 56.2 pb-1 taken at a centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV. The measured cross-section agrees well with the expectation from QED. A fit to the angular distribution is used to obtain improved limits at 95% CL on the QED cut-off parameters: Lambda+ > 233 GeV and Lambda- > 265 GeV as well as a mass limit for an excited electron, M(e*) > 227 GeV assuming equal e*egamma and eegamma couplings. No evidence for resonance production is found in the invariant mass spectrum of photon pairs. Limits are obtained for the cross-section times branching ratio for a resonance decaying into two photons.

  10. Multi-photon final states in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    The process e^+e^- -> gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 25.38 pb^{-1} taken at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The measured cross-sections agree well with the expectation from QED. In a combined fit using data from all centre-of-mass energies, the angular distribution is used to obtain improved limits on the cut-off parameters: Lambda_+ > 195 GeV and Lambda_- > 210 GeV (95% CL). In addition, limits on non-standard e^+e^-gamma couplings and contact interactions, as well as a 95% CL mass limit for an excited electron, M_{e^*} > 194 GeV for an e^+e^-gamma coupling kappa = 1, are determined.

  11. Multi-Photon Production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 181 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    The process e+e- -> gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data collected by the OPAL detector at LEP between the years 1997 and 2000. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 672.3pb-1 at centre-of-mass energies lying between 181 GeV and 209 GeV. Total and differential cross- sections are determined and found to be good agreement with the predictions of QED. Fits to the observed angular distributions are used to set limits on parameters from several models of physics beyond the Standard Model such as cut-off parameters, contact interactions of the type e+e-gamma gamma, gravity in extra spatial dimensions and excited electrons. In events with three photons in the final state the mass spectrum of photon pairs is investigated. No narrow resonance X-> gamma gamma is found and limits are placed on the product of the Xgamma production cross-section and branching ratio.

  12. Resonantly enhanced production of excited fragments of gaseous molecules following core-level excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.M.; Lu, K.T.; Lee, J.M.; Ho, S.C.; Chang, H.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    2005-01-01

    State-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations have been investigated by resonant photoemission spectroscopy and dispersed UV/optical fluorescence spectroscopy. The main features in the gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 fluorescence spectrum are identified as the emission from excited Si*, Si + *, CH* and H*. The core-to-Rydberg excitations at both Si 2p and Cl 2p edges lead to a noteworthy production of not only the excited atomic fragments, neutral and ionic (Si*, Si + *) but also the excited diatomic fragments (CH*). In particular, the excited neutral atomic fragments Si* are significantly reinforced. The experimental results provide deeper insight into the state-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of molecules via core-level excitation

  13. Exciter switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  14. Vibrational excitation in a hydrogen volume source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eenshuistra, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis the complex of processes which determines the D - or H - density in a volume source, a hydrogen discharge, is studied. D - beams are of interest for driving the current of a fusion plasma in a TOKAMAK. Densities of vibrationally excited molecules, of H atoms, and of metastable hydrogen molecules were determined using Resonance-Enhanced MultiPhoton Ionization (REMPI). An experiment in which vibrationally highly excited molecules are formed by recombination of atoms in a cold metal surface, is described. The production and destruction of vibrationally excited molecules and atoms in the discharge is discussed. The vibrational distribution for 3≤ν≤5 (ν = vibrational quantumnumber) is strongly super-thermal. This effect is more apparent at higher discharge current and lower gas pressure. The analysis with a model based on rate equations, which molecules are predominantly produced by primary electron excitation of hydrogen molecules and deexcited upon one wall collision. The atom production is compatible with dissociation of molecules by primary electrons, dissociation of molecules on the filaments, and collisions between positive ions and electrons. The electrons are predominantly destroyed by recombination on the walls. Finally the production and destruction of H - in the discharge are discussed. The density of H - in the plasma, the electron density and temperature were determined. H - extraction was measured. The ratio of the extracted H - current and the H - density in the plasma gives an indication of the drift velocity of H - in the plasma. This velocity determines the emittance of the extracted beam. It was found that the H - velocity scales with the square root of the electron temperature. The measured H - densities are compatible with a qualitative model in which dissociative attachment of plasma electrons to vibrationally excited molecules is the most important process. (author). 136 refs.; 39 figs.; 10 tabs

  15. Direct measurements of multi-photon induced nonlinear lattice dynamics in semiconductors via time-resolved x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G Jackson; Lee, Sooheyong; Walko, Donald A; Watson, Michael A; Jo, Wonhuyk; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Landahl, Eric C

    2016-12-22

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in semiconductors present several fundamental problems in modern optics that are of great importance for the development of optoelectronic devices. In particular, the details of photo-induced lattice dynamics at early time-scales prior to carrier recombination remain poorly understood. We demonstrate the first integrated measurements of both optical and structural, material-dependent quantities while also inferring the bulk impulsive strain profile by using high spatial-resolution time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) on bulk crystalline gallium arsenide. Our findings reveal distinctive laser-fluence dependent crystal lattice responses, which are not described by previous TRXS experiments or models. The initial linear expansion of the crystal upon laser excitation stagnates at a laser fluence corresponding to the saturation of the free carrier density before resuming expansion in a third regime at higher fluences where two-photon absorption becomes dominant. Our interpretations of the lattice dynamics as nonlinear optical effects are confirmed by numerical simulations and by additional measurements in an n-type semiconductor that allows higher-order nonlinear optical processes to be directly observed as modulations of x-ray diffraction lineshapes.

  16. Multi-photon production in ee collisions at √(s) = 181-209 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Aakesson, P.F.

    2003-01-01

    The process e + e - →γγ(γ) is studied using data collected by the OPAL detector at LEP between the years 1997 and 2000. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 672.3 pb -1 at centre-of-mass energies lying between 181 GeV and 209 GeV. Total and differential cross-sections are determined and found to be in good agreement with the predictions of QED. Fits to the observed angular distributions are used to set limits on parameters from several models of physics beyond the Standard Model such as cut-off parameters, contact interactions of the type e + e - γγ, gravity in extra spatial dimensions and excited electrons. In events with three photons in the final state the mass spectrum of photon pairs is investigated. No narrow resonance X→γγ is found and limits are placed on the product of the X γ production cross-section and branching ratio. (orig.)

  17. Multi-photon production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    The process e+e- to 2 (or 3) gammas is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample taken at a centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 178 pb-1. The measured cross-section agrees well with the expectation from QED. A fit to the angular distribution is used to obtain improved limits at 95% CL on the QED cut-off parameters: Lambda+ > 304 GeV and Lambda- > 295 GeV as well as a mass limit for an excited electron, Me* > 306 GeV assuming equal e*egamma and eegamma couplings. Graviton exchange in the context of theories with higher dimensions is excluded for scales G+ < 660 GeV and G- < 634 GeV. No evidence for resonance production is found in the invariant mass spectrum of photon pairs. Limits are obtained for the cross-section times branching ratio for a resonance decaying into two photons and produced in association with another photon.

  18. New developments in the analysis and measurement of thicknesses by excitation of the fluorescent lines by means of {beta} particles; Nouveaux developpements de l'analyse et de la mesure des epaisseurs par excitation des raies de fluorescence au moyen de particules {beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelli, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Seibel, G [Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie, 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France)

    1960-07-01

    The process for analysing and measuring the thickness of deposits by {beta}-X fluorescence which we have already described has undergone further development. The use of promethium-147 and krypton-85 sources makes it possible to reduce the background noise which is observed with strontium-90. We present the results obtained for various measurements of the thickness of metallic coatings and the continuous measurement of calcium and of iron in ore samples. We describe the tests carried out with a view to analysing the X-rays by means of a crystal. (author) [French] Le procede d'analyse et de mesure des epaisseurs de depots par fluorescence {beta}-X que nous avons precedemment decrit a fait l'objet de nouveaux developpements. L'emploi de sources de prometheum-147 et de krypton-85 permet de reduire le bruit de fond que l'on observe avec le strontium-90. Nous dormons les resultats obtenus pour diverses mesures d'epaisseurs de depots metalliques et la mesure en continu du calcium et du fer dans les carottes de minerais. Nous decrivons les essais effectues en vue d'analyser le rayonnement X au moyen d'un cristal. (auteur)

  19. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  20. Monitoring by fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.; Gifford, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    A fluorimetric detector is described in which the fluorescence excitation source may be 3 H, 14 C, 35 S, 147 Pm or 63 Ni. Such a detector can be adapted for use with flowing liquid systems especially liquid chromatography systems. (U.K.)

