WorldWideScience

Sample records for multi-modality nuclear medicine

  1. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive ... NIBIB-funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that ...

  2. Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multi-modal transportation network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-28

    Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, all focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

  3. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  6. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of ... limitations of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a ... of your child's body. top of page How is the procedure performed? Nuclear medicine imaging is usually ...

  12. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine ... physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals or radiotracers . Depending ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions. Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine ... leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the small amount of radiotracer ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about your child’s recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications and allergies. Depending on the type ... Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed ... the thyroid gland. top of page How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray ...

  18. Nuclear medicine physics

    CERN Document Server

    De Lima, Joao Jose

    2011-01-01

    Edited by a renowned international expert in the field, Nuclear Medicine Physics offers an up-to-date, state-of-the-art account of the physics behind the theoretical foundation and applications of nuclear medicine. It covers important physical aspects of the methods and instruments involved in modern nuclear medicine, along with related biological topics. The book first discusses the physics of and machines for producing radioisotopes suitable for use in conventional nuclear medicine and PET. After focusing on positron physics and the applications of positrons in medicine and biology, it descr

  19. Technologists for Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Huey D.

    1974-01-01

    Physicians need support personnel for work with radioisotopes in diagnosing dangerous diseases. The Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) Program at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida, is described. (MW)

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan being performed, you will receive specific preparation instructions for what your child may eat and drink before the exam, especially ... Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ... Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo. ...

  1. Nuclear tele medicine; Telemedicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, L.; Hernandez, F.; Fernandez, R. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Imagenologia Diagnostica, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The great majority of the digital images of nuclear medicine are susceptible of being sent through internet. This has allowed that the work in diagnosis cabinets by image it can benefit of this modern technology. We have presented in previous congresses works related with tele medicine, however, due to the speed in the evolution of the computer programs and the internet, becomes necessary to make a current position in this modality of work. (Author)

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease in its earliest stage, often before symptoms ... benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. To learn more about nuclear medicine, visit Radiology ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  7. Practical nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Gemmell, Howard G; Sharp, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in patient care, and this book is an essential guide for all practitioners to the many techniques that inform clinical management. The first part covers the scientific basis of nuclear medicine, the rest of the book deals with clinical applications. Diagnostic imaging has an increasingly important role in patient management and, despite advances in other modalities (functional MRI and spiral CT), nuclear medicine continues to make its unique contribution by its ability to demonstrate physiological function. This book is also expanded by covering areas of d

  8. Nuclear Medicine Annual, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Among the highlights of Nuclear Medicine Annual, 1989 are a status report on the thyroid scan in clinical practice, a review of functional and structural brain imaging in dementia, an update on radionuclide renal imaging in children, and an article outlining a quality assurance program for SPECT instrumentation. Also included are discussions on current concepts in osseous sports and stress injury scintigraphy and on correlative magnetic resonance and radionuclide imaging of bone. Other contributors assess the role of nuclear medicine in clinical decision making and examine medicolegal and regulatory aspects of nuclear medicine.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... beforehand, especially if sedation is to be used. Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in ... PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special camera and a computer ... medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine the severity of or ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed ... the thyroid gland. top of page How does the procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... necessitate sedation for your child. You will receive instructions prior to the exam if your child will ... child has been sedated, you will receive specific instructions to be followed after leaving the nuclear medicine ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is ... placed over the patient's body. SPECT involves the rotation of the gamma camera heads around the patient's ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bladder. bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used ... gas via a mask, such as with a lung scan. Bladder: some exams require a catheter to ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the procedure. top of page Who interprets the results and how do we get them? A radiologist ... radiotracer administered are small, diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures result in low radiation exposure, acceptable for diagnostic exams. ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to be followed after leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the ... Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top ... to be followed after leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used. Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in a vein in your child’s arm or ... are noninvasive and, with the exception of intravenous injections, are usually painless medical tests that help physicians ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits The information provided by nuclear medicine examinations ... diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. Risks Because the doses of radiotracer administered are small, ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used to help ... children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top of page How does the procedure ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top of ... full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... organs and tissues in your body. Hybrid imaging techniques (PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are ... equipment look like? The special camera and imaging techniques used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures result in low radiation exposure, acceptable for diagnostic exams. Thus, the radiation risk ... long-term adverse effects from such low-dose exposure. For more information about safety in pediatric radiology ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... molecular information. In many centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic ... small hand-held device resembling a microphone that can detect and measure the amount of the radiotracer ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... painless medical tests that help physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals or radiotracers . Depending on the type of nuclear medicine exam, the radiotracer is either ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body. Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities ... and bladder. bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will be inhaled as a gas via a mask, such as with a lung scan. Bladder: some ... A radiologist or other physician who has specialized training in nuclear medicine will interpret the images and ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... determine appropriate treatment, if any. Risks Because the doses of radiotracer administered are small, diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures result in low radiation exposure, acceptable for diagnostic exams. Thus, the radiation ...

  10. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  11. Physics in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, Simon R; Phelps, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Physics in Nuclear Medicine - by Drs. Simon R. Cherry, James A. Sorenson, and Michael E. Phelps - provides current, comprehensive guidance on the physics underlying modern nuclear medicine and imaging using radioactively labeled tracers. This revised and updated fourth edition features a new full-color layout, as well as the latest information on instrumentation and technology. Stay current on crucial developments in hybrid imaging (PET/CT and SPECT/CT), and small animal imaging, and benefit from the new section on tracer kinetic modeling in neuroreceptor imaging.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like? Special camera or imaging devices used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation camera, detects radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnoses. In addition, manufacturers are now making single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and ... nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in a vein in your child’s arm or hand. Your child should ... body, they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pictures and provides molecular information. In many centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce special views, a practice known as image fusion or co-registration. These views allow the information ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The special camera and imaging techniques used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation camera, detects radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and ...

  18. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, B.E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Ionizing Radiation Div., Gaithersburg MD (United States); Judge, St. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient. (authors)

  19. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Brian E.; Judge, Steven

    2007-08-01

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient.

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I-131 Therapy Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript ... an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. To learn more about nuclear medicine, visit Radiology Info dot ...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stage, often before symptoms occur or before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine ... nuclear medicine exam, there are several things you can do to prepare. First, you may be asked ...

  2. Nuclear medicine technology study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Dee

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine Technology Study Guide presents a comprehensive review of nuclear medicine principles and concepts necessary for technologists to pass board examinations. The practice questions and content follow the guidelines of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and American Registry of Radiological Technologists (ARRT), allowing test takers to maximize their success in passing the examinations. The book is organized by sections of increasing difficulty, with over 600 multiple-choice questions covering all areas of nuclear medicine, including radiation safety; radi

  3. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  4. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  5. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giussani, Augusto [BfS - Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Protection and Health; Hoeschen, Christoph (eds.) [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Research Unit Medical Raditation Physics and Diagnostics

    2013-08-01

    Presents the most recent developments in nuclear medicine imaging, with emphasis on the latest research findings. Considers the latest advances in imaging systems, image reconstruction, noise correction, and quality assurance. Discusses novel concepts, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA project. Lists rules of thumb for imaging of use to both beginners and experienced researchers. This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  6. Frontiers in nuclear medicine symposium: Nuclear medicine & molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document contains the abstracts from the American College of Nuclear Physicians 1993 Fall Meeting entitled, `Frontiers in Nuclear Medicine Symposium: Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology`. This meeting was sponsored by the US DOE, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The program chairman was Richard C. Reba, M.D.

  7. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  8. [Nuclear medicine in Europe: education].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, D.; Freudenberg, L.S.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Franzius, C.; Krause, T.; Garai, I.; Biermann, M.; Gruning, T.; Leitha, T.; Gotthardt, M.

    2012-01-01

    The technical developments that have taken place in the preceding years (PET, hybrid imaging) have changed nuclear medicine. The future cooperation with radiologists will be challenging as well as positioning nuclear medicine in an European context. It can also be expected that education in nuclear

  9. On the Bicriterion Multi Modal Assignment Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Roed; Nielsen, L.R.; Andersen, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the bicriterion multi modal assignment problem which is a new generalization of the classical linear assignment problem. A two-phase solution method using an effective ranking scheme is presented. The algorithm is valid for generating all nondominated criterion points...

  10. Multi modal child-to-child interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Tine Basse

    In this presentation the interaction and relation of three boys is analyzed using multi modal analysis. The analysis clearly, and surprisingly demonstrates that the boys interact via different modes and that they are able to handle several interaction partners at the same time. They co-construct ...

  11. Multi modal child-to-child interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Tine Basse

    In this presentation the interaction and relation of three boys is analyzed using multi modal analysis. The analysis clearly, and surprisingly demonstrates that the boys interact via different modes and that they are able to handle several interaction partners at the same time. They co-construct ...

  12. Nuclear medicine and AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Doherty, M.J. (Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom) Kent and Canterbury Hospital, Canterbury (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Nunan, T.O. (Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1993-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and its associated illnesses in a relatively young population of patients provides an expanding role for nuclear medicine. The disease enforces a review of each department's infection control procedures. It has also resulted in an increase in the number of patients presenting with diseases such as Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, Kaposi's sarcoma etc. which prior to the HIV epidemic were extremely rare. Thus in high risk patients the interpretation of abnormalities in nuclear medicine scans needs to include the spectrum of opportunistic infections and unusual tumours. The presence of opportunistic infections in the severely immunocompromised patient has led to the development of techniques not normally used, i.e. lung [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) transfer/clearance, donor leukocyte scanning to allow rapid diagnosis of an abnormality. Radionuclide techniques are also used to monitor the effect of therapy directed at the HIV itself or against opportunistic infections. This review covers aspects of infection control as well as the use of radionuclides to investigate specific problems related to HIV infection and therapy of the associated disease processes. (author).

  13. [Nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopena Novales, P; Plancha Mansanet, M C; Martinez Carsi, C; Sopena Monforte, R

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty that allows modern diagnostics and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals original radiotracers (drugs linked to a radioactive isotope). In Europe, radiopharmaceuticals are considered a special group of drugs and thus their preparation and use are regulated by a set of policies that have been adopted by individual member countries. The radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic examinations are administered in very small doses. So, in general, they have no pharmacological action, side effects or serious adverse reactions. The biggest problem associated with their use are the alterations in their biodistribution that may cause diagnostic errors. Nuclear Medicine is growing considerably influenced by the appearance and development of new radiopharmaceuticals in both the diagnostic and therapeutic fields and primarily to the impact of new multimodality imaging techniques (SPECT-CT, PET-CT, PET-MRI, etc.). It's mandatory to know the limitations of these techniques, distribution and eventual physiological alterations of radiopharmaceuticals, contraindications and adverse reactions of radiological contrasts, and the possible interference of both.

  14. The next few years: nuclear medicine and molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eil, P.J. [Middlesex Hospital Mortimer Street, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    Nuclear medicine in the future will be integrated in best practice in diagnosis, staging and re-staging of disease, treatment monitoring and indeed specific new therapy. Routine multi modality imaging has clearly arrived whilst some image fusion is still required. Intra and inter modality special registration is in progress. The impact of image fusion especially PET/CT on radiotherapy planning will be major. There are major developments in therapy and especially the treatment of lymphoma with new tracers such as yttrium-90 and iodine 131 labelled anti-CD monoclonal antibodies. New registered tracers are impacting. Cancer profiling will be improved with molecular phenotype with biopsy and imaging and organ staging via imaging technology. (N.C.)

  15. Nuclear medicine in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothfeld, B. (ed.)

    1974-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following main headings: crystal scintillation counting; liquid scintillation counting; activation analysis; the in vitro nuclear medicine laboratory; blood volume in clinical practice B/sub 12/ and folate deficiency; radionuclide studies associated with abnormalities of iron; basic principles of competitive radioassay; plasma cortisol; radioimmunoassays for T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/; radioimmunoassay of estrogens; determination of androgens in biological fluids; radioimmunoassay of digitalis glycosides; growth hormone; thyrotropin; gonadotropins; radioimmunoassay of gastrin; glucagon; radioisotopic measurements of insulin; radioimmunoassay of the calcium-regulating hormones; the renin-angiotensin system and aldosterone; tumor antigens; fat absorption; protein-losing enteropathy; Australia antigen; bacteriologic cultures and sensitivities; and future pathways. (ERB)

  16. Nuclear medicine at a crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelbert, Heinrich R

    2011-12-01

    The growth of molecular imaging heightens the promise of clinical nuclear medicine as a tool for individualization of patient care and for improvement of health-care outcomes. Together with greater use of integrated structure-function imaging, clinical nuclear medicine reaches beyond traditional specialty borders into diagnostic radiology and oncology. Yet, there are concerns about the future of nuclear medicine, including progressively declining reimbursement, the competitive advantages of diagnostic radiology, limited translation of research accomplishments to clinical diagnostic imaging and patient care, and an insufficient pool of incoming highly qualified nuclear medicine clinicians. Thus, nuclear medicine views itself as being at a critical crossroads. What will be important is for nuclear medicine to be positioned as the quintessential molecular imaging modality more centrally within medical imaging and for the integration of nuclear medicine with primary care specialties to be driven more by patient needs than by specialty needs. In this way, the full potential of nuclear medicine as an effective and efficient tool for improving patient outcomes can be realized.

  17. Multi-Modal Interaction for Robotic Mules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-26

    Multi-Modal Interaction for Robotic Mules Glenn Taylor, Mike Quist , Matt Lanting, Cory Dunham, Patrick Theisen, Paul Muench Abstract...Taylor, Mike Quist , Matt Lanting, Cory Dunham, and Patrick Theisen are with Soar Technology, Inc. (corresponding author: 734-887- 7620; email: glenn...soartech.com; quist @soartech.com; matt.lanting@soartech.com; dunham@soartech.com; patrick.theisen@soartech.com Paul Muench is with US Army TARDEC

  18. Essentials of nuclear medicine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Mettler, Fred A. Jr

    2012-01-01

    Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging, by Drs. Fred A Mettler and Milton J Guiberteau, provides the practical and comprehensive guidance you need to master key nuclear imaging techniques. From physics, instrumentation, quality control, and legal requirements to hot topics such as sodium fluoride, radiopharmaceuticals, and recommended pediatric administered doses and guidelines, this sixth edition covers the fundamentals and recent developments in the practice of nuclear medicine.

  19. Current status of respiratory nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-01-01

    Multimodality image fusion is now becoming popular in respiratory nuclear medical field, since scintigraphic diagnosis, based on functional image interpretation, becomes more accurate and meaningful when supported by corresponding anatomical data. Although SPECT/PET scanner-mounted X-ray tomographic systems are now being introduced for an accurate image fusion in the chest, the use of a fully automatic multi-modality image fusion algorithm may be an alternative method. Our initial attempt of this algorithm for fusion imaging of Tc-99m MAA perfusion or thallium-201 SPECT and helical CT scan has contributed to accurate interpretation of the results without user interaction, and has facilitated the understanding of the functional basis of lung parenchymal CT attenuation changes. Three-dimensional displays with functional mapping are also now being increasingly introduced to various respiratory nuclear studies. A fractal analysis has shown successful results in the analysis of technegas and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA perfusion images, which will be increasingly applied for more objective assessment of the results. The feasibility of {sup 18}F-FDG PET scan in accurate staging of lung cancer and the good cost performance of this method in lung cancer strategy are repeatedly stressed by the recent studies. The feasibility of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA perfusion scan in the evaluation of right-to-left shunt in patients with hepatopulmonary syndrome, and the potential of {sup 123}I-MIBG scan in the evaluation of the function status of pulmonary neuroadrenergic system are new aspects for these well established tracers. There is the first attempt of intraoperative {sup 99m}Tc-colloid sentinel lymph node mapping in patients with resectable non-small cell lung cancer. This may improve the precision of pathologic staging and limit the need for mediastinal node dissection in selected patients. Radiolabeled aerosol lung scintigraphy is being increasingly applied to evaluate lung deposition of various

  20. On the Bicriterion Multi Modal Assignment Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Roed; Nielsen, L.R.; Andersen, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the bicriterion multi modal assignment problem which is a new generalization of the classical linear assignment problem. A two-phase solution method using an effective ranking scheme is presented. The algorithm is valid for generating all nondominated criterion points...... or an approximation. Extensive computational results are conducted on a large library of test instances to test the performance of the algorithm and to identify hard test instances. Also, test results of the algorithm applied to the bicriterion assignment problem is given. Here our algorithm outperforms all...

  1. Nuclear Medicine National Headquarter System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Nuclear Medicine National HQ System database is a series of MS Excel spreadsheets and Access Database Tables by fiscal year. They consist of information from all...

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT Angiography Video: Myelography Video: CT of the Heart Video: Radioiodine I-131 Therapy Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine exams will involve an injection in a vein in your child’s arm or hand. Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and ... medicine exams will involve an injection into a vein in your child's arm or hand. Children should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to ...

  4. Basic sciences of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Magdy M. (ed.) [Imperial College London (United Kingdom). Biological Imaging Centre

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear medicine has become an ever-changing and expanding diagnostic and therapeutic medical profession. The day-to-day innovations seen in the field are, in great part, due to the integration of many scientific bases with complex technologic advances. The aim of this reference book, Basic Sciences of Nuclear Medicine, is to provide the reader with a comprehensive and detailed discussion of the scientific bases of nuclear medicine, covering the different topics and concepts that underlie many of the investigations and procedures performed in the field. Topics include radiation and nuclear physics, Tc-99m chemistry, single-photon radiopharmaceuticals and PET chemistry, radiobiology and radiation dosimetry, image processing, image reconstruction, quantitative SPECT imaging, quantitative cardiac SPECT, small animal imaging (including multimodality hybrid imaging, e.g., PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and PET/MRI), compartmental modeling, and tracer kinetics. (orig.)

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the bladder, such as with a vesicoureteral reflux study. It can take several seconds to a few ... until the nuclear physician checks the images in case additional images are needed. top of page What ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help diagnose childhood disorders that are present at birth or that develop during childhood. It provides unique ... diagnose childhood disorders that are congenital (present at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... placed over the patient's body. SPECT involves the rotation of the gamma camera heads around the patient's ... the child has been sedated, you will receive specific instructions to be followed after leaving the nuclear ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look ... being recorded. Though nuclear imaging itself causes no pain, children may experience some discomfort from having to ...

  9. Radiation physics for nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is expanding rapidly, with the development of exciting new diagnostic methods and treatments. This growth is closely associated with significant advances in radiation physics. In this book, acknowledged experts explain the basic principles of radiation physics in relation to nuclear medicine and examine important novel approaches in the field. The first section is devoted to what might be termed the "building blocks" of nuclear medicine, including the mechanisms of interaction between radiation and matter and Monte Carlo codes. In subsequent sections, radiation sources for medical applications, radiopharmaceutical development and production, and radiation detectors are discussed in detail. New frontiers are then explored, including improved algorithms for image reconstruction, biokinetic models, and voxel phantoms for internal dosimetry. Both trainees and experienced practitioners and researchers will find this book to be an invaluable source of up-to-date information.

  10. Historic images in nuclear medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    In 1976, 2 major molecular imaging events coincidentally took place: Clinical Nuclear Medicine was first published in June, and in August researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania created the first images in humans with F-FDG. FDG was initially developed as part of an evolution...... set in motion by fundamental research studies with positron-emitting tracers in the 1950s by Michel Ter-Pegossian and coworkers at the Washington University. Today, Clinical Nuclear Medicine is a valued scientific contributor to the molecular imaging community, and FDG PET is considered the backbone...

  11. Nuclear medicine; La medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibille, L. [Hopital Lapeyronie CHU Montpellier, Medecine Nucleaire, 34 - Montpellier (France); Nalda, E.; Collombier, L.; Kotzki, P.O.; Boudousq, V. [CHU de Nimes, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et de biophysique, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2011-05-15

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty using the properties of radioactivity. Radioactive markers associated with vectors are used as a tracer or radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic purposes and/or therapy. Since its birth more than half a century ago, it has become essential in the care of many patients, particularly in oncology. After some definitions, this paper presents the main nuclear techniques - imaging for diagnostic, radiopharmaceuticals as therapeutic agents, intra-operative detection, technique of radioimmunoassay - and the future of this field. (authors)

  12. Radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Geon; Kim, Ja Hae; Song, Ho Chun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Radiation Safety Research Center, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Since the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, radiation safety has become an important issue in nuclear medicine. Many structured guidelines or recommendations of various academic societies or international campaigns demonstrate important issues of radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures. There are ongoing efforts to fulfill the basic principles of radiation protection in daily nuclear medicine practice. This article reviews important principles of radiation protection in nuclear medicine procedures. Useful references, important issues, future perspectives of the optimization of nuclear medicine procedures, and diagnostic reference level are also discussed.

  13. Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun

    2017-03-01

    Since the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, radiation safety has become an important issue in nuclear medicine. Many structured guidelines or recommendations of various academic societies or international campaigns demonstrate important issues of radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures. There are ongoing efforts to fulfill the basic principles of radiation protection in daily nuclear medicine practice. This article reviews important principles of radiation protection in nuclear medicine procedures. Useful references, important issues, future perspectives of the optimization of nuclear medicine procedures, and diagnostic reference level are also discussed.

  14. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapy November 8 is the International Day of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji ...

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine imaging procedures use small amounts of ...

  16. Nuclear medicine at the crossroads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.W. [Stanford Univ. Hospital, Div. of Nuclear Medicine, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Many nuclear medicine procedures, originally developed more than 20 years ago, are now performed with new radiopharmaceuticals or instruments; it is therefore apposite to reappraise what we are doing and why we are doing it. The clinical utility of nuclear medicine is discussed with reference, by way of example, to gated blood pools scans and myocardial perfusion imaging; the importance of the referred population for the outcome of studies is stressed. Attention is drawn to the likelohood that the detection of ischemia would be enhanced by the administration of nitroglycerin prior to rest thallium injection. Emphasis is also placed on the increasing acceptance of dual-tracer studies. The significance of expression of p-glycoprotein by some tumors for sestamibi imaging is discussed, and advances in respect of fluorodeoxyglucose imaging are reviewed. The final section covers issues relating to the development of new procedures, such as the value of nuclear medicine in the detection and characterization of tissue oxygen levels and the possible future role of nuclear medicine in the management of sleeping and eating disorders. (orig.)

  17. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through the area being examined and gives off energy in the form of gamma rays which are detected by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’re scheduled for a nuclear medicine exam, there are several things you can ...

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine imaging procedures use small amounts of ...

  19. Nuclear medicine physics the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    For decades this classic reference has been the book to review to master the complexities of nuclear-medicine physics. Part of the renowned The Basics series of medical physics books, Nuclear Medicine Physics has become an essential resource for radiology residents and practitioners, nuclear cardiologists, medical physicists, and radiologic technologists. This thoroughly revised Seventh Edition retains all the features that have made The Basics series a reliable and trusted partner for board review and reference. This handy manual contains key points at the end of each chapter that help to underscore principal concepts. You'll also find review questions at the end of each chapter—with detailed answers at the end of the book—to help you master the material. This edition includes useful appendices that elaborate on specific topics, such as physical characteristics of radionuclides and CGS and SI Units.

  20. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2013-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of Dr. Gopal B. Saha’s Physics and Radiobiology of Nuclear Medicine was prompted by the need to provide up-to-date information to keep pace with the perpetual growth and improvement in the instrumentation and techniques employed in nuclear medicine since the last edition published in 2006. Like previous editions, the book is intended for radiology and nuclear medicine residents to prepare for the American Board of Nuclear Medicine, American Board of Radiology, and American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine examinations, all of which require a strong physics background. Additionally, the book will serve as a textbook on nuclear medicine physics for nuclear medicine technologists taking the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board examination.

  1. A concise guide to nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important component of modern medicine. This easy-to-use book is designed to acquaint readers with the basic principles of nuclear medicine, the instrumentation used, the gamut of procedures available, and the basis for selecting specific diagnostic or therapeutic procedures and interpreting results. After an introductory chapter on the history, technical basis, and scope of nuclear medicine, a series of chapters are devoted to the application of nuclear medicine techniques in the different body systems. In addition, the use of nuclear medicine methods within oncology is

  2. Essentials of nuclear medicine physics and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Powsner, Rachel A; Powsner, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    An excellent introduction to the basic concepts of nuclear medicine physics This Third Edition of Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Physics and Instrumentation expands the finely developed illustrated review and introductory guide to nuclear medicine physics and instrumentation. Along with simple, progressive, highly illustrated topics, the authors present nuclear medicine-related physics and engineering concepts clearly and concisely. Included in the text are introductory chapters on relevant atomic structure, methods of radionuclide production, and the interaction of radiation with matter. Fu

  3. Multi-modality molecular imaging for gastric cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Junting; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Fu; Nie, Yongzhan

    2011-12-01

    Because of the ability of integrating the strengths of different modalities and providing fully integrated information, multi-modality molecular imaging techniques provide an excellent solution to detecting and diagnosing earlier cancer, which remains difficult to achieve by using the existing techniques. In this paper, we present an overview of our research efforts on the development of the optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform, including the development of the imaging system, reconstruction algorithms and preclinical biomedical applications. Primary biomedical results show that the developed optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform may provide great potential in the preclinical biomedical applications and future clinical translation.

  4. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Accurate cardiovascular imaging is essential for the successful management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Echocardiography and angiography have been for long time the most important imaging modalities in pediatric cardiology, but nuclear medicine has contributed in many situations to the comprehension of physiological consequences of CHD, quantifying pulmonary blood flow symmetry or right-to-left shunting. In recent times, remarkable improvements in imaging equipments, particularly in multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have led to the progressive integration of high resolution modalities in the clinical workup of children affected by CHD, reducing the role of diagnostic angiography. Technology has seen a parallel evolution in the field of nuclear medicine, with the advent of hybrid machines, as SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners. Improved detectors, hugely increased computing power, and new reconstruction algorithms allow for a significant reduction of the injected dose, with a parallel relevant decrease in radiation exposure. Nuclear medicine retains its distinctive capability of exploring at the tissue level many functional aspects of CHD in a safe and reproducible way. The lack of invasiveness, the limited need for sedation, the low radiation burden, and the insensitivity to body habitus variations make nuclear medicine an ideal complement of echocardiography. This is particularly true during the follow-up of patients with CHD, whose increasing survival represent a great medical success and a challenge for the health system in the next decades. Metabolic imaging using (18)FDG PET/CT has expanded its role in the management of infection and inflammation in adult patients, particularly in cardiology. The same expansion is observed in pediatric cardiology, with an increasing rate of studies on the use of FDG PET for the evaluation of children with vasculitis, suspected valvular infection or infected prosthetic devices. The

  5. Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems GPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Data were collected during the Multi-Modal Intelligent Transportation Signal Systems (MMITSS) study. MMITSS is a next-generation traffic signal system that seeks to...

  6. Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems Basic Safety Message

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Data were collected during the Multi-Modal Intelligent Transportation Signal Systems (MMITSS) study. MMITSS is a next-generation traffic signal system that seeks to...

  7. Topics of nuclear medicine research in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Okizaki, Atsutaka; Oku, Naohiko

    2017-07-25

    Last year in the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, we introduced some recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan. This was favorably received by European readers in the main. This year we wish to focus on the Annals of Nuclear Medicine on some of the fine nuclear medicine research work executed in Europe recently. In the current review article, we take up five topics: prostate-specific membrane antigen imaging, recent advances in radionuclide therapy, [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (PET) for dementia, quantitative PET assessment of myocardial perfusion, and iodine-124 ((124)I). Just at the most recent annual meeting of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine 2016, Kyoto was selected as the host city for the 2022 Congress of the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology. We hope that our continuous efforts to strengthen scientific cooperation between Europe and Japan will bring many European friends and a great success to the Kyoto meeting.

  8. Diagnostic interventions in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, J.H.; Swanson, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnostic interventions in nuclear medicine may be defined as the coadministration of a nonradioactive drug or application of a physical stimulus or physiologic maneuver to enhance the diagnostic utility of a nuclear medicine test. The rationale for each interventional maneuver follows from the physiology or metabolism of the particular organ or organ system under evaluation. Diagnostic inference is drawn from the pattern of change in the biodistribution of the tracer in response to the intervention-induced change in metabolism or function. In current practice, the most commonly performed interventional maneuvers are aimed at studies of the heart, genitourinary system, hepatobiliary system, and gastrointestinal tract. The single most commonly performed interventional study in the United States is the stress Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scan aimed at the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The stress portion of the study is accomplished with dynamic leg exercise on a treadmill and is aimed at increasing myocardial oxygen demands. Areas of myocardium distal to hemodynamically significant lesions in the coronary arteries become ischemic at peak stress due to the inability of the stenotic vessel to respond to the oxygen demand/blood flow needs of the myocardium. Ischemic areas are readily recognized as photopenic defects on scans obtained immediately after exercise, with normalization upon delayed imaging. Diuresis renography is aimed at the differential diagnosis of hydroureteronephrosis. By challenging the urinary tract collecting structures with an augmented urine flow, dilated, unobstructed systems can be differentiated from systems with significant mechanical obstruction. 137 references.

  9. Nuclear medicine applications for the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartshorne, M.F.; Peters, V.

    1987-04-01

    Although not frequently described in the podiatric literature, nuclear medicine imaging may be of great assistance to the clinical podiatrist. This report reviews in detail the use of modern nuclear medicine approaches to the diagnosis and management of the diabetic foot. Nuclear medicine techniques are helpful in evaluating possible osteomyelitis, in determining appropriate amputation levels, and in predicting response to conservative ulcer management. Specific indications for bone, gallium, and perfusion imaging are described.

  10. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Postsecondary Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    The purpose of this curriculum guide is to assist administrators and instructors in establishing nuclear medicine technician programs that will meet the accreditation standards of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education. The guide has been developed to prepare nuclear medicine technicians (NMT's) in two-year…

  11. Experience with Nuclear Medicine Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Volkan-Salanci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Radiology information system (RIS is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Material and Methods: Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system, radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex© for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. Results: NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. Conclusion: NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. (MIRT 2012;21:97-102

  12. A transformation approach to modelling multi-modal diffusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forman, Julie Lyng; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that flexible and statistically tractable multi-modal diffusion models can be attained by transformation of simple well-known diffusion models such as the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck model, or more generally a Pearson diffusion. The transformed diffusion inherits many properties...

  13. Choice set generation in multi-modal transportation networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiorenzo-Catalano, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-modal transport relates to trips for which travellers use two or more transport modes, for example bicycle and train, train and bus, or private car and metro. The main theme in this dissertation is to establish a choice set generation model and algorithm, and demonstrate its validity and

  14. Utilizing Multi-Modal Literacies in Middle Grades Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurino, Dan; Ogletree, Tamra; Saurino, Penelope

    2010-01-01

    The nature of literacy is changing. Increased student use of computer-mediated, digital, and visual communication spans our understanding of adolescent multi-modal capabilities that reach beyond the traditional conventions of linear speech and written text in the science curriculum. Advancing technology opens doors to learning that involve…

  15. Reference Resolution in Multi-modal Interaction: Position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernando, T.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2002-01-01

    In this position paper we present our research on multimodal interaction in and with virtual environments. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the necessity to spend more research on reference resolution in multimodal contexts. In multi-modal interaction the human conversational partner can

  16. Reference resolution in multi-modal interaction: Preliminary observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González González, G.R.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present our research on multimodal interaction in and with virtual environments. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the necessity to spend more research on reference resolution in multimodal contexts. In multi-modal interaction the human conversational partner can apply

  17. Multi-modal locomotion: from animal to application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, R J; Burgess, S C; Vaidyanathan, R

    2014-03-01

    The majority of robotic vehicles that can be found today are bound to operations within a single media (i.e. land, air or water). This is very rarely the case when considering locomotive capabilities in natural systems. Utility for small robots often reflects the exact same problem domain as small animals, hence providing numerous avenues for biological inspiration. This paper begins to investigate the various modes of locomotion adopted by different genus groups in multiple media as an initial attempt to determine the compromise in ability adopted by the animals when achieving multi-modal locomotion. A review of current biologically inspired multi-modal robots is also presented. The primary aim of this research is to lay the foundation for a generation of vehicles capable of multi-modal locomotion, allowing ambulatory abilities in more than one media, surpassing current capabilities. By identifying and understanding when natural systems use specific locomotion mechanisms, when they opt for disparate mechanisms for each mode of locomotion rather than using a synergized singular mechanism, and how this affects their capability in each medium, similar combinations can be used as inspiration for future multi-modal biologically inspired robotic platforms.

  18. Reference resolution in multi-modal interaction: Preliminary observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, A.; González González, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present our research on multimodal interaction in and with virtual environments. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the necessity to spend more research on reference resolution in multimodal contexts. In multi-modal interaction the human conversational partner can apply mo

  19. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2010-01-01

    From a distinguished author comes this new edition for technologists, practitioners, residents, and students in radiology and nuclear medicine. Encompassing major topics in nuclear medicine from the basic physics of radioactive decay to instrumentation and radiobiology, it is an ideal review for Board and Registry examinations. The material is well organized and written with clarity. The book is supplemented with tables and illustrations throughout. It provides a quick reference book that is concise but comprehensive, and offers a complete discussion of topics for the nuclear medicine and radi

  20. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Rosário; Costa, Gracinda

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine in Portugal has been an autonomous speciality since 1984. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, 5 years of training are necessary. The curriculum is very similar to the one approved under the auspices of the European Union of Medical Specialists, namely concerning the minimum recommended number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. There is a final assessment, and during the training the resident is in an approved continuing education programme. Departments are accredited by the Medical College in order to verify their capacity to host nuclear medicine residencies.

  1. Integrating cardiology for nuclear medicine physicians. A guide to nuclear medicine physicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movahed, Assad [East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States). Section of Cardiology; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Buscombe, John R.; Hall, Margaret [Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology is no longer a medical discipline residing solely in nuclear medicine. This is the first book to recognize this fact by integrating in-depth information from both the clinical cardiology and nuclear cardiology literature, and acknowledging cardiovascular medicine as the fundamental knowledge base needed for the practice of nuclear cardiology. The book is designed to increase the practitioner's knowledge of cardiovascular medicine, thereby enhancing the quality of interpretations through improved accuracy and clinical relevance.The text is divided into four sections covering all major topics in cardiology and nuclear cardiology: -Basic Sciences and Cardiovascular Diseases; -Conventional Diagnostic Modalities; -Nuclear Cardiology; -Management of Cardiovascular Diseases. (orig.)

  2. Rare earth elements in nuclear medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kodina G.E.; Kulakov V.N.; Sheino I.N.

    2014-01-01

    The review focuses on the key applications of stable and radioactive isotopes of rare earth elements in the technology of nuclear medicine, radionuclide diagnostics and therapy, as well as magnetic resonance imaging and binary radiotherapy technologies.

  3. Rare earth elements in nuclear medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodina G.E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The review focuses on the key applications of stable and radioactive isotopes of rare earth elements in the technology of nuclear medicine, radionuclide diagnostics and therapy, as well as magnetic resonance imaging and binary radiotherapy technologies.

  4. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Zehra [Ege University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey); Bozkurt, M. Fani; Erbas, Belkis [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Durak, Hatice [Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey)

    2017-05-15

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear medicine therapy principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aktolun, Cumali

    2012-01-01

    This book reviews nuclear medicine techniques and technology for therapy of malignant and benign diseases, covering scientific principles and clinical applications, and trials of experimental agents for treating tumors involving virtually every organ system.

  6. An overview of nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Peter; Lawson, Richard

    2015-11-25

    Nuclear medicine imaging is not generally well understood by nurses who work outside this area. Consequently, nurses can find themselves unable to answer patients' questions about nuclear medicine imaging procedures or give them proper information before they attend for a test. This article aims to explain what is involved in some common diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging procedures so that nurses are able to discuss this with patients. It also addresses some common issues about radiation protection that nurses might encounter in their usual working routine. The article includes links to videos showing some typical nuclear medicine imaging procedures from a patient's point of view and links to an e-Learning for Healthcare online resource that provides detailed information for nurses.

  7. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M Fani; Erbas, Belkıs; Durak, Hatice

    2017-01-31

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before.

  8. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which ac...

  9. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which ac...

  10. Trends in nuclear medicine in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Kashyap, Ravi; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas; Zaknun, John; Bastos, Fernando Mut; Pynda, Yaroslav

    2011-12-01

    This article describes trends in nuclear medicine in the developing world as noted by nuclear medicine professionals at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The trends identified are based on data gathered from several sources, including information gathered through a database maintained by the IAEA; evaluation of country program frameworks of various IAEA Member States; personal interactions with representatives in the nuclear medicine field from different regions of the world; official proceedings and meeting reports of the IAEA; participation in numerous national, regional, and international conferences; discussions with the leadership of major professional societies; and relevant literature. The information presented in this article relied on both objective and subjective observations. The aims of this article were to reflect on recent developments in the specialty of nuclear medicine and to envision the directions in which it is progressing. These issues are examined in terms of dimensions of practice, growth, and educational and training needs in the field of nuclear medicine. This article will enable readers to gain perspective on the status of nuclear medicine practice, with a specific focus on the developing world, and to examine needs and trends arising from the observations.

  11. Nuclear medicine consensus; Consenso sobre medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Edwaldo E.; Marin Neto, Jose Antonio; Naccarato, Alberto F.P.; Ramires, Jose Antonio F.; Castro, Iran de; Paiva, Eleuses Vieira; Thom, Anneliese F.; Barroso, Adelanir; Blum, Bernardo; Hollanda, Ricardo; Mansur, Antonio de Padua

    1995-04-01

    The use of nuclear methods in cardiovascular diseases is studied concerning diagnosis, risk, prognosis, indications and accuracy. Aspects concerning chronic coronary artery disease, myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, viable myocardium, valvular heart disease, ventricular dysfunction, heart transplant, congenital heart diseases in adults, are discussed.

  12. Multi-modal image registration using structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiri, Keyvan; Clausi, David A; Fieguth, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modal image registration has been a challenging task in medical images because of the complex intensity relationship between images to be aligned. Registration methods often rely on the statistical intensity relationship between the images which suffers from problems such as statistical insufficiency. The proposed registration method works based on extracting structural features by utilizing the complex phase and gradient-based information. By employing structural relationships between different modalities instead of complex similarity measures, the multi-modal registration problem is converted into a mono-modal one. Therefore, conventional mono-modal similarity measures can be utilized to evaluate the registration results. This new registration paradigm has been tested on magnetic resonance (MR) brain images of different modes. The method has been evaluated based on target registration error (TRE) to determine alignment accuracy. Quantitative results demonstrate that the proposed method is capable of achieving comparable registration accuracy compared to the conventional mutual information.

  13. MINERVA - A Multi-Modal Radiation Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Wessol; C. A. Wemple; D. W. Nigg; J. J. Cogliati; M. L. Milvich; C. Frederickson; M. Perkins; G. A. Harkin

    2004-10-01

    Recently, research efforts have begun to examine the combination of BNCT with external beam photon radiotherapy (Barth et al. 2004). In order to properly prepare treatment plans for patients being treated with combinations of radiation modalities, appropriate planning tools must be available. To facilitiate this, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)and Montana State University (MSU) have undertaken development of a fully multi-modal radiation treatment planning system.

  14. A Training Manual for Nuclear Medicine Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Guy H.; Alexander, George W.

    This manual was prepared for a training program in Nuclear Medicine Technology at the University of Cincinnati. Instructional materials for students enrolled in these courses in the training program include: Nuclear Physics and Instrumentation, Radionuclide Measurements, Radiation Protection, and Tracer Methodology and Radiopharmaceuticals. (CS)

  15. MULTI MODAL ONTOLOGY SEARCH FOR SEMANTIC IMAGE RETRIEVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Minu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this world of fast computing, automation plays an important role. In image retrieval technique automation is a great quest. Giving an image as a query and retrieving relevant images is a challenging research area. In this paper we are proposing a research of using Multi-Modality Ontology integration for image retrieval concept. The core strategy in multimodal information retrieval is the combination or fusion of different data modalities to expand and complement information. Here we use both visual and textual ontology contents to provide search functionalities. Both images and texts are complimentary information units as the human perspective will be different. So, the computational linguistic of images will lead to disambiguate text meaning when it is not quite clear in right sense of several words. That’s why the Multi-Modal information retrieval may lead to an improved operation of information retrieval system. If we go for automation we are in need of a fuzzy technique to predicate the result. So in this paper we using Support Vector Machine classifier to classify the image automatically by using the general feature such as color, texture and texton of an image , then by using this result we can create both feature and domain ontology for an particular image. Using this Multi-Modality Ontology we can refine our image searching system.

  16. Multi-modal imaging and cancer therapy using lanthanide oxide nanoparticles: current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J Y; Chang, Y; Lee, G H

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is an essential tool for diagnosis and therapy of diseases such as cancers. It is likely true that medicine has developed with biomedical imaging methods. Sensitivity and resolution of biomedical imaging methods can be improved with imaging agents. Furthermore, it will be ideal if imaging agents could be also used as therapeutic agents. Therefore, one dose can be used for both diagnosis and therapy of diseases (i.e., theragnosis). This will simplify medical treatment of diseases, and will be also a benefit to patients. Mixed (Ln(1x)Ln(2y)O3, x + y = 2) or unmixed (Ln2O3) lanthanide (Ln) oxide nanoparticles (Ln = Eu, Gd, Dy, Tb, Ho, Er) are potential multi-modal imaging and cancer therapeutic agents. The lanthanides have a variety of magnetic and optical properties, useful for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescent imaging (FI), respectively. They also highly attenuate X-ray beam, useful for X-ray computed tomography (CT). In addition gadolinium-157 ((157)Gd) has the highest thermal neutron capture cross section among stable radionuclides, useful for gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT). Therefore, mixed or unmixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles can be used for multi-modal imaging methods (i.e., MRI-FI, MRI-CT, CT-FI, and MRICT- FI) and cancer therapy (i.e., GdNCT). Since mixed or unmixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles are single-phase and solid-state, they can be easily synthesized, and are compact and robust, which will be beneficial to biomedical applications. In this review physical properties of the lanthanides, synthesis, characterizations, multi-modal imagings, and cancer therapy of mixed and unmixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles are discussed.

  17. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medicine offers the potential to identify disease in its earliest stage, often before symptoms occur or before ... from taking certain medications before the exam. Also, it’s best to leave any jewelry at home and ...

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medicine offers the potential to identify disease in its earliest stage, often before symptoms occur or before ... from taking certain medications before the exam. Also, it’s best to leave any jewelry at home and ...

  19. Radionuclides for nuclear medicine: a nuclear physicists' view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantone, M.; Haddad, F.; Harissopoulos, S.

    2013-01-01

    NuPECC (the Nuclear Physics European Collaboration Committee, an expert committee of the European Science Foundation) has the mission to strengthen European Collaboration in nuclear science through the promotion of nuclear physics and its trans-disciplinary use and application. NuPECC is currently...... working on a report on “Nuclear Physics for Medicine” and has set up a working group to review the present status and prospects of radionuclides for nuclear medicine. An interim report will be presented to seek comments and constructive input from EANM members. In particular it is investigated how nuclear...... physics Methods and nuclear physics facilities are supporting the development and supply of medical radionuclides and how this support could be further strengthened in future. Aspects that will be addressed: •In recent years, the reactor-based supply chain of 99Mo/99mTc generators was repeatedly...

  20. Visual tracking for multi-modality computer-assisted image guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basafa, Ehsan; Foroughi, Pezhman; Hossbach, Martin; Bhanushali, Jasmine; Stolka, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    With optical cameras, many interventional navigation tasks previously relying on EM, optical, or mechanical guidance can be performed robustly, quickly, and conveniently. We developed a family of novel guidance systems based on wide-spectrum cameras and vision algorithms for real-time tracking of interventional instruments and multi-modality markers. These navigation systems support the localization of anatomical targets, support placement of imaging probe and instruments, and provide fusion imaging. The unique architecture - low-cost, miniature, in-hand stereo vision cameras fitted directly to imaging probes - allows for an intuitive workflow that fits a wide variety of specialties such as anesthesiology, interventional radiology, interventional oncology, emergency medicine, urology, and others, many of which see increasing pressure to utilize medical imaging and especially ultrasound, but have yet to develop the requisite skills for reliable success. We developed a modular system, consisting of hardware (the Optical Head containing the mini cameras) and software (components for visual instrument tracking with or without specialized visual features, fully automated marker segmentation from a variety of 3D imaging modalities, visual observation of meshes of widely separated markers, instant automatic registration, and target tracking and guidance on real-time multi-modality fusion views). From these components, we implemented a family of distinct clinical and pre-clinical systems (for combinations of ultrasound, CT, CBCT, and MRI), most of which have international regulatory clearance for clinical use. We present technical and clinical results on phantoms, ex- and in-vivo animals, and patients.

  1. Introduction of nuclear medicine research in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Higashi, Tatsuya; Kuji, Ichiei; Sakamoto, Setsu; Tashiro, Manabu; Momose, Mitsuru

    2016-12-01

    There were many interesting presentations of unique studies at the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, although there were fewer attendees from Europe than expected. These presentations included research on diseases that are more frequent in Japan and Asia than in Europe, synthesis of original radiopharmaceuticals, and development of imaging devices and methods with novel ideas especially by Japanese manufacturers. In this review, we introduce recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan in the five categories of Oncology, Neurology, Cardiology, Radiopharmaceuticals and Technology. It is our hope that this article will encourage the participation of researchers from all over the world, in particular from Europe, in scientific meetings on nuclear medicine held in Japan.

