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Sample records for multi-layer arctic mixed-phase

  1. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  2. Arctic Mixed Layer Dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morison, James

    2003-01-01

    .... Over the years we have sought to understand the heat and mass balance of the mixed layer, marginal ice zone processes, the Arctic internal wave and mixing environment, summer and winter leads, and convection...

  3. Aerosol-cloud interactions in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A.

    2017-12-01

    Reliable climate projections require realistic simulations of Arctic cloud feedbacks. Of particular importance is accurately simulating Arctic mixed-phase stratocumuli (AMPS), which are ubiquitous and play an important role in regional climate due to their impact on the surface energy budget and atmospheric boundary layer structure through cloud-driven turbulence, radiative forcing, and precipitation. AMPS are challenging to model due to uncertainties in ice microphysical processes that determine phase partitioning between ice and radiatively important cloud liquid water. Since temperatures in AMPS are too warm for homogenous ice nucleation, ice must form through heterogeneous nucleation. In this presentation we discuss a relatively unexplored source of ice production-recycling of ice nuclei in regions of ice subsaturation. AMPS frequently have ice-subsaturated air near the cloud-driven mixed-layer base where falling ice crystals can sublimate, leaving behind IN. This study provides an idealized framework to understand feedbacks between dynamics and microphysics that maintain phase-partitioning in AMPS. In addition, the results of this study provide insight into the mechanisms and feedbacks that may maintain cloud ice in AMPS even when entrainment of IN at the mixed-layer boundaries is weak.

  4. Modelling micro- and macrophysical contributors to the dissipation of an Arctic mixed-phase cloud during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Loewe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic climate is changing; temperature changes in the Arctic are greater than at midlatitudes, and changing atmospheric conditions influence Arctic mixed-phase clouds, which are important for the Arctic surface energy budget. These low-level clouds are frequently observed across the Arctic. They impact the turbulent and radiative heating of the open water, snow, and sea-ice-covered surfaces and influence the boundary layer structure. Therefore the processes that affect mixed-phase cloud life cycles are extremely important, yet relatively poorly understood. In this study, we present sensitivity studies using semi-idealized large eddy simulations (LESs to identify processes contributing to the dissipation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. We found that one potential main contributor to the dissipation of an observed Arctic mixed-phase cloud, during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS field campaign, was a low cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC of about 2 cm−3. Introducing a high ice crystal concentration of 10 L−1 also resulted in cloud dissipation, but such high ice crystal concentrations were deemed unlikely for the present case. Sensitivity studies simulating the advection of dry air above the boundary layer inversion, as well as a modest increase in ice crystal concentration of 1 L−1, did not lead to cloud dissipation. As a requirement for small droplet numbers, pristine aerosol conditions in the Arctic environment are therefore considered an important factor determining the lifetime of Arctic mixed-phase clouds.

  5. Optical properties of mixed phase boundary layer clouds observed from a tethered balloon platform in the Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikand, M.; Koskulics, J.; Stamnes, K.; Hamre, B.; Stamnes, J.J.; Lawson, R.P.

    2010-01-01

    A tethered balloon system was used to collect data on radiometric and cloud microphysical properties for mixed phase boundary layer clouds, consisting of ice crystals and liquid water droplets during a May-June 2008 experimental campaign in Ny-Alesund, Norway, located high in the Arctic at 78.9 o N, 11.9 o E. The balloon instrumentation was controlled and powered from the ground making it possible to fly for long durations and to profile clouds vertically in a systematic manner. We use a radiative transfer model to analyze the radiometric measurements and estimate the optical properties of mixed-phase clouds. The results demonstrate the ability of instruments deployed on a tethered balloon to provide information about optical properties of mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic. Our radiative transfer simulations show that cloud layering has little impact on the total downward irradiance measured at the ground as long as the total optical depth remains unchanged. In contrast, the mean intensity measured by an instrument deployed on a balloon depends on the vertical cloud structure and is thus sensitive to the altitude of the balloon. We use the total downward irradiance measured by a ground-based radiometer to estimate the total optical depth and the mean intensity measured at the balloon to estimate the vertical structure of the cloud optical depth.

  6. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. McFarquhar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9–10 October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors' concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process

  7. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2009-07-01

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9-10 October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors' concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation

  8. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

    2009-02-02

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

  9. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  10. Relating large-scale subsidence to convection development in Arctic mixed-phase marine stratocumulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gillian; Connolly, Paul J.; Dearden, Christopher; Choularton, Thomas W.

    2018-02-01

    Large-scale subsidence, associated with high-pressure systems, is often imposed in large-eddy simulation (LES) models to maintain the height of boundary layer (BL) clouds. Previous studies have considered the influence of subsidence on warm liquid clouds in subtropical regions; however, the relationship between subsidence and mixed-phase cloud microphysics has not specifically been studied. For the first time, we investigate how widespread subsidence associated with synoptic-scale meteorological features can affect the microphysics of Arctic mixed-phase marine stratocumulus (Sc) clouds. Modelled with LES, four idealised scenarios - a stable Sc, varied droplet (Ndrop) or ice (Nice) number concentrations, and a warming surface (representing motion southwards) - were subjected to different levels of subsidence to investigate the cloud microphysical response. We find strong sensitivities to large-scale subsidence, indicating that high-pressure systems in the ocean-exposed Arctic regions have the potential to generate turbulence and changes in cloud microphysics in any resident BL mixed-phase clouds.Increased cloud convection is modelled with increased subsidence, driven by longwave radiative cooling at cloud top and rain evaporative cooling and latent heating from snow growth below cloud. Subsidence strengthens the BL temperature inversion, thus reducing entrainment and allowing the liquid- and ice-water paths (LWPs, IWPs) to increase. Through increased cloud-top radiative cooling and subsequent convective overturning, precipitation production is enhanced: rain particle number concentrations (Nrain), in-cloud rain mass production rates, and below-cloud evaporation rates increase with increased subsidence.Ice number concentrations (Nice) play an important role, as greater concentrations suppress the liquid phase; therefore, Nice acts to mediate the strength of turbulent overturning promoted by increased subsidence. With a warming surface, a lack of - or low - subsidence

  11. Moisture and dynamical interactions maintaining decoupled Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in the presence of a humidity inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Solomon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Observations suggest that processes maintaining subtropical and Arctic stratocumulus differ, due to the different environments in which they occur. For example, specific humidity inversions (specific humidity increasing with height are frequently observed to occur near cloud top coincident with temperature inversions in the Arctic, while they do not occur in the subtropics. In this study we use nested LES simulations of decoupled Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus (AMPS clouds observed during the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Indirect and SemiDirect Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC to analyze budgets of water components, potential temperature, and turbulent kinetic energy. These analyses quantify the processes that maintain decoupled AMPS, including the role of humidity inversions. Key structural features include a shallow upper entrainment zone at cloud top that is located within the temperature and humidity inversions, a mixed layer driven by cloud-top cooling that extends from the base of the upper entrainment zone to below cloud base, and a lower entrainment zone at the base of the mixed layer. The surface layer below the lower entrainment zone is decoupled from the cloud mixed-layer system. Budget results show that cloud liquid water is maintained in the upper entrainment zone near cloud top (within a temperature and humidity inversion due to a down gradient transport of water vapor by turbulent fluxes into the cloud layer from above and direct condensation forced by radiative cooling. Liquid water is generated in the updraft portions of the mixed-layer eddies below cloud top by buoyant destabilization. These processes cause at least 20% of the cloud liquid water to extend into the inversion. The redistribution of water vapor from the top of the humidity inversion to its base maintains the cloud layer, while the mixed layer-entrainment zone system is continually losing total water. In this decoupled system, the humidity inversion is

  12. Parameterizing correlations between hydrometeor species in mixed-phase Arctic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Vincent E.; Nielsen, Brandon J.; Fan, Jiwen; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    Mixed-phase Arctic clouds, like other clouds, contain small-scale variability in hydrometeor fields, such as cloud water or snow mixing ratio. This variability may be worth parameterizing in coarse-resolution numerical models. In particular, for modeling multispecies processes such as accretion and aggregation, it would be useful to parameterize subgrid correlations among hydrometeor species. However, one difficulty is that there exist many hydrometeor species and many microphysical processes, leading to complexity and computational expense. Existing lower and upper bounds on linear correlation coefficients are too loose to serve directly as a method to predict subgrid correlations. Therefore, this paper proposes an alternative method that begins with the spherical parameterization framework of Pinheiro and Bates (1996), which expresses the correlation matrix in terms of its Cholesky factorization. The values of the elements of the Cholesky matrix are populated here using a "cSigma" parameterization that we introduce based on the aforementioned bounds on correlations. The method has three advantages: (1) the computational expense is tolerable; (2) the correlations are, by construction, guaranteed to be consistent with each other; and (3) the methodology is fairly general and hence may be applicable to other problems. The method is tested noninteractively using simulations of three Arctic mixed-phase cloud cases from two field experiments: the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign and the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Benchmark simulations are performed using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model that includes a bin microphysical scheme. The correlations estimated by the new method satisfactorily approximate the correlations produced by the LES.

  13. Cloud phase identification of Arctic boundary-layer clouds from airborne spectral reflection measurements: test of three approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ehrlich

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Arctic boundary-layer clouds were investigated with remote sensing and in situ instruments during the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR campaign in March and April 2007. The clouds formed in a cold air outbreak over the open Greenland Sea. Beside the predominant mixed-phase clouds pure liquid water and ice clouds were observed. Utilizing measurements of solar radiation reflected by the clouds three methods to retrieve the thermodynamic phase of the cloud are introduced and compared. Two ice indices IS and IP were obtained by analyzing the spectral pattern of the cloud top reflectance in the near infrared (1500–1800 nm wavelength spectral range which is characterized by ice and water absorption. While IS analyzes the spectral slope of the reflectance in this wavelength range, IS utilizes a principle component analysis (PCA of the spectral reflectance. A third ice index IA is based on the different side scattering of spherical liquid water particles and nonspherical ice crystals which was recorded in simultaneous measurements of spectral cloud albedo and reflectance.

    Radiative transfer simulations show that IS, IP and IA range between 5 to 80, 0 to 8 and 1 to 1.25 respectively with lowest values indicating pure liquid water clouds and highest values pure ice clouds. The spectral slope ice index IS and the PCA ice index IP are found to be strongly sensitive to the effective diameter of the ice crystals present in the cloud. Therefore, the identification of mixed-phase clouds requires a priori knowledge of the ice crystal dimension. The reflectance-albedo ice index IA is mainly dominated by the uppermost cloud layer (τ<1.5. Therefore, typical boundary-layer mixed-phase clouds with a liquid cloud top layer will

  14. A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlin, Ann; vanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; Mrowiec, Agnieszka; Morrison, Hugh; Zuidema, Paquita; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) campaign provide a unique opportunity to test understanding of cloud ice formation. Under the microphysically simple conditions observed (apparently negligible ice aggregation, sublimation, and multiplication), the only expected source of new ice crystals is activation of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and the only sink is sedimentation. Large-eddy simulations with size-resolved microphysics are initialized with IN number concentration N(sub IN) measured above cloud top, but details of IN activation behavior are unknown. If activated rapidly (in deposition, condensation, or immersion modes), as commonly assumed, IN are depleted from the well-mixed boundary layer within minutes. Quasi-equilibrium ice number concentration N(sub i) is then limited to a small fraction of overlying N(sub IN) that is determined by the cloud-top entrainment rate w(sub e) divided by the number-weighted ice fall speed at the surface v(sub f). Because w(sub c) 10 cm/s, N(sub i)/N(sub IN)<< 1. Such conditions may be common for this cloud type, which has implications for modeling IN diagnostically, interpreting measurements, and quantifying sensitivity to increasing N(sub IN) (when w(sub e)/v(sub f)< 1, entrainment rate limitations serve to buffer cloud system response). To reproduce observed ice crystal size distributions and cloud radar reflectivities with rapidly consumed IN in this case, the measured above-cloud N(sub IN) must be multiplied by approximately 30. However, results are sensitive to assumed ice crystal properties not constrained by measurements. In addition, simulations do not reproduce the pronounced mesoscale heterogeneity in radar reflectivity that is observed.

  15. The atmospheric boundary layer response to the dynamic new Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing ice-free area in the Arctic Ocean has transformed its climate system to one with more dynamic boundary layer clouds and seasonal sea ice. During the fall freeze season, the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) is a crucial mechanism for the loss of excessive ocean heat to the atmosphere, and it has been speculated to play an important role in the recent cloud cover increase and boundary layer (BL) instability observed in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Based on multi-year Japanese cruise ship observations from the ice-strengthened R/V Mirai, we are able to characterize the late summer and early fall ocean-BL interactions in this region. Although the BL is found to be well-mixed more than 90% of the time, the SSHF can explain only 10% of the mixed layer height variability. It is the cloud-generated convective turbulence that apparently dominates BL mixing in this ice-free region, which is similar to previous in-situ observations (SHEBA, ASCOS) over sea ice. The SSHF, however, may contribute to BL instability during conditions of uplift (low-pressure), and the presence of the highly stable stratus cloud regime. The efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus cloud regime) despite an enhanced ocean-atmosphere temperature difference (ΔT). In general, surface-generated mixing is favored during episodes of high surface wind speeds as opposed to pronounced ΔT. Our analysis suggests a weak local response of the boundary layer stability to the loss of sea ice cover during late summer, which is masked by the strong influence of the large-scale circulation (and clouds). Apart from the fall season, we also studied the Arctic Ocean BL properties during the cold months (Nov-Apr) using multi-year satellite measurements (COSMIC RO). As the boundary layer is typically stable at this time, one might expect major differences in the nature of surface-atmosphere coupling compared to that observed during late

  16. Classification of Arctic, midlatitude and tropical clouds in the mixed-phase temperature regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Anja; Meyer, Jessica; Afchine, Armin; Luebke, Anna; Günther, Gebhard; Dorsey, James R.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Ehrlich, Andre; Wendisch, Manfred; Baumgardner, Darrel; Wex, Heike; Krämer, Martina

    2017-10-01

    The degree of glaciation of mixed-phase clouds constitutes one of the largest uncertainties in climate prediction. In order to better understand cloud glaciation, cloud spectrometer observations are presented in this paper, which were made in the mixed-phase temperature regime between 0 and -38 °C (273 to 235 K), where cloud particles can either be frozen or liquid. The extensive data set covers four airborne field campaigns providing a total of 139 000 1 Hz data points (38.6 h within clouds) over Arctic, midlatitude and tropical regions. We develop algorithms, combining the information on number concentration, size and asphericity of the observed cloud particles to classify four cloud types: liquid clouds, clouds in which liquid droplets and ice crystals coexist, fully glaciated clouds after the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process and clouds where secondary ice formation occurred. We quantify the occurrence of these cloud groups depending on the geographical region and temperature and find that liquid clouds dominate our measurements during the Arctic spring, while clouds dominated by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process are most common in midlatitude spring. The coexistence of liquid water and ice crystals is found over the whole mixed-phase temperature range in tropical convective towers in the dry season. Secondary ice is found at midlatitudes at -5 to -10 °C (268 to 263 K) and at higher altitudes, i.e. lower temperatures in the tropics. The distribution of the cloud types with decreasing temperature is shown to be consistent with the theory of evolution of mixed-phase clouds. With this study, we aim to contribute to a large statistical database on cloud types in the mixed-phase temperature regime.

  17. The open-ocean sensible heat flux and its significance for Arctic boundary layer mixing during early fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Manisha; Wu, Dong L.

    2016-10-01

    The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL) clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multi-year Japanese cruise-ship observations from R/V Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean-atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime), yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure) followed by the highly stable (stratus) regime. Overall, it can explain ˜ 10 % of the open-ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative) mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the R/V Mirai for better understanding and

  18. The open-ocean sensible heat flux and its significance for Arctic boundary layer mixing during early fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganeshan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multi-year Japanese cruise-ship observations from R/V Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean–atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime, yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure followed by the highly stable (stratus regime. Overall, it can explain  ∼  10 % of the open-ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the R/V Mirai for

  19. Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

    2005-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring

  20. Classification of Arctic, midlatitude and tropical clouds in the mixed-phase temperature regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Costa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The degree of glaciation of mixed-phase clouds constitutes one of the largest uncertainties in climate prediction. In order to better understand cloud glaciation, cloud spectrometer observations are presented in this paper, which were made in the mixed-phase temperature regime between 0 and −38 °C (273 to 235 K, where cloud particles can either be frozen or liquid. The extensive data set covers four airborne field campaigns providing a total of 139 000 1 Hz data points (38.6 h within clouds over Arctic, midlatitude and tropical regions. We develop algorithms, combining the information on number concentration, size and asphericity of the observed cloud particles to classify four cloud types: liquid clouds, clouds in which liquid droplets and ice crystals coexist, fully glaciated clouds after the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen process and clouds where secondary ice formation occurred. We quantify the occurrence of these cloud groups depending on the geographical region and temperature and find that liquid clouds dominate our measurements during the Arctic spring, while clouds dominated by the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen process are most common in midlatitude spring. The coexistence of liquid water and ice crystals is found over the whole mixed-phase temperature range in tropical convective towers in the dry season. Secondary ice is found at midlatitudes at −5 to −10 °C (268 to 263 K and at higher altitudes, i.e. lower temperatures in the tropics. The distribution of the cloud types with decreasing temperature is shown to be consistent with the theory of evolution of mixed-phase clouds. With this study, we aim to contribute to a large statistical database on cloud types in the mixed-phase temperature regime.

  1. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); McInnes, K.L. [CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Mordialloc (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  2. Improving Mixed-phase Cloud Parameterization in Climate Model with the ACRF Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhien [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2016-12-13

    Mixed-phase cloud microphysical and dynamical processes are still poorly understood, and their representation in GCMs is a major source of uncertainties in overall cloud feedback in GCMs. Thus improving mixed-phase cloud parameterizations in climate models is critical to reducing the climate forecast uncertainties. This study aims at providing improved knowledge of mixed-phase cloud properties from the long-term ACRF observations and improving mixed-phase clouds simulations in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). The key accomplishments are: 1) An improved retrieval algorithm was developed to provide liquid droplet concentration for drizzling or mixed-phase stratiform clouds. 2) A new ice concentration retrieval algorithm for stratiform mixed-phase clouds was developed. 3) A strong seasonal aerosol impact on ice generation in Arctic mixed-phase clouds was identified, which is mainly attributed to the high dust occurrence during the spring season. 4) A suite of multi-senor algorithms was applied to long-term ARM observations at the Barrow site to provide a complete dataset (LWC and effective radius profile for liquid phase, and IWC, Dge profiles and ice concentration for ice phase) to characterize Arctic stratiform mixed-phase clouds. This multi-year stratiform mixed-phase cloud dataset provides necessary information to study related processes, evaluate model stratiform mixed-phase cloud simulations, and improve model stratiform mixed-phase cloud parameterization. 5). A new in situ data analysis method was developed to quantify liquid mass partition in convective mixed-phase clouds. For the first time, we reliably compared liquid mass partitions in stratiform and convective mixed-phase clouds. Due to the different dynamics in stratiform and convective mixed-phase clouds, the temperature dependencies of liquid mass partitions are significantly different due to much higher ice concentrations in convective mixed phase clouds. 6) Systematic evaluations

  3. Classification of Arctic, Mid-Latitude and Tropical Clouds in the Mixed-Phase Temperature Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Anja; Afchine, Armin; Luebke, Anna; Meyer, Jessica; Dorsey, James R.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Ehrlich, André; Wendisch, Manfred; Krämer, Martina

    2016-04-01

    The degree of glaciation and the sizes and habits of ice particles formed in mixed-phase clouds remain not fully understood. However, these properties define the mixed clouds' radiative impact on the Earth's climate and thus a correct representation of this cloud type in global climate models is of importance for an improved certainty of climate predictions. This study focuses on the occurrence and characteristics of two types of clouds in the mixed-phase temperature regime (238-275K): coexistence clouds (Coex), in which both liquid drops and ice crystals exist, and fully glaciated clouds that develop in the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen regime (WBF clouds). We present an extensive dataset obtained by the Cloud and Aerosol Particle Spectrometer NIXE-CAPS, covering Arctic, mid-latitude and tropical regions. In total, we spent 45.2 hours within clouds in the mixed-phase temperature regime during five field campaigns (Arctic: VERDI, 2012 and RACEPAC, 2014 - Northern Canada; mid-latitude: COALESC, 2011 - UK and ML-Cirrus, 2014 - central Europe; tropics: ACRIDICON, 2014 - Brazil). We show that WBF and Coex clouds can be identified via cloud particle size distributions. The classified datasets are used to analyse temperature dependences of both cloud types as well as range and frequencies of cloud particle concentrations and sizes. One result is that Coex clouds containing supercooled liquid drops are found down to temperatures of -40 deg C only in tropical mixed clouds, while in the Arctic and mid-latitudes no liquid drops are observed below about -20 deg C. In addition, we show that the cloud particles' aspherical fractions - derived from polarization signatures of particles with diameters between 20 and 50 micrometers - differ significantly between WBF and Coex clouds. In Coex clouds, the aspherical fraction of cloud particles is generally very low, but increases with decreasing temperature. In WBF clouds, where all cloud particles are ice, about 20-40% of the cloud

  4. Multi-sensor measurements of mixed-phase clouds above Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwell, Robert A.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Neely, Ryan R.; Turner, David D.

    2018-04-01

    Liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic strongly affect the regional surface energy and ice mass budgets, yet much remains unknown about the nature of these clouds due to the lack of intensive measurements. Lidar measurements of these clouds are challenged by very large signal dynamic range, which makes even seemingly simple tasks, such as thermodynamic phase classification, difficult. This work focuses on a set of measurements made by the Clouds Aerosol Polarization and Backscatter Lidar at Summit, Greenland and its retrieval algorithms, which use both analog and photon counting as well as orthogonal and non-orthogonal polarization retrievals to extend dynamic range and improve overall measurement quality and quantity. Presented here is an algorithm for cloud parameter retrievals that leverages enhanced dynamic range retrievals to classify mixed-phase clouds. This best guess retrieval is compared to co-located instruments for validation.

  5. Boundary layer stability and Arctic climate change: a feedback study using EC-Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bintanja, R.; Linden, E.C. van der; Hazeleger, W. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    Amplified Arctic warming is one of the key features of climate change. It is evident in observations as well as in climate model simulations. Usually referred to as Arctic amplification, it is generally recognized that the surface albedo feedback governs the response. However, a number of feedback mechanisms play a role in AA, of which those related to the prevalent near-surface inversion have received relatively little attention. Here we investigate the role of the near-surface thermal inversion, which is caused by radiative surface cooling in autumn and winter, on Arctic warming. We employ idealized climate change experiments using the climate model EC-Earth together with ERA-Interim reanalysis data to show that boundary-layer mixing governs the efficiency by which the surface warming signal is 'diluted' to higher levels. Reduced vertical mixing, as in the stably stratified inversion layer in Arctic winter, thus amplifies surface warming. Modelling results suggest that both shortwave - through the (seasonal) interaction with the sea ice feedback - and longwave feedbacks are affected by boundary-layer mixing, both in the Arctic and globally, with the effect on the shortwave feedback dominating. The amplifying effect will decrease, however, with climate warming because the surface inversion becomes progressively weaker. We estimate that the reduced Arctic inversion has slowed down global warming by about 5% over the past 2 decades, and we anticipate that it will continue to do so with ongoing Arctic warming. (orig.)

  6. Characterizing Arctic mixed-phase cloud structure and its relationship with humidity and temperature inversion using ARM NSA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shaoyue; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Li, J.-L. F.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the characteristics of the Arctic mixed-phase cloud (AMC) have been investigated using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement North Slope Alaska site from October 2006 to September 2009. AMC has an annual occurrence frequency of 42.3%, which includes 18.7% of single-layered AMCs and 23.6% for multiple layers. Two cloud base heights (CBHs) are defined from ceilometer and micropulse lidar (MPL) measurements. For single-layered AMC, the ceilometer-derived CBH represents the base of the liquid-dominant layer near the cloud top, while MPL-derived CBH represents base of the lower ice-dominant layer. The annual mean CBHs from ceilometer and MPL measurements are 1.0 km and 0.6 km, respectively, with the largest difference ( 1.0 km) occurring from December to March and the smallest difference in September. The humidity inversion occurrence decreases with increasing humidity inversion intensity (stronger in summer than in winter). During the winter months, AMC occurrences increase from 15% to 35% when the inversion intensity increases from 0.1 to 0.9 g/kg. On the contrary, despite a higher frequency of strong humidity inversion in summer, AMC occurrences are nearly invariant for different inversion intensities. On average, humidity and temperature inversion frequencies of occurrence above an AMC are 5 and 8 times, respectively, as high as those below an AMC. The strong inversion occurrences for both humidity and temperature above an AMC provide the moisture sources from above for the formation and maintenance of AMCs. This result helps to reconcile the persistency of AMCs even when the Arctic surface is covered by snow and ice.

  7. Ozone variability and halogen oxidation within the Arctic and sub-Arctic springtime boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Gilman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of halogen oxidation on the variabilities of ozone (O3 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs within the Arctic and sub-Arctic atmospheric boundary layer was investigated using field measurements from multiple campaigns conducted in March and April 2008 as part of the POLARCAT project. For the ship-based measurements, a high degree of correlation (r = 0.98 for 544 data points collected north of 68° N was observed between the acetylene to benzene ratio, used as a marker for chlorine and bromine oxidation, and O3 signifying the vast influence of halogen oxidation throughout the ice-free regions of the North Atlantic. Concurrent airborne and ground-based measurements in the Alaskan Arctic substantiated this correlation and were used to demonstrate that halogen oxidation influenced O3 variability throughout the Arctic boundary layer during these springtime studies. Measurements aboard the R/V Knorr in the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans provided a unique view of the transport of O3-poor air masses from the Arctic Basin to latitudes as far south as 52° N. FLEXPART, a Lagrangian transport model, was used to quantitatively determine the exposure of air masses encountered by the ship to first-year ice (FYI, multi-year ice (MYI, and total ICE (FYI+MYI. O3 anti-correlated with the modeled total ICE tracer (r = −0.86 indicating that up to 73% of the O3 variability measured in the Arctic marine boundary layer could be related to sea ice exposure.

  8. Multi-layer Far-Infrared Component Technology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR will demonstrate the feasibility of a process to create multi-layer thin-film optics for the far-infrared/sub-millimeter wave spectral region. The...

  9. Storm-driven Mixing and Potential Impact on the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiayan; Comiso, Josefino; Walsh, David; Krishfield, Richard; Honjo, Susumu; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the ocean, atmosphere, and ice made by Ice-Ocean Environmental Buoys (IOEBs) indicate that mixing events reaching the depth of the halocline have occurred in various regions in the Arctic Ocean. Our analysis suggests that these mixing events were mechanically forced by intense storms moving across the buoy sites. In this study, we analyzed these mixing events in the context of storm developments that occurred in the Beaufort Sea and in the general area just north of Fram Strait, two areas with quite different hydrographic structures. The Beaufort Sea is strongly influenced by inflow of Pacific water through Bering Strait, while the area north of Fram Strait is directly affected by the inflow of warm and salty North Atlantic water. Our analyses of the basin-wide evolution of the surface pressure and geostrophic wind fields indicate that the characteristics of the storms could be very different. The buoy-observed mixing occurred only in the spring and winter seasons when the stratification was relatively weak. This indicates the importance of stratification, although the mixing itself was mechanically driven. We also analyze the distribution of storms, both the long-term climatology as well as the patterns for each year in the last two decades. The frequency of storms is also shown to be correlated- (but not strongly) to Arctic Oscillation indices. This study indicates that the formation of new ice that leads to brine rejection is unlikely the mechanism that results in the type of mixing that could overturn the halocline. On the other hand, synoptic-scale storms can force mixing deep enough to the halocline and thermocline layer. Despite a very stable stratification associated with the Arctic halocline, the warm subsurface thermocline water is not always insulated from the mixed layer.

  10. The Open-Ocean Sensible Heat Flux and Its Significance for Arctic Boundary Layer Mixing During Early Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Manisha; Wu, Dongliang

    2016-01-01

    The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL) clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multiyear Japanese cruise-ship observations from RV Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean-atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime), yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure) followed by the highly stable (stratus) regime. Overall, it can explain 10 of the open ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative) mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the RV Mirai for better understanding and

  11. Impacts of Subgrid Heterogeneous Mixing between Cloud Liquid and Ice on the Wegner-Bergeron-Findeisen Process and Mixed-phase Clouds in NCAR CAM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, D.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Mixed-phase clouds are persistently observed over the Arctic and the phase partitioning between cloud liquid and ice hydrometeors in mixed-phase clouds has important impacts on the surface energy budget and Arctic climate. In this study, we test the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5) with the single-column and weather forecast configurations and evaluate the model performance against observation data from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's M-PACE field campaign in October 2004 and long-term ground-based multi-sensor remote sensing measurements. Like most global climate models, we find that CAM5 also poorly simulates the phase partitioning in mixed-phase clouds by significantly underestimating the cloud liquid water content. Assuming pocket structures in the distribution of cloud liquid and ice in mixed-phase clouds as suggested by in situ observations provides a plausible solution to improve the model performance by reducing the Wegner-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process rate. In this study, the modification of the WBF process in the CAM5 model has been achieved with applying a stochastic perturbation to the time scale of the WBF process relevant to both ice and snow to account for the heterogeneous mixture of cloud liquid and ice. Our results show that this modification of WBF process improves the modeled phase partitioning in the mixed-phase clouds. The seasonal variation of mixed-phase cloud properties is also better reproduced in the model in comparison with the long-term ground-based remote sensing observations. Furthermore, the phase partitioning is insensitive to the reassignment time step of perturbations.

  12. 1 Mixing state and absorbing properties of black carbon during Arctic haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Marco; Gysel, Martin; Eleftheriadis, Kosas; Laj, Paolo; Hans-Werner, Jacobi

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic atmosphere is periodically affected by the Arctic haze occurring in spring. One of its particulate components is the black carbon (BC), which is considered to be an important contributor to climate change in the Arctic region. Beside BC-cloud interaction and albedo reduction of snow, BC may influence Arctic climate interacting directly with the solar radiation, warming the corresponding aerosol layer (Flanner, 2013). Such warming depends on BC atmospheric burden and also on the efficiency of BC to absorb light, in fact the light absorption is enhanced by mixing of BC with other atmospheric non-absorbing materials (lensing effect) (Bond et al., 2013). The BC reaching the Arctic is evilly processed, due to long range transport. Aging promote internal mixing and thus absorption enhancement. Such modification of mixing and is quantification after long range transport have been observed in the Atlantic ocean (China et al., 2015) but never investigated in the Arctic. During field experiments conducted at the Zeppelin research site in Svalbard during the 2012 Arctic spring, we investigated the relative precision of different BC measuring techniques; a single particle soot photometer was then used to assess the coating of Arctic black carbon. This allowed quantifying the absorption enhancement induced by internal mixing via optical modelling; the optical assessment of aged black carbon in the arctic will be of major interest for future radiative forcing assessment.Optical characterization of the total aerosol indicated that in 2012 no extreme smoke events took place and that the aerosol population was dominated by fine and non-absorbing particles. Low mean concentration of rBC was found (30 ng m-3), with a mean mass equivalent diameter above 200 nm. rBC concentration detected with the continuous soot monitoring system and the single particle soot photometer was agreeing within 15%. Combining absorption coefficient observed with an aethalometer and rBC mass

  13. A Ground-Based Doppler Radar and Micropulse Lidar Forward Simulator for GCM Evaluation of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Moving Forward Towards an Apples-to-apples Comparison of Hydrometeor Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamer, K.; Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, A. S.; Kollias, P.; Clothiaux, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    An important aspect of evaluating Artic cloud representation in a general circulation model (GCM) consists of using observational benchmarks which are as equivalent as possible to model output in order to avoid methodological bias and focus on correctly diagnosing model dynamical and microphysical misrepresentations. However, current cloud observing systems are known to suffer from biases such as limited sensitivity, and stronger response to large or small hydrometeors. Fortunately, while these observational biases cannot be corrected, they are often well understood and can be reproduced in forward simulations. Here a ground-based millimeter wavelength Doppler radar and micropulse lidar forward simulator able to interface with output from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE GCM is presented. ModelE stratiform hydrometeor fraction, mixing ratio, mass-weighted fall speed and effective radius are forward simulated to vertically-resolved profiles of radar reflectivity, Doppler velocity and spectrum width as well as lidar backscatter and depolarization ratio. These forward simulated fields are then compared to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ground-based observations to assess cloud vertical structure (CVS). Model evalution of Arctic mixed-phase cloud would also benefit from hydrometeor phase evaluation. While phase retrieval from synergetic observations often generates large uncertainties, the same retrieval algorithm can be applied to observed and forward-simulated radar-lidar fields, thereby producing retrieved hydrometeor properties with potentially the same uncertainties. Comparing hydrometeor properties retrieved in exactly the same way aims to produce the best apples-to-apples comparisons between GCM ouputs and observations. The use of a comprenhensive ground-based forward simulator coupled with a hydrometeor classification retrieval algorithm provides a new perspective for GCM evaluation of Arctic mixed-phase

  14. Turbulent Mixing and Vertical Heat Transfer in the Surface Mixed Layer of the Arctic Ocean: Implication of a Cross-Pycnocline High-Temperature Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yusuke; Takeda, Hiroki

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the mixing processes in the vicinity of surface mixed layer (SML) of the Arctic Ocean. Turbulence activity and vertical heat transfer are quantitatively characterized in the Northwind Abyssal Plain, based on the RV Mirai Arctic cruise, during the transition from late summer to early winter 2014. During the cruise, noticeable storm events were observed, which came over the ship's location and contributed to the deepening of the SML. According to the ship-based microstructure observation, within the SML, the strong wind events produced enhanced dissipation rates of turbulent kinetic energy in the order of magnitude of ɛ = 10-6-10-4W kg-1. On thermal variance dissipation rate, χ increases toward the base of SML, reaching O(10-7) K2 s-1, resulting in vertical heat flux of O(10) W m-2. During the occasional energetic mixing events, the near-surface warm water was transferred downward and penetrated through the SML base, creating a cross-pycnocline high-temperature anomaly (CPHTA) at approximately 20-30 m depth. Near CPHTA, the vertical heat flux was anomalously magnified to O(10-100) W m-2. Following the fixed-point observation, in the regions of marginal and thick ice zones, the SML heat content was monitored using an autonomous drifting buoy, UpTempO. During most of the ice-covered period, the ocean-to-ice turbulent heat flux was dominant, rather than the diapycnal heat transfer across the SML bottom interface.

  15. Observational constraints on Arctic boundary-layer clouds, surface moisture and sensible heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Boisvert, L.; Klaus, D.; Dethloff, K.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dry, cold environment and dynamic surface variations make the Arctic a unique but difficult region for observations, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Spaceborne platforms have been the key vantage point to capture basin-scale changes during the recent Arctic warming. Using the AIRS temperature, moisture and surface data, we found that the Arctic surface moisture flux (SMF) had increased by 7% during 2003-2013 (18 W/m2 equivalent in latent heat), mostly in spring and fall near the Arctic coastal seas where large sea ice reduction and sea surface temperature (SST) increase were observed. The increase in Arctic SMF correlated well with the increases in total atmospheric column water vapor and low-level clouds, when compared to CALIPSO cloud observations. It has been challenging for climate models to reliably determine Arctic cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 and assuming a more efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process with generalized subgrid-scale variability for total water content, we were able to produce a cloud distribution that is more consistent with the CloudSat/CALIPSO observations. More importantly, the modified schemes decrease (increase) the cloud water (ice) content in mixed-phase clouds, which help to improve the modeled CRF and energy budget at the surface, because of the dominant role of the liquid water in CRF. Yet, the coupling between Arctic low clouds and the surface is complex and has strong impacts on ABL. Studying GPS/COSMIC radio occultation (RO) refractivity profiles in the Arctic coldest and driest months, we successfully derived ABL inversion height and surface-based inversion (SBI) frequency, and they were anti-correlated over the Arctic Ocean. For the late summer and early fall season, we further analyzed Japanese R/V Mirai ship measurements and found that the open-ocean surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) can explain 10 % of the ABL height variability, whereas mechanisms such as cloud

  16. Investigation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds by combining airborne remote sensing and in situ observations during VERDI, RACEPAC and ACLOUD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, André; Bierwirth, Eike; Borrmann, Stephan; Crewell, Susanne; Herber, Andreas; Hoor, Peter; Jourdan, Olivier; Krämer, Martina; Lüpkes, Christof; Mertes, Stephan; Neuber, Roland; Petzold, Andreas; Schnaiter, Martin; Schneider, Johannes; Weigel, Ralf; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Wendisch, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    To improve our understanding of Arctic mixed-phase clouds a series of airborne research campaigns has been initiated by a collaboration of German research institutes. Clouds in areas dominated by a close sea-ice cover were observed during the research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) and the Radiation-Aerosol-Cloud Experiment in the Arctic Circle (RACEPAC, April/May 2014) which both were based in Inuvik, Canada. The aircraft (Polar 5 & 6, Basler BT-67) operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Germany did cover a wide area above the Canadian Beaufort with in total 149 flight hours (62h during VERDI, 87h during RACEPAC). For May/June 2017 a third campaign ACLOUD (Arctic Clouds - Characterization of Ice, aerosol Particles and Energy fluxes) with base in Svalbard is planned within the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre TR 172 ArctiC Amplification: Climate Relevant Atmospheric and SurfaCe Processes, and Feedback Mechanisms (AC)3 to investigate Arctic clouds in the transition zone between open ocean and sea ice. The aim of all campaigns is to combine remote sensing and in-situ cloud, aerosol and trace gas measurements to investigate interactions between radiation, cloud and aerosol particles. While during VERDI remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed by one aircraft subsequently, for RACEPAC and ACLOUD two identical aircraft are coordinated at different altitudes to horizontally collocate both remote sensing and in-situ measurements. The campaign showed that in this way radiative and microphysical processes in the clouds can by studied more reliably and remote sensing methods can be validated efficiently. Here we will illustrate the scientific strategy of the projects including the progress in instrumentation. Differences in the general synoptic and sea ice situation and related changes in cloud properties at the different locations and seasons will be

  17. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll and Calanus finmarchicus in the Norwegian Sea - A basin-scale habitat comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Bagø ien, Espen; Melle, Webjø rn; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal patterns for mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll, and Calanus finmarchicus in different water masses between 62 and 70°N of the Norwegian Sea were compared using spatiotemporally aggregated basin-scale data. Norwegian Coastal Water was stratified throughout the year due to a low-salinity upper layer. The winter mixed layer depth was typically about 50-60m, and the spring phytoplankton bloom peaked in late April. In Atlantic and Arctic Waters the winter mixed layer depths were much greater, typically about 175-250m. Due to the requirement for thermal stratification, the phytoplankton build-ups there were slower and the peaks were delayed until late May. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrient consumption and chlorophyll was similar for the Atlantic and Arctic areas. Young Calanus copepodites of the first new generation in Coastal Water peaked in early May, preceding the peak in Atlantic Water by about 2weeks, and that in Arctic Water by about 6weeks. While the young G 1 cohorts in Coastal and Atlantic waters coincided rather well in time with the phytoplankton blooms, the timing of the cohort in Arctic Water was delayed compared to the phytoplankton. Two or more Calanus generations in Coastal Water, and two generations in Atlantic Water were observed. Only one generation was found in Arctic Water, where scarce autumn data precludes evaluation of a possible second generation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll and Calanus finmarchicus in the Norwegian Sea - A basin-scale habitat comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Bagøien, Espen

    2012-09-01

    Seasonal patterns for mixed layer depths, nutrients, chlorophyll, and Calanus finmarchicus in different water masses between 62 and 70°N of the Norwegian Sea were compared using spatiotemporally aggregated basin-scale data. Norwegian Coastal Water was stratified throughout the year due to a low-salinity upper layer. The winter mixed layer depth was typically about 50-60m, and the spring phytoplankton bloom peaked in late April. In Atlantic and Arctic Waters the winter mixed layer depths were much greater, typically about 175-250m. Due to the requirement for thermal stratification, the phytoplankton build-ups there were slower and the peaks were delayed until late May. Seasonal development of mixed layer depths, nutrient consumption and chlorophyll was similar for the Atlantic and Arctic areas. Young Calanus copepodites of the first new generation in Coastal Water peaked in early May, preceding the peak in Atlantic Water by about 2weeks, and that in Arctic Water by about 6weeks. While the young G 1 cohorts in Coastal and Atlantic waters coincided rather well in time with the phytoplankton blooms, the timing of the cohort in Arctic Water was delayed compared to the phytoplankton. Two or more Calanus generations in Coastal Water, and two generations in Atlantic Water were observed. Only one generation was found in Arctic Water, where scarce autumn data precludes evaluation of a possible second generation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol–cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects. PMID:25404677

  20. Representation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process in climate models: Perspectives from a cloud-resolving study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiwen; Ghan, Steven; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Liu, Xiaohong; Rasch, Philip J.; Korolev, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Two types of Arctic mixed-phase clouds observed during the ISDAC and M-PACE field campaigns are simulated using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with size-resolved cloud microphysics. The modeled cloud properties agree reasonably well with aircraft measurements and surface-based retrievals. Cloud properties such as the probability density function (PDF) of vertical velocity (w), cloud liquid and ice, regimes of cloud particle growth, including the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process, and the relationships among properties/processes in mixed-phase clouds are examined to gain insights for improving their representation in General Circulation Models (GCMs). The PDF of the simulated w is well represented by a Gaussian function, validating, at least for arctic clouds, the subgrid treatment used in GCMs. The PDFs of liquid and ice water contents can be approximated by Gamma functions, and a Gaussian function can describe the total water distribution, but a fixed variance assumption should be avoided in both cases. The CRM results support the assumption frequently used in GCMs that mixed phase clouds maintain water vapor near liquid saturation. Thus, ice continues to grow throughout the stratiform cloud but the WBF process occurs in about 50% of cloud volume where liquid and ice co-exist, predominantly in downdrafts. In updrafts, liquid and ice particles grow simultaneously. The relationship between the ice depositional growth rate and cloud ice strongly depends on the capacitance of ice particles. The simplified size-independent capacitance of ice particles used in GCMs could lead to large deviations in ice depositional growth.

  1. Cloud-Scale Numerical Modeling of the Arctic Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Steven K.

    1998-01-01

    The interactions between sea ice, open ocean, atmospheric radiation, and clouds over the Arctic Ocean exert a strong influence on global climate. Uncertainties in the formulation of interactive air-sea-ice processes in global climate models (GCMs) result in large differences between the Arctic, and global, climates simulated by different models. Arctic stratus clouds are not well-simulated by GCMs, yet exert a strong influence on the surface energy budget of the Arctic. Leads (channels of open water in sea ice) have significant impacts on the large-scale budgets during the Arctic winter, when they contribute about 50 percent of the surface fluxes over the Arctic Ocean, but cover only 1 to 2 percent of its area. Convective plumes generated by wide leads may penetrate the surface inversion and produce condensate that spreads up to 250 km downwind of the lead, and may significantly affect the longwave radiative fluxes at the surface and thereby the sea ice thickness. The effects of leads and boundary layer clouds must be accurately represented in climate models to allow possible feedbacks between them and the sea ice thickness. The FIRE III Arctic boundary layer clouds field program, in conjunction with the SHEBA ice camp and the ARM North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean site, will offer an unprecedented opportunity to greatly improve our ability to parameterize the important effects of leads and boundary layer clouds in GCMs.

  2. Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Triggered by Strong Aerosol Emissions in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Kravitz, B.; Rasch, P. J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, A.

    2014-12-01

    Previous process-oriented modeling studies have highlighted the dependence of effectiveness of cloud brightening by aerosols on cloud regimes in warm marine boundary layer. Cloud microphysical processes in clouds that contain ice, and hence the mechanisms that drive aerosol-cloud interactions, are more complicated than in warm clouds. Interactions between ice particles and liquid drops add additional levels of complexity to aerosol effects. A cloud-resolving model is used to study aerosol-cloud interactions in the Arctic triggered by strong aerosol emissions, through either geoengineering injection or concentrated sources such as shipping and fires. An updated cloud microphysical scheme with prognostic aerosol and cloud particle numbers is employed. Model simulations are performed in pure super-cooled liquid and mixed-phase clouds, separately, with or without an injection of aerosols into either a clean or a more polluted Arctic boundary layer. Vertical mixing and cloud scavenging of particles injected from the surface is still quite efficient in the less turbulent cold environment. Overall, the injection of aerosols into the Arctic boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. The pure liquid clouds are more susceptible to the increase in aerosol number concentration than the mixed-phase clouds. Rain production processes are more effectively suppressed by aerosol injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. Aerosol injection into a clean boundary layer results in a greater cloud albedo increase than injection into a polluted one, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, the impact of dynamical feedback due to precipitation changes is small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation

  3. A 4.5 km resolution Arctic Ocean simulation with the global multi-resolution model FESOM 1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wekerle, Claudia; Danilov, Sergey; Wang, Xuezhu; Jung, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    In the framework of developing a global modeling system which can facilitate modeling studies on Arctic Ocean and high- to midlatitude linkage, we evaluate the Arctic Ocean simulated by the multi-resolution Finite Element Sea ice-Ocean Model (FESOM). To explore the value of using high horizontal resolution for Arctic Ocean modeling, we use two global meshes differing in the horizontal resolution only in the Arctic Ocean (24 km vs. 4.5 km). The high resolution significantly improves the model's representation of the Arctic Ocean. The most pronounced improvement is in the Arctic intermediate layer, in terms of both Atlantic Water (AW) mean state and variability. The deepening and thickening bias of the AW layer, a common issue found in coarse-resolution simulations, is significantly alleviated by using higher resolution. The topographic steering of the AW is stronger and the seasonal and interannual temperature variability along the ocean bottom topography is enhanced in the high-resolution simulation. The high resolution also improves the ocean surface circulation, mainly through a better representation of the narrow straits in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA). The representation of CAA throughflow not only influences the release of water masses through the other gateways but also the circulation pathways inside the Arctic Ocean. However, the mean state and variability of Arctic freshwater content and the variability of freshwater transport through the Arctic gateways appear not to be very sensitive to the increase in resolution employed here. By highlighting the issues that are independent of model resolution, we address that other efforts including the improvement of parameterizations are still required.

  4. Arctic boundary layer properties and its influence on cloud occurrence frequency, phase and structure in autumn season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, S.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, autumnal boundary layer characteristics and cloud properties have been investigated using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement North Slope of Alaska (ARM NSA) site from January 2002 to December 2008. We found that both cloud and planetary boundary layer (PBL) properties can be well distinguished by surface wind directions. When the ARM NSA site is dominated by a northerly wind during the period September- November, the PBL is at near saturation for all three months; while the maximum RH layer varies from low and thin in September, to higher and thicker in October, and then it becomes close to surface again in November. Both the ceilometer and the MPL derived cloud base heights coincide well with the RH maximum layer in the PBL for all three autumnal months. The frequencies of occurrence of mixed phase clouds in September and October are around 60-80% under a northerly wind, which are about 1.5 times higher than those during a southerly wind. Under northerly wind, the PDFs of PBL temperature and specific humidity are narrow and unimodal, with a peak probability around 0.4-0.5. Under a southerly wind, on the other hand, the PBL is both warmer and wetter than northerly wind profiles, which result in lower RH values (10-15% lower) in September and October; and the PDFs of PBL temperature and specific humidity are more evenly distributed with larger distribution range and lower PDF peak values (<0.3). In September, colder and dryer PBL is more favorable for mixed phase cloud formation, cloud occurrence frequency decreases from 90% to 60% as PBL temperature and specific humidity increase. In October, the frequency of occurrence of mixed phase clouds also decreases from 90% to 50-60% as PBL temperature increases. While in November, it increases first and then decreases with increasing PBL temperature and specific humidity. The frequency of occurrence of mixed phase clouds is linearly correlated to PBL RH values: for all three months, it

  5. PIV measurement of turbulent bubbly mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Based on experimental investigation of single-phase turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives, bubbly mixing layer was experimentally investigated by PIV. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number based on the velocity difference of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges is 73333. Gas bubbles with about 0.5% gas fraction were injected into pure water mixing layer with/without polymer additives from three different parts at the end of the splitter plate. The comparison between single phase and bubbly mixing layer shows clearly that the dynamic development of mixing layer is great influenced by the bubble injection. Similar with single phase, the Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central mixing flow field part and the width will increase with increasing the Reynolds number. Mean Reynolds stress will decrease with bubble injection in high Reynolds numbers and the decreasing of Reynolds stress with polymer additives is much more than pure water case.

  6. Impact of aerosol intrusions on sea-ice melting rates and the structure Arctic boundary layer clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, W.; Carrio, G.; Jiang, H.

    2003-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory sea-ice model (LANL CICE) was implemented into the real-time and research versions of the Colorado State University-Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS@CSU). The original version of CICE was modified in its structure to allow module communication in an interactive multigrid framework. In addition, some improvements have been made in the routines involved in the coupling, among them, the inclusion of iterative methods that consider variable roughness lengths for snow-covered ice thickness categories. This version of the model also includes more complex microphysics that considers the nucleation of cloud droplets, allowing the prediction of mixing ratios and number concentrations for all condensed water species. The real-time version of RAMS@CSU automatically processes the NASA Team SSMI F13 25km sea-ice coverage data; the data are objectively analyzed and mapped to the model grid configuration. We performed two types of cloud resolving simulations to assess the impact of the entrainment of aerosols from above the inversion on Arctic boundary layer clouds. The first series of numerical experiments corresponds to a case observed on May 4 1998 during the FIRE-ACE/SHEBA field experiment. Results indicate a significant impact on the microstructure of the simulated clouds. When assuming polluted initial profiles above the inversion, the liquid water fraction of the cloud monotonically decreases, the total condensate paths increases and downward IR tends to increase due to a significant increase in the ice water path. The second set of cloud resolving simulations focused on the evaluation of the potential effect of aerosol concentration above the inversion on melting rates during spring-summer period. For these multi-month simulations, the IFN and CCN profiles were also initialized assuming the 4 May profiles as benchmarks. Results suggest that increasing the aerosol concentrations above the boundary layer increases sea-ice melting

  7. Determination of monomethylmercury and dimethylmercury in the Arctic marine boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baya, Pascale A; Gosselin, Michel; Lehnherr, Igor; St Louis, Vincent L; Hintelmann, Holger

    2015-01-06

    Our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of monomethylmercury (MMHg) in the Arctic is incomplete because atmospheric sources and sinks of MMHg are still unclear. We sampled air in the Canadian Arctic marine boundary layer to quantify, for the first time, atmospheric concentrations of methylated Hg species (both MMHg and dimethylmercury (DMHg)), and, estimate the importance of atmospheric deposition as a source of MMHg to Arctic land- and sea-scapes. Overall atmospheric MMHg and DMHg concentrations (mean ± SD) were 2.9 ± 3.6 and 3.8 ± 3.1 (n = 37) pg m(-3), respectively. Concentrations of methylated Hg species in the marine boundary layer varied significantly among our sites, with a predominance of MMHg over Hudson Bay (HB), and DMHg over Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) waters. We concluded that DMHg is of marine origin and that primary production rate and sea-ice cover are major drivers of its concentration in the Canadian Arctic marine boundary layer. Summer wet deposition rates of atmospheric MMHg, likely to be the product of DMHg degradation in the atmosphere, were estimated at 188 ± 117.5 ng m(-2) and 37 ± 21.7 ng m(-2) for HB and CAA, respectively, sustaining MMHg concentrations available for biomagnification in the pelagic food web.

  8. Photo-polarimetric sensitivities to layering and mixing of absorbing aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kalashnikova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate to what extent multi-angle polarimetric measurements are sensitive to vertical mixing/layering of absorbing aerosols, adopting calibration uncertainty of 1.5% in intensity and 0.5% in the degree of linear polarization of Multiangle Spectro-Polarimetric Imager (MSPI. Employing both deterministic and Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes with polarization, we conduct modeling experiments to determine how the measured Stokes vector elements are affected at UV and short visible wavelengths by the vertical distribution, mixing and layering of smoke and dust aerosols for variety of microphysical parameters. We find that multi-angular polarimetry holds the potential to infer dust-layer heights and thicknesses at blue visible channel due to its lesser sensitivity to changes in dust coarse mode optical properties, but higher sensitivity to the dust vertical profiles. Our studies quantify requirements for obtaining simultaneous information on aerosol layer height and absorption under MSPI measurement uncertainties.

  9. Controls on Arctic sea ice from first-year and multi-year survival rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunke, Jes [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The recent decrease in Arctic sea ice cover has transpired with a significant loss of multi year ice. The transition to an Arctic that is populated by thinner first year sea ice has important implications for future trends in area and volume. Here we develop a reduced model for Arctic sea ice with which we investigate how the survivability of first year and multi year ice control the mean state, variability, and trends in ice area and volume.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Heat Entrainment Under Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramudu, Eshwan; Gelderloos, Renske; Yang, Di; Meneveau, Charles; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2018-01-01

    Arctic sea ice has declined rapidly in recent decades. The faster than projected retreat suggests that free-running large-scale climate models may not be accurately representing some key processes. The small-scale turbulent entrainment of heat from the mixed layer could be one such process. To better understand this mechanism, we model the Arctic Ocean's Canada Basin, which is characterized by a perennial anomalously warm Pacific Summer Water (PSW) layer residing at the base of the mixed layer and a summertime Near-Surface Temperature Maximum (NSTM) within the mixed layer trapping heat from solar radiation. We use large eddy simulation (LES) to investigate heat entrainment for different ice-drift velocities and different initial temperature profiles. The value of LES is that the resolved turbulent fluxes are greater than the subgrid-scale fluxes for most of our parameter space. The results show that the presence of the NSTM enhances heat entrainment from the mixed layer. Additionally there is no PSW heat entrained under the parameter space considered. We propose a scaling law for the ocean-to-ice heat flux which depends on the initial temperature anomaly in the NSTM layer and the ice-drift velocity. A case study of "The Great Arctic Cyclone of 2012" gives a turbulent heat flux from the mixed layer that is approximately 70% of the total ocean-to-ice heat flux estimated from the PIOMAS model often used for short-term predictions. Present results highlight the need for large-scale climate models to account for the NSTM layer.

  11. Circumpolar measurements of speciated mercury, ozone and carbon monoxide in the boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommar, J.; Andersson, M. E.; Jacobi, H.-W.

    2010-06-01

    Using the Swedish icebreaker Oden as a platform, continuous measurements of airborne mercury (gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0), divalent gaseous mercury species HgIIX2(g) (acronym RGM) and mercury attached to particles (PHg)) and some long-lived trace gases (carbon monoxide CO and ozone O3) were performed over the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. The measurements were performed for nearly three months (July-September 2005) during the Beringia 2005 expedition (from Göteborg, Sweden via the proper Northwest Passage to the Beringia region Alaska - Chukchi Penninsula - Wrangel Island and in-turn via a north-polar transect to Longyearbyen, Spitsbergen). The Beringia 2005 expedition was the first time that these species have been measured during summer over the Arctic Ocean going from 60° to 90° N. During the North Atlantic transect, concentration levels of Hg0, CO and O3 were measured comparable to typical levels for the ambient mid-hemispheric average. However, a rapid increase of Hg0 in air and surface water was observed when entering the ice-covered waters of the Canadian Arctic archipelago. Large parts of the measured waters were supersaturated with respect to Hg0, reflecting a strong disequilibrium. Heading through the sea ice of the Arctic Ocean, a fraction of the strong Hg0 pulse in the water was transferred with some time-delay into the air samples collected ~20 m above sea level. Several episodes of elevated Hg0 in air were encountered along the sea ice route with higher mean concentration (1.81±0.43 ng m-3) compared to the marine boundary layer over ice-free Arctic oceanic waters (1.55±0.21 ng m-3). In addition, the bulk of the variance in the temporal series of Hg0 concentrations was observed during July. The Oden Hg0 observations compare in this aspect very favourably with those at the coastal station Alert. Atmospheric boundary layer O3 mixing ratios decreased when initially sailing northward. In the Arctic, an O3 minimum around 15-20 ppbV was

  12. Carbon monoxide and methane in the North American Arctic and Subarctic troposphere - July-August 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriss, Robert C.; Sachse, Glen W.; Hill, Gerald F.; Wade, Larry; Bartlett, Karen B.; Collins, James E.; Steele, L. P.; Novelli, Paul C.

    1992-01-01

    Enhanced concentrations of CH4 in the unpolluted atmospheric mixed layer over both Arctic and subarctic tundra landscapes are documented here using data from the NASA Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A). The CH4 concentration gradients were determined mainly by interactions of biogenic emission from wet tundra and turbulent mixing proceses. The gradient were most frequently associated with intrusion of upper tropospheric or stratospheric air into the midtroposphere, emissions from forest and tundra fires, and long-range transport of enhanced concentration of these gases from unidentified sources. Summertime haze layers exhibited midtropospheric enhancements of CH4 similar to those measured in winter Arctic events. The observations confirm the importance of Arctic and Subarctic wetland environments as a regional source of global atmospheric CH4.

  13. AFFORDABLE MULTI-LAYER CERAMIC (MLC) MANUFACTURING FOR POWER SYSTEMS (AMPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.A. Barringer, Ph.D.

    2002-11-27

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is attempting to develop high-performance, cost-competitive solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems. Recognizing the challenges and limitations facing the development of SOFC stacks comprised of electrode-supported cells and metallic interconnects, McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) has chosen to pursue an alternate path to commercialization. MTI is developing a multi-layer, co-fired, planar SOFC stack that will provide superior performance and reliability at reduced costs relative to competing designs. The MTI approach combines state-of-the-art SOFC materials with the manufacturing technology and infrastructure established for multi-layer ceramic (MLC) packages for the microelectronics industry. The rationale for using MLC packaging technology is that high quality, low-cost manufacturing has been demonstrated at high volumes. With the proper selection of SOFC materials, implementation of MLC fabrication methods offers unique designs for stacks (cells and interconnects) that are not possible through traditional fabrication methods. The MTI approach eliminates use of metal interconnects and ceramic-metal seals, which are primary sources of stack performance degradation. Co-fired cells are less susceptible to thermal cycling stresses by using material compositions that have closely matched coefficients of thermal expansion between the cell and the interconnect. The development of this SOFC stack technology was initiated in October 1999 under the DOE cosponsored program entitled ''Affordable Multi-layer Ceramic Manufacturing for Power Systems (AMPS)''. The AMPS Program was conducted as a two-phase program: Phase I--Feasibility Assessment (10/99--9/00); and Phase II--Process Development for Co-fired Stacks (10/00-3/02). This report provides a summary of the results from Phase I and a more detailed review of the results for Phase II. Phase I demonstrated the feasibility for fabricating multi-layer, co-fired cells and

  14. Few layer graphene wrapped mixed phase TiO2 nanofiber as a potential electrode material for high performance supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirugnanam, Lavanya; Sundara, Ramaprabhu

    2018-06-01

    A combination of favorable composition and optimized anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 (MPTNF)/Hydrogen exfoliated graphene (HEG) composite nanofibers (MPTNF/HEG) and anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite nanofibers (MPTNF/rGO) have been reported to enhance the electrochemical properties for supercapacitor applications. These composite nanofibers have been synthesized by an efficient route of electrospinning together with the help of easy chemical methods. Both the composites exhibit good charge storage capability with enhanced pseudocapacitance and electric double-layer capacitance (EDLC) as confirmed by cyclic voltammetry studies. MPTNF/HEG composite showed maximum specific capacitance of 210.5 F/g at the current density of 1 A/g, which was mainly due to its availability of the more active sites for ions adsorption on a few layers of graphene wrapped TiO2 nanofiber surface. The synergistic effect of anatase/rutile mixed phase with one dimensional nanostructure and the electronic interaction between TiO2 and few layer graphene provided the subsequent improvement of ion adsorption capacity. Also exhibit excellent electrochemical performance to improve the capacitive properties of TiO2 electrode materials which is required for the development of flexible electrodes in energy storage devices and open up new opportunities for high performance supercapacitors.