  1. Milk-derived multi-fluorescent graphene quantum dot-based cancer theranostic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Mukeshchand, E-mail: mukeshchandthakur@yahoo.com [School of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, D.Y. Patil University, Sector 15, CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai 400 614, Maharashtra (India); N.S.N. Research Centre for Nanotechnology and Bio-nanotechnology, Jambhul Phata, Ambernath (W) 421 504, Maharashtra (India); Mewada, Ashmi [N.S.N. Research Centre for Nanotechnology and Bio-nanotechnology, Jambhul Phata, Ambernath (W) 421 504, Maharashtra (India); Walchand Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Bio-nanotechnology (wcRnb), Walchand College of Arts and Science, Walchand-Hirachand Marg, Ashok Chowk, Solapur 413006, Maharashtra (India); Pandey, Sunil, E-mail: gurus.spandey@gmail.com [N.S.N. Research Centre for Nanotechnology and Bio-nanotechnology, Jambhul Phata, Ambernath (W) 421 504, Maharashtra (India); Bhori, Mustansir, E-mail: mustansyrr@gmail.com [School of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, D.Y. Patil University, Sector 15, CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai 400 614, Maharashtra (India); Singh, Kanchanlata [School of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, D.Y. Patil University, Sector 15, CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai 400 614, Maharashtra (India); Sharon, Maheshwar [N.S.N. Research Centre for Nanotechnology and Bio-nanotechnology, Jambhul Phata, Ambernath (W) 421 504, Maharashtra (India); Walchand Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Bio-nanotechnology (wcRnb), Walchand College of Arts and Science, Walchand-Hirachand Marg, Ashok Chowk, Solapur 413006, Maharashtra (India); Sharon, Madhuri, E-mail: sharonmadhuri@gmail.com [N.S.N. Research Centre for Nanotechnology and Bio-nanotechnology, Jambhul Phata, Ambernath (W) 421 504, Maharashtra (India); Walchand Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Bio-nanotechnology (wcRnb), Walchand College of Arts and Science, Walchand-Hirachand Marg, Ashok Chowk, Solapur 413006, Maharashtra (India)

    2016-10-01

    An economical green-chemistry approach was used for the synthesis of aqueous soluble graphene quantum dots (GQDs) from cow milk for simultaneous imaging and drug delivery in cancer. The GQDs synthesized using one-pot microwave-assisted heating were multi-fluorescent, spherical in shape having a lateral size of ca. 5 nm. The role of processing parameters such as heating time and ionic strength showed a profound effect on photoluminescence properties of GQDs. The GQDs were N-doped and oxygen-rich as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Cysteamine hydrochloride (Cys) was used to attach an anti-cancer drug berberine hydrochloride (BHC) on GQDs forming GQDs@Cys-BHC complex with c.a. 88% drug loading efficiency. In vitro drug release was studied at the acidic-basic environment and drug kinetics was studied using pharmacokinetic statistical models. The GQDs were biocompatible on L929 cells whereas theranostic GQDs@Cys-BHC complex showed a potent cytotoxic effect on different cancerous cell line models: cervical cancer cell lines such as HeLa cells and breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-231 confirmed by Trypan blue and MTT-based cytotoxic assays. Furthermore, multi-excitation based cellular bioimaging was demonstrated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and fluorescence microscopy using GQDs as well as GQDs@Cys-BHC complex. Thus, drug delivery (therapeutic) and bioimaging (diagnostic) properties of GQDs@Cys-BHC complex are thought to have a potential in vitro theranostic application in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Facile green synthesis of bright dual-florescent GQDs using cow milk as a precursor • Microwave irradiation time and pH have profound effects on fluorescent properties of GQDs. • Decoration of anti-cancer drug BHC onto GQDs via Cys-linker as theranostic platform • A pH responsive in vitro anti-cancer drug release and drug release kinetic study • Multi-photon bioimaging, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis study

  2. Milk-derived multi-fluorescent graphene quantum dot-based cancer theranostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Mukeshchand; Mewada, Ashmi; Pandey, Sunil; Bhori, Mustansir; Singh, Kanchanlata; Sharon, Maheshwar; Sharon, Madhuri

    2016-01-01

    An economical green-chemistry approach was used for the synthesis of aqueous soluble graphene quantum dots (GQDs) from cow milk for simultaneous imaging and drug delivery in cancer. The GQDs synthesized using one-pot microwave-assisted heating were multi-fluorescent, spherical in shape having a lateral size of ca. 5 nm. The role of processing parameters such as heating time and ionic strength showed a profound effect on photoluminescence properties of GQDs. The GQDs were N-doped and oxygen-rich as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Cysteamine hydrochloride (Cys) was used to attach an anti-cancer drug berberine hydrochloride (BHC) on GQDs forming GQDs@Cys-BHC complex with c.a. 88% drug loading efficiency. In vitro drug release was studied at the acidic-basic environment and drug kinetics was studied using pharmacokinetic statistical models. The GQDs were biocompatible on L929 cells whereas theranostic GQDs@Cys-BHC complex showed a potent cytotoxic effect on different cancerous cell line models: cervical cancer cell lines such as HeLa cells and breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-231 confirmed by Trypan blue and MTT-based cytotoxic assays. Furthermore, multi-excitation based cellular bioimaging was demonstrated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and fluorescence microscopy using GQDs as well as GQDs@Cys-BHC complex. Thus, drug delivery (therapeutic) and bioimaging (diagnostic) properties of GQDs@Cys-BHC complex are thought to have a potential in vitro theranostic application in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Facile green synthesis of bright dual-florescent GQDs using cow milk as a precursor • Microwave irradiation time and pH have profound effects on fluorescent properties of GQDs. • Decoration of anti-cancer drug BHC onto GQDs via Cys-linker as theranostic platform • A pH responsive in vitro anti-cancer drug release and drug release kinetic study • Multi-photon bioimaging, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis study

  3. Pre-Excitation Studies for Rubidium-Plasma Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Aladi, M; Barna, I.F.; Czitrovszky, Aladar; Djotyan, Gagik; Dombi, Peter; Dzsotjan, David; FöLdes, Istvan; Hamar, Gergo; Ignacz, Peter; Kedves, Miklos; Kerekes, Attila; Levai, Peter; Marton, Istvan; Nagy, Attila; Oszetzky, Daniel; Pocsai, Mihaly; Racz, Peter; Raczkevi, Bela; Szigeti, Janos; Sörlei, Zsuzsa; Szipöcs, Robert; Varga, Dezso; Varga-Umbrich, Karoly; Varro, Sandor; Vamos, Lenard; Vesztergombi, György

    2014-01-01

    The key element in the Proton-Driven-Plasma-Wake-Field-Accelerator (AWAKE) project is the generation of highly uniform plasma from Rubidium vapor. The standard way to achieve full ionization is to use high power laser which can assure the over-barrier-ionization (OBI) along the 10 meters long active region. The Wigner-team in Budapest is investigating an alternative way of uniform plasma generation. The proposed Resonance Enhanced Multi Photon Ionization (REMPI) scheme probably can be realized by much less laser power. In the following the resonant pre-excitations of the Rb atoms are investigated, theoretically and the status report about the preparatory work on the experiment are presented.

  4. Voiced Excitations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holzricher, John

    2004-01-01

    To more easily obtain a voiced excitation function for speech characterization, measurements of skin motion, tracheal tube, and vocal fold, motions were made and compared to EM sensor-glottal derived...