  2. Role of nuclear medicine in melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-11-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumour of the melanocytes presenting characteristic metabolic and biological features, which remains a difficult and important issue in oncology. As a functional modality, nuclear medicine offers a variety of possibilities to assist in the clinical management of this disease. A brief survey of currently available techniques is presented for the diagnosis, staging and follow up, either by organ imaging or by using a great spectrum of tumour-seeking radiopharmaceuticals. The role of lymphoscintigraphy in melanoma is emphasized, as well as the supportive role of nuclear medicine in the surgical theater, enabling selective lymph node dissection by the sentinel node procedure and high dose regional chemotherapy by isolated limb perfusion. Although hardly used for metastatic melanoma so far, with all its tumour-seeking approaches nuclear medicine holds a therapeutic potential for this disease as well. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 47 refs.

  3. Applications of nuclear medicine in genitourinary imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaufox, M.D.; Kalika, V.; Scharf, S.; Milstein, D.

    1982-01-01

    Major advances in nuclear medicine instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals for renal studies have occurred during the last decade. Current nuclear medicine methodology can be applied for accurate evaluation of renal function and for renal imaging in a wide variety of clinical situations. Total renal function can be estimated from the plasma clearance of agents excreted by glomerular filtration or tubular secretion, and individual function can be estimated by imaging combined with renography. A major area of radionuclide application is in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy. The introduction of diuretic renography and the use of computer-generated regions of interest offer the clinician added useful data which may aid in diagnosis and management. Imaging is of proven value also in trauma, renovascular hypertension, and acute and chronic renal failure. Methods for the evaluation of residual urine, vesicoureteral reflux, and testicular torsion have achieved increasing clinical use. These many procedures assure a meaningful and useful role for the application of nuclear medicine in genitourinary imaging.

  4. Introduction of nuclear medicine research in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inubushi, Masayuki [Kawasaki Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya [National Institutes of Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Chiba (Japan); Kuji, Ichiei [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hidaka-shi, Saitama (Japan); Sakamoto, Setsu [Dokkyo University School of Medicine, PET Center, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Division of Cyclotron Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Momose, Mitsuru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    There were many interesting presentations of unique studies at the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, although there were fewer attendees from Europe than expected. These presentations included research on diseases that are more frequent in Japan and Asia than in Europe, synthesis of original radiopharmaceuticals, and development of imaging devices and methods with novel ideas especially by Japanese manufacturers. In this review, we introduce recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan in the five categories of Oncology, Neurology, Cardiology, Radiopharmaceuticals and Technology. It is our hope that this article will encourage the participation of researchers from all over the world, in particular from Europe, in scientific meetings on nuclear medicine held in Japan. (orig.)

  5. Dose Estimation in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Goodkind, Alison B; Plyku, Donika; Khamwan, Kitiwat; O'Reilly, Shannon E; Cao, Xinhua; Frey, Eric C; Li, Ye; Bolch, Wesley E; Sgouros, George; Treves, S Ted

    2017-03-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in children is well established for imaging practically all physiologic systems but particularly in the fields of oncology, neurology, urology, and orthopedics. Pediatric nuclear medicine yields images of physiologic and molecular processes that can provide essential diagnostic information to the clinician. However, nuclear medicine involves the administration of radiopharmaceuticals that expose the patient to ionizing radiation and children are thought to be at a higher risk for adverse effects from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore it may be considered prudent to take extra care to optimize the radiation dose associated with pediatric nuclear medicine. This requires a solid understanding of the dosimetry associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children. Models for estimating the internal radiation dose from radiopharmaceuticals have been developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging and other groups. But to use these models accurately in children, better pharmacokinetic data for the radiopharmaceuticals and anatomical models specifically for children need to be developed. The use of CT in the context of hybrid imaging has also increased significantly in the past 15 years, and thus CT dosimetry as it applies to children needs to be better understood. The concept of effective dose has been used to compare different practices involving radiation on a dosimetric level, but this approach may not be appropriate when applied to a population of children of different ages as the radiosensitivity weights utilized in the calculation of effective dose are not specific to children and may vary as a function of age on an organ-by-organ bias. As these gaps in knowledge of dosimetry and radiation risk as they apply to children are filled, more accurate models can be developed that allow for better approaches to dose optimization. In turn, this

  6. Multi-modality image registration using the decomposition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mazlinda; Chen, Ke

    2017-04-01

    In medical image analysis, image registration is one of the crucial steps required to facilitate automatic segmentation, treatment planning and other application involving imaging machines. Image registration, also known as image matching, aims to align two or more images so that information obtained can be compared and combined. Different imaging modalities and their characteristics make the task more challenging. We propose a decomposition model combining parametric and non-parametric deformation for multi-modality image registration. Numerical results show that the normalised gradient field perform better than the mutual information with the decomposition model.

  7. Coercive Region-level Registration for Multi-modal Images

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Newstadt, Gregory; Simmons, Jeffrey; hero, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    We propose a coercive approach to simultaneously register and segment multi-modal images which share similar spatial structure. Registration is done at the region level to facilitate data fusion while avoiding the need for interpolation. The algorithm performs alternating minimization of an objective function informed by statistical models for pixel values in different modalities. Hypothesis tests are developed to determine whether to refine segmentations by splitting regions. We demonstrate that our approach has significantly better performance than the state-of-the-art registration and segmentation methods on microscopy images.

  8. Multi-modal intervention improved oral intake in hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, M; Beermann, T; Mortensen, M N

    2015-01-01

    : A 12-months observational multi-modal intervention study was done, using the top-down and bottom-up principle. All hospitalized patients (>3 days) were included. Setting: A university hospital with 758 beds and all specialities. Measurements: Record audit of GNP, energy- and protein-intake by 24-h......BACKGROUND: Good nutritional practice (GNP) includes screening, nutrition plan and monitoring, and is mandatory for targeted treatment of malnourished patients in hospital. AIMS: To optimize energy- and protein-intake in patients at nutritional risk and to improve GNP in a hospital setting. METHODS...

  9. Rationale for the combination of nuclear medicine with magnetic resonance for pre-clinical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J; Kapusta, Maciej; Li, Junqiang; Patt, Bradley E

    2006-08-01

    Multi-modality combinations of SPECT/CT and PET/CT have proven to be highly successful in the clinic and small animal SPECT/CT and PET/CT are becoming the norm in the research and drug development setting. However, the use of ionizing radiation from a high-resolution CT scanner is undesirable in any setting and particularly in small animal imaging (SAI), in laboratory experiments where it can result in radiation doses of sufficient magnitude that the experimental results can be influenced by the organism's response to radiation. The alternative use of magnetic resonance (MR) would offer a high-resolution, non-ionizing method for anatomical imaging of laboratory animals. MR brings considerably more than its 3D anatomical capability, especially regarding the imaging of laboratory animals. Dynamic MR imaging techniques can facilitate studies of perfusion, oxygenation, and diffusion amongst others. Further, MR spectroscopy can provide images that can be related to the concentration of endogenous molecules in vivo. MR imaging of injected contrast agents extends MR into the domain of molecular imaging. In combination with nuclear medicine (NM) SPECT and PET modalities in small animal imaging, MR would facilitate studies of dynamic processes such as biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. However, the detectors for nearly all PET and SPECT systems are still based on vacuum tube technology, namely: photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) in which the signal is generated by transporting electrons over a substantial distance within an evacuated glass tube, making them inoperable in even small magnetic fields. Thus the combination of SPECT or PET with MR has not been practical until the recent availability of semiconductor detectors such as silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD's) for PET and CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for SPECT coupled with the availability of high-density low noise ASIC electronics to read out the semiconductor detectors. The strong advantage of these

  10. Feature-based Alignment of Volumetric Multi-modal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Matthew; Zöllei, Lilla; Wells, William M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for aligning image volumes acquired from different imaging modalities (e.g. MR, CT) based on 3D scale-invariant image features. A novel method for encoding invariant feature geometry and appearance is developed, based on the assumption of locally linear intensity relationships, providing a solution to poor repeatability of feature detection in different image modalities. The encoding method is incorporated into a probabilistic feature-based model for multi-modal image alignment. The model parameters are estimated via a group-wise alignment algorithm, that iteratively alternates between estimating a feature-based model from feature data, then realigning feature data to the model, converging to a stable alignment solution with few pre-processing or pre-alignment requirements. The resulting model can be used to align multi-modal image data with the benefits of invariant feature correspondence: globally optimal solutions, high efficiency and low memory usage. The method is tested on the difficult RIRE data set of CT, T1, T2, PD and MP-RAGE brain images of subjects exhibiting significant inter-subject variability due to pathology. PMID:24683955

  11. A multi-modal parcellation of human cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Matthew F; Coalson, Timothy S; Robinson, Emma C; Hacker, Carl D; Harwell, John; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Andersson, Jesper; Beckmann, Christian F; Jenkinson, Mark; Smith, Stephen M; Van Essen, David C

    2016-08-11

    Understanding the amazingly complex human cerebral cortex requires a map (or parcellation) of its major subdivisions, known as cortical areas. Making an accurate areal map has been a century-old objective in neuroscience. Using multi-modal magnetic resonance images from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) and an objective semi-automated neuroanatomical approach, we delineated 180 areas per hemisphere bounded by sharp changes in cortical architecture, function, connectivity, and/or topography in a precisely aligned group average of 210 healthy young adults. We characterized 97 new areas and 83 areas previously reported using post-mortem microscopy or other specialized study-specific approaches. To enable automated delineation and identification of these areas in new HCP subjects and in future studies, we trained a machine-learning classifier to recognize the multi-modal 'fingerprint' of each cortical area. This classifier detected the presence of 96.6% of the cortical areas in new subjects, replicated the group parcellation, and could correctly locate areas in individuals with atypical parcellations. The freely available parcellation and classifier will enable substantially improved neuroanatomical precision for studies of the structural and functional organization of human cerebral cortex and its variation across individuals and in development, aging, and disease.

  12. MINERVA - a multi-modal radiation treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemple, C.A. E-mail: cew@enel.gov; Wessol, D.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Cogliati, J.J.; Milvich, M.L.; Frederickson, C.; Perkins, M.; Harkin, G.J

    2004-11-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Montana State University have undertaken development of MINERVA, a patient-centric, multi-modal, radiation treatment planning system. This system can be used for planning and analyzing several radiotherapy modalities, either singly or combined, using common modality independent image and geometry construction and dose reporting and guiding. It employs an integrated, lightweight plugin architecture to accommodate multi-modal treatment planning using standard interface components. The MINERVA design also facilitates the future integration of improved planning technologies. The code is being developed with the Java Virtual Machine for interoperability. A full computation path has been established for molecular targeted radiotherapy treatment planning, with the associated transport plugin developed by researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Development of the neutron transport plugin module is proceeding rapidly, with completion expected later this year. Future development efforts will include development of deformable registration methods, improved segmentation methods for patient model definition, and three-dimensional visualization of the patient images, geometry, and dose data. Transport and source plugins will be created for additional treatment modalities, including brachytherapy, external beam proton radiotherapy, and the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc codes for external beam photon and electron radiotherapy.

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET i

  14. Neuroimaging in nuclear medicine: drug addicted brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong-An; Kim, Dae-Jin [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Addiction to illicit drugs in one of today's most important social issues. Most addictive drugs lead to irreversible parenchymal changes in the human brain. Neuroimaging data bring to light the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the abused drugs, and demonstrate that addiction is a disease of the brain. Continuous researches better illustrate the neurochemical alterations in brain function, and attempt to discover the links to consequent behavioral changes. Newer hypotheses and theories follow the numerous results, and more rational methods of approaching therapy are being developed. Substance abuse is on the rise in Korea, and social interest in the matter as well. On the other hand, diagnosis and treatment of drug addiction is still very difficult, because how the abused substance acts in the brain, or how it leads to behavioral problems in not widely known. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of drug addiction can improve the process of diagnosing addict patients, planning therapy, and predicting the prognosis . Neuroimaging approaches by nuclear medicine methods are expected to objectively judge behavioral and neurochemical changes, and response to treatment. In addition, as genes associated with addictive behavior are discovered, functional nuclear medicine images will aid in the assessment of individuals. Reviewing published literature on neuroimaging regarding nuclear medicine is expected to be of assistance to the management of drug addict patients. What's more, means of applying nuclear medicine to the care of drug addict patients should be investigated further.

  15. Collaborative environment for nuclear medicine training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, Claudia Regio; Dalpiaz, Gabriel Goulart; Giraffa, Lucia Maria, E-mail: claudinharb@gmail.co [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Silva, Ana Maria Marques da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Silva Junior, Neivo da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (HSL-PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Hospital Sao Lucas; Ferreto, Tiago Coelho; Rose, Cesar Augusto Fonticielha de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Informatica; Silva, Vinicius Duval da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (FAMED/PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Medicina. Dept. de Patologia e Radiacoes

    2011-05-15

    Objective: To validate the proposal for development of a virtual collaborative environment for training of nuclear medicine personnel. Materials and Methods: Organizational assumptions, constraints and functionalities that should be offered to the professionals in this field were raised early in the development of the environment. The prototype was developed in the Moodle environment, including data storage and interaction functionalities. A pilot interaction study was developed with a sample of specialists in nuclear medicine. Users' opinions collected by means of semi-structured questionnaire were submitted to quantitative and content analysis. Results: The proposal of a collaborative environment was validated by a learning courses of nuclear medicine professionals and considered as an aid in the training in this field. Suggestions for improvements and new functionalities were made. There is a need to establish a program for education of moderators specifically for this environment, considering the different interaction characteristics as the online and conventional teaching methods are compared. Conclusion: The collaborative environment will allow the exchange of experiences and case discussions among professionals from institutions located in different regions all over the country, enhancing the collaboration among them. Thus, the environment can contribute in the early and continued education of nuclear medicine professionals. (author)

  16. A nuclear chocolate box: the periodic table of nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Philip J

    2015-03-21

    Radioisotopes of elements from all parts of the periodic table find both clinical and research applications in radionuclide molecular imaging and therapy (nuclear medicine). This article provides an overview of these applications in relation to both the radiological properties of the radionuclides and the chemical properties of the elements, indicating past successes, current applications and future opportunities and challenges for inorganic chemistry.

  17. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases. As effort has, therefore, been made to place the reviews provided in this book in a broader context. The effort to do this is reflected by the inclusion of introductory chapters that address basic principles of nuclear medicine imaging, followed by overview of issues that are closely related to quantitative nuclear imaging and its potential role in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. ...

  18. The importance of HIFAR to nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, N.R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Since its official opening on 26 January 1960, the HIFAR research reactor operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) at Lucas Heights near Sydney has been used to support an expanding nuclear medicine market. HIFAR has characteristics which make it very suitable for this role and the effect has been to make ANSTO the dominant supplier of reactor-based radiopharmaceuticals in Australia and a significant exporter. While HIFAR has capacity to support limited increased production, its future requires government decisions. The author concluded that the absence of an operational research reactor in Australia and the lack of another local source of neutrons could directly affect the practice of nuclear medicine in the country and the level of presently increasing exports. 1 fig.

  19. Assessment of a multi-modal intervention for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, H G; Barbosa Ventura, A; Castaño-Romero, F; Sauchelli, F D; Prolo Acosta, A; Rodríguez Alcázar, F J; Vicente Sánchez, A; Ruiz Antúnez, E; Marcos, M; Laso, J

    2016-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent an important healthcare burden. To assess the effectiveness of an evidence-based multi-modal, multi-disciplinary intervention intended to improve outcomes by reducing the use of urinary catheters (UCs) and minimizing the incidence of CAUTIs in the internal medicine department of a university hospital. A multi-modal intervention was developed, including training sessions, urinary catheterization reminders, surveillance systems, and mechanisms for staff feedback of results. The frequency of UC use and incidence of CAUTIs were recorded in three-month periods before (P1) and during the intervention (P2). The catheterization rate decreased significantly during P2 [27.8% vs 16.9%; relative risk (RR): 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57-0.65]. We also observed a reduction in CAUTI risk (18.3 vs 9.8%; RR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.30-0.93), a reduction in the CAUTI rate per 1000 patient-days [5.5 vs 2.8; incidence ratio (IR): 0.52; 95% CI: 0.28-0.94], and a non-significant decrease in the CAUTI rate per 1000 catheter-days (19.3 vs 16.9; IR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.46-1.55). The multi-modal intervention was effective in reducing the catheterization rate and the frequency of CAUTIs. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

    1989-01-01

    Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

  1. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  2. Converting Energy to Medical Progress [Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  3. Multi-modal cockpit interface for improved airport surface operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Jarvis J. (Inventor); Bailey, Randall E. (Inventor); Prinzel, III, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Kramer, Lynda J. (Inventor); Williams, Steven P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for multi-modal cockpit interface during surface operation of an aircraft comprises a head tracking device, a processing element, and a full-color head worn display. The processing element is configured to receive head position information from the head tracking device, to receive current location information of the aircraft, and to render a virtual airport scene corresponding to the head position information and the current aircraft location. The full-color head worn display is configured to receive the virtual airport scene from the processing element and to display the virtual airport scene. The current location information may be received from one of a global positioning system or an inertial navigation system.

  4. Exploring Multi-Modal Distributions with Nested Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Feroz, F

    2013-01-01

    In performing a Bayesian analysis, two difficult problems often emerge. First, in estimating the parameters of some model for the data, the resulting posterior distribution may be multi-modal or exhibit pronounced (curving) degeneracies. Secondly, in selecting between a set of competing models, calculation of the Bayesian evidence for each model is computationally expensive using existing methods such as thermodynamic integration. Nested Sampling is a Monte Carlo method targeted at the efficient calculation of the evidence, but also produces posterior inferences as a by-product and therefore provides means to carry out parameter estimation as well as model selection. The main challenge in implementing Nested Sampling is to sample from a constrained probability distribution. One possible solution to this problem is provided by the Galilean Monte Carlo (GMC) algorithm. We show results of applying Nested Sampling with GMC to some problems which have proven very difficult for standard Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MC...

  5. Discovering Knowledge from Multi-modal Lecture Recordings

    CERN Document Server

    Kannan, Rajkumar

    2010-01-01

    Educational media mining is the process of converting raw media data from educational systems to useful information that can be used to design learning systems, answer research questions and allow personalized learning experiences. Knowledge discovery encompasses a wide range of techniques ranging from database queries to more recent developments in machine learning and language technology. Educational media mining techniques are now being used in IT Services research worldwide. Multi-modal Lecture Recordings is one of the important types of educational media and this paper explores the research challenges for mining lecture recordings for the efficient personalized learning experiences. Keywords: Educational Media Mining; Lecture Recordings, Multimodal Information System, Personalized Learning; Online Course Ware; Skills and Competences;

  6. Game of Objects: vicarious causation and multi-modal media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Pedinotti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies philosopher Graham Harman's object-oriented theory of "vicarious causation" to an analysis of the multi-modal media phenomenon known as "Game of Thrones." Examining the manner in which George R.R. Martin's best-selling series of fantasy novels has been adapted into a board game, a video game, and a hit HBO television series, it uses the changes entailed by these processes to trace the contours of vicariously generative relations. In the course of the resulting analysis, it provides new suggestions concerning the eidetic dimensions of Harman's causal model, particularly with regard to causation in linear networks and in differing types of game systems.

  7. A multi-modal approach to perceptual tone mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicent Caselles

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an improvement of TSTM, a recently proposed tone mapping operator for High Dynamic Range (HDR images, based on a multi-modal analysis. One of the key features of TSTM is a suitable implementation of the Naka-Rushton equation that mimics the visual adaptation performed by the human visual system coherently with Weber-Fechner's law of contrast perception. In the present paper we use the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM in order to detect the modes of the log-scale luminance histogram of a given HDR image and then we use the information provided by GMM to properly devise a Naka-Rushton equation for each mode. Finally, we properly select the parameters in order to merge those equations into a continuous function. Tests and comparisons to show how this new method is capable of improving the performances of TSTM are provided and commented, as well as comparisons with state of the art methods.

  8. Wearable Brain Imaging with Multi-Modal Physiological Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangman, Gary E; Ivkovic, Vladimir; Zhang, Quan

    2017-07-13

    The brain is a central component of cognitive and physical human performance. Measures including functional brain activation, cerebral perfusion, cerebral oxygenation, evoked electrical responses, and resting hemodynamic and electrical activity are all related to, or can predict health status or performance decrements. However, measuring brain physiology typically requires large, stationary machines that are not suitable for mobile or self-monitoring. Moreover, when individuals are ambulatory, systemic physiological fluctuations-e.g., in heart rate, blood pressure, skin perfusion and more-can interfere with non-invasive brain measurements. In efforts to address the physiological monitoring and performance assessment needs for astronauts during spaceflight, we have developed easy-to-use, wearable prototypes- NINscan, for near-infrared scanning-that can collect synchronized multi-modal physiology data, including hemodynamic deep-tissue imaging (including brain and muscles), electroencephalography, electrocardiography, electromyography, electrooculography, accelerometry, gyroscopy, pressure, respiration and temperature measurements. Given their self-contained and portable nature, these devices can be deployed in a much broader range of settings-including austere environments-thereby enabling a wider range of novel medical and research physiology applications. We review these, including high-altitude assessments, self-deployable multi-modal e.g., (polysomnographic) recordings in remote or low-resource environments, fluid shifts in variable-gravity or spaceflight analog environments, intra-cranial brain motion during high-impact sports, and long-duration monitoring for clinical symptom-capture in various clinical conditions. In addition to further enhancing sensitivity and miniaturization, advanced computational algorithms could help support real-time feedback and alerts regarding performance and health. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  9. Multi-modal myocontrol: Testing combined force- and electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Markus; Eiband, Thomas; Castellini, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    Myocontrol, that is control of prostheses using bodily signals, has proved in the decades to be a surprisingly hard problem for the scientific community of assistive and rehabilitation robotics. In particular, traditional surface electromyography (sEMG) seems to be no longer enough to guarantee dexterity (i.e., control over several degrees of freedom) and, most importantly, reliability. Multi-modal myocontrol is concerned with the idea of using novel signal gathering techniques as a replacement of, or alongside, sEMG, to provide high-density and diverse signals to improve dexterity and make the control more reliable. In this paper we present an offline and online assessment of multi-modal sEMG and force myography (FMG) targeted at hand and wrist myocontrol. A total number of twenty sEMG and FMG sensors were used simultaneously, in several combined configurations, to predict opening/closing of the hand and activation of two degrees of freedom of the wrist of ten intact subjects. The analysis was targeted at determining the optimal sensor combination and control parameters; the experimental results indicate that sEMG sensors alone perform worst, yielding a nRMSE of 9.1%, while mixing FMG and sEMG or using FMG only reduces the nRMSE to 5.2-6.6%. To validate these results, we engaged the subject with median performance in an online goal-reaching task. Analysis of this further experiment reveals that the online behaviour is similar to the offline one.

  10. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, J.J.; Gurney, J.; McClain, W.J. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    The Directory of Computer Users in Nuclear Medicine consists primarily of detailed descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical Installation Description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution and the names of persons within the institution who can be contacted for further information. If the department has access to a central computer facility for data analysis or timesharing, the type of equipment available and the method of access to that central computer is included. The dedicated data processing equipment used by the department in its nuclear medicine studies is described, including the peripherals, languages used, modes of data collection, and other pertinent information. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the types of studies for which the data processing equipment is used, including the language(s) used, the method of output, and an estimate of the frequency of the particular study. An Installation Index and an Organ Studies Index are also included. (PCS)

  11. Basic science of nuclear medicine the bare bone essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kai H

    2015-01-01

    Through concise, straightforward explanations and supporting graphics that bring abstract concepts to life, the new Basic Science of Nuclear Medicine—the Bare Bone Essentials is an ideal tool for nuclear medicine technologist students and nuclear cardiology fellows looking for an introduction to the fundamentals of the physics and technologies of modern day nuclear medicine.

  12. Development of Convergence Nanoparticles for Multi-Modal Bio-Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-18

    Multi-Modal Bio- Medical Imaging Key researchers: Jinwoo Cheon Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University Address: 134 Shinchon...01-02-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Convergence Nanoparticles for Multi-Modal Bio- Medical Imaging 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA48690714016

  13. The origin of human multi-modal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Stephen C; Holler, Judith

    2014-09-19

    One reason for the apparent gulf between animal and human communication systems is that the focus has been on the presence or the absence of language as a complex expressive system built on speech. But language normally occurs embedded within an interactional exchange of multi-modal signals. If this larger perspective takes central focus, then it becomes apparent that human communication has a layered structure, where the layers may be plausibly assigned different phylogenetic and evolutionary origins--especially in the light of recent thoughts on the emergence of voluntary breathing and spoken language. This perspective helps us to appreciate the different roles that the different modalities play in human communication, as well as how they function as one integrated system despite their different roles and origins. It also offers possibilities for reconciling the 'gesture-first hypothesis' with that of gesture and speech having evolved together, hand in hand--or hand in mouth, rather--as one system. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Multi-modal vertebrae recognition using Transformed Deep Convolution Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yunliang; Landis, Mark; Laidley, David T; Kornecki, Anat; Lum, Andrea; Li, Shuo

    2016-07-01

    Automatic vertebra recognition, including the identification of vertebra locations and naming in multiple image modalities, are highly demanded in spinal clinical diagnoses where large amount of imaging data from various of modalities are frequently and interchangeably used. However, the recognition is challenging due to the variations of MR/CT appearances or shape/pose of the vertebrae. In this paper, we propose a method for multi-modal vertebra recognition using a novel deep learning architecture called Transformed Deep Convolution Network (TDCN). This new architecture can unsupervisely fuse image features from different modalities and automatically rectify the pose of vertebra. The fusion of MR and CT image features improves the discriminativity of feature representation and enhances the invariance of the vertebra pattern, which allows us to automatically process images from different contrast, resolution, protocols, even with different sizes and orientations. The feature fusion and pose rectification are naturally incorporated in a multi-layer deep learning network. Experiment results show that our method outperforms existing detection methods and provides a fully automatic location+naming+pose recognition for routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi-Modal Inference in Animacy Perception for Artificial Object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohske Takahashi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Sometimes we feel animacy for artificial objects and their motion. Animals usually interact with environments through multiple sensory modalities. Here we investigated how the sensory responsiveness of artificial objects to the environment would contribute to animacy judgment for them. In a 90-s trial, observers freely viewed four objects moving in a virtual 3D space. The objects, whose position and motion were determined following Perlin-noise series, kept drifting independently in the space. Visual flashes, auditory bursts, or synchronous flashes and bursts appeared with 1–2 s intervals. The first object abruptly accelerated their motion just after visual flashes, giving an impression of responding to the flash. The second object responded to bursts. The third object responded to synchronous flashes and bursts. The forth object accelerated at a random timing independent of flashes and bursts. The observers rated how strongly they felt animacy for each object. The results showed that the object responding to the auditory bursts was rated as having weaker animacy compared to the other objects. This implies that sensory modality through which an object interacts with the environment may be a factor for animacy perception in the object and may serve as the basis of multi-modal and cross-modal inference of animacy.

  16. Development of Scintillators in Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak

    2015-01-01

    High-quality image is necessary for accurate diagnosis in nuclear medicine. There are many factors in creating a good image and detector is the most important one. In recent years, several detectors are studied to get a better picture. The aim of this paper is comparison of some type of these detectors such as thallium activated sodium iodide bismuth germinate cesium activated yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG: Ce) YAP: Ce "lutetium aluminum garnet activated by cerium" CRY018 "CRY019" lanthanum bromide and cadmium zinc telluride. We studied different properties of these crystals including density, energy resolution and decay times that are more important factors affecting the image quality.

  17. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresinska, Anna [Institute of Cardiology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Birkenfeld, Bozena [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Szczecin (Poland); Krolicki, Leszek [Warsaw Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Dziuk, Miroslaw [Military Institute of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes

  18. Nuclear medicine applications and their mathematical basis

    CERN Document Server

    Goris, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This book reviews some principal applications of nuclear medicine, specifically from the viewpoint of the mathematical and physical analyses that support the interpretation. In contradistinction to other approaches, the mathematics does not precede the applications in introductory chapters, but is presented in the application chapters with various degrees of granularity. More details on mathematical derivations are illustrated in the last chapter for interested readers. A more detailed review of Bayes theorem can be found (in Chapter 7) explaining how the literature results were retabulated

  19. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-10-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  20. Nuclear Medicine at Charles Sturt University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, H. [Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW (Australia); Sinclair, P. [Charles Sturt University, Dubbo, NSW (Australia); Scollard, D. [Michener Institute, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-06-01

    Full text: A distance educational programme for upgrading of Certificate, Associate Diploma and Diploma to a Bachelor of Applied Science degree commenced in second semester of 1997 with approximately 15 Australian students and 15 Canadian students. The first graduation will occur in 1998. Formal links with the Michener Institute in Toronto have allowed Canadian students access to study resources during the course. All students entering the course are accredited or registered with their respective professional societies. The short conversion programme for those with three year diplomas includes Nuclear Medicine Physics and Instrumentation, Imaging Pathology, Clinical Neuroscience and Research Method subjects. An inaugural undergraduate degree programme in Nuclear Medicine Technology commences in first semester of 1998 on the Riverina Campus at Wagga Wagga. An intake of 15 students is anticipated. This small group of rural based students will have the benefits of international expertise. The programme has a strong clinical practice component including time on campus to supplement the practicum in departments. Physiology studies continue through to third year to complement the professional subjects. Active participation is solicited from those departments involved with aspects of the practicum well before students are placed. A fully functional teaching laboratory has been constructed containing a well equipped radiopharmacy, gamma camera room and computer laboratory using modern applications software to provide the students with a solid background in their chosen field

  1. Display of nuclear medicine imaging studies

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, B; Samuel, A M

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging studies involve evaluation of a large amount of image data. Digital signal processing techniques have introduced processing algorithms that increase the information content of the display. Nuclear medicine imaging studies require interactive selection of suitable form of display and pre-display processing. Static imaging study requires pre-display processing to detect focal defects. Point operations (histogram modification) along with zoom and capability to display more than one image in one screen is essential. This album mode of display is also applicable to dynamic, MUGA and SPECT data. Isometric display or 3-D graph of the image data is helpful in some cases e.g. point spread function, flood field data. Cine display is used on a sequence of images e.g. dynamic, MUGA and SPECT imaging studies -to assess the spatial movement of tracer with time. Following methods are used at the investigator's discretion for inspection of the 3-D object. 1) Display of orthogonal projections, 2) Disp...

  2. Registration strategies for multi-modal whole-body MRI mosaicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceranka, Jakub; Polfliet, Mathias; Lecouvet, Frédéric; Michoux, Nicolas; de Mey, Johan; Vandemeulebroucke, Jef

    2017-06-21

    To test and compare different registration approaches for performing whole-body diffusion-weighted (wbDWI) image station mosaicing, and its alignment to corresponding anatomical T1 whole-body image. Four different registration strategies aiming at mosaicing of diffusion-weighted image stations, and their alignment to the corresponding whole-body anatomical image, were proposed and evaluated. These included two-step approaches, where diffusion-weighted stations are first combined in a pairwise (Strategy 1) or groupwise (Strategy 2) manner and later non-rigidly aligned to the anatomical image; a direct pairwise mapping of DWI stations onto the anatomical image (Strategy 3); and simultaneous mosaicing of DWI and alignment to the anatomical image (Strategy 4). Additionally, different images driving the registration were investigated. Experiments were performed for 20 whole-body images of patients with bone metastases. Strategies 1 and 2 showed significant improvement in mosaicing accuracy with respect to the non-registered images (P multi-modal alignment. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics. 7th ed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailidis, Dimitris

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics. 7th ed. Ramesh Chandra, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, a Wolters Kluwer Business. Philadelphia, 2012. Softbound, 224 pp. Price: $69.99. ISBN: 9781451109412. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. 77 FR 20097 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Georgia Multi-Modal Passenger Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... surrounding destinations and districts from one another. The purpose of the Georgia Multi-modal Passenger... environment. 4. Alternatives FTA and GDOT will consider all reasonable alternatives to provide a multi-modal... horizon. The Build alternatives will involve construction of a new multi-modal transit terminal and...

  5. Special monitoring in nuclear medicine; Monitoreo especial en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C.C.; Puerta, J.A.; Morales, J. [Asociacion Colombiana de Proteccion Radiologica (Colombia)]. e-mail: ccbeltra@gmail.com

    2006-07-01

    Colombia counts with around 56 centers of Nuclear Medicine, 70 Nuclear Doctors and more of 100 Technologists in this area. The radioisotopes more used are the {sup 131} I and the {sup 99m} Tc. The radiological surveillance singular in the country is carried out for external dosimetry, being the surveillance by incorporation of radioactive materials very sporadic in our media. Given the necessity to implement monitoring programs in the incorporation of radionuclides of the occupationally exposed personnel, in the routine practice them routine of Nuclear Medicine, it was implemented a pilot program of Special Monitoring with two centers of importance in the city of Medellin. This program it was carried out with the purpose of educating, to stimulate and to establish a program of reference monitoring with base in the National Program of Monitoring in the radionuclides Incorporation that serves like base for its application at level of all the services of Nuclear Medicine in the country. This monitoring type was carried out with the purpose of obtaining information on the work routine in these centers, form of manipulation and dosage of the radionuclides, as well as the administration to the patient. The application of the program was carried out to define the frequency of Monitoring and analysis technique for the implementation of a program of routine monitoring, following the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection. For their application methods of activity evaluation were used in urine and in 7 workers thyroid, of those which only two deserve an analysis because they presented important activities. The measures were carried out during one month, every day by means in urine samples and to the most critic case is practiced two thyroid measures, one in the middle of the period and another when concluding the monitoring. To the other guy is practiced an activity count in thyroid when concluding the monitoring period. The obtained

  6. Deformable registration of multi-modal data including rigid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Klein, Gregory J.; Kimdon, Joey A.; Kuo, Chaincy; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2003-05-02

    Multi-modality imaging studies are becoming more widely utilized in the analysis of medical data. Anatomical data from CT and MRI are useful for analyzing or further processing functional data from techniques such as PET and SPECT. When data are not acquired simultaneously, even when these data are acquired on a dual-imaging device using the same bed, motion can occur that requires registration between the reconstructed image volumes. As the human torso can allow non-rigid motion, this type of motion should be estimated and corrected. We report a deformation registration technique that utilizes rigid registration for bony structures, while allowing elastic transformation of soft tissue to more accurately register the entire image volume. The technique is applied to the registration of CT and MR images of the lumbar spine. First a global rigid registration is performed to approximately align features. Bony structures are then segmented from the CT data using semi-automated process, and bounding boxes for each vertebra are established. Each CT subvolume is then individually registered to the MRI data using a piece-wise rigid registration algorithm and a mutual information image similarity measure. The resulting set of rigid transformations allows for accurate registration of the parts of the CT and MRI data representing the vertebrae, but not the adjacent soft tissue. To align the soft tissue, a smoothly-varying deformation is computed using a thin platespline(TPS) algorithm. The TPS technique requires a sparse set of landmarks that are to be brought into correspondence. These landmarks are automatically obtained from the segmented data using simple edge-detection techniques and random sampling from the edge candidates. A smoothness parameter is also included in the TPS formulation for characterization of the stiffness of the soft tissue. Estimation of an appropriate stiffness factor is obtained iteratively by using the mutual information cost function on the result

  7. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Lacey R, E-mail: lgreene@csu.edu.au [Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (Australia); Wilkinson, Deborah [Faculty of Health, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  8. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sombut Boonyaprapa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1955, the first nuclear medicine division was established in Thailand by Professor Romsai Suwannik in the Department of Radiology, Siriraj Hospil, Mahidol University in Bangkok. In 1959 four years later, the second nuclear medicine division was established in the Department of Radiology, Chulalongkorn Hospital in Bangkok. The third nuclear medicine division was started in Rajvithi Hospital in Bangkok in 1961. The fourth nuclear medicine division was installed in Chiang Mai University which is the first University located outside of Bangkok in 1965 by Professor Dusadee Prabhasavat and Professor Sanan Simarak, ten years after the first nuclear medicine division in Siriraj Hospital. At the present in Thailand, there are twenty-five organizations providing clinical nuclear medicine services. Five medical faculties provide three years nuclear medicine residency training. There are eight companies which supply radiopharmaceuticals and/or nuclear medicine instruments one of these belongs to governmental office of atomic for peace (OAP of Thailand. In conclusion: Nuclear medicine researches and clinical practices in Thailand had been progressed from the past to the present time and will more progress in the near future, which certainly is the part of Asian countries and ARCCNM.

  9. Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems Vehicle Trajectories for Roadside Equipment

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Data were collected during the Multi-Modal Intelligent Transportation Signal Systems (MMITSS) study. MMITSS is a next-generation traffic signal system that seeks to...

  10. A new region descriptor for multi-modal medical image registration and region detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaonan Wan; Dongdong Yu; Feng Yang; Caiyun Yang; Chengcai Leng; Min Xu; Jie Tian

    2015-08-01

    Establishing accurate anatomical correspondences plays a critical role in multi-modal medical image registration and region detection. Although many features based registration methods have been proposed to detect these correspondences, they are mostly based on the point descriptor which leads to high memory cost and could not represent local region information. In this paper, we propose a new region descriptor which depicts the features in each region, instead of in each point, as a vector. First, feature attributes of each point are extracted by a Gabor filter bank combined with a gradient filter. Then, the region descriptor is defined as the covariance of feature attributes of each point inside the region, based on which a cost function is constructed for multi-modal image registration. Finally, our proposed region descriptor is applied to both multi-modal region detection and similarity metric measurement in multi-modal image registration. Experiments demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed region descriptor.

  11. Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems Signal Plans for Roadside Equipment

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Data were collected during the Multi-Modal Intelligent Transportation Signal Systems (MMITSS) study. MMITSS is a next-generation traffic signal system that seeks to...

  12. The impact of nuclear science on medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, G

    1999-01-01

    From the very beginning, i.e. from the discovery of the natural radioactivity by H. Becquerel and the production of radium by M. Curie, nuclear physics had a strong impact on medicine: Radioactive sources were immediately made use of in tumor therapy long before the action mechanisms of ionizing radiation were understood. The invention of the tracer technique by G. Hevesy opened a new field for the study of chemokinetics as well as for the in-vivo measurement of various organ functions. In the percutane tumor therapy hadrons like neutrons, pions, protons and heavier ions were tested. Presently, proton therapy is a great success and is spreading all over the world. The new techniques of target-conform treatment using heavy ions for an improved tumor targeting and control represent the latest great improvement of radiation tumor therapy.

  13. Pediatric nuclear medicine: A practical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintelon, H.; Piepsz, A. [Academic Hospital VUB, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Meidicine; Dejonckheere, M. [Erasme Hospital ULB, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Anesthesiology

    1997-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the practical aspects of pediatric nuclear medicine, particularly the controversy about drug sedation. The authors conclude that drug sedation should be exceptionally used. There is an alternative way, consisting in an adequate approach of the patient: good information to the parents and the child; taking care of the child`s environment, starting from the first contacts in the waiting room; specific education of technologists: this includes injections and blood sampling, but also proper handling of the child during the procedure and adequate psychological attitudes toward child and parents. Taking these factors into account, it is exceptional that a test has to be postponed because of the lack of collaboration of the patient; good quality images, using the recommended paediatric amounts of radioactivity can be achieved even for procedures of prolonged duration.

  14. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henne, R.L.; Erickson, J.J.; McClain, W.J.; Kirch, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    The directory is composed of two major divisions, a Users' section and a Vendors' section. The Users' section consists of detailed installation descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution as well as names of persons to contact. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the type of studies for which the computers are utilized, including the languages used, the method of output and an estimate of how often the study is performed. The Vendors' section contains short descriptions of current commercially available nuclear medicine systems as supplied by the vendors themselves. In order to reduce the amount of obsolete data and to include new institutions in future updates of the directory, a user questionnaire is included. (HLW)

  15. Bi-objective optimization for multi-modal transportation routing planning problem based on Pareto optimality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of study is to solve the multi-modal transportation routing planning problem that aims to select an optimal route to move a consignment of goods from its origin to its destination through the multi-modal transportation network. And the optimization is from two viewpoints including cost and time. Design/methodology/approach: In this study, a bi-objective mixed integer linear programming model is proposed to optimize the multi-modal transportation routing planning problem. Minimizing the total transportation cost and the total transportation time are set as the optimization objectives of the model. In order to balance the benefit between the two objectives, Pareto optimality is utilized to solve the model by gaining its Pareto frontier. The Pareto frontier of the model can provide the multi-modal transportation operator (MTO and customers with better decision support and it is gained by the normalized normal constraint method. Then, an experimental case study is designed to verify the feasibility of the model and Pareto optimality by using the mathematical programming software Lingo. Finally, the sensitivity analysis of the demand and supply in the multi-modal transportation organization is performed based on the designed case. Findings: The calculation results indicate that the proposed model and Pareto optimality have good performance in dealing with the bi-objective optimization. The sensitivity analysis also shows the influence of the variation of the demand and supply on the multi-modal transportation organization clearly. Therefore, this method can be further promoted to the practice. Originality/value: A bi-objective mixed integer linear programming model is proposed to optimize the multi-modal transportation routing planning problem. The Pareto frontier based sensitivity analysis of the demand and supply in the multi-modal transportation organization is performed based on the designed case.

  16. Nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy; Medicina nuclear y radiofarmacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon A, M. C. [Sociedad Mexicana de Seguridad Radiologica A. C., Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-12-15

    In the areas of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy frequently happens that the personnel that is incorporated as a candidate to serve as personnel occupationally exposed have varied skills, not necessarily have an ingrained culture of safety and radiation protection, some are resistant to adoption a work discipline and have very limited notions of normalization, including the safety basic standards. In fact, referring to the safety basic standards, concepts such as practice justification, protection optimization and dose limitation, can be very abstract concepts for such personnel. In regard to training strategies, it was noted that training in the work is an effective tool although it is very demanding for the learner but mainly for the teaches. The experts number that can occur in this manner is limited because it is an individualized system; however those from the process usually acquire a good preparation, which certainly includes theoretical aspects. For greater efficiency it is necessary that hospitals account facilities, procedures and personnel that might have an exclusive dedication to education and training of human resources. This would create a safety culture, alleviating the burdens of the already existing expertise and improves the training conditions. The Mexican Society of Radiological Safety (SMSR) can help in these efforts through the publication of guides aimed at work training, coordination and articulation of the possible courses already on the market and own the courses organization, workshops and conferences with more frequency. It would also serves that the SMSR acts as speaker with political actors, advocating for the courses validation offered by higher learning institutions, coordinating and promoting postgraduates in Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy. (Author)

  17. Multi-modal Virtual Scenario Enhances Neurofeedback Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avihay Cohen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade neurofeedback has become the focus of a growing body of research. With real-time fMRI enabling on-line monitoring of emotion related areas such as the amygdala, many have begun testing its therapeutic benefits. However most existing neurofeedback procedures still use monotonic uni-modal interfaces, thus possibly limiting user engagement and weakening learning efficiency. The current study tested a novel multi-sensory neurofeedback animated scenario aimed at enhancing user experience and improving learning. We examined whether relative to a simple uni-modal 2D interface, learning via an interface of complex multi-modal 3D scenario will result in improved neurofeedback learning. As a neural-probe, we used the recently developed fMRI-inspired EEG model of amygdala activity (amygdala-EEG finger print; amygdala-EFP, enabling low-cost and mobile limbic neurofeedback training. Amygdala-EFP was reflected in the animated scenario by the unrest level of a hospital waiting-room in which virtual characters become impatient, approach the admission-desk and complain loudly. Successful down-regulation was reflected as an ease in the room unrest-level. We tested whether relative to a standard uni-modal 2D graphic thermometer interface, this animated scenario could facilitate more effective learning and improve the training experience. Thirty participants underwent two separated neurofeedback sessions (one-week apart practicing down-regulation of the amygdala-EFP signal. In the first session, half trained via the animated scenario and half via a thermometer interface. Learning efficiency was tested by three parameters: (a effect-size of the change in amygdala-EFP following training, (b sustainability of the learned down-regulation in the absence of online feedback, and (c transferability to an unfamiliar context. Comparing amygdala-EFP signal amplitude between the last and the first neurofeedback trials revealed that the animated scenario

  18. Multi-modality imaging of transient osteoporosis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmel, Filip; Van Der Veen, Hugo C; Van Schelven, Willem D; Collins, James M P; Vanneuville, Isabelle; Rijk, Paul C

    2012-10-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH), also referred to as bone marrow edema syndrome (BMES) of the femoral head and neck, is an uncommon and therefore underdiagnosed benign skeletal disorder, affecting primarily women, particularly in their last trimester of pregnancy, and middle-aged men. The disease is characterized by self-limiting hip pain and radiographically evident osteopenia, but these radiographic findings can sometimes be delayed. In the early phase, the main diagnostic dilemma lies in differentiating TOH from osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Conventional radiographs, Tc-99m bone scans (multiphase, SPECT or SPECT/CT) and MRI scans from 10 male patients with 12 TOH episodes were retrospectively and independently reviewed by two nuclear medicine physicians and a musculoskeletal radiologist. The purpose was to identify a typical imaging pattern, and secondly, to reliably distinguish TOH from ONFH. In the early phase of TOH, conventional radiography of the hip could not sufficiently detect focal osteopenia. But in all 10 patients (mean age 45 years, range, 34-62), bone scans and MRI scans demonstrated a similar pattern of diffuse hyperaemia, bony uptake, and bone marrow edema in the femoral head and neck, extending to and ending with a sharp demarcation at the intertrochanteric region. Additionally, neither SPECT nor SPECT/CT nor MRI revealed any cold area or crescent-shaped subchondral defect in the femoral head, indicating ONFH. In some cases there was a joint effusion in varying degree. In 9 patients, an uneventful recovery was eventually observed. Scintigraphically diffuse hyperaemic and/or homogeneous osseous uptake in femoral head and neck extending to the intertrochanteric region, as well as the recently introduced term transient bone marrow edema syndrome (BMES) of the hip on MRI, are probably both expressions of the same pathophysiological mechanism, and pathognomonic for TOH. Hopefully, recognizing this highly specific imaging pattern

  19. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel [University Hospital Olomouc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamínek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic.