  15. A comparison of multi-spectral, multi-angular, and multi-temporal remote sensing datasets for fractional shrub canopy mapping in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkowitz, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Shrub cover appears to be increasing across many areas of the Arctic tundra biome, and increasing shrub cover in the Arctic has the potential to significantly impact global carbon budgets and the global climate system. For most of the Arctic, however, there is no existing baseline inventory of shrub canopy cover, as existing maps of Arctic vegetation provide little information about the density of shrub cover at a moderate spatial resolution across the region. Remotely-sensed fractional shrub canopy maps can provide this necessary baseline inventory of shrub cover. In this study, we compare the accuracy of fractional shrub canopy (> 0.5 m tall) maps derived from multi-spectral, multi-angular, and multi-temporal datasets from Landsat imagery at 30 m spatial resolution, Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) imagery at 250 m and 500 m spatial resolution, and MultiAngle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) imagery at 275 m spatial resolution for a 1067 km2 study area in Arctic Alaska. The study area is centered at 69 ??N, ranges in elevation from 130 to 770 m, is composed primarily of rolling topography with gentle slopes less than 10??, and is free of glaciers and perennial snow cover. Shrubs > 0.5 m in height cover 2.9% of the study area and are primarily confined to patches associated with specific landscape features. Reference fractional shrub canopy is determined from in situ shrub canopy measurements and a high spatial resolution IKONOS image swath. Regression tree models are constructed to estimate fractional canopy cover at 250 m using different combinations of input data from Landsat, MODIS, and MISR. Results indicate that multi-spectral data provide substantially more accurate estimates of fractional shrub canopy cover than multi-angular or multi-temporal data. Higher spatial resolution datasets also provide more accurate estimates of fractional shrub canopy cover (aggregated to moderate spatial resolutions) than lower spatial resolution datasets

  16. Carbon monoxide and methane in the North American Arctic and Subarctic troposphere - July-August 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harriss, R.C.; Sachse, G.W.; Hill, G.F.; Wade, L.; Bartlett, K.B.; Collins, J.E.; Steele, L.P.; Novelli, P.C. (New Hampshire Univ., Durham (United States) NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States) Lockheed Engineering Sciences Co., Hampton, VA (United States) Science and Technology Corp., Hampton, VA (United States) Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Enhanced concentrations of CH4 in the unpolluted atmospheric mixed layer over both Arctic and subarctic tundra landscapes are documented here using data from the NASA Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A). The CH4 concentration gradients were determined mainly by interactions of biogenic emission from wet tundra and turbulent mixing proceses. The gradient were most frequently associated with intrusion of upper tropospheric or stratospheric air into the midtroposphere, emissions from forest and tundra fires, and long-range transport of enhanced concentration of these gases from unidentified sources. Summertime haze layers exhibited midtropospheric enhancements of CH4 similar to those measured in winter Arctic events. The observations confirm the importance of Arctic and Subarctic wetland environments as a regional source of global atmospheric CH4. 33 refs.

  17. A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Pringle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute ~40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with ~20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal. Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O3, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for

  18. A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindell, D T; Chin, M; Dentener, F; Doherty, R M; Faluvegi, G; Fiore, A M; Hess, P; Koch, D M; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Schultz, M G; Schulz, M; Stevenson, D S; Teich, H; Textor, C; Wild, O; Bergmann, D J; Bey, I; Bian, H; Cuvelier, C; Duncan, B N; Folberth, G; Horowitz, L W; Jonson, J; Kaminski, J W; Marmer, E; Park, R; Pringle, K J; Schroeder, S; Szopa, S; Takemura, T; Zeng, G; Keating, T J; Zuber, A

    2008-03-13

    We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission) vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC) onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute {approx}40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with {approx}20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal). Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O{sub 3}, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for European

  19. Overview of Boundary Layer Clouds Using Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, B.; Dong, X.; Wu, P.; Qiu, S.

    2017-12-01

    A comprehensive summary of boundary layer clouds properties based on our few recently studies will be presented. The analyses include the global cloud fractions and cloud macro/micro- physical properties based on satellite measurements using both CERES-MODIS and CloudSat/Caliposo data products,; the annual/seasonal/diurnal variations of stratocumulus clouds over different climate regions (mid-latitude land, mid-latitude ocean, and Arctic region) using DOE ARM ground-based measurements over Southern great plain (SGP), Azores (GRW), and North slope of Alaska (NSA) sites; the impact of environmental conditions to the formation and dissipation process of marine boundary layer clouds over Azores site; characterizing Arctice mixed-phase cloud structure and favorable environmental conditions for the formation/maintainess of mixed-phase clouds over NSA site. Though the presentation has widely spread topics, we will focus on the representation of the ground-based measurements over different climate regions; evaluation of satellite retrieved cloud properties using these ground-based measurements, and understanding the uncertainties of both satellite and ground-based retrievals and measurements.

  20. Toward Exploring the Synergy Between Cloud Radar Polarimetry and Doppler Spectral Analysis in Deep Cold Precipitating Systems in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oue, Mariko; Kollias, Pavlos; Ryzhkov, Alexander; Luke, Edward P.

    2018-03-01

    The study of Arctic ice and mixed-phase clouds, which are characterized by a variety of ice particle types in the same cloudy volume, is challenging research. This study illustrates a new approach to qualitative and quantitative analysis of the complexity of ice and mixed-phase microphysical processes in Arctic deep precipitating systems using the combination of Ka-band zenith-pointing radar Doppler spectra and quasi-vertical profiles of polarimetric radar variables measured by a Ka/W-band scanning radar. The results illustrate the frequent occurrence of multimodal Doppler spectra in the dendritic/planar growth layer, where locally generated, slower-falling particle populations are well separated from faster-falling populations in terms of Doppler velocity. The slower-falling particle populations contribute to an increase of differential reflectivity (ZDR), while an enhanced specific differential phase (KDP) in this dendritic growth temperature range is caused by both the slower and faster-falling particle populations. Another area with frequent occurrence of multimodal Doppler spectra is in mixed-phase layers, where both populations produce ZDR and KDP values close to 0, suggesting the occurrence of a riming process. Joint analysis of the Doppler spectra and the polarimetric radar variables provides important insight into the microphysics of snow formation and allows the separation of the contributions of ice of different habits to the values of reflectivity and ZDR.

  1. Storm-Driven Mixing and Potential Impact on the Arctic Ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Jiayan

    2004-01-01

    Observations of the ocean, atmosphere, and ice made by Ice-Ocean Environmental Buoys indicate that mixing events reaching the depth of the halocline have occurred in various regions in the Arctic Ocean...

  2. Multi-type particle layer improved light trapping for photovoltaic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Christin

    2016-01-01

    . The absorbance was enhanced compared to the bare Si wafer and I demonstrated on mixing particles a broadband boost in the absorbance within the homogeneous wafer region, excluding parasitic absorption in the particle layer. I studied the efficiency enhancement for varying geometries. Multi-type layers made of Si...

  3. Trade-off analysis of discharge-desiltation-turbidity and ANN analysis on sedimentation of a combined reservoir-reach system under multi-phase and multi-layer conjunctive releasing operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Lin; Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Wei, Chih-Chiang; Yao, Chun-Hao

    2017-10-01

    Multi-objective reservoir operation considering the trade-off of discharge-desiltation-turbidity during typhoons and sediment concentration (SC) simulation modeling are the vital components for sustainable reservoir management. The purposes of this study were (1) to analyze the multi-layer release trade-offs between reservoir desiltation and intake turbidity of downstream purification plants and thus propose a superior conjunctive operation strategy and (2) to develop ANFIS-based (adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system) and RTRLNN-based (real-time recurrent learning neural networks) substitute SC simulation models. To this end, this study proposed a methodology to develop (1) a series of multi-phase and multi-layer sediment-flood conjunctive release modes and (2) a specialized SC numerical model for a combined reservoir-reach system. The conjunctive release modes involve (1) an optimization model where the decision variables are multi-phase reduction/scaling ratios and the timings to generate a superior total release hydrograph for flood control (Phase I: phase prior to flood arrival, Phase II/III: phase prior to/subsequent to peak flow) and (2) a combination method with physical limitations regarding separation of the singular hydrograph into multi-layer release hydrographs for sediment control. This study employed the featured signals obtained from statistical quartiles/sediment duration curve in mesh segmentation, and an iterative optimization model with a sediment unit response matrix and corresponding geophysical-based acceleration factors, for efficient parameter calibration. This research applied the developed methodology to the Shihmen Reservoir basin in Taiwan. The trade-off analytical results using Typhoons Sinlaku and Jangmi as case examples revealed that owing to gravity current and re-suspension effects, Phase I + II can de-silt safely without violating the intake's turbidity limitation before reservoir discharge reaches 2238 m3/s; however

  4. Tradeoffs in Chemical and Thermal Variations in the Post-perovskite Phase Transition: Mixed Phase Regions in the Deep Lower Mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. F.; Spera, F. J.; Yuen, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    The recent discovery of a phase-transition in Mg-rich perovskite (Pv) to a post-perovskite (pPv) phase at lower mantle depths and its relationship to D", lower mantle heterogeneity and iron content prompted an investigation of the relative importance of lower mantle (LM) compositional and temperature fluctuations in creating topographic undulations on mixed phase regions. Above the transition, Mg-rich Pv makes up ~70 percent by mass of the LM. Using results from experimental phase equilibria, first-principles computations and thermodynamic relations for Fe2+-Mg mixing in silicates, a preliminary thermodynamic model for the perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition in the divariant system MgSiO3-FeSiO3 is developed. Complexities associated with components Fe2O3 and Al2O3 and other phases (Ca-Pv, magnesiowustite) are neglected. The model predicts phase transition pressures are sensitive to the FeSiO3 content of perovskite (~-1.5 GPa per one mole percent FeSiO3). This leads to considerable topography along the top boundary of the mixed phase region. The Clapeyron slope for the Pv to pPv transition at XFeSiO3=0.1 is +11 MPa/K about 20% higher than for pure Mg-Pv. Increasing bulk concentration of iron elevates the mixed (two-phase) layer above the core-mantle boundary (CMB); increasing temperature acts to push the mixed layer deeper into the LM into the D" thermal boundary layer resting upon the (CMB). For various LM geotherms and CMB temperatures, a single mixed layer of thickness ~300 km lies within the bottom 40% of the lower mantle. For low iron contents (XFeSiO3 ~5 mole percent or less), two perched layers are found. This is the divariant analog to the univariant double-crosser. The hotter the mantle, the deeper the mixed phase layer; the more iron-rich the LM, the higher the mixed phase layer. In a hotter Hadean Earth with interior temperatures everywhere 200-500 K warmer pPv is not stable unless the LM bulk composition is Fe-enriched compared to the present

  5. The Impedance of Multi-layer Vacuum Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, L

    2003-01-01

    Many components of the LHC vacuum chamber have multi-layered walls : the copper coated cold beam screen, the titanium coated ceramic chamber of the dump kickers, the ceramic chamber of the injection kickers coated with copper stripes, only to name a few. Theories and computer programs are available for some time already to evaluate the impedance of these elements. Nevertheless, the algorithm developed in this paper is more convenient in its application and has been used extensively in the design phase of multi-layer LHC vacuum chamber elements. It is based on classical transmission line theory. Closed expressions are derived for simple layer configurations, while beam pipes involving many layers demand a chain calculation. The algorithm has been tested with a number of published examples and was verified with experimental data as well.

  6. Elastic Buckling Behaviour of General Multi-Layered Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Ming Lin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Elastic buckling behaviour of multi-layered graphene sheets is rigorously investigated. Van der Waals forces are modelled, to a first order approximation, as linear physical springs which connect the nodes between the layers. Critical buckling loads and their associated modes are established and analyzed under different boundary conditions, aspect ratios and compressive loading ratios in the case of graphene sheets compressed in two perpendicular directions. Various practically possible loading configurations are examined and their effect on buckling characteristics is assessed. To model more accurately the buckling behaviour of multi-layered graphene sheets, a physically more representative and realistic mixed boundary support concept is proposed and applied. For the fundamental buckling mode under mixed boundary support, the layers with different boundary supports deform similarly but non-identically, leading to resultant van der Waals bonding forces between the layers which in turn affect critical buckling load. Results are compared with existing known solutions to illustrate the excellent numerical accuracy of the proposed modelling approach. The buckling characteristics of graphene sheets presented in this paper form a comprehensive and wholesome study which can be used as potential structural design guideline when graphene sheets are employed for nano-scale sensing and actuation applications such as nano-electro-mechanical systems.

  7. Boundary layer and free-tropospheric dimethyl sulfide in the Arctic spring and summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Norman, Ann-Lise; Croft, Betty; Martin, Randall V.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Burkart, Julia; Rempillo, Ofelia; Bozem, Heiko; Kunkel, Daniel; Thomas, Jennie L.; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Wentworth, Gregory R.; Levasseur, Maurice; Staebler, Ralf M.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Leaitch, W. Richard

    2017-07-01

    Vertical distributions of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS(g)) were sampled aboard the research aircraft Polar 6 near Lancaster Sound, Nunavut, Canada, in July 2014 and on pan-Arctic flights in April 2015 that started from Longyearbyen, Spitzbergen, and passed through Alert and Eureka, Nunavut, and Inuvik, Northwest Territories. Larger mean DMS(g) mixing ratios were present during April 2015 (campaign mean of 116 ± 8 pptv) compared to July 2014 (campaign mean of 20 ± 6 pptv). During July 2014, the largest mixing ratios were found near the surface over the ice edge and open water. DMS(g) mixing ratios decreased with altitude up to about 3 km. During April 2015, profiles of DMS(g) were more uniform with height and some profiles showed an increase with altitude. DMS reached as high as 100 pptv near 2500 m. Relative to the observation averages, GEOS-Chem (www.geos-chem.org) chemical transport model simulations were higher during July and lower during April. Based on the simulations, more than 90 % of the July DMS(g) below 2 km and more than 90 % of the April DMS(g) originated from Arctic seawater (north of 66° N). During April, 60 % of the DMS(g), between 500 and 3000 m originated from Arctic seawater. During July 2014, FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) simulations locate the sampled air mass over Baffin Bay and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago 4 days back from the observations. During April 2015, the locations of the air masses 4 days back from sampling were varied: Baffin Bay/Canadian Archipelago, the Arctic Ocean, Greenland and the Pacific Ocean. Our results highlight the role of open water below the flight as the source of DMS(g) during July 2014 and the influence of long-range transport (LRT) of DMS(g) from further afield in the Arctic above 2500 m during April 2015.

  8. Light source distribution and scattering phase function influence light transport in diffuse multi-layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudelle, Fabrice; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre; Askoura, Mohamed Lamine

    2017-06-01

    Red and near-Infrared light is often used as a useful diagnostic and imaging probe for highly scattering media such as biological tissues, fruits and vegetables. Part of diffusively reflected light gives interesting information related to the tissue subsurface, whereas light recorded at further distances may probe deeper into the interrogated turbid tissues. However, modelling diffusive events occurring at short source-detector distances requires to consider both the distribution of the light sources and the scattering phase functions. In this report, a modified Monte Carlo model is used to compute light transport in curved and multi-layered tissue samples which are covered with a thin and highly diffusing tissue layer. Different light source distributions (ballistic, diffuse or Lambertian) are tested with specific scattering phase functions (modified or not modified Henyey-Greenstein, Gegenbauer and Mie) to compute the amount of backscattered and transmitted light in apple and human skin structures. Comparisons between simulation results and experiments carried out with a multispectral imaging setup confirm the soundness of the theoretical strategy and may explain the role of the skin on light transport in whole and half-cut apples. Other computational results show that a Lambertian source distribution combined with a Henyey-Greenstein phase function provides a higher photon density in the stratum corneum than in the upper dermis layer. Furthermore, it is also shown that the scattering phase function may affect the shape and the magnitude of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution (BRDF) exhibited at the skin surface.

  9. Modelling ice microphysics of mixed-phase clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola, J.; Raatikainen, T.; Tonttila, J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.

    2017-12-01

    The low-level Arctic mixed-phase clouds have a significant role for the Arctic climate due to their ability to absorb and reflect radiation. Since the climate change is amplified in polar areas, it is vital to apprehend the mixed-phase cloud processes. From a modelling point of view, this requires a high spatiotemporal resolution to capture turbulence and the relevant microphysical processes, which has shown to be difficult.In order to solve this problem about modelling mixed-phase clouds, a new ice microphysics description has been developed. The recently published large-eddy simulation cloud model UCLALES-SALSA offers a good base for a feasible solution (Tonttila et al., Geosci. Mod. Dev., 10:169-188, 2017). The model includes aerosol-cloud interactions described with a sectional SALSA module (Kokkola et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 2469-2483, 2008), which represents a good compromise between detail and computational expense.Newly, the SALSA module has been upgraded to include also ice microphysics. The dynamical part of the model is based on well-known UCLA-LES model (Stevens et al., J. Atmos. Sci., 56, 3963-3984, 1999) which can be used to study cloud dynamics on a fine grid.The microphysical description of ice is sectional and the included processes consist of formation, growth and removal of ice and snow particles. Ice cloud particles are formed by parameterized homo- or heterogeneous nucleation. The growth mechanisms of ice particles and snow include coagulation and condensation of water vapor. Autoconversion from cloud ice particles to snow is parameterized. The removal of ice particles and snow happens by sedimentation and melting.The implementation of ice microphysics is tested by initializing the cloud simulation with atmospheric observations from the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). The results are compared to the model results shown in the paper of Ovchinnikov et al. (J. Adv. Model. Earth Syst., 6, 223-248, 2014) and they show a good

  10. Meteorological conditions in the central Arctic summer during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tjernström

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the rapidly changing climate in the Arctic is limited by a lack of understanding of underlying strong feedback mechanisms that are specific to the Arctic. Progress in this field can only be obtained by process-level observations; this is the motivation for intensive ice-breaker-based campaigns such as the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS, described here. However, detailed field observations also have to be put in the context of the larger-scale meteorology, and short field campaigns have to be analysed within the context of the underlying climate state and temporal anomalies from this.

    To aid in the analysis of other parameters or processes observed during this campaign, this paper provides an overview of the synoptic-scale meteorology and its climatic anomaly during the ASCOS field deployment. It also provides a statistical analysis of key features during the campaign, such as key meteorological variables, the vertical structure of the lower troposphere and clouds, and energy fluxes at the surface. In order to assess the representativity of the ASCOS results, we also compare these features to similar observations obtained during three earlier summer experiments in the Arctic Ocean: the AOE-96, SHEBA and AOE-2001 expeditions.

    We find that these expeditions share many key features of the summertime lower troposphere. Taking ASCOS and the previous expeditions together, a common picture emerges with a large amount of low-level cloud in a well-mixed shallow boundary layer, capped by a weak to moderately strong inversion where moisture, and sometimes also cloud top, penetrate into the lower parts of the inversion. Much of the boundary-layer mixing is due to cloud-top cooling and subsequent buoyant overturning of the cloud. The cloud layer may, or may not, be connected with surface processes depending on the depths of the cloud and surface-based boundary layers and on the relative strengths of surface-shear and

  11. Influence of the liquid layer within mixed-phase clouds on radar observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfitzenmaier, L.; Dufournet, Y.; Unal, C.M.H.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed-phase clouds play an important role in the earth system. They affect earth radiative balance and the climate (Comstock et al., 2007; Solomon et al., 2007) as well as the formation of precipitation (de Boer et al., 2009; Fan et al., 2011; Lamb and Verlinde, 2011). Within such mixed-phase clouds

  12. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Bernsten, T. K.; Bian, H.; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; DeLuca, N.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within-snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004 to 2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng/g for an earlier phase of AeroCom models (phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng/g for a more recent phase of AeroCom models (phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng/g. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model-measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90degN) atmospheric residence time for BC in phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates

  13. Single-particle characterization of the high-Arctic summertime aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sierau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle mass-spectrometric measurements were carried out in the high Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS. The instrument deployed was an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 and 3000 nm in diameter showed mass-spectrometric patterns, indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the high Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol–cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest the presence of a particle type of

  14. Single-particle characterization of the high-Arctic summertime aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierau, B.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Leck, C.; Paatero, J.; Lohmann, U.

    2014-07-01

    Single-particle mass-spectrometric measurements were carried out in the high Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS). The instrument deployed was an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 and 3000 nm in diameter showed mass-spectrometric patterns, indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the high Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol-cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest the presence of a particle type of unknown composition

  15. Single-particle characterization of the High Arctic summertime aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierau, B.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Leck, C.; Paatero, J.; Lohmann, U.

    2014-01-01

    Single-particle mass spectrometric measurements were carried out in the High Arctic north of 80° during summer 2008. The campaign took place onboard the icebreaker Oden and was part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS). The instrument deployed was an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) that provides information on the chemical composition of individual particles and their mixing state in real-time. Aerosols were sampled in the marine boundary layer at stations in the open ocean, in the marginal ice zone, and in the pack ice region. The largest fraction of particles detected for subsequent analysis in the size range of the ATOFMS between approximately 200 nm to 3000 nm in diameter showed mass spectrometric patterns indicating an internal mixing state and a biomass burning and/or biofuel source. The majority of these particles were connected to an air mass layer of elevated particle concentration mixed into the surface mixed layer from the upper part of the marine boundary layer. The second largest fraction was represented by sea salt particles. The chemical analysis of the over-ice sea salt aerosol revealed tracer compounds that reflect chemical aging of the particles during their long-range advection from the marginal ice zone, or open waters south thereof prior to detection at the ship. From our findings we conclude that long-range transport of particles is one source of aerosols in the High Arctic. To assess the importance of long-range particle sources for aerosol-cloud interactions over the inner Arctic in comparison to local and regional biogenic primary aerosol sources, the chemical composition of the detected particles was analyzed for indicators of marine biological origin. Only a~minor fraction showed chemical signatures of potentially ocean-derived primary particles of that kind. However, a chemical bias in the ATOFMS's detection capabilities observed during ASCOS might suggest a presence of a particle type of unknown composition

  16. Changes in Ocean Circulation with an Ice-Free Arctic: Reconstructing Early Holocene Arctic Ocean Circulation Using Geochemical Signals from Individual Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livsey, C.; Spero, H. J.; Kozdon, R.

    2016-12-01

    The impacts of sea ice decrease and consequent hydrologic changes in the Arctic Ocean will be experienced globally as ocean and atmospheric temperatures continue to rise, though it is not evident to what extent. Understanding the structure of the Arctic water column during the early/mid Holocene sea ice minimum ( 6-10 kya), a post-glacial analogue of a seasonally ice-free Arctic, will help us to predict what the changes we can expect as the Earth warms over the next century. Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral; Nps) is a species of planktonic foraminifera that dominates assemblages in the polar oceans. This species grows its chambers (ontogenetic calcite) in the surface waters and subsequently descends through the water column to below the mixed layer where it quickly adds a thick crust of calcite (Kohfeld et al., 1996). Therefore, geochemical signals from both the surface waters and sub-mixed layer depths are captured within single Nps shells. We were able to target ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), therefore capturing signals from both the ontogenetic and crust calcite in single Nps shells. This data was combined with laser ablation- inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) Mg/Ca profiles of trace metals through the two layers of calcite of the same shells, to determine the thermal structure of the water column. Combining δ18O, temperature, and salinity gradients from locations across the Arctic basin allow us to reconstruct the hydrography of the early Holocene Arctic sea ice minimum. These results will be compared with modern Arctic water column characteristics in order to develop a conceptual model of Arctic Ocean oceanographic change due to global warming. Kohfeld, K.E., Fairbanks, R.G., Smith, S.L., Walsh, I.D., 1996. Neogloboquadrina pachyderma(sinistral coiling) as paleoceanographic tracers in polar oceans: Evidence from northeast water polynya plankton tows, sediment traps, and surface sediments. Paleoceanography 11, 679-699.

  17. Processes that generate and deplete liquid water and snow in thin midlevel mixed-phase clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam J.; Larson, Vincent E.; Niu, Jianguo; Kankiewicz, J. Adam; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2009-06-01

    This paper uses a numerical model to investigate microphysical, radiative, and dynamical processes in mixed-phase altostratocumulus clouds. Three cloud cases are chosen for study, each of which was observed by aircraft during the fifth or ninth Complex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX). These three clouds are numerically modeled using large-eddy simulation (LES). The observed and modeled clouds consist of a mixed-phase layer with a quasi-adiabatic profile of liquid, and a virga layer below that consists of snow. A budget of cloud (liquid) water mixing ratio is constructed from the simulations. It shows that large-scale ascent/descent, radiative cooling/heating, turbulent transport, and microphysical processes are all significant. Liquid is depleted indirectly via depositional growth of snow (the Bergeron-Findeisen process). This process is more influential than depletion of liquid via accretional growth of snow. Also constructed is a budget of snow mixing ratio, which turns out to be somewhat simpler. It shows that snow grows by deposition in and below the liquid (mixed-phase) layer, and sublimates in the remainder of the virga region below. The deposition and sublimation are balanced primarily by sedimentation, which transports the snow from the growth region to the sublimation region below. In our three clouds, the vertical extent of the virga layer is influenced more by the profile of saturation ratio below the liquid (mixed-phase) layer than by the mixing ratio of snow at the top of the virga layer.

  18. Multi-Wave Mixing Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yanpeng

    2009-01-01

    "Multi-Wave Mixing Processes - From Ultrafast Polarization Beats to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency" discusses the interactions of efficient multi-wave mixing (MWM) processes enhanced by atomic coherence in multilevel atomic systems. It covers topics in five major areas: attosecond and femtosecond polarization beats of four-wave mixing (FWM) processes; heterodyne detection of FWM, six-wave mixing (SWM) and eight-wave mixing (EWM) processes; Raman and Rayleigh enhanced polarization beats; coexistence and interactions of MWM processes via electromagnetically induced transparency(EIT); multi-dressing MWM processes. The book is intended for researchers, advanced undergraduate and graduate students in Nonlinear Optics. Dr. Yanpeng Zhang is a professor at the Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi'an Jiaotong University. Dr. Min Xiao is a professor of Physics at University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, U.S.A.

  19. Contributions of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation, Large-Scale Circulation, and Shallow Cumulus Detrainment to Cloud Phase Transition in Mixed-Phase Clouds with NCAR CAM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, D.; Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Mixed-phase clouds consisting of both liquid and ice water occur frequently at high-latitudes and in mid-latitude storm track regions. This type of clouds has been shown to play a critical role in the surface energy balance, surface air temperature, and sea ice melting in the Arctic. Cloud phase partitioning between liquid and ice water determines the cloud optical depth of mixed-phase clouds because of distinct optical properties of liquid and ice hydrometeors. The representation and simulation of cloud phase partitioning in state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) are associated with large biases. In this study, the cloud phase partition in mixed-phase clouds simulated from the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) is evaluated against satellite observations. Observation-based supercooled liquid fraction (SLF) is calculated from CloudSat, MODIS and CPR radar detected liquid and ice water paths for clouds with cloud-top temperatures between -40 and 0°C. Sensitivity tests with CAM5 are conducted for different heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations with respect to aerosol influence (Wang et al., 2014), different phase transition temperatures for detrained cloud water from shallow convection (Kay et al., 2016), and different CAM5 model configurations (free-run versus nudged winds and temperature, Zhang et al., 2015). A classical nucleation theory-based ice nucleation parameterization in mixed-phase clouds increases the SLF especially at temperatures colder than -20°C, and significantly improves the model agreement with observations in the Arctic. The change of transition temperature for detrained cloud water increases the SLF at higher temperatures and improves the SLF mostly over the Southern Ocean. Even with the improved SLF from the ice nucleation and shallow cumulus detrainment, the low SLF biases in some regions can only be improved through the improved circulation with the nudging technique. Our study highlights the challenges of

  20. Multi-decadal Arctic sea ice roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamados, M.; Stroeve, J.; Kharbouche, S.; Muller, J. P., , Prof; Nolin, A. W.; Petty, A.; Haas, C.; Girard-Ardhuin, F.; Landy, J.

    2017-12-01

    The transformation of Arctic sea ice from mainly perennial, multi-year ice to a seasonal, first-year ice is believed to have been accompanied by a reduction of the roughness of the ice cover surface. This smoothening effect has been shown to (i) modify the momentum and heat transfer between the atmosphere and ocean, (ii) to alter the ice thickness distribution which in turn controls the snow and melt pond repartition over the ice cover, and (iii) to bias airborne and satellite remote sensing measurements that depend on the scattering and reflective characteristics over the sea ice surface topography. We will review existing and novel remote sensing methodologies proposed to estimate sea ice roughness, ranging from airborne LIDAR measurement (ie Operation IceBridge), to backscatter coefficients from scatterometers (ASCAT, QUICKSCAT), to multi angle maging spectroradiometer (MISR), and to laser (Icesat) and radar altimeters (Envisat, Cryosat, Altika, Sentinel-3). We will show that by comparing and cross-calibrating these different products we can offer a consistent multi-mission, multi-decadal view of the declining sea ice roughness. Implications for sea ice physics, climate and remote sensing will also be discussed.

  1. Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Using Sound Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Johnson, M. A.

    2002-05-01

    The monthly and annual means from three Arctic ocean - sea ice climate model simulations are compared for the period 1979-1997. Sound speed is used to integrate model outputs of temperature and salinity along a section between Barrow and Franz Josef Land. A statistical approach is used to test for differences among the three models for two basic data subsets. We integrated and then analyzed an upper layer between 2 m - 50 m, and also a deep layer from 500 m to the bottom. The deep layer is characterized by low time-variability. No high-frequency signals appear in the deep layer having been filtered out in the upper layer. There is no seasonal signal in the deep layer and the monthly means insignificantly oscillate about the long-period mean. For the deep ocean the long-period mean can be considered quasi-constant, at least within the 19 year period of our analysis. Thus we assumed that the deep ocean would be the best choice for comparing the means of the model outputs. The upper (mixed) layer was chosen to contrast the deep layer dynamics. There are distinct seasonal and interannual signals in the sound speed time series in this layer. The mixed layer is a major link in the ocean - air interaction mechanism. Thus, different mean states of the upper layer in the models might cause different responses in other components of the Arctic climate system. The upper layer also strongly reflects any differences in atmosphere forcing. To compare data from the three models we have used a one-way t-test for the population mean, the Wilcoxon one-sample signed-rank test (when the requirement of normality of tested data is violated), and one-way ANOVA method and F-test to verify our hypothesis that the model outputs have the same mean sound speed. The different statistical approaches have shown that all models have different mean characteristics of the deep and upper layers of the Arctic Ocean.

  2. Martian Mixed Layer during Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G. M.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.

    2008-09-01

    In situ measurements of the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer (MPBL) encompass only the sur- face layer. Therefore, in order to fully address the MPBL, it becomes necessary to simulate somehow the behaviour of the martian mixed layer. The small-scale processes that happen in the MPBL cause GCM's ([1], [2]) to describe only partially the turbulent statistics, height, convective scales, etc, of the surface layer and the mixed layer. For this reason, 2D and 3D martian mesoscale models ([4], [5]), and large eddy simulations ([4], [6], [7], [8]) have been designed in the last years. Although they are expected to simulate more accurately the MPBL, they take an extremely expensive compu- tational time. Alternatively, we have derived the main turbu- lent characteristics of the martian mixed layer by using surface layer and mixed layer similarity ([9], [10]). From in situ temperature and wind speed measurements, together with quality-tested simu- lated ground temperature [11], we have character- ized the martian mixed layer during the convective hours of Pathfinder mission Sol 25. Mean mixed layer turbulent statistics like tem- perature variance , horizontal wind speed variance , vertical wind speed variance , viscous dissipation rate , and turbu- lent kinetic energy have been calculated, as well as the mixed layer height zi, and the convective scales of wind w? and temperature θ?. Our values, obtained with negligible time cost, match quite well with some previously obtained results via LES's ([4] and [8]). A comparisson between the above obtained mar- tian values and the typical Earth values are shown in Table 1. Convective velocity scale w doubles its counterpart terrestrial typical value, as it does the mean wind speed variances and . On the other hand, the temperature scale θ? and the mean temperature variance are virtually around one order higher on Mars. The limitations of these results concern the va- lidity of the convective mixed layer similarity. This theory

  3. An AeroCom assessment of black carbon in Arctic snow and sea ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; De Luca, N.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Koch, D.; Liu, X.; Mann, G. W.; Penner, J. E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, S. D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; van Noije, T.; Yun, Y.; Zhang, K.

    2014-01-01

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea ice. In this paper, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within-snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004 to 2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g-1 for an earlier phase of AeroCom models (phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g-1 for a more recent phase of AeroCom models (phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g-1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60–90° N) atmospheric residence time for BC in phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with

  4. Phase diagrams in mixed spin-3/2 and spin-2 Ising system with two alternative layers within the effective-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Polat, Yasin; Keskin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The phase diagrams in the mixed spin-3/2 and spin-2 Ising system with two alternative layers on a honeycomb lattice are investigated and discussed by the use of the effective-field theory with correlations. The interaction of the nearest-neighbour spins of each layer is taken to be positive (ferromagnetic interaction) and the interaction of the adjacent spins of the nearest-neighbour layers is considered to be either positive or negative (ferromagnetic or anti-ferromagnetic interaction). The temperature dependence of the layer magnetizations of the system is examined to characterize the nature (continuous or discontinuous) of the phase transitions and obtain the phase transition temperatures. The system exhibits both second- and first-order phase transitions besides triple point (TP), critical end point (E), multicritical point (A), isolated critical point (C) and reentrant behaviour depending on the interaction parameters. We have also studied the temperature dependence of the total magnetization to find the compensation points, as well as to determine the type of behaviour, and N-type behaviour in Néel classification nomenclature existing in the system. The phase diagrams are constructed in eight different planes and it is found that the system also presents the compensation phenomena depending on the sign of the bilinear exchange interactions. (general)

  5. Arctic potential - Could more structured view improve the understanding of Arctic business opportunities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintsala, Henna; Niemelä, Sami; Tervonen, Pekka

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest towards the Arctic has been witnessed during the past decades. However, the commonly shared definitions of the Arctic key concepts have not yet penetrated national and international arenas for political and economic decision making. The lack of jointly defined framework has made different analyses related to the Arctic quite limited considering the magnitude of economic potential embedded in Arctic. This paper is built on the key findings of two separate, yet connected projects carried out in the Oulu region, Finland. In this paper's approach, the Arctic context has been defined as a composition of three overlapping layers. The first layer is the phenomenological approach to define the Arctic region. The second layer is the strategy-level analysis to define different Arctic paths as well as a national level description of a roadmap to Arctic specialization. The third layer is the operationalization of the first two layers to define the Arctic business context and business opportunities. The studied case from Oulu region indicates that alternative futures for the Arctic competences and business activities are in resemblance with only two of the four identified strategic pathways. Introduction of other pathways to regional level actors as credible and attractive options would require additional, systematic efforts.

  6. Ice and ocean velocity in the Arctic marginal ice zone: Ice roughness and momentum transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia T. Cole

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between sea ice concentration, sea ice roughness, ocean stratification, and momentum transfer to the ice and ocean is subject to seasonal and decadal variations that are crucial to understanding the present and future air-ice-ocean system in the Arctic. In this study, continuous observations in the Canada Basin from March through December 2014 were used to investigate spatial differences and temporal changes in under-ice roughness and momentum transfer as the ice cover evolved seasonally. Observations of wind, ice, and ocean properties from four clusters of drifting instrument systems were complemented by direct drill-hole measurements and instrumented overhead flights by NASA operation IceBridge in March, as well as satellite remote sensing imagery about the instrument clusters. Spatially, directly estimated ice-ocean drag coefficients varied by a factor of three with rougher ice associated with smaller multi-year ice floe sizes embedded within the first-year-ice/multi-year-ice conglomerate. Temporal differences in the ice-ocean drag coefficient of 20–30% were observed prior to the mixed layer shoaling in summer and were associated with ice concentrations falling below 100%. The ice-ocean drag coefficient parameterization was found to be invalid in September with low ice concentrations and small ice floe sizes. Maximum momentum transfer to the ice occurred for moderate ice concentrations, and transfer to the ocean for the lowest ice concentrations and shallowest stratification. Wind work and ocean work on the ice were the dominant terms in the kinetic energy budget of the ice throughout the melt season, consistent with free drift conditions. Overall, ice topography, ice concentration, and the shallow summer mixed layer all influenced mixed layer currents and the transfer of momentum within the air-ice-ocean system. The observed changes in momentum transfer show that care must be taken to determine appropriate parameterizations

  7. Arctic Haze Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Linlu; Xue, Yong

    2013-04-01

    The Arctic atmosphere is perturbed by nature/anthropogenic aerosol sources known as the Arctic haze, was firstly observed in 1956 by J. Murray Mitchell in Alaska (Mitchell, 1956). Pacyna and Shaw (1992) summarized that Arctic haze is a mixture of anthropogenic and natural pollutants from a variety of sources in different geographical areas at altitudes from 2 to 4 or 5 km while the source for layers of polluted air at altitudes below 2.5 km mainly comes from episodic transportation of anthropogenic sources situated closer to the Arctic. Arctic haze of low troposphere was found to be of a very strong seasonal variation characterized by a summer minimum and a winter maximum in Alaskan (Barrie, 1986; Shaw, 1995) and other Arctic region (Xie and Hopke, 1999). An anthropogenic factor dominated by together with metallic species like Pb, Zn, V, As, Sb, In, etc. and nature source such as sea salt factor consisting mainly of Cl, Na, and K (Xie and Hopke, 1999), dust containing Fe, Al and so on (Rahn et al.,1977). Black carbon and soot can also be included during summer time because of the mix of smoke from wildfires. The Arctic air mass is a unique meteorological feature of the troposphere characterized by sub-zero temperatures, little precipitation, stable stratification that prevents strong vertical mixing and low levels of solar radiations (Barrie, 1986), causing less pollutants was scavenged, the major revival pathway for particulates from the atmosphere in Arctic (Shaw, 1981, 1995; Heintzenberg and Larssen, 1983). Due to the special meteorological condition mentioned above, we can conclude that Eurasian is the main contributor of the Arctic pollutants and the strong transport into the Arctic from Eurasia during winter caused by the high pressure of the climatologically persistent Siberian high pressure region (Barrie, 1986). The paper intends to address the atmospheric characteristics of Arctic haze by comparing the clear day and haze day using different dataset

  8. Boundary layer and free-tropospheric dimethyl sulfide in the Arctic spring and summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghahremaninezhad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vertical distributions of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS(g were sampled aboard the research aircraft Polar 6 near Lancaster Sound, Nunavut, Canada, in July 2014 and on pan-Arctic flights in April 2015 that started from Longyearbyen, Spitzbergen, and passed through Alert and Eureka, Nunavut, and Inuvik, Northwest Territories. Larger mean DMS(g mixing ratios were present during April 2015 (campaign mean of 116  ±  8 pptv compared to July 2014 (campaign mean of 20  ±  6 pptv. During July 2014, the largest mixing ratios were found near the surface over the ice edge and open water. DMS(g mixing ratios decreased with altitude up to about 3 km. During April 2015, profiles of DMS(g were more uniform with height and some profiles showed an increase with altitude. DMS reached as high as 100 pptv near 2500 m. Relative to the observation averages, GEOS-Chem (www.geos-chem.org chemical transport model simulations were higher during July and lower during April. Based on the simulations, more than 90 % of the July DMS(g below 2 km and more than 90 % of the April DMS(g originated from Arctic seawater (north of 66° N. During April, 60 % of the DMS(g, between 500 and 3000 m originated from Arctic seawater. During July 2014, FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model simulations locate the sampled air mass over Baffin Bay and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago 4 days back from the observations. During April 2015, the locations of the air masses 4 days back from sampling were varied: Baffin Bay/Canadian Archipelago, the Arctic Ocean, Greenland and the Pacific Ocean. Our results highlight the role of open water below the flight as the source of DMS(g during July 2014 and the influence of long-range transport (LRT of DMS(g from further afield in the Arctic above 2500 m during April 2015.

  9. Observed microphysical changes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds when transitioning from sea ice to open ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Young

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In situ airborne observations of cloud microphysics, aerosol properties, and thermodynamic structure over the transition from sea ice to ocean are presented from the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA campaign. A case study from 23 March 2013 provides a unique view of the cloud microphysical changes over this transition under cold-air outbreak conditions. Cloud base lifted and cloud depth increased over the transition from sea ice to ocean. Mean droplet number concentrations, Ndrop, also increased from 110 ± 36 cm−3 over the sea ice to 145 ± 54 cm−3 over the marginal ice zone (MIZ. Downstream over the ocean, Ndrop decreased to 63 ± 30 cm−3. This reduction was attributed to enhanced collision-coalescence of droplets within the deep ocean cloud layer. The liquid water content increased almost four fold over the transition and this, in conjunction with the deeper cloud layer, allowed rimed snowflakes to develop and precipitate out of cloud base downstream over the ocean. The ice properties of the cloud remained approximately constant over the transition. Observed ice crystal number concentrations averaged approximately 0.5–1.5 L−1, suggesting only primary ice nucleation was active; however, there was evidence of crystal fragmentation at cloud base over the ocean. Little variation in aerosol particle number concentrations was observed between the different surface conditions; however, some variability with altitude was observed, with notably greater concentrations measured at higher altitudes ( >  800 m over the sea ice. Near-surface boundary layer temperatures increased by 13 °C from sea ice to ocean, with corresponding increases in surface heat fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy. These significant thermodynamic changes were concluded to be the primary driver of the microphysical evolution of the cloud. This study represents the first investigation, using in situ

  10. Simulation of the catalyst layer in PEMFC based on a novel two-phase lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jiejing; Yang Wei; Xu Li [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang Yuxin, E-mail: yxwang@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: > We propose a novel two phase lattice model of catalyst layer in PEMFC. > The model features a catalyst phase and a mixed ionomer and pores phase. > Transport and electrochemical reaction in the lattice are simulated. > The model enables more accurate results than pore-solid two phase model. > Profiles of oxygen level and reaction rate across catalyst layer vary with cell current. - Abstract: A lattice model of catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), consisting of randomly distributed catalyst phase (C phase) and mixed ionomer-pore phase (IP phase), was established by means of Monte Carlo method. Transport and electrochemical reactions in the model catalyst layer were calculated. The newly proposed C-IP model was compared with previously established pore-solid two phase model. The variation of oxygen level and reaction rate along the thickness of catalyst layer with cell current was discussed. The effect of ionomer distribution across catalyst layer was studied by comparing profiles of oxygen level, reaction rate and overpotential, as well as corresponding polarization curves.

  11. Temporal and spatial changes in mixed layer properties and atmospheric net heat flux in the Nordic Seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A; Alekseev, G; Korablev, A; Esau, I

    2010-01-01

    The Nordic Seas are an important area of the World Ocean where warm Atlantic waters penetrate far north forming the mild climate of Northern Europe. These waters represent the northern rim of the global thermohaline circulation. Estimates of the relationships between the net heat flux and mixed layer properties in the Nordic Seas are examined. Oceanographic data are derived from the Oceanographic Data Base (ODB) compiled in the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. Ocean weather ship 'Mike' (OWS) data are used to calculate radiative and turbulent components of the net heat flux. The net shortwave flux was calculated using a satellite albedo dataset and the EPA model. The net longwave flux was estimated by Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) method. Turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface were calculated using the COARE 3.0 algorithm. The net heat flux was calculated by using oceanographic and meteorological data of the OWS 'Mike'. The mixed layer depth was estimated for the period since 2002 until 2009 by the 'Mike' data as well. A good correlation between these two parameters has been found. Sensible and latent heat fluxes controlled by surface air temperature/sea surface temperature gradient are the main contributors into net heat flux. Significant correlation was found between heat fluxes variations at the OWS 'Mike' location and sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean.

  12. Temporal and spatial changes in mixed layer properties and atmospheric net heat flux in the Nordic Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A; Alekseev, G [SI ' Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Korablev, A; Esau, I, E-mail: avsmir@aari.nw.r [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    The Nordic Seas are an important area of the World Ocean where warm Atlantic waters penetrate far north forming the mild climate of Northern Europe. These waters represent the northern rim of the global thermohaline circulation. Estimates of the relationships between the net heat flux and mixed layer properties in the Nordic Seas are examined. Oceanographic data are derived from the Oceanographic Data Base (ODB) compiled in the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. Ocean weather ship 'Mike' (OWS) data are used to calculate radiative and turbulent components of the net heat flux. The net shortwave flux was calculated using a satellite albedo dataset and the EPA model. The net longwave flux was estimated by Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) method. Turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface were calculated using the COARE 3.0 algorithm. The net heat flux was calculated by using oceanographic and meteorological data of the OWS 'Mike'. The mixed layer depth was estimated for the period since 2002 until 2009 by the 'Mike' data as well. A good correlation between these two parameters has been found. Sensible and latent heat fluxes controlled by surface air temperature/sea surface temperature gradient are the main contributors into net heat flux. Significant correlation was found between heat fluxes variations at the OWS 'Mike' location and sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean.

  13. Ammonia in the summertime Arctic marine boundary layer: sources, sinks, and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Wentworth

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuous hourly measurements of gas-phase ammonia (NH3(g were taken from 13 July to 7 August 2014 on a research cruise throughout Baffin Bay and the eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Concentrations ranged from 30 to 650 ng m−3 (40–870 pptv with the highest values recorded in Lancaster Sound (74°13′ N, 84°00′ W. Simultaneous measurements of total ammonium ([NHx], pH and temperature in the ocean and in melt ponds were used to compute the compensation point (χ, which is the ambient NH3(g concentration at which surface–air fluxes change direction. Ambient NH3(g was usually several orders of magnitude larger than both χocean and χMP (< 0.4–10 ng m3 indicating these surface pools are net sinks of NH3. Flux calculations estimate average net downward fluxes of 1.4 and 1.1 ng m−2 s−1 for the open ocean and melt ponds, respectively. Sufficient NH3(g was present to neutralize non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO42− in the boundary layer during most of the study. This finding was corroborated with a historical data set of PM2.5 composition from Alert, Nunavut (82°30′ N, 62°20′ W wherein the median ratio of NH4+/nss-SO42− equivalents was greater than 0.75 in June, July and August. The GEOS-Chem chemical transport model was employed to examine the impact of NH3(g emissions from seabird guano on boundary-layer composition and nss-SO42− neutralization. A GEOS-Chem simulation without seabird emissions underestimated boundary layer NH3(g by several orders of magnitude and yielded highly acidic aerosol. A simulation that included seabird NH3 emissions was in better agreement with observations for both NH3(g concentrations and nss-SO42− neutralization. This is strong evidence that seabird colonies are significant sources of NH3 in the summertime Arctic, and are ubiquitous enough to impact atmospheric composition across the entire Baffin Bay region. Large wildfires in the Northwest Territories were likely

  14. Phase transformations in nickel-aluminum alloys during ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eridon, J.; Rehn, L.; Was, G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of ion beam mixing of nickel-aluminum alloys with 500 keV krypton ions has been investigated over a range of temperature, composition, ion dose, and post-irradiation thermal treatments. Samples were formed by alternate evaporation of layers of aluminum and nickel. A portion of these samples was subsequently annealed to form intermetallic compounds. Irradiations were performed at both room temperature and 80 0 K using the 2MV ion accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. Phase transformations were observed during both in situ irradiations in the High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM) at Argonne, and also in subsequent analysis of an array of irradiated samples. Electron diffraction indicates the presence of metastable crystalline structures not present in the conventional nickel-aluminum phase diagram. Transformations occur at doses as low as 5 x 10 14 cm -2 and continue to develop as the irradiation progresses up to 2 x 10 16 cm -2 . Layer mixing is followed through Rutherford Backscattering analysis. Samples are also checked with x-rays and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). A thermodynamic argument is presented to explain the phase transformations in terms of movements on a free energy diagram. This analysis explains the interesting paradox concerning the radiation hardness of the NiAl phase and the amorphous structure of mixed Ni-50% Al layers

  15. Three layer model analysis on two-phase critical flow through a converging nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochi, J.; Ayukawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    A three layer model is proposed for a two-phase critical flow through a converging nozzle in this paper. Most previous analyses of the two phase flow have been based on a homogeneous or a separated flow model as the conservation equations. These results were found to have large deviations from the actual measurements for two phase critical flows. The presented model is based on the assumption that a flow consists of three layers with a mixing region between gas and liquid phase layers. The effect of gas and liquid fraction occupied in the mixing layer was made clear from the numerical results. The measurements of the critical flow rate and the pressure profiles through a converging nozzle were made with air-water flow. The calculated results of these models are discussed in comparison with the experimental data for the flow rates and the pressure distributions under critical conditions

  16. Transient effects in unstable ablation fronts and mixing layers in HEDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarisse, J-M; Gauthier, S; Dastugue, L; Vallet, A; Schneider, N

    2016-01-01

    We report results obtained for two elementary unstable flow configurations relevant to high energy density physics: the ablation front instability and the Rayleigh–Taylor -instability induced mixing layer. These two flows are characterized by a transience of their perturbation dynamics. In the ablative flow case, this perturbation dynamics transience takes the form of finite-durations of successive linear-perturbation evolution phases until reaching regimes of decaying oscillations. This behaviour is observed in various regimes: weakly or strongly accelerated ablation fronts, irradiation asymmetries or initial external-surface defects, and is a result of the mean-flow unsteadiness and stretching. In the case of the Rayleigh–Taylor-instability induced mixing layer, perturbation dynamics transience manifests itself through the extinction of turbulence and mixing as the flow reaches a stable state made of two stably stratified layers of pure fluids separated by an unstratified mixing layer. A second feature, also due to compressibility, takes the form of an intense acoustic wave production, mainly localized in the heavy fluid. Finally, we point out that a systematic short-term linear-perturbation dynamics analysis should be undertaken within the framework of non-normal stability theory. (paper)

  17. Stability of mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Krothapalli, A

    1993-01-01

    The research program for the first year of this project (see the original research proposal) consists of developing an explicit marching scheme for solving the parabolized stability equations (PSE). Performing mathematical analysis of the computational algorithm including numerical stability analysis and the determination of the proper boundary conditions needed at the boundary of the computation domain are implicit in the task. Before one can solve the parabolized stability equations for high-speed mixing layers, the mean flow must first be found. In the past, instability analysis of high-speed mixing layer has mostly been performed on mean flow profiles calculated by the boundary layer equations. In carrying out this project, it is believed that the boundary layer equations might not give an accurate enough nonparallel, nonlinear mean flow needed for parabolized stability analysis. A more accurate mean flow can, however, be found by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is that its accuracy is consistent with the PSE method. Furthermore, the method of solution is similar. Hence, the major part of the effort of the work of this year has been devoted to the development of an explicit numerical marching scheme for the solution of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equation as applied to the high-seed mixing layer problem.

  18. Secondary sulfate is internally mixed with sea spray aerosol and organic aerosol in the winter Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpes, Rachel M.; Bondy, Amy L.; Bonanno, Daniel; Moffet, Ryan C.; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Ault, Andrew P.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2018-03-01

    Few measurements of aerosol chemical composition have been made during the winter-spring transition (following polar sunrise) to constrain Arctic aerosol-cloud-climate feedbacks. Herein, we report the first measurements of individual particle chemical composition near Utqiaġvik (Barrow), Alaska, in winter (seven sample days in January and February 2014). Individual particles were analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX, 24 847 particles), Raman microspectroscopy (300 particles), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS, 290 particles). Sea spray aerosol (SSA) was observed in all samples, with fresh and aged SSA comprising 99 %, by number, of 2.5-7.5 µm diameter particles, 65-95 % from 0.5-2.5 µm, and 50-60 % from 0.1-0.5 µm, indicating SSA is the dominant contributor to accumulation and coarse-mode aerosol during the winter. The aged SSA particles were characterized by reduced chlorine content with 94 %, by number, internally mixed with secondary sulfate (39 %, by number, internally mixed with both nitrate and sulfate), indicative of multiphase aging reactions during transport. There was a large number fraction (40 % of 1.0-4.0 µm diameter particles) of aged SSA during periods when particles were transported from near Prudhoe Bay, consistent with pollutant emissions from the oil fields participating in atmospheric processing of aerosol particles. Organic carbon and sulfate particles were observed in all samples and comprised 40-50 %, by number, of 0.1-0.4 µm diameter particles, indicative of Arctic haze influence. Soot was internally mixed with organic and sulfate components. All sulfate was mixed with organic carbon or SSA particles. Therefore, aerosol sources in the Alaskan Arctic and resulting aerosol chemical mixing states need to be considered when predicting aerosol climate effects, particularly cloud

  19. Multi-Layer E-Textile Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lucy E.; Bibeau, Kaila; Mulligan, Lucie; Frith, Ashton; Simon, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Stitched e-textile circuits facilitate wearable, flexible, comfortable wearable technology. However, while stitched methods of e-textile circuits are common, multi-layer circuit creation remains a challenge. Here, we present methods of stitched multi-layer circuit creation using accessible tools and techniques.

  20. Renormalization group study of the multi-layer sine-gordon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandori, I.

    2005-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. We analyze the phase structure of the system of coupled sine-Gordon (SG) type field theoric models. The 'pure,' SG model is periodic in the internal space spanned by the field variable. The central subjects of investigation is the multi-layer sine-Gordon (LSG) model, where the periodicity is broken partially by the coupling terms between the layers each of which is described by a scalar field, where the second term on the r.h.s. describes the interaction of the layers. Here, we dis- cuss the generalization of the results obtained for the two-layer sine-Gordon model found in the previous study. Besides the obvious field theoretical interest, the LSG model has been used to describe the vortex properties of high transition temperature superconductors, and the extension of the previous analysis to a general N-layer model is necessary for a description of the critical behaviour of vortices in realistic multi-layer systems. The couplings between the layers can be considered as mass terms. Since the periodicity of the LSG model has been broken only partially, the N-layer model has always a single zero mass eigenvalue. The presence of this single zero mass eigenvalue is found to be decisive with respect to the phase structure of the N-layer models. By a suitable rotation of the field variables, we identify the periodic mode (which corresponds to the zero mass eigenvalue) and N - 1 non-periodic modes (with explicit mass terms). The N - 1 non-periodic modes have a trivial IR scaling which holds independently of β which has been proven consistently using (i) the non-perturbative renormalization group study of the rotated model, (ii) the Gaussian integration about the vanishing-field saddle point. Due to the presence of the periodic mode the model undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless type phase transition which occurs at a coupling parameter β c 2 = 8Nπ, where N is the number of layers. The critical value β c 2 corresponds to the critical

  1. Geometrical nonlinear free vibration of multi-layered graphene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinbao; He Xiaoqiao; Kitipornchai, S; Zhang Hongwu

    2011-01-01

    A nonlinear continuum model is developed for the nonlinear vibration analysis of multi-layered graphene sheets (MLGSs), in which the nonlinear van der Waals (vdW) interaction between any two layers is formulated explicitly. The nonlinear equations of motion are studied by the harmonic-balance methods. Based on the present model, the nonlinear stiffened amplitude-frequency relations of double-layered graphene sheets (DLGSs) are investigated in the spectral neighbourhood of lower frequencies. The influence of the vdW interaction on the vibration properties of DLGSs is well illustrated by plotting the resulting modes' shapes, in which in-phase and anti-phase vibrations of DLGSs are studied. In particular, the large-amplitude vibration which associates with the anti-phase resonant frequencies, separating DLGS into single-layered GSs, is a promising application that needs to be explored further. In contrast, the vibration modes that are associated with the resonant frequencies are nonidentical and give various vibration patterns, which indicates that MLGSs are highly suited to being used as high-frequency resonators.

  2. Vertical distribution of microphysical properties of Arctic springtime low-level mixed-phase clouds over the Greenland and Norwegian seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioche, Guillaume; Jourdan, Olivier; Delanoë, Julien; Gourbeyre, Christophe; Febvre, Guy; Dupuy, Régis; Monier, Marie; Szczap, Frédéric; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Gayet, Jean-François

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to characterize the microphysical and optical properties of ice crystals and supercooled liquid droplets within low-level Arctic mixed-phase clouds (MPCs). We compiled and analyzed cloud in situ measurements from four airborne spring campaigns (representing 18 flights and 71 vertical profiles in MPCs) over the Greenland and Norwegian seas mainly in the vicinity of the Svalbard archipelago. Cloud phase discrimination and representative vertical profiles of the number, size, mass and shape of ice crystals and liquid droplets are established. The results show that the liquid phase dominates the upper part of the MPCs. High concentrations (120 cm-3 on average) of small droplets (mean values of 15 µm), with an averaged liquid water content (LWC) of 0.2 g m-3 are measured at cloud top. The ice phase dominates the microphysical properties in the lower part of the cloud and beneath it in the precipitation region (mean values of 100 µm, 3 L-1 and 0.025 g m-3 for diameter, particle concentration and ice water content (IWC), respectively). The analysis of the ice crystal morphology shows that the majority of ice particles are irregularly shaped or rimed particles; the prevailing regular habits found are stellars and plates. We hypothesize that riming and diffusional growth processes, including the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) mechanism, are the main growth mechanisms involved in the observed MPCs. The impact of larger-scale meteorological conditions on the vertical profiles of MPC properties was also investigated. Large values of LWC and high concentration of smaller droplets are possibly linked to polluted situations and air mass origins from the south, which can lead to very low values of ice crystal size and IWC. On the contrary, clean situations with low temperatures exhibit larger values of ice crystal size and IWC. Several parameterizations relevant for remote sensing or modeling studies are also determined, such as IWC (and LWC) - extinction

  3. Vertical distribution of microphysical properties of Arctic springtime low-level mixed-phase clouds over the Greenland and Norwegian seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mioche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to characterize the microphysical and optical properties of ice crystals and supercooled liquid droplets within low-level Arctic mixed-phase clouds (MPCs. We compiled and analyzed cloud in situ measurements from four airborne spring campaigns (representing 18 flights and 71 vertical profiles in MPCs over the Greenland and Norwegian seas mainly in the vicinity of the Svalbard archipelago. Cloud phase discrimination and representative vertical profiles of the number, size, mass and shape of ice crystals and liquid droplets are established. The results show that the liquid phase dominates the upper part of the MPCs. High concentrations (120 cm−3 on average of small droplets (mean values of 15 µm, with an averaged liquid water content (LWC of 0.2 g m−3 are measured at cloud top. The ice phase dominates the microphysical properties in the lower part of the cloud and beneath it in the precipitation region (mean values of 100 µm, 3 L−1 and 0.025 g m−3 for diameter, particle concentration and ice water content (IWC, respectively. The analysis of the ice crystal morphology shows that the majority of ice particles are irregularly shaped or rimed particles; the prevailing regular habits found are stellars and plates. We hypothesize that riming and diffusional growth processes, including the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen (WBF mechanism, are the main growth mechanisms involved in the observed MPCs. The impact of larger-scale meteorological conditions on the vertical profiles of MPC properties was also investigated. Large values of LWC and high concentration of smaller droplets are possibly linked to polluted situations and air mass origins from the south, which can lead to very low values of ice crystal size and IWC. On the contrary, clean situations with low temperatures exhibit larger values of ice crystal size and IWC. Several parameterizations relevant for remote sensing or modeling studies are also determined

  4. Lagrangian mixed layer modeling of the western equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Toshiaki; Lukas, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Processes that control the upper ocean thermohaline structure in the western equatorial Pacific are examined using a Lagrangian mixed layer model. The one-dimensional bulk mixed layer model of Garwood (1977) is integrated along the trajectories derived from a nonlinear 1 1/2 layer reduced gravity model forced with actual wind fields. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data are used to estimate surface freshwater fluxes for the mixed layer model. The wind stress data which forced the 1 1/2 layer model are used for the mixed layer model. The model was run for the period 1987-1988. This simple model is able to simulate the isothermal layer below the mixed layer in the western Pacific warm pool and its variation. The subduction mechanism hypothesized by Lukas and Lindstrom (1991) is evident in the model results. During periods of strong South Equatorial Current, the warm and salty mixed layer waters in the central Pacific are subducted below the fresh shallow mixed layer in the western Pacific. However, this subduction mechanism is not evident when upwelling Rossby waves reach the western equatorial Pacific or when a prominent deepening of the mixed layer occurs in the western equatorial Pacific or when a prominent deepening of the mixed layer occurs in the western equatorial Pacific due to episodes of strong wind and light precipitation associated with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Comparison of the results between the Lagrangian mixed layer model and a locally forced Eulerian mixed layer model indicated that horizontal advection of salty waters from the central Pacific strongly affects the upper ocean salinity variation in the western Pacific, and that this advection is necessary to maintain the upper ocean thermohaline structure in this region.

