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Sample records for multi-isotope process mip

  1. FY09 PROGRESS: MULTI-ISOTOPE PROCESS (MIP) MONITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Laspe, Amy R.; Ward, Rebecca M.

    2009-01-01

    Model and experimental estimates of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor performance for determining burnup after dissolution and acid concentration during solvent extraction steps during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are presented. Modern industrial reprocessing techniques, including the PUREX and UREX+ family of separations technologies, are based on solvent extraction between organic and aqueous phases. In these bi-phase systems, product (actinide) and contaminant (fission and activation products) elements are preferentially driven (thermodynamically) to opposite phases, with small amounts of each remaining in the other phase. The distribution of each element, between the organic and aqueous phases, is determined by major process variables such as acid concentration, organic ligand concentration, reduction potential, and temperature. Hence, for consistent performance of the separation process, the distribution of each element between the organic and aqueous phases should be relatively constant. During 'normal' operations the pattern of elements distributing into the product and waste streams at each segment of the facility should be reproducible, resulting in a statistically significant signature of the nominal process conditions. Under 'abnormal' conditions, such as those expected under some protracted diversion scenarios, patterns of elements within the various streams would be expected to change measurably. The MIP monitoring approach utilizes changes in the concentrations of gamma-emitting elements as evidence of changes to the process chemistry. It exploits a suite of gamma emitting isotopes to track multiple chemical species and behaviors simultaneously, thus encompassing a large array of elements that are affected by chemical and physical changes. In-process surveillance by the MIP monitor is accomplished by coupling the gamma spectrometry of the streams with multivariate techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA is a chemometrics tool

  2. The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor Project: FY13 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coble, Jamie B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, David V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mcdonald, Luther W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Forrester, Joel B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Unlu, Kenan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Landsberger, Sheldon [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bender, Sarah [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Dayman, Kenneth J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Reilly, Dallas D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor provides an efficient approach to monitoring the process conditions in reprocessing facilities in support of the goal of “… (minimization of) the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism.” The MIP Monitor measures the distribution of the radioactive isotopes in product and waste streams of a nuclear reprocessing facility. These isotopes are monitored online by gamma spectrometry and compared, in near-real-time, to spectral patterns representing “normal” process conditions using multivariate analysis and pattern recognition algorithms. The combination of multivariate analysis and gamma spectroscopy allows us to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. By targeting multiple gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, relatively high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout an existing facility. The automated multivariate analysis can provide a level of data obscurity, giving a built-in information barrier to protect sensitive or proprietary operational data. Proof-of-concept simulations and experiments have been performed in previous years to demonstrate the validity of this tool in a laboratory setting for systems representing aqueous reprocessing facilities. However, pyroprocessing is emerging as an alternative to aqueous reprocessing techniques.

  3. Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor: A Near-Real-Time Monitor For Reprocessing Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Douglas, Matthew; Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The threat of protracted diversion of Pu from commercial reprocessing operations is perhaps the greatest concern to national and international agencies tasked with safeguarding these facilities. While it is generally understood that a method for direct monitoring of process on-line and in near-real time (NRT) would be the best defense against protracted diversion scenarios, an effective method with these qualities has yet to be developed. Here, we attempt to bridge this gap by proposing an on-line NRT process monitoring method that should be sensitive to minor alterations in process conditions and compatible with small, easily deployable, detection systems. This Approach is known as the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor and involves the determination and recognition of the contaminant pattern within a process stream for a suite of indicator (radioactive) elements present in the spent fuel as a function of process variables. Utilization of a suite of radio-elements, including ones with multiple oxidation states, decreases the likelihood that attempts to divert Pu by altering the ReDox environment within the process would go undetected. In addition, by identifying gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, this Approach might eliminate the need for bulky neutron detection systems, relying instead on small, portable, high-resolution gamma detectors easily deployable throughout the facility

  4. Origins and processes of groundwater salinization in the urban coastal aquifers of Recife (Pernambuco, Brazil): A multi-isotope approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, Lise; Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Bertrand, Guillaume; Kloppmann, Wolfram; Aquilina, Luc; Martins, Veridiana; Hirata, Ricardo; Montenegro, Suzana; Pauwels, Hélène; Chatton, Eliot; Franzen, Melissa; Aurouet, Axel; Lasseur, Eric; Picot, Géraldine; Guerrot, Catherine; Fléhoc, Christine