  1. Career prospects for graduating nuclear medicine residents: survey of nuclear medicine program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Guiberteau, Milton J; Metter, Darlene F; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    There has been much consternation in the nuclear medicine (NM) community in recent years regarding the difficulty many NM graduates experience in securing initial employment. A survey designed to determine the extent and root causes behind the paucity of career opportunities was sent to all 2010-2011 NM residency program directors. The results of that survey and its implications for NM trainees and the profession are presented and discussed in this article.

  2. Source Book of Educational Materials for Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijar, Mary Lou, Comp.; Lewis, Jeannine T., Comp.

    The contents of this sourcebook of educational materials are divided into the following sections: Anatomy and Physiology; Medical Terminology; Medical Ethics and Department Management; Patient Care and Medical Decision-Making; Basic Nuclear Medicine; Diagnostic in Vivo; Diagnostic in Vitro; Pediatric Nuclear Medicine; Radiation Detection and…

  3. Estimated dose from diagnostic nuclear medicine patients to people outside the Nuclear Medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Marissa L

    2013-11-01

    Patients undergoing nuclear medicine scans can be a source of radiation exposure for staff, family and the public. In this paper, 12 common nuclear medicine scans are considered. Doses are estimated for a range of scenarios, to hospital staff, to the public and to the patients' co-workers and family. Estimates are based on dose rates measured as patients left the Nuclear Medicine department. Radiopharmaceutical clearance is calculated from biokinetic models described in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications 53, 80 and 106. For all scan types, and all scenarios, doses are estimated to be substantially less than the trigger level of 300 µSv. Within the hospital, Intensive Care Unit staff receive the highest dose (up to 80 µSv) from patients who have had a myocardial scan or a positron emission tomography scan. For out-patients, the highest doses (up to 100 µSv) are associated with travel on public transport (for 4 h) on the same day as the scan.

  4. Distribution of nuclear medicine service in Brazil; Distribuicao do servico de medicina nuclear no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ana Carolina Costa da; Duarte, Alessandro; Santos, Bianca Maciel dos [Faculdade Metodo de Sao Paulo (FAMESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    The Brazil does not posses a good distribution of nuclear medicine service por all his territory. This paper shows the difference among country regions as far the number of clinics of nuclear medicine as is concerning, and also doctors licensed in the area and radioprotection supervisors, both licensed by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN)

  5. Minimizing and communicating radiation risk in pediatric nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S Ted; Adelstein, S James

    2012-03-01

    The value of pediatric nuclear medicine is well established. Pediatric patients are referred to nuclear medicine from nearly all pediatric specialties including urology, oncology, cardiology, gastroenterology, and orthopedics. Radiation exposure is associated with a potential, small, risk of inducing cancer in the patient later in life and is higher in younger patients. Recently, there has been enhanced interest in exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Thus, it is incumbent on practitioners of pediatric nuclear medicine to have an understanding of dosimetry and radiation risk to communicate effectively with their patients and their families. This article reviews radiation dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals and also CT given the recent proliferation of PET/CT and SPECT/CT. It also describes the scientific basis for radiation risk estimation in the context of pediatric nuclear medicine. Approaches for effective communication of risk to patients' families are discussed. Lastly, radiation dose reduction in pediatric nuclear medicine is explicated.

  6. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children.

  7. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  8. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  9. Metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in nuclear medicine; Terapia metabolica mediante radiofarmacos en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reguera, L.; Lozano, M. L.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    In 1986 the National Board of Medical Specialties defined the specialty of nuclear medicine as a medical specialty that uses radioisotopes for prevention, diagnosis, therapy and medical research. Nowadays, treatment with radiopharmaceuticals has reached a major importance within of nuclear medicine. The ability to treat tumors with radiopharmaceutical, Radiation selective therapy has become a first line alternative. In this paper, the current situation of the different therapies that are sued in nuclear medicine, is reviewed. (Author)

  10. What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety www.imagegently.org What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine uses radioactive isotopes to create pictures of the human body. ...

  11. Nuclear oncology, a fast growing field of nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine in oncology has been for a long time synonymous with bone scintigraphy, the first ever whole body imaging modality, and with treatment of thyroid cancer with iodine-131. More recently, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using peptides such as 111In-labelled octreotide became a reference imaging method in the detection and staging of neuroendocrine tumors while 131I- and 123I-MIBG remain the tracers of reference for pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging based on peritumoral injection of 99mTc-labelled colloids supports, in combination with per operative detection, the procedure of sentinel node identification in breast cancers and melanomas. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently experiencing a considerable growth in oncology based on the use of 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), a very sensitive, although non-specific, tumor tracer. Development of instrumentation is crucial in this expansion of PET imaging with new crystals being more sensitive and hybrid imagers that permit to reduce the acquisition time and offer fused PET-CT images. Current developments in therapy can be classified into three categories. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) based on monoclonal antibodies (or fragments) labelled with beta-emitters. This technique has recently made its entrance in clinical practice with a 90Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibody ( 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin ®)) approved in US for the treatment of some subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Radionuclide-bone pain palliation has experienced developments with 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re-HEDP or 89Sr, efficient in patients with widespread disease. Last, the same peptides, as those used in SRS, are being developed for therapy, labelled with 90Y, 111In or 177Lu in patients who failed to respond to other treatments. Overall, nuclear oncology is currently a fast growing field thanks to the combined developments of radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation.

  12. Nuclear medicine imaging and therapy: gender biases in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Valeria M; Aarsvold, John N; Alazraki, Naomi P

    2014-01-01

    Gender-based medicine is medical research and care conducted with conscious consideration of the sex and gender differences of subjects and patients. This issue of Seminars is focused on diseases for which nuclear medicine is part of routine management and for which the diseases have sex- or gender-based differences that affect incidence or pathophysiology and that thus have differences that can potentially affect the results of the relevant nuclear medicine studies. In this first article, we discuss neurologic diseases, certain gastrointestinal conditions, and thyroid conditions. The discussion is in the context of those sex- or gender-based aspects of these diseases that should be considered in the performance, interpretation, and reporting of the relevant nuclear medicine studies. Cardiovascular diseases, gynecologic diseases, bone conditions such as osteoporosis, pediatric occurrences of some diseases, human immunodeficiency virus-related conditions, and the radiation dose considerations of nuclear medicine studies are discussed in the other articles in this issue.

  13. Specific filters applied in nuclear medicine services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Vitor S.; Crispim, Verginia R., E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Brandao, Luis E.B. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ) Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In Nuclear Medicine, radioiodine, in various chemical forms, is a key tracer used in diagnostic practices and/or therapy. Due to its high volatility, medical professionals may incorporate radioactive iodine during the preparation of the dose to be administered to the patient. In radioactive iodine therapy doses ranging from 3.7 to 7.4 GBq per patient are employed. Thus, aiming at reducing the risk of occupational contamination, we developed a low cost filter to be installed at the exit of the exhaust system where doses of radioactive iodine are fractionated, using domestic technology. The effectiveness of radioactive iodine retention by silver impregnated silica [10%] crystals and natural activated carbon was verified using radiotracer techniques. The results showed that natural activated carbon is effective for I{sub 2} capture for a large or small amount of substrate but its use is restricted due to its low flash point (150 deg C). Besides, when poisoned by organic solvents, this flash point may become lower, causing explosions if absorbing large amounts of nitrates. To hold the CH{sub 3}I gas, it was necessary to increase the volume of natural activated carbon since it was not absorbed by SiO{sub 2} + Ag crystals. We concluded that, for an exhaust flow range of (306 {+-} 4) m{sup 3}/h, a double stage filter using SiO{sub 2} + Ag in the first stage and natural activated carbon in the second is sufficient to meet radiological safety requirements. (author)

  14. Computer Generated Cardiac Model For Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, John F.; Miller, Tom R.

    1981-07-01

    A computer generated mathematical model of a thallium-201 myocardial image is described which is based on realistic geometric and physiological assumptions. The left ventricle is represented by an ellipsoid truncated by aortic and mitral valve planes. Initially, an image of a motionless left ventricle is calculated with the location, size, and relative activity of perfusion defects selected by the designer. The calculation includes corrections for photon attenuation by overlying structures and the relative distribution of activity within the tissues. Motion of the ventricular walls is simulated either by a weighted sum of images at different stages in the cardiac cycle or by a blurring function whose width varies with position. Camera and collimator blurring are estimated by the MTF of the system measured at a representative depth in a phantom. Statistical noise is added using a Poisson random number generator. The usefulness of this model is due to two factors: the a priori characterization of location and extent of perfusion defects and the strong visual similarity of the images to actual clinical studies. These properties should permit systematic evaluation of image processing algorithms using this model. The principles employed in developing this cardiac image model can readily be applied to the simulation of other nuclear medicine studies and to other medical imaging modalities including computed tomography, ultrasound, and digital radiography.

  15. Nuclear medicine and the nursing mother

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, A.J.; Mountford, P.J. (Kent and Canterbury Hospital (UK))

    1985-07-20

    Many radiopharmaceuticals may be detected in breast milk, but differ from other drugs in that for diagnostic purposes they are used in tracer quantities and do not produce demonstrable pharmacological changes in mother or infant. Patients may also be given non-radioactive drugs to induce changes in the distribution of the radiopharmaceuticals and some of these, too, appear in milk (e.g. frusemide, potassium perchlorate, iodides, and cholecystokinin). Iodides are selectively concentrated in breast milk, and some consider them contra-indicated during lactation. A period of interruption of breast feeding, expression of milk, and reduction of close contact with the infant is usually recommended for mothers who have a nuclear medicine investigation. The inconvenience and disadvantages of interrupting breast feeding have to be balanced against the potential risk to the infant: the prolonged interruption of feeding advocated for some agents is often impracticable. Interruption for 24 hours for sup(99m)Tc compounds is excessive for doses used in Britain. Twelve hours leaves a wide range of safety for pertechnetate. No interruption is needed for sup(99m)Tc-macroaggregated albumin and sup(99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine-penta-acetic acid in order to remain below one tenth of the annual limit of intake.

  16. Annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. EANM'14. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-10-15

    The proceedings of the annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine EANM'14 contain abstracts on the following issues: nuclear cardiology practices, PET in lymphoma, advances in nuclear cardiology, dosimetry for intra-arterial treatment in the liver, pediatric nuclear medicine, therapeutic nuclear medicine, SPECT/CT, prostate cancer, extended competencies for nuclear medicine technologists, neurosciences - neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, radionuclide therapy and dosimetry - preclinical studies, physics and instrumentation, clinical molecular imaging, conventional and specialized nuclear medicine.

  17. Nuclear medicine imaging in the evaluation of endocrine hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punit Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine hypertension forms a small (< 5% but curable subset of patients with hypertension. Common endocrine causes of hypertension include pheochromocytoma, Cushing′s syndrome, primary hyperaldosteronism, and thyroid disorders. Nuclear medicine imaging plays an important role in evaluation of patients with endocrine hypertension. It has established role in patients of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, Cushing′s syndrome, aldosteronism, and thyroid disorders. We present a brief overview of role of nuclear medicine imaging in endocrine hypertension. Development of newer radiotracers might further broaden the role of nuclear medicine in these patients.

  18. Recommendations on Strengthening the Development of Nuclear Medicine in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih-chen Wang

    2009-01-01

    @@ This paper outlines briefly the role of nuclear medicine in life sciences and health care. Molecular imaging by using isotopic tracers can noninvasively visualize the chemistry or hidden process in the cells and tissues inside the body, obtaining "functional" images to provide early information of any disease and revealing the secrets of life. The vitality of nuclear medicine is its ability to translate bench into new clinical application that can benefits the patients. Although nuclear medicine community in China has made significant achievement with a great effort since 1950s, there are many obstacles to future development. Recommended measures are proposed here in an attempt to solve our existing problems.

  19. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016.

  20. Oncological nuclear medicine: from antibody to PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuneo, Saga; Takako, Furukawa [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging Center, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    Department of Diagnostic Imaging has recently established in the Molecular Imaging Center of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The major aim of the department is to develop novel molecular imaging probes and to establish functional imaging methods of various cancers. The department consists of three sections; 1) biomolecule section (find out optimal biomolecule as the target of cancer imaging), 2) molecular diagnosis section (develop imaging method using specific molecular probe), and 3) clinical diagnosis section (applying molecular imaging modalities to cancer patients). In the present lecture, I would like to review my experiences in various aspects of cancer imaging using nuclear medicine procedures, which might be important in the research in the new department. The talk includes; 1) characteristics and limitations of cancer targeting with radiolabeled anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies and the attempts to overcome the limitations including pre-targeting strategy, 2 ) application of a newly synthesized polyamine (dendrimer) to the delivery and imaging of oligo-DNA and cancer treatment, 3) transfection of Na '/I - sym-porter gene to add iodide uptake mechanism to non-thyroid cancer cells for the wider application of radioiodine therapy, which is now also used as a promising reporter gene in gene therapy, and 4) basic and clinical study of PET metabolic imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluoro-thymidine (FLT) to evaluate the characteristics of various cancers. Although these modalities can not directly visualize molecular processes occurring in cancer cells, we can evaluate the imaging results with the insight of molecular biology, and the experiences of these modalities can be the bases for the future development of molecular imaging of malignant tumors. (author)

  1. Low-Rank and Joint Sparse Representations for Multi-Modal Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Patel, Vishal M; Chellappa, Rama

    2017-10-01

    We propose multi-task and multivariate methods for multi-modal recognition based on low-rank and joint sparse representations. Our formulations can be viewed as generalized versions of multivariate low-rank and sparse regression, where sparse and low-rank representations across all modalities are imposed. One of our methods simultaneously couples information within different modalities by enforcing the common low-rank and joint sparse constraints among multi-modal observations. We also modify our formulations by including an occlusion term that is assumed to be sparse. The alternating direction method of multipliers is proposed to efficiently solve the resulting optimization problems. Extensive experiments on three publicly available multi-modal biometrics and object recognition data sets show that our methods compare favorably with other feature-level fusion methods.

  2. Clustered iterative stochastic ensemble method for multi-modal calibration of subsurface flow models

    KAUST Repository

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H.

    2013-05-01

    A novel multi-modal parameter estimation algorithm is introduced. Parameter estimation is an ill-posed inverse problem that might admit many different solutions. This is attributed to the limited amount of measured data used to constrain the inverse problem. The proposed multi-modal model calibration algorithm uses an iterative stochastic ensemble method (ISEM) for parameter estimation. ISEM employs an ensemble of directional derivatives within a Gauss-Newton iteration for nonlinear parameter estimation. ISEM is augmented with a clustering step based on k-means algorithm to form sub-ensembles. These sub-ensembles are used to explore different parts of the search space. Clusters are updated at regular intervals of the algorithm to allow merging of close clusters approaching the same local minima. Numerical testing demonstrates the potential of the proposed algorithm in dealing with multi-modal nonlinear parameter estimation for subsurface flow models. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Nuclear medicine in oncology 2: Breast, prostate, and cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nuclear medicine approaches to cancer detection, staging and treatment. T Kotze, MB BCh, FCNP .... treatment response after chemo-radiation; and (iv) documenting recurrent cervical cancer, .... Small-cell lung cancer. Currently, the use of ...

  4. 19. Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine; 19. Congresso brasileiro de biologia e medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The issue contain 97 abstracts of 19 Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine held in Pernambuco, Brazil, from November 4 to 8, 1998. The subjects addressed are diagnostic and therapy nuclear medicine techniques, especially scintiscanning, SPECT and PET and their uses. The main topics were as follows: cardiology, neuro-psychiatry, oncology, endocrinology, radiopharmacy, infectious diseases, radiobiology and others.

  5. Predicting the multi-modal binding propensity of small molecules: towards an understanding of drug promiscuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunwan; Lee, Soyoung; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Kim, Dongsup

    2009-08-01

    Drug promiscuity is one of the key issues in current drug development. Many famous drugs have turned out to behave unexpectedly due to their propensity to bind to multiple targets. One of the primary reasons for this promiscuity is that drugs bind to multiple distinctive target environments, a feature that we call multi-modal binding. Accordingly, investigations into whether multi-modal binding propensities can be predicted, and if so, whether the features determining this behavior can be found, would be an important advance. In this study, we have developed a structure-based classifier that predicts whether small molecules will bind to multiple distinct binding sites. The binding sites for all ligands in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were clustered by binding site similarity, and the ligands that bind to many dissimilar binding sites were identified as multi-modal binding ligands. The mono-binding ligands were also collected, and the classifiers were built using various machine-learning algorithms. A 10-fold cross-validation procedure showed 70-85% accuracy depending on the choice of machine-learning algorithm, and the different definitions used to identify multi-modal binding ligands. In addition, a quantified importance measurement for global and local descriptors was also provided, which suggests that the local features are more likely to have an effect on multi-modal binding than the global ones. The interpretable global and local descriptors were also ranked by their importance. To test the classifier on real examples, several test sets including well-known promiscuous drugs were collected by a literature and database search. Despite the difficulty in constructing appropriate testable sets, the classifier showed reasonable results that were consistent with existing information on drug behavior. Finally, a test on natural enzyme substrates and artificial drugs suggests that the natural compounds tend to exhibit a broader range of multi-modal binding than the

  6. Predicting the Attitude Flow in Dialogue Based on Multi-Modal Speech Cues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel Henrichsen, Peter; Allwood, Jens

    2013-01-01

    We present our experiments on attitude detection based on annotated multi-modal dialogue data1. Our long-term goal is to establish a computational model able to predict the attitudinal patterns in humanhuman dialogue. We believe, such prediction algorithms are useful tools in the pursuit of reali......We present our experiments on attitude detection based on annotated multi-modal dialogue data1. Our long-term goal is to establish a computational model able to predict the attitudinal patterns in humanhuman dialogue. We believe, such prediction algorithms are useful tools in the pursuit...

  7. Common and uncommon vascular rings and slings: a multi-modality review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillman, Jonathan R.; Agarwal, Prachi P.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Attili, Anil K. [University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Lexington, KY (United States); Dorfman, Adam L. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Vascular rings and pulmonary slings are congenital anomalies of the aortic arch/great vessels and pulmonary arteries, respectively, that commonly present early during infancy and childhood with respiratory and/or feeding difficulties. The diagnosis of these conditions frequently utilizes a multi-modality radiological approach, commonly utilizing some combination of radiography, esophagography, CT angiography and MR angiography. The purpose of this pictorial review is to illustrate the radiological findings of common and uncommon vascular rings and pulmonary slings in children using a state-of-the-art multi-modality imaging approach. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear medicine in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, S Ted; Baker, Amanda; Fahey, Frederic H; Cao, Xinhua; Davis, Royal T; Drubach, Laura A; Grant, Frederick D; Zukotynski, Katherine

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear medicine has an important role in the care of newborns and children less than 1 y old. Patients in this age group present with a spectrum of diseases different from those of older children or adults. These patients can benefit from the full range of nuclear medicine studies. In these young children, nuclear medicine studies are more likely to be used to evaluate a wide range of congenital conditions but also can be helpful for evaluating acquired conditions such as infection, cancer, and trauma. This review first will cover the general aspects of nuclear medicine practice with these patients, including the special considerations that can help achieve successful diagnostic imaging. These topics will include clinical indications, imaging technology, instrumentation, software, positioning and immobilization, sedation, local and general anesthesia, radiopharmaceutical doses, radiation risk, and dose reduction. The review then will discuss the specific nuclear medicine studies that typically are obtained in patients in this age group. With extra care and attention to the special needs of this population, nuclear medicine departments can successfully study patients less than 1 y old.

  9. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Raihan

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as 'Radioisotope Centre' and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its course of development, but still the facilities are inadequate. At present there are 20 nuclear medicine establishments with 3 PET-CTs, 42 gamma camera/SPECTs with 95 physicians, 20 physicists, 10 radiochemists and 150 technologists. The Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh (SNMB) was formed in 1993 and publishing its official journal since 1997. Bangladesh also has close relationships with many international organizations like IAEA, ARCCNM, AOFNMB, ASNM, WFNMB and WARMTH. The history and the present scenario of the status of nuclear medicine in Bangladesh are being described here.

  10. Analyse et traitement d'images multi modales en oncologie

    OpenAIRE

    Hatt, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    With an initial formation in theoretical computer sciences with a focus on image processing and analysis, my current research activities deal with image and information processing and analysis for applications in medicine, namely oncology and radiotherapy. More specifically, my research interests are image automatic segmentation and classification for organs and tumors delineation, image denoising and deconvolution for qualitative and quantitative improvement, and more recently, multi observa...

  11. Nuclear medicine in dentistry revisited: New avenues to explore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Boloor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear medicine and radioactive tracers have considerable application in dental research, because they provide one of the few practical methods for studying the limited metabolic activities of bones and teeth. The ease with which minute amounts of these radioactive materials may be accurately measured and distinguished from the mass of inert element in the tooth is particularly valuable. They are useful in studying many problems of calcification and mineral exchange. There are also opportunities of their use in investigating fluorosis, caries protection, periodontal disease, micro leakage studies of dental materials, root resorption, nutritional, and endocrine effects, as well as numerous other dental problems. Other usages of nuclear medicine in dentistry are listed below: Age written in teeth by nuclear tests, scintigraphic evaluation of osteoblastic activity, and evaluation of osteoblastic activity around dental implants using bone scintigraphy. Nuclear medicine can be an indicator of "active" alveolar bone loss. Nuclear medicine techniques are used as an adjunct for the diagnosis of oral diseases (benign tumors and carcinomas and temporomandibular joint disease. This review article discusses these indications of nuclear medicine.

  12. IAEA support to medical physics in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Sgouros, George

    2013-05-01

    Through its programmatic efforts and its publications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has helped define the role and responsibilities of the nuclear medicine physicist in the practice of nuclear medicine. This paper describes the initiatives that the IAEA has undertaken to support medical physics in nuclear medicine. In 1984, the IAEA provided guidance on how to ensure that the equipment used for detecting, imaging, and quantifying radioactivity is functioning properly (Technical Document [TECDOC]-137, "Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments"). An updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-137 was issued in 1991 as IAEA-TECDOC-602, and this included new chapters on scanner-computer systems and single-photon emission computed tomography systems. Nuclear medicine physics was introduced as a part of a project on radiation imaging and radioactivity measurements in the 2002-2003 IAEA biennium program in Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics. Ten years later, IAEA activities in this field have expanded to cover quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of nuclear medicine equipment, education and clinical training, professional recognition of the role of medical physicists in nuclear medicine physics, and finally, the coordination of research and development activities in internal dosimetry. As a result of these activities, the IAEA has received numerous requests to support the development and implementation of QA or QC programs for radioactivity measurements in nuclear medicine in many Member States. During the last 5 years, support was provided to 20 Member States through the IAEA's technical cooperation programme. The IAEA has also supported education and clinical training of medical physicists. This type of support has been essential for the development and expansion of the Medical Physics profession, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The need for basic as well as specialized clinical training in medical physics was identified as a

  13. Computers in Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Imaging - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Kapoor

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital computers are becoming increasingly popular for a variety of purposes in nuclear medicine. They are particuiarly useful in the areas of nuclear imaging and gamma camera image processing,radionuclide inventory and patient record keeping. By far the most important use of the digital computer is in array processors which are commonly available with emission computed systems for fast reconstruction of images in transverse, coronal and sagittal views, particularly when the data to be handled is enormous and involves filtration and correction processes. The addition of array processors to computer systems has helped the clinicians in improving diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging capability. This paper reviews briefly therole of computers in the field of nuclear medicine imaging.

  14. (In)Flexibility of Constituency in Japanese in Multi-Modal Categorial Grammar with Structured Phonology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a theory of categorial grammar called Multi-Modal Categorial Grammar with Structured Phonology. The central feature that distinguishes this theory from the majority of contemporary syntactic theories is that it decouples (without completely segregating) two aspects of syntax--hierarchical organization (reflecting…

  15. Manifold-based feature point matching for multi-modal image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Wang, Manning; Song, Zhijian

    2013-03-01

    Images captured using different modalities usually have significant variations in their intensities, which makes it difficult to reveal their internal structural similarities and achieve accurate registration. Most conventional feature-based image registration techniques are fast and efficient, but they cannot be used directly for the registration of multi-modal images because of these intensity variations. This paper introduces the theory of manifold learning to transform the original images into mono-modal modalities, which is a feature-based method that is applicable to multi-modal image registration. Subsequently, scale-invariant feature transform is used to detect highly distinctive local descriptors and matches between corresponding images, and a point-based registration is executed. The algorithm was tested with T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained from BrainWeb. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the method were performed and the results compared with those produced previously. The experiments showed that feature point matching after manifold learning achieved more accurate results than did the similarity measure for multi-modal image registration. This study provides a new manifold-based feature point matching method for multi-modal medical image registration, especially for MR images. The proposed method performs better than do conventional intensity-based techniques in terms of its registration accuracy and is suitable for clinical procedures. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Information content and analysis methods for multi-modal high-throughput biomedical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Bisakha; Henaff, Mikael; Ma, Sisi; Efstathiadis, Efstratios; Peskin, Eric R; Picone, Marco; Poli, Tito; Aliferis, Constantin F; Statnikov, Alexander

    2014-03-21

    The spectrum of modern molecular high-throughput assaying includes diverse technologies such as microarray gene expression, miRNA expression, proteomics, DNA methylation, among many others. Now that these technologies have matured and become increasingly accessible, the next frontier is to collect "multi-modal" data for the same set of subjects and conduct integrative, multi-level analyses. While multi-modal data does contain distinct biological information that can be useful for answering complex biology questions, its value for predicting clinical phenotypes and contributions of each type of input remain unknown. We obtained 47 datasets/predictive tasks that in total span over 9 data modalities and executed analytic experiments for predicting various clinical phenotypes and outcomes. First, we analyzed each modality separately using uni-modal approaches based on several state-of-the-art supervised classification and feature selection methods. Then, we applied integrative multi-modal classification techniques. We have found that gene expression is the most predictively informative modality. Other modalities such as protein expression, miRNA expression, and DNA methylation also provide highly predictive results, which are often statistically comparable but not superior to gene expression data. Integrative multi-modal analyses generally do not increase predictive signal compared to gene expression data.

  17. A Multi-Modal Active Learning Experience for Teaching Social Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmueller, April

    2011-01-01

    This article details a multi-modal active learning experience to help students understand elements of social categorization. Each student in a group dynamics course observed two groups in conflict and identified examples of in-group bias, double-standard thinking, out-group homogeneity bias, law of small numbers, group attribution error, ultimate…

  18. Multi-criteria appraisal of multi-modal urban public transport systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyvan Ekbatani, M.; Cats, O.

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) modelling framework for the appraisal of multi-modal urban public transportation services. MCDM is commonly used to obtain choice alternatives that satisfy a range of performance indicators. The framework embraces both compensatory and

  19. Conceptual Coherence Revealed in Multi-Modal Representations of Astronomy Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blown, Eric; Bryce, Tom G. K.

    2010-01-01

    The astronomy concepts of 345 young people were studied over a 10-year period using a multi-media, multi-modal methodology in a research design where survey participants were interviewed three times and control subjects were interviewed twice. The purpose of the research was to search for evidence to clarify competing theories on "conceptual…

  20. DASC: Robust Dense Descriptor for Multi-Modal and Multi-Spectral Correspondence Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungryong; Min, Dongbo; Ham, Bumsub; Do, Minh N; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2017-09-01

    Establishing dense correspondences between multiple images is a fundamental task in many applications. However, finding a reliable correspondence between multi-modal or multi-spectral images still remains unsolved due to their challenging photometric and geometric variations. In this paper, we propose a novel dense descriptor, called dense adaptive self-correlation (DASC), to estimate dense multi-modal and multi-spectral correspondences. Based on an observation that self-similarity existing within images is robust to imaging modality variations, we define the descriptor with a series of an adaptive self-correlation similarity measure between patches sampled by a randomized receptive field pooling, in which a sampling pattern is obtained using a discriminative learning. The computational redundancy of dense descriptors is dramatically reduced by applying fast edge-aware filtering. Furthermore, in order to address geometric variations including scale and rotation, we propose a geometry-invariant DASC (GI-DASC) descriptor that effectively leverages the DASC through a superpixel-based representation. For a quantitative evaluation of the GI-DASC, we build a novel multi-modal benchmark as varying photometric and geometric conditions. Experimental results demonstrate the outstanding performance of the DASC and GI-DASC in many cases of dense multi-modal and multi-spectral correspondences.

  1. Dispersive multi-modal mud-roll estimation and removal using feedback-loop approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiyama, T.; Blacquiere, G.

    2013-01-01

    In a shallow water environment, mud-rolls are often dominant and appear as a prevailing coherent linear noise in OBC seismic data. Their complex properties make the noise removal notably challenging in seismic processing. To address the challenges, we propose a method of dispersive multi-modal

  2. Multi-Modal Clique-Graph Matching for View-Based 3D Model Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An-An; Nie, Wei-Zhi; Gao, Yue; Su, Yu-Ting

    2016-05-01

    Multi-view matching is an important but a challenging task in view-based 3D model retrieval. To address this challenge, we propose an original multi-modal clique graph (MCG) matching method in this paper. We systematically present a method for MCG generation that is composed of cliques, which consist of neighbor nodes in multi-modal feature space and hyper-edges that link pairwise cliques. Moreover, we propose an image set-based clique/edgewise similarity measure to address the issue of the set-to-set distance measure, which is the core problem in MCG matching. The proposed MCG provides the following benefits: 1) preserves the local and global attributes of a graph with the designed structure; 2) eliminates redundant and noisy information by strengthening inliers while suppressing outliers; and 3) avoids the difficulty of defining high-order attributes and solving hyper-graph matching. We validate the MCG-based 3D model retrieval using three popular single-modal data sets and one novel multi-modal data set. Extensive experiments show the superiority of the proposed method through comparisons. Moreover, we contribute a novel real-world 3D object data set, the multi-view RGB-D object data set. To the best of our knowledge, it is the largest real-world 3D object data set containing multi-modal and multi-view information.

  3. A Hybrid FPGA/Coarse Parallel Processing Architecture for Multi-modal Visual Feature Descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Baunegaard With; Kjær-Nielsen, Anders; Alonso, Javier Díaz

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the hybrid architecture developed for speeding up the processing of so-called multi-modal visual primitives which are sparse image descriptors extracted along contours. In the system, the first stages of visual processing are implemented on FPGAs due to their highly parallel...

  4. A Multi-Modal Active Learning Experience for Teaching Social Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmueller, April

    2011-01-01

    This article details a multi-modal active learning experience to help students understand elements of social categorization. Each student in a group dynamics course observed two groups in conflict and identified examples of in-group bias, double-standard thinking, out-group homogeneity bias, law of small numbers, group attribution error, ultimate…

  5. Ultrasmall Biocompatible WO3- x Nanodots for Multi-Modality Imaging and Combined Therapy of Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ling; Chen, Ling; Zheng, Shimin; Zeng, Jianfeng; Duan, Guangxin; Wang, Yong; Wang, Guanglin; Chai, Zhifang; Li, Zhen; Gao, Mingyuan

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasmall biocompatible WO3 - x nanodots with an outstanding X-ray radiation sensitization effect are prepared, and demonstrated to be applicable for multi-modality tumor imaging through computed tomography and photoacoustic imaging (PAI), and effective cancer treatment combining both photothermal therapy and radiation therapy.

  6. Multi-modal Discourse Analysis of Peng Liyuan’s Dress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾伟红

    2016-01-01

    Traditional discourse analysis basically focuses on language rather than non-linguistic symbol resources in terms of meaning construction. The latter emerging multi-modal discourse analysis breaks this limitation into a large extent. This paper analyzed Peng Liyuan’s dress with semiotics of Saussure and visual grammar of Kress and Van Ixeuwen as theoretical framework.

  7. Multi-modal affect induction for affective brain-computer interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, C.; Broek, E.L. van den; Brouwer, A.M.; Nijboer, F.; Wouwe, N.C. van; Heylen, D.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable applications of affective brain-computer interfaces (aBCI) in realistic, multi-modal environments require a detailed understanding of the processes involved in emotions. To explore the modalityspecific nature of affective responses, we studied neurophysiological responses (i.e., EEG) of 24

  8. Multi-modal affect induction for affective brain-computer interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, C.; Broek, E.L. van den; Brouwer, A.M.; Nijboer, F.; Wouwe, N.C. van; Heylen, D.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable applications of affective brain-computer interfaces (aBCI) in realistic, multi-modal environments require a detailed understanding of the processes involved in emotions. To explore the modalityspecific nature of affective responses, we studied neurophysiological responses (i.e., EEG) of 24

  9. Multi-criteria appraisal of multi-modal urban public transport systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyvan Ekbatani, M.; Cats, O.

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) modelling framework for the appraisal of multi-modal urban public transportation services. MCDM is commonly used to obtain choice alternatives that satisfy a range of performance indicators. The framework embraces both compensatory and non-

  10. Distributed Network Control for Mobile Multi-Modal Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    Distributed Network Control for Mobile Multi-Modal Wireless Sensor Networks Doina Bein , Yicheng Wen, Shashi Phoha1, Bharat B. Madan, and Asok Ray The...Journal of High Perfor- mance Computing Applications, Special Issue on Sensor Networks 16 (3) (2002) 235–241. [30] Y. Wen, D. Bein , S. Phoha

  11. Multi-Modal Obstacle Detection in Unstructured Environments with Conditional Random Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Mikkel; Underwood, James

    2017-01-01

    explicitly handling sparse point cloud data and exploiting both spatial, temporal, and multi-modal links between corresponding 2D and 3D regions. The proposed method is evaluated on a diverse dataset, comprising a dairy paddock and a number of different orchards gathered with a perception research robot...

  12. Use of Multi-Modal Media and Tools in an Online Information Literacy Course: College Students' Attitudes and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Liang; Williams, James Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This project studies the use of multi-modal media objects in an online information literacy class. One hundred sixty-two undergraduate students answered seven surveys. Significant relationships are found among computer skills, teaching materials, communication tools and learning experience. Multi-modal media objects and communication tools are…

  13. Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toohey, R.E.; Stabin, M.G. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    For years many have employed the concept of ``total-body dose`` or ``whole-body dose,`` i.e., the total energy deposited in the body divided by the mass of the body, when evaluating the risks of different nuclear medicine procedures. The effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), first described in ICRP Publication 26, has been accepted by some as a better quantity to use in evaluating the total risk of a procedure, but its use has been criticized by others primarily because the tissue weighting factors were intended for use in the radiation worker, rather than the nuclear medicine patient population. Nevertheless, in ICRP Publication 52, the ICRP has suggested that the H{sub E} may be used in nuclear medicine. The ICRP also has published a compendium of dose estimates, including H{sub E} values, for various nuclear medicine procedures at various ages in ICRP Publication 53. The effective dose (E) of ICRP Publication 60 is perhaps more suitable for use in nuclear medicine, with tissue weighting factors based on the entire population. Other comparisons of H{sub E} and E have been published. The authors have used the program MIRDOSE 3.1 to compute total-body dose, H{sub E}, and E for 62 radiopharmaceutical procedures, based on the best current biokinetic data available.

  14. [Legal implications of information to the patient in nuclear medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Sánchez, J

    2004-01-01

    Every patient has the right to be informed about a medical procedure. The nuclear medicine physician has the duty to inform the patients and, if necessary, to obtain a reasonable written consent before some radioisotopic examinations. The following must be considered in every informed consent of a nuclear medicine procedure: the need for the patient information ("why"), the type of information given ("how"), the person who performs it ("who"), the moment in the time ("when") and the place ("where") where the consent is performed. It must always be kept in mind that, although the informed consent has a protection function from the medicolegal point of view, this function may be lost if the consent is not performed correctly. In this paper the importance and the medicolegal implications of the patient information in Nuclear Medicine are evaluated and discussed.

  15. Training requirements for chemists in radiotracer development for nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, R.; Fowler, J.

    1988-01-01

    This panel was organized to address the current and anticipated future shortage of chemists with advanced training to fill positions in the nuclear medicine field. Although hard data and statistics are difficult to acquire, we will attempt to highlight the impact of chemistry on nuclear medicine and to describe the growth of the field which has led to an increasing need for chemists resulting in the current manpower shortage. We also will make recommendations for attracting Ph.D. chemists to careers in nuclear medicine research and possible mechanisms for postgraduate training. Solving this problem and establishing a long term committment and mechanism for advanced training is critically important to meet the current needs of the profession and to assure future growth and innovation. 3 tabs.

  16. Internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine procedures; Dosimetria interna por procedimientos en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera Magarino, F.; Salgado Garcia, C.; Ruiz Manzano, P.; Rivas Ballarin, M. A.; Jimenez Hefernan, A.; Sanchez Segovia, J.

    2011-07-01

    The Department of Radio Physics and Radiation Protection, University Hospital Lozano Blesa Zaragoza presented a calculus textbook to estimate patient doses in diagnostic nuclear medicine. In this paper present an updated version referred Book of calculation.

  17. Application of nuclear physics in medical physics and nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear physics has a long history of influencing and advancing medical fields. At TRIUMF we use the applications of nuclear physics to diagnose several diseases via medical isotopes and treat cancer by using proton beams. The Life Science division has a long history of producing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) isotopes but we are also investigating the production of SPECT and PET isotopes with a potential shortage for clinical operation or otherwise limited access to chemists, biologists and medical researchers. New targets are being developed, aided by a simulation platform investigating the processes inside a target under proton irradiation - nuclear, thermodynamic, and chemical. Simulations also aid in the development of new beam-shaping devices for TRIUMF's Proton Therapy facility, Canada's only proton therapy facility, as well as new treatment testing systems. Both promise improved treatment delivery for cancer patients.

  18. Pioneers of nuclear medicine, Madame Curie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2004-01-01

    Among those who have made important discoveries in the field of radioactivity and thus helped in the development of nuclear medicine as an identical entity are: Heinrich Hertz who in 1886 demonstrated the existence of radiowaves. In 1895 Wilhelm Röntgen discovered the X-rays. In 1896 H. Becquerel described the phenomenon of radioactivity. He showed that a radioactive uranium salt was emitting radioactivity which passing through a metal foil darkened a photographic plate. An analogous experiment performed by S.Thomson in London was announced to the president of the Royal Society of London before the time H.Becquerel announced his discovery but Thomson never claimed priority for his discovery. Muarie Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) was undoubtedly the most important person to attribute to the discovery of radioactivity. In 1898 she discovered radium as a natural radioactive element. This is how she describes the hard time she had, working with her husband Pierre Curie (1859-1906) for the discovery of radium and polonium: "During the first year we did not go to the theater or to a concert or visited friends. I miss my relatives, my father and my daughter that I see every morning and only for a little while. But I do not complain...". In presenting her discovery of radium, Madame Curie said: " ...in the hands of a criminal, radium is very dangerous. So we must often ask ourselves: will humanity earn or lose from this discovery? I, myself belong to those who believe the former...". The notebooks that Madame Curie had when she was working with radium and other radioactive elements like polonium, thorium and uranium are now kept in Paris. They are contaminated with radioactive materials having very long half-lives and for this reason anyone who wishes to have access to these notes should sign that he takes full responsibility. There are some more interesting points in Madame Curie's life which may not be widely known like: Although her full name is Maria Sklodowska

  19. Festschrift. The Institute of Nuclear Medicine. 50 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Medicine, founded in 1961, celebrates with this Festschrift, its Golden Jubilee. It has been a remarkable 50 years of progress of the radionuclide tracer methodology. From initial, physiology based experimentation, a full independent medical discipline evolved, and with it, a comprehensive clinical service. Diagnosis and Treatment with radiotracers have established the basis for Nuclear Medicine. Technological advances have permeated the field like none other, its multidisciplinary character and its translational research are embedded in the history of the Institute and its success. Recent and latest advances in the field promise a future as bright as has been witnessed and documented in the last 50 years.

  20. Radionuclides for nuclear medicine: a nuclear physicists' view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantone, M.; Haddad, F.; Harissopoulos, S.

    2013-01-01

    transport of individual doses lead to a renewed interest in radionuclide generators such as 68Ge/68Ga, 82Sr/82Rb or even 44Ti/44Sc. For long time such generator nuclides were mainly produced at non-European accelerators (BNL, LANL, TRIUMF, iThemba Labs) that are mainly devoted to support nuclear physics...... challenged by unforeseen outages. This triggered the proposition and development of complementary accelerator-based production Methods of 99mTc. Long-term prospects for 99mTc supply in Europe will be discussed. •The emergence of new applications as well as rising costs and regulations for radioactive...... facilities. The recent addition of ARRONAX, a dedicated production facility in Nantes, France, and the upcoming inauguration of a 70 MeV cyclotron at the nuclear physics facility SPES at Legnaro, Italy will greatly improve Europe’s production capabilities of these nuclides. •Ongoing accelerator R&D for new...

  1. Historic images in nuclear medicine: 1976: the first issue of clinical nuclear medicine and the first human FDG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Søren; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2014-08-01

    In 1976, 2 major molecular imaging events coincidentally took place: Clinical Nuclear Medicine was first published in June, and in August researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania created the first images in humans with F-FDG. FDG was initially developed as part of an evolution set in motion by fundamental research studies with positron-emitting tracers in the 1950s by Michel Ter-Pegossian and coworkers at the Washington University. Today, Clinical Nuclear Medicine is a valued scientific contributor to the molecular imaging community, and FDG PET is considered the backbone of this evolving and exciting discipline.

  2. Distributed Detection in Sensor Networks with Limited Range Multi-Modal Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Ermis, E

    2008-01-01

    We consider a multi-object detection problem over a sensor network (SNET) with limited range multi-modal sensors. Limited range sensing environment arises in a sensing field prone to signal attenuation and path losses. The general problem complements the widely considered decentralized detection problem where all sensors observe the same object. In this paper we develop a distributed detection approach based on recent development of the false discovery rate (FDR) and the associated BH test procedure. The BH procedure is based on rank ordering of scalar test statistics. We first develop scalar test statistics for multidimensional data to handle multi-modal sensor observations and establish its optimality in terms of the BH procedure. We then propose a distributed algorithm in the ideal case of infinite attenuation for identification of sensors that are in the immediate vicinity of an object. We demonstrate communication message scalability to large SNETs by showing that the upper bound on the communication mes...

  3. Integration of Multi-Modal Biomedical Data to Predict Cancer Grade and Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, John H; Hoffman, Ryan; Kothari, Sonal; Wu, Po-Yen; Wang, May D

    2016-02-01

    The Big Data era in Biomedical research has resulted in large-cohort data repositories such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). These repositories routinely contain hundreds of matched patient samples for genomic, proteomic, imaging, and clinical data modalities, enabling holistic and multi-modal integrative analysis of human disease. Using TCGA renal and ovarian cancer data, we conducted a novel investigation of multi-modal data integration by combining histopathological image and RNA-seq data. We compared the performances of two integrative prediction methods: majority vote and stacked generalization. Results indicate that integration of multiple data modalities improves prediction of cancer grade and outcome. Specifically, stacked generalization, a method that integrates multiple data modalities to produce a single prediction result, outperforms both single-data-modality prediction and majority vote. Moreover, stacked generalization reveals the contribution of each data modality (and specific features within each data modality) to the final prediction result and may provide biological insights to explain prediction performance.

  4. Design and experimental study of a multi-modal piezoelectric energy harvester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xing Yu [School of Energy, Power and Mechanical Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing (China); Oyadiji, S. Olutunde [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United States)

    2017-01-15

    A multi-modal piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is designed in this article. It consists of a cantilevered base beam and some upper and lower layer beams with rigid masses bonded between the beams as spacers. For a four-layer harvester subjected to random base excitations, relocating the mass positions leads to the generation of up to four close resonance frequencies over the frequency range from 10 Hz to 100 Hz with relative large power output. The harvesters are connected with a resistance decade box and the frequency response functions of the voltage and power on resistive loads are determined. The experimental results are validated with the simulation results using the finite element method. On a certain level of power output, the experimental results show that the multi-modal harvesters can generate a frequency band that is more than two times greater than the frequency band produced by a cantilevered beam harvester.

  5. Outcome of transarterial chemoembolization-based multi-modal treatment in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Do Seon; Nam, Soon Woo; Bae, Si Hyun; Kim, Jin Dong; Jang, Jeong Won; Song, Myeong Jun; Lee, Sung Won; Kim, Hee Yeon; Lee, Young Joon; Chun, Ho Jong; You, Young Kyoung; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-02-28

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)-based multimodal treatment in patients with large hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 146 consecutive patients were included in the analysis, and their medical records and radiological data were reviewed retrospectively. In total, 119 patients received TACE-based multi-modal treatments, and the remaining 27 received conservative management. Overall survival (Pmulti-modal treatment group compared with the TACE-only group (P=0.002) but also in the surgical treatment group compared with the loco-regional treatment-only group (Pmulti-modal treatment (P=0.002) were identified as independent post-treatment prognostic factors. TACE-based multi-modal treatments were safe and more beneficial than conservative management. Salvage surgery after successful downstaging resulted in long-term survival in patients with large, unresectable HCC.