  5. Exciting Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  6. Excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1974-01-01

    Excited States, Volume I reviews radiationless transitions, phosphorescence microwave double resonance through optical spectra in molecular solids, dipole moments in excited states, luminescence of polar molecules, and the problem of interstate interaction in aromatic carbonyl compounds. The book discusses the molecular electronic radiationless transitions; the double resonance techniques and the relaxation mechanisms involving the lowest triplet state of aromatic compounds; as well as the optical spectra and relaxation in molecular solids. The text also describes dipole moments and polarizab

  7. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states; Excitation et ionisation des atomes d'hydrogene et d'helium par des impulsions laser femtosecondes: approche theorique par des etats de Coulomb-Volkov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichard, R

    2007-12-15

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when {Dirac_h}{omega} > I{sub p}: it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with {Dirac_h}{omega} < I{sub p}: new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  8. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states; Excitation et ionisation des atomes d'hydrogene et d'helium par des impulsions laser femtosecondes: approche theorique par des etats de Coulomb-Volkov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichard, R

    2007-12-15

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when {Dirac_h}{omega} > I{sub p}: it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with {Dirac_h}{omega} < I{sub p}: new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  9. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  10. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  11. Excited fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjema, F.; Djouadi, A.; Kneur, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The production of excited fermions with mass above 100 GeV is considered. f→Vf (1) decay widths are calculated where V=γ, Z or W. Excited fermion pair production in e + e - annihilation and in γγ collisions, and single production in e + e - annihilation, eγ and γγ collisions is also discussed. Cross sections are calculated for all these cases. The discovery potential of the NLC at 500 GeV is compared with that of other colliders. (K.A.) 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  13. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  14. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F.; Nield, Kathryn M.; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600 nm and emitted above 700 nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  15. Activation of 5-[125I]iodonaphthyl-1-azide via excitation of fluorescent (N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)) lipid analogs in living cells. A potential tool for identification of compartment-specific proteins and proteins involved in intracellular transport and metabolism of lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, A.G.; Pagano, R.E.; Raviv, Y.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a new technique for analysis of proteins located near fluorescent lipid analogs in intact living cells using the membrane-permeant, photoactivatable probe, 5-[ 125 I]iodonaphthyl-1-azide ([ 125 I]INA). [ 125 I] INA can be activated directly with UV light or indirectly through excitation of adjacent fluorophores (photosensitizers) with visible light to modify nearby proteins covalently with 125 I. In this report we demonstrate that fluorescent phospholipids and sphingolipids containing N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-6-aminocaproic acid serve as appropriate photosensitizers for [ 125 I]INA. Using Chinese hamster ovary fibroblasts, we optimized the labeling conditions with respect to lipid concentration and time of irradiation and then examined the profiles of cellular proteins that were labeled when fluorescent analogs of ceramide, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidic acid were used as photosensitizers in living cells. The use of different fluorescent lipids, which label different subcellular compartments of cells as determined by fluorescence microscopy, derivatized different sets of cellular proteins with 125 I. The labeled proteins were subsets of the total set of proteins available for derivatization as determined by direct activation of [ 125 I]INA. Most proteins labeled by this procedure were pelleted by centrifugation of cell lysates at high speed (260,000 x g), but several soluble proteins were also labeled under these conditions. The implications of using this technique for identification of compartment-specific proteins and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport are discussed

  16. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  17. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Barrera Pinero, R.

    1960-01-01

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  18. Excited-state relaxation of some aminoquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and fluorescence rate constants ( k f of 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzoxazolylquinoline (I, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylquinoline (II, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -methoxybenzothiazolyl-quinoline (III, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylbenzoquinoline (IV at different temperatures have been measured. The shortwavelength shift of fluorescence spectra of compounds studied (23–49 nm in ethanol as the temperature decreases (the solvent viscosity increases points out that the excited-state relaxation process takes place. The rate of this process depends essentially on the solvent viscosity, but not the solvent polarity. The essential increasing of fluorescence rate constant k f (up to about 7 times as the solvent viscosity increases proves the existence of excited-state structural relaxation consisting in the mutual internal rotation of molecular fragments of aminoquinolines studied, followed by the solvent orientational relaxation.

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy and multi-way techniques. PARAFAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Graeber, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC) is increasingly used to decompose fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) into their underlying chemical components. In the ideal case where fluorescence conforms to Beers Law, this process can lead to the mathematical identification and quantification...

  20. Fluorescence lifetime measurement of radical ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Nobuyuki; Kinugasa, Jun-ichiro; Hagiri, Masahide; Nakayama, Toshihiro; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Maki; Daido, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    One-photonic excitation of a charge transfer complex of hexamethoxybenzene (HMB) and nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate (NO + BF 4 - ) in acetonitrile afforded fluorescences emission from excited radical cation of HMB (HMB + *). Lifetime of the excited radical ion species was measured to be 7 ps by the pump-probe transient absorption technique. The lifetime was much shorter than that of free radical ion (63 ps), indicating the presence of an interaction between HMB + * and NO in the excited complex. (author)

  1. Study on vinasse dynamics in soil usin energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence with radioisotopic excitation Estudo da dinâmica da vinhaça em solo utilizando a fluorescência de raios x por dispersão de energia com excitação radioisotópica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Simabuco

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of S, Cl, K and Ca along the profiles of two soils of different texture (Red Yellow Podzolic and Dark Red Latosol treated with amounts of vinasse equivalent to 4000 m³/ha were studied using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, observing a significant increase in the contents of these elements. The same effect was observed for Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr contents in soils treated with vinasse as compared to the control. The concentrations of Al, Si, Ti, Mn, Fe and Zr could also be evaluated but no significant variation was observed due to the high soil initial concentrations of these elements as compared to the low concentrations in the vinasse. Annular radioactive sources of Fe-55 and Cd-109 were employed for the excitation of these elements in the soil samples, treated or not with vinassse. For the detection of the characteristic X-rays, a Si (Li semiconductor detector was used, coupled to a multichannel emulation card inserted in a microcomputer.A distribuição de S, Cl, K e Ca ao longo de perfis de dois solos de diferentes texturas (Podzólico Vermelho Amarelo e Latossolo Vermelho Escuro, tratados com uma dose de vinhaça equivalente a 4000 m³/ha, foi estudada utilizando a fluorescência de raios X por dispersão de energia, observando-se um acréscimo significativo dos teores destes elementos. O mesmo efeito foi observado nos teores de Cu, Zn, Rb e Sr nos solos tratados com vinhaça em relação às testemunhas. As concentrações de Al, Si, Ti, Mn, Fe e Zr também puderam ser avaliadas, mas não houve variação nos perfis, devido à alta concentração inicial nos solos acompanhada de baixa concentração na vinhaça. Na excitação dos elementos presentes nas amostras de solo tratados ou não com vinhaça foram empregadas fontes radioativas anelares de Fe-55 e Cd-109, e na detecção dos raios X característicos um detector semicondutor de Si (Li, acoplado a uma placa analisadora de pulsos multicanal, inserida em um

  2. Excited baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested

  3. Excited baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  4. Rydberg excitation of neutral nitric oxide molecules in strong UV and near-IR laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Hang; Zhang Jun-Feng; Zuo Wan-Long; Xu Hai-Feng; Jin Ming-Xing; Ding Da-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Rydberg state excitations of neutral nitric oxide molecules are studied in strong ultraviolet (UV) and near-infra-red (IR) laser fields using a linear time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer with the pulsed electronic field ionization method. The yield of Rydberg molecules is measured as a function of laser intensity and ellipticity, and the results in UV laser fields are compared with those in near-IR laser fields. The present study provides the first experimental evidence of neutral Rydberg molecules surviving in a strong laser field. The results indicate that a rescattering-after-tunneling process is the main contribution to the formation of Rydberg molecules in strong near-IR laser fields, while multi-photon excitation may play an important role in the strong UV laser fields. (paper)

  5. Spin and parity assignments to dipole excitations of the odd-mass nucleus {sup 207}Pb from nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments with linearly-polarized {gamma}-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietralla, N; Fritzsche, M; Savran, D [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Li, T C [Nuclear Structure Laboratory, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Ahmed, M W; Tonchev, A P; Tornow, W; Weller, H R [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Werner, V, E-mail: pietralla@ikp.tu-darmstadt.d [A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory (WNSL), Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Pb({gamma}-vector ,{gamma}') photon scattering reactions were studied [1] with the nearly monochromatic, linearly polarized photon beams at the High Intensity {gamma}-ray Source (HI{gamma}S) at the DFELL. Azimuthal scattering intensity asymmetries measured with respect to the polarization plane of the beam have been used for the first time to assign both the spin and parity quantum numbers of dipole excited states of {sup 206,207,208}Pb at excitation energies in the vicinity of 5.5 MeV. Evidence for dominant particle-core coupling is deduced from these results along with information on excitation energies and electromagnetic transition matrix elements.

  6. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Biryukova, T.; Sukhinina, A.; Vdovin, Yu

    2010-11-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 - 645 nm and 340 - 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy.