  5. Double layer mixed matrix membrane adsorbers improving capacity and safety hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiful; Borneman, Z.; Wessling, M.

    2018-05-01

    Double layer mixed matrix membranes adsorbers have been developed for blood toxin removal by embedding activated carbon into cellulose acetate macroporous membranes. The membranes are prepared by phase inversion method via water vapor induced phase separation followed by an immersion precipitation step. Double layer MMM consisting of an active support and a separating layer. The active support layer consists of activated carbon particles embedded in macroporous cellulose acetate; the separating layer consists of particle free cellulose acetate. The double layer membrane possess an open and interconnected macroporous structure with a high loading of activated carbon available for blood toxins removal. The MMM AC has a swelling degree of 6.5 %, porosity of 53 % and clean water flux of 800 Lm-2h-1bar-1. The prepared membranes show a high dynamic Creatinine (Crt) removal during hemodilysis process. The Crt removal by adsorption contributes to amore than 83 % of the total removal. The double layer adsorptive membrane proves hemodialysis membrane can integrated with adsorption, in which blood toxins are removed in one step.

  6. Multi-Layer 5G Mobile Phone Antenna for Multi-User MIMO Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojaroudiparchin, Naser; Shen, Ming; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2015-01-01

    for 5G wireless communications. Two identical linear sub arrays can be simultaneously used at different sides of the mobile-phone printed circuit board (PCB) for operation in diversity or multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) modes. Each sub array contains eight elements of very compact off......-center dipole antennas with dimensions of 5.4×0.67 mm2. The feature of compact design with good beam-steering function makes them well-suited to integrate into the mobile-phone mock-up. The fundamental properties of the proposed antenna have been investigated. Simulations show that the proposed 5G antenna......In this study, a new design of multi-layer phased array antenna for millimeter-wave (mm-Wave) fifth generation (5G) mobile terminals is proposed. The proposed linear phased array antenna is designed on four layers of the Rogers RT5880 substrates to operate at 28 GHz which is under consideration...

  7. Variability of the Mixed-Layer Height Over Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Franco, J. L.; Stremme, W.; Bezanilla, A.; Ruiz-Angulo, A.; Grutter, M.

    2018-02-01

    The diurnal and seasonal variability of the mixed-layer height in urban areas has implications for ground-level air pollution and the meteorological conditions. Measurements of the backscatter of light pulses with a commercial lidar system were performed for a continuous period of almost six years between 2011 and 2016 in the southern part of Mexico City. The profiles were temporally and vertically smoothed, clouds were filtered out, and the mixed-layer height was determined with an ad hoc treatment of both the filtered and unfiltered profiles. The results are in agreement when compared with values of mixed-layer height reconstructed from, (i) radiosonde data, and (ii) surface and vertical column densities of a trace gas. The daily maxima of the mean mixed-layer height reach values > 3 km above ground level in the months of March-April, and are clearly lower (pollution episodes and the height of the mixed layer. The growth rate of the convective mixed-layer height has a seasonal behaviour, which is characterized together with the mixed-layer-height anomalies. A clear residual layer is evident from the backscattered signals recorded in days with specific atmospheric conditions, but also from the cloud-filtered mean diurnal profiles. The occasional presence of a residual layer results in an overestimation of the reported mixed-layer height during the night and early morning hours.

  8. Mixing in straight shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasso, P. S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements were performed in a liquid plane mixing layer to extract the probability density function (pdf) of the mixture fraction of a passive scalar across the layer. Three Reynolds number (Re) cases were studied, 10,000, 33,000 and 90,000, with Re based on velocity difference and visual thickness. The results show that a non-marching pdf (central hump invariant from edge to edge of the layer) exists for Re = 10,000 but that a marching type pdf characterizes the Re = 33,000 and Re = 90,000 cases. For all cases, a broad range of mixture fraction values is found at each location across the layer. Streamwise and spanwise ramps across the layer, and structure-to-structure variation were observed and are believed to be responsible for the above behavior of the composition field. Tripping the boundary layer on the high-speed side of the splitter plate for each of the above three cases resulted in increased three-dimensionality and a change in the composition field. Average and average mixed fluid compositions are reported for all cases.

  9. Liquid-liquid phase separation in internally mixed magnesium sulfate/glutaric acid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng-Min; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Ge, Mao-Fa

    2018-04-01

    The confocal Raman microscopy is utilized to investigate the liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) of mixed magnesium sulfate/glutaric acid (MgSO4/GA) droplets deposited on a hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrate and a hydrophilic quartz substrate. Raman spectra collected from different regions of the mixed droplets provide detailed information of component distributions for MgSO4 and GA. During the dehydration process, the MgSO4/GA mixed particles show the initial liquid-liquid phase separation between 85% and 80% relative humidity (RH) on both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrates. For the droplets deposited on the two substrates, the inner phase of droplets is dominated by aqueous MgSO4, which is surrounded by a rich GA organic layer due to the surface tension effects. In addition, the crystallization of GA could be observed in the organic aqueous phase while it is inhibited in the inner MgSO4 phase due to the effects of gel formation of MgSO4 at low RH. The Raman spectra reveal that with decreasing RH the morphology of the mixed droplet evolves from a uniform droplet to the structure of LLPS with the GA crystallizing in the outer layer and MgSO4 gel formed in the inner phase. These findings contribute to the further understanding of the role of interactions between inorganic salts and organic acids on the morphological evolution and environmental effects of atmospheric aerosols under ambient RH conditions.

  10. Multi-layer coatings for bipolar rechargeable batteries with enhanced terminal voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Kaschmitter, James; Pierce, Steve

    2017-06-06

    A method for producing a multi-layer bipolar coated cell according to one embodiment includes applying a first active cathode material above a substrate to form a first cathode; applying a first solid-phase ionically-conductive electrolyte material above the first cathode to form a first electrode separation layer; applying a first active anode material above the first electrode separation layer to form a first anode; applying an electrically conductive barrier layer above the first anode; applying a second active cathode material above the anode material to form a second cathode; applying a second solid-phase ionically-conductive electrolyte material above the second cathode to form a second electrode separation layer; applying a second active anode material above the second electrode separation layer to form a second anode; and applying a metal material above the second anode to form a metal coating section. In another embodiment, the anode is formed prior to the cathode. Cells are also disclosed.

  11. Mechanisms causing reduced Arctic sea ice loss in a coupled climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. West

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The fully coupled climate model HadGEM1 produces one of the most accurate simulations of the historical record of Arctic sea ice seen in the IPCC AR4 multi-model ensemble. In this study, we examine projections of sea ice decline out to 2030, produced by two ensembles of HadGEM1 with natural and anthropogenic forcings included. These ensembles project a significant slowing of the rate of ice loss to occur after 2010, with some integrations even simulating a small increase in ice area. We use an energy budget of the Arctic to examine the causes of this slowdown. A negative feedback effect by which rapid reductions in ice thickness north of Greenland reduce ice export is found to play a major role. A slight reduction in ocean-to-ice heat flux in the relevant period, caused by changes in the meridional overturning circulation (MOC and subpolar gyre in some integrations, as well as freshening of the mixed layer driven by causes other than ice melt, is also found to play a part. Finally, we assess the likelihood of a slowdown occurring in the real world due to these causes.

  12. Controlled meteorological (CMET free balloon profiling of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer around Spitsbergen compared to ERA-Interim and Arctic System Reanalyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Roberts

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations from CMET (Controlled Meteorological balloons are analysed to provide insights into tropospheric meteorological conditions (temperature, humidity, wind around Svalbard, European High Arctic. Five Controlled Meteorological (CMET balloons were launched from Ny-Ålesund in Svalbard (Spitsbergen over 5–12 May 2011 and measured vertical atmospheric profiles over coastal areas to both the east and west. One notable CMET flight achieved a suite of 18 continuous soundings that probed the Arctic marine boundary layer (ABL over a period of more than 10 h. Profiles from two CMET flights are compared to model output from ECMWF Era-Interim reanalysis (ERA-I and to a high-resolution (15 km Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR product. To the east of Svalbard over sea ice, the CMET observed a stable ABL profile with a temperature inversion that was reproduced by ASR but not captured by ERA-I. In a coastal ice-free region to the west of Svalbard, the CMET observed a stable ABL with strong wind shear. The CMET profiles document increases in ABL temperature and humidity that are broadly reproduced by both ASR and ERA-I. The ASR finds a more stably stratified ABL than observed but captured the wind shear in contrast to ERA-I. Detailed analysis of the coastal CMET-automated soundings identifies small-scale temperature and humidity variations with a low-level flow and provides an estimate of local wind fields. We demonstrate that CMET balloons are a valuable approach for profiling the free atmosphere and boundary layer in remote regions such as the Arctic, where few other in situ observations are available for model validation.

  13. A robust multi-frequency mixing algorithm for suppression of rivet signal in GMR inspection of riveted structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdernejad, Morteza S.; Karpenko, Oleksii; Ye, Chaofeng; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish

    2016-02-01

    The advent of Giant Magneto-Resistive (GMR) technology permits development of novel highly sensitive array probes for Eddy Current (EC) inspection of multi-layer riveted structures. Multi-frequency GMR measurements with different EC pene-tration depths show promise for detection of bottom layer notches at fastener sites. However, the distortion of the induced magnetic field due to flaws is dominated by the strong fastener signal, which makes defect detection and classification a challenging prob-lem. This issue is more pronounced for ferromagnetic fasteners that concentrate most of the magnetic flux. In the present work, a novel multi-frequency mixing algorithm is proposed to suppress rivet signal response and enhance defect detection capability of the GMR array probe. The algorithm is baseline-free and does not require any assumptions about the sample geometry being inspected. Fastener signal suppression is based upon the random sample consensus (RANSAC) method, which iteratively estimates parameters of a mathematical model from a set of observed data with outliers. Bottom layer defects at fastener site are simulated as EDM notches of different length. Performance of the proposed multi-frequency mixing approach is evaluated on finite element data and experimental GMR measurements obtained with unidirectional planar current excitation. Initial results are promising demonstrating the feasibility of the approach.

  14. Eulerian and Lagrangian Parameterization of the Oceanic Mixed Layer using Large Eddy Simulation and MPAS-Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Roekel, Luke [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-30

    We have conducted a suite of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to form the basis of a multi-model comparison (left). The results have led to proposed model improvements. We have verified that Eulerian-Lagrangian effective diffusivity estimates of mesoscale mixing are consistent with traditional particle statistics metrics (right). LES and Lagrangian particles will be utilized to better represent the movement of water into and out of the mixed layer.

  15. Observed aerosol suppression of cloud ice in low-level Arctic mixed-phase clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Norgren, Matthew S.; Boer, Gijs; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2018-01-01

    The interactions that occur between aerosols and a mixed-phase cloud system, and the subsequent alteration of the microphysical state of such clouds, is a problem that has yet to be well constrained. Advancing our understanding of aerosol-ice processes is necessary to determine the impact of natural and anthropogenic emissions on Earth’s climate and to improve our capability to predict future climate states. This paper deals specifically with how aerosols influence ice mass production in low-...

  16. Variability of the Mixed-Layer Height Over Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Franco, J. L.; Stremme, W.; Bezanilla, A.; Ruiz-Angulo, A.; Grutter, M.

    2018-06-01

    The diurnal and seasonal variability of the mixed-layer height in urban areas has implications for ground-level air pollution and the meteorological conditions. Measurements of the backscatter of light pulses with a commercial lidar system were performed for a continuous period of almost six years between 2011 and 2016 in the southern part of Mexico City. The profiles were temporally and vertically smoothed, clouds were filtered out, and the mixed-layer height was determined with an ad hoc treatment of both the filtered and unfiltered profiles. The results are in agreement when compared with values of mixed-layer height reconstructed from, (i) radiosonde data, and (ii) surface and vertical column densities of a trace gas. The daily maxima of the mean mixed-layer height reach values > 3 km above ground level in the months of March-April, and are clearly lower (behaviour, which is characterized together with the mixed-layer-height anomalies. A clear residual layer is evident from the backscattered signals recorded in days with specific atmospheric conditions, but also from the cloud-filtered mean diurnal profiles. The occasional presence of a residual layer results in an overestimation of the reported mixed-layer height during the night and early morning hours.

  17. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  18. Development of an Efficient Meso- scale Multi-phase Flow Solver in Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taehun [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2015-10-20

    The proposed research aims at formulating a predictive high-order Lattice Boltzmann Equation for multi-phase flows relevant to nuclear energy related application - namely, saturated and sub-cooled boiling in reactors, and liquid- liquid mixing and extraction for fuel cycle separation. An efficient flow solver will be developed based on the Finite Element based Lattice Boltzmann Method (FE- LBM), accounting for phase-change heat transfer and capable of treating multiple phases over length scales from the submicron to the meter. A thermal LBM will be developed in order to handle adjustable Prandtl number, arbitrary specific heat ratio, a wide range of temperature variations, better numerical stability during liquid-vapor phase change, and full thermo-hydrodynamic consistency. Two-phase FE-LBM will be extended to liquid–liquid–gas multi-phase flows for application to high-fidelity simulations building up from the meso-scale up to the equipment sub-component scale. While several relevant applications exist, the initial applications for demonstration of the efficient methods to be developed as part of this project include numerical investigations of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomena in nuclear reactor fuel bundles, and liquid-liquid mixing and interfacial area generation for liquid-liquid separations. In addition, targeted experiments will be conducted for validation of this advanced multi-phase model.

  19. Implications of fractured Arctic perennial ice cover on thermodynamic and dynamic sea ice processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplin, Matthew G.; Scharien, Randall; Else, Brent; Howell, Stephen; Barber, David G.; Papakyriakou, Tim; Prinsenberg, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Decline of the Arctic summer minimum sea ice extent is characterized by large expanses of open water in the Siberian, Laptev, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas, and introduces large fetch distances in the Arctic Ocean. Long waves can propagate deep into the pack ice, thereby causing flexural swell and failure of the sea ice. This process shifts the floe size diameter distribution smaller, increases floe surface area, and thereby affects sea ice dynamic and thermodynamic processes. The results of Radarsat-2 imagery analysis show that a flexural fracture event which occurred in the Beaufort Sea region on 6 September 2009 affected ˜40,000 km2. Open water fractional area in the area affected initially decreased from 3.7% to 2.7%, but later increased to ˜20% following wind-forced divergence of the ice pack. Energy available for lateral melting was assessed by estimating the change in energy entrainment from longwave and shortwave radiation in the mixed-layer of the ocean following flexural fracture. 11.54 MJ m-2 of additional energy for lateral melting of ice floes was identified in affected areas. The impact of this process in future Arctic sea ice melt seasons was assessed using estimations of earlier occurrences of fracture during the melt season, and is discussed in context with ocean heat fluxes, atmospheric mixing of the ocean mixed layer, and declining sea ice cover. We conclude that this process is an important positive feedback to Arctic sea ice loss, and timing of initiation is critical in how it affects sea ice thermodynamic and dynamic processes.

  20. Coordinated Multi-layer Multi-domain Optical Network (COMMON) for Large-Scale Science Applications (COMMON)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokkarane, Vinod [University of Massachusetts

    2013-09-01

    We intend to implement a Coordinated Multi-layer Multi-domain Optical Network (COMMON) Framework for Large-scale Science Applications. In the COMMON project, specific problems to be addressed include 1) anycast/multicast/manycast request provisioning, 2) deployable OSCARS enhancements, 3) multi-layer, multi-domain quality of service (QoS), and 4) multi-layer, multidomain path survivability. In what follows, we outline the progress in the above categories (Year 1, 2, and 3 deliverables).

  1. Generation of layering in the upper arctic troposphere away from the jet stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karpetchko

    Full Text Available Ozone sounding databases for two stations, So-dankylä (67° N, 27° E and Ny-Ålesund (79° N, 12° E were used in order to investigate the generation of layering in the upper and middle troposphere of the Arctic. We concentrated on dry, ozone-rich and stable layers observed below the thermal tropopause under light wind conditions. This condition ensures that the observed layer is not a tropopause fold, a well-known phenomenon that develops within frontal zones near the jet stream. Selection criteria for ozone, humidity and stability anomalies of the tropopause fold detection algorithm were used here to pick out for detailed studies the most pronounced examples of laminae. For all these cases the meteorological situations were investigated in order to establish the origin of the observed layers. We found that layers could be classified into two groups. Laminae of the first group were observed equatorward of the jet stream and those of a second group were observed poleward of the jet. The meteorological situation for the first group resembles that for equatorward stratospheric streamer propagation. It was found that this group accounts for only a small fraction of the layers observed at Sodankylä and for none of those observed at Ny-Ålesund during the period investigated. A large case-to-case variability in the synoptic situation was observed for the second group of laminae, which were detected northward of the jet stream. Nevertheless, in about half of the cases, streamers of tropospheric air were found in the vicinity of the stations on the isentropic surfaces just above the detected stratospheric layers. Back trajectory analyses showed that these layers originated in the vicinity of the polar jet stream. We suppose that laminae-like structures in the troposphere were caused, in both groups, by equatorward (poleward advection of the stratospheric (tropospheric air, together with differential vertical shear. Forward-trajectory calculations

  2. Generation of layering in the upper arctic troposphere away from the jet stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karpetchko

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Ozone sounding databases for two stations, So-dankylä (67° N, 27° E and Ny-Ålesund (79° N, 12° E were used in order to investigate the generation of layering in the upper and middle troposphere of the Arctic. We concentrated on dry, ozone-rich and stable layers observed below the thermal tropopause under light wind conditions. This condition ensures that the observed layer is not a tropopause fold, a well-known phenomenon that develops within frontal zones near the jet stream. Selection criteria for ozone, humidity and stability anomalies of the tropopause fold detection algorithm were used here to pick out for detailed studies the most pronounced examples of laminae. For all these cases the meteorological situations were investigated in order to establish the origin of the observed layers. We found that layers could be classified into two groups. Laminae of the first group were observed equatorward of the jet stream and those of a second group were observed poleward of the jet. The meteorological situation for the first group resembles that for equatorward stratospheric streamer propagation. It was found that this group accounts for only a small fraction of the layers observed at Sodankylä and for none of those observed at Ny-Ålesund during the period investigated. A large case-to-case variability in the synoptic situation was observed for the second group of laminae, which were detected northward of the jet stream. Nevertheless, in about half of the cases, streamers of tropospheric air were found in the vicinity of the stations on the isentropic surfaces just above the detected stratospheric layers. Back trajectory analyses showed that these layers originated in the vicinity of the polar jet stream. We suppose that laminae-like structures in the troposphere were caused, in both groups, by equatorward (poleward advection of the stratospheric (tropospheric air, together with differential vertical shear. Forward-trajectory calculations

  3. Industrial applications of multi-functional, multi-phase reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, G.J.; Chewter, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    To reveal trends in the design and operation of multi-functional, multi-phase reactors, this paper describes, in historical sequence, three industrial applications of multi-functional, multi-phase reactors developed and operated by Shell Chemicals during the last five decades. For each case, we

  4. Thermotropic phase transitions of catanionic dodecylsulfates with multi-charged and multi-tailed quaternary ammonium centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihelj, Tea, E-mail: tmihelj@irb.hr [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Department of Physical Chemistry, Laboratory for Synthesis and Processes of Self-assembling of Organic Molecules, Bijenička c. 54, P.O. Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Popović, Jasminka [Division for Materials Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, POB 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Skoko, Željko [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenička cesta 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Tomašić, Vlasta, E-mail: vlastom@irb.hr [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Department of Physical Chemistry, Laboratory for Synthesis and Processes of Self-assembling of Organic Molecules, Bijenička c. 54, P.O. Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-09-10

    Highlights: • Thermal behavior of quaternary ammonium n-dodecylsulfates is characterized. • Typical layered structure dominates in all examined compounds at room temperature. • The dimeric didodecylsulfate crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/m. • Thermotropic phases formation characteristic for multi-tailed n-dodecylsulfates. • Multi-charged n-dodecylsulfates are soft crystals at higher temperatures. - Abstract: Five novel anhydrous catanionic dodecylsulfates containing multi-charged and multi-tailed quaternary ammonium centers were synthesized and examined with light microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction. This study is an attempt to explain the relationship between chemical structure, molecular architecture, phase transition characteristics and thermodynamics and the nature of intermolecular interactions of the individual amphiphiles that ultimately lead to different mesomorphic product. All examined compounds are of typical layered structure at room temperature. The long spacing decreases linearly with the increase of either ionic head or n-dodecyl chain number. The thermal analysis of the examined multi-charged catanionics indicates thermotropic mesomorphism, whereas multi-tailed dodecylsulfates show only properties of soft crystals. Maltese crosses, oily streaks textures, stepped drops and fan-shaped textures affirmed the existence of various smectic mesophases at room and higher temperatures. Thermodynamically the most ordered compound is dimeric didodecylsulfate, and the most disordered is three-tailed dodecylsulfate. The addition of the new quaternary ammonium center or alkyl chain causes the increment of the lattice energy first, and it decreases by further changes in the structure. The temperatures of crystallization decrease by any mentioned addition.

  5. The Drivers of the CH4 Seasonal Cycle in the Arctic and What Long-Term Observations of CH4 Imply About Trends in Arctic CH4 Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Bruhwiler, L.; Miller, J. B.; Wofsy, S. C.; Miller, C. E.; Chang, R. Y.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Daube, B.; Pittman, J. V.; Dinardo, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    The large seasonal change in the atmospheric column for CH4 in the Arctic is driven by two dominant processes: transport of CH4 from low latitudes and surface emissions throughout the Arctic region. The NOAA ESRL Carbon Cycle Group Aircraft Program along with the NASA funded Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) have initiated an effort to better understand the factors controlling the seasonal changes in the mole fraction of CH4 in the Arctic with a multi-scale aircraft observing network in Alaska. The backbone of this network is multi-species flask sampling from 500 to 8000 masl that has been conducted every two weeks for the last 10 years over Poker Flat, AK. In addition regular profiles at the interior Alaska site at Poker Flat, NOAA has teamed up with the United States Coast Guard to make profiling flights with continuous observations of CO2, CO, CH4 and Ozone between Kodiak and Barrow every 2 weeks. More recently, CARVE has significantly added to this observational network with targeted flights focused on exploring the variability of CO2, CH4 and CO in the boundary layer both in the interior and the North Slope regions of Alaska. Taken together with the profiling of HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO), ground sites at Barrow and a new CARVE interior Alaska surface site just north of Fairbanks, AK, we now have the ability to investigate the full evolution of the seasonal cycle in the Arctic using both the multi-scale sampling offered by the different aircraft platforms as well as the multi-species sampling offered by in-situ and flask sampling. The flasks also provide a valuable tie-point between different platforms so that spatial and temporal gradients can be properly interpreted. In the context of the seasonal cycle observed by the aircraft platforms we will look at long term ground observations over the last 20 years to assess changes in Arctic CH4 emissions which have occurred as a result of 0.6C/decade changes in mean surface

  6. The salinity effect in a mixed layer ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A model of the thermally mixed layer in the upper ocean as developed by Kraus and Turner and extended by Denman is further extended to investigate the effects of salinity. In the tropical and subtropical Atlantic Ocean rapid increases in salinity occur at the bottom of a uniformly mixed surface layer. The most significant effects produced by the inclusion of salinity are the reduction of the deepening rate and the corresponding change in the heating characteristics of the mixed layer. If the net surface heating is positive, but small, salinity effects must be included to determine whether the mixed layer temperature will increase or decrease. Precipitation over tropical oceans leads to the development of a shallow stable layer accompanied by a decrease in the temperature and salinity at the sea surface.

  7. Crustal Viscosity Structure Estimated from Multi-Phase Mixing Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinevar, W. J.; Behn, M. D.; Hirth, G.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of lower crustal viscosity are typically constrained by analyses of isostatic rebound, post seismic creep, and laboratory-derived flow laws for crustal rocks and minerals. Here we follow a new approach for calculating the viscosity structure of the lower continental crust. We use Perple_X to calculate mineral assemblages for different crustal compositions. Effective viscosity is then calculated using the rheologic mixing model of Huet et al. (2014) incorporating flow laws for each mineral phase. Calculations are performed along geotherms appropriate for the Basin and Range, Tibetan Plateau, Colorado Plateau, and the San Andreas Fault. To assess the role of crustal composition on viscosity, we examined two compositional gradients extending from an upper crust with ~67 wt% SiO2 to a lower crust that is either: (i) basaltic with ~53 wt% SiO2 (Rudnick and Gao, 2003), or (ii) andesitic with ~64% SiO2 (Hacker et al., 2011). In all cases, the middle continental crust has a viscosity that is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that inferred for wet quartz, a common proxy for mid-crustal viscosities. An andesitic lower crust results in viscosities of 1020-1021 Pa-s and 1021-1022 Pa-s for hotter and colder crustal geotherms, respectively. A mafic lower crust predicts viscosities that are an order of magnitude higher for the same geotherm. In all cases, the viscosity calculated from the mixing model decreases less with depth compared to single-phase estimates. Lastly, for anhydrous conditions in which alpha quartz is stable, we find that there is a strong correlation between Vp/Vs and bulk viscosity; in contrast, little to no correlation exists for hydrous conditions.

  8. Design of multi-phase dynamic chemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chenrui; Tan, Junjun; Hsieh, Ming-Chien; Pan, Ting; Goodwin, Jay T.; Mehta, Anil K.; Grover, Martha A.; Lynn, David G.

    2017-08-01

    Template-directed polymerization reactions enable the accurate storage and processing of nature's biopolymer information. This mutualistic relationship of nucleic acids and proteins, a network known as life's central dogma, is now marvellously complex, and the progressive steps necessary for creating the initial sequence and chain-length-specific polymer templates are lost to time. Here we design and construct dynamic polymerization networks that exploit metastable prion cross-β phases. Mixed-phase environments have been used for constructing synthetic polymers, but these dynamic phases emerge naturally from the growing peptide oligomers and create environments suitable both to nucleate assembly and select for ordered templates. The resulting templates direct the amplification of a phase containing only chain-length-specific peptide-like oligomers. Such multi-phase biopolymer dynamics reveal pathways for the emergence, self-selection and amplification of chain-length- and possibly sequence-specific biopolymers.

  9. A Water Model Study on Mixing Behavior of the Two-Layered Bath in Bottom Blown Copper Smelting Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Lang; Cui, Zhixiang; Ma, Xiaodong; Jiang, Xu; Chen, Mao; Xiang, Yong; Zhao, Baojun

    2018-05-01

    The bottom-blown copper smelting furnace is a novel copper smelter developed in recent years. Many advantages of this furnace have been found, related to bath mixing behavior under its specific gas injection scheme. This study aims to use an oil-water double-phased laboratory-scale model to investigate the impact of industry-adjustable variables on bath mixing time, including lower layer thickness, gas flow rate, upper layer thickness and upper layer viscosity. Based on experimental results, an overall empirical relationship of mixing time in terms of these variables has been correlated, which provides the methodology for industry to optimize mass transfer in the furnace.

  10. Application and Limitations of GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) Data for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height Detection over the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent changes in the Arctic environment, it is important to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) properties over the Arctic Ocean, especially to explore the variability in ABL clouds (such as sensitivity and feedback to sea ice loss). For example, radiosonde and satellite observations of the Arctic ABL height (and low-cloud cover) have recently suggested a positive response to sea ice loss during October that may not occur during the melt season (June-September). Owing to its high vertical and spatiotemporal resolution, an independent ABL height detection algorithm using GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) refractivity in the Arctic is explored. Similar GPS-RO algorithms developed previously typically define the level of the most negative moisture gradient as the ABL height. This definition is favorable for subtropical oceans where a stratocumulus-topped ABL is often capped by a layer of sharp moisture lapse rate (coincident with the temperature inversion). The Arctic Ocean is also characterized by stratocumulus cloud cover, however, the specific humidity does not frequently decrease in the ABL capping inversion. The use of GPS-RO refractivity for ABL height retrieval therefore becomes more complex. During winter months (December-February), when the total precipitable water in the troposphere is a minimum, a fairly straightforward algorithm for ABL height retrieval is developed. The applicability and limitations of this method for other seasons (Spring, Summer, Fall) is determined. The seasonal, interannual and spatial variability in the GPS-derived ABL height over the Arctic Ocean, as well as its relation to the underlying surface (ice vs. water), is investigated. The GPS-RO profiles are also explored for the evidence of low-level moisture transport in the cold Arctic environment.

  11. Multi-scale Modeling of Arctic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, B. R.; Roesler, E. L.; Dexheimer, D.

    2017-12-01

    The presence and properties of clouds are critically important to the radiative budget in the Arctic, but clouds are notoriously difficult to represent in global climate models (GCMs). The challenge stems partly from a disconnect in the scales at which these models are formulated and the scale of the physical processes important to the formation of clouds (e.g., convection and turbulence). Because of this, these processes are parameterized in large-scale models. Over the past decades, new approaches have been explored in which a cloud system resolving model (CSRM), or in the extreme a large eddy simulation (LES), is embedded into each gridcell of a traditional GCM to replace the cloud and convective parameterizations to explicitly simulate more of these important processes. This approach is attractive in that it allows for more explicit simulation of small-scale processes while also allowing for interaction between the small and large-scale processes. The goal of this study is to quantify the performance of this framework in simulating Arctic clouds relative to a traditional global model, and to explore the limitations of such a framework using coordinated high-resolution (eddy-resolving) simulations. Simulations from the global model are compared with satellite retrievals of cloud fraction partioned by cloud phase from CALIPSO, and limited-area LES simulations are compared with ground-based and tethered-balloon measurements from the ARM Barrow and Oliktok Point measurement facilities.

  12. PIV measurement of turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives was experimentally investigated by PIV in present paper. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number for pure water case based on the velocity differences of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges from 14667∼73333. Flow field and turbulent quantities of turbulent mixing layer with 200ppm polymer additives were measured and compared with pure water mixing layer flow. It is shown that the dynamic development of mixing layer is greatly influenced by polymer addictives. The smaller vortices are eliminated and the coherent structure is much clearer. Similar with pure water case, Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central part of mixing layer and the width will increase with the Reynolds number increasing. However, compared with pure water case, the coniform width of polymer additives case is larger, which means the polymer additives will lead to the diffusion of coherent structure. The peak value of vorticity in different cross section will decrease with the development of mixing layer. Compared with pure water case, the vorticity is larger at the beginning of the mixing layer but decreases faster in the case with polymer additives.

  13. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model - An example from Arabian Sea and Equatorial Pacific

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.

    and supported by quasi-steady upwelling. Remotely sensed chlorophyll pigment concentrations from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) are used to investigate the chlorophyll modulation of ocean mixed layer thermodynamics in a bulk mixed-layer model, embedded...

  14. Coastal groundwater salinization: Focus on the vertical variability in a multi-layered aquifer through a multi-isotope fingerprinting (Roussillon Basin, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle, E-mail: e.petelet@brgm.fr [BRGM, Avenue C. Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Négrel, Philippe [BRGM, Avenue C. Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Aunay, Bertrand [BRGM, Réunion Agency, 5, rue Sainte-Anne, CS 51016, 97404 Saint Denis Cedex (France); Ladouche, Bernard; Bailly-Comte, Vincent [BRGM Montpellier Agency, 1039, rue de Pinville, 34000 Montpellier (France); Guerrot, Catherine; Flehoc, Christine [BRGM, Avenue C. Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Pezard, Philippe; Lofi, Johanna [Géosciences Montpellier, UMR 5243, Université de Montpellier, cc069, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05 (France); Dörfliger, Nathalie [BRGM, Avenue C. Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 02 (France)

    2016-10-01

    The Roussillon sedimentary Basin (South France) is a complex multi-layered aquifer, close to the Mediterranean Sea facing seasonally increases of water abstraction and salinization issues. We report geochemical and isotopic vertical variability in this aquifer using groundwater sampled with a Westbay System® at two coastal monitoring sites: Barcarès and Canet. The Westbay sampling allows pointing out and explaining the variation of water quality along vertical profiles, both in productive layers and in the less permeable ones where most of the chemical processes are susceptible to take place. The aquifer layers are not equally impacted by salinization, with electrical conductivity ranging from 460 to 43,000 μS·cm{sup −1}. The δ{sup 2}H–δ{sup 18}O signatures show mixing between seawater and freshwater components with long water residence time as evidenced by the lack of contribution from modern water using {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C and CFCs/SF6. S(SO{sub 4}) isotopes also evidence seawater contribution but some signatures can be related to oxidation of pyrite and/or organically bounded S. In the upper layers {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios are close to that of seawater and then increase with depth, reflecting water–rock interaction with argillaceous formations while punctual low values reflect interaction with carbonate. Boron isotopes highlight secondary processes such as adsorption/desorption onto clays in addition to mixings. At the Barcarès site (120 m deep), the high salinity in some layers appear to be related neither to present day seawater intrusion, nor to Salses-Leucate lagoonwater intrusion. Groundwater chemical composition thus highlights binary mixing between fresh groundwater and inherited salty water together with cation exchange processes, water–rock interactions and, locally, sedimentary organic matter mineralisation probably enhanced by pyrite oxidation. Finally, combining the results of this study and those of Caballero and Ladouche (2015

  15. Crystalline structure in the confined-deconfined mixed phase: Neutron stars as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1996-01-01

    We review the differences in first order phase transition of single and multi-component systems, and then discuss the crystalline structure expected to exist in the mixed confined deconfined phase of hadronic matter. The particular context of neutron stars is chosen for illustration. The qualitative results are general and apply for example to the vapor-liquid transition in subsaturated asymmetric nuclear matter

  16. Applied model for the growth of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1991-01-01

    numerically. When the mixed layer is shallow or the atmosphere nearly neutrally stratified, the growth is controlled mainly by mechanical turbulence. When the layer is deep, its growth is controlled mainly by convective turbulence. The model is applied on a data set of the evolution of the height of the mixed...... layer in the morning hours, when both mechanical and convective turbulence contribute to the growth process. Realistic mixed-layer developments are obtained....

  17. Multi-layer micro/nanofluid devices with bio-nanovalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Auciello, Orlando H.; Firestone, Millicent A.

    2013-01-01

    A user-friendly multi-layer micro/nanofluidic flow device and micro/nano fabrication process are provided for numerous uses. The multi-layer micro/nanofluidic flow device can comprise: a substrate, such as indium tin oxide coated glass (ITO glass); a conductive layer of ferroelectric material, preferably comprising a PZT layer of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) positioned on the substrate; electrodes connected to the conductive layer; a nanofluidics layer positioned on the conductive layer and defining nanochannels; a microfluidics layer positioned upon the nanofluidics layer and defining microchannels; and biomolecular nanovalves providing bio-nanovalves which are moveable from a closed position to an open position to control fluid flow at a nanoscale.

  18. Hygroscopicity and composition of Alaskan Arctic CCN during April 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Moore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a comprehensive characterization of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN sampled in the Alaskan Arctic during the 2008 Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC project, a component of the POLARCAT and International Polar Year (IPY initiatives. Four distinct air mass types were sampled including a cleaner Arctic background and a relatively pristine sea ice boundary layer as well as biomass burning and anthropogenic pollution plumes. Despite differences in chemical composition, inferred aerosol hygroscopicities were fairly invariant and ranged from κ = 0.1–0.3 over the atmospherically-relevant range of water vapor supersaturations studied. Organic aerosols sampled were found to be well-oxygenated, consistent with long-range transport and aerosol aging processes. However, inferred hygroscopicities are less than would be predicted based on previous parameterizations of biogenic oxygenated organic aerosol, suggesting an upper limit on organic aerosol hygroscopicity above which κ is less sensitive to the O:C ratio. Most Arctic aerosols act as CCN above 0.1 % supersaturation, although the data suggest the presence of an externally-mixed, non-CCN-active mode comprising approximately 0–20% of the aerosol number. CCN closure was assessed using measured size distributions, bulk chemical composition, and assumed aerosol mixing states; CCN predictions tended toward overprediction, with the best agreement (±0–20 % obtained by assuming the aerosol to be externally-mixed with soluble organics. Closure also varied with CCN concentration, and the best agreement was found for CCN concentrations above 100 cm−3 with a 1.5- to 3-fold overprediction at lower concentrations.

  19. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    in a mixed-layer isopycnal General Circulation Model – An ... three dimensional ocean circulation theory combined with solar radiation transfer process. 1. .... temperature decrease compared with simulation without chlorophyll (bottom panel).

  20. Multi-chamber and multi-layer thiol-ene microchip for cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, H. Y.; Hemmingsen, Mette; Lafleur, Josiane P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-layer and multi-chamber microfluidic chip fabricated using two different thiol-ene mixtures. Sandwiched between the thiol-ene chip layers is a commercially available membrane whose morphology has been altered with coatings of thiol-ene mixtures. Experiments have been conducted ...... with the microchip and shown that the fabricated microchip is suitable for long term cell culture....

  1. Factors controlling black carbon distribution in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ling; Li, Qinbin; Li, Yinrui; He, Cenlin

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of black carbon (BC) in the Arctic, including BC concentration in snow (BCsnow, ng g-1) and surface air (BCair, ng m-3), as well as emissions, dry deposition, and wet scavenging using the global three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model (CTM) GEOS-Chem. We find that the model underestimates BCsnow in the Arctic by 40 % on average (median = 11.8 ng g-1). Natural gas flaring substantially increases total BC emissions in the Arctic (by ˜ 70 %). The flaring emissions lead to up to 49 % increases (0.1-8.5 ng g-1) in Arctic BCsnow, dramatically improving model comparison with observations (50 % reduction in discrepancy) near flaring source regions (the western side of the extreme north of Russia). Ample observations suggest that BC dry deposition velocities over snow and ice in current CTMs (0.03 cm s-1 in the GEOS-Chem) are too small. We apply the resistance-in-series method to compute a dry deposition velocity (vd) that varies with local meteorological and surface conditions. The resulting velocity is significantly larger and varies by a factor of 8 in the Arctic (0.03-0.24 cm s-1), which increases the fraction of dry to total BC deposition (16 to 25 %) yet leaves the total BC deposition and BCsnow in the Arctic unchanged. This is largely explained by the offsetting higher dry and lower wet deposition fluxes. Additionally, we account for the effect of the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process in mixed-phase clouds, which releases BC particles from condensed phases (water drops and ice crystals) back to the interstitial air and thereby substantially reduces the scavenging efficiency of clouds for BC (by 43-76 % in the Arctic). The resulting BCsnow is up to 80 % higher, BC loading is considerably larger (from 0.25 to 0.43 mg m-2), and BC lifetime is markedly prolonged (from 9 to 16 days) in the Arctic. Overall, flaring emissions increase BCair in the Arctic (by ˜ 20 ng m-3), the updated vd more than halves BCair (by ˜ 20 ng m-3

  2. Aerosols at the poles: an AeroCom Phase II multi-model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sand

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic and natural sources reach the polar regions through long-range transport and affect the local radiation balance. Such transport is, however, poorly constrained in present-day global climate models, and few multi-model evaluations of polar anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing exist. Here we compare the aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm from simulations with 16 global aerosol models from the AeroCom Phase II model intercomparison project with available observations at both poles. We show that the annual mean multi-model median is representative of the observations in Arctic, but that the intermodel spread is large. We also document the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of the AOD for the individual aerosol species: black carbon (BC from fossil fuel and biomass burning, sulfate, organic aerosols (OAs, dust, and sea-salt. For a subset of models that represent nitrate and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs, we document the role of these aerosols at high latitudes.The seasonal dependence of natural and anthropogenic aerosols differs with natural aerosols peaking in winter (sea-salt and spring (dust, whereas AOD from anthropogenic aerosols peaks in late spring and summer. The models produce a median annual mean AOD of 0.07 in the Arctic (defined here as north of 60° N. The models also predict a noteworthy aerosol transport to the Antarctic (south of 70° S with a resulting AOD varying between 0.01 and 0.02. The models have estimated the shortwave anthropogenic radiative forcing contributions to the direct aerosol effect (DAE associated with BC and OA from fossil fuel and biofuel (FF, sulfate, SOAs, nitrate, and biomass burning from BC and OA emissions combined. The Arctic modelled annual mean DAE is slightly negative (−0.12 W m−2, dominated by a positive BC FF DAE in spring and a negative sulfate DAE in summer. The Antarctic DAE is governed by BC FF. We perform sensitivity

  3. Multi-layered breathing architectural envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Andreas; Foged, Isak Worre; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    A multi layered breathing envelope is developed as a method of natural ventilation. The two main layers consist of mineral wool and air permeable concrete. The mineral wool works as a dynamic insulation and the permeable concrete as a heat recovery system with a high thermal mass for heat storage...

  4. Numerical modelling of the atmospheric mixing-layer diurnal evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnary, L. de.

    1990-03-01

    This paper introduce a numeric procedure to determine the temporal evolution of the height, potential temperature and mixing ratio in the atmospheric mixing layer. The time and spatial derivatives were evaluated via forward in time scheme to predict the local evolution of the mixing-layer parameters, and a forward in time, upstream in space scheme to predict the evolution of the mixing-layer over a flat region with a one-dimensional advection component. The surface turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat were expressed using a simple sine wave that is function of the hour day and kind of the surface (water or country). (author) [pt

  5. Rain-on-snow and ice layer formation detection using passive microwave radiometry: An arctic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, A.; Royer, A.; Montpetit, B.; Johnson, C. A.; Brucker, L.; Dolant, C.; Richards, A.; Roy, A.

    2015-12-01

    With the current changes observed in the Arctic, an increase in occurrence of rain-on-snow (ROS) events has been reported in the Arctic (land) over the past few decades. Several studies have established that strong linkages between surface temperatures and passive microwaves do exist, but the contribution of snow properties under winter extreme events such as rain-on-snow events (ROS) and associated ice layer formation need to be better understood that both have a significant impact on ecosystem processes. In particular, ice layer formation is known to affect the survival of ungulates by blocking their access to food. Given the current pronounced warming in northern regions, more frequent ROS can be expected. However, one of the main challenges in the study of ROS in northern regions is the lack of meteorological information and in-situ measurements. The retrieval of ROS occurrence in the Arctic using satellite remote sensing tools thus represents the most viable approach. Here, we present here results from 1) ROS occurrence formation in the Peary caribou habitat using an empirically developed ROS algorithm by our group based on the gradient ratio, 2) ice layer formation across the same area using a semi-empirical detection approach based on the polarization ratio spanning between 1978 and 2013. A detection threshold was adjusted given the platform used (SMMR, SSM/I and AMSR-E), and initial results suggest high-occurrence years as: 1981-1982, 1992-1993; 1994-1995; 1999-2000; 2001-2002; 2002-2003; 2003-2004; 2006-2007; 2007-2008. A trend in occurrence for Banks Island and NW Victoria Island and linkages to caribou population is presented.

  6. Optimization of multi-layered metallic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Dor, G.; Dubinsky, A.; Elperin, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We investigated the problem of optimization of a multi-layered metallic shield. → The maximum ballistic limit velocity is a criterion of optimization. → The sequence of materials and the thicknesses of layers in the shield are varied. → The general problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming. → Analytical solutions are obtained for two- and three-layered shields. - Abstract: We investigate the problem of optimization of multi-layered metallic shield whereby the goal is to determine the sequence of materials and the thicknesses of the layers that provide the maximum ballistic limit velocity of the shield. Optimization is performed under the following constraints: fixed areal density of the shield, the upper bound on the total thickness of the shield and the bounds on the thicknesses of the plates manufactured from every material. The problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming which can be solved numerically using known methods. For the most interesting in practice cases of two-layered and three-layered shields the solution is obtained in the explicit analytical form.

  7. Modeling Macroscopic Shape Distortions during Sintering of Multi-layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye

    as to help achieve defect free multi-layer components. The initial thickness ratio between the layers making the multi-layer has also significant effect on the extent of camber evolution depending on the material systems. During sintering of tubular bi-layer structures, tangential (hoop) stresses are very...... large compared to radial stresses. The maximum value of hoop stress, which can generate processing defects such as cracks and coating peel-offs, occurs at the beginning of the sintering cycle. Unlike most of the models defining material properties based on porosity and grain size only, the multi...... (firing). However, unintended features like shape instabilities of samples, cracks or delamination of layers may arise during sintering of multi-layer composites. Among these defects, macroscopic shape distortions in the samples can cause problems in the assembly or performance of the final component...

  8. Exploring the Contribution of Primary Marine Organic Matter to the Arctic Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, D. B.; Chang, R. Y. W.; Boyer, M.; Abbatt, J.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean is a significant source of aerosol to the atmosphere, and contributes significantly to the aerosol population especially in remote locations. Both primary and secondary processes connect the ocean to ambient aerosol loadings, but the extent to which the ocean is a source of organic material to the atmosphere is a current topic of scientific debate. The contribution of primary marine aerosol to atmospheric organic matter may have an influence on the water uptake properties and chemical reactivity of primary marine aerosol particles, influencing their climate-relevant properties. In this study, we characterize the contribution of primary marine aerosol to the arctic marine boundary layer using coincident quantitative measurements of freshly-produced sea spray aerosol and ambient marine aerosol to the arctic boundary layer during an expedition aboard the CCGS Amundsen. Sea spray production experiments were conducted during the cruise using a tank fitted with a plunging waterfall apparatus, a technique which has been recently shown to closely mimic the aerosol production behavior of controlled breaking waves. Comparison of the chemical composition of sea spray particles generated from water samples in various locations throughout the Canadian Archipelago will be presented. A tracer analysis of specific compounds known to be important contributors to primary marine organic material are tracked using GC/MS, along with those known to be tracers of biological aerosol and other organic matter sources. Size-segregated trends in tracer concentrations and ratios with inorganic components will be discussed in the context of understanding the contribution of primary organics to the Arctic atmosphere and in comparison with other sources of organic material observed during the ship-board campaign.

  9. Automated solid-phase extraction of phenolic acids using layered double hydroxide-alumina-polymer disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Milad; Palomino Cabello, Carlos; Saraji, Mohammad; Manuel Estela, Jose; Cerdà, Víctor; Turnes Palomino, Gemma; Maya, Fernando

    2018-01-26

    The application of layered double hydroxide-Al 2 O 3 -polymer mixed-matrix disks for solid-phase extraction is reported for the first time. Al 2 O 3 is embedded in a polymer matrix followed by an in situ metal-exchange process to obtain a layered double hydroxide-Al 2 O 3 -polymer mixed-matrix disk with excellent flow-through properties. The extraction performance of the prepared disks is evaluated as a proof of concept for the automated extraction using sequential injection analysis of organic acids (p-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid) following an anion-exchange mechanism. After the solid-phase extraction, phenolic acids were quantified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection using a core-shell silica-C18 stationary phase and isocratic elution (acetonitrile/0.5% acetic acid in pure water, 5:95, v/v). High sensitivity and reproducibility were obtained with limits of detection in the range of 0.12-0.25 μg/L (sample volume, 4 mL), and relative standard deviations between 2.9 and 3.4% (10 μg/L, n = 6). Enrichment factors of 34-39 were obtained. Layered double hydroxide-Al 2 O 3 -polymer mixed-matrix disks had an average lifetime of 50 extractions. Analyte recoveries ranged from 93 to 96% for grape juice and nonalcoholic beer samples. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Characteristics of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Arctic outflow in Fram Strait: assessing the changes and fate of terrigenous CDOM in the Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granskog, M.A.; Stedmon, Colin; Dodd, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Absorption coefficients of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured together with salinity, δ18O, and inorganic nutrients across the Fram Strait. A pronounced CDOM absorption maximum between 30 and 120 m depth was associated with river and sea ice brine enriched water, characteristic...... of the Arctic mixed layer and upper halocline waters in the East Greenland Current (EGC). The lowest CDOM concentrations were found in the Atlantic inflow. We show that the salinity-CDOM relationship is not suitable for evaluating conservative mixing of CDOM. The strong correlation between meteoric water...... and CDOM is indicative of the riverine/terrigenous origin of CDOM in the EGC. Based on CDOM absorption in Polar Water and comparison with an Arctic river discharge weighted mean, we estimate that a 49–59% integrated loss of CDOM absorption across 250–600 nm has occurred. A preferential removal...

  11. Diffusion layer modeling for condensation with multi-component noncondensable gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Many condensation problems involving noncondensable gases have multiple noncondensable species, for example air (with nitrogen, oxygen, and other gases); and other problems where light gases like hydrogen may mix with heavier gases like nitrogen. Particularly when the binary mass diffusion coefficients of the noncondensable species are substantially different, the noncondensable species tend to segregate in the condensation boundary layer. This paper presents a fundamental analysis of the mass transport with multiple noncondensable species, identifying a simple method to calculate an effective mass diffusion coefficient that can be used with the simple diffusion layer model, and discusses in detail the effects of using mass and mole based quantities, and various simplifying approximations, on predicted condensation rates. The results are illustrated with quantitative examples to demonstrate the potential importance of multi-component noncondensable gas effects

  12. A Large Eddy Simulation Study of Heat Entrainment under Sea Ice in the Canadian Arctic Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramudu, E.; Yang, D.; Gelderloos, R.; Meneveau, C. V.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2016-12-01

    Sea ice cover in the Arctic has declined rapidly in recent decades. The much faster than projected retreat suggests that climate models may be missing some key processes, or that these processes are not accurately represented. The entrainment of heat from the mixed layer by small-scale turbulence is one such process. In the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, relatively warm Pacific Summer Water (PSW) resides at the base of the mixed layer. With an increasing influx of PSW, the upper ocean in the Canadian Basin has been getting warmer and fresher since the early 2000s. While studies show a correlation between sea ice reduction and an increase in PSW temperature, others argue that PSW intrusions in the Canadian Basin cannot affect sea ice thickness because the strongly-stratified halocline prevents heat from the PSW layer from being entrained into the mixed layer and up to the basal ice surface. In this study, we try to resolve this conundrum by simulating the turbulent entrainment of heat from the PSW layer to a moving basal ice surface using large eddy simulation (LES). The LES model is based on a high-fidelity spectral approach on horizontal planes, and includes a Lagrangian dynamic subgrid model that reduces the need for empirical inputs for subgrid-scale viscosities and diffusivities. This LES tool allows us to investigate physical processes in the mixed layer at a very fine scale. We focus our study on summer conditions, when ice is melting, and show for a range of ice-drift velocities, halocline temperatures, and halocline salinity gradients characteristic of the Canadian Basin how much heat can be entrained from the PSW layer to the sea ice. Our results can be used to improve parameterizations of vertical heat flux under sea ice in coarse-grid ocean and climate models.

  13. Nudging the Arctic Ocean to quantify Arctic sea ice feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Evelien; Severijns, Camiel; Bintanja, Richard

    2017-04-01

    It is well-established that the Arctic is warming 2 to 3 time faster than rest of the planet. One of the great uncertainties in climate research is related to what extent sea ice feedbacks amplify this (seasonally varying) Arctic warming. Earlier studies have analyzed existing climate model output using correlations and energy budget considerations in order to quantify sea ice feedbacks through indirect methods. From these analyses it is regularly inferred that sea ice likely plays an important role, but details remain obscure. Here we will take a different and a more direct approach: we will keep the sea ice constant in a sensitivity simulation, using a state-of -the-art climate model (EC-Earth), applying a technique that has never been attempted before. This experimental technique involves nudging the temperature and salinity of the ocean surface (and possibly some layers below to maintain the vertical structure and mixing) to a predefined prescribed state. When strongly nudged to existing (seasonally-varying) sea surface temperatures, ocean salinity and temperature, we force the sea ice to remain in regions/seasons where it is located in the prescribed state, despite the changing climate. Once we obtain fixed' sea ice, we will run a future scenario, for instance 2 x CO2 with and without prescribed sea ice, with the difference between these runs providing a measure as to what extent sea ice contributes to Arctic warming, including the seasonal and geographical imprint of the effects.

  14. Mixing processes at the subsurface layer in the Amundsen Sea shelf region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, J.; Djoumna, G.; Francis, D. K.; Holland, D.

    2017-12-01

    In the Amundsen Sea shelf region, mixing processes promote an upward transport of diapycnal fluxes of heat and salt from the subsurface to the surface mixing layer. Here we estimate the diapycnal mixing rates on the Amundsen shelf from a multi-year mooring cluster and five research cruises. By applying fine-scale parameterizations, the mixing rates obtained were higher near the southern end of Pine Island glacier front and exceeded 10-2 m2s-1. The eddy diffusivity increased near the critical latitude (74o 28' S) for semi-diurnal M2 tides, which coincided with near-critical topography on the shelf. This condition favored the generation of internal waves of M2 frequency. The semi-diurnal dynamic enhanced the mixing that potentially affected the heat budget and the circulation of the modified Circumpolar Deep Water. This can be observed in the characteristics of water exchange both below the ice shelves and between the continental shelf and the ice shelf cavities. The location of the critical latitude and critical topography provided favorable conditions for the generation of internal waves. KEYWORDS: Mixing processes, diapycnal fluxes, critical latitude, Circumpolar Deep Water.

  15. A theoretical study of mixing downstream of transverse injection into a supersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. J.; Zelazny, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and analytical study was made of mixing downstream of transverse hydrogen injection, from single and multiple orifices, into a Mach 4 air boundary layer over a flat plate. Numerical solutions to the governing three-dimensional, elliptic boundary layer equations were obtained using a general purpose computer program. Founded upon a finite element solution algorithm. A prototype three-dimensional turbulent transport model was developed using mixing length theory in the wall region and the mass defect concept in the outer region. Excellent agreement between the computed flow field and experimental data for a jet/freestream dynamic pressure ratio of unity was obtained in the centerplane region of the single-jet configuration. Poorer agreement off centerplane suggests an inadequacy of the extrapolated two-dimensional turbulence model. Considerable improvement in off-centerplane computational agreement occured for a multi-jet configuration, using the same turbulent transport model.

  16. Ordered mixed-layer structures in the Mighei carbonaceous chondrite matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy of the Mighei carbonaceous chondrite matrix has revealed the presence of a new mixed layer structure material. This mixed-layer material consists of an ordered arrangement of serpentine-type (S) and brucite-type (B) layers in the sequence SBBSBB. Electron diffraction and imaging techniques show that the basal periodicity is approximately 17 A. Discrete crystals of SBB-type material are typically curved, of small size (less than 1 micron) and show structural variations similar to the serpentine group minerals. Mixed-layer material also occurs in association with planar serpentine. Characteristics of SBB-type material are not consistent with known terrestrial mixed-layer clay minerals. Evidence for formation by a condensation event or by subsequent alteration of pre-existing material is not yet apparent.

  17. Layered mixing on the New England Shelf in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianing; Greenan, Blair J. W.; Lu, Youyu; Oakey, Neil S.; Shaw, William J.

    2014-09-01

    The layered structure of stratification and mixing on the New England Shelf (NES) in summer is examined by analyzing a comprehensive set of observations of hydrography, currents and turbulence. A clear distinction in mixing characteristics between the midcolumn water (consisting of subsurface stratification, middepth weak stratification and lower-layer stratification) and a well-mixed bottom boundary layer (BBL) is revealed. The combination of subtidal Ekman onshore bottom transport and cross-shore density gradient created a lower-layer stratification that inhibited the upward extension of the BBL turbulence. The BBL mixing was related to strong shear generated by bottom stress, and the magnitude and periodic variation of BBL mixing was determined by both the tidal and subtidal flows. Mixing in the midcolumn water occurred under stably stratified conditions and showed correspondence with the occurrence of near-inertial and semidiurnal internal waves. Positive correlations between buoyancy frequency squared (N2) and shear variance (S2), S2 and dissipation rate (ɛ), N2 and ɛ are established in the midcolumn, but not in the BBL. The midcolumn ɛ was reasonably described by a slightly modified MacKinnon-Gregg (MG) model.

  18. Nonlinear Stability and Structure of Compressible Reacting Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M. J.; Mansour, N. N.; Reynolds, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    The parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used to investigate issues of nonlinear flow development and mixing in compressible reacting shear layers. Particular interest is placed on investigating the change in flow structure that occurs when compressibility and heat release are added to the flow. These conditions allow the 'outer' instability modes- one associated with each of the fast and slow streams-to dominate over the 'central', Kelvin-Helmholtz mode that unaccompanied in incompressible nonreacting mixing layers. Analysis of scalar probability density functions in flows with dominant outer modes demonstrates the ineffective, one-sided nature of mixing that accompany these flow structures. Colayer conditions, where two modes have equal growth rate and the mixing layer is formed by two sets of vortices, offer some opportunity for mixing enhancement. Their extent, however, is found to be limited in the mixing layer's parameter space. Extensive validation of the PSE technique also provides a unique perspective on central- mode vortex pairing, further supporting the view that pairing is primarily governed perspective sheds insight on how linear stability theory is able to provide such an accurate prediction of experimentally-observed, fully nonlinear flow phenomenon.

  19. Nomogram for the height of the daytime mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyren, K. [Ericsson EriSoft AB, Umeaa (Sweden); Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    We present a nomogram that provide information about the general behaviour of the mixed layer at a given location. The nomogram is meant to be a practical and easy to use tool to determine the height of the mixed layer for i.e. weather forecaster, air pollution studies and planning of meteorological experiments. Use of the nomogram is restricted to flat, relatively homogeneous terrain. Inhomogeneous terrain with patch scales of 10 km or more might create organised circulation like i.e. lake breezes. The data represented in the nomogram is computed using a meteorological preprocessor and climatological temperature data for the location. The nomogram is simplified but retain main physical processes that control the evolution of the mixed layer and can be easily constructed for any chosen location on land. Nomogram of the mixed layer behavior at the location of Cabauw, the Netherlands is shown and discussed. (au)

  20. Thin TaC layer produced by ion mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barna, Árpád; Kotis, László; Pécz, Béla

    2012-01-01

    in strongly asymmetric ion mixing; the carbon was readily transported to the Ta layer, while the reverse process was much weaker. Because of the asymmetrical transport the C/TaC interface remained sharp independently from the applied fluence. The carbon transported to the Ta layer formed Ta......Ion-beam mixing in C/Ta layered systems was investigated. C 8nm/Ta 12nm and C 20nm/Ta 19nm/C 20nm layer systems were irradiated by Ga+ ions of energy in the range of 2–30keV. In case of the 8nm and 20nm thick C cover layers applying 5–8keV and 20–30keV Ga+ ion energy, respectively resulted...

  1. Constitutive behaviour of mixed mode loaded adhesive layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, J.L.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Stigh, U.

    2007-01-01

    in the failure process zone. The constitutive behaviour of the adhesive layer is obtained by a so called inverse method and fitting an existing mixed mode cohesive model, which uses a coupled formulation to describe a mode dependent constitutive behaviour. The cohesive parameters are determined by optimizing......Mixed mode testing of adhesive layer is performed with the Mixed mode double Cantilever Bean? specimen. During the experiments, the specimens are loaded by transversal and/or shear forces; seven different mode mixities are tested. The J-integral is used to evaluate the energy dissipation...