  6. mDCC_tools: characterizing multi-modal atomic motions in molecular dynamics trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Mohan, Neetha; Fukuda, Ikuo; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-08-15

    We previously reported the multi-modal Dynamic Cross Correlation (mDCC) method for analyzing molecular dynamics trajectories. This method quantifies the correlation coefficients of atomic motions with complex multi-modal behaviors by using a Bayesian-based pattern recognition technique that can effectively capture transiently formed, unstable interactions. Here, we present an open source toolkit for performing the mDCC analysis, including pattern recognitions, complex network analyses and visualizations. We include a tutorial document that thoroughly explains how to apply this toolkit for an analysis, using the example trajectory of the 100 ns simulation of an engineered endothelin-1 peptide dimer. The source code is available for free at http://www.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp/rcsfp/pi/mdcctools/, implemented in C ++ and Python, and supported on Linux. kota.kasahara@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. A flexible graphical model for multi-modal parcellation of the cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisot, Sarah; Glocker, Ben; Ktena, Sofia Ira; Arslan, Salim; Schirmer, Markus D; Rueckert, Daniel

    2017-09-06

    Advances in neuroimaging have provided a tremendous amount of in-vivo information on the brain's organisation. Its anatomy and cortical organisation can be investigated from the point of view of several imaging modalities, many of which have been studied for mapping functionally specialised cortical areas. There is strong evidence that a single modality is not sufficient to fully identify the brain's cortical organisation. Combining multiple modalities in the same parcellation task has the potential to provide more accurate and robust subdivisions of the cortex. Nonetheless, existing brain parcellation methods are typically developed and tested on single modalities using a specific type of information. In this paper, we propose Graph-based Multi-modal Parcellation (GraMPa), an iterative framework designed to handle the large variety of available input modalities to tackle the multi-modal parcellation task. At each iteration, we compute a set of parcellations from different modalities and fuse them based on their local reliabilities. The fused parcellation is used to initialise the next iteration, forcing the parcellations to converge towards a set of mutually informed modality specific parcellations, where correspondences are established. We explore two different multi-modal configurations for group-wise parcellation using resting-state fMRI, diffusion MRI tractography, myelin maps and task fMRI. Quantitative and qualitative results on the Human Connectome Project database show that integrating multi-modal information yields a stronger agreement with well established atlases and more robust connectivity networks that provide a better representation of the population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Importance of multi-modal approaches to effectively identify cataract cases from electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peissig, Peggy L; Rasmussen, Luke V; Berg, Richard L; Linneman, James G; McCarty, Catherine A; Waudby, Carol; Chen, Lin; Denny, Joshua C; Wilke, Russell A; Pathak, Jyotishman; Carrell, David; Kho, Abel N; Starren, Justin B

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in using electronic health records (EHRs) to identify subjects for genomic association studies, due in part to the availability of large amounts of clinical data and the expected cost efficiencies of subject identification. We describe the construction and validation of an EHR-based algorithm to identify subjects with age-related cataracts. We used a multi-modal strategy consisting of structured database querying, natural language processing on free-text documents, and optical character recognition on scanned clinical images to identify cataract subjects and related cataract attributes. Extensive validation on 3657 subjects compared the multi-modal results to manual chart review. The algorithm was also implemented at participating electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics (eMERGE) institutions. An EHR-based cataract phenotyping algorithm was successfully developed and validated, resulting in positive predictive values (PPVs) >95%. The multi-modal approach increased the identification of cataract subject attributes by a factor of three compared to single-mode approaches while maintaining high PPV. Components of the cataract algorithm were successfully deployed at three other institutions with similar accuracy. A multi-modal strategy incorporating optical character recognition and natural language processing may increase the number of cases identified while maintaining similar PPVs. Such algorithms, however, require that the needed information be embedded within clinical documents. We have demonstrated that algorithms to identify and characterize cataracts can be developed utilizing data collected via the EHR. These algorithms provide a high level of accuracy even when implemented across multiple EHRs and institutional boundaries.

  9. Making Faces - State-Space Models Applied to Multi-Modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Schiøler, Tue

    2005-01-01

    The two main focus areas of this thesis are State-Space Models and multi modal signal processing. The general State-Space Model is investigated and an addition to the class of sequential sampling methods is proposed. This new algorithm is denoted as the Parzen Particle Filter. Furthermore, the Ma...... application an information theoretic vector quantizer is also proposed. Based on interactions between particles, it is shown how a quantizing scheme based on an analytic cost function can be derived....

  10. Multi-modal gesture recognition using integrated model of motion, audio and video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutsu, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Takaki; Obara, Junya; Kusajima, Ikuo; Takeichi, Kazunari; Takano, Wataru; Nakamura, Yoshihiko

    2015-07-01

    Gesture recognition is used in many practical applications such as human-robot interaction, medical rehabilitation and sign language. With increasing motion sensor development, multiple data sources have become available, which leads to the rise of multi-modal gesture recognition. Since our previous approach to gesture recognition depends on a unimodal system, it is difficult to classify similar motion patterns. In order to solve this problem, a novel approach which integrates motion, audio and video models is proposed by using dataset captured by Kinect. The proposed system can recognize observed gestures by using three models. Recognition results of three models are integrated by using the proposed framework and the output becomes the final result. The motion and audio models are learned by using Hidden Markov Model. Random Forest which is the video classifier is used to learn the video model. In the experiments to test the performances of the proposed system, the motion and audio models most suitable for gesture recognition are chosen by varying feature vectors and learning methods. Additionally, the unimodal and multi-modal models are compared with respect to recognition accuracy. All the experiments are conducted on dataset provided by the competition organizer of MMGRC, which is a workshop for Multi-Modal Gesture Recognition Challenge. The comparison results show that the multi-modal model composed of three models scores the highest recognition rate. This improvement of recognition accuracy means that the complementary relationship among three models improves the accuracy of gesture recognition. The proposed system provides the application technology to understand human actions of daily life more precisely.

  11. Spatio-temporal multi-modality ontology for indexing and retrieving satellite images

    OpenAIRE

    MESSOUDI, Wassim; FARAH, Imed Riadh; SAHEB ETTABAA, Karim; Ben Ghezala, Henda; SOLAIMAN, Basel

    2009-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents spatio-temporal multi-modality ontology for indexing and retrieving satellite images in the high level to improve the quality of the system retrieval and to perform semantic in the retrieval process.Our approach is based on three modules: (1) regions and features extraction, (2) ontological indexing and (3) semantic image retrieval. The first module allows extracting regions from the satellite image using the fuzzy c-means FCM) segmentation algorith...

  12. A computer vision integration model for a multi-modal cognitive system

    OpenAIRE

    Vrecko A.; Skocaj D.; Hawes N.; Leonardis A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a general method for integrating visual components into a multi-modal cognitive system. The integration is very generic and can combine an arbitrary set of modalities. We illustrate our integration approach with a specific instantiation of the architecture schema that focuses on integration of vision and language: a cognitive system able to collaborate with a human, learn and display some understanding of its surroundings. As examples of cross-modal interaction we describe mechanis...

  13. Automatic extraction of geometric lip features with application to multi-modal speaker identification

    OpenAIRE

    Arsic, I.; Vilagut Abad, R.; Thiran, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of automatic extraction of the geometric lip features for the purposes of multi-modal speaker identification. The use of visual information from the mouth region can be of great importance for improving the speaker identification system performance in noisy conditions. We propose a novel method for automated lip features extraction that utilizes color space transformation and a fuzzy-based c-means clustering technique. Using the obtained visual cues close...

  14. Multi-modal Gesture Recognition using Integrated Model of Motion, Audio and Video

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOUTSU Yusuke; KOBAYASHI Takaki; OBARA Junya; KUSAJIMAIkuo; TAKEICHI Kazunari; TAKANO Wataru; NAKAMURA Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Gesture recognition is used in many practical applications such as human-robot interaction, medical rehabilitation and sign language. With increasing motion sensor development, multiple data sources have become available, which leads to the rise of multi-modal gesture recognition. Since our previous approach to gesture recognition depends on a unimodal system, it is difficult to classify similar motion patterns. In order to solve this problem, a novel approach which integrates motion, audio and video models is proposed by using dataset captured by Kinect. The proposed system can recognize observed gestures by using three models. Recognition results of three models are integrated by using the proposed framework and the output becomes the final result. The motion and audio models are learned by using Hidden Markov Model. Random Forest which is the video classifier is used to learn the video model. In the experiments to test the performances of the proposed system, the motion and audio models most suitable for gesture recognition are chosen by varying feature vectors and learning methods. Additionally, the unimodal and multi-modal models are compared with respect to recognition accuracy. All the experiments are conducted on dataset provided by the competition organizer of MMGRC, which is a workshop for Multi-Modal Gesture Recognition Challenge. The comparison results show that the multi-modal model composed of three models scores the highest recognition rate. This improvement of recognition accuracy means that the complementary relationship among three models improves the accuracy of gesture recognition. The proposed system provides the application technology to understand human actions of daily life more precisely.

  15. Adaptive Multi-Modal Data Mining and Fusion for Autonomous Intelligence Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Final DATES COVERED (From To) From 15-12-2006 to 15-12-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adaptive Multi-Modal Data Mining and Fusion For Autonomous...well as geospatial mapping of documents and images. 15. SUBJECT TERMS automated data mining , streaming data, geospatial Internet localization, Arabic...streaming text data mining . 1.1 Mixed Language Text Database Search A particularly useful component that was under development was on a mixed language

  16. Increasing the Efficiency of 6-DoF Visual Localization Using Multi-Modal Sensory Data

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Ronald; Wang, Sen; Wen, Hongkai; Trigoni, Niki; Markham, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Localization is a key requirement for mobile robot autonomy and human-robot interaction. Vision-based localization is accurate and flexible, however, it incurs a high computational burden which limits its application on many resource-constrained platforms. In this paper, we address the problem of performing real-time localization in large-scale 3D point cloud maps of ever-growing size. While most systems using multi-modal information reduce localization time by employing side-channel informat...

  17. Is there a place for music in nuclear medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannouli, Vaitsa; Lytras, Nikolaos; Syrmos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Music, since the time of ancient Greek Asclepieia is well-known for its influence on men's behavior. Nuclear Medicine can study the effect of music in humans' brain. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown brain areas to be activated after colored hearing vs after hearing to words. Furthermore, PET studies gave evidence that visual imagery of a musical stave is used by some musically untrained subjects in a pitch discrimination task. Listening to music combines intellect and emotion by intimate anatomical and functional connexions between temporal lobe, hippocampus and limbic system. Mozart's music is considered the best for bringing favorable music effects to men. This is called "the Mozart's effect" and by some is attributed to the fact that this kind of music's sequences tend to repeat regularly every 20-30sec, which is about the same length of time as brain-wave patterns. It may be useful to suggest that a certain kind of music played in the waiting room and/or in the examining room of a Nuclear Medicine Department may support patients ' cooperation with their physicians, especially in cardiac nuclear medicine. Furthermore, patients should be calm and not afraid of radioactivity. A long DVD program to be played during working hours can be decided between a music therapist and the Nuclear Medicine physician.

  18. Nuclear Medicine | RadTown USA | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    >Nuclear medicine procedures can help detect and treat disease by using a small amount of radioactive material, called a radiopharmaceutical. Some radiopharmaceuticals are used with imaging equipment to detect diseases. Others are placed in or near a cancerous tumor to shrink or kill it.

  19. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Two-Year Curriculum Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David

    This curriculum guide prescribes an educational program for training nuclear medicine technologists. Following a brief section on program development, the curriculum is both outlined and presented in detail. For each of the 44 courses, the following information is given: (1) sequential placement of the course in the curriculum; (2) course…

  20. Australian per caput dose from diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, A; Wallace, A; Marks, P; Edmonds, K; Tingey, D; Johnston, P

    2013-10-01

    The largest man-made contributor to the ionising radiation dose to the Australian population is from diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine. The last estimation of this dose was made in 2004 (1.3 mSv), this paper describes a recent re-evaluation of this dose to reflect the changes in imaging trends and technology. The estimation was calculated by summing the dose from five modalities, computed tomography (CT), general radiography/fluoroscopy, interventional procedures, mammography and nuclear medicine. Estimates were made using Australian frequency data and dose data from a range of Australian and international sources of average effective dose values. The ionising radiation dose to the Australian population in 2010 from diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine is estimated to be 1.7 mSv (1.11 mSv CT, 0.30 mSv general radiography/fluoroscopy, 0.17 mSv interventional procedures, 0.03 mSv mammography and 0.10 mSv nuclear medicine). This exceeds the estimate of 1.5 mSv per person from natural background and cosmic radiation.

  1. Multi-modal image registration based on gradient orientations of minimal uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nigris, Dante; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new multi-scale technique for multi-modal image registration based on the alignment of selected gradient orientations of reduced uncertainty. We show how the registration robustness and accuracy can be improved by restricting the evaluation of gradient orientation alignment to locations where the uncertainty of fixed image gradient orientations is minimal, which we formally demonstrate correspond to locations of high gradient magnitude. We also embed a computationally efficient technique for estimating the gradient orientations of the transformed moving image (rather than resampling pixel intensities and recomputing image gradients). We have applied our method to different rigid multi-modal registration contexts. Our approach outperforms mutual information and other competing metrics in the context of rigid multi-modal brain registration, where we show sub-millimeter accuracy with cases obtained from the retrospective image registration evaluation project. Furthermore, our approach shows significant improvements over standard methods in the highly challenging clinical context of image guided neurosurgery, where we demonstrate misregistration of less than 2 mm with relation to expert selected landmarks for the registration of pre-operative brain magnetic resonance images to intra-operative ultrasound images.

  2. Multi-modal discriminative dictionary learning for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wu, Xia; Xu, Lele; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Li, Rui

    2017-10-01

    The differentiation of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD), from normal control (NC) is important as the recent research emphasis on early pre-clinical stage for possible disease abnormality identification, intervention and even possible prevention. The current study puts forward a multi-modal supervised within-class-similarity discriminative dictionary learning algorithm (SCDDL) we introduced previously for distinguishing MCI from NC. The proposed new algorithm was based on weighted combination and named as multi-modality SCDDL (mSCDDL). Structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI), fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and florbetapir PET data of 113 AD patients, 110 MCI patients and 117 NC subjects from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative database were adopted for classification between MCI and NC, as well as between AD and NC. Adopting mSCDDL, the classification accuracy achieved 98.5% for AD vs. NC and 82.8% for MCI vs. NC, which were superior to or comparable with the results of some other state-of-the-art approaches as reported in recent multi-modality publications. The mSCDDL procedure was a promising tool in assisting early diseases diagnosis using neuroimaging data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis de Senneville, B; Zachiu, C; Ries, M; Moonen, C

    2016-10-21

    Image registration is part of a large variety of medical applications including diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and/or treatment effectiveness and, more recently, therapy guidance. Such applications usually involve several imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, x-ray or magnetic resonance imaging, either separately or combined. In the current work, we propose a non-rigid multi-modal registration method (namely EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration) that aims at maximizing edge alignment between the images being registered. The proposed algorithm requires only contrasts between physiological tissues, preferably present in both image modalities, and assumes deformable/elastic tissues. Given both is shown to be well suitable for non-rigid co-registration across different image types/contrasts (T1/T2) as well as different modalities (CT/MRI). This is achieved using a variational scheme that provides a fast algorithm with a low number of control parameters. Results obtained on an annotated CT data set were comparable to the ones provided by state-of-the-art multi-modal image registration algorithms, for all tested experimental conditions (image pre-filtering, image intensity variation, noise perturbation). Moreover, we demonstrate that, compared to existing approaches, our method possesses increased robustness to transient structures (i.e. that are only present in some of the images).

  4. A multi-modal face recognition method using complete local derivative patterns and depth maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shouyi; Dai, Xu; Ouyang, Peng; Liu, Leibo; Wei, Shaojun

    2014-10-20

    In this paper, we propose a multi-modal 2D + 3D face recognition method for a smart city application based on a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) and various kinds of sensors. Depth maps are exploited for the 3D face representation. As for feature extraction, we propose a new feature called Complete Local Derivative Pattern (CLDP). It adopts the idea of layering and has four layers. In the whole system, we apply CLDP separately on Gabor features extracted from a 2D image and depth map. Then, we obtain two features: CLDP-Gabor and CLDP-Depth. The two features weighted by the corresponding coefficients are combined together in the decision level to compute the total classification distance. At last, the probe face is assigned the identity with the smallest classification distance. Extensive experiments are conducted on three different databases. The results demonstrate the robustness and superiority of the new approach. The experimental results also prove that the proposed multi-modal 2D + 3D method is superior to other multi-modal ones and CLDP performs better than other Local Binary Pattern (LBP) based features.

  5. EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Senneville, B. Denis; Zachiu, C.; Ries, M.; Moonen, C.

    2016-10-01

    Image registration is part of a large variety of medical applications including diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and/or treatment effectiveness and, more recently, therapy guidance. Such applications usually involve several imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, x-ray or magnetic resonance imaging, either separately or combined. In the current work, we propose a non-rigid multi-modal registration method (namely EVolution: an edge-based variational method for non-rigid multi-modal image registration) that aims at maximizing edge alignment between the images being registered. The proposed algorithm requires only contrasts between physiological tissues, preferably present in both image modalities, and assumes deformable/elastic tissues. Given both is shown to be well suitable for non-rigid co-registration across different image types/contrasts (T1/T2) as well as different modalities (CT/MRI). This is achieved using a variational scheme that provides a fast algorithm with a low number of control parameters. Results obtained on an annotated CT data set were comparable to the ones provided by state-of-the-art multi-modal image registration algorithms, for all tested experimental conditions (image pre-filtering, image intensity variation, noise perturbation). Moreover, we demonstrate that, compared to existing approaches, our method possesses increased robustness to transient structures (i.e. that are only present in some of the images).

  6. Discriminative multi-task feature selection for multi-modality classification of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tingting; Zu, Chen; Jie, Biao; Shen, Dinggang; Zhang, Daoqiang

    2016-09-01

    Recently, multi-task based feature selection methods have been used in multi-modality based classification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, i.e., mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, in traditional multi-task feature selection methods, some useful discriminative information among subjects is usually not well mined for further improving the subsequent classification performance. Accordingly, in this paper, we propose a discriminative multi-task feature selection method to select the most discriminative features for multi-modality based classification of AD/MCI. Specifically, for each modality, we train a linear regression model using the corresponding modality of data, and further enforce the group-sparsity regularization on weights of those regression models for joint selection of common features across multiple modalities. Furthermore, we propose a discriminative regularization term based on the intra-class and inter-class Laplacian matrices to better use the discriminative information among subjects. To evaluate our proposed method, we perform extensive experiments on 202 subjects, including 51 AD patients, 99 MCI patients, and 52 healthy controls (HC), from the baseline MRI and FDG-PET image data of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The experimental results show that our proposed method not only improves the classification performance, but also has potential to discover the disease-related biomarkers useful for diagnosis of disease, along with the comparison to several state-of-the-art methods for multi-modality based AD/MCI classification.

  7. A Multi-Modality CMOS Sensor Array for Cell-Based Assay and Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Taiyun; Park, Jong Seok; Butts, Jessica C; Hookway, Tracy A; Su, Amy; Zhu, Chengjie; Styczynski, Mark P; McDevitt, Todd C; Wang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated multi-modality CMOS cellular sensor array with four sensing modalities to characterize different cell physiological responses, including extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance mapping, optical detection with shadow imaging and bioluminescence sensing, and thermal monitoring. The sensor array consists of nine parallel pixel groups and nine corresponding signal conditioning blocks. Each pixel group comprises one temperature sensor and 16 tri-modality sensor pixels, while each tri-modality sensor pixel can be independently configured for extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance measurement (voltage excitation/current sensing), and optical detection. This sensor array supports multi-modality cellular sensing at the pixel level, which enables holistic cell characterization and joint-modality physiological monitoring on the same cellular sample with a pixel resolution of 80 μm × 100 μm. Comprehensive biological experiments with different living cell samples demonstrate the functionality and benefit of the proposed multi-modality sensing in cell-based assay and drug screening.

  8. A Multi-Modal Face Recognition Method Using Complete Local Derivative Patterns and Depth Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyi Yin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a multi-modal 2D + 3D face recognition method for a smart city application based on a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN and various kinds of sensors. Depth maps are exploited for the 3D face representation. As for feature extraction, we propose a new feature called Complete Local Derivative Pattern (CLDP. It adopts the idea of layering and has four layers. In the whole system, we apply CLDP separately on Gabor features extracted from a 2D image and depth map. Then, we obtain two features: CLDP-Gabor and CLDP-Depth. The two features weighted by the corresponding coefficients are combined together in the decision level to compute the total classification distance. At last, the probe face is assigned the identity with the smallest classification distance. Extensive experiments are conducted on three different databases. The results demonstrate the robustness and superiority of the new approach. The experimental results also prove that the proposed multi-modal 2D + 3D method is superior to other multi-modal ones and CLDP performs better than other Local Binary Pattern (LBP based features.

  9. American College of Nuclear Physics 1991 DOE day symposium: Aids and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Since first described in 1981, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has become the medical dilemma of the century. AIDS retrovirus, and the economic consequences of this exposure are staggering. AIDS has been the topic of conferences and symposia worldwide. This symposium, to be held on January 25, 1991, at the 17th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the American College of Nuclear Physicians, will expose the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists to their role in the diagnosis of AIDS, and will educate them on the socio-economic and ethical issues related to this problem. In addition, the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists must be aware of their role in the management of their departments in order to adequately protect the health care professionals working in their laboratories. Strategies are currently being developed to control the spread of bloodborne diseases within the health care setting, and it is incumbent upon the Nuclear Medicine community to be aware of such strategies.

  10. Nuclear data for medicine and electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Bergenwall, B.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Mermod, P.; Nilsson, L.; Oesterlund, M. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Dangtip, S.; Tippawan, U. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)]|[Fast Neutron Research Facility, Chiang Mai Univ. (Thailand); Olsson, N. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)]|[Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden); Prokofiev, A.V.; Renberg, P.U. [The Svedberg Lab., Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Fast-neutron cancer therapy is now routinely performed at about a dozen facilities worldwide. Typical neutron energies for treatment are up to 70 MeV. Lately, it has been recognized that cosmic-ray neutrons, with energies up to many GeV, give significant dose contributions to airplane personnel. In fact, airplane personnel are the category, which receives the largest doses in civil work. These cosmic-ray neutrons also create a reliability problem in modern electronics. A neutron can cause a nuclear reaction inside or near a chip, thus releasing free charge, which in turn could, e.g., flip the memory content or change the result of a logical operation. For all these applications, improved knowledge of the underlying nuclear physics is of major importance. The MEDLEY setup, which has been extensively used for ADS related work, has been used for measurements of cross sections related to biomedicine and electronics reliability. Simulations of single-event upsets are described as well as accelerated device testing activities at neutron beams. (orig.)

  11. High Performance Organ-Specific Nuclear Medicine Imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stan

    2006-04-01

    One of the exciting applications of nuclear science is nuclear medicine. Well-known diagnostic imaging tools such as PET and SPECT (as well as MRI) were developed as spin-offs of basic scientific research in atomic and nuclear physics. Development of modern instrumentation for applications in particle physics experiments offers an opportunity to contribute to development of improved nuclear medicine (gamma and positron) imagers, complementing the present set of standard imaging tools (PET, SPECT, MRI, ultrasound, fMRI, MEG, etc). Several examples of new high performance imagers developed in national laboratories in collaboration with academia will be given to demonstrate this spin-off activity. These imagers are designed to specifically image organs such as breast, heart, head (brain), or prostate. The remaining and potentially most important challenging application field for dedicated nuclear medicine imagers is to assist with cancer radiation treatments. Better control of radiation dose delivery requires development of new compact in-situ imagers becoming integral parts of the radiation delivery systems using either external beams or based on radiation delivery by inserting or injecting radioactive sources (gamma, beta or alpha emitters) into tumors.

  12. Nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging in sports injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaudermans, Andor W.J.M. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Gielen, Jan L.M.A. [Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Sports Medicine; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Medicine; Zwerver, Johannes (ed.) [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Center for Sports Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This comprehensive book describes in detail how nuclear medicine and radiology can meet the needs of the sports medicine physician by assisting in precise diagnosis, clarification of pathophysiology, imaging of treatment outcome and monitoring of rehabilitation. Individual sections focus on nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging of injuries to the head and face, spine, chest, shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, pelvic region, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot. The pathophysiology of sports injuries frequently encountered in different regions of the body is described from the perspective of each specialty, and the potential diagnostic and management benefits offered by the new hybrid imaging modalities - SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MRI - are explained. In addition, a range of basic and general issues are addressed, including imaging of the injuries characteristic of specific sports. It is hoped that this book will promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication and improve the management of injured recreational or elite athletes.

  13. Therapeutic Applications of Monte Carlo Calculations in Nuclear Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Sgouros, George

    2003-01-01

    This book examines the applications of Monte Carlo (MC) calculations in therapeutic nuclear medicine, from basic principles to computer implementations of software packages and their applications in radiation dosimetry and treatment planning. It is written for nuclear medicine physicists and physicians as well as radiation oncologists, and can serve as a supplementary text for medical imaging, radiation dosimetry and nuclear engineering graduate courses in science, medical and engineering faculties. With chapters is written by recognised authorities in that particular field, the book covers the entire range of MC applications in therapeutic medical and health physics, from its use in imaging prior to therapy to dose distribution modelling targeted radiotherapy. The contributions discuss the fundamental concepts of radiation dosimetry, radiobiological aspects of targeted radionuclide therapy and the various components and steps required for implementing a dose calculation and treatment planning methodology in ...

  14. Application of Technetium and Rhenium in Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, Roger

    2012-06-01

    Technetium and Rhenium are the two lower elements in the manganese triad. Whereas rhenium is known as an important part of high resistance alloys, technetium is mostly known as a cumbersome product of nuclear fission. It is less known that its metastable isotope 99mTc is of utmost importance in nuclear medicine diagnosis. The technical application of elemental rhenium is currently complemented by investigations of its isotope 188Re, which could play a central role in the future for internal, targeted radiotherapy. This article will briefly describe the basic principles behind diagnostic methods with radionuclides for molecular imaging, review the 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals currently in clinical routine and focus on the chemical challenges and current developments towards improved, radiolabeled compounds for diagnosis and therapy in nuclear medicine.

  15. 42 CFR 482.53 - Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine... HOSPITALS Optional Hospital Services § 482.53 Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services. If the hospital provides nuclear medicine services, those services must meet the needs of the patients...

  16. An efficient nano-based theranostic system for multi-modal imaging-guided photothermal sterilization in gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Rui; Du, Yingda; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-07-01

    Since understanding the healthy status of gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) is of vital importance, clinical implementation for GI tract-related disease have attracted much more attention along with the rapid development of modern medicine. Here, a multifunctional theranostic system combining X-rays/CT/photothermal/photoacoustic mapping of GI tract and imaging-guided photothermal anti-bacterial treatment is designed and constructed. PEGylated W18O49 nanosheets (PEG-W18O49) are created via a facile solvothermal method and an in situ probe-sonication approach. In terms of excellent colloidal stability, low cytotoxicity, and neglectable hemolysis of PEG-W18O49, we demonstrate the first example of high-performance four-modal imaging of GI tract by using these nanosheets as contrast agents. More importantly, due to their intrinsic absorption of NIR light, glutaraldehyde-modified PEG-W18O49 are successfully applied as fault-free targeted photothermal agents for imaging-guided killing of bacteria on a mouse infection model. Critical to pre-clinical and clinical prospects, long-term toxicity is further investigated after oral administration of these theranostic agents. These kinds of tungsten-based nanomaterials exhibit great potential as multi-modal contrast agents for directed visualization of GI tract and anti-bacterial agents for phothothermal sterilization.

  17. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: models and identifiability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Garbarino, Sara; Vivaldi, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the first of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. Specifically, here we discuss the identifiability problem for a general n-dimension compartmental system and provide uniqueness results in the case of two-compartment and three-compartment compartmental models. The second paper will utilize this framework in order to show how nonlinear regularization schemes can be applied to obtain numerical estimates of the tracer coefficients in the case of nuclear medicine data corresponding to brain, liver and kidney physiology.

  18. Role of nuclear medicine in ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashida, Kohei; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Naito, Hiroaki; Omine, Hiromi; Kozuka, Takahiro (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    With the progress in gamma camera and computer system, nuclear medicine has been applied for diagnostic tool in ischemic heart disease. There are two devices for cardiac images; (1) Radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA) by in vivo sup(99m)Tc-RBC labeling (2) Myocardial imaging by /sup 201/Tlcl. RNA can evaluate the kinesis of wall motion of left ventricle with gated pool scan and also detect reserve of cardiac function with exercise study. Myocardial imaging at rest can identify myocardial necrosis and the imaging in exercise can detect myocardial ischemia. The elaborateness and reproducibility of cardiac image in nuclear medicine will play the great role to evaluate clinical stage of ischemic heart disease by not only imaging but also functional diagnosis.

  19. Search of new scintillation materials for nuclear medicine application

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, M V

    2000-01-01

    Oxide crystals have a great potential to develop new advanced scintillation materials which are dense, fast, and bright. This combination of parameters, when combined to affordable price, gives a prospect for materials to be applied in nuclear medicine devices. Some of them have been developed for the last two decades along the line of rear-earth (RE) garnet (RE/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/) oxiorthosilicate (RE/sub 2/SiO/sub 5/) and perovskite (REAlO/sub 3/) crystals doped with Ce ions. Among recently developed oxide materials the lead tungstate scintillator (PWO) becomes the most used scintillation material in high energy physics experiments due to its application in CMS and ALICE experiments at LHC. In this paper we discuss scintillation properties of some new heavy compounds doped with Ce as well as light yield improvement of PWO crystals to apply them in low energy physics and nuclear medicine. (18 refs).

  20. Forensic Medicine: Age Written in Teeth by Nuclear Bomb Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2005-05-04

    Establishing the age of individuals is an important step in identification and a frequent challenge in forensic medicine. This can be done with high precision up to adolescence by analysis of dentition, but establishing the age of adults has remained difficult. Here we show that measuring {sup 14}C from nuclear bomb tests in tooth enamel provides a sensitive way to establish when a person was born.

  1. Basic principles in the radiation dosimetry of nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabin, Michael; Xu, Xie George

    2014-05-01

    The basic principles of the use of radiation dosimetry in nuclear medicine are reviewed. The basic structure of the main mathematical equations are given and formal dosimetry systems are discussed. An extensive overview of the history and current status of anthropomorphic models (phantoms) is given. The sources and magnitudes of uncertainties in calculated internal dose estimates are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A hypo-status in drug-dependent brain revealed by multi-modal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze; Suh, Jesse; Duan, Dingna; Darnley, Stefanie; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Jian; O'Brien, Charles; Childress, Anna Rose

    2016-09-22

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disorder with no proven effective cure. Assessing both structural and functional brain alterations by using multi-modal, rather than purely unimodal imaging techniques, may provide a more comprehensive understanding of the brain mechanisms underlying addiction, which in turn may facilitate future treatment strategies. However, this type of research remains scarce in the literature. We acquired multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging from 20 cocaine-addicted individuals and 19 age-matched controls. Compared with controls, cocaine addicts showed a multi-modal hypo-status with (1) decreased brain tissue volume in the medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC); (2) hypo-perfusion in the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, right temporal cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and (3) reduced irregularity of resting state activity in the OFC and limbic areas, as well as the cingulate, visual and parietal cortices. In the cocaine-addicted brain, larger tissue volume in the medial OFC, anterior cingulate cortex and ventral striatum and smaller insular tissue volume were associated with higher cocaine dependence levels. Decreased perfusion in the amygdala and insula was also correlated with higher cocaine dependence levels. Tissue volume, perfusion, and brain entropy in the insula and prefrontal cortex, all showed a trend of negative correlation with drug craving scores. The three modalities showed voxel-wise correlation in various brain regions, and combining them improved patient versus control brain classification accuracy. These results, for the first time, demonstrate a comprehensive cocaine-dependence and craving-related hypo-status regarding the tissue volume, perfusion and resting brain irregularity in the cocaine-addicted brain. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. Multi-modal 2D-3D non-rigid registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prümmer, M.; Hornegger, J.; Pfister, M.; Dörfler, A.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-modal non-rigid 2D-3D registration technique. This method allows a non-rigid alignment of a patient pre-operatively computed tomography (CT) to few intra operatively acquired fluoroscopic X-ray images obtained with a C-arm system. This multi-modal approach is especially focused on the 3D alignment of high contrast reconstructed volumes with intra-interventional low contrast X-ray images in order to make use of up-to-date information for surgical guidance and other interventions. The key issue of non-rigid 2D-3D registration is how to define the distance measure between high contrast 3D data and low contrast 2D projections. In this work, we use algebraic reconstruction theory to handle this problem. We modify the Euler-Lagrange equation by introducing a new 3D force. This external force term is computed from the residual of the algebraic reconstruction procedures. In the multi-modal case we replace the residual between the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) and observed X-ray images with a statistical based distance measure. We integrate the algebraic reconstruction technique into a variational registration framework, so that the 3D displacement field is driven to minimize the reconstruction distance between the volumetric data and its 2D projections using mutual information (MI). The benefits of this 2D-3D registration approach are its scalability in the number of used X-ray reference images and the proposed distance that can handle low contrast fluoroscopies as well. Experimental results are presented on both artificial phantom and 3D C-arm CT images.

  4. Deep convolutional neural networks for multi-modality isointense infant brain image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Li, Rongjian; Deng, Houtao; Wang, Li; Lin, Weili; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-03-01

    The segmentation of infant brain tissue images into white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an important role in studying early brain development in health and disease. In the isointense stage (approximately 6-8 months of age), WM and GM exhibit similar levels of intensity in both T1 and T2 MR images, making the tissue segmentation very challenging. Only a small number of existing methods have been designed for tissue segmentation in this isointense stage; however, they only used a single T1 or T2 images, or the combination of T1 and T2 images. In this paper, we propose to use deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for segmenting isointense stage brain tissues using multi-modality MR images. CNNs are a type of deep models in which trainable filters and local neighborhood pooling operations are applied alternatingly on the raw input images, resulting in a hierarchy of increasingly complex features. Specifically, we used multi-modality information from T1, T2, and fractional anisotropy (FA) images as inputs and then generated the segmentation maps as outputs. The multiple intermediate layers applied convolution, pooling, normalization, and other operations to capture the highly nonlinear mappings between inputs and outputs. We compared the performance of our approach with that of the commonly used segmentation methods on a set of manually segmented isointense stage brain images. Results showed that our proposed model significantly outperformed prior methods on infant brain tissue segmentation. In addition, our results indicated that integration of multi-modality images led to significant performance improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sustainable Multi-Modal Sensing by a Single Sensor Utilizing the Passivity of an Elastic Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Takuma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When a robot equipped with compliant joints driven by elastic actuators contacts an object and its joints are deformed, multi-modal information, including the magnitude and direction of the applied force and the deformation of the joint, is used to enhance the performance of the robot such as dexterous manipulation. In conventional approaches, some types of sensors used to obtain the multi-modal information are attached to the point of contact where the force is applied and at the joint. However, this approach is not sustainable for daily use in robots, i.e., not durable or robust, because the sensors can undergo damage due to the application of excessive force and wear due to repeated contacts. Further, multiple types of sensors are required to measure such physical values, which add to the complexity of the device system of the robot. In our approach, a single type of sensor is used and it is located at a point distant from the contact point and the joint, and the information is obtained indirectly by the measurement of certain physical parameters that are influenced by the applied force and the joint deformation. In this study, we employ the McKibben pneumatic actuator whose inner pressure changes passively when a force is applied to the actuator. We derive the relationships between information and the pressures of a two-degrees-of-freedom (2-DoF joint mechanism driven by four pneumatic actuators. Experimental results show that the multi-modal information can be obtained by using the set of pressures measured before and after the force is applied. Further, we apply our principle to obtain the stiffness values of certain contacting objects that can subsequently be categorized by using the aforementioned relationships.

  6. Initial experience with a nuclear medicine viewing workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Robert M.; Burt, Robert W.

    1992-07-01

    Graphical User Interfaced (GUI) workstations are now available from commercial vendors. We recently installed a GUI workstation in our nuclear medicine reading room for exclusive use of staff and resident physicians. The system is built upon a Macintosh platform and has been available as a DELTAmanager from MedImage and more recently as an ICON V from Siemens Medical Systems. The workstation provides only display functions and connects to our existing nuclear medicine imaging system via ethernet. The system has some processing capabilities to create oblique, sagittal and coronal views from transverse tomographic views. Hard copy output is via a screen save device and a thermal color printer. The DELTAmanager replaced a MicroDELTA workstation which had both process and view functions. The mouse activated GUI has made remarkable changes to physicians'' use of the nuclear medicine viewing system. Training time to view and review studies has been reduced from hours to about 30-minutes. Generation of oblique views and display of brain and heart tomographic studies has been reduced from about 30-minutes of technician''s time to about 5-minutes of physician''s time. Overall operator functionality has been increased so that resident physicians with little prior computer experience can access all images on the image server and display pertinent patient images when consulting with other staff.

  7. Recent applications of nuclear medicine in diagnostics: II part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Treglia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Positron-emission tomography (PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT are effective diagnostic imaging tools in several clinical settings. The aim of this article (the second of a 2-part series is to examine some of the more recent applications of nuclear medicine imaging techniques, particularly in the fields of neurology, cardiology, and infection/inflammation. Discussion: A review of the literature reveals that in the field of neurology nuclear medicine techniques are most widely used to investigate cognitive deficits and dementia (particularly those associated with Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, and movement disorders. In cardiology, SPECT and PET also play important roles in the work-up of patients with coronary artery disease, providing accurate information on the state of the myocardium (perfusion, metabolism, and innervation. White blood cell scintigraphy and FDG-PET are widely used to investigate many infectious/inflammatory processes. In each of these areas, the review discusses the use of recently developed radiopharmaceuticals, the growth of tomographic nuclear medicine techniques, and the ways in which these advances are improving molecular imaging of biologic processes at the cellular level.

  8. Recent applications of nuclear medicine in diagnostics (I part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Treglia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aim of this review is to describe the recent applications of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnostics, particularly in oncology. Materials and methods: We reviewed scientific literature data searching for the current role of tomographic nuclear medicine techniques (SPECTand PET in oncology and summarized the main applications of these techniques. Results: Nuclear medicine techniques have a key role in oncology allowing early diagnosis of many tumours, an accurate staging of disease and evalutation of treatment response. Hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT imaging systems now provide metabolic and functional information from SPECTor PETcombined with the high spatial resolution and anatomic information of CT. The most frequent applications of SPECT/CT in oncology concern thyroid tumours, neuroendocrine tumours, bone metastases and lymph node mapping. Furthermore the evaluation of many tumours may benefit from PET/CT imaging. Discussion: The recent development of new radiopharmaceuticals and the growth of hybrid tomographic devices, such as SPECT/CT and PET/CT, now permits molecular imaging of biologic processes at the cellular level to improve both the diagnosis and treatment of many tumours.

  9. Multi-modal spectroscopic imaging with synchrotron light to study mechanisms of brain disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Kelly L.; Fimognari, Nicholas; Hollings, Ashley; Kiernan, Mitchell; Lam, Virginie; Tidy, Rebecca J.; Takechi, Ryu; George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Mamo, John C.; Harris, Hugh H.; Hackett, Mark J.

    2017-04-01

    The international health care costs associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia have been predicted to reach $2 trillion USD by 2030. As such, there is urgent need to develop new treatments and diagnostic methods to stem an international health crisis. A major limitation to therapy and diagnostic development is the lack of complete understanding about the disease mechanisms. Spectroscopic methods at synchrotron light sources, such as FTIR, XRF, and XAS, offer a "multi-modal imaging platform" to reveal a wealth of important biochemical information in situ within ex vivo tissue sections, to increase our understanding of disease mechanisms.

  10. Multi-Modal Imaging with a Toolbox of Influenza A Reporter Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vy; Poole, Daniel S; Jeffery, Justin J; Sheahan, Timothy P; Creech, Donald; Yevtodiyenko, Aleksey; Peat, Andrew J; Francis, Kevin P; You, Shihyun; Mehle, Andrew

    2015-10-13

    Reporter viruses are useful probes for studying multiple stages of the viral life cycle. Here we describe an expanded toolbox of fluorescent and bioluminescent influenza A reporter viruses. The enhanced utility of these tools enabled kinetic studies of viral attachment, infection, and co-infection. Multi-modal bioluminescence and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of infected animals revealed that antiviral treatment reduced viral load, dissemination, and inflammation. These new technologies and applications will dramatically accelerate in vitro and in vivo influenza virus studies.

  11. A low-power multi-modal body sensor network with application to epileptic seizure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altini, Marco; Del Din, Silvia; Patel, Shyamal; Schachter, Steven; Penders, Julien; Bonato, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring patients' physiological signals during their daily activities in the home environment is one of the challenge of the health care. New ultra-low-power wireless technologies could help to achieve this goal. In this paper we present a low-power, multi-modal, wearable sensor platform for the simultaneous recording of activity and physiological data. First we provide a description of the wearable sensor platform, and its characteristics with respect to power consumption. Second we present the preliminary results of the comparison between our sensors and a reference system, on healthy subjects, to test the reliability of the detected physiological (electrocardiogram and respiration) and electromyography signals.

  12. Using Multi-Modal 3D Contours and Their Relations for Vision and Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baseski, Emre; Pugeault, Nicolas; Kalkan, Sinan

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we make use of 3D contours and relations between them (namely, coplanarity, cocolority, distance and angle) for four different applications in the area of computer vision and vision-based robotics. Our multi-modal contour representation covers both geometric and appearance information....... We show the potential of reasoning with global entities in the context of visual scene analysis for driver assistance, depth prediction, robotic grasping and grasp learning. We argue that, such 3D global reasoning processes complement widely-used 2D local approaches such as bag-of-features since 3D...

  13. Research on Satellite Fault Diagnosis and Prediction Using Multi-modal Reasoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangTianshe; SunYanhong; CaoYuping

    2004-01-01

    Diagnosis and prediction of satellite fault are more difficult than that of other equipment due to the complex structure of satellites and the presence of muhi-excite sources of satellite faults. Generally, one kind of reasoning model can only diagnose and predict one kind of satellite faults. In this paper the author introduces an application of a new method using multi-modal reasoning to diagnose and predict satellite faults. The method has been used in the development of knowledge-based satellite fault diagnosis and recovery system (KSFDRS) successfully. It is shown that the method is effective.

  14. Data Processing And Machine Learning Methods For Multi-Modal Operator State Classification Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Tristan A.

    2015-01-01

    This document is intended as an introduction to a set of common signal processing learning methods that may be used in the software portion of a functional crew state monitoring system. This includes overviews of both the theory of the methods involved, as well as examples of implementation. Practical considerations are discussed for implementing modular, flexible, and scalable processing and classification software for a multi-modal, multi-channel monitoring system. Example source code is also given for all of the discussed processing and classification methods.

  15. Multi-Modal Imaging with a Toolbox of Influenza AReporter Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Tran

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reporter viruses are useful probes for studying multiple stages of the viral life cycle. Here we describe an expanded toolbox of fluorescent and bioluminescent influenza A reporter viruses. The enhanced utility of these tools enabled kinetic studies of viral attachment, infection, and co-infection. Multi-modal bioluminescence and positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT imaging of infected animals revealed that antiviral treatment reduced viral load, dissemination, and inflammation. These new technologies and applications will dramatically accelerate in vitro and in vivo influenza virus studies.

  16. SU-E-I-83: Error Analysis of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using a Preclinical Multi-Modality QA Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fullerton, G; Goins, B [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous study a preclinical multi-modality quality assurance (QA) phantom that contains five tumor-simulating test objects with 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 mm diameters was developed for accurate tumor size measurement by researchers during cancer drug development and testing. This study analyzed the errors during tumor volume measurement from preclinical magnetic resonance (MR), micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) and ultrasound (US) images acquired in a rodent tumor model using the preclinical multi-modality QA phantom. Methods: Using preclinical 7-Tesla MR, US and micro-CT scanners, images were acquired of subcutaneous SCC4 tumor xenografts in nude rats (3–4 rats per group; 5 groups) along with the QA phantom using the same imaging protocols. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging was performed to determine reference tumor volume. Volumes measured for the rat tumors and phantom test objects were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three imaging modalities. Then linear regression analysis was performed to compare image-based tumor volumes with the reference tumor volume and known test object volume for the rats and the phantom respectively. Results: The slopes of regression lines for in-vivo tumor volumes measured by three imaging modalities were 1.021, 1.101 and 0.862 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. For phantom, the slopes were 0.9485, 0.9971 and 0.9734 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. Conclusion: For both animal and phantom studies, random and systematic errors were observed. Random errors were observer-dependent and systematic errors were mainly due to selected imaging protocols and/or measurement method. In the animal study, there were additional systematic errors attributed to ellipsoidal assumption for tumor shape. The systematic errors measured using the QA phantom need to be taken into account to reduce measurement

  17. Online multi-modal robust non-negative dictionary learning for visual tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Guan, Naiyang; Tao, Dacheng; Qiu, Xiaogang; Luo, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Dictionary learning is a method of acquiring a collection of atoms for subsequent signal representation. Due to its excellent representation ability, dictionary learning has been widely applied in multimedia and computer vision. However, conventional dictionary learning algorithms fail to deal with multi-modal datasets. In this paper, we propose an online multi-modal robust non-negative dictionary learning (OMRNDL) algorithm to overcome this deficiency. Notably, OMRNDL casts visual tracking as a dictionary learning problem under the particle filter framework and captures the intrinsic knowledge about the target from multiple visual modalities, e.g., pixel intensity and texture information. To this end, OMRNDL adaptively learns an individual dictionary, i.e., template, for each modality from available frames, and then represents new particles over all the learned dictionaries by minimizing the fitting loss of data based on M-estimation. The resultant representation coefficient can be viewed as the common semantic representation of particles across multiple modalities, and can be utilized to track the target. OMRNDL incrementally learns the dictionary and the coefficient of each particle by using multiplicative update rules to respectively guarantee their non-negativity constraints. Experimental results on a popular challenging video benchmark validate the effectiveness of OMRNDL for visual tracking in both quantity and quality.