  7. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  9. Electronic-excitation energy transfer in heterogeneous dye solutions under laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levshin, L.V.; Mukushev, B.T.; Saletskii, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of electronic-excitation energy transfer (EEET) among dye molecules of different types for different exciting-fight wavelengths and temperatures. Upon selective laser excitation of the donor, the inhomogeneous broadening of molecular levels increases the probability of EEET from the donor to acceptor molecules. The efficiency of this process is directly proportional to the acceptor molecule concentration and is temperature dependent. The EEET is accompanied by the spectral migration of energy among donor molecules, which reduces the fluorescence quantum efficiency of the donor. Increasing the frequency of the exciting light decreases in the donor fluorescence quantum efficiency. An increase in the acceptor molecule concentration results in a decrease of the spectral migration of excitation in the donor molecule system. 5 refs., 5 figs

  10. Enhanced localized fluorescence in plasmonic nanoantennae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, R.M.; Yuan, H.-K.; Liu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    in fluorescence that reaches 100 times enhancement. Near-field excitation shows enhanced fluorescence from a single nanoantenna localized in a subwavelength area of similar to 0.15 mu m(2). The polarization of enhanced emission is along the main antenna axis. These observed experimental results are important...

  11. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  12. Red and green fluorescence from oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, C.M.C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Krom, B.P.; Janus, M.M.; ten Cate, J.M.; de Soet, J.J.; Crielaard, W.; van der Veen, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis.

  13. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  14. Superior optical nonlinearity of an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Tingchao [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies (CDPT), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Zhao, Yanli [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Gao, Yang; Grimsdale, Andrew C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Lin, Xiaodong, E-mail: linxd@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Sun, Handong, E-mail: linxd@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies (CDPT), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-03-16

    Strong multiphoton absorption and harmonic generation in organic fluorescent chromophores are, respectively, significant in many fields of research. However, most of fluorescent chromophores fall short of the full potential due to the absence of the combination of such different nonlinear upconversion behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye could exhibit efficient two- and three-photon absorption under the excitation of femtosecond pulses in solution phase. Benefiting from its biocompatibility and strong excited state absorption behavior, in vitro two-photon bioimaging and superior optical limiting have been exploited, respectively. Simultaneously, the chromophore could generate efficient three-photon excited fluorescence and third-harmonic generation (THG) when dispersed into PMMA film, circumventing the limitations of classical fluorescent chromophores. Such chromophore may find application in the production of coherent light sources of higher photon energy. Moreover, the combination of three-photon excited fluorescence and THG can be used in tandem to provide complementary information in biomedical studies.

  15. Strong electric and magnetic dipole excitations in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneissl, U.

    1993-01-01

    Systematic nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments have been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility of the Stutgart dynamitron to investigate the distribution of magnetic and electric dipole excitations in deformed nuclei

  16. Excitation methods for energy dispersive analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaklevic, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The rapid development in recent years of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis has been based primarily on improvements in semiconductor detector x-ray spectrometers. However, the whole analysis system performance is critically dependent on the availability of optimum methods of excitation for the characteristic x rays in specimens. A number of analysis facilities based on various methods of excitation have been developed over the past few years. A discussion is given of the features of various excitation methods including charged particles, monochromatic photons, and broad-energy band photons. The effects of the excitation method on background and sensitivity are discussed from both theoretical and experimental viewpoints. Recent developments such as pulsed excitation and polarized photons are also discussed

  17. Multi-spectral endogenous fluorescence imaging for bacterial differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Babayants, Margarita V.; Korotkov, Oleg V.; Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Rimskaya, Elena N.; Shikunova, Irina A.; Kurlov, Vladimir N.; Cherkasova, Olga P.; Komandin, Gennady A.; Reshetov, Igor V.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the multi-spectral endogenous fluorescence imaging was implemented for bacterial differentiation. The fluorescence imaging was performed using a digital camera equipped with a set of visual bandpass filters. Narrowband 365 nm ultraviolet radiation passed through a beam homogenizer was used to excite the sample fluorescence. In order to increase a signal-to-noise ratio and suppress a non-fluorescence background in images, the intensity of the UV excitation was modulated using a mechanical chopper. The principal components were introduced for differentiating the samples of bacteria based on the multi-spectral endogenous fluorescence images.

  18. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René; Hermann, Gregers G

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence...... this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder....

  19. LASER FLUORESCENCE EEM PROBE FOR CONE PENETROMETER POLLUTION ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fiber optic LIF (Laser induced fluorescence) EEM (Excitation emission matrix) instrument for CPT deployment has been successfully developed and field tested. The system employs a Nd: YAG laser and Raman shifter as a rugged field portable excitation source. This excitation sou...

  20. Spectral reconstruction for shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuxia; Chernavskaia, Olga; Popp, Jürgen; Bocklitz, Thomas

    2018-08-15

    Fluorescence emission is one of the major obstacles to apply Raman spectroscopy in biological investigations. It is usually several orders more intense than Raman scattering and hampers further analysis. In cases where the fluorescence emission is too intense to be efficiently removed via routine mathematical baseline correction algorithms, an alternative approach is needed. One alternative approach is shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS), where two Raman spectra are recorded with two slightly different excitation wavelengths. Ideally, the fluorescence emission at the two excitations does not change while the Raman spectrum shifts according to the excitation wavelength. Hence the fluorescence is removed in the difference of the two recorded Raman spectra. For better interpretability a spectral reconstruction procedure is necessary to recover the fluorescence-free Raman spectrum. This is challenging due to the intensity variations between the two recorded Raman spectra caused by unavoidable experimental changes as well as the presence of noise. Existent approaches suffer from drawbacks like spectral resolution loss, fluorescence residual, and artefacts. In this contribution, we proposed a reconstruction method based on non-negative least squares (NNLS), where the intensity variations between the two measurements are utilized in the reconstruction model. The method achieved fluorescence-free reconstruction on three real-world SERDS datasets without significant information loss. Thereafter, we quantified the performance of the reconstruction based on artificial datasets from four aspects: reconstructed spectral resolution, precision of reconstruction, signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and fluorescence residual. The artificial datasets were constructed with varied Raman to fluorescence intensity ratio (RFIR), SNR, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), excitation wavelength shift, and fluorescence variation between the two spectra. It was demonstrated that

  1. Excited states in stochastic electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, H.M.; Marshall, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    It is shown that the set of Wigner functions associated with the excited states of the harmonic oscillator constitute a complete set of functions over the phase space. An arbitraty distribution can be expanded in terms of these Wigner functions. By studying the time evolution, according to Stochastic Electrodynamics, of the expansion coefficients, becomes feasible to separate explicity the contributionsof the radiative reaction and the vaccuum field to the Einsten. A coefficients for this system. A simple semiclassical explanation of the Weisskopf-Heitler phenomenon in resonance fluorescence is also supplied. (author) [pt

  2. Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, II, Robert W.; Rubenstein, Richard; Piltch, Martin; Gray, Perry

    2010-12-07

    A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

  3. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  4. L{sub {iota}}, L{sub {alpha}}, L{sub {beta}} and L{sub {gamma}} X-ray fluorescence cross-sections of heavy elements for the exciting photons energy 38.18, 43.95, 50.21 and 59.5 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastug, Arif [Department of Physics Education, College of Education, Erzincan University, 24030 Erzincan (Turkey)], E-mail: abastug40@hotmail.com

    2008-03-15

    The cross-sections for the production of L{sub {iota}}, L{sub {alpha}}, L{sub {beta}} and L{sub {gamma}} X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in Er, Ta, W, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi by photons with energies in the range 38-59.5 keV have been measured, using a standard doublereflection experimental set-up. Measurements have been performed using an annular 241 Am primary source and X-ray emitting secondary-exciter system. Experimental cross-sections have been compared with the theoretically calculated values of L X-ray cross-sections and fairly good agreement is observed between the experimental and theoretical values.

  5. Starlight excitation of permitted lines in the Orion Nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandi, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    From an idealized model of the Orion Nebula and from an analysis of line ratios it is shown that direct starlight excitation of the permitted O I line dominates over recombination and Lyman line fluorescence. The line strengths predicted by this mechanism agree reasonably well with those observed in the Orion Nebula. The application of direct starlight excitation to other ions is also discussed

  6. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  7. Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization and Uv-Uv Hole-Burning Spectroscopic Studies of Jet-Cooled Acetanilide Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ceol Joo; Min, Ahreum; Ahn, Ahreum; Lee, Seung Jun; Choi, Myong Yong; Kim, Seong Keun

    2013-06-01

    Conformational investigations and photochemistry of jet-cooled methacetine (MA) and phenacetine (PA) using one color resonant two-photon ionization (REMPI), UV-UV hole-burning and IR-dip spectroscopy are presented. MA and PA are derivatives of acetanilide, substituted by methoxyl, ethoxyl group in the para position of acetanilide, respectively. Moreover, we have investigated conformational information of the acetanilide derivatives (AAP, MA and PA)-water. In this work, we will present and discuss the solvent effects of the hydroxyl group of acetanilide derivatives in the excited state.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence of some plant leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmi, M.S.; Mohamed, M.M.; Amer, R.; Elshazly, O.; Elraey, M.