  2. Reference Models for Multi-Layer Tissue Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    function of multi-layer tissues (etiology and management of pressure ulcers ). What was the impact on other disciplines? As part of the project, a data...simplification to develop cost -effective models of surface manipulation of multi-layer tissues. Deliverables. Specimen- (or subject) and region-specific...simplification to develop cost -effective models of surgical manipulation. Deliverables. Specimen-specific surrogate models of upper legs confirmed against data

  3. Microstructures of tribologically modified surface layers in two-phase alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, C G; Ortega, I; Jacobo, V H; Ortiz, A; Bravo, A E; Schouwenaars, R

    2014-01-01

    When ductile alloys are subject to sliding wear, small increments of plastic strain accumulate into severe plastic deformation and mechanical alloying of the surface layer. The authors constructed a simple coaxial tribometer, which was used to study this phenomenon in wrought Al-Sn and cast Cu-Mg-Sn alloys. The first class of materials is ductile and consists of two immiscible phases. Tribological modification is observed in the form of a transition zone from virgin material to severely deformed grains. At the surface, mechanical mixing of both phases competes with diffusional unmixing. Vortex flow patterns are typically observed. The experimental Cu-Mg-Sn alloys are ductile for Mg-contents up to 2 wt% and consist of a- dendrites with a eutectic consisting of a brittle Cu 2 Mg-matrix with α-particles. In these, the observations are similar to the Al-Sn Alloys. Alloys with 5 wt% Mg are brittle due to the contiguity of the eutectic compound. Nonetheless, under sliding contact, this compound behaves in a ductile manner, showing mechanical mixing of a and Cu 2 Mg in the top layers and a remarkable transition from a eutectic to cellular microstructure just below, due to severe shear deformation. AFM-observations allow identifying the mechanically homogenized surface layers as a nanocrystalline material with a cell structure associated to the sliding direction

  4. Regular network model for the sea ice-albedo feedback in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Stoffels, Marc; Wackerbauer, Renate

    2011-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean and sea ice form a feedback system that plays an important role in the global climate. The complexity of highly parameterized global circulation (climate) models makes it very difficult to assess feedback processes in climate without the concurrent use of simple models where the physics is understood. We introduce a two-dimensional energy-based regular network model to investigate feedback processes in an Arctic ice-ocean layer. The model includes the nonlinear aspect of the ice-water phase transition, a nonlinear diffusive energy transport within a heterogeneous ice-ocean lattice, and spatiotemporal atmospheric and oceanic forcing at the surfaces. First results for a horizontally homogeneous ice-ocean layer show bistability and related hysteresis between perennial ice and perennial open water for varying atmospheric heat influx. Seasonal ice cover exists as a transient phenomenon. We also find that ocean heat fluxes are more efficient than atmospheric heat fluxes to melt Arctic sea ice.

  5. Experimental analysis on stress wave in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yun Ho; Ham, Hyo Sick

    1998-01-01

    The guided wave propagation in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures is experimentally explored based on theoretical dispersion curves. It turns out that proper selection of incident angle and frequency is critical for guided wave generation in multi-layered structures. Theoretical dispersion curves greatly depend on adhesive zone thickness, layer thickness and material properties. It was possible to determine the adhesive zone thickness of an inhomogeneous multi-layered structure by monitoring experimentally the change of dispersion curves.

  6. Soil Surface Organic Layers in Alaska's Arctic Foothills: Development, Distribution and Microclimatic Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, C. A.; Mann, D. H.; Verbyla, D.; Valentine, D.; Kunz, M. L.; Heiser, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accumulated organic matter at the ground surface plays an important role in arctic ecosystems. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) influence temperature, moisture, and chemistry in the underlying mineral soil and, on a global basis, comprise enormous stores of labile carbon. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is prerequisite to modeling the responses of arctic ecosystem processes to climate changes. Here, we ask three questions regarding SSOLs in the Arctic Foothills in northern Alaska: 1) What environmental factors control their spatial distribution? 2) How long do they take to form? 3) What is the relationship between SSOL thickness and mineral soil temperature through the growing season? The best topographically-controlled predictors of SSOL thickness and spatial distribution are duration of sunlight during the growing-season, upslope drainage area, slope gradient, and elevation. SSOLs begin to form within several decades following disturbance but require 500-700 years to reach equilibrium states. Once formed, mature SSOLs lower peak growing-season temperature and mean annual temperature in the underlying mineral horizon by 8° and 3° C respectively, which reduces available growing degree days within the upper mineral soil by nearly 80%. How ongoing climate change in northern Alaska will affect the region's SSOLs is an open and potentially crucial question.

  7. Lateral phase separation of mixed polymer brushes on planar and spherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lehn, Reid; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    A mixed polymer brush consists of two (or more) polymer species grafted to a surface at a high density, inducing the polymers to highly stretch to maximize favorable solvent interactions while minimizing polymer overlap. The enthalpic and entropic interactions between the different polymers give rise to lateral phase behavior on the surface. Understanding this phase separation behavior is interesting for applications in nanotemplating and controlled protein adsorption. In this work, we present a novel theoretical model to quickly predict lateral phase separated morphologies of mixed polymer brushes on planar, cylindrical and spherical surfaces. The model combines a Flory-Huggins model for enthalpic interactions between the polymer components with an Alexander-de Gennes model for the entropy of the brush layers. When there is a length difference between the polymer components, these two interactions along with the conformational entropy of the system lead to a range of morphologies including stripes, dimples, mixing, and complete phase separation. The computational efficiency of this model allows for phase diagrams to be generated with great accuracy. The results of our model thus allow for the fast prediction of lateral morphologies on different geometries.

  8. The Thermodynamic Structure of Arctic Coastal Fog Occurring During the Melt Season over East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Gaëlle F.; Jiskoot, Hester; Cassano, John J.; Gultepe, Ismail; James, Timothy D.

    2018-05-01

    An automated method to classify Arctic fog into distinct thermodynamic profiles using historic in-situ surface and upper-air observations is presented. This classification is applied to low-resolution Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA) soundings and high-resolution Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) soundings in low- and high-Arctic coastal and pack-ice environments. Results allow investigation of fog macrophysical properties and processes in coastal East Greenland during melt seasons 1980-2012. Integrated with fog observations from three synoptic weather stations, 422 IGRA soundings are classified into six fog thermodynamic types based on surface saturation ratio, type of temperature inversion, fog-top height relative to inversion-base height and stability using the virtual potential temperature gradient. Between 65-80% of fog observations occur with a low-level inversion, and statically neutral or unstable surface layers occur frequently. Thermodynamic classification is sensitive to the assigned dew-point depression threshold, but categorization is robust. Despite differences in the vertical resolution of radiosonde observations, IGRA and ASCOS soundings yield the same six fog classes, with fog-class distribution varying with latitude and environmental conditions. High-Arctic fog frequently resides within an elevated inversion layer, whereas low-Arctic fog is more often restricted to the mixed layer. Using supplementary time-lapse images, ASCOS microwave radiometer retrievals and airmass back-trajectories, we hypothesize that the thermodynamic classes represent different stages of advection fog formation, development, and dissipation, including stratus-base lowering and fog lifting. This automated extraction of thermodynamic boundary-layer and inversion structure can be applied to radiosonde observations worldwide to better evaluate fog conditions that affect transportation and lead to improvements in numerical models.

  9. Collaborative-Hybrid Multi-Layer Network Control for Emerging Cyber-Infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Tom [USC; Ghani, Nasir [UNM; Boyd, Eric [UCAID

    2010-08-31

    At a high level, there were four basic task areas identified for the Hybrid-MLN project. They are: o Multi-Layer, Multi-Domain, Control Plane Architecture and Implementation, including OSCARS layer2 and InterDomain Adaptation, Integration of LambdaStation and Terapaths with Layer2 dynamic provisioning, Control plane software release, Scheduling, AAA, security architecture, Network Virtualization architecture, Multi-Layer Network Architecture Framework Definition; o Heterogeneous DataPlane Testing; o Simulation; o Project Publications, Reports, and Presentations.

  10. Young’s modulus of multi-layer microcantilevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhikang Deng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model for calculating the Young’s modulus of multi-layer microcantilevers with a coating is proposed, and validated by a three-dimensional (3D finite element (FE model using ANSYS parametric design language (APDL and atomic force microscopy (AFM characterization. Compared with typical theoretical models (Rayleigh-Ritz model, Euler-Bernoulli (E-B beam model and spring mass model, the proposed theoretical model can obtain Young’s modulus of multi-layer microcantilevers more precisely. Also, the influences of coating’s geometric dimensions on Young’s modulus and resonant frequency of microcantilevers are discussed. The thickness of coating has a great influence on Young’s modulus and resonant frequency of multi-layer microcantilevers, and the coating should be considered to calculate Young’s modulus more precisely, especially when fairly thicker coating is employed.

  11. Mixed phase clouds: observations and theoretical advances (overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Alexei

    2013-04-01

    Mixed phase clouds play important role in precipitation formation and radiation budget of the Earth. The microphysical measurements in mixed phase clouds are notoriously difficult due to many technical challenges. The airborne instrumentation for characterization of the microstructure of mixed phase clouds is discussed. The results multiyear airborne observations and measurements of frequency of occurrence of mixed phase, characteristic spatial scales, humidity in mixed phase and ice clouds are presented. A theoretical framework describing the thermodynamics and phase transformation of a three phase component system consisting of ice particles, liquid droplets and water vapor is discussed. It is shown that the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process plays different role in clouds with different dynamics. The problem of maintenance and longevity of mixed phase clouds is discussed.

  12. Some properties of the layer phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Y.K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    1984-07-01

    There exists a layer phase at least in the non-isotropic U(1) lattice gauge field model for lattice dimension D >= 5 and layer dimension d = D - 1. The authors analyze some of the main properties of the layer phase. These are as follows: the behaviour of massless gauge particles (photons); the behaviour of doubly-sign charged particles and the behaviour of Wilson loops. A non-isotropic O(N) model is suggested and analyzed too. It is proved that in this case there exists no layer phase. Finally a model involving a non-isotropic antisymmetric tensor gauge field of arbitrary order is studied and a criterion for the dimensionality of the layer phase is given. (Auth.)

  13. The crystal structure of the mixed-layer Aurivillius phase Bi 5Ti 1.5W 1.5O 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, J.; Boullay, Ph.; Créon, N.; Mercurio, D.

    2005-09-01

    The crystal structure of the 1+2 mixed-layer Aurivillius phase Bi 5Ti 1.5W 1.5O 15 (SG I2cm n o 46: -cba, Z=4, a=5.4092(3) Å, b=5.3843(3) Å and c=41.529(3) Å) consisting of the ordered intergrowth of one and two octahedra thick perovskite-type blocks separated by [Bi 2O 2] 2+ slabs is reported. Supported by an electron diffraction investigation and, using the Rietveld analysis, it is shown that this compound should be described using a I-centering lattice in agreement with the generalised structural model of the Aurivillius type compounds recently presented by the authors. The structure of this Bi 5Ti 1.5W 1.5O 15 phase is analyzed in comparison with the related simple members (Bi 2WO 6 and Bi 3Ti 1.5W 0.5O 9). The crystal structure of Bi 3Ti 1.5W 0.5O 9 is also reported.

  14. Multi-Instrument Observations of a Geomagnetic Storm and its Effects on the Arctic Ionosphere: A Case Study of the 19 February 2014 Storm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durgonics, Tibor; Komjathy, Attila; Verkhoglyadova, Olga

    2017-01-01

    We present a multi-instrumented approach for the analysis of the Arctic ionosphere during the 19 February 2014 highly complex, multiphase geomagnetic storm, which had the largest impact on the disturbance storm-time (Dst) index that year. The geomagnetic storm was the result of two powerful Earth......-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs). It produced a strong long lasting negative storm phase over Greenland with a dominant energy input in the polar-cap. We employed GNSS networks, geomagnetic observatories, and a specific ionosonde station in Greenland. We complemented the approach with spaceborne measurements...... specifically found that, (1) Thermospheric O/N2 measurements demonstrated significantly lower values over the Greenland sector than prior to the storm-time. (2) An increased ion flow in the topside ionosphere was observed during the negative storm phase. (3) Negative storm phase was a direct consequence...

  15. Development of new neutron spin echo spectrometer using multi-layer film spin splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaki, Seiji; Ebisawa, Toru; Hino, Masahiro; Achiwa, Norio

    2001-01-01

    Neutron spin echo spectrometry is a method using neutron Larmor precession motion in magnetic field, for the measurement of velocity change before and after quasi-elastic scattering of neutron by a sample, such as macromolecules, with high accuracy. The neutron spin echo spectrometer is an interferometer in quantum mechanics, which a neutron is arranged with a parallel or an antiparallel state against magnetic field direction. Intensities of neutron interaction with matters are measured by the superposition of the both spin state components. The contrast losses of interference fringes caused from velocity diversion of incident neutrons are protected by spin echo method, in which a phase shift between the parallel and anti-parallel state neutrons is reduced by reversion of the spin state on the way of neutron path. Neutron beam of high intensity can be measured with a high energy resolution. Strong magnetic field is usually needed to introduce the phase shift between the both spin state components. A multi-layer film spin splitter (MSS) is developed for introducing the phase shift instead of the strong magnetic fields. The MSS consists of three layers, non-magnetic mirror of Ni/Ti, gap layer of Ti (∼1 μm), and magnetic mirror of Permalloy/Ge. Surface roughness of the gap layer leads to diversions of the phase shift, because that the fluctuation of thickness of gap layer is proportional to the phase shift. Characteristics of the MSS are tested as follow: (1) reflectivity of polarized neutron, (2) function check of the MSS, (3) uniformity check of the gap layer, (4) evaluation of the gap layer-thickness. (Suetake, M.)

  16. Multi-decadal modulations in the Aleutian-Icelandic Low seesaw and the axial symmetry of the Arctic Oscillation signature, as revealed in the 20th century reanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Shi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Seesaw relationship in intensity between the surface Aleutian and Icelandic Lows (AIS is a manifestation of atmospheric teleconnection that bridges the interannual variability over the Pacific and Atlantic in particular winter months. Analysis of the 20th Century Reanalysis data reveals that the strength and timing of AIS have undergone multi-decadal modulations in conjunction with those in structure of the Arctic Oscillation (AO signature, extracted in the leading mode of interannual sea-level pressure (SLP variability over the extratropical Northern Hemisphere. Specifically, events of what may be called ‘pure AO’, in which SLP anomalies exhibit a high degree of axial symmetry in association with in-phase SLP variability between the midlatitude Atlantic and Pacific, tended to occur during multi-decadal periods in which the inter-basin teleconnection through AIS was active under the enhanced interannual variability of the Aleutian Low. In contrast, the axial symmetry of the AO pattern was apparently reduced during a multi-decadal period in which the AIS teleconnection was inactive under the weakened interannual variability of the Aleutian Low. In this period, the leading mode of interannual SLP variability represented a meridional seesaw between the Atlantic and Arctic, which resembles SLP anomaly pattern associated with the cold-ocean/warm-land (COWL temperature pattern. These multi-decadal modulations in interannual AIS signal and the axial symmetry of the interannual AO pattern occurred under multi-decadal changes in the background state that also represented the polarity changes of the COWL-like anomaly pattern.

  17. Universality Results for Multi-layer Radial Hele-Shaw Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daripa, Prabir; Gin, Craig; Daripa Research Team

    2014-03-01

    Saffman-Taylor instability is a well known viscosity driven instability of an interface separating two immiscible fluids. We study linear stability of this displacement process in multi-layer radial Hele-Shaw geometry involving an arbitrary number of immiscible fluid phases. Universal stability results have been obtained and applied to design displacement processes that are considerably less unstable than the pure Saffman-Taylor case. In particular, we derive universal formula which gives specific values of the viscosities of the fluid layers corresponding to smallest unstable band. Other similar universal results will also be presented. The talk is based on ongoing work. Supported by an NPRP Grant # 08-777-1-141 from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of the Qatar Foundation). The statements made herein are solely the responsibility of the authors.

  18. MATERIAL DEPENDENCE OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN MULTI-LAYER MULTI-METAL COOKWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMADREZA SEDIGH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laminated structure is becoming more popular in cookware markets; however, there seems to be a lack of enough scientific studies to evaluate its pros and cons, and to show that how it functions. A numerical model using a finite element method with temperature-dependent material properties has been performed to investigate material and layer dependence of temperature distribution in multi-layer multi-metal plate exposed to irregular heating. Behavior of two parameters including mean temperature value and uniformity on the inner surface of plate under variations of thermal properties and geometrical conditions have been studied. The results indicate that conductive metals used as first layer in bi-layer plates have better thermal performance than those used in the second layer. In addition, since cookware manufacturers increasingly prefer to use all-clad aluminium plate, recently, this structure is analysed in the present study as well. The results show all-clad copper and aluminum plate possesses lower temperature gradient compared with single layer aluminum and all-clad aluminum core plates.

  19. Distribution and Sources of Black Carbon in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ling

    The Arctic is warming at twice the global rate over recent decades. To slow down this warming trend, there is growing interest in reducing the impact from short-lived climate forcers, such as black carbon (BC), because the benefits of mitigation are seen more quickly relative to CO2 reduction. To propose efficient mitigation policies, it is imperative to improve our understanding of BC distribution in the Arctic and to identify the sources. In this dissertation, we investigate the sensitivity of BC in the Arctic, including BC concentrations in snow (BCsnow) and BC concentrations in air (BCair), to emissions, dry deposition and wet scavenging using a global 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) GEOS-Chem. By including flaring emissions, estimating dry deposition velocity using resistance-in-series method, and including Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) in wet scavenging, simulated BCsnow in the eight Arctic sub-regions agree with the observations within a factor of two, and simulated BCair fall within the uncertainty range of observations. Specifically, we find that natural gas flaring emissions in Western Extreme North of Russia (WENR) strongly enhance BCsnow (by up to ?50%) and BCair (by 20-32%) during snow season in the so-called 'Arctic front', but has negligible impact on BC in the free troposphere. The updated dry deposition velocity over snow and ice is much larger than those used in most of global CTMs and agrees better with observation. The resulting BCsnow changes marginally because of the offsetting of higher dry and lower wet deposition fluxes. In contrast, surface BCair decreases strongly due to the faster dry deposition (by 27-68%). WBF occurs when the environmental vapor pressure is in between the saturation vapor pressure of ice crystals and water drops in mixed-phase clouds. As a result, water drops evaporate and releases BC particles in them back into the interstitial air. In most CTMs, WBF is either missing or represented by a uniform and low BC

  20. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  1. Universality Results for Multi-Layer Hele-Shaw and Porous Media Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daripa, Prabir

    2012-11-01

    Saffman-Taylor instability is a well known viscosity driven instability of an interface. Motivated by a need to understand the effect of various injection policies currently in practice for chemical enhanced oil recovery, we study linear stability of displacement processes in a Hele-Shaw cell involving injection of an arbitrary number of immiscible fluid phases in succession. This is a problem involving many interfaces. Universal stability results have been obtained for this multi-layer (multi-region) flow in the sense that the results hold with arbitrary number of interfaces. These stability results have been applied to design injection policies that are considerably less unstable than the pure Saffman-Taylor case. In particular, we determine specific values of the viscosity of the fluid layers corresponding to smallest unstable band. Moreover, we discuss universal selection principle of optimal viscous profiles. The talk is based on following papers. Qatar National Fund (a member of the Qatar Foundation).

  2. The Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS mission: design, execution, and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Jacob

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS mission was conducted in two 3-week deployments based in Alaska (April 2008 and western Canada (June–July 2008. Its goal was to better understand the factors driving current changes in Arctic atmospheric composition and climate, including (1 influx of mid-latitude pollution, (2 boreal forest fires, (3 aerosol radiative forcing, and (4 chemical processes. The June–July deployment was preceded by one week of flights over California (ARCTAS-CARB focused on (1 improving state emission inventories for greenhouse gases and aerosols, (2 providing observations to test and improve models of ozone and aerosol pollution. ARCTAS involved three aircraft: a DC-8 with a detailed chemical payload, a P-3 with an extensive aerosol and radiometric payload, and a B-200 with aerosol remote sensing instrumentation. The aircraft data augmented satellite observations of Arctic atmospheric composition, in particular from the NASA A-Train. The spring phase (ARCTAS-A revealed pervasive Asian pollution throughout the Arctic as well as significant European pollution below 2 km. Unusually large Siberian fires in April 2008 caused high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols and also affected ozone. Satellite observations of BrO column hotspots were found not to be related to Arctic boundary layer events but instead to tropopause depressions, suggesting the presence of elevated inorganic bromine (5–10 pptv in the lower stratosphere. Fresh fire plumes from Canada and California sampled during the summer phase (ARCTAS-B indicated low NOx emission factors from the fires, rapid conversion of NOx to PAN, no significant secondary aerosol production, and no significant ozone enhancements except when mixed with urban pollution.

  3. Influences on the reflectance of Arctic sea ice and the impact of anthropogenic impurities on the surface shortwave radiation balance

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Hannes; Herber, Andreas; Birnbaum, Gerit; Seckmeyer, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate influences on the reflectance of snow covered Arctic sea ice, a discrete ordinate method and Mie-Theory based radiative transfer model has been set up. This model, the Snow on Sea Ice Model (SoSIM), is able to investigate changes in spectral and spectrally integrated (broadband) albedo of a multi-layer snow cover on sea ice due to varying snow microphysical parameters, atmospheric composition and incoming solar radiation. For typical conditions in the Arctic sea-ice ar...

  4. Investigation of aperiodic W/C multi-layer mirror for X-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhanshan; Cheng Xinbin; Zhu Jingtao; Huang Qiushi; Zhang Zhong; Chen Lingyan

    2011-01-01

    Design, fabrication and characterization of aperiodic tungsten/carbon (W/C) multi-layer mirror were studied. W/C multi-layer was designed as a broad-angle reflective supermirror for Cu-Kα line (λ = 0.154 nm) in the grazing incident angular range (0.9-1.1 deg.) using simulated annealing algorithm. To deposit the W/C depth-graded multi-layer mirror accurately, we introduce an effective layer growth rate as a function of layer thickness. This method greatly improves the reflectivity curve compared to the conventional multi-layer mirror prepared with constant growth rate. The deposited multi-layer mirror exhibits an average reflectivity of 19% over the grazing incident angle range of 0.88-1.08 deg. which mainly coincides with the designed value. Furthermore, the physical mechanisms were discussed and the re-sputtering process of light-atom layers is accounted for the modification of layer thicknesses which leads to the effective growth rates. Using this calibration method, the aperiodic multi-layer mirrors can be better fabricated for X-ray optics.

  5. A Study on Elastic Guided Wave Modal Characteristics in Multi-Layered Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Chong Myoung

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a program which can calculate phase and group velocities, attenuation and wave structures of each mode in multi-layered plates. The wave structures of each mode are obtained, varying material properties and number of layers. The key in the success of guided wave NDE is how to optimize the mode selection scheme by minimizing energy loss when a structure is in contact with liquid. In this study, the normalized out-of-plane displacements at the surface of a free plate are used to predict the variation of modal attenuation and verily the correlation between attenuation and wave structure. It turns out that the guided wave attenuation can be efficiently obtain from the out-of-plane displacement variation of a free wave guide alleviating such mathematical difficulties in extracting complex roots for the eigenvalue problem of a liquid loaded wave guide. Through this study, the concert to optimize guided wave mode selection is accomplished to enhance sensitivity and efficiency in nondestructive evaluation for multi-layered structures.

  6. The delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic food web: why sea ice matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pućko, Monika; Stern, Gary A; Macdonald, Robie W; Jantunen, Liisa M; Bidleman, Terry F; Wong, Fiona; Barber, David G; Rysgaard, Søren

    2015-02-15

    For decades sea ice has been perceived as a physical barrier for the loading of contaminants to the Arctic Ocean. We show that sea ice, in fact, facilitates the delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web through processes that: 1) are independent of contaminant physical-chemical properties (e.g. 2-3-fold increase in exposure to brine-associated biota), and 2) depend on physical-chemical properties and, therefore, differentiate between contaminants (e.g. atmospheric loading of contaminants to melt ponds over the summer, and their subsequent leakage to the ocean). We estimate the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in melt pond water in the Beaufort Sea, Canadian High Arctic, in 2008, at near-gas exchange equilibrium based on Henry's law constants (HLCs), air concentrations and exchange dynamics. CUPs currently present the highest risk of increased exposures through melt pond loading and drainage due to the high ratio of melt pond water to seawater concentration (Melt pond Enrichment Factor, MEF), which ranges from 2 for dacthal to 10 for endosulfan I. Melt pond contaminant enrichment can be perceived as a hypothetical 'pump' delivering contaminants from the atmosphere to the ocean under ice-covered conditions, with 2-10% of CUPs annually entering the Beaufort Sea via this input route compared to the standing stock in the Polar Mixed Layer of the ocean. The abovementioned processes are strongly favored in first-year ice compared to multi-year ice and, therefore, the dynamic balance between contaminant inventories and contaminant deposition to the surface ocean is being widely affected by the large-scale icescape transition taking place in the Arctic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical simulation of phase change material composite wallboard in a multi-layered building envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwanzig, Stephen D.; Lian, Yongsheng; Brehob, Ellen G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A numerical method to study the heat transfer through a PCM composite wallboard is presented. ► PCM wallboard can reduce energy consumption and shift peak electricity load. ► There is an optimal location for the PCM wallboard in the building envelop. ► The PCM wallboard performance depends on weather conditions. - Abstract: Phase change materials (PCMs) have the capability to store/release massive latent heat when undergoing phase change. When impregnated or encapsulated into wallboard or concrete systems, PCMs can greatly enhance their thermal energy storage capacity and effective thermal mass. When used in the building envelope PCM wallboard has the potential to improve building operation by reducing the energy requirement for maintaining thermal comfort, downsizing the AC/heating equipment, and shifting the peak load from the electrical grid. In this work we numerically studied the potential of PCM on energy saving for residential homes. For that purpose we solved the one-dimensional, transient heat equation through the multi-layered building envelope using the Crank–Nicolson discretization scheme. A source term is incorporated to account for the thermal-physical properties of the composite PCM wallboard. Using this code we examined a PCM composite wallboard incorporated into the walls and roof of a typical residential building across various climate zones. The PCM performance was studied under all seasonal conditions using the latest typical meteorological year (TMY3) data for exterior boundary conditions. Our simulations show that PCM performance highly depends on the weather conditions, emphasizing the necessity to choose different PCMs at different climate zones. Comparisons were also made between different PCM wallboard locations. Our work shows that there exists an optimal location for PCM placement within building envelope dependent upon the resistance values between the PCM layer and the exterior boundary conditions. We further

  8. Low-dimensional analysis, using POD, for two mixing layer-wake interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braud, Caroline; Heitz, Dominique; Arroyo, Georges; Perret, Laurent; Delville, Joeel; Bonnet, Jean-Paul

    2004-01-01

    The mixing layer-wake interaction is studied experimentally in the framework of two flow configurations. For the first one, the initial conditions of the mixing layer are modified by using a thick trailing edge, a wake effect is therefore superimposed to the mixing layer from its beginning (blunt trailing edge). In the second flow configuration, a canonical mixing layer is perturbed in its asymptotic region by the wake of a cylinder arranged perpendicular to the plane of the mixing layer. These interactions are analyzed mainly by using two-point velocity correlations and the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). These two flow configurations differ by the degree of complexity they involve: the former is mainly 2D while the latter is highly 3D. The blunt trailing edge configuration is analyzed by using rakes of hot wire probes. This flow configuration is found to be considerably different when compared to a conventional mixing layer. It appears in particular that the scale of the large structures depends only on the trailing edge thickness and does not grow in its downstream evolution. A criterion, based on POD, is proposed in order to separate wake-mixing layer dominant areas of the downstream evolution of the flow. The complex 3D dynamical behaviour resulting from the interaction between the canonical plane mixing layer and the wake of a cylinder is investigated using data arising from particle image velocimetry measurements. An analysis of the velocity correlations shows different length scales in the regions dominated by wake like structures and shear layer type structures. In order to characterize the particular organization in the plane of symmetry, a POD-Galerkin projection of the Navier-Stokes equations is performed in this plane. This leads to a low-dimensional dynamical system that allows the analysis of the relationship between the dominant frequencies to be performed. A reconstruction of the dominant periodic motion suspected from previous studies is

  9. Arctic Riverine CDOM and its effects on the Polar Marine Light Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orandle, Zoe Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weijer, Wilbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Elliott, Scott M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Shanlin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-28

    It is well-known that CDOM (Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter) can have a significant effect on biological activity in the photic zones of aquatic ecosystems. However, the extent of CDOM’s interference with biological activity is not well-known. We examined this issue in great detail in the mixed surface layer of the Arctic Ocean. We studied the impacts of CDOM’s light attenuation on Arctic phytoplankton populations to discover if riverine CDOM’s presence in the Arctic ocean could inhibit and possibly prevent local phytoplankton populations from performing photosynthesis. We incorporated biogeochemistry concepts and data with oceanographic models and calculations to approach the problem. The results showed that riverine CDOM can indeed significantly impact the productivity of phytoplankton populations during the spring and summer months near the major Arctic river mouths we chose to examine. Although our study was detailed and inclusive of many variables, the issue of CDOM’s light attenuation and its effects on phytoplankton populations must be explored on a global scale to help understand if riverine CDOM could prove disastrous for phytoplankton populations.

  10. Spacer layer effect and microstructure on multi-layer [NdFeB/Nb]n films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, J.-L.; Yao, Y.-D.; Chin, T.-S.; Kronmueller, H.

    2002-01-01

    Spacer layer effect on multi-layer [NdFeB/Nb] n films has been investigated from the variation of magnetic properties and microstructure of the films. From a HRTEM cross-section view observation, the average grain size of [NdFeB/Nb] n multi-layers was controlled by both annealing temperature and thickness of NdFeB layer. Selected area diffraction pattern indicated that the structure of Nb spacer layer was amorphous. The grain size and coercivity of [NdFeB x /Nb] n films change from 50 nm and 16.7 kOe to 167 nm and 9 kOe for films with x=40 nm, n=10 and x=200 nm, n=2, respectively

  11. Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Planetary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Haekkinen, S.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of a fifty-year record (1946-1995) of monthly-averaged sea level pressure data provides a link between the phases of planetary-scale sea level pressure waves and Arctic Ocean and ice variability. Results of this analysis show: (1) a breakdown of the dominant wave 1 pattern in the late 1960's, (2) shifts in the mean phase of waves 1 and 2 since this breakdown, (3) an eastward shift in the phases of both waves 1 and 2 during the years of simulated cyclonic Arctic Ocean circulation relative to their phases during the years of anticyclonic circulation, (4) a strong decadal variability of wave phase associated with simulated Arctic Ocean circulation changes. Finally, the Arctic atmospheric circulation patterns that emerge when waves 1 and 2 are in their extreme eastern and western positions suggest an alternative approach for determining significant forcing patterns of sea ice and high-latitude variability.

  12. Mixed-layer carbon cycling at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Andrea J.; Sabine, Christopher L.; Cronin, Meghan F.; Sutton, Adrienne J.

    2017-02-01

    Seven years of data from the NOAA Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) surface mooring, located in the North Pacific Ocean carbon sink region, were used to evaluate drivers of mixed-layer carbon cycling. A time-dependent mass balance approach relying on two carbon tracers was used to diagnostically evaluate how surface ocean processes influence mixed-layer carbon concentrations over the annual cycle. Results indicate that the annual physical carbon input is predominantly balanced by biological carbon uptake during the intense spring bloom. Net annual gas exchange that adds carbon to the mixed layer and the opposing influence of net precipitation that dilutes carbon concentrations make up smaller contributions to the annual mixed-layer carbon budget. Decomposing the biological term into annual net community production (aNCP) and calcium carbonate production (aCaCO3) yields 7 ± 3 mol C m-2 yr-1 aNCP and 0.5 ± 0.3 mol C m-2 yr-1 aCaCO3, giving an annually integrated particulate inorganic carbon to particulate organic carbon production ratio of 0.07 ± 0.05, as a lower limit. Although we find that vertical physical processes dominate carbon input to the mixed layer at KEO, it remains unclear how horizontal features, such as eddies, influence carbon production and export by altering nutrient supply as well as the depth of winter ventilation. Further research evaluating linkages between Kuroshio Extension jet instabilities, eddy activity, and nutrient supply mechanisms is needed to adequately characterize the drivers and sensitivities of carbon cycling near KEO.

  13. Optimisation of multi-layer rotationally moulded foamed structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, A. J.; McCourt, M. P.; Kearns, M. P.; Martin, P. J.; Cunningham, E.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-layer skin-foam and skin-foam-skin sandwich constructions are of increasing interest in the rotational moulding process for two reasons. Firstly, multi-layer constructions can improve the thermal insulation properties of a part. Secondly, foamed polyethylene sandwiched between solid polyethylene skins can increase the mechanical properties of rotationally moulded structural components, in particular increasing flexural properties and impact strength (IS). The processing of multiple layers of polyethylene and polyethylene foam presents unique challenges such as the control of chemical blowing agent decomposition temperature, and the optimisation of cooling rates to prevent destruction of the foam core; therefore, precise temperature control is paramount to success. Long cooling cycle times are associated with the creation of multi-layer foam parts due to their insulative nature; consequently, often making the costs of production prohibitive. Devices such as Rotocooler®, a rapid internal mould water spray cooling system, have been shown to have the potential to significantly decrease cooling times in rotational moulding. It is essential to monitor and control such devices to minimise the warpage associated with the rapid cooling of a moulding from only one side. The work presented here demonstrates the use of threaded thermocouples to monitor the polymer melt in multi-layer sandwich constructions, in order to analyse the cooling cycle of multi-layer foamed structures. A series of polyethylene skin-foam test mouldings were produced, and the effect of cooling medium on foam characteristics, mechanical properties, and process cycle time were investigated. Cooling cycle time reductions of 45%, 26%, and 29% were found for increasing (1%, 2%, and 3%) chemical blowing agent (CBA) amount when using internal water cooling technology from ˜123°C compared with forced air cooling (FAC). Subsequently, a reduction of IS for the same skin-foam parts was found to be 1%, 4

  14. Multiphase modeling of nitrate photochemistry in the quasi-liquid layer (QLL: implications for NOx release from the Arctic and coastal Antarctic snowpack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Saiz-Lopez

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We utilize a multiphase model, CON-AIR (Condensed Phase to Air Transfer Model, to show that the photochemistry of nitrate (NO3− in and on ice and snow surfaces, specifically the quasi-liquid layer (QLL, can account for NOx volume fluxes, concentrations, and [NO]/[NO2] (γ=[NO]/[NO2] measured just above the Arctic and coastal Antarctic snowpack. Maximum gas phase NOx volume fluxes, concentrations and γ simulated for spring and summer range from 5.0×104 to 6.4×105 molecules cm−3 s−1, 5.7×108 to 4.8×109 molecules cm−3, and ~0.8 to 2.2, respectively, which are comparable to gas phase NOx volume fluxes, concentrations and γ measured in the field. The model incorporates the appropriate actinic solar spectrum, thereby properly weighting the different rates of photolysis of NO3− and NO2−. This is important since the immediate precursor for NO, for example, NO2−, absorbs at wavelengths longer than nitrate itself. Finally, one-dimensional model simulations indicate that both gas phase boundary layer NO and NO2 exhibit a negative concentration gradient as a function of height although [NO]/[NO2] are approximately constant. This gradient is primarily attributed to gas phase reactions of NOx with halogens oxides (i.e. as BrO and IO, HOx, and hydrocarbons, such as CH3O2.

  15. Late winter biogeochemical conditions under sea ice in the Canadian High Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen S. Findlay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the Arctic summer sea-ice extent in decline, questions are arising as to how changes in sea-ice dynamics might affect biogeochemical cycling and phenomena such as carbon dioxide (CO2 uptake and ocean acidification. Recent field research in these areas has concentrated on biogeochemical and CO2 measurements during spring, summer or autumn, but there are few data for the winter or winter–spring transition, particularly in the High Arctic. Here, we present carbon and nutrient data within and under sea ice measured during the Catlin Arctic Survey, over 40 days in March and April 2010, off Ellef Ringnes Island (78° 43.11′ N, 104° 47.44′ W in the Canadian High Arctic. Results show relatively low surface water (1–10 m nitrate (<1.3 µM and total inorganic carbon concentrations (mean±SD=2015±5.83 µmol kg−1, total alkalinity (mean±SD=2134±11.09 µmol kg−1 and under-ice pCO2sw (mean±SD=286±17 µatm. These surprisingly low wintertime carbon and nutrient conditions suggest that the outer Canadian Arctic Archipelago region is nitrate-limited on account of sluggish mixing among the multi-year ice regions of the High Arctic, which could temper the potential of widespread under-ice and open-water phytoplankton blooms later in the season.

  16. Two-equation and multi-fluid turbulence models for Rayleigh–Taylor mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkinakis, I.W.; Drikakis, D.; Youngs, D.L.; Williams, R.J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new improved version of the K–L model. • The improved K–L is found in good agreement with the multi-fluid model and ILES. • The study concerns Rayleigh–Taylor flows at initial density ratios 3:1 and 20:1. - Abstract: This paper presents a new, improved version of the K–L model, as well as a detailed investigation of K–L and multi-fluid models with reference to high-resolution implicit large eddy simulations of compressible Rayleigh–Taylor mixing. The accuracy of the models is examined for different interface pressures and specific heat ratios for Rayleigh–Taylor flows at initial density ratios 3:1 and 20:1. It is shown that the original version of the K–L model requires modifications in order to provide comparable results to the multi-fluid model. The modifications concern the addition of an enthalpy diffusion term to the energy equation; the formulation of the turbulent kinetic energy (source) term in the K equation; and the calculation of the local Atwood number. The proposed modifications significantly improve the results of the K–L model, which are found in good agreement with the multi-fluid model and implicit large eddy simulations with respect to the self-similar mixing width; peak turbulent kinetic energy growth rate, as well as volume fraction and turbulent kinetic energy profiles. However, a key advantage of the two-fluid model is that it can represent the degree of molecular mixing in a direct way, by transferring mass between the two phases. The limitations of the single-fluid K–L model as well as the merits of more advanced Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes models are also discussed throughout the paper.

  17. Summertime observations of elevated levels of ultrafine particles in the high Arctic marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Julia; Willis, Megan D.; Bozem, Heiko; Thomas, Jennie L.; Law, Kathy; Hoor, Peter; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Köllner, Franziska; Schneider, Johannes; Herber, Andreas; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Leaitch, W. Richard

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by increasing levels of open ocean in the Arctic summer and the lack of prior altitude-resolved studies, extensive aerosol measurements were made during 11 flights of the NETCARE July 2014 airborne campaign from Resolute Bay, Nunavut. Flights included vertical profiles (60 to 3000 m above ground level) over open ocean, fast ice, and boundary layer clouds and fogs. A general conclusion, from observations of particle numbers between 5 and 20 nm in diameter (N5 - 20), is that ultrafine particle formation occurs readily in the Canadian high Arctic marine boundary layer, especially just above ocean and clouds, reaching values of a few thousand particles cm-3. By contrast, ultrafine particle concentrations are much lower in the free troposphere. Elevated levels of larger particles (for example, from 20 to 40 nm in size, N20 - 40) are sometimes associated with high N5 - 20, especially over low clouds, suggestive of aerosol growth. The number densities of particles greater than 40 nm in diameter (N > 40) are relatively depleted at the lowest altitudes, indicative of depositional processes that will lower the condensation sink and promote new particle formation. The number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN; measured at 0.6 % supersaturation) are positively correlated with the numbers of small particles (down to roughly 30 nm), indicating that some fraction of these newly formed particles are capable of being involved in cloud activation. Given that the summertime marine Arctic is a biologically active region, it is important to better establish the links between emissions from the ocean and the formation and growth of ultrafine particles within this rapidly changing environment.

  18. Corrosion behaviour in saline environments of single-layer titanium and aluminium coatings, and of Ti/Al alternated multi-layers elaborated by a multi-beam PVD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merati, Abdenacer

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis reports the characterization of anti-corrosion titanium and aluminium coatings deposited on a 35CD4 steel under the form of mono-metallic layers or alternated Ti/Al multi-layers, and obtained by a multibeam PVD technique. The influence of different parameters is studied: single-layer thickness (5, 15 or 30 micro-metres), multi-layer distribution (5 to 6) and substrate (smooth or threaded). Layer nature and microstructure are studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as corrosion toughness in aqueous saline environments. Coated threaded samples have been studied after tightening tests. It appears that titanium layers are denser and more uniform than aluminium layers, and that multi-layer coatings provide a better protection than single-layer coatings. The best behaviour is obtained when titanium is in contact with steel, and aluminium is the outer layer in contact with the corroding environment [fr

  19. Characteristics of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Arctic outflow in the Fram Strait: Assessing the changes and fate of terrigenous CDOM in the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Granskog, M.A.; Stedmon, C.A.; Dodd, P.A.; Amon, R.M.W.; Pavlov, A.K.; de Steur, L.; Hansen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Absorption coefficients of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured together with salinity, delta O-18, and inorganic nutrients across the Fram Strait. A pronounced CDOM absorption maximum between 30 and 120 m depth was associated with river and sea ice brine enriched water, characteristic of the Arctic mixed layer and upper halocline waters in the East Greenland Current (EGC). The lowest CDOM concentrations were found in the Atlantic inflow. We show that the salinity-CDOM relati...

  20. Studying the influence of temperature and pressure on microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds using airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreea, Boscornea; Sabina, Stefan; Sorin-Nicolae, Vajaiac; Mihai, Cimpuieru

    2015-04-01

    One cloud type for which the formation and evolution process is not well-understood is the mixed-phase type. In general mixed-phase clouds consist of liquid droplets and ice crystals. The temperature interval within both liquid droplets and ice crystals can potentially coexist is limited to 0 °C and - 40 °C. Mixed-phase clouds account for 20% to 30% of the global cloud coverage. The need to understand the microphysical characteristics of mixed-phase clouds to improve numerical forecast modeling and radiative transfer calculation is of major interest in the atmospheric community. In the past, studies of cloud phase composition have been significantly limited by a lack of aircraft instruments capable of discriminating between the ice and liquid phase for a wide range of particle sizes. Presently, in situ airborne measurements provide the most accurate information about cloud microphysical characteristics. This information can be used for verification of both numerical models and cloud remote-sensing techniques. The knowledge of the temperature and pressure variation during the airborne measurements is crucial in order to understand their influence on the cloud dynamics and also their role in the cloud formation processes like accretion and coalescence. Therefore, in this paper is presented a comprehensive study of cloud microphysical properties in mixed-phase clouds in focus of the influence of temperature and pressure variation on both, cloud dynamics and the cloud formation processes, using measurements performed with the ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research in property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS). The airborne laboratory equipped for special research missions is based on a Hawker Beechcraft - King Air C90 GTx aircraft and is equipped with a sensors system CAPS - Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (30 bins, 0.51-50 µm) and a HAWKEYE cloud probe. The analyzed data in this

  1. Phase-partitioning in mixed-phase clouds - An approach to characterize the entire vertical column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalesse, H.; Luke, E. P.; Seifert, P.

    2017-12-01

    The characterization of the entire vertical profile of phase-partitioning in mixed-phase clouds is a challenge which can be addressed by synergistic profiling measurements with ground-based polarization lidars and cloud radars. While lidars are sensitive to small particles and can thus detect supercooled liquid (SCL) layers, cloud radar returns are dominated by larger particles (like ice crystals). The maximum lidar observation height is determined by complete signal attenuation at a penetrated optical depth of about three. In contrast, cloud radars are able to penetrate multiple liquid layers and can thus be used to expand the identification of cloud phase to the entire vertical column beyond the lidar extinction height, if morphological features in the radar Doppler spectrum can be related to the existence of SCL. Relevant spectral signatures such as bimodalities and spectral skewness can be related to cloud phase by training a neural network appropriately in a supervised learning scheme, with lidar measurements functioning as supervisor. The neural network output (prediction of SCL location) derived using cloud radar Doppler spectra can be evaluated with several parameters such as liquid water path (LWP) detected by microwave radiometer (MWR) and (liquid) cloud base detected by ceilometer or Raman lidar. The technique has been previously tested on data from Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) instruments in Barrow, Alaska and is in this study utilized for observations from the Leipzig Aerosol and Cloud Remote Observations System (LACROS) during the Analysis of the Composition of Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques (ACCEPT) field experiment in Cabauw, Netherlands in Fall 2014. Comparisons to supercooled-liquid layers as classified by CLOUDNET are provided.

  2. Analytical solution for the convectively-mixed atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, H.G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer theory assuming a zeroth order jump at the entrainment zone, analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height evolution are derived with different degrees of accuracy. First, an exact implicit expression for the boundary-layer height for a situation

  3. Alkenone-based reconstructions reveal four-phase Holocene temperature evolution for High Arctic Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bilt, Willem G. M.; D'Andrea, William J.; Bakke, Jostein; Balascio, Nicholas L.; Werner, Johannes P.; Gjerde, Marthe; Bradley, Raymond S.

    2018-03-01

    Situated at the crossroads of major oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns, the Arctic is a key component of Earth's climate system. Compounded by sea-ice feedbacks, even modest shifts in the region's heat budget drive large climate responses. This is highlighted by the observed amplified response of the Arctic to global warming. Assessing the imprint and signature of underlying forcing mechanisms require paleoclimate records, allowing us to expand our knowledge beyond the short instrumental period and contextualize ongoing warming. However, such datasets are scarce and sparse in the Arctic, limiting our ability to address these issues. Here, we present two quantitative Holocene-length paleotemperature records from the High Arctic Svalbard archipelago, situated in the climatically sensitive Arctic North Atlantic. Temperature estimates are based on U37K unsaturation ratios from sediment cores of two lakes. Our data reveal a dynamic Holocene temperature evolution, with reconstructed summer lake water temperatures spanning a range of ∼6-8 °C, and characterized by four phases. The Early Holocene was marked by an early onset (∼10.5 ka cal. BP) of insolation-driven Hypsithermal conditions, likely compounded by strengthening oceanic heat transport. This warm interval was interrupted by cooling between ∼10.5-8.3 ka cal. BP that we attribute to cooling effects from the melting Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. Temperatures declined throughout the Middle Holocene, following a gradual trend that was accentuated by two cooling steps between ∼7.8-7 ka cal. BP and around ∼4.4-4.3 ka cal. BP. These transitions coincide with a strengthening influence of Arctic water and sea-ice in the adjacent Fram Strait. During the Late Holocene (past 4 ka), temperature change decoupled from the still-declining insolation, and fluctuated around comparatively cold mean conditions. By showing that Holocene Svalbard temperatures were governed by an alternation of forcings, this study

  4. Microlayer source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the summertime marine Arctic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, Emma L.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Lee, Alex K. Y.; Thomas, Jennie L.; Blais, Marjolaine; Gosselin, Michel; Miller, Lisa A.; Papakyriakou, Tim; Willis, Megan D.; Liggio, John

    2017-06-01

    Summertime Arctic shipboard observations of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) such as organic acids, key precursors of climatically active secondary organic aerosol (SOA), are consistent with a novel source of OVOCs to the marine boundary layer via chemistry at the sea surface microlayer. Although this source has been studied in a laboratory setting, organic acid emissions from the sea surface microlayer have not previously been observed in ambient marine environments. Correlations between measurements of OVOCs, including high levels of formic acid, in the atmosphere (measured by an online high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer) and dissolved organic matter in the ocean point to a marine source for the measured OVOCs. That this source is photomediated is indicated by correlations between the diurnal cycles of the OVOC measurements and solar radiation. In contrast, the OVOCs do not correlate with levels of isoprene, monoterpenes, or dimethyl sulfide. Results from box model calculations are consistent with heterogeneous chemistry as the source of the measured OVOCs. As sea ice retreats and dissolved organic carbon inputs to the Arctic increase, the impact of this source on the summer Arctic atmosphere is likely to increase. Globally, this source should be assessed in other marine environments to quantify its impact on OVOC and SOA burdens in the atmosphere, and ultimately on climate.

  5. Microlayer source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the summertime marine Arctic boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, Emma L; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Wentzell, Jeremy J B; Lee, Alex K Y; Thomas, Jennie L; Blais, Marjolaine; Gosselin, Michel; Miller, Lisa A; Papakyriakou, Tim; Willis, Megan D; Liggio, John

    2017-06-13

    Summertime Arctic shipboard observations of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) such as organic acids, key precursors of climatically active secondary organic aerosol (SOA), are consistent with a novel source of OVOCs to the marine boundary layer via chemistry at the sea surface microlayer. Although this source has been studied in a laboratory setting, organic acid emissions from the sea surface microlayer have not previously been observed in ambient marine environments. Correlations between measurements of OVOCs, including high levels of formic acid, in the atmosphere (measured by an online high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer) and dissolved organic matter in the ocean point to a marine source for the measured OVOCs. That this source is photomediated is indicated by correlations between the diurnal cycles of the OVOC measurements and solar radiation. In contrast, the OVOCs do not correlate with levels of isoprene, monoterpenes, or dimethyl sulfide. Results from box model calculations are consistent with heterogeneous chemistry as the source of the measured OVOCs. As sea ice retreats and dissolved organic carbon inputs to the Arctic increase, the impact of this source on the summer Arctic atmosphere is likely to increase. Globally, this source should be assessed in other marine environments to quantify its impact on OVOC and SOA burdens in the atmosphere, and ultimately on climate.

  6. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundar...

  7. The phase mixing of shear Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uberoi, C.

    1993-04-01

    The phase mixing of shear Alfven waves is discussed as a current sheets crossover phenomena by using the well-behaved time dependent solution of the Alfven wave equation. This method is a more direct approach than the initial value problem technique to find the collisionless damping time of the surface waves, which as it represents the coherency loss is argued to be the phase mixing time. The phase mixing time obtained by both the methods compares well. The direct method however, has an advantage that no particular profile for the magnetic field variation need to be chosen and secondly the phase mixing time and the time scale for which the resistivity effects become important can be expressed conveniently in terms of Alfven transit times before crossover. (author). 11 refs

  8. Operational geometric phase for mixed quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, O; Heydari, H

    2013-01-01

    The geometric phase has found a broad spectrum of applications in both classical and quantum physics, such as condensed matter and quantum computation. In this paper, we introduce an operational geometric phase for mixed quantum states, based on spectral weighted traces of holonomies, and we prove that it generalizes the standard definition of the geometric phase for mixed states, which is based on quantum interferometry. We also introduce higher order geometric phases, and prove that under a fairly weak, generically satisfied, requirement, there is always a well-defined geometric phase of some order. Our approach applies to general unitary evolutions of both non-degenerate and degenerate mixed states. Moreover, since we provide an explicit formula for the geometric phase that can be easily implemented, it is particularly well suited for computations in quantum physics. (paper)

  9. Multi-centennial Record of Labrador Sea Primary Productivity and Sea-Ice Variability Archived in Coralline Algal Ba/Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Phoebe; Halfar, Jochen; Adey, Walter; Hetzinger, Steffen; Zack, Thomas; Moore, Kent; Wortmann, Ulrich; Williams, Branwen; Hou, Alicia

    2017-04-01

    Arctic sea-ice thickness and concentration have dropped by approximately 9% per decade since 1978. Concurrent with this sea-ice decline is an increase in rates of phytoplankton productivity, driven by shoaling of the mixed layer and enhanced transmittance of solar radiation into the surface ocean. This has recently been confirmed by phytoplankton studies in Arctic and Subarctic basins that have revealed earlier timing, prolonged duration, and increased primary productivity of the spring phytoplankton bloom. However, difficulties of navigating in remote ice-laden waters and harsh polar climates have often resulted in short and incomplete records of in-situ plankton abundance in the northwestern Labrador Sea. Alternatively, information of past ocean productivity may be gained through the study of trace nutrient distributions in the surface water column. Investigations of dissolved barium (Ba) concentrations in the Arctic reveal significant depletions of Ba in surface seawaters due to biological scavenging during the spring phytoplankton bloom. Here we apply a barium-to-calcium (Ba/Ca) and carbon isotope (δ13C) multiproxy approach to long-lived crustose coralline algae in order to reconstruct an annually-resolved multi-centennial record of Labrador Sea productivity related to sea-ice variability in Labrador, Canada that extends well into the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1646 AD). The crustose coralline alga Clathromorphum compactum is a shallow marine calcareous plant that is abundant along the eastern Canadian coastline, and produces annual growth increments which allow for the precise calendar dating and geochemical sampling of hard tissue. Algal Ba/Ca ratios can serve as a promising new proxy for surface water productivity, demonstrating a close correspondence to δ13C that does not suffer from the anthropogenically-induced carbon isotope decline (ex. Suess Effect) beginning in the 1960s. Coralline algal Ba/Ca demonstrates statistically significant correlations to both

  10. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice - implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysgaard, S.; Glud, R. N.; Lennert, K.; Cooper, M.; Halden, N.; Leakey, R. J. G.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Barber, D.

    2012-08-01

    A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air-sea CO2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO3·6H2O) in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km2 (0.5-1 m thick) drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced the ice floe thickness by 0.2 m per week and resulted in an estimated 3.8 ppm decrease of pCO2 in the ocean surface mixed layer. This corresponds to an air-sea CO2 uptake of 10.6 mmol m-2 sea ice d-1 or to 3.3 ton km-2 ice floe week-1. This is markedly higher than the estimated primary production within the ice floe of 0.3-1.3 mmol m-2 sea ice d-1. Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO2 uptake.

  11. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S. K.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5°C to -40°C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

  12. Multi-area layered multicast scheme for MPLS networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yajie; Yang, Zongkai; Wang, Yuming; Chen, Jingwen

    2005-02-01

    Multi-protocol label switching (MPLS) is multiprotocols both at layer 2 and layer 3. It is suggested to overcome the shortcomings of performing complex longest prefix matching in layer 3 routing by using short, fixed length labels. The MPLS community has put more effort into the label switching of unicast IP traffic, but less in the MPLS multicast mechanism. The reasons are the higher label consumption, the dynamical mapping of L3 multicast tree to L2 LSPs and the 20-bit shim header which is much fewer than the IPv4 IP header. On the other hand, heterogeneity of node capability degrades total performance of a multicast group. In order to achieve the scalability as well as the heterogeneity in MPLS networks, a novel scheme of MPLS-based Multi-area Layered Multicast Scheme (MALM) is proposed. Unlike the existing schemes which focus on aggregating the multicast stream, we construct the multicast tree based on the virtual topology aggregation. The MPLS area is divided into different sub-areas to form the hierarchical virtual topology and the multicast group is reconstructed into multiple layers according to the node capability. At the same time, the label stack is used to save the label space. For stability of the MALM protocol, a multi-layer protection scheme is also discussed. The experiment results show that the proposed scheme saves label space and decrease the Multicast Forwarding Table in much degree.

  13. The roll-up and merging of coherent structures in shallow mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, M. Y.; Ghidaoui, M. S.; Kolyshkin, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study seeks a fundamental explanation to the development of two-dimensional coherent structures (2DCSs) in shallow mixing layers. A nonlinear numerical model based on the depth-averaged shallow water equations is used to investigate the temporal evolution of shallow mixing layers, where the mapping from temporal to spatial results is made using the velocity at the center of the mixing layers. The flow is periodic in the streamwise direction. Transmissive boundary conditions are used in the cross-stream boundaries to prevent reflections. Numerical results are compared to linear stability analysis, mean-field theory, and secondary stability analysis. Results suggest that the onset and development of 2DCS in shallow mixing layers are the result of a sequence of instabilities governed by linear theory, mean-field theory, and secondary stability theory. The linear instability of the shearing velocity gradient gives the onset of 2DCS. When the perturbations reach a certain amplitude, the flow field of the perturbations changes from a wavy shape to a vortical (2DCS) structure because of nonlinearity. The development of the vertical 2DCS does not appear to follow weakly nonlinear theory; instead, it follows mean-field theory. After the formation of 2DCS, separate 2DCSs merge to form larger 2DCS. In this way, 2DCSs grow and shallow mixing layers develop and grow in scale. The merging of 2DCS in shallow mixing layers is shown to be caused by the secondary instability of the 2DCS. Eventually 2DCSs are dissipated by bed friction. The sequence of instabilities can cause the upscaling of the turbulent kinetic energy in shallow mixing layers.

  14. Electrohydrodynamic direct—writing of conductor—insulator-conductor multi-layer interconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Gao-Feng; Pei Yan-Bo; Wang Xiang; Zheng Jian-Yi; Sun Dao-Heng

    2014-01-01

    A multi-layer interconnection structure is a basic component of electronic devices, and printing of the multi-layer interconnection structure is the key process in printed electronics. In this work, electrohydrodynamic direct-writing (EDW) is utilized to print the conductor—insulator—conductor multi-layer interconnection structure. Silver ink is chosen to print the conductor pattern, and a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution is utilized to fabricate the insulator layer between the bottom and top conductor patterns. The influences of EDW process parameters on the line width of the printed conductor and insulator patterns are studied systematically. The obtained results show that the line width of the printed structure increases with the increase of the flow rate, but decreases with the increase of applied voltage and PVP content in the solution. The average resistivity values of the bottom and top silver conductor tracks are determined to be 1.34 × 10 −7 Ω·m and 1.39 × 10 −7 Ω·m, respectively. The printed PVP layer between the two conductor tracks is well insulated, which can meet the insulation requirement of the electronic devices. This study offers an alternative, fast, and cost-effective method of fabricating conductor—insulator—conductor multi-layer interconnections in the electronic industry

  15. Design considerations for energy efficient, resilient, multi-layer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Anna Manolova; Hansen, Line Pyndt; Ruepp, Sarah Renée

    2016-01-01

    measures. In this complex problem, considerations such as client traffic granularity, applied grooming policies and multi-layer resiliency add even more complexity. A commercially available network planning tool is used to investigate the interplay between different methods for resilient capacity planning......This work investigates different network design considerations with respect to energy-efficiency, under green-field resilient multi-layer network deployment. The problem of energy efficient, reliable multi-layer network design is known to result in different trade-offs between key performance....... Switching off low-utilized transport links has been investigated via a pro-active re-routing applied during the network planning. Our analysis shows that design factors such as the applied survivability strategy and the applied planning method have higher impact on the key performance indicators compared...

  16. Mixed phase Pt-Ru catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell anode by flame aerosol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Debasish; Bischoff, H.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2005-01-01

    A spray-flame aerosol catalyzation technique was studied for producing Pt-Ru anode electrodes for the direct methanol fuel cell. Catalysts were produced as aerosol nanoparticles in a spray-flame reactor and deposited directly as a thin layer on the gas diffusion layer. The as-prepared catalyst wa......Ru1/Vulcan carbon. The kinetics of methanol oxidation on the mixed phase catalyst was also explored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. (c) 2005 The Electrochemical Society.......A spray-flame aerosol catalyzation technique was studied for producing Pt-Ru anode electrodes for the direct methanol fuel cell. Catalysts were produced as aerosol nanoparticles in a spray-flame reactor and deposited directly as a thin layer on the gas diffusion layer. The as-prepared catalyst...... was found to be a mixture of nanocrystalline, mostly unalloyed Pt and an amorphous phase mostly of Ru and to a lesser extent of Pt oxides on top of the crystalline phase. The flame-produced Pt1Ru1 demonstrated similar onset potential but similar to 60% higher activity compared to commercially available Pt1...