  18. Online multi-modal robust non-negative dictionary learning for visual tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Dictionary learning is a method of acquiring a collection of atoms for subsequent signal representation. Due to its excellent representation ability, dictionary learning has been widely applied in multimedia and computer vision. However, conventional dictionary learning algorithms fail to deal with multi-modal datasets. In this paper, we propose an online multi-modal robust non-negative dictionary learning (OMRNDL algorithm to overcome this deficiency. Notably, OMRNDL casts visual tracking as a dictionary learning problem under the particle filter framework and captures the intrinsic knowledge about the target from multiple visual modalities, e.g., pixel intensity and texture information. To this end, OMRNDL adaptively learns an individual dictionary, i.e., template, for each modality from available frames, and then represents new particles over all the learned dictionaries by minimizing the fitting loss of data based on M-estimation. The resultant representation coefficient can be viewed as the common semantic representation of particles across multiple modalities, and can be utilized to track the target. OMRNDL incrementally learns the dictionary and the coefficient of each particle by using multiplicative update rules to respectively guarantee their non-negativity constraints. Experimental results on a popular challenging video benchmark validate the effectiveness of OMRNDL for visual tracking in both quantity and quality.

  19. Multi-modal face parts fusion based on Gabor feature for face recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Yan; Su Guangda; Shang Yan; Li Congcong

    2009-01-01

    A novel face recognition method, which is a fusion of multi-modal face parts based on Gabor feature (MMP-GF), is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the bare face image detached from the normalized image was convolved with a family of Gabor kernels, and then according to the face structure and the key-points locations, the calculated Gabor images were divided into five parts: Gabor face, Gabor eyebrow, Gabor eye, Gabor nose and Gabor mouth. After that multi-modal Gabor features were spatially partitioned into non-overlapping regions and the averages of regions were concatenated to be a low dimension feature vector, whose dimension was further reduced by principal component analysis (PCA). In the decision level fusion, match results respectively calculated based on the five parts were combined according to linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and a normalized matching algorithm was used to improve the performance. Experiments on FERET database show that the proposed MMP-GF method achieves good robustness to the expression and age variations.

  20. Large Margin Multi-Modal Multi-Task Feature Extraction for Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong Luo; Yonggang Wen; Dacheng Tao; Jie Gui; Chao Xu

    2016-01-01

    The features used in many image analysis-based applications are frequently of very high dimension. Feature extraction offers several advantages in high-dimensional cases, and many recent studies have used multi-task feature extraction approaches, which often outperform single-task feature extraction approaches. However, most of these methods are limited in that they only consider data represented by a single type of feature, even though features usually represent images from multiple modalities. We, therefore, propose a novel large margin multi-modal multi-task feature extraction (LM3FE) framework for handling multi-modal features for image classification. In particular, LM3FE simultaneously learns the feature extraction matrix for each modality and the modality combination coefficients. In this way, LM3FE not only handles correlated and noisy features, but also utilizes the complementarity of different modalities to further help reduce feature redundancy in each modality. The large margin principle employed also helps to extract strongly predictive features, so that they are more suitable for prediction (e.g., classification). An alternating algorithm is developed for problem optimization, and each subproblem can be efficiently solved. Experiments on two challenging real-world image data sets demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method.

  1. Multi-Modal Curriculum Learning for Semi-Supervised Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Tao, Dacheng; Maybank, Stephen J; Liu, Wei; Kang, Guoliang; Yang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Semi-supervised image classification aims to classify a large quantity of unlabeled images by typically harnessing scarce labeled images. Existing semi-supervised methods often suffer from inadequate classification accuracy when encountering difficult yet critical images, such as outliers, because they treat all unlabeled images equally and conduct classifications in an imperfectly ordered sequence. In this paper, we employ the curriculum learning methodology by investigating the difficulty of classifying every unlabeled image. The reliability and the discriminability of these unlabeled images are particularly investigated for evaluating their difficulty. As a result, an optimized image sequence is generated during the iterative propagations, and the unlabeled images are logically classified from simple to difficult. Furthermore, since images are usually characterized by multiple visual feature descriptors, we associate each kind of features with a teacher, and design a multi-modal curriculum learning (MMCL) strategy to integrate the information from different feature modalities. In each propagation, each teacher analyzes the difficulties of the currently unlabeled images from its own modality viewpoint. A consensus is subsequently reached among all the teachers, determining the currently simplest images (i.e., a curriculum), which are to be reliably classified by the multi-modal learner. This well-organized propagation process leveraging multiple teachers and one learner enables our MMCL to outperform five state-of-the-art methods on eight popular image data sets.

  2. Progressive Graph-Based Transductive Learning for Multi-modal Classification of Brain Disorder Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengxia; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Adeli, Ehsan; Zhu, Yingying; Zu, Chen; Nie, Feiping; Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Guorong

    2016-10-01

    Graph-based Transductive Learning (GTL) is a powerful tool in computer-assisted diagnosis, especially when the training data is not sufficient to build reliable classifiers. Conventional GTL approaches first construct a fixed subject-wise graph based on the similarities of observed features (i.e., extracted from imaging data) in the feature domain, and then follow the established graph to propagate the existing labels from training to testing data in the label domain. However, such a graph is exclusively learned in the feature domain and may not be necessarily optimal in the label domain. This may eventually undermine the classification accuracy. To address this issue, we propose a progressive GTL (pGTL) method to progressively find an intrinsic data representation. To achieve this, our pGTL method iteratively (1) refines the subject-wise relationships observed in the feature domain using the learned intrinsic data representation in the label domain, (2) updates the intrinsic data representation from the refined subject-wise relationships, and (3) verifies the intrinsic data representation on the training data, in order to guarantee an optimal classification on the new testing data. Furthermore, we extend our pGTL to incorporate multi-modal imaging data, to improve the classification accuracy and robustness as multi-modal imaging data can provide complementary information. Promising classification results in identifying Alzheimer's disease (AD), Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and Normal Control (NC) subjects are achieved using MRI and PET data.

  3. Aggregation for Computing Multi-Modal Stationary Distributions in 1-D Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcu, Neslihan; Pekergin, Nihal; Pekergin, Ferhan; Guzelis, Cuneyt

    2017-04-27

    This paper proposes aggregation-based, three-stage algorithms to overcome the numerical problems encountered in computing stationary distributions and mean first passage times for multi-modal birth-death processes of large state space sizes. The considered birth-death processes which are defined by Chemical Master Equations are used in modeling stochastic behavior of gene regulatory networks. Computing stationary probabilities for a multi-modal distribution from Chemical Master Equations is subject to have numerical problems due to the probability values running out of the representation range of the standard programming languages with the increasing size of the state space. The aggregation is shown to provide a solution to this problem by analyzing first reduced size subsystems in isolation and then considering the transitions between these subsystems. The proposed algorithms are applied to study the bimodal behavior of the lac operon of E. coli described with a one-dimensional birth-death model. Thus the determination of the entire parameter range of bimodality for the stochastic model of lac operon is achieved.

  4. Multi-modal use of a socially directed call in bonobos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Genty

    Full Text Available 'Contest hoots' are acoustically complex vocalisations produced by adult and subadult male bonobos (Pan paniscus. These calls are often directed at specific individuals and regularly combined with gestures and other body signals. The aim of our study was to describe the multi-modal use of this call type and to clarify its communicative and social function. To this end, we observed two large groups of bonobos, which generated a sample of 585 communicative interactions initiated by 10 different males. We found that contest hooting, with or without other associated signals, was produced to challenge and provoke a social reaction in the targeted individual, usually agonistic chase. Interestingly, 'contest hoots' were sometimes also used during friendly play. In both contexts, males were highly selective in whom they targeted by preferentially choosing individuals of equal or higher social rank, suggesting that the calls functioned to assert social status. Multi-modal sequences were not more successful in eliciting reactions than contest hoots given alone, but we found a significant difference in the choice of associated gestures between playful and agonistic contexts. During friendly play, contest hoots were significantly more often combined with soft than rough gestures compared to agonistic challenges, while the calls' acoustic structure remained the same. We conclude that contest hoots indicate the signaller's intention to interact socially with important group members, while the gestures provide additional cues concerning the nature of the desired interaction.

  5. Multi-Modal Use of a Socially Directed Call in Bonobos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genty, Emilie; Clay, Zanna; Hobaiter, Catherine; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    ‘Contest hoots’ are acoustically complex vocalisations produced by adult and subadult male bonobos (Pan paniscus). These calls are often directed at specific individuals and regularly combined with gestures and other body signals. The aim of our study was to describe the multi-modal use of this call type and to clarify its communicative and social function. To this end, we observed two large groups of bonobos, which generated a sample of 585 communicative interactions initiated by 10 different males. We found that contest hooting, with or without other associated signals, was produced to challenge and provoke a social reaction in the targeted individual, usually agonistic chase. Interestingly, ‘contest hoots’ were sometimes also used during friendly play. In both contexts, males were highly selective in whom they targeted by preferentially choosing individuals of equal or higher social rank, suggesting that the calls functioned to assert social status. Multi-modal sequences were not more successful in eliciting reactions than contest hoots given alone, but we found a significant difference in the choice of associated gestures between playful and agonistic contexts. During friendly play, contest hoots were significantly more often combined with soft than rough gestures compared to agonistic challenges, while the calls' acoustic structure remained the same. We conclude that contest hoots indicate the signaller's intention to interact socially with important group members, while the gestures provide additional cues concerning the nature of the desired interaction. PMID:24454745

  6. Multi-modal signal acquisition using a synchronized wireless body sensor network in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugradt, Maik; Mann, Steffen; Tigges, Timo; Görnig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2016-02-01

    Wearable home-monitoring devices acquiring various biosignals such as the electrocardiogram, photoplethysmogram, electromyogram, respirational activity and movements have become popular in many fields of research, medical diagnostics and commercial applications. Especially ambulatory settings introduce still unsolved challenges to the development of sensor hardware and smart signal processing approaches. This work gives a detailed insight into a novel wireless body sensor network and addresses critical aspects such as signal quality, synchronicity among multiple devices as well as the system's overall capabilities and limitations in cardiovascular monitoring. An early sign of typical cardiovascular diseases is often shown by disturbed autonomic regulations such as orthostatic intolerance. In that context, blood pressure measurements play an important role to observe abnormalities like hypo- or hypertensions. Non-invasive and unobtrusive blood pressure monitoring still poses a significant challenge, promoting alternative approaches including pulse wave velocity considerations. In the scope of this work, the presented hardware is applied to demonstrate the continuous extraction of multi modal parameters like pulse arrival time within a preliminary clinical study. A Schellong test to diagnose orthostatic hypotension which is typically based on blood pressure cuff measurements has been conducted, serving as an application that might significantly benefit from novel multi-modal measurement principles. It is further shown that the system's synchronicity is as precise as 30 μs and that the integrated analog preprocessing circuits and additional accelerometer data provide significant advantages in ambulatory measurement environments.

  7. Treating psychological trauma in first responders: a multi-modal paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Raymond B

    2015-06-01

    Responding to critical incidents may result in 5.9-22% of first responders developing psychological trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder. These impacts may be physical, mental, and/or behavioral. This population remains at risk, given the daily occurrence of critical incidents. Current treatments, primarily focused on combat and rape victims, have included single and double interventions, which have proven helpful to some but not all victims and one standard of care has remained elusive. However, even though the need is established, research on the treatment interventions of first responders has been limited. Given the multiplicity of impacts from psychological trauma and the inadequacies of responder treatment intervention research thus far, this paper proposes a paradigmatic shift from single/double treatment interventions to a multi-modal approach to first responder victim needs. A conceptual framework based on psychological trauma is presented and possible multi-modal interventions selected from the limited, extant first responder research are utilized to illustrate how the approach would work and to encourage clinical and experimental research into first responder treatment needs.

  8. Online Multi-Modal Robust Non-Negative Dictionary Learning for Visual Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Guan, Naiyang; Tao, Dacheng; Qiu, Xiaogang; Luo, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Dictionary learning is a method of acquiring a collection of atoms for subsequent signal representation. Due to its excellent representation ability, dictionary learning has been widely applied in multimedia and computer vision. However, conventional dictionary learning algorithms fail to deal with multi-modal datasets. In this paper, we propose an online multi-modal robust non-negative dictionary learning (OMRNDL) algorithm to overcome this deficiency. Notably, OMRNDL casts visual tracking as a dictionary learning problem under the particle filter framework and captures the intrinsic knowledge about the target from multiple visual modalities, e.g., pixel intensity and texture information. To this end, OMRNDL adaptively learns an individual dictionary, i.e., template, for each modality from available frames, and then represents new particles over all the learned dictionaries by minimizing the fitting loss of data based on M-estimation. The resultant representation coefficient can be viewed as the common semantic representation of particles across multiple modalities, and can be utilized to track the target. OMRNDL incrementally learns the dictionary and the coefficient of each particle by using multiplicative update rules to respectively guarantee their non-negativity constraints. Experimental results on a popular challenging video benchmark validate the effectiveness of OMRNDL for visual tracking in both quantity and quality. PMID:25961715

  9. Eigenanatomy: sparse dimensionality reduction for multi-modal medical image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Benjamin M; Wang, Danny J J; Gee, James C; Avants, Brian B

    2015-02-01

    Rigorous statistical analysis of multimodal imaging datasets is challenging. Mass-univariate methods for extracting correlations between image voxels and outcome measurements are not ideal for multimodal datasets, as they do not account for interactions between the different modalities. The extremely high dimensionality of medical images necessitates dimensionality reduction, such as principal component analysis (PCA) or independent component analysis (ICA). These dimensionality reduction techniques, however, consist of contributions from every region in the brain and are therefore difficult to interpret. Recent advances in sparse dimensionality reduction have enabled construction of a set of image regions that explain the variance of the images while still maintaining anatomical interpretability. The projections of the original data on the sparse eigenvectors, however, are highly collinear and therefore difficult to incorporate into multi-modal image analysis pipelines. We propose here a method for clustering sparse eigenvectors and selecting a subset of the eigenvectors to make interpretable predictions from a multi-modal dataset. Evaluation on a publicly available dataset shows that the proposed method outperforms PCA and ICA-based regressions while still maintaining anatomical meaning. To facilitate reproducibility, the complete dataset used and all source code is publicly available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An Evaluation of the Pedestrian Classification in a Multi-Domain Multi-Modality Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Miron

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to study the problem of pedestrian classification across different light spectrum domains (visible and far-infrared (FIR and modalities (intensity, depth and motion. In recent years, there has been a number of approaches for classifying and detecting pedestrians in both FIR and visible images, but the methods are difficult to compare, because either the datasets are not publicly available or they do not offer a comparison between the two domains. Our two primary contributions are the following: (1 we propose a public dataset, named RIFIR , containing both FIR and visible images collected in an urban environment from a moving vehicle during daytime; and (2 we compare the state-of-the-art features in a multi-modality setup: intensity, depth and flow, in far-infrared over visible domains. The experiments show that features families, intensity self-similarity (ISS, local binary patterns (LBP, local gradient patterns (LGP and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG, computed from FIR and visible domains are highly complementary, but their relative performance varies across different modalities. In our experiments, the FIR domain has proven superior to the visible one for the task of pedestrian classification, but the overall best results are obtained by a multi-domain multi-modality multi-feature fusion.

  11. An arbitrary boundary triangle mesh generation method for multi-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuanxuan; Deng, Yong; Gong, Hui; Meng, Yuanzheng; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming

    2012-03-01

    Low-resolution and ill-posedness are the major challenges in diffuse optical tomography(DOT)/fluorescence molecular tomography(FMT). Recently, the multi-modality imaging technology that combines micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) with DOT/FMT is developed to improve resolution and ill-posedness. To take advantage of the fine priori anatomical maps obtained from micro-CT, we present an arbitrary boundary triangle mesh generation method for FMT/DOT/micro-CT multi-modality imaging. A planar straight line graph (PSLG) based on the image of micro-CT is obtained by an adaptive boundary sampling algorithm. The subregions of mesh are accurately matched with anatomical structures by a two-step solution, firstly, the triangles and nodes during mesh refinement are labeled respectively, and then a revising algorithm is used to modifying meshes of each subregion. The triangle meshes based on a regular model and a micro-CT image are generated respectively. The results show that the subregions of triangle meshes can match with anatomical structures accurately and triangle meshes have good quality. This provides an arbitrary boundaries triangle mesh generation method with the ability to incorporate the fine priori anatomical information into DOT/FMT reconstructions.

  12. Coronary plaque morphology on multi-modality imagining and periprocedural myocardial infarction after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Sato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI may be complicated by periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI as manifested by elevated cardiac biomarkers such as creatine kinase (CK-MB or troponin T. The occurrence of PMI has been shown to be associated with worse short- and long-term clinical outcome. However, recent studies suggest that PMI defined by biomarker levels alone is a marker of atherosclerosis burden and procedural complexity but in most cases does not have independent prognostic significance. Diagnostic multi-modality imaging such as intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, coronary angioscopy, near-infrared spectroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used to closely investigate the atherosclerotic lesion in order to detect morphological markers of unstable and vulnerable plaques in the patients undergoing PCI. With the improvement of technical aspects of multimodality coronary imaging, clinical practice and research are increasingly shifting toward defining the clinical implication of plaque morphology and patients outcomes. There were numerous published data regarding the relationship between pre-PCI lesion subsets on multi-modality imaging and post-PCI biomarker levels. In this review, we discuss the relationship between coronary plaque morphology estimated by invasive or noninvasive coronary imaging and the occurrence of PMI. Furthermore, this review underlies that the value of the multimodality coronary imaging approach will become the gold standard for invasive or noninvasive prediction of PMI in clinical practice.

  13. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu P. Joshi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research.

  14. Advancing Precision Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging for Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Chadwick L; Maly, Joseph J; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    PET with fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 ((18)F FDG-PET) is a meaningful biomarker for the detection, targeted biopsy, and treatment of lymphoma. This article reviews the evolution of (18)F FDG-PET as a putative biomarker for lymphoma and addresses the current capabilities, challenges, and opportunities to enable precision medicine practices for lymphoma. Precision nuclear medicine is driven by new imaging technologies and methodologies to more accurately detect malignant disease. Although quantitative assessment of response is limited, such technologies will enable a more precise metabolic mapping with much higher definition image detail and thus may make it a robust and valid quantitative response assessment methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiation exposure analysis of female nuclear medicine radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Young [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering Graduate School, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technologist, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this study, radiation workers who work in nuclear medicine department were analyzed to find the cause of differences of radiation exposure from General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition and Conduct, especially females working on nuclear medicine radiation, in order to pave the way for positive defense against radiation exposure. The subjects were 106 radiation workers who were divided into two groups of sixty-four males and forty-two females answered questions about their General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition, Conduct, and radiation exposure dose which was measured by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter). The results of the analysis revealed that as the higher score of knowledge and conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in female groups, and as the higher score of conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in male groups. In the correlation analysis of female groups, the non-experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of knowledge and conduct was higher and the experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of recognition and conduct was higher. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of nuclear medicine radiation workers, the gender caused the meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of female groups compared to male groups. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of female groups, the factor of conduct showed a meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of the experienced in pregnancy was lower compared to the non-experienced. The conclusion of this study revealed that radiation exposure of female groups was lower than that of male groups. Therefore, male groups need to more actively defend themselves against radiation exposure. Among the female groups, the experienced in pregnancy who have an active defense tendency showed a lower radiation exposure. Thus

  16. Characterization of iodinated adrenomedullin derivatives suitable for lung nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Yan; Letourneau, Myriam; Chatenet, David [Laboratoire d' etudes moleculaires et pharmacologiques des peptides, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Ville de Laval, Qc, H7V 1B7 (Canada); Dupuis, Jocelyn [Research Center, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Fournier, Alain, E-mail: alain.fournier@iaf.inrs.ca [Laboratoire d' etudes moleculaires et pharmacologiques des peptides, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Ville de Laval, Qc, H7V 1B7 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: We have recently demonstrated the effectiveness of 99m-technetium adrenomedullin (AM) as a new molecular lung imaging agent that could provide significant advantages for the diagnosis and follow-up of disorders affecting the pulmonary circulation such as pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension. Having the possibility to conjugate the targeting molecule with different radionuclides would offer more flexibility and potential advantages depending on clinical situations. Since various iodine isotopes are currently used in nuclear medicine and in pharmacological studies, we have evaluated which iodination method should be privileged in order to produce a good iodinated AM-derived nuclear medicine agent. Methods: Synthetic AM was labeled with iodine through chemical and lactoperoxidase oxidation methods. Position of the iodine atom on the peptide was determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis following cyanogen bromide cleavage and carboxypeptidase Y digestion. Binding affinity of iodinated AM analogues was evaluated by competition and saturation binding experiments on dog lung preparations. Results: In this study, we demonstrated that, upon lactoperoxidase oxidation, iodination occurred at Tyr{sup 1} and that this radioligand retained higher binding affinity and specificity over preparations obtained through chemical oxidation. Conclusions: These results emphasize the fact that even a small chemical modification, i.e. iodination, might deeply modify the pharmacological profile of a compound and support observations that the C-terminal tail of human AM plays an important role in the AM receptor binding process. Consequently, incorporation of a radionuclide to produce an AM-based nuclear medicine agent should privilege the N-terminus of the molecule.

  17. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine; Doskatalogen foer nukleaermedicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Nosslin, Bertil [Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmoe (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik; Johansson, Lennart [Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeaa (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik

    2004-09-01

    The work with a Swedish catalogue of radiation absorbed doses to patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations has continued. After the previous report in 1999, biokinetic data and dose estimates (mean absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and effective dose) have been produced for a number of substances: {sup 11}C- acetate, {sup 11}C- methionine, {sup 18}F-DOPA, whole antibody labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I, fragment of antibody, F(ab'){sub 2} labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I and fragment of antibody, Fab' labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I. The absorbed dose estimates for these substances have been made from published biokinetic information. For other substances of interest, e.g. {sup 14}C-urea (children age 3-6 years), {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid, {sup 14}C-xylose and {sup 14}C-triolein, sufficient literature data have not been available. Therefore, a large number of measurements on patients and volunteers have been carried out, in order to determine the biokinetics and dosimetry for these substances. Samples of breast milk from 50 mothers, who had been subject to nuclear medicine investigations, have been collected at various times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the mother. The activity concentration in the breast milk samples has been measured. The absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the child who ingests the milk have been determined for 17 different radiopharmaceuticals. Based on these results revised recommendations for interruption of breast-feeding after nuclear medicine investigations are suggested.

  18. Management of radioactive waste generated in nuclear medicine; Gestion de los residuos radiactivos generados en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz Perez, P.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear medicine is a clinical specialty in which radioactive material is used in non-encapsulated form, for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Nuclear medicine involves administering to a patient a radioactive substance, usually liquid, both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This process generates solid radioactive waste (syringes, vials, gloves) and liquid (mainly the patient's urine). (Author)

  19. Image Reconstruction for Prostate Specific Nuclear Medicine imagers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Smith

    2007-01-11

    There is increasing interest in the design and construction of nuclear medicine detectors for dedicated prostate imaging. These include detectors designed for imaging the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with single gamma as well as positron-emitting radionuclides. New detectors and acquisition geometries present challenges and opportunities for image reconstruction. In this contribution various strategies for image reconstruction for these special purpose imagers are reviewed. Iterative statistical algorithms provide a framework for reconstructing prostate images from a wide variety of detectors and acquisition geometries for PET and SPECT. The key to their success is modeling the physics of photon transport and data acquisition and the Poisson statistics of nuclear decay. Analytic image reconstruction methods can be fast and are useful for favorable acquisition geometries. Future perspectives on algorithm development and data analysis for prostate imaging are presented.

  20. A Multi-Modal Control Using a Hybrid Pole-Placement-Integral Resonant Controller (PPIR) with Experimental Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2011-01-01

    Control of multi-modal structural vibrations has been an important and challenging problem in flexible structural systems. This paper proposes a new vibration control algorithm for multi-modal structural control. The proposed algorithm combines a pole-placement controller with an integral resonant...... controller. The pole-placement controller is used to achieve a target equivalent modal viscous damping in the system and helps in the suppression of higher modes, which contribute to the vibration response of flexible structures. The integral resonant controller successfully reduces the low frequency...... vibrations e.g. caused by broad-band turbulent wind excitations. Hence, the proposed hybrid controller can effectively suppress complex multi-modal vibrations in flexible systems. Both numerical and experimental studies have been carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm using...

  1. Automatic quantification of multi-modal rigid registration accuracy using feature detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauler, F; Furtado, H; Jurisic, M; Polanec, S H; Spick, C; Laprie, A; Nestle, U; Sabatini, U; Birkfellner, W

    2016-07-21

    In radiotherapy, the use of multi-modal images can improve tumor and target volume delineation. Images acquired at different times by different modalities need to be aligned into a single coordinate system by 3D/3D registration. State of the art methods for validation of registration are visual inspection by experts and fiducial-based evaluation. Visual inspection is a qualitative, subjective measure, while fiducial markers sometimes suffer from limited clinical acceptance. In this paper we present an automatic, non-invasive method for assessing the quality of intensity-based multi-modal rigid registration using feature detectors. After registration, interest points are identified on both image data sets using either speeded-up robust features or Harris feature detectors. The quality of the registration is defined by the mean Euclidean distance between matching interest point pairs. The method was evaluated on three multi-modal datasets: an ex vivo porcine skull (CT, CBCT, MR), seven in vivo brain cases (CT, MR) and 25 in vivo lung cases (CT, CBCT). Both a qualitative (visual inspection by radiation oncologist) and a quantitative (mean target registration error-mTRE-based on selected markers) method were employed. In the porcine skull dataset, the manual and Harris detectors give comparable results but both overestimated the gold standard mTRE based on fiducial markers. For instance, for CT-MR-T1 registration, the mTREman (based on manually annotated landmarks) was 2.2 mm whereas mTREHarris (based on landmarks found by the Harris detector) was 4.1 mm, and mTRESURF (based on landmarks found by the SURF detector) was 8 mm. In lung cases, the difference between mTREman and mTREHarris was less than 1 mm, while the difference between mTREman and mTRESURF was up to 3 mm. The Harris detector performed better than the SURF detector with a resulting estimated registration error close to the gold standard. Therefore the Harris detector was shown to be the more suitable

  2. Automatic quantification of multi-modal rigid registration accuracy using feature detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauler, F.; Furtado, H.; Jurisic, M.; Polanec, S. H.; Spick, C.; Laprie, A.; Nestle, U.; Sabatini, U.; Birkfellner, W.

    2016-07-01

    In radiotherapy, the use of multi-modal images can improve tumor and target volume delineation. Images acquired at different times by different modalities need to be aligned into a single coordinate system by 3D/3D registration. State of the art methods for validation of registration are visual inspection by experts and fiducial-based evaluation. Visual inspection is a qualitative, subjective measure, while fiducial markers sometimes suffer from limited clinical acceptance. In this paper we present an automatic, non-invasive method for assessing the quality of intensity-based multi-modal rigid registration using feature detectors. After registration, interest points are identified on both image data sets using either speeded-up robust features or Harris feature detectors. The quality of the registration is defined by the mean Euclidean distance between matching interest point pairs. The method was evaluated on three multi-modal datasets: an ex vivo porcine skull (CT, CBCT, MR), seven in vivo brain cases (CT, MR) and 25 in vivo lung cases (CT, CBCT). Both a qualitative (visual inspection by radiation oncologist) and a quantitative (mean target registration error—mTRE—based on selected markers) method were employed. In the porcine skull dataset, the manual and Harris detectors give comparable results but both overestimated the gold standard mTRE based on fiducial markers. For instance, for CT-MR-T1 registration, the mTREman (based on manually annotated landmarks) was 2.2 mm whereas mTREHarris (based on landmarks found by the Harris detector) was 4.1 mm, and mTRESURF (based on landmarks found by the SURF detector) was 8 mm. In lung cases, the difference between mTREman and mTREHarris was less than 1 mm, while the difference between mTREman and mTRESURF was up to 3 mm. The Harris detector performed better than the SURF detector with a resulting estimated registration error close to the gold standard. Therefore the Harris detector was shown to be the more suitable

  3. Multi-modal hard x-ray imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M

    2014-04-01

    Multi-modal hard x-ray imaging sensitive to absorption, refraction, phase and scattering contrast is demonstrated using a simple setup implemented with a laboratory source. The method is based on selective reflection at the edge of a mirror, aligned to partially reflect a pencil x-ray beam after its interaction with a sample. Quantitative scattering contrast from a test sample is experimentally demonstrated using this method. Multi-modal imaging of a house fly (Musca domestica) is shown as proof of principle of the technique for biological samples.

  4. Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Reed, John A.

    2003-01-01

    The following reports are presented on this project:A first year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable,Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; A second year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; An Extensible, Interchangeable and Sharable Database Model for Improving Multidisciplinary Aircraft Design; Interactive, Secure Web-enabled Aircraft Engine Simulation Using XML Databinding Integration; and Improving the Aircraft Design Process Using Web-based Modeling and Simulation.

  5. A multi-biometric feature-fusion framework for improved uni-modal and multi-modal human identification

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brown, K

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available provide important guidelines that enable the sys- tematic implementation of multi-modal biometric systems for future research and applications. Feature-level fusion is in particular need of these guidelines because of the ”curse of dimensionality” problem.... The training samples were sequentially chosen from one to five and the rest were used for testing. To the best of our knowledge there are no studies that fuse face and fingerprint data acquired from the SDUMLA multi-modal database. B. Pre-processing Pixel...

  6. Necessity of Internal Monitoring for Nuclear Medicine Staff in a Large Specialized Chinese Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Hou, Chang-Song; Li, Wen-Liang; Yang, Hui; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2016-04-12

    This work intends to quantify the risk of internal contaminations in the nuclear medicine staff of one hospital in Henan province, China. For this purpose, the criteria proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine whether it is necessary to conduct internal individual monitoring was applied to all of the 18 nuclear medicine staff members who handled radionuclides. The activity of different radionuclides used during a whole calendar year and the protection measures adopted were collected for each staff member, and the decision as to whether nuclear medicine staff in the hospital should be subjected to internal monitoring was made on the basis of the criteria proposed by IAEA. It is concluded that for all 18 members of the nuclear medicine staff in the hospital, internal monitoring is required. Internal exposure received by nuclear medicine staff should not be ignored, and it is necessary to implement internal monitoring for nuclear medicine staff routinely.

  7. Avoidable challenges of a nuclear medicine facility in a developing nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedapo, Kayode Solomon; Onimode, Yetunde Ajoke; Ejeh, John Enyi; Adepoju, Adewale Oluwaseun

    2013-10-01

    The role of nuclear medicine in disease management in a developing nation is as impactful as it is in other regions of the world. However, in the developing world, the practice of nuclear medicine is faced with a myriad of challenges, which can be easily avoided. In this review, we examine the many avoidable challenges to the practice of nuclear medicine in a developing nation. The review is largely based on personal experiences of the authors who are the pioneers and current practitioners of nuclear medicine in a typical developing nation. If the challenges examined in this review are avoided, the practice of nuclear medicine in such a nation will be more effective and practitioners will be more efficient in service delivery. Hence, the huge benefits of nuclear medicine will be made available to patients in such a developing nation.

  8. Multi-Modal Reasoning Medical Diagnosis System Integrated With Probabilistic Reasoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Tian; Xun Chen; Sheng-Ping Dong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a Multi Modal Reasoning (MMR) method integrated with probabilistic reasoning is proposed for the diagnosis support module of the open eHealth platform. MMR is based on both Rule Based Reasoning (RBR) and Case Based Reasoning (CBR). It is not only applied to the identification of diseases and syndromes based on medical guidelines,but also deals with exceptional cases and individual therapies in order to improve diagnostic accuracy. Moreover, a new rule expression frame is introduced to deal with uncertainty, which can represent and process vague, imprecise, and incomplete information. Furthermore, this system is capable of updating the attributes of rules and inducing rules with a small data sample.

  9. Multi-modal vibration energy harvesting approach based on nonlinear oscillator arrays under magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, I.; Kacem, N.; Bouhaddi, N.; Bouazizi, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a multi-modal vibration energy harvesting approach based on arrays of coupled levitated magnets. The equations of motion which include the magnetic nonlinearity and the electromagnetic damping are solved using the harmonic balance method coupled with the asymptotic numerical method. A multi-objective optimization procedure is introduced and performed using a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm for the cases of small magnet arrays in order to select the optimal solutions in term of performances by bringing the eigenmodes close to each other in terms of frequencies and amplitudes. Thanks to the nonlinear coupling and the modal interactions even for only three coupled magnets, the proposed method enable harvesting the vibration energy in the operating frequency range of 4.6-14.5 Hz, with a bandwidth of 190% and a normalized power of 20.2 {mW} {{cm}}-3 {{{g}}}-2.

  10. Development of internal solitary waves in various thermocline regimes - a multi-modal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gerkema

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical analysis is made on the appearance of oceanic internal solitary waves in a multi-modal setting. This is done for observed profiles of stratification from the Sulu Sea and the Bay of Biscay, in which thermocline motion is dominated by the first and third mode, respectively. The results show that persistent solitary waves occur only in the former case, in accordance with the observations. In the Bay of Biscay much energy is transferred from the third mode to lower modes, implying that a uni-modal approach would not have been appropriate. To elaborate on these results in a systematic way, a simple model for the stratification is used; an interpretation is given in terms of regimes of thermocline strength.

  11. Multi-modal human-machine interface of a telerobotic system for remote arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Haichao; Gao Hongming; Wu Lin; Zhang Guangjun

    2008-01-01

    In telerobotic system for remote welding, human-machine interface is one of the most important factor for enhancing capability and efftciency. This paper presents an architecture design of human-machine interface for welding telerobotic system: welding multi-modal human-machine interface. The human-machine interface integrated several control modes, which are namely shared control, teleteaching, supervisory control and local autonomous control. Space mouse, panoramic vision camera and graphics simulation system are also integrated into the human-machine interface for welding teleoperation. Finally, weld seam tracing and welding experiments of U-shape seam are performed by these control modes respectively. The results show that the system has better performance of human-machine interaction and complexity environment welding.

  12. Creating multi-modal logistics centers: Prospect for development in Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nodir Jumaniyazov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available All we have witnessed several summits of the so-called G-20 to overcome the crisis and attempt to delineate the ”look” of new rules of the emerging new world economic system. However, according to many experts, these rules will not be able to radically change the current system of economic relations, which is based on the processes of globalization and economic interpenetration of the world. One can list the many elements of the system. Among them, as a manifestation of a growing specialization of production, and deepening of cooperative relations in the world the special role is played by multi-modal logistics centers (MLC, of both regional and global concern. If stock and commodity exchanges are the link in the global economy, meanwhile a multimodal logistics centers serve as their practical and technical support.

  13. Exploiting Higher Order and Multi-modal Features for 3D Object Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiforenko, Lilita

    2017-01-01

    . The initial work introduces a feature descriptor that uses edge categorisation in combination with a local multi-modal histogram descriptor in order to detect objects with little or no texture or surface variation. The comparison is performed with a state-of-the-art method, which is outperformed...... by the presented edge descriptor. The second work presents an approach for robust detection of multiple objects by combining feature descriptors that capture both surface and edge information. This work presents quantitative results, where the performance of the developed feature descriptor combination is compared......-of-the-art descriptor and to this date, constant improvements of it are presented. The evaluation of PPFs is performed on seven publicly available datasets and it presents not only the performance comparison towards other popularly used methods, but also investigations of the space of possible point pair relations...

  14. Using Multi-Modal 3D Contours and Their Relations for Vision and Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baseski, Emre; Pugeault, Nicolas; Kalkan, Sinan

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we make use of 3D contours and relations between them (namely, coplanarity, cocolority, distance and angle) for four different applications in the area of computer vision and vision-based robotics. Our multi-modal contour representation covers both geometric and appearance information....... We show the potential of reasoning with global entities in the context of visual scene analysis for driver assistance, depth prediction, robotic grasping and grasp learning. We argue that, such 3D global reasoning processes complement widely-used 2D local approaches such as bag-of-features since 3D...... relations are invariant under camera transformations and 3D information can be directly linked to actions. We therefore stress the necessity of including both global and local features with different spatial dimensions within a representation. We also discuss the importance of an efficient use...

  15. A Distance Measure Comparison to Improve Crowding in Multi-Modal Problems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Todd VOllmer; Terence Soule; Milos Manic

    2010-08-01

    Solving multi-modal optimization problems are of interest to researchers solving real world problems in areas such as control systems and power engineering tasks. Extensions of simple Genetic Algorithms, particularly types of crowding, have been developed to help solve these types of problems. This paper examines the performance of two distance measures, Mahalanobis and Euclidean, exercised in the processing of two different crowding type implementations against five minimization functions. Within the context of the experiments, empirical evidence shows that the statistical based Mahalanobis distance measure when used in Deterministic Crowding produces equivalent results to a Euclidean measure. In the case of Restricted Tournament selection, use of Mahalanobis found on average 40% more of the global optimum, maintained a 35% higher peak count and produced an average final best fitness value that is 3 times better.

  16. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications.

  17. Multi-modal Person Localization And Emergency Detection Using The Kinect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Galatas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Person localization is of paramount importance in an ambient intelligence environment since it is the first step towards context-awareness. In this work, we present the development of a novel system for multi-modal person localization and emergency detection in an assistive ambient intelligence environment for the elderly. Our system is based on the depth sensor and microphone array of 2 Kinect devices. We use skeletal tracking conducted on the depth images and sound source localization conducted on the captured audio signal to estimate the location of a person. In conjunction with the location information, automatic speech recognition is used as a natural and intuitive means of communication in order to detect emergencies and accidents, such as falls. Our system attained high accuracy for both the localization and speech recognition tasks, verifying its effectiveness.

  18. Incidental acquisition of foreign language vocabulary through brief multi-modal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Marie-Josée; van Heuven, Walter J B; Conklin, Kathy; Tunney, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    First language acquisition requires relatively little effort compared to foreign language acquisition and happens more naturally through informal learning. Informal exposure can also benefit foreign language learning, although evidence for this has been limited to speech perception and production. An important question is whether informal exposure to spoken foreign language also leads to vocabulary learning through the creation of form-meaning links. Here we tested the impact of exposure to foreign language words presented with pictures in an incidental learning phase on subsequent explicit foreign language learning. In the explicit learning phase, we asked adults to learn translation equivalents of foreign language words, some of which had appeared in the incidental learning phase. Results revealed rapid learning of the foreign language words in the incidental learning phase showing that informal exposure to multi-modal foreign language leads to foreign language vocabulary acquisition. The creation of form-meaning links during the incidental learning phase is discussed.

  19. Incidental acquisition of foreign language vocabulary through brief multi-modal exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Josée Bisson

    Full Text Available First language acquisition requires relatively little effort compared to foreign language acquisition and happens more naturally through informal learning. Informal exposure can also benefit foreign language learning, although evidence for this has been limited to speech perception and production. An important question is whether informal exposure to spoken foreign language also leads to vocabulary learning through the creation of form-meaning links. Here we tested the impact of exposure to foreign language words presented with pictures in an incidental learning phase on subsequent explicit foreign language learning. In the explicit learning phase, we asked adults to learn translation equivalents of foreign language words, some of which had appeared in the incidental learning phase. Results revealed rapid learning of the foreign language words in the incidental learning phase showing that informal exposure to multi-modal foreign language leads to foreign language vocabulary acquisition. The creation of form-meaning links during the incidental learning phase is discussed.

  20. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2016-05-19

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications.

  1. Development of Advanced Multi-Modality Radiation Treatment Planning Software for Neutron Radiotherapy and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, D; Wessol, D; Wemple, C; Harkin, G; Hartmann-Siantar, C

    2002-08-20

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has long been active in development of advanced Monte-Carlo based computational dosimetry and treatment planning methods and software for advanced radiotherapy, with a particular focus on Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and, to a somewhat lesser extent, Fast-Neutron Therapy. The most recent INEEL software system of this type is known as SERA, Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications. As a logical next step in the development of modern radiotherapy planning tools to support the most advanced research, INEEL and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the developers of the PEREGRTNE computational engine for radiotherapy treatment planning applications, have recently launched a new project to collaborate in the development of a ''next-generation'' multi-modality treatment planning software system that will be useful for all modern forms of radiotherapy.

  2. Multi-Modal Ultra-Widefield Imaging Features in Waardenburg Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Netan; Rao, Rajesh C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by a group of features including; telecanthus, a broad nasal root, synophrys of the eyebrows, piedbaldism, heterochromia irides, and deaf-mutism. Hypopigmentation of the choroid is a unique feature of this condition examined with multi-modal Ultra-Widefield Imaging in this report. Material/Methods Report of a single case. Results Bilateral symmetric choroidal hypopigmentation was observed with hypoautofluorescence in the region of hypopigmentation. Fluorescein angiography revealed a normal vasculature, however a thickened choroid was seen on Enhanced-Depth Imaging Spectral-Domain OCT (EDI SD-OCT). Conclusion(s) Choroidal hypopigmentation is a unique feature of Waardenburg syndrome, which can be visualized with ultra-widefield fundus autofluorescence. The choroid may also be thickened in this condition and its thickness measured with EDI SD-OCT. PMID:26114849

  3. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-03-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma.

  4. Programmable aperture microscopy: A computational method for multi-modal phase contrast and light field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Zhang, Minliang; Chen, Qian

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective programmable aperture microscope to realize multi-modal computational imaging by integrating a programmable liquid crystal display (LCD) into a conventional wide-field microscope. The LCD selectively modulates the light distribution at the rear aperture of the microscope objective, allowing numerous imaging modalities, such as bright field, dark field, differential phase contrast, quantitative phase imaging, multi-perspective imaging, and full resolution light field imaging to be achieved and switched rapidly in the same setup, without requiring specialized hardwares and any moving parts. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging unstained cheek cells, profiling microlens array, and changing perspective views of thick biological specimens. The post-exposure refocusing of a butterfly mouthpart and RFP-labeled dicot stem cross-section is also presented to demonstrate the full resolution light field imaging capability of our system for both translucent and fluorescent specimens.

  5. Nuclear medicine and multimodality imaging of pediatric neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Wolfgang Peter; Pfluger, Thomas [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system and is metastatic or high risk for relapse in nearly 50% of cases. Therefore, exact staging with radiological and nuclear medicine imaging methods is crucial for defining the adequate therapeutic choice. Tumor cells express the norepinephrine transporter, which makes metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of norepinephrine, an ideal tumor specific agent for imaging. MIBG imaging has several disadvantages, such as limited spatial resolution, limited sensitivity in small lesions and the need for two or even more acquisition sessions. Most of these limitations can be overcome with positron emission tomography (PET) using [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose [FDG]. Furthermore, new tracers, such as fluorodopa or somatostatin receptor agonists, have been tested for imaging neuroblastoma recently. However, MIBG scintigraphy and PET alone are not sufficient for operative or biopsy planning. In this regard, a combination with morphological imaging is indispensable. This article will discuss strategies for primary and follow-up diagnosis in neuroblastoma using different nuclear medicine and radiological imaging methods as well as multimodality imaging. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Musso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE.

  7. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Maria; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE. PMID:25695043

  8. Children in nuclear medicine; Kinder in der Nuklearmedizin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    With each study in paediatric nuclear medicine one must try to reach a high quality standard with a minimum of radiation exposure to the child. This is true for the indication for the study and the interpretation of the results as well as the preparation, the image acquisition, the processing and the documentation. A continuous evaluation of all aspects is necessary to receive optimal, clinically relevant information. In addition it is important that the child keeps nuclear medicine in a good mind, especially when it has to come back for a control study. (orig.) [German] Bei jeder paediatrischen Untersuchung in der Nuklearmedizin muss versucht werden, eine optimale Aussage bei moeglichst niedriger Strahlenexposition des Kindes zu erreichen. Dieses gilt sowohl fuer die Indikationsstellung der Untersuchung sowie die Interpretation der Untersuchungsergebnisse, als auch fuer die Vorbereitung, die Durchfuehrung, die Auswertung und die Dokumentation. Eine staendige Ueberpruefung aller dieser Aspekte ist erforderlich, um durch die nuklearmedizinische Untersuchung optimale, klinisch relevante Informationen zu erhalten. Zusaetzlich soll erreicht werden, dass das Kind - auch im Hinblick auf Folgeuntersuchungen - die Nuklearmedizin in guter Erinnerung behaelt. (orig.)

  9. Fetal dose in radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy; Dosis fetal en radiodiagnostico, medicina nuclear y radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales, F. J.; Martinez, L. C.; Candela, C.