    1992-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is successfully used as a technique for remote detection of spectral characteristics of some plants. A pulsed nitrogen laser at 337.1 nm is used to excite cotton, corn and rice leaves. The fluorescence spectrum is detected in the range from 340 nm to 820 nm. It is found that, these plant leaves have common fluorescence maxima at 440 nm, 685 nm and 740 nm. plant leaves are also found to be identifiable by the ratio of the fluorescence intensity at 440 nm to that at 685 nm. The present technique can be further used as a means of assessing, remotely, plant stresses. 5 fig

  9. Measuring fluorescence polarization with a dichrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John C

    2017-09-01

    A method for obtaining fluorescence polarization data from an instrument designed to measure circular and linear dichroism is compared with a previously reported approach. The new method places a polarizer between the sample and a detector mounted perpendicular to the direction of the incident beam and results in determination of the fluorescence polarization ratio, whereas the previous method does not use a polarizer and yields the fluorescence anisotropy. A similar analysis with the detector located axially with the excitation beam demonstrates that there is no frequency modulated signal due to fluorescence polarization in the absence of a polarizer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The application of {beta}-ray excitation fluorescence to the measurement of the thickness of deposits and to analysis; Applications de la fluorescence excitee au moyen des rayons {beta} a la mesure des epaisseurs des depots et a l'analyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelli, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Seibel, G [Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France)

    1961-07-01

    Principles of the method are first outlined and the instrumentation used is described. The different types of radiation detectors are subject of a detailed study. As a source of {beta}-radiation {sup 90}(Sr + Y) was used as well as {sup 147}Pm. Great care was taken to eliminate back-diffused electrons by deflection by a strong permanent magnet. The method was applied to the measurement of the thickness of deposits of Cr, Zn, Sn, Cd and Cu on iron as well as Zn, Cr, Ag and Au on copper and the results obtained are discussed. An attempt was made, to use {beta}-X-ray fluorescence for the analysis of minerals, iron ore and glass and for routine control of Si-Mn, Si-Ca, Fe-Mn and Fe-W. Finally the method of {beta}-X-ray fluorescence is compared with normal-X-ray fluorescence and possibilities of further development are cited. (author) [French] Les principes de la methode et l'instrumentation utilisee sont presentes. On decrit en particulier les detecteurs de rayonnement utilises. Comme source de rayonnement on utilise {sup 90}(Sr + Y) et {sup 147}Pm. Pour eliminer les electrons retrodiffuses on utilise un aimant permanent place sur le trajet du faisceau. La methode est appliquee a la mesure des epaisseurs des depots metalliques tels que le Cr, Zn, Sn, Cd et Cu sur fer et le Zn, Cr, Ag et Au sur cuivre. D'autre part, la fluorescence {beta}-X etait utilisee pour l'analyse des minerais et des verres et pour le controle des alliages Fe-Mn, Fe-W, Si-Mn, Si-Ca. Enfin, on passe a une comparaison entre la fluorescence {beta}-X et la fluorescence X normale et on discute les possibilites d'un developpement futur. (auteur)

  11. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  12. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-01-01

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  13. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  14. Some dispersive X-ray fluorescence applications in energies with radioisotopic excitation source; Algunas aplicaciones de la fluorescencia de rayos X dispersiva en energias con fuente de excitacion radioisotopica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelfang, P; Vazquez, C

    1991-12-31

    The aim of this work is based on the use of interelemental correction coefficients which are calculated through fundamental parameters. To this purpose, it is necessary to know about the physical constants for each element including the absorption coefficient values and fluorescence yield, the incidence radiation energy, geometric and instrumental parameters. Besides, a special application of the program for the determination of a Nd-La mixed crystal formula is included. (Author). [Espanol] La propuesta de este trabajo se basa en el empleo de coeficientes de correccion interelementales que son calculados a traves de los parametros fundamentales. Para ello se necesitan conocer las constantes fisicas para cada elemento que incluyen los valores de los coeficientes de absorcion y rendimiento de fluorescencia, la energia de la radiacion de incidencia y parametros instrumentales y geometricos. Se incluye ademas una aplicacion especial del programa para la determinacion de la formula de un cristal mixto de Nd y La. (Autor).

  15. Composite model describing the excitation and de-excitation of nitrogen by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, A.E.; Hickman, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    Based on recent studies, the effect of re-excited ions in the emission of electron beam induced fluorescence in nitrogen has been estimated. These effects are included in the formulation of a composite model describing the excitation and de-excitation of nitrogen by an electron beam. The shortcomings of previous models, namely the dependence of the measured temperature on true gas temperature as well as the gas density, are almost completely eliminated in the range of temperatures and densities covered by the available data. (auth)

  16. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  17. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M C Volgenant

    Full Text Available Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation. Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  18. A study of single and multi-photon production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The production of final states involving one or more energetic photons from e+e- collisions at high energies is studied using data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of two samples of 2.9 pb-1 each, recorded at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV and 136 GeV. The data are in agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model. From an analysis of two-photon final states new limits are placed on the parameters of models involving contact interactions and excited electrons. The 95% confidence level lower limits on the QED cut-off parameters are found to be 169 and 132 GeV respectively.

  19. A study of single and multi-photon production in e +e - collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The production of final states involving one or more energetic photons from e +e - collisions at high energies is studied using data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of two samples of 2.9 pb -1 each, recorded at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV and 136 GeV. The data are in agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model. From an analysis of two-photon final states new limits are placed on the parameters of models involving e +e -γγ contact interactions and excited electrons. The 95% confidence level lower limits on the QED cut-off parameters Λ+ and Λ- are found to be 169 and 132 GeV respectively.

  20. Picosecond excitation transport in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay profiles are used to study excitation transport in 2- and 3-dimensional disordered systems. Time-correlated single photon counting detection is used to collect the fluorescence depolarization data. The high signal-to-noise ratios afforded by this technique makes it possible to critically examine current theories of excitation transport. Care has been taken to eliminate or account for the experimental artifacts common to this type of study. Solutions of 3,3'-diethyloxadicarbocyanine iodide (DODCI) in glycerol serve as a radomly distributed array of energy donors in 3-dimensions. A very thin sample cell (/approximately/ 2 μm) is used to minimize the effects of fluorescence self-absorption on the decay kinetics. Evidence of a dynamic shift of the fluorescence spectrum of DODCI in glycerol due to solvent reorganization is presented. The effects of excitation trapping on the decay profiles is minimized in the data analysis procedure. The 3-body theory of Gochanour, Andersen, and Fayer (GAF) and the far less complex 2-particle analytic theory of Huber, Hamilton, and Barnett yield indistinguishable fits to the data over the wide dynamic range of concentrations and decay times studied

  1. Two Dimensional Multiwavelength Fluorescence Spectra of Dipicolinic Acid and Calcium Dipicolinate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarasanandarajah, Sivananthan

    2004-01-01

    .... In this paper we report in some detail on the room temperature fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of DPA and its calcium ion complex and comparison of the excitation-emission spectrum...

  2. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A; Vdovin, Yu; Biryukova, T

    2010-01-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 – 645 nm and 340 – 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy

  3. An operational fluorescence system for crop assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Charles; Belanger, Marie-Christine; Viau, Alain A.; Chamberland, Martin; Roy, Simon

    2004-03-01

    The development of precision farming requires new tools for plant nutritional stress monitoring. An operational fluorescence system has been designed for vegetation status mapping and stress detection at plant and field scale. The instrument gives relative values of fluorescence at different wavelengths induced by the two-excitation sources. Lightinduced fluorescence has demonstrated successful crop health monitoring and plant nutritional stress detection capabilities. The spectral response of the plants has first been measured with an hyperspectral imager using laser-induced fluorescence. A tabletop imaging fluorometer based on flash lamp technology has also been designed to study the spatial distribution of fluorescence on plant leaves. For field based non-imaging system, LED technology is used as light source to induce fluorescence of the plant. The operational fluorescence system is based on ultraviolet and blue LED to induce fluorescence. Four narrow fluorescence bands centered on 440, 520, 690 and 740nm are detected. The instrument design includes a modular approach for light source and detector. It can accommodate as many as four different light sources and six bands of fluorescence detection. As part of the design for field application, the instrument is compatible with a mobile platform equipped with a GPS and data acquisition system. The current system developed by Telops/GAAP is configured for potato crops fluorescence measurement but can easily be adapted for other crops. This new instrument offers an effective and affordable solution for precision farming.