  17. Calculation studies of a multi-layer decoupler system for a decoupled hydrogen moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, M.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    2001-01-01

    We proposed a multi-layer decoupler as a method to improve pulse characteristics of emitted neutrons from a decoupled hydrogen moderator. Pulse shapes from a moderator with the multi layer-decoupler were compared with those with a traditional single layer decoupler. It was found that the multi-layer decoupler system gave better pulse characteristic with less decrease of peak intensity. (author)

  18. Tropospheric ozone annual variation and possible troposphere-stratosphere coupling in the Arctic and Antarctic as derived from ozone soundings at Resolute and Amundsen-Scott stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruzdev, A.N.; Sitnov, S.A. (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics)

    1993-01-01

    The tropospheric ozone annual variation in the northern and southern polar regions is analyzed from ozone sounding data obtained at Resolute during a 15-year period and Amundsen-Scott during a 7-year period. The phase of ozone annual variation above Resolute changes (increases) gradually from the stratosphere across the tropopause to the middle troposphere. Unlike this, the phase of the Antarctic ozone annual harmonic has a discontinuity in the layer of the changing tropopause level, so that the annual harmonic in the upper troposphere, lower stratosphere is 4-to-5 months out of phase (earlier) to that above and beneath. Above both the Arctic and Antarctic stations, the ozone mixing ratio and its vertical gradient evolve in a similar manner in the wide layer from the lower stratosphere to the middle troposphere. This likely points out that ozone in this layer is controlled from above. An indication of the stratospheric-tropospheric ozone exchange above Resolute is noted from mid-winter to spring. The analysis of columnar tropospheric ozone changes gives a lower estimate of the cross-tropopause ozone flux up to 5x10[sup 10] mol cm[sup -2] s[sup -1]. Above the South Pole, the cross-tropopause ozone flux is not usually large. There is also some evidence that early in the spring, when the stratospheric ozone 'hole' is developed, the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange conducts the influence of the 'hole' into the upper troposphere, where the integrated ozone destruction is estimated to be 8x10[sup 10] mol cm[sup -2] s[sup -1]. Correlation analysis gives no ozone-tropopause correlation in the Antarctic in winter, while in other seasons as well as during all seasons in the Arctic, there are negative correlation peaks just above the tropopause. (19 refs., 6 figs.).

  19. High energy PIXE: A tool to characterize multi-layer thick samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subercaze, A.; Koumeir, C.; Métivier, V.; Servagent, N.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.

    2018-02-01

    High energy PIXE is a useful and non-destructive tool to characterize multi-layer thick samples such as cultural heritage objects. In a previous work, we demonstrated the possibility to perform quantitative analysis of simple multi-layer samples using high energy PIXE, without any assumption on their composition. In this work an in-depth study of the parameters involved in the method previously published is proposed. Its extension to more complex samples with a repeated layer is also presented. Experiments have been performed at the ARRONAX cyclotron using 68 MeV protons. The thicknesses and sequences of a multi-layer sample including two different layers of the same element have been determined. Performances and limits of this method are presented and discussed.

  20. Zooplankton in the Arctic outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, K. A.; Dritz, A. V.; Nikishina, A. B.

    2009-04-01

    Climate changes in the Arctic cause the changes in the current system that may have cascading effect on the structure of plankton community and consequently on the interlinked and delicately balanced food web. Zooplankton species are by definition incapable to perform horizontal moving. Their transport is connected with flowing water. There are zooplankton species specific for the definite water masses and they can be used as markers for the different currents. That allows us to consider zooplankton community composition as a result of water mixing in the studied area. Little is known however about the mechanisms by which spatial and temporal variability in advection affect dynamics of local populations. Ice conditions are also very important in the function of pelagic communities. Melting time is the trigger to all "plankton blooming" processes, and the duration of ice-free conditions determines the food web development in the future. Fram Strait is one of the key regions for the Arctic: the cold water outflow comes through it with the East Greenland Current and meets warm Atlantic water, the West Spitsbergen Current, producing complicated hydrological situation. During 2007 and 2008 we investigated the structure functional characteristics of zooplankton community in the Fram Strait region onboard KV "Svalbard" (April 2007, April and May 2008) and RV "Jan Mayen" (May 2007, August 2008). This study was conducted in frame of iAOOS Norway project "Closing the loop", which, in turn, was a part of IPY. During this cruises multidisciplinary investigations were performed, including sea-ice observations, CTD and ADCP profiling, carbon flux, nutrients and primary production measurements, phytoplankton sampling. Zooplankton was collected with the Hydro-Bios WP2 net and MultiNet Zooplankton Sampler, (mouth area 0.25 m2, mesh size 180 um).Samples were taken from the depth strata of 2000-1500, 1500-1000, 1000-500,500-200, 200-100, 100-60, 60-30, 30-0 m. Gut fluorescence

  1. Generalized modeling of multi-component vaporization/condensation phenomena for multi-phase-flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, K.; Fukuda, K.; Tobita, Y.; Kondo, Sa.; Suzuki, T.; Maschek, W.

    2003-01-01

    A new multi-component vaporization/condensation (V/C) model was developed to provide a generalized model for safety analysis codes of liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs). These codes simulate thermal-hydraulic phenomena of multi-phase, multi-component flows, which is essential to investigate core disruptive accidents of LMRs such as fast breeder reactors and accelerator driven systems. The developed model characterizes the V/C processes associated with phase transition by employing heat transfer and mass-diffusion limited models for analyses of relatively short-time-scale multi-phase, multi-component hydraulic problems, among which vaporization and condensation, or simultaneous heat and mass transfer, play an important role. The heat transfer limited model describes the non-equilibrium phase transition processes occurring at interfaces, while the mass-diffusion limited model is employed to represent effects of non-condensable gases and multi-component mixture on V/C processes. Verification of the model and method employed in the multi-component V/C model of a multi-phase flow code was performed successfully by analyzing a series of multi-bubble condensation experiments. The applicability of the model to the accident analysis of LMRs is also discussed by comparison between steam and metallic vapor systems. (orig.)

  2. Quantum control of multi-wave mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2013-01-01

    Multi-wave mixing gives rise to new frequency components due to the interaction of light signals with a suitable nonlinear medium. In this book a systematic framework for the control of these processes is used to lead readers through a plethora of related effects and techniques.

  3. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice – implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. G. Leakey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air–sea CO2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO3·6H2O in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km2 (0.5–1 m thick drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced the ice floe thickness by 0.2 m per week and resulted in an estimated 3.8 ppm decrease of pCO2 in the ocean surface mixed layer. This corresponds to an air–sea CO2 uptake of 10.6 mmol m−2 sea ice d−1 or to 3.3 ton km−2 ice floe week−1. This is markedly higher than the estimated primary production within the ice floe of 0.3–1.3 mmol m−2 sea ice d−1. Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO2 uptake.

  4. Responses of Mixed-Phase Cloud Condensates and Cloud Radiative Effects to Ice Nucleating Particle Concentrations in NCAR CAM5 and DOE ACME Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Shi, Y.; Wu, M.; Zhang, K.

    2017-12-01

    Mixed-phase clouds frequently observed in the Arctic and mid-latitude storm tracks have the substantial impacts on the surface energy budget, precipitation and climate. In this study, we first implement the two empirical parameterizations (Niemand et al. 2012 and DeMott et al. 2015) of heterogeneous ice nucleation for mixed-phase clouds in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5) and DOE Accelerated Climate Model for Energy Version 1 (ACME1). Model simulated ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations based on Niemand et al. and DeMott et al. are compared with those from the default ice nucleation parameterization based on the classical nucleation theory (CNT) in CAM5 and ACME, and with in situ observations. Significantly higher INP concentrations (by up to a factor of 5) are simulated from Niemand et al. than DeMott et al. and CNT especially over the dust source regions in both CAM5 and ACME. Interestingly the ACME model simulates higher INP concentrations than CAM5, especially in the Polar regions. This is also the case when we nudge the two models' winds and temperature towards the same reanalysis, indicating more efficient transport of aerosols (dust) to the Polar regions in ACME. Next, we examine the responses of model simulated cloud liquid water and ice water contents to different INP concentrations from three ice nucleation parameterizations (Niemand et al., DeMott et al., and CNT) in CAM5 and ACME. Changes in liquid water path (LWP) reach as much as 20% in the Arctic regions in ACME between the three parameterizations while the LWP changes are smaller and limited in the Northern Hemispheric mid-latitudes in CAM5. Finally, the impacts on cloud radiative forcing and dust indirect effects on mixed-phase clouds are quantified with the three ice nucleation parameterizations in CAM5 and ACME.

  5. Optimizing Ship Classification in the Arctic Ocean: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Rahmes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multi-disciplinary system model for determining decision making strategies based upon the ability to perform data mining and pattern discovery utilizing open source actionable information to prepare for specific events or situations from multiple information sources. We focus on combining detection theory with game theory for classifying ships in Arctic Ocean to verify ship reporting. More specifically, detection theory is used to determine probability of deciding if a ship or certain ship class is present or not. We use game theory to fuse information for optimal decision making on ship classification. Hierarchy game theory framework enables complex modeling of data in probabilistic modeling. However, applicability to big data is complicated by the difficulties of inference in complex probabilistic models, and by computational constraints. We provide a framework for fusing sensor inputs to help compare if the information of a ship matches its AIS reporting requirements using mixed probabilities from game theory. Our method can be further applied to optimizing other choke point scenarios where a decision is needed for classification of ground assets or signals. We model impact on decision making on accuracy by adding more parameters or sensors to the decision making process as sensitivity analysis.

  6. Off-diagonal generalization of the mixed-state geometric phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipp, Stefan; Sjoeqvist, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The concept of off-diagonal geometric phases for mixed quantal states in unitary evolution is developed. We show that these phases arise from three basic ideas: (1) fulfillment of quantum parallel transport of a complete basis, (2) a concept of mixed-state orthogonality adapted to unitary evolution, and (3) a normalization condition. We provide a method for computing the off-diagonal mixed-state phases to any order for unitarities that divide the parallel transported basis of Hilbert space into two parts: one part where each basis vector undergoes cyclic evolution and one part where all basis vectors are permuted among each other. We also demonstrate a purification based experimental procedure for the two lowest-order mixed-state phases and consider a physical scenario for a full characterization of the qubit mixed-state geometric phases in terms of polarization-entangled photon pairs. An alternative second order off-diagonal mixed-state geometric phase, which can be tested in single-particle experiments, is proposed

  7. Thermoelectric characteristics of Pt-silicide/silicon multi-layer structured p-type silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Wonchul; Jun, Dongseok; Kim, Soojung; Shin, Mincheol; Jang, Moongyu

    2015-01-01

    Electric and thermoelectric properties of silicide/silicon multi-layer structured devices were investigated with the variation of silicide/silicon heterojunction numbers from 3 to 12 layers. For the fabrication of silicide/silicon multi-layered structure, platinum and silicon layers are repeatedly sputtered on the (100) silicon bulk substrate and rapid thermal annealing is carried out for the silicidation. The manufactured devices show ohmic current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. The Seebeck coefficient of bulk Si is evaluated as 195.8 ± 15.3 μV/K at 300 K, whereas the 12 layered silicide/silicon multi-layer structured device is evaluated as 201.8 ± 9.1 μV/K. As the temperature increases to 400 K, the Seebeck coefficient increases to 237.2 ± 4.7 μV/K and 277.0 ± 1.1 μV/K for bulk and 12 layered devices, respectively. The increase of Seebeck coefficient in multi-layered structure is mainly attributed to the electron filtering effect due to the Schottky barrier at Pt-silicide/silicon interface. At 400 K, the thermal conductivity is reduced by about half of magnitude compared to bulk in multi-layered device which shows the efficient suppression of phonon propagation by using Pt-silicide/silicon hetero-junctions. - Highlights: • Silicide/silicon multi-layer structured is proposed for thermoelectric devices. • Electric and thermoelectric properties with the number of layer are investigated. • An increase of Seebeck coefficient is mainly attributed the Schottky barrier. • Phonon propagation is suppressed with the existence of Schottky barrier. • Thermal conductivity is reduced due to the suppression of phonon propagation

  8. Four-wave mixing and phase conjugation in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear optical effects such as Stimulated Brillouin Scattering, Stimulated Raman Scattering, self-focusing, wave-mixing, parametric mixing, etc., have a long history in plasma physics. Recently, four-wave mixing in plasmas and its applications to phase conjugation has been extensively studied. Although four-wave mixing (FWM), using various nonlinear mediums, has many practical applications in the visible regime, no successful attempt has been made to study or demonstrate FWM for wavelengths longer than 10μm. Plasmas as phase conjugate mirrors have received considerable attention since they become more efficient at longer wavelengths (far-infrared to microwave). The purpose of this thesis is to study various fundamental issues which concern the suitability of plasmas for four-wave mixing and phase conjugation. The major contributions of this thesis are the identification and study of thermal and ionization nonlinearities as potential four-wave mixing and phase conjugation mechanisms and the study of the affect of density inhomogeneities on the FWM process. Using a fluid description for the plasma, this thesis demonstrates that collisional heating generates a thermal force which substantially enhances the phase conjugate reflectivity. The prospect of using a novel ionization nonlinearity in weakly ionized plasmas for wave-mixing and phase conjugation is discussed. The ionization nonlinearity arises from localized heating of the plasma by the beat-wave. Wherever, the local temperature is increased, a plasma density grating is produced due to increased electron-impact ionization. Numerical estimates of the phase conjugate reflectivity indicate reflectivities in the range of 10 -4 -10 -3 are possible in a weakly ionized steady-state gas discharge plasma

  9. Hybrid Multi-Layer Network Control for Emerging Cyber-Infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summerhill, Richard [Internet2, Washington, DC (United States); Lehman, Tom [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Information Sciences Inst. (ISI); Ghani, Nasir [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering; Boyd, Eric [Univ. Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-08-14

    There were four basic task areas identified for the Hybrid-MLN project. They are: Multi-Layer, Multi-Domain, Control Plane Architecture and Implementation; Heterogeneous DataPlane Testing; Simulation; Project Publications, Reports, and Presentations.

  10. The Mixed Phase of Charged AdS Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyabut Burikham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the mixed phase of charged AdS black hole and radiation when the total energy is fixed below the threshold to produce a stable charged black hole branch. The coexistence conditions for the charged AdS black hole and radiation are derived for the generic case when radiation particles carry charge. The phase diagram of the mixed phase is demonstrated for both fixed potential and charge ensemble. In the dual gauge picture, they correspond to the mixed phase of quark-gluon plasma (QGP and hadron gas in the fixed chemical potential and density ensemble, respectively. In the nuclei and heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies, the mixed phase of exotic QGP and hadron gas could be produced. The mixed phase will condense and evaporate into the hadron gas as the fireball expands.

  11. In-situ observation of Asian pollution transported into the Arctic lowermost stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Roiger

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available On a research flight on 10 July 2008, the German research aircraft Falcon sampled an air mass with unusually high carbon monoxide (CO, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN and water vapour (H2O mixing ratios in the Arctic lowermost stratosphere. The air mass was encountered twice at an altitude of 11.3 km, ~800 m above the dynamical tropopause. In-situ measurements of ozone, NO, and NOy indicate that this layer was a mixed air mass containing both air from the troposphere and stratosphere. Backward trajectory and Lagrangian particle dispersion model analysis suggest that the Falcon sampled the top of a polluted air mass originating from the coastal regions of East Asia. The anthropogenic pollution plume experienced strong up-lift in a warm conveyor belt (WCB located over the Russian east-coast. Subsequently the Asian air mass was transported across the North Pole into the sampling area, elevating the local tropopause by up to ~3 km. Mixing with surrounding Arctic stratospheric air most likely took place during the horizontal transport when the tropospheric streamer was stretched into long and narrow filaments. The mechanism illustrated in this study possibly presents an important pathway to transport pollution into the polar tropopause region.

  12. Bacterial communities from Arctic seasonal sea ice are more compositionally variable than those from multi-year sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Ido; Lange, Benjamin; Beckers, Justin; Haas, Christian; Lanoil, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Arctic sea ice can be classified into two types: seasonal ice (first-year ice, FYI) and multi-year ice (MYI). Despite striking differences in the physical and chemical characteristics of FYI and MYI, and the key role sea ice bacteria play in biogeochemical cycles of the Arctic Ocean, there are a limited number of studies comparing the bacterial communities from these two ice types. Here, we compare the membership and composition of bacterial communities from FYI and MYI sampled north of Ellesmere Island, Canada. Our results show that communities from both ice types were dominated by similar class-level phylogenetic groups. However, at the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level, communities from MYI and FYI differed in both membership and composition. Communities from MYI sites had consistent structure, with similar membership (presence/absence) and composition (OTU abundance) independent of location and year of sample. By contrast, communities from FYI were more variable. Although FYI bacterial communities from different locations and different years shared similar membership, they varied significantly in composition. Should these findings apply to sea ice across the Arctic, we predict increased compositional variability in sea ice bacterial communities resulting from the ongoing transition from predominantly MYI to FYI, which may impact nutrient dynamics in the Arctic Ocean.

  13. Universality Results for Multi-phase Hele-Shaw Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daripa, Prabir

    2013-03-01

    Saffman-Taylor instability is a well known viscosity driven instability of an interface separating two immiscible fluids. We study linear stability of displacement processes in a Hele-Shaw cell involving an arbitrary number of immiscible fluid phases. This is a problem involving many interfaces. Universal stability results have been obtained for this multi-phase immiscible flow in the sense that the results hold for arbitrary number of interfaces. These stability results have been applied to design displacement processes that are considerably less unstable than the pure Saffman-Taylor case. In particular, we derive universal formula which gives specific values of the viscosities of the fluid layers corresponding to smallest unstable band. Other similar universal results will also be presented. The talk is based on the following paper. This work was supported by the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of The Qatar Foundation).

  14. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munroe, James R., E-mail: jmunroe@mun.ca [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada); Sutherland, Bruce R., E-mail: bsuther@ualberta.ca [Departments of Physics and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  15. Preparation of a large-scale and multi-layer molybdenum crystal and its characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadayuki

    1989-01-01

    In the present work, the secondary recrystallization method was applied to obtain a large-scale and multi-layer crystal from a hot-rolled multi-laminated molybdenum sheet doped and stacked alternately with different amounts of dopant. It was found that the time and/or temperature at which secondary recrystallization commence from the multi- layer sheet is strongly dependent on the amounts of dopants. Therefore the potential nucleus of the secondary grain from layers with different amounts of dopant occurred first at the layer with a small amount of dopant and then grew into the layer with a large amount of dopant after an anneal at 1800 0 C-2000 0 C. Consequently a large -scale and multi-layer molybdenum crystal can easily be obtained. 12 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  16. Controls on Arctic sea ice from first-year and multi-year ice survival rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, K.; Bitz, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Thompson, L.

    2009-12-01

    The recent decrease in Arctic sea ice cover has transpired with a significant loss of multi-year (MY) ice. The transition to an Arctic that is populated by thinner first-year (FY) sea ice has important implications for future trends in area and volume. We develop a reduced model for Arctic sea ice with which we investigate how the survivability of FY and MY ice control various aspects of the sea-ice system. We demonstrate that Arctic sea-ice area and volume behave approximately as first-order autoregressive processes, which allows for a simple interpretation of September sea-ice in which its mean state, variability, and sensitivity to climate forcing can be described naturally in terms of the average survival rates of FY and MY ice. This model, used in concert with a sea-ice simulation that traces FY and MY ice areas to estimate the survival rates, reveals that small trends in the ice survival rates explain the decline in total Arctic ice area, and the relatively larger loss of MY ice area, over the period 1979-2006. Additionally, our model allows for a calculation of the persistence time scales of September area and volume anomalies. A relatively short memory time scale for ice area (~ 1 year) implies that Arctic ice area is nearly in equilibrium with long-term climate forcing at all times, and therefore observed trends in area are a clear indication of a changing climate. A longer memory time scale for ice volume (~ 5 years) suggests that volume can be out of equilibrium with climate forcing for long periods of time, and therefore trends in ice volume are difficult to distinguish from its natural variability. With our reduced model, we demonstrate the connection between memory time scale and sensitivity to climate forcing, and discuss the implications that a changing memory time scale has on the trajectory of ice area and volume in a warming climate. Our findings indicate that it is unlikely that a “tipping point” in September ice area and volume will be

  17. What Drives the Variability of the Atlantic Water Circulation in the Arctic Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lique, C.; Johnson, H. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Atlantic Water (AW) layer in the Arctic Basin is isolated from the atmosphere by the overlaying surface layer; yet observations of the AW pan-Arctic boundary current have revealed that the velocities in this layer exhibit significant variations on all timescales. Here, analysis of a global ocean/sea ice model hindcast, complemented by experiments performed with an idealized process model, are used to investigate what controls the variability of AW circulation, with a focus on the role of wind forcing. The AW circulation carries the imprint of wind variations, both remotely over the Nordic and Barents seas where they force variability on the AW inflow to the Arctic Basin, and locally over the Arctic Basin through the forcing of the wind-driven Beaufort gyre, which modulates and transfers the wind variability to the AW layer. Our results further suggest that understanding variability in the large amount of heat contained within the AW layer requires a better understanding of the circulation within both AW and surface layers.

  18. Factors Controlling Black Carbon Deposition in Snow in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, L.; Li, Q.; He, C.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of black carbon (BC) concentration in snow in the Arctic to BC emissions, dry deposition and wet scavenging efficiency using a 3D global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem driven by meteorological field GEOS-5. With all improvements, simulated median BC concentration in snow agrees with observation (19.2 ng g-1) within 10%, down from -40% in the default GEOS-Chem. When the previously missed gas flaring emissions (mainly located in Russia) are included, the total BC emission in the Arctic increases by 70%. The simulated BC in snow increases by 1-7 ng g-1, with the largest improvement in Russia. The discrepancy of median BC in snow in the whole Arctic reduces from -40% to -20%. In addition, recent measurements of BC dry deposition velocity suggest that the constant deposition velocity of 0.03 cm s-1 over snow and ice used in the GEOS-Chem is too low. So we apply resistance-in-series method to calculate the dry deposition velocity over snow and ice and the resulted dry deposition velocity ranges from 0.03 to 0.24 cm s-1. However, the simulated total BC deposition flux in the Arctic and BC in snow does not change, because the increased dry deposition flux has been compensated by decreased wet deposition flux. However, the fraction of dry deposition to total deposition increases from 16% to 25%. This may affect the mixing of BC and snow particles and further affect the radative forcing of BC deposited in snow. Finally, we reduced the scavenging efficiency of BC in mixed-phase clouds to account for the effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process based on recent observations. The simulated BC concentration in snow increases by 10-100%, with the largest increase in Greenland (100%), Tromsø (50%), Alaska (40%), and Canadian Arctic (30%). Annual BC loading in the Arctic increases from 0.25 to 0.43 mg m-2 and the lifetime of BC increases from 9.2 to 16.3 days. This indicates that BC simulation in the Arctic is really sensitive to

  19. Arctic action against climatic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njaastad, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    The articles describes efforts to map the climatic changes in the Arctic regions through the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment Project which is a joint venture between eight Arctic countries: Denmark, Canada, the USA, Russia, Finland, Sweden and Norway. The project deals with the consequences of the changes such as the UV radiation due to diminishing ozone layers. The aims are: Evaluate and integrate existing knowledge in the field and evaluate and predict the consequences particularly on the environment both in the present and the future and produce reliable and useful information in order to aid the decision-making processes

  20. Anatomy of a metabentonite: nucleation and growth of illite crystals and their colescence into mixed-layer illite/smectite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Blum, A.E.; Serravezza, M.

    2011-01-01

    The illite layer content of mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) in a 2.5 m thick, zoned, metabentonite bed from Montana decreases regularly from the edges to the center of the bed. Traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern modeling using Markovian statistics indicated that this zonation results from a mixing in different proportions of smectite-rich R0 I/S and illite-rich R1 I/S, with each phase having a relatively constant illite layer content. However, a new method for modeling XRD patterns of I/S indicates that R0 and R1 I/S in these samples are not separate phases (in the mineralogical sense of the word), but that the samples are composed of illite crystals that have continuous distributions of crystal thicknesses, and of 1 nm thick smectite crystals. The shapes of these distributions indicate that the crystals were formed by simultaneous nucleation and growth. XRD patterns for R0 and R1 I/S arise by interparticle diffraction from a random stacking of the crystals, with swelling interlayers formed at interfaces between crystals from water or glycol that is sorbed on crystal surfaces. It is the thickness distributions of smectite and illite crystals (also termed fundamental particles, or Nadeau particles), rather than XRD patterns for mixed-layer I/S, that are the more reliable indicators of geologic history, because such distributions are composed of well-defined crystals that are not affected by differences in surface sorption and particle arrangements, and because their thickness distribution shapes conform to the predictions of crystal growth theory, which describes their genesis.

  1. Zonally asymmetric response of the Southern Ocean mixed-layer depth to the Southern Annular Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallée, J. B.; Speer, K. G.; Rintoul, S. R.

    2010-04-01

    Interactions between the atmosphere and ocean are mediated by the mixed layer at the ocean surface. The depth of this layer is determined by wind forcing and heating from the atmosphere. Variations in mixed-layer depth affect the rate of exchange between the atmosphere and deeper ocean, the capacity of the ocean to store heat and carbon and the availability of light and nutrients to support the growth of phytoplankton. However, the response of the Southern Ocean mixed layer to changes in the atmosphere is not well known. Here we analyse temperature and salinity data from Argo profiling floats to show that the Southern Annular Mode (SAM), the dominant mode of atmospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere, leads to large-scale anomalies in mixed-layer depth that are zonally asymmetric. From a simple heat budget of the mixed layer we conclude that meridional winds associated with departures of the SAM from zonal symmetry cause anomalies in heat flux that can, in turn, explain the observed changes of mixed-layer depth and sea surface temperature. Our results suggest that changes in the SAM, including recent and projected trends attributed to human activity, drive variations in Southern Ocean mixed-layer depth, with consequences for air-sea exchange, ocean sequestration of heat and carbon, and biological productivity.

  2. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun; Jiang, Xiao; Sun, Ke; He, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct

  3. Development of planar CT system for multi-layer PCB inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Youn, Hanbean; Kam, Soohwa; Park, Eunpyeong; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    X-ray defect inspection apparatus can be used in the production line to inspect the PCB. However, a simple X-ray radiography cannot discriminate defects from the multi-layer PCBs because the layers of them overlays the defects. To complement this issue, computed tomography (CT) technology is applied to the NDT system which can offer 3-dimensional information of object. However, CT requires hundreds of projection images to examine a single PCB, hence real-time inspection is nearly impossible. In this study, we develop a planar computed tomography (pCT) system appropriate for the multi-layer PCB inspection. For the image reconstruction of planar cross-section images, we use the digital tomosynthesis (DTS) concept in association with the limited angle scanning. and performance characterization of the pCT system for the PCB inspection. The 3-d Fourier characteristics and more quantitative performance, such as contrast, uniformity, depth resolution will be presented. The cross-sectional images of multi-layer PCBs will also be demonstrated.

  4. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2016-09-23

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) in a recent study (Zhou, K., Attili, A., Alshaarawi, A., and Bisetti, F. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer. Physics of Fluids, 26, 065106 (2014)). In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of aerosol evolution is carried out along Lagrangian trajectories obtained in the previous simulation, in order to quantify the error of the moment method used in the previous simulation. Moreover, the particle size distribution (PSD), not available in the previous works, is also investigated. Along a fluid parcel moving through the turbulent flow, temperature and vapor concentration exhibit complex fluctuations, triggering complicate aerosol processes and rendering complex PSD. However, the mean PSD is found to be bi-modal in most of the mixing layer except that a tri-modal distribution is found in the turbulent transition region. The simulated PSDs agree with the experiment observations available in the literature. A different explanation on the formation of such PSDs is provided.

  5. Interferential multi-layer mirrors for X-UV radiation: fabrication, characterization and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn Ki Byoung

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the fabrication of W/C, Ni/C and Mo/C interferential multi-layer mirrors which can be used in the X-UV domain. They have been manufactured by cathodic pulverisation by using a new system for the in-situ control of the thickness of deposited layers, based on the measurement, sampling and real time integration of the ionic current which goes through the target during the coating process. Different methods (X ray diffraction at different wavelengths, electron microscopy and diffraction, in situ electronic resistivity measurement) have been used to study the main parameters which govern the multi-layer reflectivity: structure, substrate and interface roughness, minimum thickness to be deposited to obtain a continuous layer, number of bi-layers, stacking evenness, rate of absorbent element thickness to the period. Absolute reflectivity measurements have been performed by using short wavelength synchrotron radiation and the S component of polarised soft X rays obtained after double reflection on two parallel multi-layer mirrors oriented according to the Brewster angle. Ferromagnetic properties of Ni/C multi-layers have been studied to investigate fundamental magnetic properties, and to obtain additional information on interface structure [fr

  6. Geometric Phases for Mixed States in Trapped Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Hongxia

    2006-01-01

    The generalization of geometric phase from the pure states to the mixed states may have potential applications in constructing geometric quantum gates. We here investigate the mixed state geometric phases and visibilities of the trapped ion system in both non-degenerate and degenerate cases. In the proposed quantum system, the geometric phases are determined by the evolution time, the initial states of trapped ions, and the initial states of photons. Moreover, special periods are gained under which the geometric phases do not change with the initial states changing of photon parts in both non-degenerate and degenerate cases. The high detection efficiency in the ion trap system implies that the mixed state geometric phases proposed here can be easily tested.

  7. Tests of Parameterized Langmuir Circulation Mixing in the Oceans Surface Mixed Layer II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-11

    inertial oscillations in the ocean are governed by three-dimensional processes that are not accounted for in a one-dimensional simulation , and it was...Unlimited 52 Paul Martin (228) 688-5447 Recent large-eddy simulations (LES) of Langmuir circulation (LC) within the surface mixed layer (SML) of...used in the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and tested for (a) a simple wind-mixing case, (b) simulations of the upper ocean thermal structure at Ocean

  8. Estimation of thermal insulation performance in multi-layer insulator for liquid helium pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Kuriyama, Masaaki; Shibata, Takemasa

    1991-01-01

    For a multi-layer insulator around the liquid helium pipes for cryopumps of JT-60 NBI, a multi-layer insulator composed of 10 layers, which can be wound around the pipe at the same time and in which the respective layers are in concentric circles by shifting them in arrangement, has been developed and tested. As the result, it was shown that the newly developed multi-layer insulator has better thermal insulation performance than the existing one, i.e. the heat load of the newly developed insulator composed of 10 layers was reduced to 1/3 the heat load of the existing insulator, and the heat leak at the joint of the insulator in longitudinal direction of the pipe was negligible. In order to clarify thermal characteristics of the multi-layer insulator, the heat transfer through the insulator has been analyzed considering the radiation heat transfer by the netting spacer between the reflectors, and the temperature dependence on the emissivities and the heat transmission coefficients of these two components of the insulator. The analytical results were in good agreements with the experimental ones, so that the analytical method was shown to be valid. Concerning the influence of the number of layers and the layer density on the insulation performance of the insulator, analytical results showed that the multi-layer insulator with the number of layer about N = 20 and the layer density below 2.0 layer/mm was the most effective for the liquid helium pipe of a JT-60 cryopump. (author)

  9. 3D Defect Localization on Exothermic Faults within Multi-Layered Structures Using Lock-In Thermography: An Experimental and Numerical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Yong; Lee, Kye-Sung; Hur, Hwan; Nam, Ki-Hwan; Hong, Suk-Ju; Lee, Ah-Yeong; Chang, Ki Soo; Kim, Geon-Hee; Kim, Ghiseok

    2017-10-13

    Micro-electronic devices are increasingly incorporating miniature multi-layered integrated architectures. However, the localization of faults in three-dimensional structure remains challenging. This study involved the experimental and numerical estimation of the depth of a thermally active heating source buried in multi-layered silicon wafer architecture by using both phase information from an infrared microscopy and finite element simulation. Infrared images were acquired and real-time processed by a lock-in method. It is well known that the lock-in method can increasingly improve detection performance by enhancing the spatial and thermal resolution of measurements. Operational principle of the lock-in method is discussed, and it is represented that phase shift of the thermal emission from a silicon wafer stacked heat source chip (SSHSC) specimen can provide good metrics for the depth of the heat source buried in SSHSCs. Depth was also estimated by analyzing the transient thermal responses using the coupled electro-thermal simulations. Furthermore, the effects of the volumetric heat source configuration mimicking the 3D through silicon via integration package were investigated. Both the infrared microscopic imaging with the lock-in method and FE simulation were potentially useful for 3D isolation of exothermic faults and their depth estimation for multi-layered structures, especially in packaged semiconductors.

  10. Bulk and interface quantum states of electrons in multi-layer heterostructures with topological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Aleksandar; Zhang, Kexin; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2018-06-01

    In this article we describe the bulk and interface quantum states of electrons in multi-layer heterostructures in one dimension, consisting of topological insulators (TIs) and topologically trivial materials. We use and extend an effective four-band continuum Hamiltonian by introducing position dependence to the eight material parameters of the Hamiltonian. We are able to demonstrate complete conduction-valence band mixing in the interface states. We find evidence for topological features of bulk states of multi-layer TI heterostructures, as well as demonstrating both complete and incomplete conduction-valence band inversion at different bulk state energies. We show that the linear k z terms in the low-energy Hamiltonian, arising from overlap of p z orbitals between different atomic layers in the case of chalcogenides, control the amount of tunneling from TIs to trivial insulators. Finally, we show that the same linear k z terms in the low-energy Hamiltonian affect the material’s ability to form the localised interface state, and we demonstrate that due to this effect the spin and probability density localisation in a thin film of Sb2Te3 is incomplete. We show that changing the parameter that controls the magnitude of the overlap of p z orbitals affects the transport characteristics of the topologically conducting states, with incomplete topological state localisation resulting in increased backscattering.

  11. Assessment of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice predictability in CMIP5 decadal hindcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the ability of coupled global climate models to predict decadal variability of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. We analyze decadal hindcasts/predictions of 11 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5 models. Decadal hindcasts exhibit a large multi-model spread in the simulated sea ice extent, with some models deviating significantly from the observations as the predicted ice extent quickly drifts away from the initial constraint. The anomaly correlation analysis between the decadal hindcast and observed sea ice suggests that in the Arctic, for most models, the areas showing significant predictive skill become broader associated with increasing lead times. This area expansion is largely because nearly all the models are capable of predicting the observed decreasing Arctic sea ice cover. Sea ice extent in the North Pacific has better predictive skill than that in the North Atlantic (particularly at a lead time of 3–7 years, but there is a re-emerging predictive skill in the North Atlantic at a lead time of 6–8 years. In contrast to the Arctic, Antarctic sea ice decadal hindcasts do not show broad predictive skill at any timescales, and there is no obvious improvement linking the areal extent of significant predictive skill to lead time increase. This might be because nearly all the models predict a retreating Antarctic sea ice cover, opposite to the observations. For the Arctic, the predictive skill of the multi-model ensemble mean outperforms most models and the persistence prediction at longer timescales, which is not the case for the Antarctic. Overall, for the Arctic, initialized decadal hindcasts show improved predictive skill compared to uninitialized simulations, although this improvement is not present in the Antarctic.

  12. Comparison of organic light emitting diodes with different mixed layer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, Y.Y.; Siew, W.O. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia); Yap, S.S. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tou, T.Y., E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.my [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia)

    2014-11-03

    A mixed-source thermal evaporation method was used to fabricate organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with uniformly mixed (UM), continuously graded mixed (CGM) and step-wise graded, mixed (SGM) light-emitting layers. N,N′-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine and Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum were used, respectively, as the hole- and electron-transport materials. As compared to the conventional, heterojunction OLED, the maximum brightness of UM-, CGM- and SGM-OLEDs without charge injection layers were improved by 2.2, 3.8 and 2.1 times, respectively, while the maximum power efficiencies improved by 1.5, 3.2 and 1.9 times. These improvements were discussed in terms of more distributed recombination zone and removal of interfacial barrier. - Highlights: • Fabrication of OLEDs using a mixed-source evaporation technique • Three different types of mixed-host OLEDs with better brightness • Improved electroluminescence and power efficiencies as compared to conventional OLED.

  13. Performance Test of the Microwave Ion Source with the Multi-layer DC Break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Il; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Cho, Yong Sub

    2012-01-01

    A microwave proton source has been developed as a proton injector for the 100-MeV proton linac of the PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project). On microwave ion source, the high voltage for the beam extraction is applied to the plasma chamber, also to the microwave components such as a 2.45GHz magnetron, a 3-stub tuner, waveguides. If microwave components can be installed on ground side, the microwave ion source can be operated and maintained easily. For the purpose, the multi-layer DC break has been developed. A multi-layer insulation has the arrangement of conductors and insulators as shown in the Fig. 1. For the purpose of stable operation as the multi-layer DC break, we checked the radiation of the insulator depending on materials and high voltage test of a fabricated multi-layer insulation. In this report, the details of performance test of the multi-layer DC break will be presented

  14. Enhancing Physical Layer Security of Multiuser SIMO Mixed RF/FSO Relay Networks with Multi-Eavesdroppers

    KAUST Repository

    El-Malek, Ahmed H. Abd

    2017-02-09

    In this paper, we investigate the secrecy performance of multiuser (MU) single-input multiple-output (SIMO) mixed radio frequency (RF)/free space optical (FSO) relay network with opportunistic user scheduling and multiple eavesdropping attacks. The considered system includes multiple users, one amplify-and-froward (AF) relay, one destination and multiple eavesdroppers. The users are connected with a multi-antenna relay through RF links and the relay is connected with the destination through an FSO link. Maximal ratio combining (MRC) scheme is used at the relay node to combine the received signals at its different antennas. The RF/FSO channels are assumed to follow Nakagami-m/Gamma-Gamma fading models with considering the effect of pointing errors. In particular, we derive closed- form expressions for the exact and asymptotic outage probabilities. The asymptotic outage results are then used to obtain the optimal RF transmission power based on the dominant link between the RF and FSO links. Then, the considered system secrecy performance is investigated in the presence of multi- eavesdroppers where exact closed-form expression for the intercept probability is derived. Finally, a cooperative jamming model is proposed along with power allocation to enhance the system secrecy performance. Monte-Carlo simulations are provided to validate the achieved exact and asymptotic results.

  15. Design, simulation and testing of a novel radial multi-pole multi-layer magnetorheological brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xuezheng; Yao, Jin

    2018-02-01

    This paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a novel radial multi-pole multi-layer magnetorheological (MR) brake. This MR brake has an innovative structural design with superposition principle of two magnetic fields generated by the inner coils and the outer coils. The MR brake has several media layers of magnetorheological (MR) fluid located between the inner coils and the outer coils, and it can provide higher torque and higher torque density than conventional single-disk or multi-disk or multi-pole single-layer MR brakes can. In this paper, a brief introduction to the structure of the proposed MR brake was given first. Then, theoretical analysis of the magnetic circuit and the braking torque was conducted. In addition, a 3D electromagnetic model of the MR brake was developed to simulate and examine the magnetic flux intensity and corresponding braking torque. A prototype of the brake was fabricated and several tests were carried out to validate its torque capacity. The results show that the proposed MR brake can produce a maximum braking torque of 133 N m and achieve a high torque density of 25.0 kN m-2, a high torque range of 42 and a high torque-to-power ratio of 0.95 N m W-1.

  16. Phase controlled metal–insulator transition in multi-leg quasiperiodic optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, Santanu K.; Sil, Shreekantha; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2017-01-01

    A tight-binding model of a multi-leg ladder network with a continuous quasiperiodic modulation in both the site potential and the inter-arm hopping integral is considered. The model mimics optical lattices where ultra-cold fermionic or bosonic atoms are trapped in double well potentials. It is observed that, the relative phase difference between the on-site potential and the inter-arm hopping integral, which can be controlled by the tuning of the interfering laser beams trapping the cold atoms, can result in a mixed spectrum of one or more absolutely continuous subband(s) and point like spectral measures. This opens up the possibility of a re-entrant metal–insulator transition. The subtle role played by the relative phase difference mentioned above is revealed, and we corroborate it numerically by working out the multi-channel electronic transmission for finite two-, and three-leg ladder networks. The extension of the calculation beyond the two-leg case is trivial, and is discussed in the work. - Graphical abstract: ▪ - Highlights: • Phase controlled metal–insulator transition is discussed. • An analytical prescription is given to understand MI transition. • Our work provides a way of designing experiments involving laser beams.

  17. Five-dimensional Lattice Gauge Theory as Multi-Layer World

    OpenAIRE

    Murata, Michika; So, Hiroto

    2003-01-01

    A five-dimensional lattice space can be decomposed into a number of four-dimens ional lattices called as layers. The five-dimensional gauge theory on the lattice can be interpreted as four-dimensional gauge theories on the multi-layer with interactions between neighboring layers. In the theory, there exist two independent coupling constants; $\\beta_4$ controls the dynamics inside a layer and $\\beta_5$ does the strength of the inter-layer interaction.We propose the new possibility to realize t...

  18. Ice nucleating particles in the high Arctic at the beginning of the melt season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, M.; Gong, X.; Van Pinxteren, M.; Welti, A.; Zeppenfeld, S.; Herrmann, H.; Stratmann, F.

    2017-12-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) initiate the ice crystal formation in persistent Arctic mixed-phase clouds and are important for the formation of precipitation, which affects the radiative properties of the Arctic pack ice as well as the radiative properties of clouds. Sources of Arctic INP have been suggested to be local emissions from the marine boundary and long-range transport. To what extent local marine sources contribute to the INP population or if the majority of INPs originate from long-range transport is not yet known. Ship-based INP measurements in the PASCAL framework are reported. The field campaign took place from May 24 to July 20 2017 around and north of Svalbard (up to 84°N, between 0° and 35°E) onboard the RV Polarstern. INP concentrations were determined applying in-situ measurements (DMT Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei, SPIN) and offline filter techniques (filter sampling on both quartz fiber and polycarbonate filters with subsequent analysis of filter pieces and water suspension from particles collected on filters by means of immersion freezing experiments on cold stage setups). Additionally the compartments sea-surface micro layer (SML), bulk sea water, snow, sea ice and fog water were sampled and their ice nucleation potential quantified, also utilizing cold stages. The measurements yield comprehensive picture of the spatial and temporal distribution of INPs around Svalbard for the different compartments. The dependence of the INP concentration on meteorological conditions (e.g. wind speed) and the geographical situation (sea ice cover, distance to the ice edge) are investigated. Potential sources of INP are identified by the comparison of INP concentrations in the compartments and by back trajectory analysis.

  19. Arctic pipeline planning design, construction, and equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Utilize the most recent developments to combat challenges such as ice mechanics. The perfect companion for engineers wishing to learn state-of-the-art methods or further develop their knowledge of best practice techniques, Arctic Pipeline Planning provides a working knowledge of the technology and techniques for laying pipelines in the coldest regions of the world. Arctic Pipeline Planning provides must-have elements that can be utilized through all phases of arctic pipeline planning and construction. This includes information on how to: Solve challenges in designing arctic pipelines Protect pipelines from everyday threats such as ice gouging and permafrost Maintain safety and communication for construction workers while supporting typical codes and standards Covers such issues as land survey, trenching or above ground, environmental impact of construction Provides on-site problem-solving techniques utilized through all phases of arctic pipeline planning and construction Is packed with easy-to-read and under...

  20. Mixed and mixing layer depths in the ocean surface boundary layer under conditions of diurnal stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, G.; Reverdin, G.; Marié, L.; Ward, B.

    2014-12-01

    A comparison between mixed (MLD) and mixing (XLD) layer depths is presented from the SubTRopical Atlantic Surface Salinity Experiment (STRASSE) cruise in the subtropical Atlantic. This study consists of 400 microstructure profiles during fairly calm and moderate conditions (2 background level. Two different thresholds for the background dissipation level are tested, 10-8 and 10-9 m2 s-3, and these are compared with the MLD as calculated using a density threshold. The larger background threshold agrees with the MLD during restratification but only extends to half the MLD during nighttime convection, while the lesser threshold agrees well during convection but is deeper by a factor of 2 during restratification. Observations suggest the use of a larger density threshold to determine the MLD in a buoyancy driven regime.

  1. Modeling the Observed Microwave Emission from Shallow Multi-Layer Tundra Snow Using DMRT-ML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Saberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The observed brightness temperatures (Tb at 37 GHz from typical moderate density dry snow in mid-latitudes decreases with increasing snow water equivalent (SWE due to volume scattering of the ground emissions by the overlying snow. At a certain point, however, as SWE increases, the emission from the snowpack offsets the scattering of the sub-nivean emission. In tundra snow, the Tb slope reversal occurs at shallower snow thicknesses. While it has been postulated that the inflection point in the seasonal time series of observed Tb V 37 GHz of tundra snow is controlled by the formation of a thick wind slab layer, the simulation of this effect has yet to be confirmed. Therefore, the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory for Multi Layered (DMRT-ML snowpack is used to predict the passive microwave response from airborne observations over shallow, dense, slab-layered tundra snow. Airborne radiometer observations coordinated with ground-based in situ snow measurements were acquired in the Canadian high Arctic near Eureka, NT, in April 2011. The DMRT-ML was parameterized with the in situ snow measurements using a two-layer snowpack and run in two configurations: a depth hoar and a wind slab dominated pack. With these two configurations, the calibrated DMRT-ML successfully predicted the Tb V 37 GHz response (R correlation of 0.83 when compared with the observed airborne Tb footprints containing snow pits measurements. Using this calibrated model, the DMRT-ML was applied to the whole study region. At the satellite observation scale, observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E over the study area reflected seasonal differences between Tb V 37 GHz and Tb V 19 GHz that supports the hypothesis of the development of an early season volume scattering depth hoar layer, followed by the growth of the late season emission-dominated wind slab layer. This research highlights the necessity to consider the two

  2. Description of Mixed-Phase Clouds in Weather Forecast and Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    deficits, leading to freeze-up of both sea ice and the ocean surface. The surface albedo and processes impacting the energy content of the upper ocean...appear key to producing a temporal difference be- tween the freeze-up of the sea - ice surface and adjacent open water. While synoptic conditions, atmos...Leck, 2013: Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea - ice in late summer, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 13, 13191-13244, doi

  3. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Padolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Mahoney, Michael J.; Richard, Erik

    2002-01-01

    This work describes transport and thermodynamic processes that control water vapor near the tropopause during the SAGE III-Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE), held during the Arctic 1999/2000 winter season. Aircraft-based water vapor, carbon monoxide, and ozone measurements were analyzed so as to establish how deeply tropospheric air mixes into the Arctic lowermost stratosphere and what the implications are for cloud formation and water vapor removal in this region of the atmosphere. There are three major findings. First, troposphere-to-stratosphere exchange extends into the Arctic stratosphere to about 13 km. Penetration is to similar levels throughout the winter, however, because ozone increases with altitude most rapidly in the early spring, tropospheric air mixes with the highest values of ozone in that season. The effect of this upward mixing is to elevate water vapor mixing ratios significantly above their prevailing stratospheric values of above 5ppmv. Second, the potential for cloud formation in the stratosphere is highest during early spring, with about 20% of the parcels which have ozone values of 300-350 ppbv experiencing ice saturation in a given 10 day period. Third, during early spring, temperatures at the troposphere are cold enough so that 5-10% of parcels experience relative humidities above 100%, even if the water content is as low as 5 ppmv. The implication is that during this period, dynamical processes near the Arctic tropopause can dehydrate air and keep the Arctic tropopause region very dry during early spring.

  4. Seasonal and multi-year surface displacements measured by DInSAR in a High Arctic permafrost environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Ashley C. A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Treitz, Paul; Short, Naomi; Brisco, Brian

    2018-02-01

    Arctic landscapes undergo seasonal and long-term changes as the active layer thaws and freezes, which can result in localized or irregular subsidence leading to the formation of thermokarst terrain. Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) is a technique capable of measuring ground surface displacements resulting from thawing permafrost at centimetre precision and is quickly gaining acceptance as a means of measuring ground displacement in permafrost regions. Using RADARSAT-2 stacked DInSAR data from 2013 and 2015 we determined the magnitude and patterns of land surface change in a continuous permafrost environment. At our study site situated in the Canadian High Arctic, DInSAR seasonal ground displacement patterns were consistent with field observations of permafrost degradation. As expected, many DInSAR values are close to the detection threshold (i.e., 1 cm) and therefore do not indicate significant change; however, DInSAR seasonal ground displacement patterns aligned well with climatological and soil conditions and offer geomorphological insight into subsurface processes in permafrost environments. While our dataset is limited to two years of data representing a three-year time period, the displacements derived from DInSAR provide insight into permafrost change in a High Arctic environment and demonstrate that DInSAR is an applicable tool for understanding environmental change in remote permafrost regions.

  5. Effect of shock interactions on mixing layer between co-flowing supersonic flows in a confined duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S. M. V.; Asano, S.; Imani, I.; Saito, T.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments are conducted to observe the effect of shock interactions on a mixing layer generated between two supersonic streams of Mach number M _{1} = 1.76 and M _{2} = 1.36 in a confined duct. The development of this mixing layer within the duct is observed using high-speed schlieren and static pressure measurements. Two-dimensional, compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the k-ω SST turbulence model in Fluent. Further, adverse pressure gradients are imposed by placing inserts of small ( boundary layer thickness) thickness on the walls of the test section. The unmatched pressures cause the mixing layer to bend and lead to the formation of shock structures that interact with the mixing layer. The mixing layer growth rate is found to increase after the shock interaction (nearly doubles). The strongest shock is observed when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow. This shock interacts with the mixing layer exciting flow modes that produce sinusoidal flapping structures which enhance the mixing layer growth rate to the maximum (by 1.75 times). Shock fluctuations are characterized, and it is observed that the maximum amplitude occurs when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow.

  6. Effects of Thermobaricity on Coupled Ice-Mixed Layer Thermodynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roth, Mathias

    2003-01-01

    .... This density structure often leads to entrainment and affects both the mixed layer depth and the ice thickness, Thermobaricity, the combined dependence of seawater thermal expansion on temperature...

  7. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the Arctic Ocean. Distribution and pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josefsson, Dan

    1998-05-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations have been determined in seawater and sediment samples collected in 1991, 1994 and 1996 in the Eurasian Arctic shelf and interior. Global fallout, releases from European reprocessing plants and the Chernobyl accident are identified as the three main sources. From measurements in the Eurasian shelf seas it is concluded that the total input of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr from these sources has been decreasing during the 1990`s, while {sup 129}I has increased. The main fraction of the reprocessing and Chernobyl activity found in Arctic Ocean surface layer is transported from the Barents Sea east along the Eurasian Arctic shelf seas to the Laptev Sea before entering the Nansen Basin. This inflow results in highest {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I and {sup 90}Sr concentrations in the Arctic Ocean surface layers, and continuously decreasing concentrations with depth. Chernobyl-derived {sup 137}Cs appeared in the central parts of the Arctic Ocean around 1991, and in the mid 1990`s the fraction to total {sup 137}Cs was approximately 30% in the entire Eurasian Arctic region. The transfer times for releases from Sellafield are estimated to be 5-7 years to the SE Barents Sea, 7-9 years to the Kara Sea, 10-11 years to the Laptev Sea and 12-14 years to the central Arctic Ocean. Global fallout is the primary source of plutonium with highest concentrations found in the Atlantic layer of the Arctic Ocean. When transported over the shallow shelf seas, particle reactive transuranic elements experience an intense scavenging. A rough estimate shows that approximately 75% of the plutonium entering the Kara and Laptev Seas are removed to the sediment. High seasonal riverine input of {sup 239}, {sup 240}Pu is observed near the mouths of the large Russian rivers. Sediment inventories show much higher concentrations on the shelf compared to the deep Arctic Ocean. This is primarily due to the low particle flux in the open ocean

  8. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the Arctic Ocean. Distribution and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josefsson, Dan

    1998-05-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations have been determined in seawater and sediment samples collected in 1991, 1994 and 1996 in the Eurasian Arctic shelf and interior. Global fallout, releases from European reprocessing plants and the Chernobyl accident are identified as the three main sources. From measurements in the Eurasian shelf seas it is concluded that the total input of 134 Cs, 137 Cs and 90 Sr from these sources has been decreasing during the 1990's, while 129 I has increased. The main fraction of the reprocessing and Chernobyl activity found in Arctic Ocean surface layer is transported from the Barents Sea east along the Eurasian Arctic shelf seas to the Laptev Sea before entering the Nansen Basin. This inflow results in highest 137 Cs, 129 I and 90 Sr concentrations in the Arctic Ocean surface layers, and continuously decreasing concentrations with depth. Chernobyl-derived 137 Cs appeared in the central parts of the Arctic Ocean around 1991, and in the mid 1990's the fraction to total 137 Cs was approximately 30% in the entire Eurasian Arctic region. The transfer times for releases from Sellafield are estimated to be 5-7 years to the SE Barents Sea, 7-9 years to the Kara Sea, 10-11 years to the Laptev Sea and 12-14 years to the central Arctic Ocean. Global fallout is the primary source of plutonium with highest concentrations found in the Atlantic layer of the Arctic Ocean. When transported over the shallow shelf seas, particle reactive transuranic elements experience an intense scavenging. A rough estimate shows that approximately 75% of the plutonium entering the Kara and Laptev Seas are removed to the sediment. High seasonal riverine input of 239 , 240 Pu is observed near the mouths of the large Russian rivers. Sediment inventories show much higher concentrations on the shelf compared to the deep Arctic Ocean. This is primarily due to the low particle flux in the open ocean

  9. Mixed convection in fluid superposed porous layers

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, John M

    2017-01-01

    This Brief describes and analyzes flow and heat transport over a liquid-saturated porous bed. The porous bed is saturated by a liquid layer and heating takes place from a section of the bottom. The effect on flow patterns of heating from the bottom is shown by calculation, and when the heating is sufficiently strong, the flow is affected through the porous and upper liquid layers. Measurements of the heat transfer rate from the heated section confirm calculations. General heat transfer laws are developed for varying porous bed depths for applications to process industry needs, environmental sciences, and materials processing. Addressing a topic of considerable interest to the research community, the brief features an up-to-date literature review of mixed convection energy transport in fluid superposed porous layers.

  10. Stochastic Theory of Turbulence Mixing by Finite Eddies in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-01-01

    Turbulence mixing is treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic hypothesis. The theory simplifies for mixing by exchange (strong-eddies) and is then applied to the boundary layer (involving scaling). This maps boundary layer turbulence onto

  11. Development of a low activation concrete shielding wall by multi-layered structure for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Maegawa, Toshio; Yoshimatsu, Kenji; Sato, Koichi; Nonaka, Akira; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    A multi-layered concrete structure has been developed to reduce induced activity in the shielding for neutron generating facilities such as a fusion reactor. The multi-layered concrete structure is composed of: (1) an inner low activation concrete, (2) a boron-doped low activation concrete as the second layer, and (3) ordinary concrete as the outer layer of the neutron shield. With the multi-layered concrete structure the volume of boron is drastically decreased compared to a monolithic boron-doped concrete. A 14 MeV neutron shielding experiment with multi-layered concrete structure mockups was performed at FNS and several reaction rates and induced activity in the mockups were measured. This demonstrated that the multi-layered concrete effectively reduced low energy neutrons and induced activity.

  12. Evaluation of polyethylenimine/carrageenan multi-layer for antibacterial activity of pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briones, Annabelle V.; Bigol, Urcila G.; Sato, Toshinori

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the antibacterial activity of multi-layer of polyethylenimine (PEI) and carrageenan (κ,ι, λ) for potential use as coating on biomaterial surface. The multi-layer of PEI/carrageenan was formed using the layer-by-layer assembly absorption technique and was monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and bio molecular interaction analysis. All samples were prepared in phosphate buffer solution and applied to mica disk alternately. The micrographs showed the formation of bi-layer of polyethylenimine and carrageenan (κ, ι, λ) as observed in the change of height of the layer and surface morphology. The bimolecular binding of carrageenan with polyethylenimine was also investigated using a biosensor. The sensorgram showed that PEI interacted molecularly with carrageenan. Results were: 1,916.08 pg/nm 2 for kappa type; 1,844.1 pg/nm 2 for iota type and 6,074.24 pg/nm 2 for lambda type. The multi-layer showed antibacterial activity against Enterobacter cloaceae, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcal strains (Enterococcus faecalis (EF) 29212 and 29505). (author)

  13. DNS of non-premixed combustion in a compressible mixing layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, R.J.M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Lange, de H.C.; Geurts, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The non-premixed reaction of fuel with air in a mixing layer is studied using DNS. The situation is a model for the mixing-controlled combustion in a Diesel engine. We show that the combustion region can be comparably passive with respect to relatively large scale aerodynamic instabilities. However

  14. Quasi-Geostrophic Diagnosis of Mixed-Layer Dynamics Embedded in a Mesoscale Turbulent Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanne, C. P.; Klein, P.

    2016-02-01

    A new quasi-geostrophic model has been developed to diagnose the three-dimensional circulation, including the vertical velocity, in the upper ocean from high-resolution observations of sea surface height and buoyancy. The formulation for the adiabatic component departs from the classical surface quasi-geostrophic framework considered before since it takes into account the stratification within the surface mixed-layer that is usually much weaker than that in the ocean interior. To achieve this, the model approximates the ocean with two constant-stratification layers : a finite-thickness surface layer (or the mixed-layer) and an infinitely-deep interior layer. It is shown that the leading-order adiabatic circulation is entirely determined if both the surface streamfunction and buoyancy anomalies are considered. The surface layer further includes a diabatic dynamical contribution. Parameterization of diabatic vertical velocities is based on their restoring impacts of the thermal-wind balance that is perturbed by turbulent vertical mixing of momentum and buoyancy. The model skill in reproducing the three-dimensional circulation in the upper ocean from surface data is checked against the output of a high-resolution primitive-equation numerical simulation. Correlation between simulated and diagnosed vertical velocities are significantly improved in the mixed-layer for the new model compared to the classical surface quasi-geostrophic model, reaching 0.9 near the surface.

  15. Choice ofoptimal phase for liver angiography and multi-phase scanning with multi-slice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Hong; Song Yunlong; Bi Yongmin; Wang Dong; Shi Huiping; Zhang Wanshi; Zhu Hongxian; Yang Hua; Ji Xudong; Fan Hongxia

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of test bolus technique with multi-slice spiral CT (MSCT) for determining the optimal scan delay time in CT Hepatic artery (HA)-portal vein (PV) angiography and multi-phase scanning. Methods: MSCT liver angiography and multi-phase scanning were performed in 187 patients divided randomly into two groups. In group A (n=59), the scan delay time was set according to the subjective experiences of operators; in group B (n=128), the scan delay time was determined by test bolus technique. Abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric, vein were selected as target blood vessels, and 50 HU was set as enhancement threshold value. 20 ml contrast agent was injected intravenously and time-density curve of target blood vessels were obtained, then HA-PV scanning delay time were calculated respectively. The quality of CTA images obtained by using these 2 methods were compared and statistically analysed using Chi-square criterion. Results: For hepatic artery phase, the images of group A are: excellent in 34 (58%), good in 17 (29%), and poor in 8 (13%), while those of group B are excellent in 128(100%), good in 0(0%), and poor in 0(0%). For portal vein phase, the images of group A are: excellent in 23 (39%), good in 27 (46%), and poor in 9 (15%), while those of group B are excellent in 96 (75%), good in 28 (22%), and poor in 4 (3%) respectively. There was statistically significant difference between the ratios of image quality in group A and group B (χ 2 =14.97, 9.18, P< 0.05). Conclusion: Accurate scan delay time was best determined by using test bolus technique, which can improve the image quality of liver angiography and multi-phase scanning. (authors)

  16. High efficiency rubrene based inverted top-emission organic light emitting devices with a mixed single layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhaokui; Lou, Yanhui; Naka, Shigeki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Inverted top-emission organic light emitting devices (TEOLEDs) with a mixed single layer by mixing of electron transport materials (PyPySPyPy and Alq 3 ), hole transport material (α-NPD) and dope material (rubrene) were investigated. Maximum power efficiency of 3.5 lm/W and maximum luminance of 7000 cd/m 2 were obtained by optimizing the mixing ratio of PyPySPyPy:Alq 3 :α-NPD:rubrene=25:50:25:1. Luminance and power efficiency of mixed single layer device were two times improved compared to bi-layer heterojunction device and tri-layer heterojunction device. Lifetime test also shows that the mixed single layer device exhibits longer operational lifetimes of 343 h, which is three times longer than the 109 h for tri-layer device, and two times longer than the 158 h for bi-layer device. In addition, the maximum luminance and power efficiency were obtained at 20,000 cd/m 2 and 7.5 lm/W, respectively, when a TPD layer of 45 nm was capped onto the top metal electrode.