    2015-07-01

    Sometimes irradiation of the fetus in the mother's womb is inevitable in the field of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, either through ignorance a priori status of this pregnancy, either because for clinical reasons it is necessary to perform the radiological study or treatment. In the first cases, know the dose at which it has exposed the fetus is essential when assessing the associated risk, while in the second it is when assessing the justification of the test. (Author)

  10. Stability, structure and scale: improvements in multi-modal vessel extraction for SEEG trajectory planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, Maria A; Rodionov, Roman; Nowell, Mark; Achhala, Sufyan; Zombori, Gergely; Mendelson, Alex F; Cardoso, M Jorge; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew W; Duncan, John S; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2015-08-01

    Brain vessels are among the most critical landmarks that need to be assessed for mitigating surgical risks in stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) implantation. Intracranial haemorrhage is the most common complication associated with implantation, carrying significantly associated morbidity. SEEG planning is done pre-operatively to identify avascular trajectories for the electrodes. In current practice, neurosurgeons have no assistance in the planning of electrode trajectories. There is great interest in developing computer-assisted planning systems that can optimise the safety profile of electrode trajectories, maximising the distance to critical structures. This paper presents a method that integrates the concepts of scale, neighbourhood structure and feature stability with the aim of improving robustness and accuracy of vessel extraction within a SEEG planning system. The developed method accounts for scale and vicinity of a voxel by formulating the problem within a multi-scale tensor voting framework. Feature stability is achieved through a similarity measure that evaluates the multi-modal consistency in vesselness responses. The proposed measurement allows the combination of multiple images modalities into a single image that is used within the planning system to visualise critical vessels. Twelve paired data sets from two image modalities available within the planning system were used for evaluation. The mean Dice similarity coefficient was 0.89 ± 0.04, representing a statistically significantly improvement when compared to a semi-automated single human rater, single-modality segmentation protocol used in clinical practice (0.80 ± 0.03). Multi-modal vessel extraction is superior to semi-automated single-modality segmentation, indicating the possibility of safer SEEG planning, with reduced patient morbidity.

  11. Classification algorithms with multi-modal data fusion could accurately distinguish neuromyelitis optica from multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, Arman; Riyahi-Alam, Sadjad; Saeedi, Roghayyeh; Roostaei, Tina; Nazeri, Arash; Aghsaei, Aida; Doosti, Rozita; Ganjgahi, Habib; Bodini, Benedetta; Shakourirad, Ali; Pakravan, Manijeh; Ghana'ati, Hossein; Firouznia, Kavous; Zarei, Mojtaba; Azimi, Amir Reza; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) exhibits substantial similarities to multiple sclerosis (MS) in clinical manifestations and imaging results and has long been considered a variant of MS. With the advent of a specific biomarker in NMO, known as anti-aquaporin 4, this assumption has changed; however, the differential diagnosis remains challenging and it is still not clear whether a combination of neuroimaging and clinical data could be used to aid clinical decision-making. Computer-aided diagnosis is a rapidly evolving process that holds great promise to facilitate objective differential diagnoses of disorders that show similar presentations. In this study, we aimed to use a powerful method for multi-modal data fusion, known as a multi-kernel learning and performed automatic diagnosis of subjects. We included 30 patients with NMO, 25 patients with MS and 35 healthy volunteers and performed multi-modal imaging with T1-weighted high resolution scans, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). In addition, subjects underwent clinical examinations and cognitive assessments. We included 18 a priori predictors from neuroimaging, clinical and cognitive measures in the initial model. We used 10-fold cross-validation to learn the importance of each modality, train and finally test the model performance. The mean accuracy in differentiating between MS and NMO was 88%, where visible white matter lesion load, normal appearing white matter (DTI) and functional connectivity had the most important contributions to the final classification. In a multi-class classification problem we distinguished between all of 3 groups (MS, NMO and healthy controls) with an average accuracy of 84%. In this classification, visible white matter lesion load, functional connectivity, and cognitive scores were the 3 most important modalities. Our work provides preliminary evidence that computational tools can be used to help make an objective differential diagnosis of NMO and MS.

  12. Multi-Modal Treatment Approach to Painful Rib Syndrome: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, Andrew; Ferrante, Francis Michael

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical chest wall pain is a common presenting complaint in the primary care office, emergency room, and specialty clinic. Diagnostic testing is often expensive due to similar presenting symptoms that may involve the heart or lungs. Since the chest wall biomechanics are poorly understood by many clinicians, few effective treatments are offered to patients with rib-related acute pain, which may lead to chronic pain. This case series and literature review illustrates biomechanics involved in the pathogenesis of rib-related chest wall pain and suggests an effective multi-modal treatment plan using interventional techniques with emphasis on manual manipulative techniques. Case series and literature review. Pain clinic in an academic medical center. This is a case series of 3 patients diagnosed with painful rib syndrome using osteopathic palpatory physical examination techniques. Ultrasound-guided intercostal nerve blocks were followed by manual manipulation of mechanically displaced ribs as a part of our multi-modal treatment plan. A review of the literature was undertaken to clarify nomenclature used in the description of rib-related pain, to describe the biomechanics involved in the pathogenesis of mechanical rib pain, and to illustrate the use of effective manual manipulation techniques. This review is introductory and not a complete review of all manual or interventional pain management techniques applicable to the treatment of mechanical rib-related pain. Manual diagnostic and therapeutic skills can be learned by physicians to treat biomechanically complex rib-related chest wall pain in combination with interventional image-guided techniques. Pain physicians should learn certain basic manual manipulation skills both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  13. Real-time multi-modal rigid registration based on a novel symmetric-SIFT descriptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Chen; Jie Tian

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of image registration is to spatially align two or more single-modality images taken at different times,or several images acquired by multiple imaging modalities.Intensity-based registration usually requires optimization of the similarity metric between the images.However,global optimization techniques are too time-consuming,and local optimization techniques frequently fail to search the global transformation space because of the large initial misalignment of the two images.Moreover,for large non-overlapping area registration,the similarity metric cannot reach its optimum value when the two images are properly registered.In order to solve these problems,we propose a novel Symmetric Scale Invariant Feature Transform (symmetric-SIFT) descriptor and develop a fast multi-modal image registration technique.The proposed technique automatically generates a lot of highly distinctive symmetric-SIFT descriptors for two images,and the registration is performed by matching the corresponding descriptors over two images.These descriptors are invariant to image scale and rotation,and are partially invariant to affine transformation.Moreover,these descriptors are symmetric to contrast,which makes it suitable for multi-modal image registration.The proposed technique abandons the optimization and similarity metric strategy.It works with near real-time performance,and can deal with the large non-overlapping and large initial misalignment situations.Test cases involving scale change,large non-overlapping,and large initial misalignment on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) datasets show that it needs much less runtime and achieves better accuracy when compared to other algorithms.(C) 2009 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences.Published by Elsevier Limited and Science in China Press.All rights reserved.

  14. Classification algorithms with multi-modal data fusion could accurately distinguish neuromyelitis optica from multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Eshaghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO exhibits substantial similarities to multiple sclerosis (MS in clinical manifestations and imaging results and has long been considered a variant of MS. With the advent of a specific biomarker in NMO, known as anti-aquaporin 4, this assumption has changed; however, the differential diagnosis remains challenging and it is still not clear whether a combination of neuroimaging and clinical data could be used to aid clinical decision-making. Computer-aided diagnosis is a rapidly evolving process that holds great promise to facilitate objective differential diagnoses of disorders that show similar presentations. In this study, we aimed to use a powerful method for multi-modal data fusion, known as a multi-kernel learning and performed automatic diagnosis of subjects. We included 30 patients with NMO, 25 patients with MS and 35 healthy volunteers and performed multi-modal imaging with T1-weighted high resolution scans, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI. In addition, subjects underwent clinical examinations and cognitive assessments. We included 18 a priori predictors from neuroimaging, clinical and cognitive measures in the initial model. We used 10-fold cross-validation to learn the importance of each modality, train and finally test the model performance. The mean accuracy in differentiating between MS and NMO was 88%, where visible white matter lesion load, normal appearing white matter (DTI and functional connectivity had the most important contributions to the final classification. In a multi-class classification problem we distinguished between all of 3 groups (MS, NMO and healthy controls with an average accuracy of 84%. In this classification, visible white matter lesion load, functional connectivity, and cognitive scores were the 3 most important modalities. Our work provides preliminary evidence that computational tools can be used to help make an objective differential diagnosis

  15. Multi-modal ECG Holter system for sleep-disordered breathing screening: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupard, Laurent; Mathieu, Marc; Goldman, Michael; Chouchou, Florian; Roche, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    The high prevalence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) among heart diseases patients becomes increasingly recognized. A reliable exploring tool of SDB well adapted to cardiologists practice would be very useful for the management of these patients. We assessed a novel multi-modal electrocardiogram (ECG) Holter which incorporated both thoracic impedance and pulse oximetry signals. We compared in a home setting, a standard condition for Holter recordings, results from the novel device to a classical ambulatory polygraph in subjects with suspected SDB. The analysis of cardiac arrhythmias in relationship with SDB is also presented. A total of 118 patients clinically suspected of having SDB were evaluated (mean age 57 ± 14 years, mean body mass index [BMI] 32 ± 6 kg/m(2)). The new device allows calculating a new index called thoracic impedance (TI) disturbance index (TIDI+) evaluated from TI and SpO(2) signals recorded from a Holter monitor. In the population under study, 93% had more than 70% of usable TI signal and 95% had more than 90% for SpO(2) during sleep time recording. Screening performance results based on automatic analysis is accurate: TIDI + demonstrates a high level of sensitivity (96.8%), specificity (72.3%) as well as positive (82.4%) and negative (94.4%) predictive value for the detection of SDB. Moreover, detection of SDB periods permits us to observe a possible respiratory association of several nocturnal arrhythmias. The multi-modal Holter should be considered as a valuable evaluating tool for SDB screening and as a case selection technique for facilitating access to a full polysomnography for severe cases. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity to study arrhythmia consequences with both respiratory and hypoxia disturbances.

  16. FULLY CONVOLUTIONAL NETWORKS FOR MULTI-MODALITY ISOINTENSE INFANT BRAIN IMAGE SEGMENTATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Dong; Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    The segmentation of infant brain tissue images into white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an important role in studying early brain development. In the isointense phase (approximately 6-8 months of age), WM and GM exhibit similar levels of intensity in both T1 and T2 MR images, resulting in extremely low tissue contrast and thus making the tissue segmentation very challenging. The existing methods for tissue segmentation in this isointense phase usually employ patch-based sparse labeling on single T1, T2 or fractional anisotropy (FA) modality or their simply-stacked combinations without fully exploring the multi-modality information. To address the challenge, in this paper, we propose to use fully convolutional networks (FCNs) for the segmentation of isointense phase brain MR images. Instead of simply stacking the three modalities, we train one network for each modality image, and then fuse their high-layer features together for final segmentation. Specifically, we conduct a convolution-pooling stream for multimodality information from T1, T2, and FA images separately, and then combine them in high-layer for finally generating the segmentation maps as the outputs. We compared the performance of our approach with that of the commonly used segmentation methods on a set of manually segmented isointense phase brain images. Results showed that our proposed model significantly outperformed previous methods in terms of accuracy. In addition, our results also indicated a better way of integrating multi-modality images, which leads to performance improvement.

  17. Architecture of the Multi-Modal Organizational Research and Production Heterogeneous Network (MORPHnet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiken, R.J.; Carlson, R.A.; Foster, I.T. [and others

    1997-01-01

    The research and education (R&E) community requires persistent and scaleable network infrastructure to concurrently support production and research applications as well as network research. In the past, the R&E community has relied on supporting parallel network and end-node infrastructures, which can be very expensive and inefficient for network service managers and application programmers. The grand challenge in networking is to provide support for multiple, concurrent, multi-layer views of the network for the applications and the network researchers, and to satisfy the sometimes conflicting requirements of both while ensuring one type of traffic does not adversely affect the other. Internet and telecommunications service providers will also benefit from a multi-modal infrastructure, which can provide smoother transitions to new technologies and allow for testing of these technologies with real user traffic while they are still in the pre-production mode. The authors proposed approach requires the use of as much of the same network and end system infrastructure as possible to reduce the costs needed to support both classes of activities (i.e., production and research). Breaking the infrastructure into segments and objects (e.g., routers, switches, multiplexors, circuits, paths, etc.) gives the capability to dynamically construct and configure the virtual active networks to address these requirements. These capabilities must be supported at the campus, regional, and wide-area network levels to allow for collaboration by geographically dispersed groups. The Multi-Modal Organizational Research and Production Heterogeneous Network (MORPHnet) described in this report is an initial architecture and framework designed to identify and support the capabilities needed for the proposed combined infrastructure and to address related research issues.

  18. Providing University Education in Physical Geography across the South Pacific Islands: Multi-Modal Course Delivery and Student Grade Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, James P.; Poole, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Enormous distances across the vast South Pacific hinder student access to the main Fiji campus of the regional tertiary education provider, the University of the South Pacific (USP). Fortunately, USP has been a pioneer in distance education (DE) and promotes multi-modal delivery of programmes. Geography has embraced DE, but doubts remain about…

  19. Multi-modal assessment of neurovascular coupling during cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion using remote middle cerebral artery occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Fordsmann, Jonas C; Martin, Chris

    2017-01-01

    how neurovascular coupling is affected hyperacutely during cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion. We have developed a remote middle cerebral artery occlusion model in the rat, which enables multi-modal assessment of neurovascular coupling immediately prior to, during and immediately following reperfusion...

  20. Effective Beginning Handwriting Instruction: Multi-Modal, Consistent Format for 2 Years, and Linked to Spelling and Composing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Beverly; Abbott, Robert D.; Berninger, Virginia W.

    2017-01-01

    In Study 1, the treatment group (N = 33 first graders, M = 6 years 10 months, 16 girls) received Slingerland multi-modal (auditory, visual, tactile, motor through hand, and motor through mouth) manuscript (unjoined) handwriting instruction embedded in systematic spelling, reading, and composing lessons; and the control group (N = 16 first graders,…

  1. Sex in the Curriculum: The Effect of a Multi-Modal Sexual History-Taking Module on Medical Student Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Goodrich, Katie G.; Leitsch, Sara A.; Cook, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a multi-modal curricular intervention designed to teach sexual history-taking skills to medical students. The Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics, the National Board of Medical Examiners, and others, have identified sexual history-taking as a learning objective…

  2. Observing Coaching and Reflecting: A Multi-modal Natural Language-based Dialogue System in a Learning Context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Helvert, Joy; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Börner, Dirk; Petukhova, Volha; Alexandersson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The Metalogue project aims to develop a multi-modal, multi-party dialogue system with metacognitive abilities that will advance our understanding of natural conversational human-machine interaction and dialogue interfaces. This paper introduces the vision for the system and discusses its application

  3. Hopc: a Novel Similarity Metric Based on Geometric Structural Properties for Multi-Modal Remote Sensing Image Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuanxin; Shen, Li

    2016-06-01

    Automatic matching of multi-modal remote sensing images (e.g., optical, LiDAR, SAR and maps) remains a challenging task in remote sensing image analysis due to significant non-linear radiometric differences between these images. This paper addresses this problem and proposes a novel similarity metric for multi-modal matching using geometric structural properties of images. We first extend the phase congruency model with illumination and contrast invariance, and then use the extended model to build a dense descriptor called the Histogram of Orientated Phase Congruency (HOPC) that captures geometric structure or shape features of images. Finally, HOPC is integrated as the similarity metric to detect tie-points between images by designing a fast template matching scheme. This novel metric aims to represent geometric structural similarities between multi-modal remote sensing datasets and is robust against significant non-linear radiometric changes. HOPC has been evaluated with a variety of multi-modal images including optical, LiDAR, SAR and map data. Experimental results show its superiority to the recent state-of-the-art similarity metrics (e.g., NCC, MI, etc.), and demonstrate its improved matching performance.

  4. Sex in the Curriculum: The Effect of a Multi-Modal Sexual History-Taking Module on Medical Student Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Goodrich, Katie G.; Leitsch, Sara A.; Cook, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a multi-modal curricular intervention designed to teach sexual history-taking skills to medical students. The Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics, the National Board of Medical Examiners, and others, have identified sexual history-taking as a learning objective…

  5. Risk factors for insufficient perioperative oral nutrition after hip fracture surgery within a multi-modal rehabilitation programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai B; Jensen, Pia S; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    To examine oral nutritional intake in the perioperative phase in elderly hip fracture patients treated according to a well-defined multi-modal rehabilitation program, including unselected oral nutritional supplementation, and to identify independent risk factors for insufficient nutritional intake....

  6. DIAGNOSIS-GUIDED METHOD FOR IDENTIFYING MULTI-MODALITY NEUROIMAGING BIOMARKERS ASSOCIATED WITH GENETIC RISK FACTORS IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Many recent imaging genetic studies focus on detecting the associations between genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits (QTs). Although there exist a large number of generalized multivariate regression analysis methods, few of them have used diagnosis information in subjects to enhance the analysis performance. In addition, few of models have investigated the identification of multi-modality phenotypic patterns associated with interesting genotype groups in traditional methods. To reveal disease-relevant imaging genetic associations, we propose a novel diagnosis-guided multi-modality (DGMM) framework to discover multi-modality imaging QTs that are associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its top genetic risk factor (i.e., APOE SNP rs429358). The strength of our proposed method is that it explicitly models the priori diagnosis information among subjects in the objective function for selecting the disease-relevant and robust multi-modality QTs associated with the SNP. We evaluate our method on two modalities of imaging phenotypes, i.e., those extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method not only achieves better performances under the metrics of root mean squared error and correlation coefficient but also can identify common informative regions of interests (ROIs) across multiple modalities to guide the disease-induced biological interpretation, compared with other reference methods.

  7. AAPM/SNMMI Joint Task Force: report on the current state of nuclear medicine physics training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Beth A; Allison, Jerry D; Clements, Jessica B; Coffey, Charles W; Fahey, Frederic H; Gress, Dustin A; Kinahan, Paul E; Nickoloff, Edward L; Mawlawi, Osama R; MacDougall, Robert D; Pizzutiello, Robert J

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) recognized the need for a review of the current state of nuclear  medicine physics training and the need to explore pathways for improving nuclear medicine physics training opportunities. For these reasons, the two organizations formed a joint AAPM/SNMMI Ad Hoc Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Physics  Training. The mission of this task force was to assemble a representative group of stakeholders to:• Estimate the demand for board-certified nuclear medicine physicists in the next 5-10 years,• Identify the critical issues related to supplying an adequate number of physicists who have received the appropriate level of training in nuclear medicine physics, and• Identify approaches that may be considered to facilitate the training of nuclear medicine physicists.As a result, a task force was appointed and chaired by an active member of both organizations that included representation from the AAPM, SNMMI, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (ABSNM), and the Commission for the Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP). The Task Force first met at the AAPM Annual Meeting in Charlotte in July 2012 and has met regularly face-to-face, online, and by conference calls. This manuscript reports the findings of the Task Force, as well as recommendations to achieve the stated mission.

  8. Guidance for nuclear medicine staff on radiopharmaceuticals drug interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Santos-Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous drug interactions related to radiopharmaceuticals take place every day in hospitals many of which are not reported or detected. Information concerning this kind of reaction is not abundant, and nuclear medicine staff are usually overwhelmed by this information. To better understand this type of reaction, and to help nuclear medicine staff deal with it, a review of the literature was conducted. The results show that almost all of radiopharmaceuticals marketed around the world present drug interactions with a large variety of compounds. This suggests that a logical framework to make decisions based on reviews incorporating adverse reactions must be created. The review also showed that researchers undertaking a review of literature, or even a systematic review that incorporates drug interactions, must understand the rationale for the suggested methods and be able to implement them in their review. Additionally, a global effort should be made to report as many cases of drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals as possible. With this, a complete picture of drug interactions with radiopharmaceuticals can be drawn.Diversos casos de interações medicamentosas com radiofármacos ocorrem diariamente na rotina hospitalar, contudo muitos deles não são notificados ou mesmo percebidos. Informações a respeito desse tipo de reação não é abundante e os profissionais da medicina nuclear muitas vezes estão assoberbados por essas informações. De modo a entender esse tipo de reação e auxiliar a medicina nuclear a lidar com essa situação uma revisão da literatura foi realizada. Os resultados mostraram que a totalidade dos radiofármacos comercializados no mundo apresentam interação medicamentosa com uma enorme variedade de outros medicamentos. Dessa forma sugere-se que revisões sobre radiofármacos inclua um capítulo sobre efeitos adversos. Além disso, um esforço mundial para notificar efeitos adversos deve ser realizado, pois somente

  9. Current Status of Imaging Physics and Instrumentation In Nuclear Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Joung [Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Diagnostic and functional imaging device have been developed independently. The recognition that combining of these two devices can provide better diagnostic outcomes by fusing anatomical and functional images. The representative examples of combining devices would be PET/CT and SPECT/CT. Development and their applications of animal imaging and instrumentation have been very active, as new drug development with advanced imaging device has been increased. The development of advanced imaging device resulted in researching and developing for detector technology and imaging systems. It also contributed to develop a new software, reconstruction algorithm, correction methods for physical factors, image quantitation, computer simulation, kinetic modeling, dosimetry, and correction for motion artifacts. Recently, development of MRI and PET by combining them together was reported. True integration of MRI and PET has been making the progress and their results were reported. The recent status of imaging and instrumentation in nuclear medicine is reported in this paper.

  10. Epigenetic stochasticity, nuclear structure and cancer: the implications for medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, A P

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize an evolution of thinking about the epigenetic basis of human cancer, from the earliest studies of altered DNA methylation in cancer to the modern comprehensive epigenomic era. Converging data from epigenetic studies of primary cancers and from experimental studies of chromatin in development and epithelial-mesenchymal transition suggest a role for epigenetic stochasticity as a driving force of cancer, with Darwinian selection of tumour cells at the expense of the host. This increased epigenetic stochasticity appears to be mediated by large-scale changes in DNA methylation and chromatin in domains associated with the nuclear lamina. The implications for diagnosis include the potential to identify stochastically disrupted progenitor cells years before cancer develops, and to target drugs to epigenetic drivers of gene expression instability rather than to mean effects per se. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  11. Breast cancer: an overview of nuclear medicine imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munro, P. [QEII/Dalhousie School of Health Sciences, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this overview is to introduce the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures routinely used in the management of the patient with breast cancer and includes what some may consider being the future of nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography. Imaging the breast with {sup 99m}Tc MIBI to lymphatic mapping and the search for the sentinel lymph node for biopsy purposes, as well as bone scans used in the search for metastases will be discussed. Wall motion and ejection fraction studies are discussed as a monitoring tool for patients requiring cardiotoxic chemotherapy. The final section of the synopsis deals with the treatment of bone metastases for the purpose of palliation of this often debilitating disease. (author)

  12. Role of Nuclear Medicine in the cardiac resinchronization therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Simone Cristina Soares, E-mail: simonecordis@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Giorgi, Maria Clementina Pinto; D' Orio, Silvana Angelina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio [Instituto do Coracao (InCor/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) emerged as one of the most promising approaches in the treatment of cardiac dyssynchrony in heart failure patients' refractory to medical treatment. However, despite very promising clinical and functional results, individual response analyses show that a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. The role of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in the selection of CRT candidates by the assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony, myocardial viability, myocardial perfusion and blood flow and sympathetic cardiac activity has been discussed in this review. The potential utilization of this tool to improve the comprehension of detrimental effects of dyssynchrony on cardiac function and the evaluation and monitoring of the response to CRT were also considered. Other molecular targets that characterize glucose and fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis, angiotensin converting enzyme activity and angiogenesis that can be evaluated with this technique were described. (author)

  13. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers.

  14. Diffusion processes in tumors: A nuclear medicine approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Helman

    2016-07-01

    The number of counts used in nuclear medicine imaging techniques, only provides physical information about the desintegration of the nucleus present in the the radiotracer molecules that were uptaken in a particular anatomical region, but that information is not a real metabolic information. For this reason a mathematical method was used to find a correlation between number of counts and 18F-FDG mass concentration. This correlation allows a better interpretation of the results obtained in the study of diffusive processes in an agar phantom, and based on it, an image from the PETCETIX DICOM sample image set from OsiriX-viewer software was processed. PET-CT gradient magnitude and Laplacian images could show direct information on diffusive processes for radiopharmaceuticals that enter into the cells by simple diffusion. In the case of the radiopharmaceutical 18F-FDG is necessary to include pharmacokinetic models, to make a correct interpretation of the gradient magnitude and Laplacian of counts images.

  15. A novel automated method for doing registration and 3D reconstruction from multi-modal RGB/IR image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Richard; Whitaker, Ross

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the use of multi-modal camera rigs consisting of an RGB sensor and an infrared (IR) sensor have become increasingly popular for use in surveillance and robotics applications. The advantages of using multi-modal camera rigs include improved foreground/background segmentation, wider range of lighting conditions under which the system works, and richer information (e.g. visible light and heat signature) for target identification. However, the traditional computer vision method of mapping pairs of images using pixel intensities or image features is often not possible with an RGB/IR image pair. We introduce a novel method to overcome the lack of common features in RGB/IR image pairs by using a variational methods optimization algorithm to map the optical flow fields computed from different wavelength images. This results in the alignment of the flow fields, which in turn produce correspondences similar to those found in a stereo RGB/RGB camera rig using pixel intensities or image features. In addition to aligning the different wavelength images, these correspondences are used to generate dense disparity and depth maps. We obtain accuracies similar to other multi-modal image alignment methodologies as long as the scene contains sufficient depth variations, although a direct comparison is not possible because of the lack of standard image sets from moving multi-modal camera rigs. We test our method on synthetic optical flow fields and on real image sequences that we created with a multi-modal binocular stereo RGB/IR camera rig. We determine our method's accuracy by comparing against a ground truth.

  16. Nuclear medicine external individual occupational doses in Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauricio, Claudia L.P.; Lima, Ana Luiza S.; Silva, Herica L.R. da; Santos, Denison Souza [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: claudia@ird.gov.br, e-mail: analuslima@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: herica@ird.gov.br, e-mail: santosd@ird.gov.br; Silva, Claudio Ribeiro da [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Ciencia e Tecnologia da Informacao (CGTI)(Brazil)], e-mail: claudio@cnen.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    According to the Brazilian National Database there are about 300 Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS) in Brazil, 44 of them located in the State of Rio de Janeiro (RJ). Individual dose measurements are an important input for the evaluation of occupational exposure in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of radioprotection implementation and to keep individual doses as low as possible. In Brazil, most nuclear medicine (NM) staff is routinely monitored for external dose. The internal committed dose is estimated only in abnormal conditions. This paper makes a statistics analysis of all the RJ NMS annual external occupational doses in year 2005. A study of the evolution of monthly external individual doses higher than 4.00 mSv from 2004 to 2008 is also presented. The number of registered thorax monthly dose higher than 4.0 mSv is increasing, as its value. In this period the highest dose measured reaches 56.9 mSv, in one month, in 2008. About 50% of the annual doses are smaller than the monthly record level of 0.20 mSv. In 2005, around 100 professionals of RJ NMS received annual doses higher than 4.0 mSv, considering only external doses, but no one receives doses higher than 20.0 mSv. Extremities dosimeters are used by about 15% of the staff. In some cases, these doses are more than 10 times higher than the dose in thorax. This study shows the importance to improve radiation protection procedures in NM. (author)

  17. Special Radiation Protection Precautions in Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoyiannis, A. P.; Gerogiannis, J.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine concerns the administration of appropriate amounts of radioactivity of certain isotopes, in order to achieve internal localized irradiation of neoplasmatic cells. Due to the increased level and the specific isotope characteristics of administered radioactivity, special Radiation Protection precautions must be taken. This study addresses such issues, based on national as well as international legislation and guidelines. Application of the principle of optimization is of outmost importance and is based on individual dose planning. The decision about the release of Nuclear Medicine patients after therapy is determined on an individual basis, taking into account patients' pattern of contact with other people, their age and that of persons in the home environment, in addition to other factors. Estimation of the absorbed dose given to the treated organ is based on uptake measurements and other biokinetic data, as well as on the mass of the treated tissue or organ. Concerning pregnant women, the rule of thumb is that they should not be treated, unless the radionuclide therapy is required to save their lives. In that case, the potential absorbed dose and risk to the foetus should be estimated and conveyed to the patient. After radionuclide therapy, a female should be advised to avoid pregnancy for the period of time depending on the specific radionuclide. This is to ensure that the dose to a conceptus/foetus would probably not exceed 1 mGy (the member of the public dose limit). The radiation risk for relatives and caregivers is small and unlikely to exceed the legal dose constraints during the period of the patient's treatment. Solid waste from the patient's stay in hospital is a different matter, and is normally incinerated or held for a period until radioactive decay brings the activity to an acceptable level.

  18. Standardization of Administered Activities in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine: A Report of the First Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative Project, Part 2-Current Standards and the Path Toward Global Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Bom, Henry Hee-Seung; Chiti, Arturo; Choi, Yun Young; Huang, Gang; Lassmann, Michael; Laurin, Norman; Mut, Fernando; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; O'Keeffe, Darin; Pradhan, Prasanta; Scott, Andrew M; Song, Shaoli; Soni, Nischal; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Vargas, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative (NMGI) was formed in 2012 and consists of 13 international organizations with direct involvement in nuclear medicine. The underlying objectives of the NMGI are to promote human health by advancing the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, encourage global collaboration in education, and harmonize procedure guidelines and other policies that ultimately lead to improvements in quality and safety in the field throughout the world. For its first project, the NMGI decided to consider the issues involved in the standardization of administered activities in pediatric nuclear medicine. It was decided to divide the final report of this project into 2 parts. Part 1 was published in this journal in the spring of 2015. This article presents part 2 of the final report. It discusses current standards for administered activities in children and adolescents that have been developed by various professional organizations. It also presents an evaluation of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine specifically with regard to administered activities as determined by an international survey of 313 nuclear medicine clinics and centers from 29 countries. Lastly, it provides recommendations for a path toward global standardization of the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children.

  19. Multi-modal sensor based weight drop spinal cord impact system for large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongbeom; Kim, Jong-Wan; Hyun, Jung-Keun; Park, Ilyong

    2017-08-23

    A conventional weight drop spinal cord (SC) impact system for large animals is composed of a high-speed video camera, a vision system, and other things. However, a camera with high speed at over 5,000 frames per second (FPS) is very expensive. In addition, the utilization of the vision system involves complex pattern recognition algorithms and accurate arrangement of the camera and the target. The purpose of this study was to develop a large animal spinal cord injury modeling system using a multi-modal sensor instead of a high-speed video camera and vision system. Another objective of this study was to demonstrate the possibility of the developed system to measure the impact parameters in the experiments using different stiffness materials and an in-vivo porcine SC. A multi-modal sensor based spinal cord injury impact system was developed for large animals. The experiments to measure SC impact parameters were then performed using three different stiffness materials and a Yucatan miniature pig to verify the performance of system developed. A comparative experiment was performed using three different stiffness materials such as high density (HD) sponge, rubber, and clay to demonstrate the system and perform measurement for impact parameters such as impact velocity, impulsive force, and maximally compressed displacement reflecting physical properties of materials. In the animal experiment, a female Yucatan miniature pig of 60 kg weight was used. Impact conditions for all experiments were fixed at freefalling object mass of 50 g and height of 20 cm. In the impact test, measured impact velocities were almost the same for the three different stiffness materials at 1.84 ± 0.0153 m/s. Impulsive forces for the three materials of rubber, HD sponge, and clay were 50.88 N, 32.35 N, and 6.68 N, respectively. Maximally compressed displacements for rubber, HD sponge, and clay were 1.93 mm, 3.35 mm, and 15.01 mm, respectively. In the pig experiment, impact velocity, impulsive

  20. Do we need a universal 'code of ethics' in nuclear medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Chandakacharla N; Vinjamuri, Sobhan

    2010-06-01

    Recent years have seen huge advances in medicine and the science of medicine. Nuclear medicine has been no exception and there has been rapid acceptance of new concepts, new technologies and newer ways of working. Ethical principles have been traditionally considered as generic skills applicable to wide groups of scientists and doctors, with only token refinement at specialty level. Specialist bodies across the world representing wide groups of practitioners frequently have subgroups dealing exclusively with ethical issues. It could easily be argued that the basic principles of ethical practice adopted by specialist bodies closest to nuclear medicine practice, such as radiology and oncology, will also be applicable to nuclear medicine and that time and effort need not be spent on specifying a separate code for nuclear medicine. It could also be argued that nuclear medicine is an independent specialty and some (if not most) practitioners will not be aware of the guidelines adopted by other specialist societies, and that there is a need for re-iteration of ethical principles at the specialty level and on a worldwide scale.In this article we would like to present a brief history of medical ethics, discuss some of the advances in nuclear medicine and their associated ethical aspects, as well as list a framework of principles for consideration, should a specialist body deem it suitable to establish a 'code of ethics' for nuclear medicine.

  1. Strategies for CT tissue segmentation for Monte Carlo calculations in nuclear medicine dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braad, Poul-Erik; Andersen, Thomas; Hansen, Søren Baarsgaard;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: CT images are used for patient specific Monte Carlo treatment planning in radionuclide therapy. The authors investigated the impact of tissue classification, CT image segmentation, and CT errors on Monte Carlo calculated absorbed dose estimates in nuclear medicine. Methods: CT errors...... patient specific dosimetry in nuclear medicine. Accurate dosimetry was obtained with a 13-tissue ramp that included five different bone types....

  2. Highlights lecture EANM 2015: the search for nuclear medicine's superheroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    The EANM 2015 Annual Congress, held from October 10th to 14th in Hamburg, Germany, was outstanding in many respects. With 5550 participants, this was by far the largest European congress concerning nuclear medicine. More than 1750 scientific presentations were submitted, with more than 250 abstracts from young scientists, indicating that the future success of our discipline is fuelled by a high number of young individuals becoming involved in a multitude of scientific activities. Significant improvements have been made in molecular imaging of cancer, particularly in prostate cancer. PSMA-directed PET/CT appears to become a new gold standard for staging and restaging purposes. Novel tumour specific compounds have shown their potential for target identification also in other solid neoplasms and further our understanding of tumour biology and heterogeneity. In addition, a variety of nuclear imaging techniques guiding surgical interventions have been introduced. A particular focus of the congress was put on targeted, radionuclide based therapies. Novel theranostic concepts addressing also tumour entities with high incidence rates such as prostate cancer, melanoma, and lymphoma, have shown effective anti-tumour activity. Strategies have been presented to improve further already established therapeutic regimens such as somatostatin receptor based radio receptor therapy for treating advanced neuroendocrine tumours. Significant contributions were presented also in the neurosciences track. An increasing number of target structures of high interest in neurology and psychiatry are now available for PET and SPECT imaging, facilitating specific imaging of different subtypes of dementia and movement disorders as well as neuroinflammation. Major contributions in the cardiovascular track focused on further optimization of cardiac perfusion imaging by reducing radiation exposure, reducing scanning time, and improving motion correction. Besides coronary artery disease, many

  3. Links between nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy; Structuration des liens entre medecine nucleaire et radiopharmacie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelegrin, M. [Inserm, U896, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier (IRCM), universite Montpellier 1, 34 - Montpellier (France); Francois-Joubert, A. [Service de medecine nucleaire, centre hospitalier de Chambery, 73 - Chambery (France); Chassel, M.L. [Radiopharmacie, service de pharmacie, centre hospitalier de Chambery, 73 - Chambrry (France); Desruet, M.D. [Service de radiopharmacie et service pharmaceutique, clinique universitaire de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Grenoble, 38 - Grenoble (France); Bolot, C. [Service de radiopharmacie, service pharmaceutique, centre de medecine nucleaire, groupement hospitalier Est, 69 - Bron (France); Lao, S. [Service de radiopharmacie, medecine nucleaire, hopital de l' Archet, 06 - Nice (France)

    2010-11-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals are nowadays under the responsibility of the radio-pharmacist because of their medicinal product status. Radiopharmacy belongs to the hospital pharmacy department, nevertheless, interactions with nuclear medicine department are important: rooms are included or located near nuclear medicine departments in order to respect radiation protection rules, more over staff, a part of the material and some activities are shared between the two departments. Consequently, it seems essential to formalize links between the radiopharmacy and the nuclear medicine department, setting the goals to avoid conflicts and to ensure patients' security. Modalities chosen for this formalization will depend on the establishment's organization. (authors)

  4. Handbook of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Edmund E; Tateishi, Ukihide; Baum, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    This handbook will provide updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques as well as its clinical applications, including radionuclide therapy, to trainees and practitioners of nuclear medicine, radiology and general medicine. Updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging are vitally important and useful to both trainees and existing practitioners. Imaging techniques and agents are advancing and changing so rapidly that concise and pertinent information are absolutely necessary and helpful. It is hoped that this handbook will help readers be better equipped for the utilization of new imaging methods and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals.

  5. ACR-SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training: report of the task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberteau, Milton J; Graham, Michael M

    2011-06-01

    The expansion of knowledge and technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology require physicians to have more expertise in functional and anatomic imaging. The convergence of these two specialties into the new discipline of molecular imaging has also begun to place demands on residency training programs for additional instruction in physiology and molecular biology. These changes have unmasked weaknesses in current nuclear medicine and radiology training programs. Adding to the impetus for change are the attendant realities of the job market and uncertain employment prospects for physicians trained in nuclear medicine but not also trained in diagnostic radiology. With this background, the ACR and the Society of Nuclear Medicine convened the Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training to define the issues and develop recommendations for resident training.

  6. Anticipation by multi-modal association through an artificial mental imagery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona, Wilmer; Escobar, Esaú; Hermosillo, Jorge; Lara, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Mental imagery has become a central issue in research laboratories seeking to emulate basic cognitive abilities in artificial agents. In this work, we propose a computational model to produce an anticipatory behaviour by means of a multi-modal off-line hebbian association. Unlike the current state of the art, we propose to apply hebbian learning during an internal sensorimotor simulation, emulating a process of mental imagery. We associate visual and tactile stimuli re-enacted by a long-term predictive simulation chain motivated by covert actions. As a result, we obtain a neural network which provides a robot with a mechanism to produce a visually conditioned obstacle avoidance behaviour. We developed our system in a physical Pioneer 3-DX robot and realised two experiments. In the first experiment we test our model on one individual navigating in two different mazes. In the second experiment we assess the robustness of the model by testing in a single environment five individuals trained under different conditions. We believe that our work offers an underpinning mechanism in cognitive robotics for the study of motor control strategies based on internal simulations. These strategies can be seen analogous to the mental imagery process known in humans, opening thus interesting pathways to the construction of upper-level grounded cognitive abilities.

  7. Multi-modal target detection for autonomous wide area search and surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckon, Toby P.; Gaszczak, Anna; Han, Jiwan; Eichner, Marcin L.; Barnes, Stuart E.

    2013-10-01

    Generalised wide are search and surveillance is a common-place tasking for multi-sensory equipped autonomous systems. Here we present on a key supporting topic to this task - the automatic interpretation, fusion and detected target reporting from multi-modal sensor information received from multiple autonomous platforms deployed for wide-area environment search. We detail the realization of a real-time methodology for the automated detection of people and vehicles using combined visible-band (EO), thermal-band (IR) and radar sensing from a deployed network of multiple autonomous platforms (ground and aerial). This facilities real-time target detection, reported with varying levels of confidence, using information from both multiple sensors and multiple sensor platforms to provide environment-wide situational awareness. A range of automatic classification approaches are proposed, driven by underlying machine learning techniques, that facilitate the automatic detection of either target type with cross-modal target confirmation. Extended results are presented that show both the detection of people and vehicles under varying conditions in both isolated rural and cluttered urban environments with minimal false positive detection. Performance evaluation is presented at an episodic level with individual classifiers optimized for maximal each object of interest (vehicle/person) detection over a given search path/pattern of the environment, across all sensors and modalities, rather than on a per sensor sample basis. Episodic target detection, evaluated over a number of wide-area environment search and reporting tasks, generally exceeds 90%+ for the targets considered here.

  8. Nano-sensitizers for multi-modality optical diagnostic imaging and therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, Malini; Lucky, Sasidharan S.; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Dendukuri, Nagamani

    2011-07-01

    We report novel bioconjugated nanosensitizers as optical and therapeutic probes for the detection, monitoring and treatment of cancer. These nanosensitisers, consisting of hypericin loaded bioconjugated gold nanoparticles, can act as tumor cell specific therapeutic photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy coupled with additional photothermal effects rendered by plasmonic heating effects of gold nanoparticles. In addition to the therapeutic effects, the nanosensitizer can be developed as optical probes for state-of-the-art multi-modality in-vivo optical imaging technology such as in-vivo 3D confocal fluorescence endomicroscopic imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT) with improved optical contrast using nano-gold and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) based imaging and bio-sensing. These techniques can be used in tandem or independently as in-vivo optical biopsy techniques to specifically detect and monitor specific cancer cells in-vivo. Such novel nanosensitizer based optical biopsy imaging technique has the potential to provide an alternative to tissue biopsy and will enable clinicians to make real-time diagnosis, determine surgical margins during operative procedures and perform targeted treatment of cancers.

  9. Multi-Modal Neuroimaging Feature Learning for Multi-Class Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqi; Liu, Sidong; Cai, Weidong; Che, Hangyu; Pujol, Sonia; Kikinis, Ron; Feng, Dagan; Fulham, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Alzheimers disease (AD) is essential for patient care and will be increasingly important as disease modifying agents become available, early in the course of the disease. Although studies have applied machine learning methods for the computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of AD, a bottleneck in the diagnostic performance was shown in previous methods, due to the lacking of efficient strategies for representing neuroimaging biomarkers. In this study, we designed a novel diagnostic framework with deep learning architecture to aid the diagnosis of AD. This framework uses a zero-masking strategy for data fusion to extract complementary information from multiple data modalities. Compared to the previous state-of-the-art workflows, our method is capable of fusing multi-modal neuroimaging features in one setting and has the potential to require less labelled data. A performance gain was achieved in both binary classification and multi-class classification of AD. The advantages and limitations of the proposed framework are discussed. PMID:25423647

  10. Interactive Feature Space Explorer© for multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Alpay; Türkbey, Barış; Choyke, Peter L; Akin, Oguz; Aras, Ömer; Mun, Seong K

    2015-07-01

    Wider information content of multi-modal biomedical imaging is advantageous for detection, diagnosis and prognosis of various pathologies. However, the necessity to evaluate a large number images might hinder these advantages and reduce the efficiency. Herein, a new computer aided approach based on the utilization of feature space (FS) with reduced reliance on multiple image evaluations is proposed for research and routine clinical use. The method introduces the physician experience into the discovery process of FS biomarkers for addressing biological complexity, e.g., disease heterogeneity. This, in turn, elucidates relevant biophysical information which would not be available when automated algorithms are utilized. Accordingly, the prototype platform was designed and built for interactively investigating the features and their corresponding anatomic loci in order to identify pathologic FS regions. While the platform might be potentially beneficial in decision support generally and specifically for evaluating outlier cases, it is also potentially suitable for accurate ground truth determination in FS for algorithm development. Initial assessments conducted on two different pathologies from two different institutions provided valuable biophysical perspective. Investigations of the prostate magnetic resonance imaging data resulted in locating a potential aggressiveness biomarker in prostate cancer. Preliminary findings on renal cell carcinoma imaging data demonstrated potential for characterization of disease subtypes in the FS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of Predictive Values Based on Individual Risk Factors in Multi-Modality Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Lange

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of diagnostic tests with binary end-points is most frequently measured by sensitivity and specificity. However, from the clinical perspective, the main purpose of a diagnostic agent is to assess the probability of a patient actually being diseased and hence predictive values are more suitable here. As predictive values depend on the pre-test probability of disease, we provide a method to take risk factors influencing the patient’s prior probability of disease into account, when calculating predictive values. Furthermore, approaches to assess confidence intervals and a methodology to compare predictive values by statistical tests are presented. Hereby the methods can be used to analyze predictive values of factorial diagnostic trials, such as multi-modality, multi-reader-trials. We further performed a simulation study assessing length and coverage probability for different types of confidence intervals, and we present the R-Package facROC that can be used to analyze predictive values in factorial diagnostic trials in particular. The methods are applied to a study evaluating CT-angiography as a noninvasive alternative to coronary angiography for diagnosing coronary artery disease. Hereby the patients’ symptoms are considered as risk factors influencing the respective predictive values.

  12. Modeling a Multi-modal Distribution of Wind Direction Data in Kudat, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurulkamal Masseran

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wind direction is the direction from which the wind is blowing. It is expressed in terms of degrees measured clockwise from geographical direction. The knowledge of the wind direction can be used to obtain information about the wind energy potential, dispersion of particulate matter in the air, the effects of engineering structures on the building, maritime study, and etc. This study provides a suitable model for the wind direction that indicates multi-modal distributional properties. A case study involves with a data from Kudat, Malaysia has been analysed. The statistical models known as a Finite Mixture of von Mises Fisher (mvMF and Circular Distribution based on Nonnegative Trigonometric Sums (NNTS has been fitted to the data. Then, the suitability of mvMF and NNTS models were judged based on a graphical representation and goodness-of-fit statistics. The results found that the mvMF model with  components is sufficient to provide a best model. 

  13. Holographic Raman tweezers controlled by multi-modal natural user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Zoltán; Keša, Peter; Nikorovič, Matej; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Valušová, Eva; Antalík, Marián; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Holographic optical tweezers provide a contactless way to trap and manipulate several microobjects independently in space using focused laser beams. Although the methods of fast and efficient generation of optical traps are well developed, their user friendly control still lags behind. Even though several attempts have appeared recently to exploit touch tablets, 2D cameras, or Kinect game consoles, they have not yet reached the level of natural human interface. Here we demonstrate a multi-modal ‘natural user interface’ approach that combines finger and gaze tracking with gesture and speech recognition. This allows us to select objects with an operator’s gaze and voice, to trap the objects and control their positions via tracking of finger movement in space and to run semi-automatic procedures such as acquisition of Raman spectra from preselected objects. This approach takes advantage of the power of human processing of images together with smooth control of human fingertips and downscales these skills to control remotely the motion of microobjects at microscale in a natural way for the human operator.