  4. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Exciplex formation accompanied with excitation quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Stanislav G; Burshtein, Anatoly I

    2010-04-08

    The competence of the reversible exciplex formation and parallel quenching of excitation (by electron or energy transfer) was considered using a non-Markovian pi-forms approach, identical to integral encounter theory (IET). General equations accounting for the reversible quenching and exciplex formation are derived in the contact approximation. Their general solution was obtained and adopted to the most common case when the ground state particles are in great excess. Particular cases of only photoionization or just exciplex formation separately studied earlier by means of IET are reproduced. In the case of the irreversible excitation quenching, the theory allows specifying the yields of the fluorescence and exciplex luminescence, as well as the long time kinetics of excitation and exciplex decays, in the absence of quenching. The theory distinguishes between the alternative regimes of (a) fast equilibration between excitations and exciplexes followed by their decay with a common average rate and (b) the fastest and deep excitation decay followed by the weaker and slower delayed fluorescence, backed by exciplex dissociation.

  6. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  7. Multi-Photon Events with Large Missing Energy in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=192-209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01

    Events with a final state consisting of two or more photons and large missing transverse energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies in the range 192 - 209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection and compared with the expectation from the Standard Model process e+e- -> nu nu gamma gamma(gamma). No evidence for new physics contributions to this final state is observed. Upper limits on sigma (e+e- -> XX) BR^2(X -> Ygamma) are derived for the case of stable and invisible Y. In the case of massive Y the combined limits obtained from all the data range from 10 fb to 60 fb, while for the special case of massless Y the range is 20 fb to 40 fb. The limits apply to pair production of excited neutrions (X=nu^*,Y=nu), to neutralino production (X=~chi^0_2, Y=~chi^0_1) and to supersymmetric models in which X=~chi^0_1 and Y=~G is a light gravitino.

  8. Experimental assessment of fluorescence microscopy signal enhancement by stimulated emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dake, Fumihiro; Yazawa, Hiroki

    2017-10-01

    The quantity of photons generated during fluorescence microscopy is principally determined by the quantum yield of the fluorescence dyes and the optical power of the excitation beam. However, even though low quantum yields can produce poor images, it is challenging to tune this parameter, while increasing the power of the excitation beam often results in photodamage. Here, we propose the use of stimulated emission (SE) as a means of enhancing both the signal intensity and signal-to-noise ratio during confocal fluorescence microscopy. This work experimentally confirmed that both these factors can be enhanced by SE radiation, through generating a greater number of photons than are associated with the standard fluorescence signal. We also propose the concept of stimulated emission enhancing fluorescence (SEEF) microscopy, which employs both the SE and fluorescence signals, and demonstrate that the intensity of an SEEF signal is greater than those of the individual SE and fluorescence signals.

  9. Fluorescent Nanodiamonds in Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitura, Katarzyna Anna; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta

    2018-04-18

    Nanoparticles have an extended surface and a large surface area, which is the ratio of the size of the surfacearea to the volume. A functionalized surface can give rise to more modifications and therefore allows this nanomaterial to have new properties. Fluorescent molecules contain fluorophore, which is capable of being excited via the absorption of light energy at a specific wavelength and subsequently emitting radiation energy of a longer wavelength. A chemically modified surface of nanodiamond (ND; by carboxylation) demonstrated biocompatibility with DNA, cytochrome C, and antigens. In turn, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) belong to a group of new nanomaterials. Their surface can be modified by joining functional groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl, or amino, after which they can be employed as a fluorescence agent. Their fluorescent properties result from defects in the crystal lattice. FNDs reach dimensions of 4-100 nm, have attributes such as photostability, long fluorescence lifetimes (10 ns), and fluorescence emission between 600 and 700 nm. They are also nontoxic, chemically inert, biocompatible, and environmentally harmless. The main purpose of this article was to present the medical applications of various types of modified NDs.

  10. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  11. Excited charmed mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.; Shukla, S.

    1995-05-01

    The experimental status of excited charmed mesons is reviewed and is compared to theoretical expectations. Six states have been observed and their properties are consistent with those predicted for excited charmed states with orbital angular momentum equal to one

  12. Portable vibration exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  13. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected

  14. New developments in the analysis and measurement of thicknesses by {beta}-particle excitation of X fluorescent rays; Nouveaux developpements de l'analyse et de la mesure des epaisseurs par excitation des raies de fluorescence X au moyen de particules {beta}; Novye usovershenstvovaniya analiza i izmereniya plotnosti putem vozbuzhdeniya fluorestsiruyushchikh spektrov rentgenovskogo lucha beta-chastitsami; Nuevos adelantos en el analisis y la medicion de espesores mediante la excitacion de rayos X por particulas beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelli, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France); Seibel, G [Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie, St-Germain-en-Laye (France)

    1962-01-15

    The method of analysing and measuring the thickness of deposits by {beta}-X fluorescence which we previously described has been further developed. Using Pm{sup 147} and Kr{sup 85} sources, it is possible to reduce the background observed with Sr{sup 90}. We quote the results obtained for various thickness measurements of metal deposits, an analysis of the solutions, and the continuous measurement of calcium and iron in core samples. We describe experiments made for analysis of the X-radiation by crystal. (author) [French] Le procede d'analyse et de mesure des epaisseurs de depots par fluorescence {beta}-X que nous avons precedemment decrit a fait l'objet de nouveaux developpements. L'emploi de sources de {sup 147}Pm et de {sup 85}Kr permet de reduire le bruit de fond que l'on observe avec le {sup 90}Sr. Nous donnons les resultats obtenus pour diverses mesures d'epaisseurs de depots metalliques, l'analyse des solutions et la mesure en continu du calcium et du fer dans les carottes de minerais. Nous decrivons les essais effectues en vue d'analyser le rayonnement X au moyen d'un cristal. (author) [Spanish] Los autores han introducido nuevos perfeccionamientos en su procedimiento de analisis y de medicion de espesores de depositos por fluorescencia de rayos X excitada por particulas beta. La utilizacion de fuentes de {sup 147}Pm y de {sup 85}Kr permite reducir la actividad de fondo que se observa empleando {sup 90}Sr. Los autores exponen los resultados obtenidos en materia de mediciones de espesores de depositos metalicos, analisis de soluciones y medicion continua del calcio y del hierro en muestras de minerales extraidas por sondeo. Tambien describen los ensayos realizados con miras a analizar los rayos X por medio de un cristal. (author) [Russian] Protsess analiza i izmereniya plotnosti sloev putem fluorestsiruyushchikh beta- i rentgenovskikh luchej, kotoryj opisyvalsya nami ran'she, byl predmetom novykh usovershenstvovanij. Ispol'zovanie istochnikov prometeya-147 i

  15. Polarization of fluorescence: a probe of molecular autoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroi, G.E.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Poliakoff, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    The polarization of fluorescence from excited-state molecular photoions provides a direct probe of the photoionization dynamics and the symmetry signatures of autoionizing resonances. Measurements on CO 2 and CS 2 are presented as examples

  16. Multispectral open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrooz, Ali; Waterman, Peter; Vasquez, Kristine O; Meganck, Jeff; Peterson, Jeffrey D; Faqir, Ilias; Kempner, Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging informs decisions regarding surgical margins by detecting and localizing signals from fluorescent reporters, labeling targets such as malignant tissues. This guidance reduces the likelihood of undetected malignant tissue remaining after resection, eliminating the need for additional treatment or surgery. The primary challenges in performing open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging come from the weak intensity of the fluorescence signal in the presence of strong surgical and ambient illumination, and the auto-fluorescence of non-target components, such as tissue, especially in the visible spectral window (400-650 nm). In this work, a multispectral open-air fluorescence imaging system is presented for translational image-guided intraoperative applications, which overcomes these challenges. The system is capable of imaging weak fluorescence signals with nanomolar sensitivity in the presence of surgical illumination. This is done using synchronized fluorescence excitation and image acquisition with real-time background subtraction. Additionally, the system uses a liquid crystal tunable filter for acquisition of multispectral images that are used to spectrally unmix target fluorescence from non-target auto-fluorescence. Results are validated by preclinical studies on murine models and translational canine oncology models.