  17. Discrete element simulation of charging and mixed layer formation in the ironmaking blast furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Saxén, Henrik

    2016-11-01

    The burden distribution in the ironmaking blast furnace plays an important role for the operation as it affects the gas flow distribution, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions in the shaft. This work studies certain aspects of burden distribution by small-scale experiments and numerical simulation by the discrete element method (DEM). Particular attention is focused on the complex layer-formation process and the problems associated with estimating the burden layer distribution by burden profile measurements. The formation of mixed layers is studied, and a computational method for estimating the extent of the mixed layer, as well as its voidage, is proposed and applied on the results of the DEM simulations. In studying a charging program and its resulting burden distribution, the mixed layers of coke and pellets were found to show lower voidage than the individual burden layers. The dynamic evolution of the mixed layer during the charging process is also analyzed. The results of the study can be used to gain deeper insight into the complex charging process of the blast furnace, which is useful in the design of new charging programs and for mathematical models that do not consider the full behavior of the particles in the burden layers.

  18. Determination of regional heat fluxes from the growth of the mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Batchvarova, E. [National Inst. of Meteorology and Hydrology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-10-01

    The distribution of surface sensible heat flux is a critical factor in producing and modifying the mesoscale atmospheric flows, turbulence and evaporation. Parameterizations that assume homogeneous land characteristics are inappropriate to represent the spatial variability often found in nature. One possibility to overcome this problem is to increase the resolution of the model grid which demands unrealistic computing resources and data for model initialization. Area averaged fluxes can be obtained from aircraft measurements. It is essential that the flights are performed at a height where the individual surface features are not felt. A large number of flights and appropriate pattern to meet the task are needed in order to achieve a fair statistics. The mixed layer grows in response to the regional turbulent fluxes including the aggregation and small scale processes. The region of influence in upwind direction is typically 20 times the height of the mixed layer for convective and 100 times the height of the mixed layer for atmospheric near neutral conditions. In this study we determine the regional integrated sensible heat flux from information on the evolution of the mixed layer over the area. The required information to use the method can be derived from wind speed and temperature profiles obtained by radio-soundings when performed frequently enough to provide a reasonably detailed structure of the development of the mixed-layer. The method is applied to estimate the regional heat flux over the NOPEX experimental area for three days during the campaign in 1994. (au)

  19. Frequency domain phase retrieval of simultaneous multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Zhenxing; Zhong, Liyun; Xu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Wangping; Lu, Xiaoxu; Tian, Jindong

    2016-01-01

    In simultaneous multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry, we propose a novel frequency domain phase retrieval (FDPR) algorithm. First, using only a one-time phase-shifting operation, a sequence of simultaneous multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferograms (SPSMWIs) are captured by a monochrome charge-coupled device. Second, by performing a Fourier transform for each pixel of SPSMWIs, the wrapped phases of each wavelength can be retrieved from the complex amplitude located in the spectral peak of each wavelength. Finally, the phase of the synthetic wavelength can be obtained by the subtraction between the wrapped phases of a single wavelength. In this study, the principle and the application condition of the proposed approach are discussed. Both the simulation and the experimental result demonstrate the simple and convenient performance of the proposed FDPR approach. (paper)

  20. Mechanisms and modeling development of water transport/phase change in catalyst layers of portion exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yexiang [Dept. of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University Beijing (China)], email: Yexiang.Xiao@energy.lth.se; Yuan, Jinliang; Sunden, Bengt [Dept. of Energy Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)], email: Jinliang.yuan@energy.lth.se, email: bengt.sunden@energy.lth.se

    2011-07-01

    Research on proton exchange membrane fuel cells has shown that incorporation of nanosized catalysts can effectively increase active areas and catalyst activity and make a great contribution to development in performance and catalyst utilization. Multiphase transport processes are as significant and complicated as water generation/transfer processes which occur in nano-structured catalyst layers. A review project has been launched aimed at gaining a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of water generation or transport phenomena. It covers catalytic reactions and water-phase change within the catalyst layers. The review proceeds in three main stages: Firstly, it characterizes and reconstructs the nano/micro-structured pores and solid-phases; secondly, it emphasises the importance of sensitive and consistent analysis of various water-phase change and transport schemes; and thirdly, it recommends development of microscopic models for multi-phase transport processes in the pores and the solid phases.

  1. Using fluorescent dissolved organic matter to trace and distinguish the origin of Arctic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Araujo, Rafael; Granskog, Mats A.; Bracher, Astrid; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Dodd, Paul A.; Stedmon, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change affects the Arctic with regards to permafrost thaw, sea-ice melt, alterations to the freshwater budget and increased export of terrestrial material to the Arctic Ocean. The Fram and Davis Straits represent the major gateways connecting the Arctic and Atlantic. Oceanographic surveys were performed in the Fram and Davis Straits, and on the east Greenland Shelf (EGS), in late summer 2012/2013. Meteoric (fmw), sea-ice melt, Atlantic and Pacific water fractions were determined and the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (FDOM) were characterized. In Fram Strait and EGS, a robust correlation between visible wavelength fluorescence and fmw was apparent, suggesting it as a reliable tracer of polar waters. However, a pattern was observed which linked the organic matter characteristics to the origin of polar waters. At depth in Davis Strait, visible wavelength FDOM was correlated to apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and traced deep-water DOM turnover. In surface waters FDOM characteristics could distinguish between surface waters from eastern (Atlantic + modified polar waters) and western (Canada-basin polar waters) Arctic sectors. The findings highlight the potential of designing in situ multi-channel DOM fluorometers to trace the freshwater origins and decipher water mass mixing dynamics in the region without laborious samples analyses. PMID:27667721

  2. Remote Multi-layer Soil Temperature Monitoring System Based on GPRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Kuo CHEN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There is the temperature difference between the upper and lower layer of the shallow soil in the forest. It is a potential energy that can be harvested by thermoelectric generator for the electronic device in the forest. The temperature distribution at different depths of the soil is the first step for thermoelectric generation. A remote multi-layer soil temperature monitoring system based on GPRS is proposed in this paper. The MSP430F149 MCU is used as the main controller of multi-layer soil temperature monitoring system. A temperature acquisition module is designed with DS18B20 and 4 core shielded twisted-pair cable. The GPRS module sends the measured data to remote server through wireless communication network. From the experiments in the campus of Beijing Forestry University, the maximum error of measured temperature in this system is 0.2°C by comparing with professional equipment in the same condition. The results of the experiments show that the system can accurately realize real-time monitoring of multi-layer soil temperature, and the data transmission is stable and reliable.

  3. Geometric phases for mixed states during cyclic evolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Libin; Chen Jingling

    2004-01-01

    The geometric phases of cyclic evolutions for mixed states are discussed in the framework of unitary evolution. A canonical 1-form is defined whose line integral gives the geometric phase, which is gauge invariant. It reduces to the Aharonov and Anandan phase in the pure state case. Our definition is consistent with the phase shift in the proposed experiment (Sjoeqvist et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 2845) for a cyclic evolution if the unitary transformation satisfies the parallel transport condition. A comprehensive geometric interpretation is also given. It shows that the geometric phases for mixed states share the same geometric sense with the pure states

  4. DC microgrid power flow optimization by multi-layer supervision control. Design and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechilariu, Manuela; Wang, Bao Chao; Locment, Fabrice; Jouglet, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • DC microgrid (PV array, storage, power grid connection, DC load) with multi-layer supervision control. • Power balancing following power flow optimization while providing interface for smart grid communication. • Optimization under constraints: storage capability, grid power limitations, grid time-of-use pricing. • Experimental validation of DC microgrid power flow optimization by multi-layer supervision control. • DC microgrid able to perform peak shaving, to avoid undesired injection, and to make full use of locally energy. - Abstract: Urban areas have great potential for photovoltaic (PV) generation, however, direct PV power injection has limitations for high level PV penetration. It induces additional regulations in grid power balancing because of lacking abilities of responding to grid issues such as reducing grid peak consumption or avoiding undesired injections. The smart grid implementation, which is designed to meet these requirements, is facilitated by microgrids development. This paper presents a DC microgrid (PV array, storage, power grid connection, DC load) with multi-layer supervision control which handles instantaneous power balancing following the power flow optimization while providing interface for smart grid communication. The optimization takes into account forecast of PV power production and load power demand, while satisfying constraints such as storage capability, grid power limitations, grid time-of-use pricing and grid peak hour. Optimization, whose efficiency is related to the prediction accuracy, is carried out by mixed integer linear programming. Experimental results show that the proposed microgrid structure is able to control the power flow at near optimum cost and ensures self-correcting capability. It can respond to issues of performing peak shaving, avoiding undesired injection, and making full use of locally produced energy with respect to rigid element constraints

  5. Self-similar solutions for multi-species plasma mixing by gradient driven transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vold, E.; Kagan, G.; Simakov, A. N.; Molvig, K.; Yin, L.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-species transport of plasma ions across an initial interface between DT and CH is shown to exhibit self-similar species density profiles under 1D isobaric conditions. Results using transport theory from recent studies and using a Maxwell–Stephan multi-species approximation are found to be in good agreement for the self-similar mix profiles of the four ions under isothermal and isobaric conditions. The individual ion species mass flux and molar flux profile results through the mixing layer are examined using transport theory. The sum over species mass flux is confirmed to be zero as required, and the sum over species molar flux is related to a local velocity divergence needed to maintain pressure equilibrium during the transport process. The light ion species mass fluxes are dominated by the diagonal coefficients of the diffusion transport matrix, while for the heaviest ion species (C in this case), the ion flux with only the diagonal term is reduced by about a factor two from that using the full diffusion matrix, implying the heavy species moves more by frictional collisions with the lighter species than by its own gradient force. Temperature gradient forces were examined by comparing profile results with and without imposing constant temperature gradients chosen to be of realistic magnitude for ICF experimental conditions at a fuel-capsule interface (10 μm scale length or greater). The temperature gradients clearly modify the relative concentrations of the ions, for example near the fuel center, however the mixing across the fuel-capsule interface appears to be minimally influenced by the temperature gradient forces within the expected compression and burn time. Discussion considers the application of the self-similar profiles to specific conditions in ICF.

  6. Predicting the mixed-mode I/II spatial damage propagation along 3D-printed soft interfacial layer via a hyperelastic softening model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yaning

    2018-07-01

    A methodology was developed to use a hyperelastic softening model to predict the constitutive behavior and the spatial damage propagation of nonlinear materials with damage-induced softening under mixed-mode loading. A user subroutine (ABAQUS/VUMAT) was developed for numerical implementation of the model. 3D-printed wavy soft rubbery interfacial layer was used as a material system to verify and validate the methodology. The Arruda - Boyce hyperelastic model is incorporated with the softening model to capture the nonlinear pre-and post- damage behavior of the interfacial layer under mixed Mode I/II loads. To characterize model parameters of the 3D-printed rubbery interfacial layer, a series of scarf-joint specimens were designed, which enabled systematic variation of stress triaxiality via a single geometric parameter, the slant angle. It was found that the important model parameter m is exponentially related to the stress triaxiality. Compact tension specimens of the sinusoidal wavy interfacial layer with different waviness were designed and fabricated via multi-material 3D printing. Finite element (FE) simulations were conducted to predict the spatial damage propagation of the material within the wavy interfacial layer. Compact tension experiments were performed to verify the model prediction. The results show that the model developed is able to accurately predict the damage propagation of the 3D-printed rubbery interfacial layer under complicated stress-state without pre-defined failure criteria.

  7. Impact of the large-scale Arctic circulation and the North Water Polynya on nutrient inventories in Baffin Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jean-Éric; Gratton, Yves; Carmack, Eddy C.; Payne, Christopher D.; Price, Neil M.

    2002-08-01

    The distributions of nitrate, phosphate, and silicate in northern Baffin Bay were determined from 90 bottle casts taken between April 11 and July 21, 1998. During late spring, low-salinity Arctic water entered northern Smith Sound and mixed with Baffin Bay water (BBW) within the North Water Polynya. The Arctic water originated from the Bering Sea and contained high concentrations of phosphate and silicate (referred to as silicate-rich Arctic water (SRAW)). The distribution of the two water masses was established using a new tracer, Siex, which showed moderate penetration of SRAW into Smith Sound during April and a very strong incursion in May and June, consistent with the intensification of southward current velocities. Biological depletion of macronutrients in BBW began in April and continued until nitrate was exhausted from the upper mixed layer in early June. Beneath the Polynya the deep waters (>450 m) showed a marked increase in nutrient concentration toward the bottom, which was most pronounced in the south and much stronger for silicate than nitrate and phosphate. The silicate enrichment was consistent with dissolution of diatom-derived biogenic silica in deep waters. The results indicate that the North Water acts as a silicate trap in which the biota differentially transports surface silicate to depth, thereby influencing local and downstream nutrient signatures.

  8. Multi-filamentary REBCO tapes fabricated by scratching a buffer layer along the tape longitudinal direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, Chihaya, E-mail: chihaya.kurihara@jp.fujikura.com [Fujikura Ltd., 1440, Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan); Fujita, Shinji; Nakamura, Naonori; Igarashi, Mitsunori; Iijima, Yasuhiro [Fujikura Ltd., 1440, Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan); Higashikawa, Kohei; Uetsuhara, Dai; Kiss, Takanobu; Iwakuma, Masataka [Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-Ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We developed new method of slitting tape between buffer layer processes for multi-filamentary tape. • By scratching buffer layer along the tape longitudinal direction, we find that REBCO layer is divided easily without damaging it. • We have developed 100 m class multi-filamentary REBCO tapes which are suitable for superconducting coils. - Abstract: A method for making multi-filamentary REBCO tapes by only scratching buffer layer was developed for coil application which requires accurate magnetic fields. By continuous I{sub c} measurement, we found that our new multi-filamentary tape could provide almost equal I{sub c} compared to conventional tapes. Then, using EBSD and RTR-SHPM methods, a divided structure of REBCO layer was surely confirmed. AC loss was also decreased. Furthermore, the result of delamination test of our new multi-filamentary tape showed enough mechanical property. As a result, we have succeeded in developing 100 m class multi-filamentary tape for superconducting coil.

  9. Multi-filamentary REBCO tapes fabricated by scratching a buffer layer along the tape longitudinal direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Chihaya; Fujita, Shinji; Nakamura, Naonori; Igarashi, Mitsunori; Iijima, Yasuhiro; Higashikawa, Kohei; Uetsuhara, Dai; Kiss, Takanobu; Iwakuma, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed new method of slitting tape between buffer layer processes for multi-filamentary tape. • By scratching buffer layer along the tape longitudinal direction, we find that REBCO layer is divided easily without damaging it. • We have developed 100 m class multi-filamentary REBCO tapes which are suitable for superconducting coils. - Abstract: A method for making multi-filamentary REBCO tapes by only scratching buffer layer was developed for coil application which requires accurate magnetic fields. By continuous I_c measurement, we found that our new multi-filamentary tape could provide almost equal I_c compared to conventional tapes. Then, using EBSD and RTR-SHPM methods, a divided structure of REBCO layer was surely confirmed. AC loss was also decreased. Furthermore, the result of delamination test of our new multi-filamentary tape showed enough mechanical property. As a result, we have succeeded in developing 100 m class multi-filamentary tape for superconducting coil.

  10. Determination of a Critical Sea Ice Thickness Threshold for the Central Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, V.; Frauenfeld, O. W.; Nowotarski, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    While sea ice extent is readily measurable from satellite observations and can be used to assess the overall survivability of the Arctic sea ice pack, determining the spatial variability of sea ice thickness remains a challenge. Turbulent and conductive heat fluxes are extremely sensitive to ice thickness but are dominated by the sensible heat flux, with energy exchange expected to increase with thinner ice cover. Fluxes over open water are strongest and have the greatest influence on the atmosphere, while fluxes over thick sea ice are minimal as heat conduction from the ocean through thick ice cannot reach the atmosphere. We know that turbulent energy fluxes are strongest over open ocean, but is there a "critical thickness of ice" where fluxes are considered non-negligible? Through polar-optimized Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations, this study assesses how the wintertime Arctic surface boundary layer, via sensible heat flux exchange and surface air temperature, responds to sea ice thinning. The region immediately north of Franz Josef Land is characterized by a thickness gradient where sea ice transitions from the thickest multi-year ice to the very thin marginal ice seas. This provides an ideal location to simulate how the diminishing Arctic sea ice interacts with a warming atmosphere. Scenarios include both fixed sea surface temperature domains for idealized thickness variability, and fixed ice fields to detect changes in the ocean-ice-atmosphere energy exchange. Results indicate that a critical thickness threshold exists below 1 meter. The threshold is between 0.4-1 meters thinner than the critical thickness for melt season survival - the difference between first year and multi-year ice. Turbulent heat fluxes and surface air temperature increase as sea ice thickness transitions from perennial ice to seasonal ice. While models predict a sea ice free Arctic at the end of the warm season in future decades, sea ice will continue to transform

  11. Multi-layered foil capture of micrometeoroids and orbital debris in low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, A.; Graham, G.

    Much of our knowledge concerning the sub-millimetre orbital debris population that poses a threat to orbiting satellites has been gleaned from examination of surfaces retrieved and subsequently analysed as part of post-flight investigations. The preservation of the hypervelocity impact-derived remnants located on these surfaces is very variable, whether of space debris or micrometeoroid origin. Whilst glass and metallic materials show highly visible impact craters when examined using optical and electron microscopes, complex mixing between the target material and the impacting particle may make unambiguous interpretation of the impactor origin difficult or impossible. Our recent detailed examination of selected multi-layered insulation (MLI) foils from the ISAS Space Flyer Unit (SFU), and our preliminary study of NASA's Trek blanket, exposed on the Mir station, show that these constructions have the potential to preserve abundant residue material of a quality sufficient for detailed analysis. Although there are still limitations on the recognition of certain sources of orbital debris, the foils complement the metal and glass substrates. We suggest that a purpose-built multi-layered foil structure may prove to be extremely effective for rapid collection and unambiguous analysis of impact- derived residues. Such a collector could be used an environmental monitor for ISS, as it would have low mass, high durability, easy deployment, recovery and storage, making it an economically viable and attractive option.

  12. Effect of flow rate distribution at the inlet on hydrodynamic mixing in narrow rectangular multi-channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jianjun; Chen Bingde; Wang Xiaojun

    2008-01-01

    Flow and heat transfer in the narrow rectangular multi-channel is widely en- countered in the engineering application, hydrodynamic mixing in the narrow rectangular multi-channel is one of the important concerns. With the help of the Computational Fluid Dynamics code CFX, the effect of flow rate distribution of the main channel at the inlet on hydrodynamic mixing in the narrow rectangular multi-channel is numerical simulated. The results show that the flow rate distributions at the inlet have a great effect on hydrodynamics mixing in multi-channel, the flow rate in the main channel doesn't change with increasing the axial mixing section when the average flow rate at the inlet is set. Hydrodynamic mixing will arise in the mixing section when the different ratio of the flow rate distribution at the inlet is set, and hydrodynamic mixing increases with the difference of the flow rate distribution at the inlet increase. The trend of the flow rate distribution of the main channel is consistent during the whole axial mixing section, and hydrodynamic mixing in former 4 mixing section is obvious. (authors)

  13. The transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhou; Li, Junlun; Yin, Chang; Gong, Xiufen; Zhang, Dong; Xue, Honghui

    2007-02-01

    Based on the Khokhlov Zabolotskaya Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, a model in the frequency domain is given to describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media. Favorable agreement between the theoretical analyses and the measured results shows this approach could effectively describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound wave in multi-layered biological media.

  14. The transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaozhou [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Li, Junlun [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yin, Chang [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Gong, Xiufen [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Dong [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xue, Honghui [Key Lab of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2007-02-19

    Based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, a model in the frequency domain is given to describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media. Favorable agreement between the theoretical analyses and the measured results shows this approach could effectively describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound wave in multi-layered biological media.

  15. The transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaozhou; Li, Junlun; Yin, Chang; Gong, Xiufen; Zhang, Dong; Xue, Honghui

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, a model in the frequency domain is given to describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound beam in multi-layered biological media. Favorable agreement between the theoretical analyses and the measured results shows this approach could effectively describe the transmission of finite amplitude sound wave in multi-layered biological media

  16. Sources of multi-decadal variability in Arctic sea ice extent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, J J; Hargreaves, J C; Annan, J D; Abe-Ouchi, A

    2012-01-01

    The observed dramatic decrease in September sea ice extent (SIE) has been widely discussed in the scientific literature. Though there is qualitative agreement between observations and ensemble members of the Third Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3), it is concerning that the observed trend (1979–2010) is not captured by any ensemble member. The potential sources of this discrepancy include: observational uncertainty, physical model limitations and vigorous natural climate variability. The latter has received less attention and is difficult to assess using the relatively short observational sea ice records. In this study multi-centennial pre-industrial control simulations with five CMIP3 climate models are used to investigate the role that the Arctic oscillation (AO), the Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation (AMO) and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) play in decadal sea ice variability. Further, we use the models to determine the impact that these sources of variability have had on SIE over both the era of satellite observation (1979–2010) and an extended observational record (1953–2010). There is little evidence of a relationship between the AO and SIE in the models. However, we find that both the AMO and AMOC indices are significantly correlated with SIE in all the models considered. Using sensitivity statistics derived from the models, assuming a linear relationship, we attribute 0.5–3.1%/decade of the 10.1%/decade decline in September SIE (1979–2010) to AMO driven variability. (letter)

  17. Simulating Arctic clouds during Arctic Radiation- IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment (ARISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromwich, D. H.; Hines, K. M.; Wang, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    The representation within global and regional models of the extensive low-level cloud cover over polar oceans remains a critical challenge for quantitative studies and forecasts of polar climate. In response, the polar-optimized version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (Polar WRF) is used to simulate the meteorology, boundary layer, and Arctic clouds during the September-October 2014 Arctic Radiation- IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment (ARISE) project. Polar WRF was developed with several adjustments to the sea ice thermodynamics in WRF. ARISE was based out of Eielson Air Force Base near Fairbanks, Alaska and included multiple instrumented C-130 aircraft flights over open water and sea ice of the Beaufort Sea. Arctic boundary layer clouds were frequently observed within cold northeasterly flow over the open ocean and ice. Preliminary results indicate these clouds were primarily liquid water, with characteristics differing between open water and sea ice surfaces. Simulated clouds are compared to ARISE observations. Furthermore, Polar WRF simulations are run for the August-September 2008 Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) for comparison to the ARISE. Preliminary analysis shows that simulated low-level water clouds over the sea ice are too extensive during the the second half of the ASCOS field program. Alternatives and improvements to the Polar WRF cloud schemes are considered. The goal is to use the ARISE and ASCOS observations to achieve an improved polar supplement to the WRF code for open water and sea ice that can be provided to the Polar WRF community.

  18. Turbulent mixing layers in supersonic protostellar outflows, with application to DG Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. C.; Bicknell, G. V.; Sutherland, R. S.; Salmeron, R.; McGregor, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent entrainment processes may play an important role in the outflows from young stellar objects at all stages of their evolution. In particular, lateral entrainment of ambient material by high-velocity, well-collimated protostellar jets may be the cause of the multiple emission-line velocity components observed in the microjet-scale outflows driven by classical T Tauri stars. Intermediate-velocity outflow components may be emitted by a turbulent, shock-excited mixing layer along the boundaries of the jet. We present a formalism for describing such a mixing layer based on Reynolds decomposition of quantities measuring fundamental properties of the gas. In this model, the molecular wind from large disc radii provides a continual supply of material for entrainment. We calculate the total stress profile in the mixing layer, which allows us to estimate the dissipation of turbulent energy, and hence the luminosity of the layer. We utilize MAPPINGS IV shock models to determine the fraction of total emission that occurs in [Fe II] 1.644 μm line emission in order to facilitate comparison to previous observations of the young stellar object DG Tauri. Our model accurately estimates the luminosity and changes in mass outflow rate of the intermediate-velocity component of the DG Tau approaching outflow. Therefore, we propose that this component represents a turbulent mixing layer surrounding the well-collimated jet in this object. Finally, we compare and contrast our model to previous work in the field.

  19. On-line gas mixing and multi-channel distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmani, S.D.; Mondal, N.K.; Satyanarayana, B.; Verma, P.; Joshi, Avinash

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, we describe a mass-flow controller based on-line gas mixing unit with the multi-channel distribution system. We highlight different aspects such as requirement, design, calibration, control and operation of this system. This unit has the capability to mix up to four different input gases and distribute over 16 output channels. Output in individual channels is controlled accurately by using capillary-based system. At present, we are using this gas mixing unit for prototype of iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector of India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO).

  20. Southern Ocean Mixed-Layer Seasonal and Interannual Variations From Combined Satellite and In Situ Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buongiorno Nardelli, B.; Guinehut, S.; Verbrugge, N.; Cotroneo, Y.; Zambianchi, E.; Iudicone, D.

    2017-12-01

    The depth of the upper ocean mixed layer provides fundamental information on the amount of seawater that directly interacts with the atmosphere. Its space-time variability modulates water mass formation and carbon sequestration processes related to both the physical and biological pumps. These processes are particularly relevant in the Southern Ocean, where surface mixed-layer depth estimates are generally obtained either as climatological fields derived from in situ observations or through numerical simulations. Here we demonstrate that weekly observation-based reconstructions can be used to describe the variations of the mixed-layer depth in the upper ocean over a range of space and time scales. We compare and validate four different products obtained by combining satellite measurements of the sea surface temperature, salinity, and dynamic topography and in situ Argo profiles. We also compute an ensemble mean and use the corresponding spread to estimate mixed-layer depth uncertainties and to identify the more reliable products. The analysis points out the advantage of synergistic approaches that include in input the sea surface salinity observations obtained through a multivariate optimal interpolation. Corresponding data allow to assess mixed-layer depth seasonal and interannual variability. Specifically, the maximum correlations between mixed-layer anomalies and the Southern Annular Mode are found at different time lags, related to distinct summer/winter responses in the Antarctic Intermediate Water and Sub-Antarctic Mode Waters main formation areas.

  1. Hydro-geochemical paths of multi-layer groundwater system in coal mining regions - Using multivariate statistics and geochemical modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pu; Hoth, Nils; Drebenstedt, Carsten; Sun, Yajun; Xu, Zhimin

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater is an important drinking water resource that requires protection in North China. Coal mining industry in the area may influence the water quality evolution. To provide primary characterization of the hydrogeochemical processes and paths that control the water quality evolution, a complex multi-layer groundwater system in a coal mining area is investigated. Multivariate statistical methods involving hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) are applied, 6 zones and 3 new principal components are classified as major reaction zones and reaction factors. By integrating HCA and PCA with hydrogeochemical correlations analysis, potential phases, reactions and connections between various zones are presented. Carbonates minerals, gypsum, clay minerals as well as atmosphere gases - CO 2 , H 2 O and NH 3 are recognized as major reactants. Mixtures, evaporation, dissolution/precipitation of minerals and cation exchange are potential reactions. Inverse modeling is finally used, and it verifies the detailed processes and diverse paths. Consequently, 4 major paths are found controlling the variations of groundwater chemical properties. Shallow and deep groundwater is connected primarily by the flow of deep groundwater up through fractures and faults into the shallow aquifers. Mining does not impact the underlying aquifers that represent the most critical groundwater resource. But controls should be taken to block the mixing processes from highly polluted mine water. The paper highlights the complex hydrogeochemical evolution of a multi-layer groundwater system under mining impact, which could be applied to further groundwater quality management in the study area, as well as most of the other coalfields in North China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal General Circulation Model - An example from Arabian Sea and equatorial Pacific

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    is influenced not only by local vertical mixing but also by horizontal con- vergence of mass and heat, a mixed layer model must consider both full dynamics due to the use of primitive equations and a parameterization for the vertical mass transfer and related... is dynamically determined without such a con- straint. Instantaneous atmospheric elds are inter- polated from the monthly means. Monthly mean climatology of chlorophyll pigment concentrations were obtained from the Coastal Zone Color Scan- ner (CZCS) from...

  3. Optical Properties of Plasmon Resonances with Ag/SiO2/Ag Multi-Layer Composite Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye-Wan, Ma; Li-Hua, Zhang; Zhao-Wang, Wu; Jie, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Optical properties of plasmon resonance with Ag/SiO 2 /Ag multi-layer nanoparticles are studied by numerical simulation based on Green's function theory. The results show that compared with single-layer Ag nanoparticles, the multi-layer nanoparticles exhibit several distinctive optical properties, e.g. with increasing the numbers of the multi-layer nanoparticles, the scattering efficiency red shifts, and the intensity of scattering enhances accordingly. It is interesting to find out that slicing an Ag-layer into multi-layers leads to stronger scattering intensity and more 'hot spots' or regions of stronger field enhancement. This property of plasmon resonance of surface Raman scattering has greatly broadened the application scope of Raman spectroscopy. The study of metal surface plasmon resonance characteristics is critical to the further understanding of surface enhanced Raman scattering as well as its applications. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  4. Seasonality of global and Arctic black carbon processes in the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme models: Global and Arctic Black Carbon Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, Rashed [School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria British Columbia Canada; Department of Meteorology, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad Pakistan; von Salzen, Knut [School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria British Columbia Canada; Canadian Center for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Environment and Climate Change Canada, University of Victoria, Victoria British Columbia Canada; Flanner, Mark [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan USA; Sand, Maria [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo, Oslo Norway; Langner, Joakim [Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Norrköping Sweden; Wang, Hailong [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Huang, Lin [Climate Chemistry Measurements and Research, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Toronto Ontario Canada

    2016-06-22

    This study quantifies black carbon (BC) processes in three global climate models and one chemistry transport model, with focus on the seasonality of BC transport, emissions, wet and dry deposition in the Arctic. In the models, transport of BC to the Arctic from lower latitudes is the major BC source for this region while Arctic emissions are very small. All models simulated a similar annual cycle of BC transport from lower latitudes to the Arctic, with maximum transport occurring in July. Substantial differences were found in simulated BC burdens and vertical distributions, with CanAM (NorESM) producing the strongest (weakest) seasonal cycle. CanAM also has the shortest annual mean residence time for BC in the Arctic followed by SMHI-MATCH, CESM and NorESM. The relative contribution of wet and dry deposition rates in removing BC varies seasonally and is one of the major factors causing seasonal variations in BC burdens in the Arctic. Overall, considerable differences in wet deposition efficiencies in the models exist and are a leading cause of differences in simulated BC burdens. Results from model sensitivity experiments indicate that scavenging of BC in convective clouds acts to substantially increase the overall efficiency of BC wet deposition in the Arctic, which leads to low BC burdens and a more pronounced seasonal cycle compared to simulations without convective BC scavenging. In contrast, the simulated seasonality of BC concentrations in the upper troposphere is only weakly influenced by wet deposition in stratiform (layer) clouds whereas lower tropospheric concentrations are highly sensitive.

  5. Numerical modeling of two-phase binary fluid mixing using mixed finite elements

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu

    2012-07-27

    Diffusion coefficients of dense gases in liquids can be measured by considering two-phase binary nonequilibrium fluid mixing in a closed cell with a fixed volume. This process is based on convection and diffusion in each phase. Numerical simulation of the mixing often requires accurate algorithms. In this paper, we design two efficient numerical methods for simulating the mixing of two-phase binary fluids in one-dimensional, highly permeable media. Mathematical model for isothermal compositional two-phase flow in porous media is established based on Darcy\\'s law, material balance, local thermodynamic equilibrium for the phases, and diffusion across the phases. The time-lag and operator-splitting techniques are used to decompose each convection-diffusion equation into two steps: diffusion step and convection step. The Mixed finite element (MFE) method is used for diffusion equation because it can achieve a high-order and stable approximation of both the scalar variable and the diffusive fluxes across grid-cell interfaces. We employ the characteristic finite element method with moving mesh to track the liquid-gas interface. Based on the above schemes, we propose two methods: single-domain and two-domain methods. The main difference between two methods is that the two-domain method utilizes the assumption of sharp interface between two fluid phases, while the single-domain method allows fractional saturation level. Two-domain method treats the gas domain and the liquid domain separately. Because liquid-gas interface moves with time, the two-domain method needs work with a moving mesh. On the other hand, the single-domain method allows the use of a fixed mesh. We derive the formulas to compute the diffusive flux for MFE in both methods. The single-domain method is extended to multiple dimensions. Numerical results indicate that both methods can accurately describe the evolution of the pressure and liquid level. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  6. Ice particle production in mid-level stratiform mixed-phase clouds observed with collocated A-Train measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Collocated A-Train CloudSat radar and CALIPSO lidar measurements between 2006 and 2010 are analyzed to study primary ice particle production characteristics in mid-level stratiform mixed-phase clouds on a global scale. For similar clouds in terms of cloud top temperature and liquid water path, Northern Hemisphere latitude bands have layer-maximum radar reflectivity (ZL that is  ∼  1 to 8 dBZ larger than their counterparts in the Southern Hemisphere. The systematically larger ZL under similar cloud conditions suggests larger ice number concentrations in mid-level stratiform mixed-phase clouds over the Northern Hemisphere, which is possibly related to higher background aerosol loadings. Furthermore, we show that springtime northern mid- and high latitudes have ZL that is larger by up to 6 dBZ (a factor of 4 higher ice number concentration than other seasons, which might be related to more dust events that provide effective ice nucleating particles. Our study suggests that aerosol-dependent ice number concentration parameterizations are required in climate models to improve mixed-phase cloud simulations, especially over the Northern Hemisphere.

  7. Arctic Submarine Slope Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, D.; Geissler, W.

    2010-12-01

    the consequence. Its geometrical configuration and timing is different from submarine slides on other glaciated continental margins. Thus, it raises the question whether slope stability within the Arctic Ocean is governed by processes specific to this environment. The extraordinary thick slabs (up to 1600 m) that were moved translationally during sliding rise the question on the nature of the weak layers associated with this process. Especially theories involving higher pore pressure are being challenged by this observation, because either extreme pore pressures or alternative explanations (e.g. mineralogical and/or textural) can be considered. To assess the actual submarine slope stability and failure potential in the Arctic Ocean, we propose to drill and recover weak layer material of the HYM from the adjacent intact strata by deep drilling under the framework of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. This is the only method to recover weak layer material from the HYM, because the strata are too thick. We further propose to drill into the adjacent deforming slope to identify material properties of the layers acting as detachment and monitor the deformation.

  8. Biodiversity of Arctic marine ecosystems and responses to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, C.; Bluhm, B.; Gallucci, V.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is undergoing major changes in many of its fundamental physical constituents, from a shift from multi- to first-year ice, shorter ice-covered periods, increasing freshwater runoff and surface stratification, to warming and alteration in the distribution of water masses....... These changes have important impacts on the chemical and biological processes that are at the root of marine food webs, influencing their structure, function and biodiversity. Here we summarise current knowledge on the biodiversity of Arctic marine ecosystems and provide an overview of fundamental factors...... that structure ecosystem biodiversity in the Arctic Ocean. We also discuss climateassociated effects on the biodiversity of Arctic marine ecosystems and discuss implications for the functioning of Arctic marine food webs. Based on the complexity and regional character of Arctic ecosystem reponses...

  9. Pan-Arctic aerosol number size distributions: seasonality and transport patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Eyal; Krejci, Radovan; Tunved, Peter; Leaitch, Richard; Nguyen, Quynh T.; Massling, Andreas; Skov, Henrik; Barrie, Leonard

    2017-07-01

    The Arctic environment has an amplified response to global climatic change. It is sensitive to human activities that mostly take place elsewhere. For this study, a multi-year set of observed aerosol number size distributions in the diameter range of 10 to 500 nm from five sites around the Arctic Ocean (Alert, Villum Research Station - Station Nord, Zeppelin, Tiksi and Barrow) was assembled and analysed.A cluster analysis of the aerosol number size distributions revealed four distinct distributions. Together with Lagrangian air parcel back-trajectories, they were used to link the observed aerosol number size distributions with a variety of transport regimes. This analysis yields insight into aerosol dynamics, transport and removal processes, on both an intra- and an inter-monthly scale. For instance, the relative occurrence of aerosol number size distributions that indicate new particle formation (NPF) event is near zero during the dark months, increases gradually to ˜ 40 % from spring to summer, and then collapses in autumn. Also, the likelihood of Arctic haze aerosols is minimal in summer and peaks in April at all sites.The residence time of accumulation-mode particles in the Arctic troposphere is typically long enough to allow tracking them back to their source regions. Air flow that passes at low altitude over central Siberia and western Russia is associated with relatively high concentrations of accumulation-mode particles (Nacc) at all five sites - often above 150 cm-3. There are also indications of air descending into the Arctic boundary layer after transport from lower latitudes.The analysis of the back-trajectories together with the meteorological fields along them indicates that the main driver of the Arctic annual cycle of Nacc, on the larger scale, is when atmospheric transport covers the source regions for these particles in the 10-day period preceding the observations in the Arctic. The scavenging of these particles by precipitation is shown to be

  10. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed layer in flow over complex terrain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the...

  11. Structure of the oceanic mixed layer in western Bay of Bengal during MONEX

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anto, A.F.; Somayajulu, Y.K.

    layer conditions of the overlying atmosphere. Structure of OML, as delineated with respect to the diurnal variation of temperature with depth, revealed three sub-layers: wave mixed, diurnal thermocline and transition layer. The first two sub...

  12. Fatigue crack growth monitoring in multi-layered structures using guided ultrasonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostson, E; Fromme, P

    2009-01-01

    This contribution investigates the application of low frequency guided ultrasonic waves for monitoring fatigue crack growth at fastener holes in the 2nd layer of multi-layered plate structures, a common problem in aerospace industry. The model multi-layered structure investigated consists of two aluminum plate-strips adhesively bonded using a structural paste adhesive. Guided ultrasonic waves were excited using multiple piezoelectric discs bonded to the surface of the multi-layered structure. The wave propagation in the tensile specimen was measured using a laser interferometer and compared to numerical simulations. Thickness and width mode shapes of the excited flexural waves were identified from Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) calculations. Experiments and 3D Finite Element (FE) simulations show a change in the scattered field around fastener holes caused by a defect in the 2nd layer. The amplitude of the guided ultrasonic wave was monitored during fatigue experiments at a single point. The measured changes in the amplitude of the ultrasonic signal due to fatigue crack growth agree well with FE simulations.

  13. Multi-actor decision making using mixed reality technologies Urban projects and multi-actor collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Basile,, Maria; Ozdirlik, Burcu; Terrin,, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    International audience; This paper is based on the results of an ongoing research project, IPCity, on the application of mixed reality technologies in urban environments. It questions the relevance of traditional language and communication medium such as drawings, perspectives and 3D models in the co-production of urban projects in multi-actor working environments. It then discusses the possible use of “mixed reality technologies” as alternative medium through five workshops organised within ...

  14. Mixing of Al into uranium silicides reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, F.R.; Birtcher, R.C.; Kestel, B.J.; Baldo, P.M.

    1996-11-01

    SEM observations have shown that irradiation induced interaction of the aluminum cladding with uranium silicide reactor fuels strongly affects both fission gas and fuel swelling behaviors during fuel burn-up. The authors have used ion beam mixing, by 1.5 MeV Kr, to study this phenomena. RBS and the 27 Al(p, γ) 28 Si resonance nuclear reaction were used to measure radiation induced mixing of Al into U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 after irradiation at 300 C. Initially U mixes into the Al layer and Al mixes into the U 3 Si. At a low dose, the Al layer is converted into UAl 4 type compound while near the interface the phase U(Al .93 Si .07 ) 3 grows. Under irradiation, Al diffuses out of the UAl 4 surface layer, and the lower density ternary, which is stable under irradiation, is the final product. Al mixing into U 3 Si 2 is slower than in U 3 Si, but after high dose irradiation the Al concentration extends much farther into the bulk. In both systems Al mixing and diffusion is controlled by phase formation and growth. The Al mixing rates into the two alloys are similar to that of Al into pure uranium where similar aluminide phases are formed

  15. Solid particle effects on heat transfer in a multi-layered molten pool with gas injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao y Leon, Rosa Marina; Corradini, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    In the very unlikely event of a severe reactor accident involving core melt and pressure vessel failure, it is important to identify the circumstances that would allow the molten core material to cool down and resolidify, bringing core debris to a stable coolable state. To achieve this, it has been proposed to flood the cavity with water from above forming a layered structure where upward heat loss from the molten pool to the water will cause the core material to quench and solidify. In this situation the molten pool would become a three-phase mixture: e.g., a solid and liquid slurry formed by the molten pool as it cools to a temperature below the temperature of liquidus, agitated by the gases formed in the concrete ablation process. The present work quantifies the partition of the heat losses upward and downward in this multi-layered configuration, considering the influence of the viscosity and the solid fraction in the pool, from test data obtained from intermediate scale experiments at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. These experimental results show heat transfer behavior for multi-layered pools for a range of viscosities and solid fractions. These results are compared to previous experimental studies and well known correlations and models

  16. Optimization of sound absorbing performance for gradient multi-layer-assembled sintered fibrous absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Weiyong; Zhu, Jian

    2012-04-01

    The transfer matrix method, based on plane wave theory, of multi-layer equivalent fluid is employed to evaluate the sound absorbing properties of two-layer-assembled and three-layer-assembled sintered fibrous sheets (generally regarded as a kind of compound absorber or structures). Two objective functions which are more suitable for the optimization of sound absorption properties of multi-layer absorbers within the wider frequency ranges are developed and the optimized results of using two objective functions are also compared with each other. It is found that using the two objective functions, especially the second one, may be more helpful to exert the sound absorbing properties of absorbers at lower frequencies to the best of their abilities. Then the calculation and optimization of sound absorption properties of multi-layer-assembled structures are performed by developing a simulated annealing genetic arithmetic program and using above-mentioned objective functions. Finally, based on the optimization in this work the thoughts of the gradient design over the acoustic parameters- the porosity, the tortuosity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the thickness of each samples- of porous metals are put forth and thereby some useful design criteria upon the acoustic parameters of each layer of porous fibrous metals are given while applying the multi-layer-assembled compound absorbers in noise control engineering.

  17. Comparison of mixed layer models predictions with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggian, P.; Riva, G.M. [CISE Spa, Divisione Ambiente, Segrate (Italy); Brusasca, G. [ENEL Spa, CRAM, Milano (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The temporal evolution of the PBL vertical structure for a North Italian rural site, situated within relatively large agricultural fields and almost flat terrain, has been investigated during the period 22-28 June 1993 by experimental and modellistic point of view. In particular, the results about a sunny day (June 22) and a cloudy day (June 25) are presented in this paper. Three schemes to estimate mixing layer depth have been compared, i.e. Holzworth (1967), Carson (1973) and Gryning-Batchvarova models (1990), which use standard meteorological observations. To estimate their degree of accuracy, model outputs were analyzed considering radio-sounding meteorological profiles and stability atmospheric classification criteria. Besides, the mixed layer depths prediction were compared with the estimated values obtained by a simple box model, whose input requires hourly measures of air concentrations and ground flux of {sup 222}Rn. (LN)

  18. On the instabilities of supersonic mixing layers - A high-Mach-number asymptotic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Thomas F.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of a family of tanh mixing layers is studied at large Mach numbers using perturbation methods. It is found that the eigenfunction develops a multilayered structure, and the eigenvalue is obtained by solving a simplified version of the Rayleigh equation (with homogeneous boundary conditions) in one of these layers which lies in either of the external streams. This analysis leads to a simple hypersonic similarity law which explains how spatial and temporal phase speeds and growth rates scale with Mach number and temperature ratio. Comparisons are made with numerical results, and it is found that this similarity law provides a good qualitative guide for the behavior of the instability at high Mach numbers. In addition to this asymptotic theory, some fully numerical results are also presented (with no limitation on the Mach number) in order to explain the origin of the hypersonic modes (through mode splitting) and to discuss the role of oblique modes over a very wide range of Mach number and temperature ratio.

  19. Arctic summertime measurements of ammonia in the near-surface atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravek, A.; Murphy, J. G.; Wentworth, G.; Croft, B.; Martin, R.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of gas-phase ammonia (NH3) in the summertime Arctic are rare, despite the impact NH3 can have on new particle formation rates and nitrogen deposition. The presence of NH3 can also increase the ratio of particulate-phase ammonium (NH4+) to non-sea salt sulphate (nss-SO42-) which decreases particle acidity. Known regional sources of NH3in the Arctic summertime include migratory seabird colonies and northern wildfires, whereas the Arctic Ocean is a net sink. In the summer of 2016, high time resolution measurements were collected in the Arctic to improve our understanding of the sources, sinks and impacts of ammonia in this remote region. A four week study was conducted at Alert, Canada (82.5º N, 62.3 º W) from June 23 to July 19, 2016 to examine the magnitude and sources of NH3 and SO42-. The Ambient Ion Monitor-Ion Chromatography system (AIM-IC) provided on-line, hourly averaged measurements of NH3, NH4+, SO42- and Na+. Measurements of NH3 ranged between 50 and 700 pptv (campaign mean of 240 pptv), consistent with previous studies in the summertime Arctic boundary layer. Levels of NH4+ and nss-SO42- were near or below detection limits ( 20 ng m-3) for the majority of the study. Tundra and lake samples were collected to investigate whether these could be important local sources of NH3 at Alert. These surface samples were analyzed for NH4+, pH and temperature and a compensation point (χ) for each sample was calculated to determine if these surface reservoirs can act as net NH3 sources. Precipitation samples were also collected throughout the study to better constrain our understanding of wet NH4+deposition in the summertime Arctic. From mid-July through August, 2016, NH3 was measured continuously using a laser spectroscopy technique onboard the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen in the eastern Arctic Ocean. Ocean-atmosphere exchange of NH3 was quantified using measurements of sea surface marine NH4+ concentrations. In addition, wet deposition of

  20. On efficiently computing multigroup multi-layer neutron reflection and transmission conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Marcos P. de

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we present an algorithm for efficient computation of multigroup discrete ordinates neutron reflection and transmission conditions, which replace a multi-layered boundary region in neutron multiplication eigenvalue computations with no spatial truncation error. In contrast to the independent layer-by-layer algorithm considered thus far in our computations, the algorithm here is based on an inductive approach developed by the present author for deriving neutron reflection and transmission conditions for a nonactive boundary region with an arbitrary number of arbitrarily thick layers. With this new algorithm, we were able to increase significantly the computational efficiency of our spectral diamond-spectral Green's function method for solving multigroup neutron multiplication eigenvalue problems with multi-layered boundary regions. We provide comparative results for a two-group reactor core model to illustrate the increased efficiency of our spectral method, and we conclude this article with a number of general remarks. (author)

  1. Preparation of multi-layer film consisting of hydrogen-free DLC and nitrogen-containing DLC for conductive hard coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yushi; Harigai, Toru; Isono, Ryo; Degai, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Tsuyoshi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Yasui, Haruyuki; Kaneko, Satoru; Kunitsugu, Shinsuke; Kamiya, Masao; Taki, Makoto

    2018-01-01

    Conductive hard-coating films have potential application as protective films for contact pins used in the electrical inspection process for integrated circuit chips. In this study, multi-layer diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were prepared as conductive hard-coating films. The multi-layer DLC films consisting of DLC and nitrogen-containing DLC (N-DLC) film were prepared using a T-shape filtered arc deposition method. Periodic DLC/N-DLC four-layer and eight-layer films had the same film thickness by changing the thickness of each layer. In the ball-on-disk test, the N-DLC mono-layer film showed the highest wear resistance; however, in the spherical polishing method, the eight-layer film showed the highest polishing resistance. The wear and polishing resistance and the aggressiveness against an opponent material of the multi-layer DLC films improved by reducing the thickness of a layer. In multi-layer films, the soft N-DLC layer between hard DLC layers is believed to function as a cushion. Thus, the tribological properties of the DLC films were improved by a multi-layered structure. The electrical resistivity of multi-layer DLC films was approximately half that of the DLC mono-layer film. Therefore, the periodic DLC/N-DLC eight-layer film is a good conductive hard-coating film.

  2. Monitoring of active layer dynamics at a permafrost site on Svalbard using multi-channel ground-penetrating radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Westermann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-channel ground-penetrating radar is used to investigate the late-summer evolution of the thaw depth and the average soil water content of the thawed active layer at a high-arctic continuous permafrost site on Svalbard, Norway. Between mid of August and mid of September 2008, five surveys have been conducted in gravelly soil over transect lengths of 130 and 175 m each. The maximum thaw depths range from 1.6 m to 2.0 m, so that they are among the deepest thaw depths recorded in sediments on Svalbard so far. The thaw depths increase by approximately 0.2 m between mid of August and beginning of September and subsequently remain constant until mid of September. The thaw rates are approximately constant over the entire length of the transects within the measurement accuracy of about 5 to 10 cm. The average volumetric soil water content of the thawed soil varies between 0.18 and 0.27 along the investigated transects. While the measurements do not show significant changes in soil water content over the first four weeks of the study, strong precipitation causes an increase in average soil water content of up to 0.04 during the last week. These values are in good agreement with evapotranspiration and precipitation rates measured in the vicinity of the the study site. While we cannot provide conclusive reasons for the detected spatial variability of the thaw depth at the study site, our measurements show that thaw depth and average soil water content are not directly correlated.

    The study demonstrates the potential of multi-channel ground-penetrating radar for mapping thaw depth in permafrost areas. The novel non-invasive technique is particularly useful when the thaw depth exceeds 1.5 m, so that it is hardly accessible by manual probing. In addition, multi-channel ground-penetrating radar holds potential for mapping the latent heat content of the active layer and for estimating weekly to monthly averages of the ground heat flux during the

  3. Simulated seasonal and interannual variability of mixed layer heat budget in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeBoyer Montegut, C.; Vialard, J.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Durand, F.; Ethe, C.; Madec, G.

    A global Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) is used to investigate the mixed layer heat budget of the Northern Indian Ocean (NIO). The model is validated against observations and shows a fairly good agreement with mixed layer depth data...

  4. A manufacturing method for multi-layer polysilicon surface-micromachining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    An advanced manufacturing technology which provides multi-layered polysilicon surface micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems is presented. Specifically, the addition of another design layer to a 4 levels process to create a 5 levels process allows consideration of fundamentally new architecture in designs for weapon advanced surety components.

  5. MixDroid: A multi-features and multi-classifiers bagging system for Android malware detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiqing; Hou, Erhang; Zheng, Liang; Feng, Weimiao

    2018-05-01

    In the past decade, Android platform has rapidly taken over the mobile market for its superior convenience and open source characteristics. However, with the popularity of Android, malwares targeting on Android devices are increasing rapidly, while the conventional rule-based and expert-experienced approaches are no longer able to handle such explosive growth. In this paper, combining with the theory of natural language processing and machine learning, we not only implement the basic feature extraction of permission application features, but also propose two innovative schemes of feature extraction: Dalvik opcode features and malicious code image, and implement an automatic Android malware detection system MixDroid which is based on multi-features and multi-classifiers. According to our experiment results on 20,000 Android applications, detection accuracy of MixDroid is 98.1%, which proves our schemes' effectiveness in Android malware detection.

  6. Application of Multi-Layered Polyurethane Foams for Flat-Walled Anechoic Linings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, J. F.; Buchholz, Jörg; Fricke, Fergus R.

    2006-01-01

    of the application of multi-layered polyurethane foams as the flat-walled anechoic lining. The investigation includes aspects such as the efficacy of a single layer of material, the minimum number of layers of linings to achieve the minimum overall thickness for low (100Hz), mid (250Hz) and high (500Hz) cut...

  7. Impact of Antarctic mixed-phase clouds on climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, R Paul; Gettelman, Andrew

    2014-12-23

    Precious little is known about the composition of low-level clouds over the Antarctic Plateau and their effect on climate. In situ measurements at the South Pole using a unique tethered balloon system and ground-based lidar reveal a much higher than anticipated incidence of low-level, mixed-phase clouds (i.e., consisting of supercooled liquid water drops and ice crystals). The high incidence of mixed-phase clouds is currently poorly represented in global climate models (GCMs). As a result, the effects that mixed-phase clouds have on climate predictions are highly uncertain. We modify the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Earth System Model (CESM) GCM to align with the new observations and evaluate the radiative effects on a continental scale. The net cloud radiative effects (CREs) over Antarctica are increased by +7.4 Wm(-2), and although this is a significant change, a much larger effect occurs when the modified model physics are extended beyond the Antarctic continent. The simulations show significant net CRE over the Southern Ocean storm tracks, where recent measurements also indicate substantial regions of supercooled liquid. These sensitivity tests confirm that Southern Ocean CREs are strongly sensitive to mixed-phase clouds colder than -20 °C.

  8. Mixed-order phase transition in a colloidal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alert, Ricard; Tierno, Pietro; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-12-01

    Mixed-order phase transitions display a discontinuity in the order parameter like first-order transitions yet feature critical behavior like second-order transitions. Such transitions have been predicted for a broad range of equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems, but their experimental observation has remained elusive. Here, we analytically predict and experimentally realize a mixed-order equilibrium phase transition. Specifically, a discontinuous solid-solid transition in a 2D crystal of paramagnetic colloidal particles is induced by a magnetic field H. At the transition field Hs, the energy landscape of the system becomes completely flat, which causes diverging fluctuations and correlation length ξ∝|H2-Hs2|-1/2. Mean-field critical exponents are predicted, since the upper critical dimension of the transition is du=2. Our colloidal system provides an experimental test bed to probe the unconventional properties of mixed-order phase transitions.

  9. Mixed-order phase transition in a colloidal crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alert, Ricard; Tierno, Pietro; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-12-05

    Mixed-order phase transitions display a discontinuity in the order parameter like first-order transitions yet feature critical behavior like second-order transitions. Such transitions have been predicted for a broad range of equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems, but their experimental observation has remained elusive. Here, we analytically predict and experimentally realize a mixed-order equilibrium phase transition. Specifically, a discontinuous solid-solid transition in a 2D crystal of paramagnetic colloidal particles is induced by a magnetic field [Formula: see text] At the transition field [Formula: see text], the energy landscape of the system becomes completely flat, which causes diverging fluctuations and correlation length [Formula: see text] Mean-field critical exponents are predicted, since the upper critical dimension of the transition is [Formula: see text] Our colloidal system provides an experimental test bed to probe the unconventional properties of mixed-order phase transitions.

  10. Mixing Acid Salts and Layered Double Hydroxides in Nanoscale under Solid Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hirokazu; Hayashi, Aki

    2014-07-30

    The immobilization of potassium sorbate, potassium aspartate and sorbic acid in layered double hydroxide under solid condition was examined. By simply mixing two solids, immobilization of sorbate and aspartate in the interlayer space of nitrate-type layered double hydroxide, so called intercalation reaction, was achieved, and the uptakes, that is, the amount of immobilized salts and the interlayer distances of intercalation compounds were almost the same as those obtained in aqueous solution. However, no intercalation was achieved for sorbic acid. Although intercalation of sorbate and aspartate into chloride-type layered double hydroxide was possible, the uptakes for these intercalation compounds were lower than those obtained using nitrate-type layered double hydroxide. The intercalation under solid condition could be achieved to the same extent as for ion-exchange reaction in aqueous solution, and the reactivity was similar to that observed in aqueous solution. This method will enable the encapsulation of acidic drug in layered double hydroxide as nano level simply by mixing both solids.

  11. Mixing Acid Salts and Layered Double Hydroxides in Nanoscale under Solid Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Nakayama

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of potassium sorbate, potassium aspartate and sorbic acid in layered double hydroxide under solid condition was examined. By simply mixing two solids, immobilization of sorbate and aspartate in the interlayer space of nitrate-type layered double hydroxide, so called intercalation reaction, was achieved, and the uptakes, that is, the amount of immobilized salts and the interlayer distances of intercalation compounds were almost the same as those obtained in aqueous solution. However, no intercalation was achieved for sorbic acid. Although intercalation of sorbate and aspartate into chloride-type layered double hydroxide was possible, the uptakes for these intercalation compounds were lower than those obtained using nitrate-type layered double hydroxide. The intercalation under solid condition could be achieved to the same extent as for ion-exchange reaction in aqueous solution, and the reactivity was similar to that observed in aqueous solution. This method will enable the encapsulation of acidic drug in layered double hydroxide as nano level simply by mixing both solids.

  12. Mixing process of a binary gas in a density stratified layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Tetsuaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1997-09-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of natural convection on the mixing process by molecular diffusion in a vertical stratified layer of a binary fluid. There are many experimental and analytical studies on natural convection in the vertical fluid layer. However, there are few studies on natural convection with molecular diffusion in the vertical stratified layer of a binary gas. Experimental study has been performed on the combined phenomena of molecular diffusion and natural convection in a binary gas system to investigate the mixing process of the binary gas in a vertical slot consisting of one side heated and the other side cooled. The range of Rayleigh number based on the slot width was about 0 < Ra{sub d} < 7.5 x 10{sup 4}. The density change of the gas mixture and the temperature distribution in the slot was obtained and the mixing process when the heavier gas ingress into the vertical slot filled with the lighter gas from the bottom side of the slot was discussed. The experimental results showed that the mixing process due to molecular diffusion was affected significantly by the natural convection induced by the slightly temperature difference between both vertical walls even if a density difference by the binary gas is larger than that by the temperature difference. (author). 81 refs.

  13. Toward the Characterization of Mixed-Phase Clouds Using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronache, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mixed-phase clouds consist of a mixture of ice particles and liquid droplets at temperatures below 0 deg C. They are present in all seasons in many regions of the world, account for about 30% of the global cloud coverage, and are linked to cloud electrification and aircraft icing. The mix of ice particles, liquid droplets, and water vapor is unstable, and such clouds are thought to have a short lifetime. A characteristic parameter is the phase composition of mixed-phase clouds. It affects the cloud life cycle and the rate of precipitation. This parameter is important for cloud parameters retrievals by radar, lidar, and satellite and is relevant for climate modeling. The phase transformation includes the remarkable Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. The direction and the rate of the phase transformations depend on the local thermodynamic and microphysical properties. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) particles determine to a large extent cloud microstructure and the dynamic response of clouds to aerosols. The complexity of dynamics and microphysics involved in mixed-phase clouds requires a set of observational and modeling tools that continue to be refined. Among these techniques, the remote sensing methods provide an increasing number of parameters, covering large regions of the world. Thus, a series of studies were dedicated to stratiform mixed-phase clouds revealing longer lifetime than previously thought. Satellite data and aircraft in situ measurements in deep convective clouds suggest that highly supercooled water often occurs in vigorous continental convective storms. In this study, we use cases of convective clouds to discuss the feasibility of mixed-phase clouds characterization and potential advantages of remote sensing.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of ion-irradiated multi-layer graphenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukagoshi, Akira [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Honda, Shin-ichi, E-mail: s-honda@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Osugi, Ryo [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Okada, Hiraku [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Niibe, Masahito [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Terasawa, Mititaka [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Hirase, Ryuji; Izumi, Hirokazu; Yoshioka, Hideki [Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Technology, Kobe 654-0037 (Japan); Niwase, Keisuke [Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Kato, Hyogo 673-1494 (Japan); Taguchi, Eiji [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Lee, Kuei-Yi [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Oura, Masaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Low-energy Ar ions (0.5–2 keV) were irradiated to multi-layer graphenes and the damage process, the local electronic states, and the degree of alignment of the basal plane, and the oxidation process upon ion irradiation were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). By Raman spectroscopy, we observed two stages similar to the case of irradiated graphite, which should relate to the accumulations of vacancies and turbulence of the basal plane, respectively. XAS analysis indicated that the number of sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon (sp{sup 2}-C) atoms decreased after ion irradiation. Angle-resolved XAS revealed that the orientation parameter (OP) decreased with increasing ion energy and fluence, reflecting the turbulence of the basal plane under irradiation. In situ XPS shows the oxidation of the irradiated multi-layer graphenes after air exposure.