  14. Analysis of Predictive Values Based on Individual Risk Factors in Multi-Modality Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Katharina; Brunner, Edgar

    2013-03-15

    The accuracy of diagnostic tests with binary end-points is most frequently measured by sensitivity and specificity. However, from the clinical perspective, the main purpose of a diagnostic agent is to assess the probability of a patient actually being diseased and hence predictive values are more suitable here. As predictive values depend on the pre-test probability of disease, we provide a method to take risk factors influencing the patient's prior probability of disease into account, when calculating predictive values. Furthermore, approaches to assess confidence intervals and a methodology to compare predictive values by statistical tests are presented. Hereby the methods can be used to analyze predictive values of factorial diagnostic trials, such as multi-modality, multi-reader-trials. We further performed a simulation study assessing length and coverage probability for different types of confidence intervals, and we present the R-Package facROC that can be used to analyze predictive values in factorial diagnostic trials in particular. The methods are applied to a study evaluating CT-angiography as a noninvasive alternative to coronary angiography for diagnosing coronary artery disease. Hereby the patients' symptoms are considered as risk factors influencing the respective predictive values.

  15. Multi-scale patch and multi-modality atlases for whole heart segmentation of MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiahai; Shen, Juan

    2016-07-01

    A whole heart segmentation (WHS) method is presented for cardiac MRI. This segmentation method employs multi-modality atlases from MRI and CT and adopts a new label fusion algorithm which is based on the proposed multi-scale patch (MSP) strategy and a new global atlas ranking scheme. MSP, developed from the scale-space theory, uses the information of multi-scale images and provides different levels of the structural information of images for multi-level local atlas ranking. Both the local and global atlas ranking steps use the information theoretic measures to compute the similarity between the target image and the atlases from multiple modalities. The proposed segmentation scheme was evaluated on a set of data involving 20 cardiac MRI and 20 CT images. Our proposed algorithm demonstrated a promising performance, yielding a mean WHS Dice score of 0.899 ± 0.0340, Jaccard index of 0.818 ± 0.0549, and surface distance error of 1.09 ± 1.11 mm for the 20 MRI data. The average runtime for the proposed label fusion was 12.58 min.

  16. Multi-modal, ultrasensitive detection of trace explosives using MEMS devices with quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Omid; Kim, Seonghwan

    2016-05-01

    Multi-modal chemical sensors based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been developed with an electrical readout. Opto-calorimetric infrared (IR) spectroscopy, capable of obtaining molecular signatures of extremely small quantities of adsorbed explosive molecules, has been realized with a microthermometer/microheater device using a widely tunable quantum cascade laser. A microthermometer/microheater device responds to the heat generated by nonradiative decay process when the adsorbed explosive molecules are resonantly excited with IR light. Monitoring the variation in microthermometer signal as a function of illuminating IR wavelength corresponds to the conventional IR absorption spectrum of the adsorbed molecules. Moreover, the mass of the adsorbed molecules is determined by measuring the resonance frequency shift of the cantilever shape microthermometer for the quantitative opto-calorimetric IR spectroscopy. In addition, micro-differential thermal analysis, which can be used to differentiate exothermic or endothermic reaction of heated molecules, has been performed with the same device to provide additional orthogonal signal for trace explosive detection and sensor surface regeneration. In summary, we have designed, fabricated and tested microcantilever shape devices integrated with a microthermometer/microheater which can provide electrical responses used to acquire both opto-calorimetric IR spectra and microcalorimetric thermal responses. We have demonstrated the successful detection, differentiation, and quantification of trace amounts of explosive molecules and their mixtures (cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using three orthogonal sensing signals which improve chemical selectivity.

  17. A software framework for real-time multi-modal detection of microsleeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, Simon J; Bones, Philip J; Weddell, Stephen J; Jones, Richard D

    2017-06-01

    A software framework is described which was designed to process EEG, video of one eye, and head movement in real time, towards achieving early detection of microsleeps for prevention of fatal accidents, particularly in transport sectors. The framework is based around a pipeline structure with user-replaceable signal processing modules. This structure can encapsulate a wide variety of feature extraction and classification techniques and can be applied to detecting a variety of aspects of cognitive state. Users of the framework can implement signal processing plugins in C++ or Python. The framework also provides a graphical user interface and the ability to save and load data to and from arbitrary file formats. Two small studies are reported which demonstrate the capabilities of the framework in typical applications: monitoring eye closure and detecting simulated microsleeps. While specifically designed for microsleep detection/prediction, the software framework can be just as appropriately applied to (i) other measures of cognitive state and (ii) development of biomedical instruments for multi-modal real-time physiological monitoring and event detection in intensive care, anaesthesiology, cardiology, neurosurgery, etc. The software framework has been made freely available for researchers to use and modify under an open source licence.

  18. MINC 2.0: A Flexible Format for Multi-Modal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Robert D.; Neelin, Peter; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Janke, Andrew L.; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Robbins, Steven M.; Baghdadi, Leila; Lerch, Jason; Sled, John G.; Adalat, Reza; MacDonald, David; Zijdenbos, Alex P.; Collins, D. Louis; Evans, Alan C.

    2016-01-01

    It is often useful that an imaging data format can afford rich metadata, be flexible, scale to very large file sizes, support multi-modal data, and have strong inbuilt mechanisms for data provenance. Beginning in 1992, MINC was developed as a system for flexible, self-documenting representation of neuroscientific imaging data with arbitrary orientation and dimensionality. The MINC system incorporates three broad components: a file format specification, a programming library, and a growing set of tools. In the early 2000's the MINC developers created MINC 2.0, which added support for 64-bit file sizes, internal compression, and a number of other modern features. Because of its extensible design, it has been easy to incorporate details of provenance in the header metadata, including an explicit processing history, unique identifiers, and vendor-specific scanner settings. This makes MINC ideal for use in large scale imaging studies and databases. It also makes it easy to adapt to new scanning sequences and modalities. PMID:27563289

  19. Multi-modal Patient Cohort Identification from EEG Report and Signal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Travis R.; Harabagiu, Sanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical electroencephalography (EEG) is the most important investigation in the diagnosis and management of epilepsies. An EEG records the electrical activity along the scalp and measures spontaneous electrical activity of the brain. Because the EEG signal is complex, its interpretation is known to produce moderate inter-observer agreement among neurologists. This problem can be addressed by providing clinical experts with the ability to automatically retrieve similar EEG signals and EEG reports through a patient cohort retrieval system operating on a vast archive of EEG data. In this paper, we present a multi-modal EEG patient cohort retrieval system called MERCuRY which leverages the heterogeneous nature of EEG data by processing both the clinical narratives from EEG reports as well as the raw electrode potentials derived from the recorded EEG signal data. At the core of MERCuRY is a novel multimodal clinical indexing scheme which relies on EEG data representations obtained through deep learning. The index is used by two clinical relevance models that we have generated for identifying patient cohorts satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria expressed in natural language queries. Evaluations of the MERCuRY system measured the relevance of the patient cohorts, obtaining MAP scores of 69.87% and a NDCG of 83.21%. PMID:28269938

  20. Multi-Modal Dictionary Learning for Image Separation With Application in Art Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligiannis, Nikos; Mota, Joao F. C.; Cornelis, Bruno; Rodrigues, Miguel R. D.; Daubechies, Ingrid

    2017-02-01

    In support of art investigation, we propose a new source separation method that unmixes a single X-ray scan acquired from double-sided paintings. In this problem, the X-ray signals to be separated have similar morphological characteristics, which brings previous source separation methods to their limits. Our solution is to use photographs taken from the front and back-side of the panel to drive the separation process. The crux of our approach relies on the coupling of the two imaging modalities (photographs and X-rays) using a novel coupled dictionary learning framework able to capture both common and disparate features across the modalities using parsimonious representations; the common component models features shared by the multi-modal images, whereas the innovation component captures modality-specific information. As such, our model enables the formulation of appropriately regularized convex optimization procedures that lead to the accurate separation of the X-rays. Our dictionary learning framework can be tailored both to a single- and a multi-scale framework, with the latter leading to a significant performance improvement. Moreover, to improve further on the visual quality of the separated images, we propose to train coupled dictionaries that ignore certain parts of the painting corresponding to craquelure. Experimentation on synthetic and real data - taken from digital acquisition of the Ghent Altarpiece (1432) - confirms the superiority of our method against the state-of-the-art morphological component analysis technique that uses either fixed or trained dictionaries to perform image separation.

  1. A multi-modal treatment approach for the shoulder: A 4 patient case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollard Henry

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the clinical management of four cases of shoulder impingement syndrome using a conservative multimodal treatment approach. Clinical Features Four patients presented to a chiropractic clinic with chronic shoulder pain, tenderness in the shoulder region and a limited range of motion with pain and catching. After physical and orthopaedic examination a clinical diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome was reached. The four patients were admitted to a multi-modal treatment protocol including soft tissue therapy (ischaemic pressure and cross-friction massage, 7 minutes of phonophoresis (driving of medication into tissue with ultrasound with 1% cortisone cream, diversified spinal and peripheral joint manipulation and rotator cuff and shoulder girdle muscle exercises. The outcome measures for the study were subjective/objective visual analogue pain scales (VAS, range of motion (goniometer and return to normal daily, work and sporting activities. All four subjects at the end of the treatment protocol were symptom free with all outcome measures being normal. At 1 month follow up all patients continued to be symptom free with full range of motion and complete return to normal daily activities. Conclusion This case series demonstrates the potential benefit of a multimodal chiropractic protocol in resolving symptoms associated with a suspected clinical diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome.

  2. Multi-modality image reconstruction for dual-head small-animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chang-Han; Chou, Cheng-Ying [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-18

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) or positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) has become routine practice in clinics. The applications of multi-modality imaging can also benefit research advances. Consequently, dedicated small-imaging system like dual-head small-animal PET (DHAPET) that possesses the advantages of high detection sensitivity and high resolution can exploit the structural information from CT or MRI. It should be noted that the special detector arrangement in DHAPET leads to severe data truncation, thereby degrading the image quality. We proposed to take advantage of anatomical priors and total variation (TV) minimization methods to reconstruct PET activity distribution form incomplete measurement data. The objective is to solve the penalized least-squares function consisted of data fidelity term, TV norm and medium root priors. In this work, we employed the splitting-based fast iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm to split smooth and non-smooth functions in the convex optimization problems. Our simulations studies validated that the images reconstructed by use of the proposed method can outperform those obtained by use of conventional expectation maximization algorithms or that without considering the anatomical prior information. Additionally, the convergence rate is also accelerated.

  3. Calculation of Prompt Fission Neutron from 233U(n, f) Reaction by Multi-Modal Los Alamos Model%Calculation of Prompt Fission Neutron from 233U(n, f) Reaction by Multi-Modal Los Alamos Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑娜; 钟春来; 樊铁栓

    2012-01-01

    An attempt is made to improve the evaluation of the prompt fission neutron emis- sion from 233U(n, f) reaction for incident neutron energies below 6 MeV. The multi-modal fission approach is applied to the improved version of Los Alamos model and the point by point model. The prompt fission neutron spectra and the prompt fission neutron as a function of fragment mass (usually named "sawtooth" data) v(A) are calculated independently for the three most dominant fission modes (standard I, standard II and superlong), and the total spectra and v(A) are syn- thesized. The multi-modal parameters are determined on the basis of experimental data of fission fragment mass distributions. The present calculation results can describe the experimental data very well, and the proposed treatment is thus a useful tool for prompt fission neutron emission prediction.

  4. Seizure Onset Detection based on a Uni- or Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (UISA/MISA) System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An automatic Uni- or Multi-modal Inteligent Seizure Acquisition (UISA/MISA) system is highly applicable for onset detection of epileptic seizures based on motion data. The modalities used are surface electromyography (sEMG), acceleration (ACC) and angular velocity (ANG). The new proposed automatic...... algorithm on motion data is extracting features as “log-sum” measures of discrete wavelet components. Classification into the two groups “seizure” versus “nonseizure” is made based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. The algorithm performs with a sensitivity of 91-100%, a median latency of 1...... second and a specificity of 100% on multi-modal data from five healthy subjects simulating seizures. The uni-modal algorithm based on sEMG data from the subjects and patients performs satisfactorily in some cases. As expected, our results clearly show superiority of the multimodal approach, as compared...

  5. Curriculum for education and training of Medical Physicists in Nuclear Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Bardies, Manuel; Belcari, Nicola;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide a guideline curriculum covering theoretical and practical aspects of education and training for Medical Physicists in Nuclear Medicine within Europe. MATERIAL AND METHODS: National training programmes of Medical Physics, Radiation Physics and Nuclear Medicine physics from...... experience required to practice as a Medical Physicist in Nuclear Medicine in Europe. It is assumed that the precondition for the beginning of the training is a good initial degree in Medical Physics at master level (or equivalent). The Learning Outcomes are categorised using the Knowledge, Skill...... Medicine. CONCLUSIONS: This new joint EANM/EFOMP European guideline curriculum is a further step to harmonise specialist training of Medical Physicists in Nuclear Medicine within Europe. It provides a common framework for national Medical Physics societies to develop or benchmark their own curricula...

  6. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2. Licenses... radiography, nuclear medicine technology, or radiation therapy technology. 2. Special eligibility to take...

  7. Therapeutic radionuclides in nuclear medicine: current and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Chai-Hong; Cheng, Mu-hua; Ng, Kwan-Hoong

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of radionuclides in therapy has been recognized for many decades. A number of radionuclides, such as iodine-131 ((131)I), phosphorous-32 ((32)P), strontium-90 ((90)Sr), and yttrium-90 ((90)Y), have been used successfully for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, the rapid growth of this branch of nuclear medicine has been stimulated by the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain and neuroendocrine and other malignant or non-malignant tumours. Today, the field of radionuclide therapy is enjoying an exciting phase and is poised for greater growth and development in the coming years. For example, in Asia, the high prevalence of thyroid and liver diseases has prompted many novel developments and clinical trials using targeted radionuclide therapy. This paper reviews the characteristics and clinical applications of the commonly available therapeutic radionuclides, as well as the problems and issues involved in translating novel radionuclides into clinical therapies.

  8. Diffusion processes in tumors: A nuclear medicine approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, Helman, E-mail: haamayae@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Universidad Nacional de Colombia (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    The number of counts used in nuclear medicine imaging techniques, only provides physical information about the desintegration of the nucleus present in the the radiotracer molecules that were uptaken in a particular anatomical region, but that information is not a real metabolic information. For this reason a mathematical method was used to find a correlation between number of counts and {sup 18}F-FDG mass concentration. This correlation allows a better interpretation of the results obtained in the study of diffusive processes in an agar phantom, and based on it, an image from the PETCETIX DICOM sample image set from OsiriX-viewer software was processed. PET-CT gradient magnitude and Laplacian images could show direct information on diffusive processes for radiopharmaceuticals that enter into the cells by simple diffusion. In the case of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}F-FDG is necessary to include pharmacokinetic models, to make a correct interpretation of the gradient magnitude and Laplacian of counts images.

  9. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better.

  10. The role of nuclear medicine in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P. (Saint James' s Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-10-01

    In most patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, endoscopy will locate the site and cause of bleeding, and also provide an opportunity for local therapy. The cause of lower GI bleeding is often difficult to attribute, even when pathology is found by colonoscopy or barium enema. Nuclear medicine techniques can be used to identify the site of bleeding in those patients in whom the initial diagnostic procedures are negative or inconclusive. Methods using transient labelling of blood (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-sulphur colloid) produce a high target-to-background ratio in positive cases, give quick results and localize bleeding sites accurately, but depend upon bleeding being active at the time of injection. Techniques using stable blood labelling (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-labelled red blood cells) may be positive even with intermittent bleeding but may take several hours to produce a result and are less precise in localization. The most useful application is in patients with recurrent or prolonged bleeding, those with inconclusive endoscopy or barium studies, and those who are high-risk surgical candidates. (author).

  11. Importance of Bladder Radioactivity for Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Sinan Gültekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most of the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine are excreted via the urinary system. This study evaluated the importance of a reduction in bladder radioactivity for radiation safety. Methods: The study group of 135 patients underwent several organ scintigraphies [40/135; thyroid scintigraphy (TS, 30/135; whole body bone scintigraphy (WBS, 35/135; myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS and 30/135; renal scintigraphy (RS] by a technologist within 1 month. In full and empty conditions, static bladder images and external dose rate measurements at 0.25, 0.50, 1, 1.5 and 2 m distances were obtained and decline ratios were calculated from these two data sets. Results: External radiation dose rates were highest in patients undergoing MPS. External dose rates at 0.25 m distance for TS, TKS, MPS and BS were measured to be 56, 106, 191 and 72 μSv h-1 for full bladder and 29, 55, 103 and 37 μSv h-1 for empty bladder, respectively. For TS, WBS, MPS and RS, respectively, average decline ratios were calculated to be 52%, 55%, 53% and 54% in the scintigraphic assessment and 49%, 51%, 49%, 50% and 50% in the assessment with Geiger counter. Conclusion: Decline in bladder radioactivity is important in terms of radiation safety. Patients should be encouraged for micturition after each scintigraphic test. Spending time together with radioactive patients at distances less than 1 m should be kept to a minimum where possible.

  12. On the safety of persons accompanying nuclear medicine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Barreto, Marlenin; López Bejerano, Gladys M; Varela Corona, Consuelo; Fleitas Estévez, Ileana

    2012-12-01

    The presence of caretakers/comforters during nuclear medicine examinations is relatively common. These caretakers receive higher doses than the general public, who receive only environmental/background exposure. The aim of this research was to know about the doses received by two significant groups of caretakers: comforters of cancer patients (Group I) and mothers of small children (Group II). The patients were scheduled to undergo two different diagnostic studies: Inmuno-Scintigraphy using a monoclonal antibody bound to (99m)Tc (for adults) and Renal Scintigraphy using (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (for children). The average effective doses were 0.27 and 0.29 mSv for Groups I and II, respectively. Additionally, environmental monitoring was performed in the waiting room for injected patients (Room I) and inside the procedure room (Room II). Equivalent environmental doses of 0.28 and 0.24 mSv for Rooms 1 and II, respectively, were found, which are similar to values reported by other authors.

  13. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine; Doskatalogen foer nukleaermedicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Johansson, Lennart; Fernlund, Per; Nosslin, Bertil

    2007-04-15

    The Swedish radiation protection authority, (SSI), has supported work on estimates of radiation doses to patients from nuclear medicine examinations since more than 20 years. A number of projects have been reported. The results are put together and published under the name 'Doskatalogen' which contains data on doses to different organs and tissues from radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics and research. This new report contains data on: {sup 11}C-labelled substances (realistic maximum model), amino acids labelled with {sup 11}C, {sup 18}F or {sup 75}Se, {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide, {sup 123}I-labelled fatty acids ({sup 123}I- BMIPP and {sup 123}I-IPPA) and revised models for previously reported {sup 15}O-labelled water, {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (rest as well as exercise) and {sup 201}Tl-ion Data for almost 200 substances and radionuclides are included in the 'Doskatalogen' today. Since the year 2001 the 'Doskatalogen' is available on the authority's home page (www.ssi.se)

  14. Nuclear medicine in problems of fertility and impotence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckier, L S; Strober, M D

    1992-04-01

    Nuclear medicine techniques may be used to test fallopian tube patency and penile vascular inflow and outflow. Radionuclide hysterosalpingography (HSP) is a readily performed method of evaluating fallopian tube patency, and is believed to be more physiologic and functionally informative than the accepted radiologic method of contrast HSP. The test is simple to perform and interpret and offers an accurate alternative to the contrast examination. For scintigraphic evaluation of impotence, blood pool studies are most useful in assessing the integrity of arterial inflow, but may also be used to generate indices of venous leak. Washout of xenon after subcutaneous injection, in the flaccid state, has been used as a measure of baseline penile perfusion, as has intracavernosal injections in the flaccid penis. Intracavernosal xenon washout during erection seems the most useful method of testing venous integrity. Washout using technetium-99m (99mTc)-labeled red blood cells (99mTc-RBC) may emerge as a convenient alternative to the more technically difficult xenon examinations.

  15. Comparison of Sleep-Wake Classification using Electroencephalogram and Wrist-worn Multi-modal Sensor Data

    OpenAIRE

    Sano, Akane; Picard, Rosalind W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the comparison of sleep-wake classification using electroencephalogram (EEG) and multi-modal data from a wrist wearable sensor. We collected physiological data while participants were in bed: EEG, skin conductance (SC), skin temperature (ST), and acceleration (ACC) data, from 15 college students, computed the features and compared the intra-/inter-subject classification results. As results, EEG features showed 83% while features from a wrist wearable sensor showed 74% and ...

  16. Automatic multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (MISA) system for detection of motor seizures from electromyographic data and motion data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter

    2012-01-01

    measures of reconstructed sub-bands from the discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) and the wavelet packet transformation (WPT). Based on the extracted features all data segments were classified using a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm as simulated seizure or normal activity. A case study...... system compared to the uni-modal one. The presented system has a promising potential for seizure detection based on multi-modal data....

  17. Examining Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice as a lifelong learning process: opportunities and challenges to the nuclear medicine professional and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Thomas N B

    2016-08-01

    This essay will explore the critical issues and challenges surrounding lifelong learning for professionals, initially exploring within the profession and organizational context of nuclear medicine practice. It will critically examine how the peer-review process called Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice (QUANUM) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) can be considered a lifelong learning opportunity to instill a culture of quality to improve patient care and elevate the status of the nuclear medicine profession and practice within the demands of social changes, policy, and globalization. This will be explored initially by providing contextual background to the identity of the IAEA as an organization responsible for nuclear medicine professionals, followed by the benefits that QUANUM can offer. Further key debates surrounding lifelong learning, such as compulsification of lifelong learning and impact on professional change, will then be weaved through the discussion using theoretical grounding through a qualitative review of the literature. Keeping in mind that there is very limited literature focusing on the implications of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process for nuclear medicine professionals, this essay uses select narratives and observations of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process from an auditor's perspective and will further provide a comparative perspective of QUANUM on the basis of other lifelong learning opportunities such as continuing professional development activities and observe parallelisms on its benefits and challenges that it will offer to other professionals in other medical speciality fields and in the teaching profession.

  18. IAEA programs in empowering the nuclear medicine profession through online educational resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Thomas Nb; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Kashyap, Ravi; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) programme in human health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases through the application of nuclear techniques. It has the specific mission of fostering the application of nuclear medicine techniques as part of the clinical management of certain types of diseases. Attuned to the continuous evolution of this specialty as well as to the advancement and diversity of methods in delivering capacity building efforts in this digital age, the section of nuclear medicine of the IAEA has enhanced its program by incorporating online educational resources for nuclear medicine professionals into its repertoire of projects to further its commitment in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Through online educational resources such as the Human Health Campus website, e-learning modules, and scheduled interactive webinars, a validation of the commitment by the IAEA in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine is strengthened while utilizing the advanced internet and communications technology which is progressively becoming available worldwide. The Human Health Campus (www.humanhealth.iaea.org) is the online educational resources initiative of the Division of Human Health of the IAEA geared toward enhancing professional knowledge of health professionals in radiation medicine (nuclear medicine and diagnostic imaging, radiation oncology, and medical radiation physics), and nutrition. E-learning modules provide an interactive learning environment to its users while providing immediate feedback for each task accomplished. Webinars, unlike webcasts, offer the opportunity of enhanced interaction with the learners facilitated through slide shows where the presenter guides and engages the audience using video and live streaming. This paper explores the IAEA's available online

  19. Classification of first-episode psychosis: a multi-modal multi-feature approach integrating structural and diffusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo, Denis; Castellani, Umberto; Perlini, Cinzia; Bellani, Marcella; Marinelli, Veronica; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Lasalvia, Antonio; Tosato, Sarah; De Santi, Katia; Murino, Vittorio; Ruggeri, Mirella; Brambilla, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    Currently, most of the classification studies of psychosis focused on chronic patients and employed single machine learning approaches. To overcome these limitations, we here compare, to our best knowledge for the first time, different classification methods of first-episode psychosis (FEP) using multi-modal imaging data exploited on several cortical and subcortical structures and white matter fiber bundles. 23 FEP patients and 23 age-, gender-, and race-matched healthy participants were included in the study. An innovative multivariate approach based on multiple kernel learning (MKL) methods was implemented on structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. MKL provides the best classification performances in comparison with the more widely used support vector machine, enabling the definition of a reliable automatic decisional system based on the integration of multi-modal imaging information. Our results show a discrimination accuracy greater than 90 % between healthy subjects and patients with FEP. Regions with an accuracy greater than 70 % on different imaging sources and measures were middle and superior frontal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, uncinate fascicles, and cingulum. This study shows that multivariate machine learning approaches integrating multi-modal and multisource imaging data can classify FEP patients with high accuracy. Interestingly, specific grey matter structures and white matter bundles reach high classification reliability when using different imaging modalities and indices, potentially outlining a prefronto-limbic network impaired in FEP with particular regard to the right hemisphere.

  20. Female preference for multi-modal courtship: multiple signals are important for male mating success in peacock spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Madeline B; Elias, Damian O; Kasumovic, Michael M

    2015-12-07

    A long-standing goal for biologists has been to understand how female preferences operate in systems where males have evolved numerous sexually selected traits. Jumping spiders of the Maratus genus are exceptionally sexually dimorphic in appearance and signalling behaviour. Presumably, strong sexual selection by females has played an important role in the evolution of complex signals displayed by males of this group; however, this has not yet been demonstrated. In fact, despite apparent widespread examples of sexual selection in nature, empirical evidence is relatively sparse, especially for species employing multiple modalities for intersexual communication. In order to elucidate whether female preference can explain the evolution of multi-modal signalling traits, we ran a series of mating trials using Maratus volans. We used video recordings and laser vibrometry to characterize, quantify and examine which male courtship traits predict various metrics of mating success. We found evidence for strong sexual selection on males in this system, with success contingent upon a combination of visual and vibratory displays. Additionally, independently produced, yet correlated suites of multi-modal male signals are linked to other aspects of female peacock spider behaviour. Lastly, our data provide some support for both the redundant signal and multiple messages hypotheses for the evolution of multi-modal signalling. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. Automatic multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (MISA) system for detection of motor seizures from electromyographic data and motion data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter; Kjaer, Troels W; Sams, Thomas; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2012-08-01

    The objective is to develop a non-invasive automatic method for detection of epileptic seizures with motor manifestations. Ten healthy subjects who simulated seizures and one patient participated in the study. Surface electromyography (sEMG) and motion sensor features were extracted as energy measures of reconstructed sub-bands from the discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) and the wavelet packet transformation (WPT). Based on the extracted features all data segments were classified using a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm as simulated seizure or normal activity. A case study of the seizure from the patient showed that the simulated seizures were visually similar to the epileptic one. The multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (MISA) system showed high sensitivity, short detection latency and low false detection rate. The results showed superiority of the multi-modal detection system compared to the uni-modal one. The presented system has a promising potential for seizure detection based on multi-modal data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A connectivity-based test-retest dataset of multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging in young healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qixiang; Dai, Zhengjia; Xia, Mingrui; Han, Zaizhu; Huang, Ruiwang; Gong, Gaolang; Liu, Chao; Bi, Yanchao; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to investigate the structures and functions of the human brain in health and disease in vivo. However, there are growing concerns about the test-retest reliability of structural and functional measurements derived from MRI data. Here, we present a test-retest dataset of multi-modal MRI including structural MRI (S-MRI), diffusion MRI (D-MRI) and resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI). Fifty-seven healthy young adults (age range: 19-30 years) were recruited and completed two multi-modal MRI scan sessions at an interval of approximately 6 weeks. Each scan session included R-fMRI, S-MRI and D-MRI data. Additionally, there were two separated R-fMRI scans at the beginning and at the end of the first session (approximately 20 min apart). This multi-modal MRI dataset not only provides excellent opportunities to investigate the short- and long-term test-retest reliability of the brain's structural and functional measurements at the regional, connectional and network levels, but also allows probing the test-retest reliability of structural-functional couplings in the human brain.

  3. Comparing uni-modal and multi-modal therapies for improving writing in acquired dysgraphia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Lindsey; Sage, Karen; Conroy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Writing therapy studies have been predominantly uni-modal in nature; i.e., their central therapy task has typically been either writing to dictation or copying and recalling words. There has not yet been a study that has compared the effects of a uni-modal to a multi-modal writing therapy in terms of improvements to spelling accuracy. A multiple-case study with eight participants aimed to compare the effects of a uni-modal and a multi-modal therapy on the spelling accuracy of treated and untreated target words at immediate and follow-up assessment points. A cross-over design was used and within each therapy a matched set of words was targeted. These words and a matched control set were assessed before as well as immediately after each therapy and six weeks following therapy. The two approaches did not differ in their effects on spelling accuracy of treated or untreated items or degree of maintenance. All participants made significant improvements on treated and control items; however, not all improvements were maintained at follow-up. The findings suggested that multi-modal therapy did not have an advantage over uni-modal therapy for the participants in this study. Performance differences were instead driven by participant variables.

  4. Fatal pulmonary embolism following elective total knee replacement using aspirin in multi-modal prophylaxis - A 12year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, C; Bayley, E; Bhamber, N; Howard, P

    2017-06-13

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has issued guidelines on which thromboprophylaxis regimens are suitable following lower limb arthroplasty. Aspirin is not a recommended agent despite being accepted in orthopaedic guidelines elsewhere. We assessed the incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) and all-cause mortality following elective primary total knee replacement (TKR) with a standardised multi-modal prophylaxis regime in a large teaching district general hospital. We utilised a prospective audit database to identify those that had died within 42 and 90days postoperatively. Data from April 2000 to 2012 were analysed for 42 and 90day mortality rates. There were a total of 8277 elective primary TKR performed over the 12year period. The multi-modal prophylaxis regimen used unless contraindicated for all patients included 75mg aspirin once daily for four weeks. Case note review ascertained the causes of death. Where a patient had been referred to the coroner, they were contacted for post mortem results. The mortality rates at 42 and 90days were 0.36 and 0.46%. There was one fatal PE within 42days of surgery (0.01%) who was taking enoxaparin because of aspirin intolerance. Two fatal PE's occurred at 48 and 57days post-operatively (0.02%). The leading cause of death was myocardial infarction (0.13%). Fatal PE following elective TKR with a multi-modal prophylaxis regime is a very rare cause of mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The sweet spot: FDG and other 2-carbon glucose analogs for multi-modal metabolic imaging of tumor metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Benjamin L; Mackie, Thomas R; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modal imaging approaches of tumor metabolism that provide improved specificity, physiological relevance and spatial resolution would improve diagnosing of tumors and evaluation of tumor progression. Currently, the molecular probe FDG, glucose fluorinated with (18)F at the 2-carbon, is the primary metabolic approach for clinical diagnostics with PET imaging. However, PET lacks the resolution necessary to yield intratumoral distributions of deoxyglucose, on the cellular level. Multi-modal imaging could elucidate this problem, but requires the development of new glucose analogs that are better suited for other imaging modalities. Several such analogs have been created and are reviewed here. Also reviewed are several multi-modal imaging studies that have been performed that attempt to shed light on the cellular distribution of glucose analogs within tumors. Some of these studies are performed in vitro, while others are performed in vivo, in an animal model. The results from these studies introduce a visualization gap between the in vitro and in vivo studies that, if solved, could enable the early detection of tumors, the high resolution monitoring of tumors during treatment, and the greater accuracy in assessment of different imaging agents.

  6. Imaging Neurodegeneration: Steps Toward Brain Network-Based Pathophysiology and Its Potential for Multi-modal Imaging Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, C; Göttler, J; Zimmer, C

    2015-10-01

    Multi-modal brain imaging provides different in vivo windows into the human brain and thereby different ways to characterize brain disorders. Particularly, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging facilitates the study of macroscopic intrinsic brain networks, which are critical for development and spread of neurodegenerative processes in different neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the current study is to present and highlight some paradigmatic findings in intrinsic network-based pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and its potential for new network-based multimodal tools in imaging diagnostics. Qualitative review of selected multi-modal imaging studies in neurodegenerative diseases particularly in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Functional connectivity of intrinsic brain networks is selectively and progressively impaired in AD, with changes likely starting before the onset of symptoms in fronto-parietal key networks such as default mode or attention networks. Patterns of distribution and development of both amyloid-β plaques and atrophy are linked with network connectivity changes, suggesting that start and spread of pathology interacts with network connectivity. Qualitatively similar findings have been observed in other neurodegenerative disorders, suggesting shared mechanisms of network-based pathophysiology across diseases. Spread of neurodegeneration is intimately linked with the functional connectivity of intrinsic brain networks. These pathophysiological insights pave the way for new multi-modal network-based tools to detect and characterize neurodegeneration in individual patients.

  7. Obstacle traversal and self-righting of bio-inspired robots reveal the physics of multi-modal locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Fearing, Ronald; Full, Robert

    Most animals move in nature in a variety of locomotor modes. For example, to traverse obstacles like dense vegetation, cockroaches can climb over, push across, reorient their bodies to maneuver through slits, or even transition among these modes forming diverse locomotor pathways; if flipped over, they can also self-right using wings or legs to generate body pitch or roll. By contrast, most locomotion studies have focused on a single mode such as running, walking, or jumping, and robots are still far from capable of life-like, robust, multi-modal locomotion in the real world. Here, we present two recent studies using bio-inspired robots, together with new locomotion energy landscapes derived from locomotor-environment interaction physics, to begin to understand the physics of multi-modal locomotion. (1) Our experiment of a cockroach-inspired legged robot traversing grass-like beam obstacles reveals that, with a terradynamically ``streamlined'' rounded body like that of the insect, robot traversal becomes more probable by accessing locomotor pathways that overcome lower potential energy barriers. (2) Our experiment of a cockroach-inspired self-righting robot further suggests that body vibrations are crucial for exploring locomotion energy landscapes and reaching lower barrier pathways. Finally, we posit that our new framework of locomotion energy landscapes holds promise to better understand and predict multi-modal biological and robotic movement.

  8. The effectiveness of multi modal representation text books to improve student's scientific literacy of senior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakiya, Hanifah; Sinaga, Parlindungan; Hamidah, Ida

    2017-05-01

    The results of field studies showed the ability of science literacy of students was still low. One root of the problem lies in the books used in learning is not oriented toward science literacy component. This study focused on the effectiveness of the use of textbook-oriented provisioning capability science literacy by using multi modal representation. The text books development method used Design Representational Approach Learning to Write (DRALW). Textbook design which was applied to the topic of "Kinetic Theory of Gases" is implemented in XI grade students of high school learning. Effectiveness is determined by consideration of the effect and the normalized percentage gain value, while the hypothesis was tested using Independent T-test. The results showed that the textbooks which were developed using multi-mode representation science can improve the literacy skills of students. Based on the size of the effect size textbooks developed with representation multi modal was found effective in improving students' science literacy skills. The improvement was occurred in all the competence and knowledge of scientific literacy. The hypothesis testing showed that there was a significant difference on the ability of science literacy between class that uses textbooks with multi modal representation and the class that uses the regular textbook used in schools.

  9. Embedded security system for multi-modal surveillance in a railway carriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouaoui, Rhalem; Audigier, Romaric; Ambellouis, Sébastien; Capman, François; Benhadda, Hamid; Joudrier, Stéphanie; Sodoyer, David; Lamarque, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    Public transport security is one of the main priorities of the public authorities when fighting against crime and terrorism. In this context, there is a great demand for autonomous systems able to detect abnormal events such as violent acts aboard passenger cars and intrusions when the train is parked at the depot. To this end, we present an innovative approach which aims at providing efficient automatic event detection by fusing video and audio analytics and reducing the false alarm rate compared to classical stand-alone video detection. The multi-modal system is composed of two microphones and one camera and integrates onboard video and audio analytics and fusion capabilities. On the one hand, for detecting intrusion, the system relies on the fusion of "unusual" audio events detection with intrusion detections from video processing. The audio analysis consists in modeling the normal ambience and detecting deviation from the trained models during testing. This unsupervised approach is based on clustering of automatically extracted segments of acoustic features and statistical Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) modeling of each cluster. The intrusion detection is based on the three-dimensional (3D) detection and tracking of individuals in the videos. On the other hand, for violent events detection, the system fuses unsupervised and supervised audio algorithms with video event detection. The supervised audio technique detects specific events such as shouts. A GMM is used to catch the formant structure of a shout signal. Video analytics use an original approach for detecting aggressive motion by focusing on erratic motion patterns specific to violent events. As data with violent events is not easily available, a normality model with structured motions from non-violent videos is learned for one-class classification. A fusion algorithm based on Dempster-Shafer's theory analyses the asynchronous detection outputs and computes the degree of belief of each probable event.

  10. Multi-modal MRI classifiers identify excessive alcohol consumption and treatment effects in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosa, Alejandro; Moreno, Andrea; Pacheco-Torres, Jesús; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Hyytiä, Petri; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Moratal, David; Canals, Santiago

    2017-09-01

    Robust neuroimaging markers of neuropsychiatric disorders have proven difficult to obtain. In alcohol use disorders, profound brain structural deficits can be found in severe alcoholic patients, but the heterogeneity of unimodal MRI measurements has so far precluded the identification of selective biomarkers, especially for early diagnosis. In the present work we used a combination of multiple MRI modalities to provide comprehensive and insightful descriptions of brain tissue microstructure. We performed a longitudinal experiment using Marchigian-Sardinian (msP) rats, an established model of chronic excessive alcohol consumption, and acquired multi-modal images before and after 1 month of alcohol consumption (6.8 ± 1.4 g/kg/day, mean ± SD), as well as after 1 week of abstinence with or without concomitant treatment with the antirelapse opioid antagonist naltrexone (2.5 mg/kg/day). We found remarkable sensitivity and selectivity to accurately classify brains affected by alcohol even after the relative short exposure period. One month drinking was enough to imprint a highly specific signature of alcohol consumption. Brain alterations were regionally specific and affected both gray and white matter and persisted into the early abstinence state without any detectable recovery. Interestingly, naltrexone treatment during early abstinence resulted in subtle brain changes that could be distinguished from non-treated abstinent brains, suggesting the existence of an intermediate state associated with brain recovery from alcohol exposure induced by medication. The presented framework is a promising tool for the development of biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of alcohol use disorders, with capacity to further inform about its progression and response to treatment. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Multi-modal classification of neurodegenerative disease by progressive graph-based transductive learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengxia; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Adeli, Ehsan; Zhu, Yingying; Nie, Feiping; Munsell, Brent; Wu, Guorong

    2017-07-01

    Graph-based transductive learning (GTL) is a powerful machine learning technique that is used when sufficient training data is not available. In particular, conventional GTL approaches first construct a fixed inter-subject relation graph that is based on similarities in voxel intensity values in the feature domain, which can then be used to propagate the known phenotype data (i.e., clinical scores and labels) from the training data to the testing data in the label domain. However, this type of graph is exclusively learned in the feature domain, and primarily due to outliers in the observed features, may not be optimal for label propagation in the label domain. To address this limitation, a progressive GTL (pGTL) method is proposed that gradually finds an intrinsic data representation that more accurately aligns imaging features with the phenotype data. In general, optimal feature-to-phenotype alignment is achieved using an iterative approach that: (1) refines inter-subject relationships observed in the feature domain by using the learned intrinsic data representation in the label domain, (2) updates the intrinsic data representation from the refined inter-subject relationships, and (3) verifies the intrinsic data representation on the training data to guarantee an optimal classification when applied to testing data. Additionally, the iterative approach is extended to multi-modal imaging data to further improve pGTL classification accuracy. Using Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease study data, the classification accuracy of the proposed pGTL method is compared to several state-of-the-art classification methods, and the results show pGTL can more accurately identify subjects, even at different progression stages, in these two study data sets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Prototype Multi-Modality Picture Archive And Communication System At Victoria General Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosil, J.; Justice, G.; Fisher, P.; Ritchie, G.; Weigl, W. J.; Gnoyke, H.

    1988-06-01

    The Medical Imaging Department at Victoria General Hospital is the first in Canada to implement an integrated multi-modality picture archive and communication system for clinical use. The aim of this paper is to present the current status of the picture archive and communication system components and to describe its function. This system was installed in April of 1987, and upgraded in November of 1987. A picture archive and communication system includes image sources, an image management system, and image display and reporting facilities. The installed image sources (digital radiography, digital fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography) provide digital data for the image management system. The image management system provides facilities for receiving, storing, retrieving, and transmitting images using conventional computers and networks. There are two display stations, a viewing console and an image processing workstation, which provide various image display and manipulation functions. In parallel with the implementation of the picture archive and communication system there are clinical, physical, and economic evaluations being pursued. An initial examination of digital image transfer rates indicate that users will experience similar image availability times as with conventional film imaging. Clinical experience to date with the picture archive and communication system has been limited to that required to evaluate digital imaging as a diagnostic tool, using digital radiography and digital fluoroscopy studies. Computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography have only recently been connected to the picture archive and communication system. Clinical experience with these modalities is limited to several cases, but image fidelity appears to be well above clinically acceptable levels.

  13. Multi-Modal, Multi-Touch Interaction with Maps in Disaster Management Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Paelke

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-touch interaction has become popular in recent years and impressive advances in technology have been demonstrated, with the presentation of digital maps as a common presentation scenario. However, most existing systems are really technology demonstrators and have not been designed with real applications in mind. A critical factor in the management of disaster situations is the access to current and reliable data. New sensors and data acquisition platforms (e.g. satellites, UAVs, mobile sensor networks have improved the supply of spatial data tremendously. However, in many cases this data is not well integrated into current crisis management systems and the capabilities to analyze and use it lag behind sensor capabilities. Therefore, it is essential to develop techniques that allow the effective organization, use and management of heterogeneous data from a wide variety of data sources. Standard user interfaces are not well suited to provide this information to crisis managers. Especially in dynamic situations conventional cartographic displays and mouse based interaction techniques fail to address the need to review a situation rapidly and act on it as a team. The development of novel interaction techniques like multi-touch and tangible interaction in combination with large displays provides a promising base technology to provide crisis managers with an adequate overview of the situation and to share relevant information with other stakeholders in a collaborative setting. However, design expertise on the use of such techniques in interfaces for real-world applications is still very sparse. In this paper we report on interdisciplinary research with a user and application centric focus to establish real-world requirements, to design new multi-modal mapping interfaces, and to validate them in disaster management applications. Initial results show that tangible and pen-based interaction are well suited to provide an intuitive and visible way to

  14. A multi-modal prostate segmentation scheme by combining spectral clustering and active shape models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Robert; Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Pungavkar, Sona; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-03-01

    Segmentation of the prostate boundary on clinical images is useful in a large number of applications including calculating prostate volume during biopsy, tumor estimation, and treatment planning. Manual segmentation of the prostate boundary is, however, time consuming and subject to inter- and intra-reader variability. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) and MR Spectroscopy (MRS) have recently emerged as promising modalities for detection of prostate cancer in vivo. In this paper we present a novel scheme for accurate and automated prostate segmentation on in vivo 1.5 Tesla multi-modal MRI studies. The segmentation algorithm comprises two steps: (1) A hierarchical unsupervised spectral clustering scheme using MRS data to isolate the region of interest (ROI) corresponding to the prostate, and (2) an Active Shape Model (ASM) segmentation scheme where the ASM is initialized within the ROI obtained in the previous step. The hierarchical MRS clustering scheme in step 1 identifies spectra corresponding to locations within the prostate in an iterative fashion by discriminating between potential prostate and non-prostate spectra in a lower dimensional embedding space. The spatial locations of the prostate spectra so identified are used as the initial ROI for the ASM. The ASM is trained by identifying user-selected landmarks on the prostate boundary on T2 MRI images. Boundary points on the prostate are identified using mutual information (MI) as opposed to the traditional Mahalanobis distance, and the trained ASM is deformed to fit the boundary points so identified. Cross validation on 150 prostate MRI slices yields an average segmentation sensitivity, specificity, overlap, and positive predictive value of 89, 86, 83, and 93% respectively. We demonstrate that the accurate initialization of the ASM via the spectral clustering scheme is necessary for automated boundary extraction. Our method is fully automated, robust to system parameters, and computationally efficient.

  15. Use of different exposure metrics for understanding multi-modal travel injury risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ilgin Guler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to identify characteristics of different metrics of exposure for quantifying multi-modal travel injury risk. First, a discussion on the use of time-based and trip-based metrics for road user exposure to injury risk, considering multiple travel modes, is presented. The main difference between a time-based and trip-based metric is argued to be that a time-based metric reflects the actual duration of time spent on the road exposed to the travel risks. This can be proven to be important when considering multiple modes since different modes typically different speeds and average travel distances. Next, the use of total number of trips, total time traveled, and mode share (time-based or trip-based is considered to compare the injury risk of a given mode at different locations. It is argued that using mode share the safety concept which focuses on absolute numbers can be generalized. Quantitative results are also obtained from combining travel survey data with police collision reports for ten counties in California. The data are aggregated for five modes: (i cars, (ii SUVs, (iii transit riders, (iv bicyclists, and (v pedestrians. These aggregated data are used to compare travel risk of different modes with time-based or trip-based exposure metrics. These quantitative results confirm the initial qualitative discussions. As the penetration of mobile probes for transportation data collection increases, the insights of this study can provide guidance on how to best utilize the added value of such data to better quantify travel injury risk, and improve safety.