  17. Elementary excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmer, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The role of elementary quasi-particle and quasi-hole excitations is reviewed in connection with the analysis of data involving high-lying nuclear states. This article includes discussions on: (i) single quasi-hole excitations in pick-up reactions, (ii) the formation of single quasi-hole and quasi-particle excitations (in different nuclei) during transfer reactions, followed by (iii) quasi-particle quasi-hole excitations in the same nucleus that are produced by photon absorption. Finally, the question of photon absorption in the vicinity of the elementary Δ resonance is discussed, where nucleonic as well as nuclear degrees of freedom can be excited

  18. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-03-10

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected for the device based on the natural frequency. Additionally, a second voltage amplitude of a second source of excitation can be selected for the device, and the first and second sources of excitation can be applied to the device. After applying the first and second sources of excitation, a frequency of the second source of excitation can be swept. Using the methods of multi- frequency excitation described herein, new operating frequencies, operating frequency ranges, resonance frequencies, resonance frequency ranges, and/or resonance responses can be achieved for devices and systems.

  19. Ratiometric fluorescent nanoparticles for sensing temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Hong-Shang, E-mail: hillphs@yahoo.com.cn; Huang, Shi-Hua [Beijing Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology (China); Wolfbeis, Otto S. [University of Regensburg, Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Chemo- and Biosensors (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A ratiometric type of fluorescent nanoparticle was prepared via an encapsulation-reprecipitation method. By introducing an alkoxysilanized dye as a reference, the nanoparticles (NPs) give both a green and a red fluorescence under one single-wavelength excitation. The resulted ratiometric fluorescence is found to be highly temperature-dependent in the physiological range (25-45 {sup o}C), with an intensity temperature sensitivity of -4.0%/{sup o}C. Given the small size (20-30 nm in diameter) and biocompatible nature (silica out layer), such kind of NPs were very promising as temperature nanosensors for cellular sensing and imaging.

  20. a simple a simple excitation control excitation control excitation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    field voltages determined follow a simple quadratic relationship that offer a very simple control scheme, dependent on only the stator current. Keywords: saturated reactances, no-load field voltage, excitation control, synchronous generators. 1. Introduction. Introduction. Introduction. The commonest generator in use today is ...

  1. Relaxation and excitation electronic processes in dielectrics irradiated by ultrafast IR and VUV pulses; Processus electroniques d'excitation et de relaxation dans les solides dielectriques excites par des impulsions IR et XUV ultracourtes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudin, J

    2005-11-15

    We studied excitation and relaxation of electrons involved during interaction of visible and VUV femtosecond pulses with dielectrics. The generated population of hot electrons, having energy of few eV to few tens of eV above the bottom of the conduction band, is responsible of phenomena ranging to defect creation to optical breakdown. Owing to two techniques: photoemission and transient photoconductivity we improve the understanding of the The first photoemission experiments deal with dielectrics irradiated by 30 fs IR pulses. The photoemission spectra measured show a large population of electrons which energy rise up to 40 eV. We interpret this result in terms of a new absorption process: direct multi-photons inter-branch transitions. The 2. type of photoemission experiments are time resolved 'pump/probe' investigation. We study the relaxation of electrons excited by a VUV pulses. We used the high order harmonics (HOH) as light sources. We found surprisingly long decay time in the range of ps timescale. Last type of experiments is photoconductivity studies of diamond samples. Using HOH as light source we measure the displacement current induced by excited electrons in the conduction band. Those electrons relax mainly by impact ionisation creating secondary electrons. Hence by probing the number of electrons we were able to measure the efficiency of these relaxation processes. We observe a diminution of this efficiency when the energy of exciting photons is above 20 eV. Owing to Monte-Carlo simulation we interpret this result in terms of band structure effect. (author)

  2. Uncovering of melanin fluorescence in human skin tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Matthias; Stankovic, Goran; Seewald, Gunter; Leupold, Dieter

    2007-07-01

    Due to its extremely low fluorescence quantum yield, in the conventionally (one-photon) excited autofluorescence of skin tissue, melanin fluorescence is masked by several other endogenous and possibly also exogenous fluorophores (e.g. NADH, FAD, Porphyrins). A first step to enhance the melanin contribution had been realized by two-photon fs-pulse excitation in the red/near IR, based on the fact that melanin can be excited by stepwise two-photon absorption, whereas all other fluorophores in this spectral region allow only simultaneous two-photon excitation. Now, the next and decisive step has been realized: Using an extremely sensitive detection system, for the first time twophoton fluorescence of skin tissue excited with pulses in the ns-range could be measured. The motivation for this step was based on the fact that the population density of the fluorescent level resulting from a stepwise excitation has a different dependence of the pulse duration than that from a simultaneous excitation (Δt2 vs. Δt). Due to this strong discrimination between the fluorophores, practically pure melanin fluorescence can be obtained. Examples for in-vivo, ex-vivo as well as paraffin embedded skin tissue will be shown. The content of information with respect to early diagnosis of skin deseases will be discussed.

  3. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  4. Interference between radiative emission and autoionization in the decay of excited states of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, L. Jr.; Theodosiou, C.E.; Wall, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    An excited state of an atom which can autoionize can also undergo radiative decay. We consider the interaction between the final states resulting from these two modes of decay, and its effects on such quantities as the fluorescence yield of the excited state, excitation profile of the excited state, and the spectra of the emitted photons and electrons. It is shown that the fraction of decays of the excited state resulting in a photon (fluorescence yield) is particularly sensitive to the details of the final-state interaction. In lowest order in the final-state interaction, the fluorescence yield is increased by a factor (1 + 1/q 2 ) from the traditional value, where q is the Fano q parameter relating to the excited state and the final atomic state

  5. Electron beam induced fluorescence measurements of the degree of hydrogen dissociation in hydrogen plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C.; Brussaard, G.J.H.; de Beer, E.C.M.; Schram, D.C.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of dissociation of hydrogen in a hydrogen plasma has been measured using electron beam induced fluorescence. A 20 kV, 1 mA electron beam excites both the ground state H atom and H2 molecule into atomic hydrogen in an excited state. From the resulting fluorescence the degree of

  6. High-contrast fluorescence imaging based on the polarization dependence of the fluorescence enhancement using an optical interference mirror slide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    High-contrast fluorescence imaging using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide that enhances the fluorescence from a fluorophore located on top of the OIM surface is reported. To enhance the fluorescence and reduce the background light of the OIM, transverse-electric-polarized excitation light was used as incident light, and the transverse-magnetic-polarized fluorescence signal was detected. As a result, an approximate 100-fold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was achieved through a 13-fold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and an 8-fold reduction of the background light.

  7. Study on serum fluorescence spectra based on wavelet transform

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... Blood plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and treatment and as such, the analysis of blood spectrum will be of very important practical significance. Serum fluorescence emission intensity is closely related with the excitation wavelength; when the excitation wavelength is 230 nm, the blood.

  8. Study on serum fluorescence spectra based on wavelet transform ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and treatment and as such, the analysis of blood spectrum will be of very important practical significance. Serum fluorescence emission intensity is closely related with the excitation wavelength; when the excitation wavelength is 230 nm, the blood lipid concentration and ...

  9. Photochemical and photoelectrochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence in photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.; Durchan, M.; Prasil, O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with kinetics and properties of variable fluorescence in leaves and thylakoids upon excitation with low intensity multi-turnover actinic light pulses corresponding with an excitation rate of about 10 Hz. These show a relatively small and amply documented rise in the sub-s time range

  10. On isospin excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenfei; Zhang Fengshou; Chen Liewen

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of Hartree-Fock theory using the extended Skyrme effective interaction, the isospin excitation energy as a function of relative neutron excess δ was investigated at different temperatures and densities. It was found that the isospin excitation energy decreased with the increment of temperature and/or the decrement of density. The authors pointed out that the decrement of isospin excitation energy was resulted from the weakening of quantum effect with increment of temperature and/or decrement of density. Meanwhile, the relationship between the isospin excitation energy and the symmetry energy was discussed and found that the symmetry energy was just a part of the isospin excitation energy. With increasing temperature and decreasing density, the contribution of the symmetry energy to the isospin excitation energy becomes more and more important. The isospin excitation energy as a function of relative neutron excess was also investigated using different potential parameters. The results shows that the isospin excitation energy is almost independent of the incompressibility and the effective mass, but strongly depends on the symmetry energy strength coefficient, which indicates that it is possible to extract the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state by investigating the isospin excitation energy in experiments