  15. Preliminary Results from the First Deployment of a Tethered-Balloon Cloud Particle Imager Instrument Package in Arctic Stratus Clouds at Ny-Alesund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, P.; Stamnes, K.; Stamnes, J.; Zmarzly, P.; O'Connor, D.; Koskulics, J.; Hamre, B.

    2008-12-01

    A tethered balloon system specifically designed to collect microphysical data in mixed-phase clouds was deployed in Arctic stratus clouds during May 2008 near Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, at 79 degrees North Latitude. This is the first time a tethered balloon system with a cloud particle imager (CPI) that records high-resolution digital images of cloud drops and ice particles has been operated in cloud. The custom tether supplies electrical power to the instrument package, which in addition to the CPI houses a 4-pi short-wavelength radiometer and a met package that measures temperature, humidity, pressure, GPS position, wind speed and direction. The instrument package was profiled vertically through cloud up to altitudes of 1.6 km. Since power was supplied to the instrument package from the ground, it was possible to keep the balloon package aloft for extended periods of time, up to 9 hours at Ny- Ålesund, which was limited only by crew fatigue. CPI images of cloud drops and the sizes, shapes and degree of riming of ice particles are shown throughout vertical profiles of Arctic stratus clouds. The images show large regions of mixed-phase cloud from -8 to -2 C. The predominant ice crystal habits in these regions are needles and aggregates of needles. The amount of ice in the mixed-phase clouds varied considerably and did not appear to be a function of temperature. On some occasions, ice was observed near cloud base at -2 C with supercooled cloud above to - 8 C that was devoid of ice. Measurements of shortwave radiation are also presented. Correlations between particle distributions and radiative measurements will be analyzed to determine the effect of these Arctic stratus clouds on radiative forcing.

  16. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing.

  17. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Arrieta

    Full Text Available Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing.

  18. Non-localized deformation in Cu−Zr multi-layer amorphous films under tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, C. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, H. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1H9 (Canada); Cao, Q.P.; Wang, X.D. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, D.X. [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Hu, J.W. [Hangzhou Workers Amateur University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liaw, P.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Jiang, J.Z., E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2016-09-05

    In metallic glasses (MGs), plastic deformation at room temperature is dominated by highly localized shear bands. Here we report the non-localized deformation under tension in Cu−Zr multi-layer MGs with a pure amorphous structure using large-scale atomistic simulations. It is demonstrated that amorphous samples with high layer numbers, composed of Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36} and Cu{sub 40}Zr{sub 60}, or Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36} and Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50}, present obviously non-localized deformation behavior. We reveal that the deformation behavior of the multi-layer-structured MG films is related but not determined by the deformation behavior of the composed individual layers. The criterion for the deformation mode change for MGs with a pure amorphous structure, in generally, was suggested, i.e., the competition between the elastic-energy density stored and the energy density needed for forming one mature shear band in MGs. Our results provide a promising strategy for designing tensile ductile MGs with a pure amorphous structure at room temperature. - Highlights: • Tensile deformation behaviors in multi-layer MG films. • Films with high layer numbers confirmed with a non-localized deformation behavior. • The deformation mode is reasonably controlled by whether U{sub p} larger than U{sub SB.}.

  19. Structure of mixed β-lactoglobulin/pectin adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces; a spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Fokkink, R.; Vliet, T. van; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2008-01-01

    Based on earlier reported surface rheological behaviour two factors appeared to be important for the functional behaviour of mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces: (1) protein/polysaccharide mixing ratio and (2) formation history of the layers. In this study complexes

  20. Structure of mixed Beta-lactoglobulin/pectin adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces; a spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Fokkink, R.G.; Vliet, van T.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Based on earlier reported surface rheological behaviour two factors appeared to be important for the functional behaviour of mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces: (1) protein/polysaccharide mixing ratio and (2) formation history of the layers. In this study complexes

  1. Mixed layer depth and thermocline climatology of the Arabian Sea and western equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.; Bahulayan, N.

    A band of zonally oriented ridge of mixed layer depth and thermocline base extending from African Coast to the Central Indian Ocean is observed between 5 degrees S and 10 degrees S throughout hte year. Mixed layer depth and thermocline base deepen...

  2. Arctic Ocean Regional Climatology (NCEI Accession 0115771)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To provide an improved oceanographic foundation and reference for multi-disciplinary studies of the Arctic Ocean, NCEI developed a new set of high-resolution...

  3. High conductivity and transparent aluminum-based multi-layer source/drain electrodes for thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rihui; Zhang, Hongke; Fang, Zhiqiang; Ning, Honglong; Zheng, Zeke; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xiaochen; Cai, Wei; Lu, Xubing; Peng, Junbiao

    2018-02-01

    In this study, high conductivity and transparent multi-layer (AZO/Al/AZO-/Al/AZO) source/drain (S/D) electrodes for thin film transistors were fabricated via conventional physical vapor deposition approaches, without toxic elements or further thermal annealing process. The 68 nm-thick multi-layer films with excellent optical properties (transparency: 82.64%), good electrical properties (resistivity: 6.64  ×  10-5 Ω m, work function: 3.95 eV), and superior surface roughness (R q   =  0.757 nm with scanning area of 5  ×  5 µm2) were fabricated as the S/D electrodes. Significantly, comprehensive performances of AZO films are enhanced by the insertion of ultra-thin Al layers. The optimal transparent TFT with this multi-layer S/D electrodes exhibited a decent electrical performance with a saturation mobility (µ sat) of 3.2 cm2 V-1 s-1, an I on/I off ratio of 1.59  ×  106, a subthreshold swing of 1.05 V/decade. The contact resistance of AZO/Al/AZO/Al/AZO multi-layer electrodes is as low as 0.29 MΩ. Moreover, the average visible light transmittance of the unpatterned multi-layers constituting a whole transparent TFT could reach 72.5%. The high conductivity and transparent multi-layer S/D electrodes for transparent TFTs possessed great potential for the applications of the green and transparent displays industry.

  4. Linear models for sound from supersonic reacting mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, P. Shivakanth; Samanta, Arnab

    2016-12-01

    We perform a linearized reduced-order modeling of the aeroacoustic sound sources in supersonic reacting mixing layers to explore their sensitivities to some of the flow parameters in radiating sound. Specifically, we investigate the role of outer modes as the effective flow compressibility is raised, when some of these are expected to dominate over the traditional Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) -type central mode. Although the outer modes are known to be of lesser importance in the near-field mixing, how these radiate to the far-field is uncertain, on which we focus. On keeping the flow compressibility fixed, the outer modes are realized via biasing the respective mean densities of the fast (oxidizer) or slow (fuel) side. Here the mean flows are laminar solutions of two-dimensional compressible boundary layers with an imposed composite (turbulent) spreading rate, which we show to significantly alter the growth of instability waves by saturating them earlier, similar to in nonlinear calculations, achieved here via solving the linear parabolized stability equations. As the flow parameters are varied, instability of the slow modes is shown to be more sensitive to heat release, potentially exceeding equivalent central modes, as these modes yield relatively compact sound sources with lesser spreading of the mixing layer, when compared to the corresponding fast modes. In contrast, the radiated sound seems to be relatively unaffected when the mixture equivalence ratio is varied, except for a lean mixture which is shown to yield a pronounced effect on the slow mode radiation by reducing its modal growth.

  5. Multi-bits memory cell using degenerated magnetic states in a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Akio; Yakushiji, Kay; Konoto, Makoto; Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    We newly developed a magnetic memory cell having multi-bit function. The memory cell composed of a perpendicularly magnetized magnetic tunnel junction (MB-pMTJ) and a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer. The multi-bit function is realized by combining the freedom of states of the magnetic free layer and that in the antiferromagnetically coupled reference layer. The structure of the reference layer is (FeB/Ta/[Co/Pt]_3)/Ru/([Co/Pt]_6); the top and the bottom layers are coupled through Ru layer where the reference layer has two degrees of freedom of a head-to-head and a bottom-to-bottom magnetic configuration. A four-state memory cell is realized by combination of both degrees of freedom. The states in the reference layer however is hardly detected by the total resistance of MB-pMTJ, because the magnetoresistance effect in the reference layer is negligibly small. That implies that the resistance values for the different states in the reference layer are degenerated. On the other hand, the two different states in the reference layer bring different stray fields to the free layer, which generate two different minor loop with different switching fields. Therefore, the magnetic states in the reference layer can be differentiated by the two-step reading, before and after applying the appropriately pulsed magnetic field which can identify the initial state in the reference layer. This method is similar to distinguishing different magnetic states in an in-plane magnetized spin-valve element. We demonstrated that four different states in the MB-pMTJ can be distinguished by the two-step read-out. The important feature of the two-step reading is a practically large operation margins (large resistance change in reading) which is equal to that of a single MTJ. Even though the two-step reading is a destructive method by which 50% of the magnetic state is changed, this MB-pMTJ is promising for high density non-volatile memory cell with a minor cost of operation speed

  6. Multi-layer hierarchical array fabricated with diatom frustules for highly sensitive bio-detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Aobo; Cai, Jun; Pan, Junfeng; Wang, Yu; Yue, Yue; Zhang, Deyuan

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms have delicate porous structures which are very beneficial in improving the absorbing ability in the bio-detection field. In this study, multi-layered hierarchical arrays were fabricated by packing Nitzschia soratensis (N. soratensis) frustules into Cosinodiscus argus (C. argus) frustules to achieve advanced sensitivity in bio-detection chips. Photolithographic patterning was used to obtain N. soratensis frustule arrays, and the floating behavior of C. argus frustules was employed to control their postures for packing N. soratensis frustule array spots. The morphology of the multi-layer C. argus–N. soratensis package array was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, demonstrating that the overall and sub-structures of the diatom frustules were retained. The signal enhancing effect of multi-layer C. argus–N. soratensis packages was demonstrated by fluorescent antibody test results. The mechanism of the enhancement was also analyzed, indicating that both complex hierarchical frustule structures and optimized posture of C. argus frustules were important for improving bio-detection sensitivities. The technique for fabricating multi-layer diatom frustules arrays is also useful for making multi-functional biochips and controllable drug delivery systems. (paper)

  7. Arctic Glass: Innovative Consumer Technology in Support of Arctic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthkoski, T.

    2015-12-01

    The advancement of cyberinfrastructure on the North Slope of Alaska is drastically limited by location-specific conditions, including: unique geophysical features, remoteness of location, and harsh climate. The associated cost of maintaining this unique cyberinfrastructure also becomes a limiting factor. As a result, field experiments conducted in this region have historically been at a technological disadvantage. The Arctic Glass project explored a variety of scenarios where innovative consumer-grade technology was leveraged as a lightweight, rapidly deployable, sustainable, alternatives to traditional large-scale Arctic cyberinfrastructure installations. Google Glass, cloud computing services, Internet of Things (IoT) microcontrollers, miniature LIDAR, co2 sensors designed for HVAC systems, and portable network kits are several of the components field-tested at the Toolik Field Station as part of this project. Region-specific software was also developed, including a multi featured, voice controlled Google Glass application named "Arctic Glass". Additionally, real-time sensor monitoring and remote control capability was evaluated through the deployment of a small cluster of microcontroller devices. Network robustness was analyzed as the devices delivered streams of abiotic data to a web-based dashboard monitoring service in near real time. The same data was also uploaded synchronously by the devices to Amazon Web Services. A detailed overview of solutions deployed during the 2015 field season, results from experiments utilizing consumer sensors, and potential roles consumer technology could play in support of Arctic science will be discussed.

  8. Numerical analysis of mixing process of two component gases in vertical fluid layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, Hirofumi; Takeda, Tetsuaki; Funatani, Shumpei

    2015-01-01

    When the depressurization accident occurs in the Very-High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR), it is expected that air enter into the reactor core. Therefore, it is important to know a mixing process of different kind of gases in the stable or unstable stratified fluid layer. Especially, it is also important to examine an influence of localized natural convection and molecular diffusion on mixing process from a viewpoint of safety. In order to research the mixing process of two component gases and flow characteristics of the localized natural convection, we have carried out numerical analysis using three dimensional CFD code. The numerical model was consisted of a storage tank and a reverse U-shaped vertical slot. They were separated by a partition plate. One side of the left vertical fluid layer was heated and the other side was cooled. The right vertical fluid layer was also cooled. The procedure of numerical analysis is as follows. Firstly, the storage tank was filled with heavy gas and the reverse U-shaped vertical slot was filled with light gas. In the left vertical fluid layer, the localized natural convection was generated by the temperature difference between the vertical walls. The flow characteristics were obtained by a steady state analysis. The unsteady state analysis was started when the partition plate was opened. The gases were mixed by molecular diffusion and natural convection. After the time elapsed, natural circulation occurred. The result obtained in this numerical analysis is as follows. The temperature difference of the left vertical fluid layer was set to 100 K. The combination of the mixed gas was nitrogen and argon. After 76 minutes elapsed, natural circulation occurred. (author)

  9. Aircraft observations of enhancement and depletion of black carbon mass in the springtime Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Spackman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the processes controlling black carbon (BC in the Arctic is crucial for evaluating the impact of anthropogenic and natural sources of BC on Arctic climate. Vertical profiles of BC mass loadings were observed from the surface to near 7-km altitude in April 2008 using a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2 during flights on the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft from Fairbanks, Alaska. These measurements were conducted during the NOAA-sponsored Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC project. In the free troposphere, the Arctic air mass was influenced by long-range transport from biomass-burning and anthropogenic source regions at lower latitudes especially during the latter part of the campaign. Average BC mass mixing ratios peaked at about 150 ng BC (kg dry air −1 near 5.5 km altitude in the aged Arctic air mass and 250 ng kg−1 at 4.5 km in biomass-burning influenced air. BC mass loadings were enhanced by up to a factor of 5 in biomass-burning influenced air compared to the aged Arctic air mass. At the bottom of some of the profiles, positive vertical gradients in BC were observed over the sea-ice. The vertical profiles generally occurred in the vicinity of open leads in the sea-ice. In the aged Arctic air mass, BC mass loadings more than doubled with increasing altitude within the ABL and across the boundary layer transition while carbon monoxide (CO remained constant. This is evidence for depletion of BC mass in the ABL. BC mass loadings were positively correlated with O3 in ozone depletion events (ODEs for all the observations in the ABL. Since bromine catalytically destroys ozone in the ABL after being released as molecular bromine in regions of new sea-ice formation at the surface, the BC–O3 correlation suggests that BC particles were removed by a surface process such as dry deposition. We develop a box model to estimate the dry deposition flux of BC

  10. Representing Sheared Convective Boundary Layer by Zeroth- and First-Order-Jump Mixed-Layer Models: Large-Eddy Simulation Verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Kim, S.W.

    2006-01-01

    Dry convective boundary layers characterized by a significant wind shear on the surface and at the inversion are studied by means of the mixed-layer theory. Two different representations of the entrainment zone, each of which has a different closure of the entrainment heat flux, are considered. The

  11. A method to estimate the height of temperature inversion layer and the effective mixing depht

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, D.

    1978-05-01

    A review of the concept PBL or turbulent boundary layer is made as it is understood in meteorology. Some features of the PBL parameterization are also discussed, as well as the methods used to estimate the temperature inversion heights during morning and afternoon hours. The study bases on the assumption of the dry adiabatic lapse rate in the mixing layer that is, water vapor and airborne material are supposed to be homogeneously mixed below the inversion layer or in the effective mixing depth. The mean mixing heights over Rio de Janeiro area respectively about 500m and 1000m at morning and afternoon hours. For Sao Paulo these values are respectively 400m and 1300m at morning and afternoon hours [pt

  12. A fracture mechanics assessment of surface cracks existing in protective layers of multi-layer composite pipes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutař, Pavel; Náhlík, Luboš; Šestáková, Lucie; Ševčík, Martin; Knésl, Zdeněk; Nezbedová, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 5 (2010), s. 1120-1125 ISSN 0263-8223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0279 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Protective layers * Multi-layer pipes damage * Fracture mechanics * Bi-material interface * Generalized stress intensity factor Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.028, year: 2010

  13. Multi-layer enhancement to polysilicon surface-micromachining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Micromachine Dept.

    1997-10-01

    A multi-level polysilicon surface-micromachining technology consisting of 5 layers of polysilicon is presented. Surface topography and film mechanical stress are the major impediments encountered in the development of a multilayer surface-micromachining process. However, excellent mechanical film characteristics have been obtained through the use of chemical-mechanical polishing for planarization of topography and by proper sequencing of film deposition with thermal anneals. Examples of operating microactuators, geared power-transfer mechanisms, and optical elements demonstrate the mechanical advantages of construction with 5 polysilicon layers.

  14. Single-phase and two-phase gas-liquid turbulent mixing between subchannels in a simulated rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadatomi, Michio; Kawahara, Akimaro; Sato, Yoshifusa; Tomino, Takayoshi.

    1996-01-01

    This study is concerned with turbulent mixing which is one of the three mechanisms of cross flows between subchannels in a nuclear fuel rod bundle. The channel used in this experiments was a vertical simulated rod bundle having two subchannels connected through 1 to 3 gaps between two rods and/or rod and channel wall. The number of the gaps was changed to investigate the effect of the number on the turbulent mixing. Turbulent mixing rates of air and water and fluctuations of pressure difference between the subchannels were measured for single-phase and two-phase gas-liquid flows under hydrodynamic equilibrium flow conditions. It has been confirmed that the turbulent mixing rate is affected strongly by the fluctuations especially for liquid phase in two-phase slug or churn flow. (author)

  15. Sediments in Arctic sea ice: Implications for entrainment, transport and release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurnberg, D.; Wollenburg, I.; Dethleff, D.; Eicken, H.; Kassens, H.; Letzig, T.; Reimnitz, E.; Thiede, Jorn

    1994-01-01

    Despite the Arctic sea ice cover's recognized sensitivity to environmental change, the role of sediment inclusions in lowering ice albedo and affecting ice ablation is poorly understood. Sea ice sediment inclusions were studied in the central Arctic Ocean during the Arctic 91 expedition and in the Laptev Sea (East Siberian Arctic Region Expedition 1992). Results from these investigations are here combined with previous studies performed in major areas of ice ablation and the southern central Arctic Ocean. This study documents the regional distribution and composition of particle-laden ice, investigates and evaluates processes by which sediment is incorporated into the ice cover, and identifies transport paths and probable depositional centers for the released sediment. In April 1992, sea ice in the Laptev Sea was relatively clean. The sediment occasionally observed was distributed diffusely over the entire ice column, forming turbid ice. Observations indicate that frazil and anchor ice formation occurring in a large coastal polynya provide a main mechanism for sediment entrainment. In the central Arctic Ocean sediments are concentrated in layers within or at the surface of ice floes due to melting and refreezing processes. The surface sediment accumulation in central Arctic multi-year sea ice exceeds by far the amounts observed in first-year ice from the Laptev Sea in April 1992. Sea ice sediments are generally fine grained, although coarse sediments and stones up to 5 cm in diameter are observed. Component analysis indicates that quartz and clay minerals are the main terrigenous sediment particles. The biogenous components, namely shells of pelecypods and benthic foraminiferal tests, point to a shallow, benthic, marine source area. Apparently, sediment inclusions were resuspended from shelf areas before and incorporated into the sea ice by suspension freezing. Clay mineralogy of ice-rafted sediments provides information on potential source areas. A smectite

  16. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  17. Pan-Arctic observations in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project and its successor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    We started a Japanese initiative - "Arctic Climate Change Research Project" - within the framework of the Green Network of Excellence (GRENE) Program, funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT), in 2011. This Project targeted understanding and forecasting "Rapid Change of the Arctic Climate System and its Global Influences." Four strategic research targets are set by the Ministry: 1. Understanding the mechanism of warming amplification in the Arctic; 2. Understanding the Arctic climate system for global climate and future change; 3. Evaluation of the impacts of Arctic change on the weather and climate in Japan, marine ecosystems and fisheries; 4. Projection of sea ice distribution and Arctic sea routes. Through a network of universities and institutions in Japan, this 5-year Project involves more than 300 scientists from 39 institutions and universities. The National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) works as the core institute and The Japan Agency for Marine- Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) joins as the supporting institute. There are 7 bottom up research themes approved: the atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, cryosphere, greenhouse gases, marine ecology and fisheries, sea ice and Arctic sea routes and climate modeling, among 22 applications. The Project will realize multi-disciplinal study of the Arctic region and connect to the projection of future Arctic and global climatic change by modeling. The project has been running since the beginning of 2011 and in those 5 years pan-Arctic observations have been carried out in many locations, such as Svalbard, Russian Siberia, Alaska, Canada, Greenland and the Arctic Ocean. In particular, 95 GHz cloud profiling radar in high precision was established at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, and intensive atmospheric observations were carried out in 2014 and 2015. In addition, the Arctic Ocean cruises by R/V "Mirai" (belonging to JAMSTEC) and other icebreakers belonging to other

  18. Characterization of the morphology of co-extruded, thermoplastic/rubber multi-layer tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Abee, R.M.A.; Vissers, A.M.J.T.; Goossens, J.G.P.; Spoelstra, A.B.; Duin, M. van

    2009-01-01

    Tapes with alternating semi-crystalline thermoplastic/rubber layers with thicknesses varying from 100 nm up to several μm were prepared by multi-layer co-extrusion. The variation in layer thickness was obtained by varying the thermoplastic/rubber feed ratio. A systematic study on the use of various microscopy techniques to visualize the morphology of the layered systems is presented. The relatively large length scales and the sample preparation make optical microscopy (OM) unsuitable to study the morphology of the multi-layer tapes. Although excellent contrast between the thermoplastic and rubber layers can be obtained, the usually applied, relatively large magnifications limit the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to small sample areas. The large range of applicable magnifications makes scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the most suitable technique to study the morphology of the multi-layer tapes. The sample preparation for SEM with a secondary electron (SE) detector is often based on the removal of one of the components, which may induce changes in the morphology. SEM with a back-scattered electron (BSE) detector is a very convenient method to study the morphology over a wide range of length scales, where the contrast between the different layers can be enhanced by chemical staining. Finally, the nucleation behavior (homogeneous versus heterogeneous) of the semi-crystalline layers, as probed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), provides valuable information on the layered morphology. The use of relatively straightforward DSC measurements shows a clear advantage with respect to the discussed microscopy techniques, since no sample preparation is required and relatively large samples can be studied, which are more representative for the bulk.

  19. Multi-layer protective armour for underwater shock wave mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hawass

    2015-12-01

    The strain gauge data and displacement sensors results showed that the multi-layer plates have higher level of underwater shock wave mitigation than the triple aluminum plates with strain and deflection of nearly 50%.

  20. Multi-phase alternative current machine winding design | Khan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... single-phase to 18-phase excitation. Experimental results of a five-phase induction machine supplied from a static five-phase supply are provided to support the proposed design. Keywords: AC machine, Multi-phase machine, Stator winding, Five-phase. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol.

  1. The Experience of Using Autonomous Drifters for Studying the Ice Fields and the Ocean Upper Layer in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Motyzhev

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The constructional and operational features of the BTC60/GPS/ice temperature-profiling drifters, developed in Marine Hydrophysical institute RAS for investigation of polar areas, are considered in this article. The drifters operated in completely automatic mode measuring air pressure, water temperatures at 17 depths down to 60 m, ocean pressures at 20, 40 and 60 m nominal depths and current locations. Accuracies of measurements were: +/-2 hPa for air pressure, +/-0.1°C for temperatures, +/-30 hPa for ocean pressure, 60 m for locations. Iridium satellite communication system was used for data transfer. Time delay between sample and delivery to a user did not exceed 10 minutes. More than 30 thermodrifters were developed in the Beaufort Sea – Canada Basin and central Arctic for the period from September 2012 to September 2014. Total duration of drifting buoys in operation was more of 4800 days. It was accepted the data of hourly samples about variability of ice-flows and ice field as a whole movements, thermo processes within upper water layer below ice, air pressure in near surface atmosphere of the Arctic region. The article includes some results of statistical analysis of data from drifter ID247950, the 3-year trajectory of which depended on the processes of transfer and evolution of ice fields in the Beaufort Sea – Canada Basin. Over a long period of time the Arctic buoy in-situ experiments allowed resulting about capability and reasonability to create reliable, technological and low-cost buoy network on basis of BTC60/GPS/ice drifters to monitor Arctic area of the World Ocean.

  2. Increased Surface Wind Speeds Follow Diminishing Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioduszewski, J.; Vavrus, S. J.; Wang, M.; Holland, M. M.; Landrum, L.

    2017-12-01

    Projections of Arctic sea ice through the end of the 21st century indicate the likelihood of a strong reduction in ice area and thickness in all seasons, leading to a substantial thermodynamic influence on the overlying atmosphere. This is likely to have an effect on winds over the Arctic Basin, due to changes in atmospheric stability and/or baroclinicity. Prior research on future Arctic wind changes is limited and has focused mainly on the practical impacts on wave heights in certain seasons. Here we attempt to identify patterns and likely mechanisms responsible for surface wind changes in all seasons across the Arctic, particularly those associated with sea ice loss in the marginal ice zone. Sea level pressure, near-surface (10 m) and upper-air (850 hPa) wind speeds, and lower-level dynamic and thermodynamic variables from the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble Project (CESM-LE) were analyzed for the periods 1971-2000 and 2071-2100 to facilitate comparison between a present-day and future climate. Mean near-surface wind speeds over the Arctic Ocean are projected to increase by late century in all seasons but especially during autumn and winter, when they strengthen by up to 50% locally. The most extreme wind speeds in the 90th percentile change even more, increasing in frequency by over 100%. The strengthened winds are closely linked to decreasing lower-tropospheric stability resulting from the loss of sea ice cover and consequent surface warming (locally over 20 ºC warmer in autumn and winter). A muted pattern of these future changes is simulated in CESM-LE historical runs from 1920-2005. The enhanced winds near the surface are mostly collocated with weaker winds above the boundary layer during autumn and winter, implying more vigorous vertical mixing and a drawdown of high-momentum air.The implications of stronger future winds include increased coastal hazards and the potential for a positive feedback with sea ice by generating higher winds and

  3. Effect of antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling on spin-wave resonance frequency of multi-layer film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Rong-ke, E-mail: rkqiu@163.com; Cai, Wei

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • A quantum approach is developed to study the SWR of a bicomponent multi-layer films. • The comparison of the SWR in films with FM and AFM interfacial coupling has been made. • The present results show the method to enhance and adjust the SWR frequency of films. - Abstract: We investigate the spin-wave resonance (SWR) frequency in a bicomponent bilayer and triple-layer films with antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic interfacial couplings, as function of interfacial coupling, surface anisotropy, interface anisotropy, thickness and external magnetic field, using the linear spin-wave approximation and Green’s function technique. The microwave properties for multi-layer magnetic film with antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling is different from those for multi-layer magnetic film with ferromagnetic interfacial coupling. For the bilayer film with antiferromagnetic interfacial couplings, as the lower (upper) surface anisotropy increases, only the SWR frequencies of the odd (even) number modes increase. The lower (upper) surface anisotropy does not affect the SWR frequencies of the even (odd) number modes{sub .} For the multi-layer film with antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling, the SWR frequency of modes m = 1, 3 and 4 decreases while that of mode m = 2 increases with increasing thickness of the film within a proper parameter region. The present results could be useful in enhancing our fundamental understanding and show the method to enhance and adjust the SWR frequency of bicomponent multi-layer magnetic films with antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic interfacial coupling.

  4. Phase characterization of Re-based diffusion barrier layer on Nb substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiarti, Eni; Wang, Youngmin; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei; Narita, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    An electron microscopy phase characterization was carried out for a Re-based diffusion barrier layer, which was deposited on the Nb substrate used as an ultra high temperature material. The coating process produced three layers; an outer Cr(Re) layer, an intermediate Cr-Nb-Re layer, and an inner Nb(Re) layer. The Cr-Nb-Re layer is considered to act as a diffusion barrier layer between the substrate and the outer Cr(Re) reservoir layer. The Cr(Re) and Nb(Re) layers are in single phase with a similar bcc structures, but they are different in structure from the intermediate layer, which is composed of a dual phase of Re 63 Cr 20 Nb 17 with a cubic structure and Nb 42 Re 33 Cr 25 with a hexagonal structure determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in this study. (author)

  5. Emergent Behavior of Arctic Precipitation in Response to Enhanced Arctic Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bruce T.; Feldl, Nicole; Lintner, Benjamin R.

    2018-03-01

    Amplified warming of the high latitudes in response to human-induced emissions of greenhouse gases has already been observed in the historical record and is a robust feature evident across a hierarchy of model systems, including the models of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). The main aims of this analysis are to quantify intermodel differences in the Arctic amplification (AA) of the global warming signal in CMIP5 RCP8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5) simulations and to diagnose these differences in the context of the energy and water cycles of the region. This diagnosis reveals an emergent behavior between the energetic and hydrometeorological responses of the Arctic to warming: in particular, enhanced AA and its associated reduction in dry static energy convergence is balanced to first order by latent heating via enhanced precipitation. This balance necessitates increasing Arctic precipitation with increasing AA while at the same time constraining the magnitude of that precipitation increase. The sensitivity of the increase, 1.25 (W/m2)/K ( 240 (km3/yr)/K), is evident across a broad range of historical and projected AA values. Accounting for the energetic constraint on Arctic precipitation, as a function of AA, in turn informs understanding of both the sign and magnitude of hydrologic cycle changes that the Arctic may experience.

  6. Langmuir wave phase-mixing in warm electron-positron-dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Sourav; Maity, Chandan

    2018-04-01

    An analytical study on nonlinear evolution of Langmuir waves in warm electron-positron-dusty plasmas is presented. The massive dust grains of either positively or negatively charged are assumed to form a fixed charge neutralizing background. A perturbative analysis of the fluid-Maxwell's equations confirms that the excited Langmuir waves phase-mix and eventually break, even at arbitrarily low amplitudes. It is shown that the nature of the dust-charge as well as the amount of dust grains can significantly influence the Langmuir wave phase-mixing process. The phase-mixing time is also found to increase with the temperature.

  7. Mixed layer depths via Doppler lidar during low-level jet events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Brian; Demoz, Belay; Bonin, Timothy; Delgado, Ruben

    2018-04-01

    A low-level jet (LLJ) is a prominent wind speed peak in the lower troposphere. Nocturnal LLJs have been shown to transport and mix atmospheric constituents from the residual layer down to the surface, breaching quiescent nocturnal conditions due to high wind shear. A new fuzzy logic algorithm combining turbulence and aerosol information from Doppler lidar scans can resolve the strength and depth of this mixing below the jet. Conclusions will be drawn about LLJ relations to turbulence and mixing.

  8. MAPLE prepared heterostructures with oligoazomethine: Fullerene derivative mixed layer for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanculescu, A.; Rasoga, O.; Socol, M.; Vacareanu, L.; Grigoras, M.; Socol, G.; Stanculescu, F.; Breazu, C.; Matei, E.; Preda, N.; Girtan, M.

    2017-09-01

    Mixed layers of azomethine oligomers containing 2,5-diamino-3,4-dicyanothiophene as central unit and triphenylamine (LV5) or carbazol (LV4) at both ends as donor and fullerene derivative, [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid butyl ester ([C60]PCB-C4) as acceptor, have been prepared by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) on glass/ITO and Si substrates. The effect of weight ratio between donor and acceptor (1:1; 1:2) and solvent type (chloroform, dimethylsulphoxide) on the optical (UV-vis transmission/absorption, photoluminescence) and morphological properties of LV4 (LV5): [C60]PCB-C4 mixed layers has been evidenced. Dark and under illumination I-V characteristics of the heterostructures realized with these mixed layers sandwiched between ITO and Al electrodes have revealed a solar cell behavior for the heterostructures prepared with both LV4 and LV5 using chloroform as matrix solvent. The solar cell structure realized with oligomer LV5, glass/ITO/LV5: [C60]PCB-C4 (1:1) has shown the best parameters.

  9. Phasing multi-segment undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Elleaume, P.; Vaerenbergh, P. Van

    1996-01-01

    An important issue in the manufacture of multi-segment undulators as a source of synchrotron radiation or as a free-electron laser (FEL) is the phasing between successive segments. The state of the art is briefly reviewed, after which a novel pure permanent magnet phasing section that is passive and does not require any current is presented. The phasing section allows the introduction of a 6 mm longitudinal gap between each segment, resulting in complete mechanical independence and reduced magnetic interaction between segments. The tolerance of the longitudinal positioning of one segment with respect to the next is found to be 2.8 times lower than that of conventional phasing. The spectrum at all gaps and useful harmonics is almost unchanged when compared with a single-segment undulator of the same total length. (au) 3 refs

  10. Level-set dynamics and mixing efficiency of passive and active scalars in DNS and LES of turbulent mixing layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Vreman, Bert; Kuerten, Hans; Luo, Kai H.

    2001-01-01

    The mixing efficiency in a turbulent mixing layer is quantified by monitoring the surface-area of level-sets of scalar fields. The Laplace transform is applied to numerically calculate integrals over arbitrary level-sets. The analysis includes both direct and large-eddy simulation and is used to

  11. Scaling Laws in Arctic Permafrost River Basins: Statistical Signature in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. C.; Gangodagamage, C.; Wilson, C. J.; Prancevic, J. P.; Brumby, S. P.; Marsh, P.; Crosby, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic landscape has been shown to be fundamentally different from the temperate landscape in many ways. Long winters and cold temperatures have led to the development of permafrost, perennially frozen ground, that controls geomorphic processes and the structure of the Arctic landscape. Climate warming is causing changes in permafrost and the active layer (the seasonally thawed surface layer) that is driving an increase in thermal erosion including thermokarst (collapsed soil), retrogressive thaw slumps, and gullies. These geomorphic anomalies in the arctic landscapes have not been well quantified, even though some of the landscape geomorphic and hydrologic characteristics and changes are detectable by our existing sensor networks. We currently lack understanding of the fundamental fluvio-thermal-erosional processes that underpin Arctic landscape structure and form, which limits our ability to develop models to predict the landscape response to current and future climate change. In this work, we seek a unified framework that can explain why permafrost landscapes are different from temperate landscapes. We use high resolution LIDAR data to analyze arctic geomorphic processes at a scale of less than a 1 m and demonstrate our ability to quantify the fundamental difference in the arctic landscape. We first simulate the arctic hillslopes from a stochastic space-filling network and demonstrate that the flow-path convergent properties of arctic landscape can be effectively captured from this simple model, where the simple model represents a landscape flowpath arrangement on a relatively impervious frozen soil layer. Further, we use a novel data processing algorithm to analyze landscape attributes such as slope, curvature, flow-accumulation, elevation-drops and other geomorphic properties, and show that the pattern of diffusion and advection dominated soil transport processes (diffusion/advection regime transition) in the arctic landscape is substantially different

  12. Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong; Bader, Jürgen; Rolph, Rebecca; Kwon, Minho

    2015-05-12

    Phytoplankton have attracted increasing attention in climate science due to their impacts on climate systems. A new generation of climate models can now provide estimates of future climate change, considering the biological feedbacks through the development of the coupled physical-ecosystem model. Here we present the geophysical impact of phytoplankton, which is often overlooked in future climate projections. A suite of future warming experiments using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model that interacts with a marine ecosystem model reveals that the future phytoplankton change influenced by greenhouse warming can amplify Arctic surface warming considerably. The warming-induced sea ice melting and the corresponding increase in shortwave radiation penetrating into the ocean both result in a longer phytoplankton growing season in the Arctic. In turn, the increase in Arctic phytoplankton warms the ocean surface layer through direct biological heating, triggering additional positive feedbacks in the Arctic, and consequently intensifying the Arctic warming further. Our results establish the presence of marine phytoplankton as an important potential driver of the future Arctic climate changes.

  13. Taxonomy-driven adaptation of multi-layer applications using templates

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Razvan; Staikopoulos, Athanasios; Liu, Peng; Brogi, Antonio; Clarke, Siobh??n

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed Current adaptation approaches mainly work in isolation and cannot be easily integrated to tackle complex adaptation scenarios. The few existing cross-layer adaptation techniques are somewhat inflexible because the adaptation process is predefined and static. In this paper we propose a methodology for the dynamic and flexible adaptation of multi-layer applications. We use events to trigger the process of matching adaptation templates, which expose adaptation logic as BPEL pro...

  14. Study on tribological properties of multi-layer surface texture on Babbitt alloys surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongya; Zhao, Feifei; Li, Yan; Li, Pengyang; Zeng, Qunfeng; Dong, Guangneng

    2016-12-01

    To improve tribological properties of Babbitt alloys, multi-layer surface texture consisted of the main grooves and secondary micro-dimples are fabricated on the Babbitt substrate through laser pulse ablation. The tribological behaviors of multi-layer surface texture are investigated using a rotating type pin-on-disc tribo-meter under variation sliding speeds, and the film pressure distributions on the textured surfaces are simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for elucidating the possible mechanisms. The results suggest that: (i) the multi-layer surface texture can reduce friction coefficient of Babbitt alloy, which has lowest friction coefficient of 0.03, in case of the groove parameter of 300 μm width and 15% of area density; (ii) the improvement effect may be more sensitive to the groove area density and the siding speed, and the textured surface with lower area density has lower friction coefficient under high sliding speed. Based on the reasons of (i) the secondary micro-dimples on Babbitt alloy possesses a hydrophobicity surface and (ii) the CFD analysis indicates that main grooves enhancing hydrodynamic effect, thus the multi-layer surface texture is regarded as dramatically improve the lubricating properties of the Babbitt alloy.

  15. Enhanced mixing in two-phase Taylor-Couette flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dherbecourt, Diane

    2015-01-01

    In the scope of the nuclear fuel reprocessing, Taylor-Couette flows between two concentric cylinders (the inner one in rotation and the outer one at rest) are used at laboratory scale to study the performances of new liquid/liquid extraction processes. Separation performances are strongly related to the mixing efficiency, the quantification of the latter is therefore of prime importance. A previous Ph.D. work has related the mixing properties to the hydrodynamics parameters in single-phase flow, using both experimental and numerical investigations. The Reynolds number, flow state and vortices height (axial wavelength) impacts were thus highlighted. This Ph.D. work extends the previous study to two-phase configurations. For experimental simplification, and to avoid droplets coalescence or breakage, spherical solid particles of PMMA from 800 μm to 1500 μm diameter are used to model rigid droplets. These beads are suspended in an aqueous solution of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and potassium Thiocyanate (KSCN). The experimental setup uses coupled Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) to access simultaneously the hydrodynamic and the mixing properties. Although the two phases are carefully chosen to match in density and refractive index, these precautions are not sufficient to ensure a good measurement quality, and a second PLIF channel is added to increase the precision of the mixing quantification. The classical PLIF channel monitors the evolution of Rhodamine WT concentration, while the additional PLIF channel is used to map a Fluorescein dye, which is homogeneously concentrated inside the gap. This way, a dynamic mask of the bead positions can be created and used to correct the Rhodamine WT raw images. Thanks to this experimental setup, a parametric study of the particles size and concentration is achieved. A double effect of the dispersed phase is evidenced. On one hand, the particles affect the flow hydrodynamic properties

  16. Cross-Dependency Inference in Multi-Layered Networks: A Collaborative Filtering Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Tong, Hanghang; Xie, Lei; Ying, Lei; He, Qing

    2017-08-01

    The increasingly connected world has catalyzed the fusion of networks from different domains, which facilitates the emergence of a new network model-multi-layered networks. Examples of such kind of network systems include critical infrastructure networks, biological systems, organization-level collaborations, cross-platform e-commerce, and so forth. One crucial structure that distances multi-layered network from other network models is its cross-layer dependency, which describes the associations between the nodes from different layers. Needless to say, the cross-layer dependency in the network plays an essential role in many data mining applications like system robustness analysis and complex network control. However, it remains a daunting task to know the exact dependency relationships due to noise, limited accessibility, and so forth. In this article, we tackle the cross-layer dependency inference problem by modeling it as a collective collaborative filtering problem. Based on this idea, we propose an effective algorithm Fascinate that can reveal unobserved dependencies with linear complexity. Moreover, we derive Fascinate-ZERO, an online variant of Fascinate that can respond to a newly added node timely by checking its neighborhood dependencies. We perform extensive evaluations on real datasets to substantiate the superiority of our proposed approaches.

  17. Sodar measurements of the mixed-layer depth over a large city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurygin, E.A. [Russia Academy of Sciences, Inst. of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    The results of synchronous sodar`s measurements on a territory of city and suburban area have shown: (a) The types of stratification over centre of the city and periphery considerably differ, and these distinctions are more often displayed in morning and evening transition period. The agreement between types of stratification in the centre and on the periphery was observed in 40% of cases; (b) At equal temperature stratification the mixed-layer depth in centre of the city is about 50-150 m higher at inversions in comparison with a periphery, at advanced convection - these depths are identical; (c) At different stratification between the city and periphery the distinction in the mixed-layer depth can reach 200. (au)

  18. Mixing phases of unstable two-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.V.; Brentano, P. von.

    1993-01-01

    An unstable two-level system decaying into an arbitrary number of channels is considered. It is shown that the mixing phases of the two overlapping resonances can be expressed in the terms of their partial widths and one additional universal mixing parameter. Some applications to a doublet of 2 + resonances in 8 Be and to the ρ-ω systems are considered. 18 refs

  19. Application of high-pressure techniques: stabilization and oxidation-state control of novel superconductive and related multi-layered copper oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, H.; Karppinen, M.

    2000-01-01

    Copper oxide superconductors possess multi-layered structures with a layer sequence of -CuO 2 -(Q-CuO 2 ) n-1 -AO-(MO 1±δ ) m -AO- or -CuO 2 -B-(O 2 -B) s-1 -CuO 2 -AO-(MO 1±δ ) m -AO- along the elongated c axis. Based on this layer sequence, the known copper oxide structures are categorized as members of the homologous series, M m A r Q n-1 Cu n O m+r+2 +n ±δ (M-mr(n-1)n ; category A) or M m A 2k B s Cu 1+k O m +4k +2s±δ (M-m(2k)s (1+k ); category B). Stabilization of such structures especially in the case of high values of the n /s parameter, i.e. the higher members of the homologous series, has been demonstrated to be apparently promoted under high pressures and/or strongly oxidizing conditions. Consequently, techniques for applying both high oxygen gas pressures (10-2000 atm) and ultra-high solid-medium pressures (2-8 GPa) have been advantageously utilized in synthesizing various superconductive copper oxide phases. Especially the ultra-high solid-medium pressure synthesis carried out in the so-called cubic-anvil/belt-type apparatus has proven to be extremely successful in synthesizing novel superconductive phases. In order to achieve high partial pressures of oxygen in the solid-medium environment, 'external' oxygen-generating oxides such as KClO 4 , KClO 3 and Ag 2 O 2 are commonly added to the precursor mixtures. It is emphasized that in some cases it is possible to utilize 'internal' oxidizing agents alone, i.e. highly oxidized precursors such as BaCuO 2+δ and Ba 2 Cu 3 O 5+δ containing metal constituents common with the desired copper oxide phase only. In the present paper, the potential and applications of high-pressure techniques in synthesizing multi-layered copper oxides and related structures are reviewed and discussed with emphasis on the important 'historical' discoveries of novel phases and the present status of controlled production of high-quality samples of such phases. (author)

  20. Evolution of a Western Arctic Ice Ocean Boundary Layer and Mixed Layer Across a Developing Thermodynamically Forced Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    heat and momentum transfer with the ice-ocean interface. These two observations demonstrate the intricate interplay between momentum, heat , and...summer evolution events: 1. Modulated shortwave radiative input to the ocean 2. Shoaled the ocean boundary layer increasing ocean heat storage 3... transfer in a stratified oceanic boundary layer. J. Geophys. Res., 92(C7), 6977–7986, doi:10.1029/JC092iC07p06977. McPhee, M. G., 1992: Turbulent heat

  1. Resource partitioning between Pacific walruses and bearded seals in the Alaska Arctic and sub-Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxtoby, L E; Horstmann, L; Budge, S M; O'Brien, D M; Wang, S W; Schollmeier, T; Wooller, M J

    2017-06-01

    Climate-mediated changes in the phenology of Arctic sea ice and primary production may alter benthic food webs that sustain populations of Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus). Interspecific resource competition could place an additional strain on ice-associated marine mammals already facing loss of sea ice habitat. Using fatty acid (FA) profiles, FA trophic markers, and FA stable carbon isotope analyses, we found that walruses and bearded seals partitioned food resources in 2009-2011. Interspecific differences in FA profiles were largely driven by variation in non-methylene FAs, which are markers of benthic invertebrate prey taxa, indicating varying consumption of specific benthic prey. We used Bayesian multi-source FA stable isotope mixing models to estimate the proportional contributions of particulate organic matter (POM) from sympagic (ice algal), pelagic, and benthic sources to these apex predators. Proportional contributions of FAs to walruses and bearded seals from benthic POM sources were high [44 (17-67)% and 62 (38-83)%, respectively] relative to other sources of POM. Walruses also obtained considerable contributions of FAs from pelagic POM sources [51 (32-73)%]. Comparison of δ 13 C values of algal FAs from walruses and bearded seals to those from benthic prey from different feeding groups from the Chukchi and Bering seas revealed that different trophic pathways sustained walruses and bearded seals. Our findings suggest that (1) resource partitioning may mitigate interspecific competition, and (2) climate change impacts on Arctic food webs may elicit species-specific responses in these high trophic level consumers.

  2. Multi-target-qubit unconventional geometric phase gate in a multi-cavity system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Cao, Xiao-Zhi; Su, Qi-Ping; Xiong, Shao-Jie; Yang, Chui-Ping

    2016-02-22

    Cavity-based large scale quantum information processing (QIP) may involve multiple cavities and require performing various quantum logic operations on qubits distributed in different cavities. Geometric-phase-based quantum computing has drawn much attention recently, which offers advantages against inaccuracies and local fluctuations. In addition, multiqubit gates are particularly appealing and play important roles in QIP. We here present a simple and efficient scheme for realizing a multi-target-qubit unconventional geometric phase gate in a multi-cavity system. This multiqubit phase gate has a common control qubit but different target qubits distributed in different cavities, which can be achieved using a single-step operation. The gate operation time is independent of the number of qubits and only two levels for each qubit are needed. This multiqubit gate is generic, e.g., by performing single-qubit operations, it can be converted into two types of significant multi-target-qubit phase gates useful in QIP. The proposal is quite general, which can be used to accomplish the same task for a general type of qubits such as atoms, NV centers, quantum dots, and superconducting qubits.

  3. Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Water and Salt Budgets of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James R.; Russell, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The annual flux of freshwater into the Arctic Ocean by the atmosphere and rivers is balanced by the export of sea ice and oceanic freshwater. Two 150-year simulations of a global climate model are used to examine how this balance might change if atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) increase. Relative to the control, the last 50-year period of the GHG experiment indicates that the total inflow of water from the atmosphere and rivers increases by 10% primarily due to an increase in river discharge, the annual sea-ice export decreases by about half, the oceanic liquid water export increases, salinity decreases, sea-ice cover decreases, and the total mass and sea-surface height of the Arctic Ocean increase. The closed, compact, and multi-phased nature of the hydrologic cycle in the Arctic Ocean makes it an ideal test of water budgets that could be included in model intercomparisons.

  4. Modelling multi-phase liquid-sediment scour and resuspension induced by rapid flows using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) accelerated with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourtakas, G.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-06-01

    A two-phase numerical model using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is applied to two-phase liquid-sediments flows. The absence of a mesh in SPH is ideal for interfacial and highly non-linear flows with changing fragmentation of the interface, mixing and resuspension. The rheology of sediment induced under rapid flows undergoes several states which are only partially described by previous research in SPH. This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the geotechnics, non-Newtonian and Newtonian flows by proposing a model that combines the yielding, shear and suspension layer which are needed to predict accurately the global erosion phenomena, from a hydrodynamics prospective. The numerical SPH scheme is based on the explicit treatment of both phases using Newtonian and the non-Newtonian Bingham-type Herschel-Bulkley-Papanastasiou constitutive model. This is supplemented by the Drucker-Prager yield criterion to predict the onset of yielding of the sediment surface and a concentration suspension model. The multi-phase model has been compared with experimental and 2-D reference numerical models for scour following a dry-bed dam break yielding satisfactory results and improvements over well-known SPH multi-phase models. With 3-D simulations requiring a large number of particles, the code is accelerated with a graphics processing unit (GPU) in the open-source DualSPHysics code. The implementation and optimisation of the code achieved a speed up of x58 over an optimised single thread serial code. A 3-D dam break over a non-cohesive erodible bed simulation with over 4 million particles yields close agreement with experimental scour and water surface profiles.

  5. Heating of multi-layered samples by a Nd: YAG pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz Neto, O.O.

    1998-01-01

    In the work we examine the heating of multi-layered samples by a powerful Nd-YAG pulsed laser. The samples are made of two and three layers, conductor-isolator (Al-Al 2 O 3 ). conductor-conductor (Al-Ag: Al-Au) an conductor-conductor-conductor (Al-Au-Ag:Ag-Au-Al). The transient behaviour of the temperature distribution throughout the samples is computed. We carry out three dimensional model calculations for the heating process in which we consider not only the temperature dependence of the sample thermal and optical parameters but also the space and time characteristics of the laser beams as the heating source. We showed the influence of the substrate in the thermal profile, in space and time, and maximum temperature on the multi-layered samples. (Author) 11 refs

  6. Suppression of Phase Mixing in Drift-Kinetic Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. T.; Dellar, P. J.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Highcock, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    The solar wind and interstellar medium are examples of strongly magnetised, weakly collisional, astrophysical plasmas. Their turbulent fluctuations are strongly anisotropic, with small amplitudes, and frequencies much lower than the Larmor frequency. This regime is described by gyrokinetic theory, a reduced five-dimensional kinetic system describing averages over Larmor orbits. A turbulent plasma may transfer free energy, a measure of fluctuation amplitudes, from injection at large scales, typically by an instability, to dissipation at small physical scales like a turbulent fluid. Alternatively, a turbulent plasma may form fine scale structures in velocity space via phase-mixing, the mechanism that leads to Landau damping in linear plasma theory. Macroscopic plasma properties like heat and momentum transport are affected by both mechanisms. While each is understood in isolation, their interaction is not. We study this interaction using a Hankel-Hermite velocity space representation of gyrokinetic theory. The Hankel transform interacts neatly with the Bessel functions that arise from averaging over Larmor orbits, so the perpendicular velocity space is decoupled for linearized problems. The Hermite transform expresses phase mixing as nearest-neighbor coupling between parallel velocity space scales represented by Hermite mode numbers. We use this representation to study transfer mechanisms in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence, the long wavelength limit of gyrokinetic theory. We show that phase space is divided into two regions, with one transfer mechanism dominating in each. Most energy is contained in the region where the fluid-like nonlinear cascade dominates. Moreover, in that region the nonlinear cascade interferes with phase mixing by exciting an "anti phase mixing" transfer of free energy from small to large velocity space scales. This cancels out the usual phase mixing, and renders the overall behavior fluid-like. These results profoundly change our understanding

  7. Neutrino mixing and lepton CP-phase in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhikh, D.A.; Ter-Martirosyan, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    One studied oscillations of the Dirac neutrinos belonging to three generations in vacuum with regard to the effect of the lepton CP-breaking phase on them in the matrix of lepton mixing (analogue of the quark CP-phase). In the general form one obtained formulae for probabilities of transition of neutrino of one kind to another at oscillations depending on three angles of mixing and on CP-phase. It was pointed that when measuring oscillation average probabilities of transition of neutrino of one kind to another one might in principle, restore the value of lepton CP-phase. Manifestation of CP-phase in the form of deviation of the values of probabilities of direct neutrino transition from reverse one is the effect practically escaping observation [ru

  8. Detecting and Understanding Changing Arctic Carbon Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhwiler, L.

    2017-12-01

    emissions over time by examining modeled and observed spatial and seasonal variability. An issue we will consider is whether well-mixed background atmospheric records are more likely to detect changing Arctic emissions compared to stronger, but more variable signal from local sources.

  9. Synthesis of ZnO nanowire arrays on ZnO−TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide seed layer for dye sensitized solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marimuthu, T. [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India); Anandhan, N., E-mail: anandhan_kn@rediffmail.com [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India); Thangamuthu, R. [Electrochemical Materials Science Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi (India); Mummoorthi, M. [Advanced Materials and Thin Film Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India); Ravi, G. [Photonic Crystal Lab, Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi (India)

    2016-08-25

    ZnO nanowire arrays (NWAs) were synthesized on ZnO−TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide seeded FTO conducting glass plate by two-step sol-gel and hydrothermal method, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal the presence of mixed and hexagonal phases in seed layer and NWAs, respectively. Scanning electron microscope images showed that the FTO glass plate is uniformly covered with grains and a few nanorods in seed layer and dense NWAs are vertically grown on the seed layer. The hexagonal structure and high crystal quality have been confirmed by micro Raman spectra. Photoluminescence spectra also present that NWAs have high crystal quality and less atomic defects. UV spectra indicate that NWAs are absorbed more dye molecules and it has the band gap equal to bulk material. The efficiency of ZnO−TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide seed layer and ZnO NWAs is found to be 0.56 and 0.84% respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectra reveal that NWAs DSSC has high charge transfer recombination resistance than the seed layer DSSC. - Highlights: • ZnO nanowire arrays were synthesized by two-step sol-gel and hydrothermal method. • The crystal structure and crystalline quality of films are confirmed by Raman spectra. • The emission properties of films are investigated by photoluminescence spectra. • ZnO nanowire arrays (NWAs) have higher charge transfer recombination resistance. • The conversion efficiency of the seed layer and NWAs is to be 0.56 and 0.84%.

  10. Simulation and Visualization of Flows Laden with Cylindrical Nanoparticles in a Mixing Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqian Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion of cylindrical particles in a mixing layer is studied using the pseudospectral method and discrete particle model. The effect of the Stokes number and particle aspect ratio on the mixing and orientation distribution of cylindrical particles is analyzed. The results show that the rollup of mixing layer drives the particles to the edge of the vortex by centrifugal force. The cylindrical particles with the small Stokes number almost follow fluid streamlines and are mixed thoroughly, while those with the large Stokes number, centrifugalized and accumulated at the edge of the vortex, are poorly mixed. The mixing degree of particles becomes worse as the particle aspect ratio increases. The cylindrical particles would change their orientation under two torques and rotate around their axis of revolution aligned to the vorticity direction when the shear rate is low, while aligning on the flow-gradient plane beyond a critical shear rate value. More particles are oriented with the flow direction, and this phenomenon becomes more obvious with the decrease of the Stokes number and particle aspect ratio.

  11. Numerical simulation of complex multi-phase fluid of casting process and its applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Li-liang

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The fluid of casting process is a typical kind of multi-phase flow. Actually, many casting phenomena have close relationship with the multi-phase flow, such as molten metal filling process, air entrapment, slag movement, venting process of die casting, gas escaping of lost foam casting and so on. Obviously, in order to analyze these phenomena accurately, numerical simulation of the multi-phase fluid is necessary. Unfortunately, so far, most of the commercial casting simulation systems do not have the ability of multi-phase flow modeling due to the difficulty in the multi-phase flow calculation. In the paper, Finite Different Method (FDM technique was adopt to solve the multi-phase fluid model. And a simple object of the muiti-phase fluid was analyzed to obtain the fluid rates of the liquid phase and the entrapped air phase.

  12. Interannual Variations in Arctic Winter Temperature: The Role of Global Scale Teleconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    OLR outgoing longwave radiation OND October-December PNA Pacific-North American R1 reanalysis SAF surface ice -snow albedo feedback SAT surface air...the reduction of multi-year sea ice in the Arctic are expected to continue over future decades, and may soon afford the U.S. Navy new opportunities...to navigate and operate in the Arctic (U.S. Navy 2014). Predicting Arctic sea ice concentration (SIC) and sea ice extent (SIE), for the purposes of

  13. A general analytical equation for phase diagrams of an N-layer ferroelectric thin film with two surface layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z X; Teng, B H; Rong, Y H; Lu, X H; Yang, X [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)], E-mail: phytbh@163.com

    2010-03-15

    Within the framework of effective-field theory with correlations, the phase diagrams of an N-layer ferroelectric thin film with two surface layers are studied by the differential operator technique based on the spin-1/2 transverse Ising model. A general analytical equation for the phase diagram of a ferroelectric thin film with arbitrary layer number as well as exchange interactions and transverse fields is derived, and then the effects of exchange interactions and transverse fields on phase diagrams are discussed for an arbitrary layer number N. Meanwhile, the crossover features, from the ferroelectric-dominant phase diagram (FPD) to the paraelectric-dominant phase diagram (PPD), for various parameters of an N-layer ferroelectric thin film with two surface layers are investigated. As a result, an N-independent common intersection point equation is obtained, and the three-dimensional curved surfaces for the crossover values are constructed. In comparison with the usual mean-field approximation, the differential operator technique with correlations reduces to some extent the ferroelectric features of a ferroelectric thin film.

  14. Atmospheric transport of pollution to the Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iversen, T.

    1984-01-01

    If the atmospheric processes are assumed to be nearly adiabatic, the conclusion is that the possible source areas of Arctic air pollution detected at ground level have to be situated in areas with almost the same temperature as observed in the Arctic itself. Sources south of the polar front system can only contribute to high-altitude (or upper level) Arctic pollution. The amplitude and phase of long, planetary waves are important since they determine the position of the polar front, and provide conditions for meridional transport of air at certain longitudes

  15. Multi-layered satisficing decision making in oil and gas production platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard Mikkelsen, Lars; Demazeau, Yves; Jørgensen, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    From a control perspective, offshore oil and gas production is very challenging due to the many and potentially conflicting production objectives that arise from the intrinsic complexity of the oil and gas domain. In this paper, we show how a multi-layered multi-agent system can be used to implem...

  16. Air Mass Origin in the Arctic and its Response to Future Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbe, Clara; Newman, Paul A.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Holzer, Mark; Oman, Luke; Polvani, Lorenzo M.; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    We present the first climatology of air mass origin in the Arctic in terms of rigorously defined air mass fractions that partition air according to where it last contacted the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Results from a present-day climate integration of the GEOSCCM general circulation model reveal that the Arctic lower troposphere below 700 mb is dominated year round by air whose last PBL contact occurred poleward of 60degN, (Arctic air, or air of Arctic origin). By comparison, approx. 63% of the Arctic troposphere above 700 mb originates in the NH midlatitude PBL, (midlatitude air). Although seasonal changes in the total fraction of midlatitude air are small, there are dramatic changes in where that air last contacted the PBL, especially above 700 mb. Specifically, during winter air in the Arctic originates preferentially over the oceans, approx. 26% in the East Pacific, and approx. 20% in the Atlantic PBL. By comparison, during summer air in the Arctic last contacted the midlatitude PBL primarily over land, overwhelmingly so in Asia (approx. 40 %) and, to a lesser extent, in North America (approx. 24%). Seasonal changes in air-mass origin are interpreted in terms of seasonal variations in the large-scale ventilation of the midlatitude boundary layer and lower troposphere, namely changes in the midlatitude tropospheric jet and associated transient eddies during winter and large scale convective motions over midlatitudes during summer.