  16. Multi-Source Learning for Joint Analysis of Incomplete Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wang, Yalin; Thompson, Paul M; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Ye, Jieping

    2012-01-01

    Incomplete data present serious problems when integrating largescale brain imaging data sets from different imaging modalities. In the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), for example, over half of the subjects lack cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measurements; an independent half of the subjects do not have fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans; many lack proteomics measurements. Traditionally, subjects with missing measures are discarded, resulting in a severe loss of available information. We address this problem by proposing two novel learning methods where all the samples (with at least one available data source) can be used. In the first method, we divide our samples according to the availability of data sources, and we learn shared sets of features with state-of-the-art sparse learning methods. Our second method learns a base classifier for each data source independently, based on which we represent each source using a single column of prediction scores; we then estimate the missing prediction scores, which, combined with the existing prediction scores, are used to build a multi-source fusion model. To illustrate the proposed approaches, we classify patients from the ADNI study into groups with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and normal controls, based on the multi-modality data. At baseline, ADNI's 780 participants (172 AD, 397 MCI, 211 Normal), have at least one of four data types: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), FDG-PET, CSF and proteomics. These data are used to test our algorithms. Comprehensive experiments show that our proposed methods yield stable and promising results.

  17. A custom multi-modal sensor suite and data analysis pipeline for aerial field phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Paul W.; Coblenz, Lauren; Sherwin, Gary; Stambler, Adam; van der Meer, Andries

    2017-05-01

    Our group has developed a custom, multi-modal sensor suite and data analysis pipeline to phenotype crops in the field using unpiloted aircraft systems (UAS). This approach to high-throughput field phenotyping is part of a research initiative intending to markedly accelerate the breeding process for refined energy sorghum varieties. To date, single rotor and multirotor helicopters, roughly 14 kg in total weight, are being employed to provide sensor coverage over multiple hectaresized fields in tens of minutes. The quick, autonomous operations allow for complete field coverage at consistent plant and lighting conditions, with low operating costs. The sensor suite collects data simultaneously from six sensors and registers it for fusion and analysis. High resolution color imagery targets color and geometric phenotypes, along with lidar measurements. Long-wave infrared imagery targets temperature phenomena and plant stress. Hyperspectral visible and near-infrared imagery targets phenotypes such as biomass and chlorophyll content, as well as novel, predictive spectral signatures. Onboard spectrometers and careful laboratory and in-field calibration techniques aim to increase the physical validity of the sensor data throughout and across growing seasons. Off-line processing of data creates basic products such as image maps and digital elevation models. Derived data products include phenotype charts, statistics, and trends. The outcome of this work is a set of commercially available phenotyping technologies, including sensor suites, a fully integrated phenotyping UAS, and data analysis software. Effort is also underway to transition these technologies to farm management users by way of streamlined, lower cost sensor packages and intuitive software interfaces.

  18. Virtual reality testing of multi-modal integration in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Anna; Peled, Avi; Weinshall, Daphna

    2005-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a new family of automatic tools for the diagnosis of schizophrenia, using Virtual Reality Technology (VRT). VRT is specifically suitable for this purpose, because it allows for multi-modal stimulation in a complex setup, and the simultaneous measurement of multiple parameters. In this work we studied sensory integration within working memory, in a navigation task through a VR maze. Along the way subjects pass through multiple rooms that include three doors each, only one of which can be used to legally exit the room. Specifically, each door is characterized by three features (color, shape and sound), and only one combination of features -- as determined by a transient opening rule -- is legal. The opening rule changes over time. Subjects must learn the rule and use it for successful navigation throughout the maze. 39 schizophrenic patients and 21 healthy controls participated in this study. Upon completion, each subject was assigned a performance profile, including various error scores, response time, navigation ability and strategy. We developed a classification procedure based on the subjects' performance profile, which correctly predicted 85% of the schizophrenic patients (and all the controls). We observed that a number of parameters showed significant correlation with standard diagnosis scores (PANSS), suggesting the potential use of our measurements for future diagnosis of schizophrenia. On the other hand, our patients did not show unusual repetition of response despite stimulus cessation (called perseveration in classical studies of schizophrenia), which is usually considered a robust marker of the disease. Interestingly, this deficit only appeared in our study when subjects did not receive proper explanation of the task.

  19. Multi-modal distraction. Using technology to combat pain in young children with burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kate; Rodger, Sylvia; Bucolo, Sam; Greer, Ristan; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-08-01

    The use of non-pharmacological pain management remains adhoc within acute paediatric burns pain management protocols despite ongoing acknowledgement of its role. Advancements in adult based pain services including the integration of virtual reality has been adapted to meet the needs of children in pain, as exemplified by the development of multi-modal distraction (MMD). This easy to use, hand held interactive device uses customized programs designed to inform the child about the procedure he/she is about to experience and to distract the child during dressing changes. (1) To investigate if either MMD procedural preparation (MMD-PP) or distraction (MMD-D) has a greater impact on child pain reduction compared to standard distraction (SD) or hand held video game distraction (VG), (2) to understand the impact of MMD-PP and MMD-D on clinic efficiency by measuring length of treatment across groups, and lastly, (3) to assess the efficacy of distraction techniques over three dressing change procedures. A prospective randomised control trial was completed in a paediatric tertiary hospital Burns Outpatient Clinic. Eighty participants were recruited and studied over their first three dressing changes. Pain was assessed using validated child report, caregiver report, nursing observation and physiological measures. MMD-D and MMD-PP were both shown to significantly relieve reported pain (peffects of both MMD-D and MMD-PP were sustained with subsequent dressing changes. The use of MMD as a preparatory or a distraction tool in an outpatient burns clinic offered superior pain reduction across three dressing changes to children when compared to standard practices or hand held video games. This device has the potential to improve clinic efficiency with reductions in treatment lengths.

  20. A novel technique to incorporate structural prior information into multi-modal tomographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Ourselin, Sébastien; Hutton, Brian F.; Dobson, Katherine J.; Kaestner, Anders P.; Lionheart, William R. B.; Withers, Philip J.; Lee, Peter D.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2014-06-01

    There has been a rapid expansion of multi-modal imaging techniques in tomography. In biomedical imaging, patients are now regularly imaged using both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and x-ray computed tomography (CT), or using both positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In non-destructive testing of materials both neutron CT (NCT) and x-ray CT are widely applied to investigate the inner structure of material or track the dynamics of physical processes. The potential benefits from combining modalities has led to increased interest in iterative reconstruction algorithms that can utilize the data from more than one imaging mode simultaneously. We present a new regularization term in iterative reconstruction that enables information from one imaging modality to be used as a structural prior to improve resolution of the second modality. The regularization term is based on a modified anisotropic tensor diffusion filter, that has shape-adapted smoothing properties. By considering the underlying orientations of normal and tangential vector fields for two co-registered images, the diffusion flux is rotated and scaled adaptively to image features. The images can have different greyscale values and different spatial resolutions. The proposed approach is particularly good at isolating oriented features in images which are important for medical and materials science applications. By enhancing the edges it enables both easy identification and volume fraction measurements aiding segmentation algorithms used for quantification. The approach is tested on a standard denoising and deblurring image recovery problem, and then applied to 2D and 3D reconstruction problems; thereby highlighting the capabilities of the algorithm. Using synthetic data from SPECT co-registered with MRI, and real NCT data co-registered with x-ray CT, we show how the method can be used across a range of imaging modalities.

  1. Design and Implementation of a Multi-Modal Biometric System for Company Access Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Stefani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the design, implementation, and deployment of a multi-modal biometric system to grant access to a company structure and to internal zones in the company itself. Face and iris have been chosen as biometric traits. Face is feasible for non-intrusive checking with a minimum cooperation from the subject, while iris supports very accurate recognition procedure at a higher grade of invasivity. The recognition of the face trait is based on the Local Binary Patterns histograms, and the Daughman’s method is implemented for the analysis of the iris data. The recognition process may require either the acquisition of the user’s face only or the serial acquisition of both the user’s face and iris, depending on the confidence level of the decision with respect to the set of security levels and requirements, stated in a formal way in the Service Level Agreement at a negotiation phase. The quality of the decision depends on the setting of proper different thresholds in the decision modules for the two biometric traits. Any time the quality of the decision is not good enough, the system activates proper rules, which ask for new acquisitions (and decisions, possibly with different threshold values, resulting in a system not with a fixed and predefined behaviour, but one which complies with the actual acquisition context. Rules are formalized as deduction rules and grouped together to represent “response behaviors” according to the previous analysis. Therefore, there are different possible working flows, since the actual response of the recognition process depends on the output of the decision making modules that compose the system. Finally, the deployment phase is described, together with the results from the testing, based on the AT&T Face Database and the UBIRIS database.

  2. Nuclear medicine technology. Review questions for the board examinations. 3. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramer, Karen [CNMT, Marianka (Slovakia); Alavi, Abass [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Hospital

    2008-07-01

    This book prepares students and technologists for registry examinations in nuclear medicine technology by providing practice questions and answers with detailed explanations, as well as a mock registry exam. The questions are designed to test the basic knowledge required of nuclear medicine technologists, as well as the practical application of that knowledge. The topics covered closely follow the content specifications for the exam given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist and the components of preparedness published by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board. This third edition includes a new chapter on positron emission tomography. (orig.)

  3. Up-to-date review of nuclear medicine applications in pediatric thoracic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwatra, Neha S; Grant, Frederick D; Lim, Ruth; Lee, Edward Y

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear medicine has an important role in the evaluation of various congenital and acquired pediatric chest diseases. Although the radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear medicine examinations used in children are broadly the same as in adults, there are some key differences in clinical indications and underlying disorders. This article provides the reader with an up-to-date review of practice of nuclear medicine as it relates to the pediatric chest, including its current role and future applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluations of Molecular Nuclear Medicine in pediatric urgencies; Evaluaciones de Medicina Nuclear Molecular en urgencias pediatricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Duncker R, C. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear Molecular, Hospital Infantil de Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Several diagnostic procedures of Molecular Nuclear Medicine are considered in first choice in clinical evaluation of patients with different illnesses. So, the gammagraphy is the diagnostic form more sensitive to detect alterations of the perfusion on organs and systems such as bones, heart, brain, lungs or kidneys. Also is possible to identify, localize, evaluate the activity of inflammatory processes such as cellulitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, the abscesses and several primary or metastatic tumours before each other diagnostic technique. In this work is treated about the importance of treatments with radioactive materials have been an important reappearance in last years since with the present capacity to localize specifically intracellular processes (for example, synthesis of DNA) new gateways are opened to research which in coming years would be of great utility. (Author)

  5. Radiation exposure in nuclear medicine: real-time measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Sylvain

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available French regulations have introduced the use of electronic dosimeters for personal monitoring of workers. In order to evaluate the exposure from diagnostic procedures to nuclear medicine staff, individual whole-body doses were measured daily with electronic (digital personal dosimeters during 20 consecutive weeks and correlated with the work load of each day. Personal doses remained always below 20 µSv/d under normal working conditions. Radiation exposure levels were highest to tech staff, nurses and stretcher-bearers. The extrapolated annual cumulative doses for all staff remained less than 10 % of the maximum legal limit for exposed workers (2 mSv/yr. Electronic dosimeters are not technically justified for routine survey of staff. The high sensitivity and immediate reading of electronic semiconductor dosimeters may become very useful for exposure control under risky working conditions. It may become an important help for optimising radiation protection.A legislação francesa introduziu o uso de dosímetros eletrônicos para monitoração da exposição do trabalhador. Afim de avaliar a exposição do trabalhador proveniente de exames diagnósticos em medicina nuclear, doses individuais do corpo inteiro foram medidas diariamente com dosímetros eletrônicos (digitais durante 20 semanas consecutivas e correlatas com as atividades de trabalho de cada dia. As doses foram sempre inferiores à 20 µSv por dia em condições normais de trabalho. Os níveis de exposição de radiação mais elevados foram para os enfermeiros, manipuladores e maqueiros. A extrapolação da dose anual para todos os trabalhadores foi menos que 10 % do limite máximo legal para os trabalhadores expostos (2 mSv/ano. Dosímetros eletrônicos não são tecnicamente justificados para a o controle de rotina da exposição dos trabalhadores, mas a alta sensibilidade e a leitura imediata desses dosímetros podem vir a serem muito úteis para o controle da exposição em condi

  6. Learning gestures and ethical issues in oncology and nuclear medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboubakr Matrane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to show the importance of learning gestures in three medical procedures (chemotherapy, brachytherapy, and bone scan. It allows us to assess complications, lack of benefit, and ethical questions to which resident physicians are confronted in their training. Materials and Methods: The study is based on a questionnaire divided into two parts distributed to 70 resident physicians and 90 patients: 60 physicians radiation oncologists and 10 nuclear physicians completed the first part of 24 items. It concerned the learning of medical practices. The second part of 18 items was completed by 90 patients (30 patients in the chemotherapy unit, 30 patients in the brachytherapy unit, and 30 patients in the nuclear medicine department; it was related to patients′ information prior to the completion (performance of the gesture. Results: The training of medical residents physicians took place mainly during the first year on conscious and well-informed patients, with the exception of brachytherapy taught later in the second year. It was preceded by a theoretical education in 56.7%, 43.3%, and 100%, respectively, in case of chemotherapy, brachytherapy, and bone scan unit, but the previous observation by a senior had failed in 16.7% in case of chemotherapy and in 36.7% in case of brachytherapy unit. Despite the almost constant presence of a senior, four incidents were associated with the first acts of chemotherapy and brachytherapy unit and one incident with the bone scan unit. These incidents had been generated, respectively, from 23.4%, 26.7%, and 20% of resident physicians surveyed (in chemotherapy, in brachytherapy, and in bone scan and had a consequence of a loss of opportunity for patient, in 20%, 13.3%, and 40%, respectively. Most patients were informed before the completion of the medical procedure, and cause ethical problems. Alternative ways of learning were known by most of the resident physicians in training

  7. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM) Program. Part 1: the QUANUM Program and Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    An effective management system that integrates quality management is essential for a modern nuclear medicine practice. The Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the mission of supporting nuclear medicine practice in low- and middle-income countries and of helping them introduce it in their health-care system, when not yet present. The experience gathered over several years has shown diversified levels of development and varying degrees of quality of practice, among others because of limited professional networking and limited or no opportunities for exchange of experiences. Those findings triggered the development of a program named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), aimed at improving the standards of NM practice in low- and middle-income countries to internationally accepted standards through the introduction of a culture of quality management and systematic auditing programs. QUANUM takes into account the diversity of nuclear medicine services around the world and multidisciplinary contributions to the practice. Those contributions include clinical, technical, radiopharmaceutical, and medical physics procedures. Aspects of radiation safety and patient protection are also integral to the process. Such an approach ensures consistency in providing safe services of superior quality to patients. The level of conformance is assessed using standards based on publications of the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and guidelines from scientific societies such as Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) and European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). Following QUANUM guidelines and by means of a specific assessment tool developed by the IAEA, auditors, both internal and external, will be able to evaluate the level of conformance. Nonconformances will then be prioritized and recommendations will be provided during an exit briefing. The

  8. Functional genomics and proteomics - the role of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, U. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Nuklearmedizin; German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Altmann, A. [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Eisenhut, M. [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiopharmacy

    2002-01-01

    Now that the sequencing of the human genome has been completed, the basic challenges are finding the genes, locating their coding regions and predicting their functions. This will result in a new understanding of human biology as well as in the design of new molecular structures as potential novel diagnostic or drug discovery targets. The assessment of gene function may be performed using the tools of the genome program. These tools represent high-throughput methods used to evaluate changes in the expression of many or all genes of an organism at the same time in order to investigate genetic pathways for normal development and disease. This will lead to a shift in the scientific paradigm: In the pre-proteomics era, functional assignments were derived from hypothesis-driven experiments designed to understand specific cellular processes. The new tools describe proteins on a proteome-wide scale, thereby creating a new way of doing cell research which results in the determination of three-dimensional protein structures and the description of protein networks. These descriptions may then be used for the design of new hypotheses and experiments in the traditional physiological, biochemical and pharmacological sense. The evaluation of genetically manipulated animals or newly designed biomolecules will require a thorough understanding of physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology and the experimental approaches will involve many new technologies, including in vivo imaging with single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography. Nuclear medicine procedures may be applied for the determination of gene function and regulation using established and new tracers or using in vivo reporter genes such as enzymes, receptors, antigens or transporters. Pharmacogenomics will identify new surrogate markers for therapy monitoring which may represent potential new tracers for imaging. Also, drug distribution studies for new therapeutic biomolecules are needed, at least

  9. Radiation dose study in nuclear medicine using GATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguwa, Kasarachi

    Dose as a result of radiation exposure is the notion generally used to disclose the imparted energy in a volume of tissue to a potential biological effect. The basic unit defined by the international system of units (SI system) is the radiation absorbed dose, which is expressed as the mean imparted energy in a mass element of the tissue known as "gray" (Gy) or J/kg. The procedure for ascertaining the absorbed dose is complicated since it involves the radiation transport of numerous types of charged particles and coupled photon interactions. The most precise method is to perform a full 3D Monte Carlo simulation of the radiation transport. There are various Monte Carlo toolkits that have tool compartments for dose calculations and measurements. The dose studies in this thesis were performed using the GEANT4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE) software (Jan et al., 2011) GATE simulation toolkit has been used extensively in the medical imaging community, due to the fact that it uses the full capabilities of GEANT4. It also utilizes an easy to-learn GATE macro language, which is more accessible than learning the GEANT4/C++ programming language. This work combines GATE with digital phantoms generated using the NCAT (NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom) toolkit (Segars et al., 2004) to allow efficient and effective estimation of 3D radiation dose maps. The GATE simulation tool has developed into a beneficial tool for Monte Carlo simulations involving both radiotherapy and imaging experiments. This work will present an overview of absorbed dose of common radionuclides used in nuclear medicine and serve as a guide to a user who is setting up a GATE simulation for a PET and SPECT study.

  10. Intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, A M D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish a working standard for intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in most of nuclear medicine facilities for the determination of the activity of radionuclides administered to patients in specific examinations or therapeutic procedures. A commercial dose calibrator, a set of standard radioactive sources, and syringes, vials and ampoules with radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine were utilized in this work. The commercial dose calibrator was calibrated for radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as linearity response and variation response with the source volume at a constant source activity concentration were performed. This instrument may be used as a reference system for intercomparison and calibration of other activity meters, as a method of quality control of dose calibrators utilized in nuclear medicine facilities.

  11. The 2011 nuclear medicine technology job analysis project of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dan; Hubble, William; Press, Bret A; Hall, Scott K; Michels, Ann D; Koenen, Roxanne; Vespie, Alan W

    2010-12-01

    The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) conducts periodic job analysis projects to update the content and eligibility requirements for all certification examinations. In 2009, the ARRT conducted a comprehensive job analysis project to update the content specifications and clinical competency requirements for the nuclear medicine technology examination. ARRT staff and a committee of volunteer nuclear medicine technologists designed a job analysis survey that was sent to a random sample of 1,000 entry-level staff nuclear medicine technologists. Through analysis of the survey data and judgments of the committee, the project resulted in changes to the nuclear medicine technology examination task list, content specifications, and clinical competency requirements. The primary changes inspired by the project were the introduction of CT content to the examination and the expansion of the content covering cardiac procedures.

  12. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine techniqu

  13. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging: highlights of the 23rd Annual EANM Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrió, Ignasi

    2011-02-01

    The most recent research developments in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging were presented at the 2010 Annual Congress of the EANM. This review summarizes some of the most relevant contributions made in the fields of oncology, cardiovascular science, neurology and psychiatry, technological innovation and novel tracers. Presentations covered basic and clinical research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, and diagnostic and therapeutic applications of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals on a global scale. The results reported demonstrate that investigative strategies using nuclear medicine techniques facilitate effective diagnosis and management of patients with most prevalent disease states. At the same time novel tracers and technologies are being explored, which hold promise for future new applications of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in research and clinical practice.

  14. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine

  15. NCRP report 160 and what it means for medical imaging and nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolus, Norman E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly explain report 160 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement and the significance of the report to medical imaging as a whole and nuclear medicine specifically. The implications of the findings of report 160 have had repercussions and will continue to affect all of ionizing radiation medical imaging. The nuclear medicine community should have an understanding of why and how report 160 is important. After reading this article, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with the main focus of report 160, the significant change that has occurred since the 1980s in the ionizing radiation exposure of people in the United States, the primary background source of ionizing radiation in the United States, the primary medical exposure to ionizing radiation in the United States, trends in nuclear medicine procedures and patient exposure, and a comparison of population doses between 2006 and the early 1980s as outlined in report 160.

  16. The role of nuclear medicine in the diagnosis of cancer of unknown origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demir, H; Berk, F; Raderer, M;

    2004-01-01

    is directed at the identification of treatable subset. Accurate diagnostic workup is crucial because both prognosis and survival rates depend mainly on detection of the primary tumor site. Although these patients undergo extensive imaging procedures, nuclear medicine techniques are under-utilized despite...... their ability of providing molecular information. Positron emission tomography has an emerging role in this clinical challenge along with other nuclear medicine methods including, bone scan, thyroid scintigraphy....

  17. Assessment of radiation exposure of nuclear medicine staff using personal TLD dosimeters and charcoal detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, F.; Garcia-Talavera, M.; Pardo, R.; Deban, L. [Valladolid Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Garcia-Talavera, P.; Singi, G.M.; Martin, E. [Hospital Clinico Univ., Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Salamanca (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Although the main concern regarding exposure to ionizing radiation for nuclear medicine workers is external radiation, inhalation of radionuclides can significantly contribute to the imparted doses. We propose a new approach to assess exposure to inhalation of {sup 131}I based on passive monitoring using activated charcoal detectors. We compared the inhalation doses to the staff of a nuclear medicine department, based on the measurements derived from charcoal detectors placed at various locations, and the external doses monitored using personal TLD dosimeters. (authors)

  18. Nuclear medicine methods in the assessment of acupuncture effects: a short review

    OpenAIRE

    Deise Elisabete Souza; Bernardo Machado Rebello; Reginaldo de Carvalho Silva Filho; Raquel Terra Agostinho; Bastos,Sohaku R. C.; Mario Bernardo-Filho

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of acupuncture are poorly understood. In consequence, numerous investigators have conducted clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture in various conditions. We have used PubMed database system to evaluate the number of publications in acupuncture and nuclear medicine procedures in the period from 1964 to 2007, using the keywords: "nuclear medicine and acupuncture", "SPECT and acupuncture", "PET and acupuncture", "scintigraphy and acupuncture", "radionuclide and acupun...

  19. Optimizing boundary detection via Simulated Search with applications to multi-modal heart segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J; Ecabert, O; Meyer, C; Kneser, R; Weese, J

    2010-02-01

    Segmentation of medical images can be achieved with the help of model-based algorithms. Reliable boundary detection is a crucial component to obtain robust and accurate segmentation results and to enable full automation. This is especially important if the anatomy being segmented is too variable to initialize a mean shape model such that all surface regions are close to the desired contours. Several boundary detection algorithms are widely used in the literature. Most use some trained image appearance model to characterize and detect the desired boundaries. Although parameters of the boundary detection can vary over the model surface and are trained on images, their performance (i.e., accuracy and reliability of boundary detection) can only be assessed as an integral part of the entire segmentation algorithm. In particular, assessment of boundary detection cannot be done locally and independently on model parameterization and internal energies controlling geometric model properties. In this paper, we propose a new method for the local assessment of boundary detection called Simulated Search. This method takes any boundary detection function and evaluates its performance for a single model landmark in terms of an estimated geometric boundary detection error. In consequence, boundary detection can be optimized per landmark during model training. We demonstrate the success of the method for cardiac image segmentation. In particular we show that the Simulated Search improves the capture range and the accuracy of the boundary detection compared to a traditional training scheme. We also illustrate how the Simulated Search can be used to identify suitable classes of features when addressing a new segmentation task. Finally, we show that the Simulated Search enables multi-modal heart segmentation using a single algorithmic framework. On computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, average segmentation errors (surface-to-surface distances) for the four chambers and

  20. Quality management in nuclear medicine for better patient care: the IAEA program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Kashyap, Ravi; Pascual, Thomas; Paez, Diana; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency promotes the practice of nuclear medicine among its Member States with a focus on quality and safety. It considers quality culture as a part of the educational process and as a tool to reduce heterogeneity in the practice of nuclear medicine, and in turn, patient care. Sensitization about quality is incorporated in all its delivery mechanisms. The Agency has developed a structured peer-review process called quality management (QM) audits in nuclear medicine practices to help nuclear medicine facilities improve their quality through this voluntary comprehensive audit process. The process is multidisciplinary, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine practice with a focus on the patient. It complements other QM and accreditation approaches developed by professional societies or accreditation agencies. The Agency is committed to propagate its utility and assist in the implementation process. Similar auditing programs for practice in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, called QUADRIL and QUATRO, respectively, are also in place. Necessary amendments in the auditing process and content are incorporated based on technological and practice changes with time. The reader will become familiar with the approach of the Agency on QM in nuclear medicine and its implementation process to improve patient care.

  1. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in Italy: highlights of the 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuocolo, A

    2011-06-01

    The 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (AIMN) took place in Rimini on March 18-21, 2011 under the chairmanship of Professor Stefano Fanti. The program was of excellent quality and put a further step for the settlement of the standardized AIMN congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success with more than 1100 total participants and more than 360 abstracts received. Of these, 40 abstracts were accepted for oral and 285 for poster presentations. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, with particular focus on advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, and infection and inflammation. Noteworthy, several presentations at this congress, focusing on quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and patient management and further demonstrated that nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in the contemporary medical scenario. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress abstract book, published as volume 55, supplement 1 of the Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in April 2011.

  2. Current Status of Nuclear Medicine Practice in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Diana; Becic, Tarik; Bhonsle, Uday; Jalilian, Amir R; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; Osso, Joao Alberto

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine (NM) in the Middle East region has experienced an important growth in the last 2 decades and has become crucial in providing healthcare to the region's population of about 395 million people. Even though there are some countries in which the services provided are limited to basic coverage of studies with (99m)Tc and (131)I, most have well-established practices covering most of the available studies in this medical specialty; this is the case in for example, Iran, Israel, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey. According to data provided by the NM professionals in the 17 countries included in the present publication, which was collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2015, the total number of gamma cameras in the region is 910 with an average of 2.3 gamma cameras per million inhabitants. Out of these, 107 cameras, or 12%, are SPECT/CT cameras. There are 194 operating PET/CT scanners, translating to one PET/CT scanner for 2.04 million people on average. The availability of PET/CT scanners in relation to population is the highest in Lebanon and Kuwait, with 2.2 and 1.7 scanners per million people, respectively. There is a total of 628 NM centers in the 17 countries, whereas most NM centers belong to the public healthcare system and in most of the countries are widely spread and not confined exclusively to capital cities. As for the radionuclide therapies, (131)I is used regularly in diagnostic workup as well as in therapeutic applications in all the countries included in this analysis. Only five countries have the capability of assembling (99)Mo-(99m)Tc generators (Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Israel, and Turkey), and cold kits are produced in several countries. Although there are no capabilities in the region to produce (99)Mo from nuclear reactors, a total of 46 cyclotrons are operated for production of PET radionuclides. The most widely used PET tracer in the region is (18)F-FDG followed by (18)F-NaF; concomitantly, the

  3. Radiation doses for pediatric nuclear medicine studies: comparing the North American consensus guidelines and the pediatric dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Frederick D.; Drubach, Laura A.; Treves, S. Ted; Fahey, Frederic H. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Joint Program in Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Estimated radiation dose is important for assessing and communicating the risks and benefits of pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Radiation dose depends on the radiopharmaceutical, the administered activity, and patient factors such as age and size. Most radiation dose estimates for pediatric nuclear medicine have not been based on administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals recommended by established practice guidelines. The dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the North American consensus guidelines each provide recommendations of administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals in children, but there are substantial differences between these two guidelines. For 12 commonly performed pediatric nuclear medicine studies, two established pediatric radiopharmaceutical administration guidelines were used to calculate updated radiation dose estimates and to compare the radiation exposure resulting from the recommendations of each of the guidelines. Estimated radiation doses were calculated for 12 common procedures in pediatric nuclear medicine using administered activities recommended by the dosage card of the EANM (version 1.5.2008) and the 2010 North American consensus guidelines for radiopharmaceutical administered activities in pediatrics. Based on standard models and nominal age-based weights, radiation dose was estimated for typical patients at ages 1, 5, 10 and 15 years and adult. The resulting effective doses were compared, with differences greater than 20% considered significant. Following either the EANM dosage card or the 2010 North American guidelines, the highest effective doses occur with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with fluorine-18 and iodine-123. In 24% of cases, following the North American consensus guidelines would result in a substantially higher radiation dose. The guidelines of the EANM dosage card would lead to a substantially higher radiation dose in 39% of all cases, and in 62% of cases in which patients

  4. Pre-emptive and multi-modal perioperative pain management may improve quality of life in patients undergoing spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Ho; Park, Jin-Oh; Suk, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Park, Moon-Soo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Park, Sangun; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Ko, Su-Kyoung; Moon, Seong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Compared to an abundance of data on surgical techniques for degenerative spine conditions and the outcomes thereof, little is available to guide optimal perioperative pain management after spinal surgery. The aim of this study was to survey patterns of perioperative pain management after spinal surgery and to investigate the effects of perioperative pain management, such as pre-emptive analgesia and multi-modal postoperative pain management, on acute postoperative satisfaction, pain reduction, and health-related quality of life in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Non-blind multicenter prospective observational clinical series. Seventeen tertiary hospitals (14 hospitals attached to medical colleges and 3 general hospitals). Pain management protocols of 393 patients (153 men, 240 women; mean age of 67 years, ranging from 21 to 91 years) from 17 tertiary hospitals after spinal surgery for degenerative spine disease were evaluated using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 79 (20%) patients received pre-emptive analgesics, which included cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, with or without administration of anticonvulsants, immediately before surgery at the time of antibiotic prophylaxis. Postoperative pain was managed mainly by multi-modal therapy (363 cases, 92%), along with various combinations of patient controlled anesthesia (PCA), conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), COX-2 inhibitors, and narcotics. Self-reported levels of pain were not significantly different among postoperative multiple modalities of pain management, but were different significantly for pre-emptive pain management regimens (P multi-modal pain management after spinal surgery may lead to better health-related quality of life, greater patient satisfaction, and less postoperative pain.

  5. Development of a Multi-modal Tissue Diagnostic System Combining High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging with Lifetime Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yinghua; Marcu, Laura; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    We report the development and validate a multi-modal tissue diagnostic technology, which combines three complementary techniques into one system including ultrasound backscatter microscopy (UBM), photoacoustic imaging (PAI), and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS). UBM enables the reconstruction of the tissue microanatomy. PAI maps the optical absorption heterogeneity of the tissue associated with structure information and has the potential to provide functional imaging of the tissue. Examination of the UBM and PAI images allows for localization of regions of interest for TR-LIFS evaluation of the tissue composition. The hybrid probe consists of a single element ring transducer with concentric fiber optics for multi-modal data acquisition. Validation and characterization of the multi-modal system and ultrasonic, photoacoustic, and spectroscopic data coregistration were conducted in a physical phantom with properties of ultrasound scattering, optical absorption, and fluorescence. The UBM system with the 41 MHz ring transducer can reach the axial and lateral resolution of 30 and 65 μm, respectively. The PAI system with 532 nm excitation light from a Nd:YAG laser shows great contrast for the distribution of optical absorbers. The TR-LIFS system records the fluorescence decay with the time resolution of ~300 ps and a high sensitivity of nM concentration range. Biological phantom constructed with different types of tissues (tendon and fat) was used to demonstrate the complementary information provided by the three modalities. Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes were compared to differentiate chemical composition of tissues at the regions of interest determined by the coregistered high resolution UBM and PAI image. Current results demonstrate that the fusion of these techniques enables sequentially detection of functional, morphological, and compositional features of biological tissue, suggesting potential applications in diagnosis of tumors

  6. Microfluidic electro-sonoporation: a multi-modal cell poration methodology through simultaneous application of electric field and ultrasonic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longsine-Parker, Whitney; Wang, Han; Koo, Chiwan; Kim, Jeongyun; Kim, Beomjoon; Jayaraman, Arul; Han, Arum

    2013-06-07

    A microfluidic device that simultaneously applies the conditions required for microelectroporation and microsonoporation in a flow-through scheme toward high-efficiency and high-throughput molecular delivery into mammalian cells is presented. This multi-modal poration microdevice using simultaneous application of electric field and ultrasonic wave was realized by a three-dimensional (3D) microelectrode scheme where the electrodes function as both electroporation electrodes and cell flow channel so that acoustic wave can be applied perpendicular to the electric field simultaneously to cells flowing through the microfluidic channel. This 3D microelectrode configuration also allows a uniform electric field to be applied while making the device compatible with fluorescent microscopy. It is hypothesized that the simultaneous application of two different fields (electric field and acoustic wave) in perpendicular directions allows formation of transient pores along two axes of the cell membrane at reduced poration intensities, hence maximizing the delivery efficiency while minimizing cell death. The microfluidic electro-sonoporation system was characterized by delivering small molecules into mammalian cells, and showed average poration efficiency of 95.6% and cell viability of 97.3%. This proof of concept result shows that by combining electroporation and sonoporation together, significant improvement in molecule delivery efficiency could be achieved while maintaining high cell viability compared to electroporation or sonoporation alone. The microfluidic electro-sonoporation device presented here is, to the best of our knowledge, the first multi-modal cell poration device using simultaneous application of electric field and ultrasonic wave. This new multi-modal cell poration strategy and system is expected to have broad applications in delivery of small molecule therapeutics and ultimately in large molecule delivery such as gene transfection applications where high

  7. Radiological Justification for and Optimization of Nuclear Medicine Practices in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Il

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear medicine is a rapidly growing discipline that employs advanced novel hybrid techniques that provide unique anatomical and functional information, as well as targets for molecular therapy. Concomitantly, there has been an increase in the attention paid to medical radiation exposure. A radiological justification for the practice of nuclear medicine has been implemented mainly through referral guidelines based on research results such as prospective randomized clinical trials. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends diagnostic reference levels as a practical mechanism to optimize medical radiation exposure in order to be commensurate with the medical purpose. The Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine has been implementing radiological optimization through a survey of the protocols on how each hospital determines the dose of administration of each radiopharmaceutical. In the case of nuclear medicine, radiation exposure of caregivers and comforters of patients discharged after administration of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can occur; therefore, optimization has been implemented through written instructions for patients, based on international recommendations. The development of patient-radiation-dose monitoring software, and a national registry and management system of patient-radiation-dose is needed to implement radiological optimization through diagnostic reference levels. This management system must work in agreement with the "Institute for Quality Management of Nuclear Medicine", and must take into account the medical reality of Korea, such as low medicine fee, in order to implement reasonable radiological justification and optimization.

  8. Comparison of sleep-wake classification using electroencephalogram and wrist-worn multi-modal sensor data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Akane; Picard, Rosalind W

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the comparison of sleep-wake classification using electroencephalogram (EEG) and multi-modal data from a wrist wearable sensor. We collected physiological data while participants were in bed: EEG, skin conductance (SC), skin temperature (ST), and acceleration (ACC) data, from 15 college students, computed the features and compared the intra-/inter-subject classification results. As results, EEG features showed 83% while features from a wrist wearable sensor showed 74% and the combination of ACC and ST played more important roles in sleep/wake classification.

  9. Development and calibration of a microfluidic biofilm growth cell with flow-templating and multi-modal characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet-Mercier, Francois; Karas, Adnane; Safdar, Muhammad; Aznaveh, Nahid Babaei; Zarabadi, Mirpouyan; Greener, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a microfluidic flow-templating platform with multi-modal characterization for studies of biofilms and their precursor materials. A key feature is a special three inlet flow-template compartment, which confines and controls the location of biofilm growth against a template wall. Characterization compartments include Raman imaging to study the localization of the nutrient solutions, optical microscopy to quantify biofilm biomass and localization, and cyclic voltammetry for flow velocity measurements. Each compartment is tested and then utilized to make preliminary measurements.

  10. Multi-modal calculations of prompt fission neutrons from 238U(n, f) at low induced energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Na; ZHONG Chun-Lai; FAN Tie-Shuan

    2011-01-01

    Properties of prompt fission neutrons from 238U(n,f) are calculated for incident neutron energies below 6 MeV using the multi-modal model,including the prompt fission neutron spectrum,the average prompt fission neutron multiplicity,and the prompt fission neutron multiplicity as a function of the fission fragment mass v(A) (usually named “sawtooth” data) The three most dominant fission modes are taken into account.The model parameters are determined on the basis of experimental fission fragment data.The predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Results from the commissioning of a multi-modal endoscope for ultrasound and time of flight PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugalho, Ricardo [LIP, Lisbon, (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration has developed a multi-modal imaging system combining Ultrasound with Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography into an endoscopic imaging device. The objective of the project is to obtain a coincidence time resolution of about 200 ps FWHM and to achieve about 1 mm spatial resolution of the PET system, while integrating all the components in a very compact detector suitable for endoscopic use. This scanner aims to be exploited for diagnostic and surgical oncology, as well as being instrumental in the clinical test of new biomarkers especially targeted for prostate and pancreatic cancer. (authors)

  12. 20. Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine. Abstracts; 20. Congresso brasileiro de biologia e medicina nuclear. Resumos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Several aspects concerning the use of nuclear medicine in cardiology, oncology, neurology, endocrinology among other areas are studied. Various topics related to diagnosis and treatment of diseases are presented, e.g. radiotracers use, radiopharmaceuticals (mainly associated with technetium 99), development and standardization of radionuclides, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions. The scintiscanning is the most reported diagnostic technique.

  13. Nuclear medicine comes of age: its present and future roles in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, J G; Kopecky, R T; Frymoyer, P A

    1990-03-01

    The current role of nuclear medicine in clinical diagnosis was surveyed in a retrospective review of medical records by two internists. About one radiologic imaging study in 20 was a radionuclide procedure, and a somewhat larger fraction was performed in outpatients. The internists found that diagnostic screening procedures in nuclear medicine influenced patient management in 63% of hospital inpatients, and quantitative/monitoring types of tests influenced management in 56%. Of the projected health care costs in the United States of $490 billion, all imaging procedures will account for only $12 billion, and nuclear medicine procedures will account for about $1 billion. Nuclear medicine research continues to blossom. The National Institutes of Health budget for diagnostic imaging research in fiscal year 1988 totaled $86.6 million; nuclear medicine projects represented 43% of this total, all other projects in radiology represented 30%, and projects outside radiology represented 30%. Research with positron emitters and positron emission tomography totaled $20.5 million, and research with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies totaled $6.2 million. Two major problems may hinder the future practice of nuclear medicine in the United States compared with that in other developed countries: (a) the serious time lag in the approval process for new radiopharmaceuticals by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other agencies and (b) the lack of a facility dedicated to the continuous production of radionuclides for biomedical research. Now, there is sporadic production permitted only during high-energy physics experiments. The recent developments which will probably induce the greatest changes in clinical nuclear medicine in the near future are the improvements in design and utilization of single photon emission computed tomographic devices and prolific generation of new radiopharmaceuticals, especially technetium-99m agents for cerebral and myocardial imaging and tumor agents.

  14. [Occupational medicine in nuclear industry and power engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, A K

    2004-01-01

    The author analysed results of medical service in atomic industry and power engineering over 50 years. Those results are beneficial for management in occupational medicine for any new complicated and potentially dangerous technology and activity.

  15. The radiological protection in the nuclear medicine practice; La proteccion radiologica en la practica de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado M, H., E-mail: hmaldonado@cnsns.gob.m [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The nuclear medicine practice dates of the 1950 years, in this work the achievements reached as regards radiological protection are shown, although even lack a lot to make, the doses for the occupationally exposed personnel have decreased with lapsing of the years, thanks to the perception of the nuclear physicians to improve the administration techniques of the radioactive material, the decrease of administered activity and the unit doses use among the most remarkable advances. The changes in the equipment s technology to quantify the activity to administer, detection systems and image formation have demanded the development of the new professionals of the nuclear medicine that allows give protection to the patient. This improvement needs to consolidate with the appropriate normative development, the involved personnel qualification and the methods and procedures actualization to improve the protection of the occupationally exposed personnel, the public, the environment and the patient. (Author)

  16. Structured and Sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis as a Brain-Wide Multi-Modal Data Fusion Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi-Nejad, Ali-Reza; Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2017-07-01

    Multi-modal data fusion has recently emerged as a comprehensive neuroimaging analysis approach, which usually uses canonical correlation analysis (CCA). However, the current CCA-based fusion approaches face problems like high-dimensionality, multi-collinearity, unimodal feature selection, asymmetry, and loss of spatial information in reshaping the imaging data into vectors. This paper proposes a structured and sparse CCA (ssCCA) technique as a novel CCA method to overcome the above problems. To investigate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we have compared three data fusion techniques: standard CCA, regularized CCA, and ssCCA, and evaluated their ability to detect multi-modal data associations. We have used simulations to compare the performance of these approaches and probe the effects of non-negativity constraint, the dimensionality of features, sample size, and noise power. The results demonstrate that ssCCA outperforms the existing standard and regularized CCA-based fusion approaches. We have also applied the methods to real functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and structural MRI data of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients (n = 34) and healthy control (HC) subjects (n = 42) from the ADNI database. The results illustrate that the proposed unsupervised technique differentiates the transition pattern between the subject-course of AD patients and HC subjects with a p-value of less than 1×10(-6) . Furthermore, we have depicted the brain mapping of functional areas that are most correlated with the anatomical changes in AD patients relative to HC subjects.

  17. Multi-Modal Imaging Including Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Patients With Posterior Multifocal Placoid Pigment Epitheliopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens Ulrich; Enders, Christian; Lang, Gerhard Klaus; Lang, Gabriele Elisabeth

    2017-09-01

    New imaging methods provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE). Four patients (eight eyes) in acute, subacute, and late phases of the disease were analyzed with multi-modal imaging methods including optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), structural OCT, fundus photography, and fundus autofluorescence. One patient was observed during the entire disease course. In acute and subacute phases of the disease, an early blockage in fluorescein angiography was found. OCTA showed perfusion defects in choriocapillaris and choroid slabs. During the course of disease, perfusion deficits observed in OCTA imaging resolved first in the choroid and then in the choriocapillaris slab. Multi-modal imaging including OCTA supports the thesis that the underlying pathology of APMPPE is an inflammatory impairment of the choroidal circulation with secondary damage to the outer retina. OCTA might be able to replace fluorescein and indocyanine angiography in the diagnostic work-up of APMPPE. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:727-733.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Multi-modal intervention improved oral intake in hospitalized patients. A one year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, M; Beermann, T; Mortensen, M N; Skadhauge, L B; Lindorff-Larsen, K; Rasmussen, H H

    2015-04-01

    Good nutritional practice (GNP) includes screening, nutrition plan and monitoring, and is mandatory for targeted treatment of malnourished patients in hospital. To optimize energy- and protein-intake in patients at nutritional risk and to improve GNP in a hospital setting. A 12-months observational multi-modal intervention study was done, using the top-down and bottom-up principle. All hospitalized patients (>3 days) were included. A university hospital with 758 beds and all specialities. Record audit of GNP, energy- and protein-intake by 24-h recall, patient interviews and staff questionnaire before and after the intervention. Based on pre-measurements, nutrition support teams in each department made targeted action plans, supervised by an expert team. Education, diagnose-specific nutrition plans, improved menus and eating environment, and awareness were initiated. Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test was used for ordinal data, and Pearson Chi square test for nominative data. Overall 545 patients participated (287 before/258 after) from 26/22 departments. There were no significant differences regarding sex, age, BMI or previous weight loss before and after the intervention. Result-indicators: Energy intake improved from 52% to 68% (p 75% of requirements). Intake of less than 50% of requirements decreased with 50%. Process-indicators: Screening improved from 56% to 77% (p multi-modal top-down and bottom-up approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. Medical case-based retrieval: integrating query MeSH terms for query-adaptive multi-modal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco de Herrera, Alba G.; Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Müller, Henning

    2015-03-01

    Advances in medical knowledge give clinicians more objective information for a diagnosis. Therefore, there is an increasing need for bibliographic search engines that can provide services helping to facilitate faster information search. The ImageCLEFmed benchmark proposes a medical case-based retrieval task. This task aims at retrieving articles from the biomedical literature that are relevant for differential diagnosis of query cases including a textual description and several images. In the context of this campaign many approaches have been investigated showing that the fusion of visual and text information can improve the precision of the retrieval. However, fusion does not always lead to better results. In this paper, a new query-adaptive fusion criterion to decide when to use multi-modal (text and visual) or only text approaches is presented. The proposed method integrates text information contained in MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms extracted and visual features of the images to find synonym relations between them. Given a text query, the query-adaptive fusion criterion decides when it is suitable to also use visual information for the retrieval. Results show that this approach can decide if a text or multi{modal approach should be used with 77.15% of accuracy.

  20. Differences in Multi-Modal Ultrasound Imaging between Triple Negative and Non-Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziyao; Tian, Jiawei; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Ying; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Lei; Jing, Hui; Wu, Tong

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify multi-modal ultrasound imaging parameters that could potentially help to differentiate between triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) and non-TNBC. Conventional ultrasonography, ultrasound strain elastography and 3-D ultrasound (3-D-US) findings from 50 TNBC and 179 non-TNBC patients were retrospectively reviewed. Immunohistochemical examination was used as the reference gold standard for cancer subtyping. Different ultrasound modalities were initially analyzed to define TNBC-related features. Subsequently, logistic regression analysis was applied to TNBC-related features to establish models for predicting TNBC. TNBCs often presented as micro-lobulated, markedly hypo-echoic masses with an abrupt interface (p = 0.015, 0.0015 and 0.004, compared with non-TNBCs, respectively) on conventional ultrasound, and showed a diminished retraction pattern phenomenon in the coronal plane (p = 0.035) on 3-D-US. Our findings suggest that B-mode ultrasound and 3-D-US in multi-modality ultrasonography could be a useful non-invasive technique for differentiating TNBCs from non-TNBCs.