  11. Excited states 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that deals with molecules in the excited states. The book describes the geometries of molecules in the excited electronic states. One paper describes the geometries of a diatomic molecule and of polyatomic molecules; it also discusses the determination of the many excited state geometries of molecules with two, three, or four atoms by techniques similar to diatomic spectroscopy. Another paper introduces an ordered theory related to excitons in pure and mixed molecular crystals. This paper also presents some experimental data such as those invo

  12. Excited states v.6

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1982-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 6 is a collection of papers that discusses the excited states of molecules. The first paper discusses the linear polyene electronic structure and potential surfaces, considering both the theoretical and experimental approaches in such electronic states. This paper also reviews the theory of electronic structure and cites some experimental techniques on polyene excitations, polyene spectroscopic phenomenology, and those involving higher states of polyenes and their triplet states. Examples of these experimental studies of excited states involve the high-resolution one-pho

  13. Plasmon enhanced silver quantum cluster fluorescence for biochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, J.P.; Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of individual silver quantum clusters on the surface of silver nanoparticles reveals strong photoactivated emission under blue light excitation [1-4]. In this work, silver nanoparticles are produced by annealing silver thin films deposited on a glass substrate and silver q...... purposes. It was found, that in presence of a strong nucleophile (such as CN-), silver quantum clusters are dissolved into non-fluorescing AgCN complexes, resulting in a fast and observable decrease of the fluorescent signal....

  14. Terahertz-Radiation-Enhanced Emission of Fluorescence from Gas Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jingle; Zhang, X.-C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the study of femtosecond laser-induced air plasma fluorescence under the illumination of terahertz (THz) pulses. Semiclassical modeling and experimental verification indicate that time-resolved THz radiation-enhanced emission of fluorescence is dominated by the electron kinetics and the electron-impact excitation of gas molecules or ions. We demonstrate that the temporal waveform of the THz field could be retrieved from the transient enhanced fluorescence, making omnidirectional, coherent detection available for THz time-domain spectroscopy.

  15. Enhanced eumelanin emission by stepwise three-photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimo, Josef; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2011-03-01

    Eumelanin fluorescence from Sepia officinalis and black human hair was activated with near-infrared radiation and multiphoton excitation. A third order multiphoton absorption by a step-wise process appears to be the underlying mechanism. The activation was caused by a photochemical process since it could not be reproduced by simple heating. Both fluorescence and brightfield imaging indicate the near-infrared irradiation caused photodamage to the eumelanin and the activated emission originated from the photodamaged region. At least two different components with about thousand-fold enhanced fluorescence were activated and could be distinguished by their excitation properties. One component was excited with wavelengths in the visible region and exhibited linear absorption dependence. The second component could be excited with near-infrared wavelengths and had a third order dependence on the laser power. The third order dependence is explained by a step-wise excited state absorption (ESA) process since it could be observed equally with the CW and femtosecond lasers. The new method for photoactivating the eumelanin fluorescence was used to map the melanin content in human hair.

  16. Application of pyrolysis–mass spectrometry and pyrolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry with electron-ionization or resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization for characterization of crude oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Stefan; Streibel, Thorsten; Erdmann, Sabrina; Sklorz, Martin; Schulz-Bull, Detlef; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Gas chromatography setup with two MS detectors applying different ionization methods. • In parallel structural information and sensitive detection of aromatic species. • Characterization of setup and application for crude oil samples. • Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons next to sulfur containing aromatics. - Abstract: A novel analytical system for gas-chromatographic investigation of complex samples has been developed, that combines the advantages of several analytical principles to enhance the analytical information. Decomposition of high molecular weight structures is achieved by pyrolysis and a high separation capacity due to the chromatographic step provides both an universal as well as a selective and sensitive substance detection. The latter is achieved by simultaneously applying electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (EI-QMS) for structural elucidation and [1 + 1]-resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization (REMPI) combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS). The system has been evaluated and tested with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) standards. It was applied to crude oil samples for the first time. In such highly complex samples several thousands of compounds are present and the identification especially of low concentrated chemical species such as PAH or their polycyclic aromatic sulfur containing heterocyclic (PASH) derivatives is often difficult. Detection of unalkylated and alkylated PAH together with PASH is considerably enhanced by REMPI–ToFMS, at times revealing aromatic structures which are not observable by EI-QMS due to their low abundance. On the other hand, the databased structure proposals of the EI-QMS analysis are needed to confirm structural information and isomers distinction. The technique allows a complex structure analysis as well as selective assessment of aromatic substances in one measurement. Information about the content of sulfur containing compounds plays a

  17. Application of pyrolysis–mass spectrometry and pyrolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry with electron-ionization or resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization for characterization of crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Stefan [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Streibel, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.streibel@uni-rostock.de [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Cooperation Group Comprehensive Molecular Analytics, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center of Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Erdmann, Sabrina [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Sklorz, Martin [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Cooperation Group Comprehensive Molecular Analytics, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center of Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Schulz-Bull, Detlef [Marine Chemistry, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde, Seestrasse 15, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Zimmermann, Ralf [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Cooperation Group Comprehensive Molecular Analytics, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center of Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Gas chromatography setup with two MS detectors applying different ionization methods. • In parallel structural information and sensitive detection of aromatic species. • Characterization of setup and application for crude oil samples. • Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons next to sulfur containing aromatics. - Abstract: A novel analytical system for gas-chromatographic investigation of complex samples has been developed, that combines the advantages of several analytical principles to enhance the analytical information. Decomposition of high molecular weight structures is achieved by pyrolysis and a high separation capacity due to the chromatographic step provides both an universal as well as a selective and sensitive substance detection. The latter is achieved by simultaneously applying electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (EI-QMS) for structural elucidation and [1 + 1]-resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization (REMPI) combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS). The system has been evaluated and tested with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) standards. It was applied to crude oil samples for the first time. In such highly complex samples several thousands of compounds are present and the identification especially of low concentrated chemical species such as PAH or their polycyclic aromatic sulfur containing heterocyclic (PASH) derivatives is often difficult. Detection of unalkylated and alkylated PAH together with PASH is considerably enhanced by REMPI–ToFMS, at times revealing aromatic structures which are not observable by EI-QMS due to their low abundance. On the other hand, the databased structure proposals of the EI-QMS analysis are needed to confirm structural information and isomers distinction. The technique allows a complex structure analysis as well as selective assessment of aromatic substances in one measurement. Information about the content of sulfur containing compounds plays a

  18. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi's sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual

  19. Tomato seeds maturity detection system based on chlorophyll fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiling; Wang, Xiu; Meng, Zhijun

    2016-10-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence intensity can be used as seed maturity and quality evaluation indicator. Chlorophyll fluorescence intensity of seed coats is tested to judge the level of chlorophyll content in seeds, and further to judge the maturity and quality of seeds. This research developed a detection system of tomato seeds maturity based on chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum technology, the system included an excitation light source unit, a fluorescent signal acquisition unit and a data processing unit. The excitation light source unit consisted of two high power LEDs, two radiators and two constant current power supplies, and it was designed to excite chlorophyll fluorescence of tomato seeds. The fluorescent signal acquisition unit was made up of a fluorescence spectrometer, an optical fiber, an optical fiber scaffolds and a narrowband filter. The data processing unit mainly included a computer. Tomato fruits of green ripe stage, discoloration stage, firm ripe stage and full ripe stage were harvested, and their seeds were collected directly. In this research, the developed tomato seeds maturity testing system was used to collect fluorescence spectrums of tomato seeds of different maturities. Principal component analysis (PCA) method was utilized to reduce the dimension of spectral data and extract principal components, and PCA was combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to establish discriminant model of tomato seeds maturity, the discriminant accuracy was greater than 90%. Research results show that using chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum technology is feasible for seeds maturity detection, and the developed tomato seeds maturity testing system has high detection accuracy.

  20. Determination of uranium in seawater by fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Toshi; Kawakubo, Senkichi; Minegishi, Hisako.

    1984-01-01

    A Fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of uranium in seawater has been developed. Anion exchange separation of uranium from seawater followed by preparation of NaF-carbonate cake and by spectrometry for ultraviolet ray excited fluorescence of uranium on the fluoride host provide the trace determinaton of uranium at the subnano gram level. Anion exchange behavior, excitation-emission behavior of the uranium on the host and effects of foreign ions to the fluorescence have been presented. Appling the method to 1 ml of seawater 3 ppb of uranium has been determined. (author)