  17. Influence of iron redox cycling on organo-mineral associations in Arctic tundra soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Elizabeth; AlBashaireh, Amineh; Singer, David; Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Gu, Baohua; Graham, David

    2017-06-01

    Arctic tundra stores large quantities of soil organic matter under varying redox conditions. As the climate warms, these carbon reservoirs are susceptible to increased rates of decomposition and release to the atmosphere as the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Geochemical interactions between soil organic matter and minerals influence decomposition in many environments but remain poorly understood in Arctic tundra systems and are not considered in decomposition models. The accumulation of iron (Fe) oxyhydroxides and organo-iron precipitates at redox interfaces may be particularly important for carbon cycling given that ferric iron [Fe(III)] species can enhance decomposition by serving as terminal electron acceptors in anoxic soils or inhibit microbial decomposition by binding organic molecules. Here, we examine chemical properties of solid-phase Fe and organic matter in organic and mineral horizons within the seasonally thawed active layer of Arctic tundra on the North Slope of Alaska. Spectroscopic techniques, including micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping, micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (μXANES) spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), were coupled with chemical sequential extractions and physical density fractionations to evaluate the spatial distribution and speciation of Fe-bearing phases and associated organic matter in soils. Organic horizons were enriched in poorly crystalline and crystalline iron oxides, and approximately 60% of total Fe stored in organic horizons was calculated to derive from upward translocation from anoxic mineral horizons. Ferrihydrite and goethite were present as coatings on mineral grains and plant debris, and in aggregates with clays and particulate organic matter. Minor amounts of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] were present in iron sulfides (i.e., pyrite and greigite) in mineral horizon soils and iron phosphates (vivianite) in organic horizons. Concentrations of organic

  18. The measurement of I-129 in the Canadian Arctic basin and other Arctic waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilius, L.R.; Zhao, X.L.

    1995-01-01

    Since the first demonstration by accelerator mass spectrometry for the measurement of 129 I in oceanic systems, the use of 129 I as a long range tracer has become widespread because the constraint of large sample volumes has been removed. Following extensive measurements of 129 I in both the Barents and Kara Seas, seawater samples were collected within the Canadian Arctic Basin, and at a cruise from the Chuchi Sea, across the pole, to the Norwegian Sea. Only 450 ml samples were required for all AMS measurements of Arctic seawater. Enhanced concentrations of 129 I were observed. Based on 137 Cs measurements for the same samples, the 129 I/ 137 Cs ratios showed the signature of Sellafield reprocessing effluents as the primary source of this 129 I. Based on average estimates, 13% of the total Sellafield/La Hague 129 I emissions now resides within the Atlantic layer of the Arctic Ocean. 7 refs., 3 figs

  19. Using long-term ARM observations to evaluate Arctic mixed-phased cloud representation in the GISS ModelE GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamer, K.; Fridlind, A. M.; Luke, E. P.; Tselioudis, G.; Ackerman, A. S.; Kollias, P.; Clothiaux, E. E.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of supercooled liquid in clouds affects surface radiative and hydrological budgets, especially at high latitudes. Capturing these effects is crucial to properly quantifying climate sensitivity. Currently, a number of CGMs disagree on the distribution of cloud phase. Adding to the challenge is a general lack of observations on the continuum of clouds, from high to low-level and from warm to cold. In the current study, continuous observations from 2011 to 2014 are used to evaluate all clouds produced by the GISS ModelE GCM over the ARM North Slope of Alaska site. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Global Weather State (GWS) approach reveals that fair-weather (GWS 7, 32% occurrence rate), as well as mid-level storm related (GWS 5, 28%) and polar (GWS 4, 14%) clouds, dominate the large-scale cloud patterns at this high latitude site. At higher spatial and temporal resolutions, ground-based cloud radar observations reveal a majority of single layer cloud vertical structures (CVS). While clear sky and low-level clouds dominate (each with 30% occurrence rate) a fair amount of shallow ( 10%) to deep ( 5%) convection are observed. Cloud radar Doppler spectra are used along with depolarization lidar observations in a neural network approach to detect the presence, layering and inhomogeneity of supercooled liquid layers. Preliminary analyses indicate that most of the low-level clouds sampled contain one or more supercooled liquid layers. Furthermore, the relationship between CVS and the presence of supercooled liquid is established, as is the relationship between the presence of supercool liquid and precipitation susceptibility. Two approaches are explored to bridge the gap between large footprint GCM simulations and high-resolution ground-based observations. The first approach consists of comparing model output and ground-based observations that exhibit the same column CVS type (i.e. same cloud depth, height and layering

  20. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    Significant research has been underway for several years in NASA Glenn Research Center's nozzle branch to develop advanced computational methods for simulating turbulent flows in exhaust nozzles. The primary efforts of this research have concentrated on improving our ability to calculate the turbulent mixing layers that dominate flows both in the exhaust systems of modern-day aircraft and in those of hypersonic vehicles under development. As part of these efforts, a hybrid numerical method was recently developed to simulate such turbulent mixing layers. The method developed here is intended for configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. Interest in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods have increased in recent years, but applying an LES method to calculate the wide range of turbulent scales from small eddies in the wall-bounded regions to large eddies in the mixing region is not yet possible with current computers. As a result, the hybrid method developed here uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall-bounded regions entering a mixing section and uses a LES procedure to calculate the mixing-dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. With this technique, closure for the RANS equations is obtained by using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The LES equations are closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Although the function of the Cebeci-Smith model to replace all of the turbulent stresses is quite different from that of the Smagorinsky subgrid model, which only replaces the small subgrid turbulent stresses, both are eddy viscosity models and both are derived at least in part from mixing-length theory. The similar formulation of these two models enables the RANS

  1. Interfacial layers evolution during annealing in Ti-Al multi-laminated composite processed using hot press and roll bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, A. H.; Eghbali, B.

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Al multi-laminated composites have great potential in high strength and low weight structures. In the present study, tri-layer Ti-Al composite was synthesized by hot press bonding under 40 MPa at 570 °C for 1 h and subsequent hot roll bonding at about 450 °C. This process was conducted in two accumulative passes to 30% and to 67% thickness reduction in initial and final passes, respectively. Then, the final annealing treatments were done at 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750 °C for 2, 4 and 6 h. Investigations on microstructural evolution and thickening of interfacial layers were performed by scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction and micro-hardness tests. The results showed that the thickening of diffusion layers corresponds to amount of deformation. In addition to thickening of the diffusion layers, the thickness of aluminum layers decreased and after annealing treatment at 750 °C for 6 h the aluminum layers were consumed entirely, which occurred because of the enhanced interdiffusion of Ti and Al elements. Scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer showed that the sequence of interfacial layers as Ti3Al-TiAl-TiAl2-TiAl3 which are believed to be the result of thermodynamic and kinetic of phase formation. Micro-hardness results presented the variation profile in accordance with the sequence of intermetallic phases and their different structures.

  2. The Need and Opportunity for an Integrated Research, Development and Testing Center in the Alaskan High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, J. O.; Ivey, M.; Helsel, F.; Dexheimer, D.; Lucero, D. A.; Cahill, C. F.; Roesler, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation will make the case for development of a permanent integrated High Arctic research and testing center at Oliktok Point, Alaska; taking advantage of existing assets and infrastructure, controlled airspace, an active UAS program and local partnerships. Arctic research stations provide critical monitoring and research on climate change for conditions and trends in the Arctic. The US Chair of the Arctic Council increased awareness of gaps in our understanding of Artic systems, scarce monitoring, lack of infrastructure and readiness for emergency response. Less sea ice brings competition for commercial shipping and resource extraction. Search and rescue, pollution mitigation and safe navigation need real-time, wide-area monitoring to respond to events. Multi-national responses for international traffic will drive a greater security presence to protect citizens and sovereign interests. To address research and technology gaps, there is a national need for a US High Arctic Center (USHARC) with an approach to partner stakeholders from science, safety and security to develop comprehensive solutions. The Station should offer year-round use, logistic support and access to varied ecological settings; phased adaptation to changing needs; and support testing of technologies such as multiple autonomous platforms, renewable energies and microgrids, and sensors in Arctic settings. We propose an Arctic Center at Oliktok Point, Alaska. Combined with the Toolik Field Station and Barrow Environmental Observatory, they form a US network of Arctic Stations. An Oliktok Point Station can provide complementary and unique assets that include: access via land, sea and air; coastal and terrestrial ecologies; controlled airspaces across land and ocean; medical and logistic support; atmospheric observations from an adjacent ARM facility; connections to Barrow and Toolik; fiber-optic communications; University of Alaska Fairbanks UAS Test Facility partnership; and an airstrip and

  3. Dynamic clustering scheme based on the coordination of management and control in multi-layer and multi-region intelligent optical network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaoliang; Yuan, Fen; Huang, Shanguo; Guo, Bingli; Gu, Wanyi

    2011-12-01

    A Dynamic clustering scheme based on coordination of management and control is proposed to reduce network congestion rate and improve the blocking performance of hierarchical routing in Multi-layer and Multi-region intelligent optical network. Its implement relies on mobile agent (MA) technology, which has the advantages of efficiency, flexibility, functional and scalability. The paper's major contribution is to adjust dynamically domain when the performance of working network isn't in ideal status. And the incorporation of centralized NMS and distributed MA control technology migrate computing process to control plane node which releases the burden of NMS and improves process efficiently. Experiments are conducted on Multi-layer and multi-region Simulation Platform for Optical Network (MSPON) to assess the performance of the scheme.

  4. Unified Multi-Layer among Software Defined Multi-Domain Optical Networks (Invited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The software defined networking (SDN enabled by OpenFlow protocol has gained popularity which can enable the network to be programmable and accommodate both fixed and flexible bandwidth services. In this paper, we present a unified multi-layer (UML architecture with multiple controllers and a dynamic orchestra plane (DOP for software defined multi-domain optical networks. The proposed architecture can shield the differences among various optical devices from multi-vendors and the details of connecting heterogeneous networks. The cross-domain services with on-demand bandwidth can be deployed via unified interfaces provided by the dynamic orchestra plane. Additionally, the globalization strategy and practical capture of signal processing are presented based on the architecture. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture is experimentally verified on the control plane of our OpenFlow-based testbed. The performance of globalization strategy under heavy traffic load scenario is also quantitatively evaluated based on UML architecture compared with other strategies in terms of blocking probability, average hops, and average resource consumption.

  5. Study on Stress Development in the Phase Transition Layer of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress development is one of the significant factors leading to the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. In this work, stress development in the two phase mixed zone named phase transition layer (PTL, which grows between the thermally grown oxide (TGO and the bond coat (BC, is investigated by using two different homogenization models. A constitutive equation of the PTL based on the Reuss model is proposed to study the stresses in the PTL. The stresses computed with the proposed constitutive equation are compared with those obtained with Voigt model-based equation in detail. The stresses based on the Voigt model are slightly higher than those based on the Reuss model. Finally, a further study is carried out to explore the influence of phase transition proportions on the stress difference caused by homogenization models. Results show that the stress difference becomes more evident with the increase of the PTL thickness ratio in the TGO.

  6. Two-phase flow and cross-mixing measurements in a rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yloenen, A.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2011-01-01

    The wire-mesh sensor technique has been used for the first time to study two-phase flow and liquid mixing in a rod bundle. A dedicated test facility (SUBFLOW) was constructed at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in a co-operation with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich). Simultaneous injection of salt water as tracer and air bubbles can be used to quantify the enhancement of liquid mixing in two-phase flow when the results are compared with the single-phase mixing experiment with the same test parameters. The second aspect in the current experiments is the two-phase flow in bundle geometry. (author)

  7. Mixed layers of sodium caseinate + dextran sulfate: influence of order of addition to oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Laureline S; Schmitt, Christophe; Leser, Martin E; Murray, Brent S; Dickinson, Eric

    2009-09-01

    We report on the interfacial properties of electrostatic complexes of protein (sodium caseinate) with a highly sulfated polysaccharide (dextran sulfate). Two routes were investigated for preparation of adsorbed layers at the n-tetradecane-water interface at pH = 6. Bilayers were made by the layer-by-layer deposition technique whereby polysaccharide was added to a previously established protein-stabilized interface. Mixed layers were made by the conventional one-step method in which soluble protein-polysaccharide complexes were adsorbed directly at the interface. Protein + polysaccharide systems gave a slower decay of interfacial tension and stronger dilatational viscoelastic properties than the protein alone, but there was no significant difference in dilatational properties between mixed layers and bilayers. Conversely, shear rheology experiments exhibited significant differences between the two kinds of interfacial layers, with the mixed system giving much stronger interfacial films than the bilayer system, i.e., shear viscosities and moduli at least an order of magnitude higher. The film shear viscoelasticity was further enhanced by acidification of the biopolymer mixture to pH = 2 prior to interface formation. Taken together, these measurements provide insight into the origin of previously reported differences in stability properties of oil-in-water emulsions made by the bilayer and mixed layer approaches. Addition of a proteolytic enzyme (trypsin) to both types of interfaces led to a significant increase in the elastic modulus of the film, suggesting that the enzyme was adsorbed at the interface via complexation with dextran sulfate. Overall, this study has confirmed the potential of shear rheology as a highly sensitive probe of associative electrostatic interactions and interfacial structure in mixed biopolymer layers.

  8. Review of multi-layered magnetoelectric composite materials and devices applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhaoqiang; PourhosseiniAsl, MohammadJavad; Dong, Shuxiang

    2018-06-01

    Multiferroic materials with the coexistence of at least two ferroic orders, such as ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, or ferroelasticity, have recently attracted ever-increasing attention due to their potential for multifunctional device applications, including magnetic and current sensors, energy harvesters, magnetoelectric (ME) random access memory and logic devices, tunable microwave devices, and ME antenna. In this article, we provide a review of the recent and ongoing research efforts in the field of multi-layered ME composites. After a brief introduction to ME composites and ME coupling mechanisms, we review recent advances in multi-layered ME composites as well as their device applications based on the direct ME effect, magnetic sensors in particular. Finally, some remaining challenges and future perspective of ME composites and their engineering applications will be discussed.

  9. On the dynamics of relativistic multi-layer spherical shell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, Merse E; Racz, Istvan, E-mail: merse@rmki.kfki.hu, E-mail: iracz@rmki.kfki.hu [RMKI, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-04-21

    The relativistic time evolution of multi-layer spherically symmetric shell systems-consisting of infinitely thin shells separated by vacuum regions-is examined. Whenever two shells collide the evolution is continued with the assumption that the collision is totally transparent. The time evolution of various multi-layer shell systems-comprising large number of shells thereby mimicking the behavior of a thick shell making it possible to study the formation of acoustic singularities-is analyzed numerically and compared in certain cases to the corresponding Newtonian time evolution. The analytic setup is chosen such that the developed code is capable of following the evolution even inside the black hole region. This, in particular, allowed us to investigate the mass inflation phenomenon in the chosen framework.

  10. Phase behavior of mixed submonolayer films of krypton and xenon on graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrykiejew, A; Sokołowski, S

    2012-04-14

    Using the results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles, we discuss the phase behavior of mixed submonolayer films of krypton and xenon adsorbed on the graphite basal plane. The calculations have been performed using two- and three-dimensional models of the systems studied. It has been demonstrated that out-of-plane motion does not affect the properties of the films as long as the total density is well below the monolayer completion and at moderate temperatures. For the total densities close to the monolayer completion, the promotion of particles to the second layer considerably affects the film properties. Our results are in a reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. The melting point of submonolayer films has been shown to exhibit non-monotonous changes with the film composition, and reaches minimum for the xenon concentration of about 50%. At the temperatures below the melting point, the structure of solid phases depends upon the film composition and the temperature; one can also distinguish commensurate and incommensurate phases. Two-dimensional calculations have demonstrated that for the xenon concentration between about 15% and 65% the adsorbed film exhibits the formation of a superstructure, in which each Xe atom is surrounded by six Kr atoms. This superstructure is stable only at very low temperatures and transforms into the mixed commensurate (√3×√3)R30° phase upon the increase of temperature. Such a superstructure does not appear when a three-dimensional model is used. Grand canonical ensemble calculations allowed us to show that for the xenon concentration of about 3% the phase diagram topology of monolayer films changes from the krypton-like (with incipient triple point) to the xenon-like (with ordinary triple point).

  11. Assessment of mixed-layer height estimation from single-wavelength ceilometer profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Knepp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Differing boundary/mixed-layer height measurement methods were assessed in moderately polluted and clean environments, with a focus on the Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. This intercomparison was performed as part of ongoing measurements at the Chemistry And Physics of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE site in Hampton, Virginia and during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ field campaign that took place in and around Denver, Colorado. We analyzed CL51 data that were collected via two different methods (BLView software, which applied correction factors, and simple terminal emulation logging to determine the impact of data collection methodology. Further, we evaluated the STRucture of the ATmosphere (STRAT algorithm as an open-source alternative to BLView (note that the current work presents an evaluation of the BLView and STRAT algorithms and does not intend to act as a validation of either. Filtering criteria were defined according to the change in mixed-layer height (MLH distributions for each instrument and algorithm and were applied throughout the analysis to remove high-frequency fluctuations from the MLH retrievals. Of primary interest was determining how the different data-collection methodologies and algorithms compare to each other and to radiosonde-derived boundary-layer heights when deployed as part of a larger instrument network. We determined that data-collection methodology is not as important as the processing algorithm and that much of the algorithm differences might be driven by impacts of local meteorology and precipitation events that pose algorithm difficulties. The results of this study show that a common processing algorithm is necessary for light detection and ranging (lidar-based MLH intercomparisons and ceilometer-network operation, and that sonde-derived boundary layer heights are higher (10–15 % at

  12. Bubble-induced mixing of two horizontal liquid layers with non-uniform gas injection at the bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Pedersen, D.R.; Leinweber, G.

    1986-01-01

    During a postulated severe core meltdown accident in an LMFBR, a large amount of sodium coolant may spill into the reactor concrete cavity. A layer of liquid products may form as a result of the sodium-concrete reactions. The liquid product layer, which is highly viscous and much heavier than sodium, separates the concrete from the sodium pool. In general, the downward transport of sodium through the liquid product layer to the unreacted concrete surface, which controls the rate of chemical erosion of the concrete, depends strongly on the agitation induced by gas evolution from the heated concrete. In this study, experiments were conducted to explore the effect of non-uniform gas injection on mixing of two horizontal mutually soluble liquid layers. The liquid in the lower layer was chosen to be more viscous and heavier than the liquid in the upper layer. To simulate the reactor accident situation, gas was injected at the bottom of the liquid-liquid system through a circular hole that covered only the center portion of the bottom surface of the lower liquid layer. The bubble-induced mixing motions were observed and the rate of mixing was measured for different hole sizes and various gas flow rates. The results of this study clearly show that the rate of gas injection is not the only parameter controlling the mixing of the liquid-liquid system. The effect of non-uniform gas injection is important at high gas flow rates. Within the present experimental conditions, the reduction in the overall mixing rate can be as large as a factor of three

  13. Disintegration of fluids under supercritical conditions from mixing layer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Databases of transitional states obtained from Direct Numerical simulations (DNS) of temporal, supercritical mixing layers for two species systems, O2/H2 and C7H16/N2, are analyzed to elucidate species-specific turbulence aspects and features of fluid disintegration.

  14. Interannual variability of the tropical Indian Ocean mixed layer depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Keerthi, M.G.; Lengaigne, M.; Vialard, J.; Montegut, C.deB.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    , shoaling the MLD (Masson et al. 2002, Qu and Meyers 2005, Du et al. 2005). The seasonal cycle in the southern tropical Indian Ocean has been less 3 investigated. Seasonal shoaling and deepening of the mixed layer in the south-western Tropical Indian...

  15. The height of the atmospheric boundary layer during unstable conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E.

    2005-11-01

    over land, especially extensive data sets from the Lower Fraser Valley in Vancouver, Canada were useful. The performance of the model over water was examined on measurements of marine boundary layer developments over Christiansoe in the Baltic Sea. The model is found to perform relative well for both small and large distance downwind from the shoreline. The validation covers a scale of 100 km. In some practical applications meteorological data are taken as the output from operational Numerical Weather Prediction models. The mixing height is not a part of the model output but has to be determined from the available data. This aspect is dealt with in chapter 4. Methods that are used to determine the mixing height from the available data are examined and improvements suggested. Numerical Weather Prediction models have a rather coarse resolution. The issue of grid resolution and its effect on the estimated mixing height is discussed. It is found that the mixing height in the coastal zone is not resolved. In chapter 5 a new method for determining the regional fluxes of momentum and sensible heat over chessboard type patchy landscapes is presented. It is based on inversion of the model for the growth of the mixed-layer in combination with a parameterized form of the blending height concept. An example from sub-arctic Lapland illustrates that the forest dominates both the aggregated (area averaged) momentum and heat fluxes, but in quite different ways. Chapter 6 provides a description of present problems and gives an outlook for future research in the field. (au)

  16. Penetration of a Small Caliber Projectile into Single and Multi-layered Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riad A.M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The normal penetration of armor-piercing projectiles into single and multi-layered steel plates has been investigated. An experimental program has been conducted to study the effect of spaced and in-contact layered targets on their ballistic resistance. Armor piercing projectiles with caliber of 7.62 mm were fired against a series of single and multi-layered steel targets. The projectile impact velocities were ranged from 300-600 m/s, whereas the total thicknesses of the tested single, spaced and in-contact layered steel targets were 3 mm. The penetration process of different tested target configurations has been simulated using Autodayn-2D hydrocode. The experimental measurements of the present work were used to discuss the effect of impact velocity, target configurations and number of layers of different spaced and in-contact layered steel targets on their ballistic resistance. In addition, the post-firing examination of the tested targets over the used impact velocity range showed that the single and each layer of spaced and in-contact laminated steel targets were failed by petalling. Finally, the obtained experimental measurements were compared with the corresponding numerical results of Autodyn-2D hydrocode, good agreement was generally obtained.

  17. Preparation, structures and magnetic properties of Dy/Zr and Ho/Zr two-layers and multi-layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luche, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The first part of the report is devoted to the description of the ultra-vacuum evaporation equipment, to the sample preparation conditions and to the characterization of the two-layers and multi-layers through reflection and glancing incidence X diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. In the second part, the magnetic properties of the samples are studied and relations between properties and structures are examined. 37 fig., 35 ref

  18. Age and gender estimation using Region-SIFT and multi-layered SVM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunduk; Lee, Sang-Heon; Sohn, Myoung-Kyu; Hwang, Byunghun

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an age and gender estimation framework using the region-SIFT feature and multi-layered SVM classifier. The suggested framework entails three processes. The first step is landmark based face alignment. The second step is the feature extraction step. In this step, we introduce the region-SIFT feature extraction method based on facial landmarks. First, we define sub-regions of the face. We then extract SIFT features from each sub-region. In order to reduce the dimensions of features we employ a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and a Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Finally, we classify age and gender using a multi-layered Support Vector Machines (SVM) for efficient classification. Rather than performing gender estimation and age estimation independently, the use of the multi-layered SVM can improve the classification rate by constructing a classifier that estimate the age according to gender. Moreover, we collect a dataset of face images, called by DGIST_C, from the internet. A performance evaluation of proposed method was performed with the FERET database, CACD database, and DGIST_C database. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach classifies age and performs gender estimation very efficiently and accurately.

  19. Smart Grid as Multi-layer Interacting System for Complex Decision Makings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompard, Ettore; Han, Bei; Masera, Marcelo; Pons, Enrico

    This chapter presents an approach to the analysis of Smart Grids based on a multi-layer representation of their technical, cyber, social and decision-making aspects, as well as the related environmental constraints. In the Smart Grid paradigm, self-interested active customers (prosumers), system operators and market players interact among themselves making use of an extensive cyber infrastructure. In addition, policy decision makers define regulations, incentives and constraints to drive the behavior of the competing operators and prosumers, with the objective of ensuring the global desired performance (e.g. system stability, fair prices). For these reasons, the policy decision making is more complicated than in traditional power systems, and needs proper modeling and simulation tools for assessing "in vitro" and ex-ante the possible impacts of the decisions assumed. In this chapter, we consider the smart grids as multi-layered interacting complex systems. The intricacy of the framework, characterized by several interacting layers, cannot be captured by closed-form mathematical models. Therefore, a new approach using Multi Agent Simulation is described. With case studies we provide some indications about how to develop agent-based simulation tools presenting some preliminary examples.

  20. Hydrocarbon accumulation characteristics and enrichment laws of multi-layered reservoirs in the Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sichuan Basin represents the earliest area where natural gas is explored, developed and comprehensively utilized in China. After over 50 years of oil and gas exploration, oil and gas reservoirs have been discovered in 24 gas-dominant layers in this basin. For the purpose of predicting natural gas exploration direction and target of each layer in the Sichuan Basin, the sedimentary characteristics of marine and continental strata in this basin were summarized and the forms of multi-cycled tectonic movement and their controlling effect on sedimentation, diagenesis and hydrocarbon accumulation were analyzed. Based on the analysis, the following characteristics were identified. First, the Sichuan Basin has experienced the transformation from marine sedimentation to continental sedimentation since the Sinian with the former being dominant. Second, multiple source–reservoir assemblages are formed based on multi-rhythmed deposition, and multi-layered reservoir hydrocarbon accumulation characteristics are vertically presented. And third, multi-cycled tectonic movement appears in many forms and has a significant controlling effect on sedimentation, diagenesis and hydrocarbon accumulation. Then, oil and gas reservoir characteristics and enrichment laws were investigated. It is indicated that the Sichuan Basin is characterized by coexistence of conventional and unconventional oil and gas reservoirs, multi-layered reservoir hydrocarbon supply, multiple reservoir types, multiple trap types, multi-staged hydrocarbon accumulation and multiple hydrocarbon accumulation models. Besides, its natural gas enrichment is affected by hydrocarbon source intensity, large paleo-uplift, favorable sedimentary facies belt, sedimentary–structural discontinuity plane and structural fracture development. Finally, the natural gas exploration and research targets of each layer in the Sichuan Basin were predicted according to the basic petroleum geologic conditions

  1. Self-Supporting High Performance Multi-Layer Insulation Technology Development (SSMLI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of MLI—Integrated Multi-Layer Insulation (IMLI)—uses rigid, low-conductivity polymer spacers instead of netting to keep the radiation barriers separated....

  2. A Multi-Phase Equation of State and Strength Model for Tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers a multi-phase equation of state and a multi-phase strength model for tin in the β, γ and liquid phases. At a phase transition there are changes in volume, energy, and properties of a material that should be included in an accurate model. The strength model will also be affected by a solid-solid phase transition. For many materials there is a lack of experimental data for strength at high pressures making the derivation of strength parameters for some phases difficult. In the case of tin there are longitudinal sound speed data on the Hugoniot available that have been used here in conjunction with a multi-phase equation of state to derive strength parameters for the γ phase, a phase which does not exist at room temperature and pressure

  3. Analysis of Arctic Sea ice coverage in 2012 using multi-source scatterometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, M.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic sea ice extent, regarded as an indicator of climate change, has been declining for the past few decades and reached the lowest ice extent in satellite record during the summer of 2012. Scatterometers can be used in sea ice identification, due to its ability to measure the backscatter characteristics of surface coverage. Thus, daily scatterometer data can be used in Arctic sea ice monitoring. In this paper, we compared the similarity and difference of three different scatterometer datasets, including ASCAT(METOP-A/B Advanced scatterometer) data, OSCAT(Oceansat-2 scatterometer)data and China's HY-2 scatterometer data, and then evaluated their performance in Artic sea ice investigation. We also constructed the sea ice coverage time series in 2012 using different scatterometer data and analyzed its temporal and spatial variation. Preliminary Results show that the maximum extent was set on 19 March, 2012. Cracks started to appear in Arctic sea ice coverage near New Siberian Islands on 18,May. Later, melt process accelerates in July and August. The northeast passage is not open until late August. On 18 September, the extent reached the minimum level and the refreezing process began. The duration of melting season is slightly shorter than the average level over the period of 1978 to 2012(ERS-1/2 scattermeter and Quickscat scatterometer data are used as supplementary records). The record low extent is likely resulted from (1)Arctic dipole pressure pattern, bringing in warm southerly winds and enhancing arctic ice discharge in Fram Strait and (2)relatively warm conditions over the Arctic areas.

  4. Evaluation of bi-functionalized mesoporous silicas as reversed phase/cation-exchange mixed-mode sorbents for multi-residue solid phase extraction of veterinary drug residues in meat samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Natalia; Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Sierra, Isabel

    2017-04-01

    A SBA-15 type mesoporous silica was synthesized and bi-functionalized with octadecylsilane (C18) or octylsilane (C8), and sulfonic acid (SO 3 - ) groups in order to obtain materials with reversed-phase/strong cation-exchange mixed-mode retention mechanism. The resulting hybrid materials (SBA-15-C18-SO 3 - and SBA-15-C8-SO 3 - ) were comprehensively characterized. They showed high surface area, high pore volume and controlled porous size. Elemental analysis of the materials revealed differences in the amount of C18 and C8. SBA-15-C18-SO 3 - contained 0.19mmol/g of C18, while SBA-15-C8-SO 3 - presented 0.54mmol/g of C8. The SO 3 - groups anchored to the silica surface of the pore walls were 0.20 and 0.09mmol/g, respectively. The bi-functionalized materials were evaluated as SPE sorbents for the multi-residue extraction of 26 veterinary drug residues in meat samples using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detector (UHPLC-MS/MS). Different sorbent amounts (100 and 200mg) and organic solvents were tested to optimize the extraction procedure. Both silicas showed big extraction potential and were successful in the extraction of the target analytes. The mixed-mode retention mechanism was confirmed by comparing both silicas with SBA-15 mesoporous silica mono-functionalized with C18 and C8. Best results were achieved with 200mg of SBA-15-C18-SO 3 - obtaining recoveries higher than 70% for the majority of analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mixing height over water and its role on the correlation between temperature and humidity fluctuations in the unstable surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2000-01-01

    layer over land, but it is nearly constant over a 24-hour cycle. During summer, the mixed layer is higher than during winter. A second inversion was often observed. A case study of the development of the mixed layer over the sea under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions during six...... consecutive days is presented. A zero-order mixed-layer height model is applied. In addition to momentum and heat fluxes the effect of subsidence was found to be important for the evolution of the mixed layer over the sea. The modelled evolution of z(i) compared successfully with measurements. We have...

  6. Effects of Model Resolution and Ocean Mixing on Forced Ice-Ocean Physical and Biogeochemical Simulations Using Global and Regional System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meibing; Deal, Clara; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Matrai, Patricia; Roberts, Andrew; Osinski, Robert; Lee, Younjoo J.; Frants, Marina; Elliott, Scott; Jeffery, Nicole; Hunke, Elizabeth; Wang, Shanlin

    2018-01-01

    The current coarse-resolution global Community Earth System Model (CESM) can reproduce major and large-scale patterns but is still missing some key biogeochemical features in the Arctic Ocean, e.g., low surface nutrients in the Canada Basin. We incorporated the CESM Version 1 ocean biogeochemical code into the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM) and coupled it with a sea-ice algal module to investigate model limitations. Four ice-ocean hindcast cases are compared with various observations: two in a global 1° (40˜60 km in the Arctic) grid: G1deg and G1deg-OLD with/without new sea-ice processes incorporated; two on RASM's 1/12° (˜9 km) grid R9km and R9km-NB with/without a subgrid scale brine rejection parameterization which improves ocean vertical mixing under sea ice. Higher-resolution and new sea-ice processes contributed to lower model errors in sea-ice extent, ice thickness, and ice algae. In the Bering Sea shelf, only higher resolution contributed to lower model errors in salinity, nitrate (NO3), and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a). In the Arctic Basin, model errors in mixed layer depth (MLD) were reduced 36% by brine rejection parameterization, 20% by new sea-ice processes, and 6% by higher resolution. The NO3 concentration biases were caused by both MLD bias and coarse resolution, because of excessive horizontal mixing of high NO3 from the Chukchi Sea into the Canada Basin in coarse resolution models. R9km showed improvements over G1deg on NO3, but not on Chl-a, likely due to light limitation under snow and ice cover in the Arctic Basin.

  7. A Lagrangian stochastic model to demonstrate multi-scale interactions between convection and land surface heterogeneity in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsakhoo, Zahra; Shao, Yaping

    2017-04-01

    Near-surface turbulent mixing has considerable effect on surface fluxes, cloud formation and convection in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Its quantifications is however a modeling and computational challenge since the small eddies are not fully resolved in Eulerian models directly. We have developed a Lagrangian stochastic model to demonstrate multi-scale interactions between convection and land surface heterogeneity in the atmospheric boundary layer based on the Ito Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) for air parcels (particles). Due to the complexity of the mixing in the ABL, we find that linear Ito SDE cannot represent convections properly. Three strategies have been tested to solve the problem: 1) to make the deterministic term in the Ito equation non-linear; 2) to change the random term in the Ito equation fractional, and 3) to modify the Ito equation by including Levy flights. We focus on the third strategy and interpret mixing as interaction between at least two stochastic processes with different Lagrangian time scales. The model is in progress to include the collisions among the particles with different characteristic and to apply the 3D model for real cases. One application of the model is emphasized: some land surface patterns are generated and then coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation (LES).

  8. CMIP5-based global wave climate projections including the entire Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-Prat, M.; Wang, X. L.; Swart, N.

    2018-03-01

    This study presents simulations of the global ocean wave climate corresponding to the surface winds and sea ice concentrations as simulated by five CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) climate models for the historical (1979-2005) and RCP8.5 scenario future (2081-2100) periods. To tackle the numerical complexities associated with the inclusion of the North Pole, the WAVEWATCH III (WW3) wave model was used with a customized unstructured Spherical Multi-Cell grid of ∼100 km offshore and ∼50 km along coastlines. The climate model simulated wind and sea ice data, and the corresponding WW3 simulated wave data, were evaluated against reanalysis and hindcast data. The results show that all the five sets of wave simulations projected lower waves in the North Atlantic, corresponding to decreased surface wind speeds there in the warmer climate. The selected CMIP5 models also consistently projected an increase in the surface wind speed in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) mid-high latitudes, which translates in an increase in the WW3 simulated significant wave height (Hs) there. The higher waves are accompanied with increased peak wave period and increased wave age in the East Pacific and Indian Oceans, and a significant counterclockwise rotation in the mean wave direction in the Southern Oceans. The latter is caused by more intense waves from the SH traveling equatorward and developing into swells. Future wave climate in the Arctic Ocean in summer is projected to be predominantly of mixed sea states, with the climatological mean of September maximum Hs ranging mostly 3-4 m. The new waves approaching Arctic coasts will be less fetch-limited as ice retreats since a predominantly southwards mean wave direction is projected in the surrounding seas.

  9. Iontophoretic transdermal drug delivery: a multi-layered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontrelli, Giuseppe; Lauricella, Marco; Ferreira, José A; Pena, Gonçalo

    2017-12-11

    We present a multi-layer mathematical model to describe the transdermal drug release from an iontophoretic system. The Nernst-Planck equation describes the basic convection-diffusion process, with the electric potential obtained by solving the Laplace's equation. These equations are complemented with suitable interface and boundary conditions in a multi-domain. The stability of the mathematical problem is discussed in different scenarios and a finite-difference method is used to solve the coupled system. Numerical experiments are included to illustrate the drug dynamics under different conditions. © The authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  10. Analytical modeling of multi-layered printed circuit board using multi-stacked via clusters as component heat spreader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monier-Vinard Eric

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to help the electronic designer to early determine the limits of the power dissipation of electronic component, an analytical model was established to allow a fast insight of relevant design parameters of a multi-layered electronic board constitution. The proposed steady-state approach based on Fourier series method promotes a practical solution to quickly investigate the potential gain of multi-layered thermal via clusters. Generally, it has been shown a good agreement between the results obtained by the proposed analytical model and those given by electronics cooling software widely used in industry. Some results highlight the fact that the conventional practices for Printed Circuit Board modeling can be dramatically underestimate source temperatures, in particular with smaller sources. Moreover, the analytic solution could be applied to optimize the heat spreading in the board structure with a local modification of the effective thermal conductivity layers.

  11. The Need and Opportunity for an Integrated Research, Development and Testing Station in the Alaskan High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, J. O.; Ivey, M.; Helsel, F.; Dexheimer, D.; Cahill, C. F.; Bendure, A.; Lucero, D. A.; Roesler, E. L.

    2016-12-01

    This presentation will make the case for development of a permanent integrated research and testing station at Oliktok Point, Alaska; taking advantage of existing assets and infrastructure, controlled airspace, an active UAS program and local partnerships. Arctic research stations provide critical monitoring and research on climate change for conditions and trends in the Arctic. The US Chair of the Arctic Council has increased awareness of gaps in our understanding of Artic systems, scarce monitoring, lack of infrastructure and readiness for emergency response. Less sea ice brings competition for commercial shipping and resource extraction. Search and rescue, pollution mitigation and safe navigation need real-time, wide-area monitoring to respond to events. Multi-national responses for international traffic will drive a greater security presence to protect citizens and sovereign interests. To address research and technology gaps, there is a national need for a High Arctic Station with an approach that partners stakeholders from science, safety and security to develop comprehensive solutions. The Station should offer year-round use, logistic support and access to varied ecological settings; phased adaptation to changing needs; and support testing of technologies such as multiple autonomous platforms, renewable energies and microgrids, and sensors in Arctic settings. We propose an Arctic Station at Oliktok Point, Alaska. Combined with the Toolik Field Station and Barrow Environmental Observatory, they form a US network of Arctic Stations. An Oliktok Point Station can provide complementary and unique assets that include: ocean access, and coastal and terrestrial systems; road access; controlled airspaces on land and ocean; nearby air facilities, medical and logistic support; atmospheric observations from an adjacent ARM facility; connections to Barrow and Toolik; fiber-optic communications; University of Alaska Fairbanks UAS Test Facility partnership; and an airstrip

  12. Mg-Fe-mixed oxides derived from layered double hydroxides: A study of the surface properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković-Nedučin Radmila P.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of surface properties on the selectivity of the synthesized catalysts was studied, considering that their selectivity towards particular hydrocarbons is crucial for their overall activity in the chosen Fischer- -Tropsch reaction. Magnesium- and iron-containing layered double hydroxides (LDH, with the general formula: [Mg1-xFex(OH2](CO3x/2?mH2O, x = = n(Fe/(n(Mg+n(Fe, synthesized with different Mg/Fe ratio and their thermally derived mixed oxides were investigated. Magnesium was chosen because of its basic properties, whereas iron was selected due to its well-known high Fischer-Tropsch activity, redox properties and the ability to form specific active sites in the layered LDH structure required for catalytic application. The thermally less stable multiphase system (synthesized outside the optimal single LDH phase range with additional Fe-phase, having a lower content of surface acid and base active sites, a lower surface area and smaller fraction of smaller mesopores, showed higher selectivity in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The results of this study imply that the metastability of derived multiphase oxides structure has a greater influence on the formation of specific catalyst surface sites than other investigated surface properties.

  13. Diffusive tunneling for alleviating Knudsen-layer reactivity reduction under hydrodynamic mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xianzhu; McDevitt, Chris; Guo, Zehua

    2017-10-01

    Hydrodynamic mix will produce small features for intermixed deuterium-tritium fuel and inert pusher materials. The geometrical characteristics of the mix feature have a large impact on Knudsen layer yield reduction. We considered two features. One is planar structure, and the other is fuel cells segmented by inert pusher material which can be represented by a spherical DT bubble enclosed by a pusher shell. The truly 3D fuel feature, the spherical bubble, has the largest degree of yield reduction, due to fast ions being lost in all directions. The planar fuel structure, which can be regarded as 1D features, has modest amount of potential for yield degradation. While the increasing yield reduction with increasing Knudsen number of the fuel region is straightforwardly anticipated, we also show, by a combination of direct simulation and simple model, that once the pusher materials is stretched sufficiently thin by hydrodynamic mix, the fast fuel ions diffusively tunnel through them with minimal energy loss, so the Knudsen layer yield reduction becomes alleviated. This yield recovery can occur in a chunk-mixed plasma, way before the far more stringent, asymptotic limit of an atomically homogenized fuel and pusher assembly. Work supported by LANL LDRD program.

  14. Development of a laser multi-layer cladding technology for damage mitigation of fuel spacers in Hanaro reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Hwang, S. S.; Suh, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    A laser multi-layer cladding technology was developed to mitigate the fretting wear damages occurred at fuel spacers in Hanaro reactor. The detailed experimental results are as follows. 1) Analyses of fretting wear damages and fabrication process of fuel spacers 2) Development and analysis of spherical Al 6061 T-6 alloy powders for the laser cladding 3) Analysis of parameter effects on laser cladding process for clad bids, and optimization of laser cladding process 4) Analysis on the changes of cladding layers due to overlapping factor change 5) Microstructural observation and phase analysis 6) Characterization of materials properties (hardness and wear tests) 7) Manufacture of prototype fuel spacers 8) Development of a vision system and revision of its related softwares

  15. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  16. An applied model for the height of the daytime mixed layer and the entrainment zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented for the height of the mixed layer and the depth of the entrainment zone under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions. It is based on the zero-order mixed layer height model of Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) and the parameterization of the entrainment zone depth......-layer height: friction velocity, kinematic heat flux near the ground and potential temperature gradient in the free atmosphere above the entrainment zone. When information is available on the horizontal divergence of the large-scale flow field, the model also takes into account the effect of subsidence...

  17. Adhesion-enhanced thick copper film deposition on aluminum oxide by an ion-beam-mixed Al seed layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Park, Jae-Won

    2012-01-01

    We report a highly-adherent 30-μm Cu conductive-path coating on an aluminum-oxide layer anodized on an aluminum-alloy substrate for a metal-printed circuit-board application. A 50-nm Al layer was first coated with an e-beam evaporative deposition method on the anodized oxide, followed by ion bombardment to mix the interfacial region. Subsequently, a Cu coating was deposited onto the mixed seed layer to the designed thickness. Adhesions of the interface were tested by using tape adhesion test, and pull-off tests and showed commercially acceptable adhesions for such thick coating layers. The ion beam mixing (IBM) plays the role of fastening the thin seed coating layer to the substrate and enhancing the adhesion of the Cu conductive path on the anodized aluminum surface.

  18. Feasibility of X-ray analysis of multi-layer thin films at a single beam voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statham, P J

    2010-01-01

    Multi-layer analysis using electron beam excitation and X-ray spectrometry is a powerful tool for characterising layers down to 1 nm thickness and with typically 1 μm lateral resolution but does not always work. Most published applications have used WDS with many measurements at different beam voltages and considerable experience has been needed to choose lines and voltages particularly for complex multi-layer problems. A new objective mathematical approach is described which demonstrates whether X-ray analysis can obtain reliable results for an arbitrary multi-layer problem. A new algorithm embodied in 'ThinFilmID' software produces a single plot that shows feasibility of achieving results with a single EDS spectrum and suggests the optimal beam voltage. Synthesis of EDS spectra allows the precision in results to be estimated and acquisition conditions modified before wasting valuable instrument time. Thus, practicality of multi-layer thin film analysis at a single beam voltage can now be established without the extensive experimentation that was previously required by a microanalysis expert. Examples are shown where the algorithm discovers viable single-voltage conditions for applications that experts previously thought could only be addressed using measurements at more than one beam voltage.

  19. Encapsulation of Phase Change Materials Using Layer-by-Layer Assembled Polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangying Yi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials absorb the thermal energy when changing their phases (e.g., solid-to-liquid at constant temperatures to achieve the latent heat storage. The major drawbacks such as limited thermal conductivity and leakage prevent the PCMs from wide application in desired areas. In this work, an environmentally friendly and low cost approach, layer-by-layer (LbL assembly technique, was applied to build up ultrathin shells to encapsulate the PCMs and therefore to regulate their changes in volume when the phase change occurs. Generally, the oppositely charged strong polyelectrolytes Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC and Poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (PSS were employed to fabricate multilayer shells on emulsified octadecane droplets using either bovine serum albumin (BSA or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS as surfactant. Specifically, using BSA as the surfactant, polyelectrolyte encapsulated octadecane spheres in size of ∼500 nm were obtained, with good shell integrity, high octadecane content (91.3% by mass, and good thermal stability after cycles of thermal treatments.

  20. Phase III (full scale) agitated mixing test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruff, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A (WRAP 2A) is the proposed second module of the WRAP facility. This facility will provide the required treatment for contact Handled (CH) Low Level (LL) Mixed Waste (MW) to allow its permanent disposal. Solidification of a portion of this waste using a cement based grout has been selected in order to reduce the toxicity and mobility of the waste in the disposal site. Mixing of the waste with the cement paste and material handling constraints/requirements associated with the mixed material is, therefore, a key process in the overall treatment strategy. This test plan addresses Phase 3, Full Scale Testing. The objectives of these tests are to determine if there are scale-up issues associated with the mixing results obtained in Phase 1 and 2 mixing tests, verify the workability of mixtures resulting from previous formulation development efforts (Waste Immobilization Development [WID]), and provide a baseline for WRAP 2A mixing equipment design. To this end, the following objectives are of particular interest: determine geometric influence of mixing blade at full scale (i.e., size, type, and location: height/offset); determine if similar results in terms of mixing effectiveness and product quality are achievable at this scale; determine if vibration is as effective at this larger scale in fluidizing the mixture and aiding in cleaning the vessel; determine if baffles or sweeping blades are needed to aid in mixing at the larger size and for cleaning the vessel; and determine quality of the poured monolithic product and investigate exotherm and filling influences at this larger size

  1. Enhancement of electroplex emission by using multi-layer device structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuanmin; Teng Feng; Xu Zheng; Hou Yanbing; Wang Yongsheng; Xu Xurong

    2005-01-01

    Electroplex emission based on poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) has been improved dramatically by using a multi-layer device structure indium-tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulphonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS)/PVK/BCP/PVK/BCP/LiF/Al. Electroplex emission at 595 nm has been improved about 10 times under low voltage and four times under high voltage compared to the double layer device ITO/PVK/BCP/Al. The maximum brightness of the device also has been improved about eight times. Bright white emission via electroplex formation can be obtained with Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates (0.336, 0.320) at 26 V with a brightness of 123 cd/m 2 . Based on the analysis of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the materials, we suggest the enhancement is mainly ascribed to the confinement effect of the quantum-well-like multi-layer device structure. Every hole and electron has more possibilities to cross recombination at the PVK/BCP interface

  2. Enhancement of electroplex emission by using multi-layer device structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yuanmin [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China); Teng Feng [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China) and Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China)]. E-mail: advanced9898@126.com; Xu Zheng [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China); Hou Yanbing [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang Yongsheng [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China); Xu Xurong [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2005-04-30

    Electroplex emission based on poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) has been improved dramatically by using a multi-layer device structure indium-tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulphonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS)/PVK/BCP/PVK/BCP/LiF/Al. Electroplex emission at 595 nm has been improved about 10 times under low voltage and four times under high voltage compared to the double layer device ITO/PVK/BCP/Al. The maximum brightness of the device also has been improved about eight times. Bright white emission via electroplex formation can be obtained with Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates (0.336, 0.320) at 26 V with a brightness of 123 cd/m{sup 2}. Based on the analysis of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the materials, we suggest the enhancement is mainly ascribed to the confinement effect of the quantum-well-like multi-layer device structure. Every hole and electron has more possibilities to cross recombination at the PVK/BCP interface.

  3. Phase Transitions in Layered Diguanidinium Hexachlorostannate(IV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szafranski, Marek; Ståhl, Kenny

    2016-01-01

    is different. The transitions involve also transformations in the networks of N-H center dot center dot center dot Cl hydrogen bonds. The large volume (similar to 3%) and entropy (similar to R ln 3) change at the transition between phases II and III, and the giant pressure coefficient of -755 K GPa(-1......Five crystalline phases of diguanidinium hexachlorostannate(IV), [C(NH2)(3)](2)SnCl6, have been identified and characterized by calorimetric and dielectric measurements, single crystal X-ray diffraction at atmospheric and high pressure, and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. The crystal...... structures of all phases are built of similar layers in which the tin hexachloride anions are connected to the guanidinium cations by N-H center dot center dot center dot Cl hydrogen bonds, forming a interact primarily by Coulombic forces between the ions from ap. double H-bonded sheets. The layers, neutral...

  4. Spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations in jet mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. G.; Adrian, R. J.; Nithianandan, C. K.; Planchon, H. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Spectral similarity laws are derived for the power spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations by application of dimensional analysis in the limit of large turbulent Reynolds number. The theory predicts that pressure spectra are generated by three distinct types of interaction in the velocity fields: a fourth order interaction between fluctuating velocities, an interaction between the first order mean shear and the third order velocity fluctuations, and an interaction between the second order mean shear rate and the second order fluctuating velocity. Measurements of one-dimensional power spectra of the turbulent static pressure fluctuations in the driven mixing layer of a subsonic, circular jet are presented, and the spectra are examined for evidence of spectral similarity. Spectral similarity is found for the low wavenumber range when the large scale flow on the centerline of the mixing layer is self-preserving. The data are also consistent with the existence of universal inertial subranges for the spectra of each interaction mode.

  5. Numerical simulation of a plane turbulent mixing layer, with applications to isothermal, rapid reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P.; Pratt, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for the numerical prediction of turbulent mixing in a spatially-developing, free shear layer. Most significantly, the computation incorporates the effects of large-scale structures, Schmidt number and Reynolds number on mixing, which have been overlooked in the past. In flow field prediction, large-eddy simulation was conducted by a modified 2-D vortex method with subgrid-scale modeling. The predicted mean velocities, shear layer growth rates, Reynolds stresses, and the RMS of longitudinal velocity fluctuations were found to be in good agreement with experiments, although the lateral velocity fluctuations were overpredicted. In scalar transport, the Monte Carlo method was extended to the simulation of the time-dependent pdf transport equation. For the first time, the mixing frequency in Curl's coalescence/dispersion model was estimated by using Broadwell and Breidenthal's theory of micromixing, which involves Schmidt number, Reynolds number and the local vorticity. Numerical tests were performed for a gaseous case and an aqueous case. Evidence that pure freestream fluids are entrained into the layer by large-scale motions was found in the predicted pdf. Mean concentration profiles were found to be insensitive to Schmidt number, while the unmixedness was higher for higher Schmidt number. Applications were made to mixing layers with isothermal, fast reactions. The predicted difference in product thickness of the two cases was in reasonable quantitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  6. A multi-layer MRI description of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, M.; Amoroso, N.; Lella, E.; Bellotti, R.; Tangaro, S.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) along with complex network is currently one of the most widely adopted techniques for detection of structural changes in neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's Disease (PD). In this paper, we present a digital image processing study, within the multi-layer network framework, combining more classifiers to evaluate the informative power of the MRI features, for the discrimination of normal controls (NC) and PD subjects. We define a network for each MRI scan; the nodes are the sub-volumes (patches) the images are divided into and the links are defined using the Pearson's pairwise correlation between patches. We obtain a multi-layer network whose important network features, obtained with different feature selection methods, are used to feed a supervised multi-level random forest classifier which exploits this base of knowledge for accurate classification. Method evaluation has been carried out using T1 MRI scans of 354 individuals, including 177 PD subjects and 177 NC from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that the features obtained from multiplex networks are able to accurately describe PD patterns. Besides, also if a privileged scale for studying PD disease exists, exploring the informative content of more scales leads to a significant improvement of the performances in the discrimination between disease and healthy subjects. In particular, this method gives a comprehensive overview of brain regions statistically affected by the disease, an additional value to the presented study.

  7. Climate change and zoonotic infections in the Russian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Revich

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate change in the Russian Arctic is more pronounced than in any other part of the country. Between 1955 and 2000, the annual average air temperature in the Russian North increased by 1.2°C. During the same period, the mean temperature of upper layer of permafrost increased by 3°C. Climate change in Russian Arctic increases the risks of the emergence of zoonotic infectious diseases. This review presents data on morbidity rates among people, domestic animals and wildlife in the Russian Arctic, focusing on the potential climate related emergence of such diseases as tick-borne encephalitis, tularemia, brucellosis, leptospirosis, rabies, and anthrax.

  8. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-06-25

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  9. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun; Attili, Antonio; Alshaarawi, Amjad; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  10. Arctic-midlatitude weather linkages in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overland, James E.; Wang, Muyin

    2018-06-01

    There is intense public interest in whether major Arctic changes can and will impact midlatitude weather such as cold air outbreaks on the central and east side of continents. Although there is progress in linkage research for eastern Asia, a clear gap is conformation for North America. We show two stationary temperature/geopotential height patterns where warmer Arctic temperatures have reinforced existing tropospheric jet stream wave amplitudes over North America: a Greenland/Baffin Block pattern during December 2010 and an Alaska Ridge pattern during December 2017. Even with continuing Arctic warming over the past decade, other recent eastern US winter months were less susceptible for an Arctic linkage: the jet stream was represented by either zonal flow, progressive weather systems, or unfavorable phasing of the long wave pattern. The present analysis lays the scientific controversy over the validity of linkages to the inherent intermittency of jet stream dynamics, which provides only an occasional bridge between Arctic thermodynamic forcing and extended midlatitude weather events.

  11. How to separate ionic liquids: Use of Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography and mixed mode phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamouroux, C.

    2011-01-01

    This chromatographic study deals with the development of a convenient and versatile method to separate Room Temperature Ionic Liquids. Different modes of chromatography were studied. The study attempts to answer the following question: 'what were the most important interactions for the separation of ionic liquids?'. The results show that the essential interactions to assure a good retention of RTILs are the ionic ones and that hydrophobic interactions play a role in the selectivity of the separation. The separation of five imidazolium salt with a traditional dial columns in Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (HILIC) was demonstrated. It shows that neutral diol grafted column allows an important retention that we assume is due to the capability of diol to develop a thick layer of water. Furthermore, stationary phase based on mixed interaction associating ion exchange and hydrophobic properties were studied. Firstly, it will be argued that it is possible to separate RTILs with a convenient retention and resolution according to a reverse phase elution with the Primesep columns made of a brush type long alkyl chain with an embedded negatively charged functional group. Secondly, a successful separation of RTILs in HILIC mode with a mixed phase column containing a cationic exchanger and a hydrophobic octyl chain length will be demonstrated. (author)

  12. Importance of lateral flux and its percolation depth on organic carbon export in Arctic tundra soil: Implications from a soil leaching experiment: Changes of OC in Arctic Soil Leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaowen [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA; Hutchings, Jack A. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA; Bianchi, Thomas S. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA; Liu, Yina [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Arellano, Ana R. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA; Schuur, Edward A. G. [Center for Ecosystem Science and Society and Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff Arizona USA; Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida USA

    2017-04-01

    Temperature rise in the Arctic is causing deepening of active layers and resulting in the mobilization of deep permafrost dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, the mechanisms of DOM mobilization from Arctic soils, especially upper soil horizons which are drained most frequently through a year, are poorly understood. Here, we conducted a short-term leaching experiment on surface and deep organic active layer soils, from the Yukon River basin, to examine the effects of DOM transport on bulk and molecular characteristics. Our data showed a net release of DOM from surface soils equal to an average of 5% of soil carbon. Conversely, deep soils percolated with surface leachates retained up to 27% of bulk DOM-while releasing fluorescent components (up to 107%), indicating selective release of aromatic components (e.g. lignin, tannin), while retaining non-chromophoric components, as supported by spectrofluorometric and ultra high resolution mass spectroscopic techniques. Our findings highlight the importance of the lateral flux of DOM on ecosystem carbon balance as well as processing of DOM transport through organic active layer soils en route to rivers and streams. This work also suggests the potential role of leachate export as an important mechanism of C losses from Arctic soils, in comparison with the more traditional pathway from soil to atmosphere in a warming Arctic.

  13. Detection of Multi-Layer and Vertically-Extended Clouds Using A-Train Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Wind, G.; Platnick, S.; Menzel, W. P.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of mUltiple cloud layers using satellite observations is important for retrieval algorithms as well as climate applications. In this paper, we describe a relatively simple algorithm to detect multiple cloud layers and distinguish them from vertically-extended clouds. The algorithm can be applied to coincident passive sensors that derive both cloud-top pressure from the thermal infrared observations and an estimate of solar photon pathlength from UV, visible, or near-IR measurements. Here, we use data from the A-train afternoon constellation of satellites: cloud-top pressure, cloud optical thickness, the multi-layer flag from the Aqua MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the optical centroid cloud pressure from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). For the first time, we use data from the CloudSat radar to evaluate the results of a multi-layer cloud detection scheme. The cloud classification algorithms applied with different passive sensor configurations compare well with each other as well as with data from CloudSat. We compute monthly mean fractions of pixels containing multi-layer and vertically-extended clouds for January and July 2007 at the OMI spatial resolution (l2kmx24km at nadir) and at the 5kmx5km MODIS resolution used for infrared cloud retrievals. There are seasonal variations in the spatial distribution of the different cloud types. The fraction of cloudy pixels containing distinct multi-layer cloud is a strong function of the pixel size. Globally averaged, these fractions are approximately 20% and 10% for OMI and MODIS, respectively. These fractions may be significantly higher or lower depending upon location. There is a much smaller resolution dependence for fractions of pixels containing vertically-extended clouds (approx.20% for OMI and slightly less for MODIS globally), suggesting larger spatial scales for these clouds. We also find higher fractions of vertically-extended clouds over land as compared with

  14. Demonstrating multi-layered MAS in control of offshore oil and gas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard Mikkelsen, Lars; Næumann, J. R.; Demazeau, Y.

    2013-01-01

    From a control perspective, offshore oil and gas production is very challenging due to the many and potentially conflicting production objectives that arise from the intrinsic complexity of the oil and gas domain. In this paper, we demonstrate how a multi-layered multi-agent system can be used in...

  15. Atmospheric Bromine in the Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, W.W.; Sperry, P.D.; Rahn, K.A.; Gladney, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    We report the first measurements of both particulate and gas phase bromine in the Arctic troposphere. Data from continuous sampling of the Arctic aerosol over a period of 4 years (1976--1980) indicate that the bromine content in the aerosol averages 6 +- 4 ngBr/SCM (5 +- 3 pptm Br) for 9 months of every year. During the 3-month period between February 15 and May 15, however, we observed an annual sharp maximum in particulate bromine with levels exceeding 100 ngBr/SCM (82 pptm Br). The Arctic aerosol showed no bromine enrichment relative to seawater except for this 3 month peak period. During the bromine maximum, enrichment factors reached 40 with average values near 10. Calculations of the amount of excess bromine in the Arctic aerosol showed that over 90% of the peak bromine had an origin other than from direct bulk seawater injection. Total levels of gas phase bromine in the Arctic troposphere found during the peak aerosol period averaged 422 +- 48 ngBr/SCM (118 +- 14 pptv). Total bromine content during this period averaged 474 +- 49 ngBr/SCM with gas-to-particle ratios ranging from 7 to 18. A measurement under nonpeak conditions showed total bromine levels at <25 ngBr/SCM. The possibility that local contamination contributed to the seasonal development of the 3-month bromine peak was carefully considered and ruled out. Elevated particualte bromine levels, with peak values ranging from 22 to 30 ngBr/SCM, were also found at Ny-Alesund, Spitsbergen (Norway). The apparent seasonal nature of this bromine peak suggests that the large bromine maximum observed at Barrow is not an isolated or unique phenomenon characteristic of that sampling location

  16. Non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of ultra-cold atomic mixtures: the multi-layer multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method for bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krönke, Sven; Cao, Lushuai; Schmelcher, Peter; Vendrell, Oriol

    2013-01-01

    We develop and apply the multi-layer multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method for bosons, which represents an ab initio method for investigating the non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of multi-species bosonic systems. Its multi-layer feature allows for tailoring the wave function ansatz to describe intra- and inter-species correlations accurately and efficiently. To demonstrate the beneficial scaling and efficiency of the method, we explored the correlated tunneling dynamics of two species with repulsive intra- and inter-species interactions, to which a third species with vanishing intra-species interaction was weakly coupled. The population imbalances of the first two species can feature a temporal equilibration and their time evolution significantly depends on the coupling to the third species. Bosons of the first and second species exhibit a bunching tendency, whose strength can be influenced by their coupling to the third species. (paper)

  17. Method of forming an oxide superconducting thin film having an R1A2C3 crystalline phase over an R2A1C1 crystalline phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelental, M.; Romanofsky, H.J.

    1992-01-