    2015-01-01

    In the coastal multilayer aquifer system of a highly urbanized southern city (Recife, Brazil), where groundwaters are affected by salinization, a multi-isotope approach (Sr, B, O, H) was used to investigate the sources and processes of salinization. The high diversity of the geological bodies, built since the Atlantic opening during the Cretaceous, highly constrains the heterogeneity of the groundwater chemistry, e.g. Sr isotope ratios, and needs to be integrated to explain the salinization processes and groundwater pathways. A paleoseawater intrusion, most probably the 120 ky B.P. Pleistocene marine transgression, and cationic exchange are clearly evidenced in the most salinized parts of the Cabo and Beberibe aquifers. All 87 Sr/ 86 Sr values are above the past and present-day seawater signatures, meaning that the Sr isotopic signature is altered due to additional Sr inputs from dilution with different freshwaters, and water–rock interactions. Only the Cabo aquifer presents a well-delimitated area of Na-HCO 3 water typical of a freshening process. The two deep aquifers also display a broad range of B concentrations and B isotope ratios with values among the highest known to date (63–68.5‰). This suggests multiple sources and processes affecting B behavior, among which mixing with saline water, B sorption on clays and mixing with wastewater. The highly fractionated B isotopic values were explained by infiltration of relatively salty water with B interacting with clays, pointing out the major role played by (palaeo)-channels for the deep Beberibe aquifer recharge. Based on an increase of salinity at the end of the dry season, a present-day seawater intrusion is identified in the surficial Boa Viagem aquifer. Our conceptual model presents a comprehensive understanding of the major groundwater salinization pathways and processes, and should be of benefit for other southern Atlantic coastal aquifers to better address groundwater management issues. - Highlights:

  5. Origins and processes of groundwater salinization in the urban coastal aquifers of Recife (Pernambuco, Brazil): A multi-isotope approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, Lise, E-mail: l.cary@brgm.fr [BRGM French Geological Survey, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle [BRGM French Geological Survey, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Bertrand, Guillaume [Institute of Geosciences, University of São Paulo, Rua do Lago, 562 Butantã, 05508-080 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kloppmann, Wolfram [BRGM French Geological Survey, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Aquilina, Luc [OSUR-Géosciences Rennes, Université Rennes 1 — CNRS, 35000 Rennes (France); Martins, Veridiana; Hirata, Ricardo [Institute of Geosciences, University of São Paulo, Rua do Lago, 562 Butantã, 05508-080 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Montenegro, Suzana [Civil Engineering Department, Federal University of Pernambuco, 50740 Recife, PE Brazil (Brazil); Pauwels, Hélène [BRGM French Geological Survey, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Chatton, Eliot [OSUR-Géosciences Rennes, Université Rennes 1 — CNRS, 35000 Rennes (France); Franzen, Melissa [CPRM, Brazilian Geologic Survey, Avenida Sul 2291, Recife PE (Brazil); Aurouet, Axel [Géo-Hyd, 101 rue Jacques Charles, 45160 Olivet (France); Lasseur, Eric; Picot, Géraldine; Guerrot, Catherine; Fléhoc, Christine [BRGM French Geological Survey, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    In the coastal multilayer aquifer system of a highly urbanized southern city (Recife, Brazil), where groundwaters are affected by salinization, a multi-isotope approach (Sr, B, O, H) was used to investigate the sources and processes of salinization. The high diversity of the geological bodies, built since the Atlantic opening during the Cretaceous, highly constrains the heterogeneity of the groundwater chemistry, e.g. Sr isotope ratios, and needs to be integrated to explain the salinization processes and groundwater pathways. A paleoseawater intrusion, most probably the 120 ky B.P. Pleistocene marine transgression, and cationic exchange are clearly evidenced in the most salinized parts of the Cabo and Beberibe aquifers. All {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr values are above the past and present-day seawater signatures, meaning that the Sr isotopic signature is altered due to additional Sr inputs from dilution with different freshwaters, and water–rock interactions. Only the Cabo aquifer presents a well-delimitated area of Na-HCO{sub 3} water typical of a freshening process. The two deep aquifers also display a broad range of B concentrations and B isotope ratios with values among the highest known to date (63–68.5‰). This suggests multiple sources and processes affecting B behavior, among which mixing with saline water, B sorption on clays and mixing with wastewater. The highly fractionated B isotopic values were explained by infiltration of relatively salty water with B interacting with clays, pointing out the major role played by (palaeo)-channels for the deep Beberibe aquifer recharge. Based on an increase of salinity at the end of the dry season, a present-day seawater intrusion is identified in the surficial Boa Viagem aquifer. Our conceptual model presents a comprehensive understanding of the major groundwater salinization pathways and processes, and should be of benefit for other southern Atlantic coastal aquifers to better address groundwater management issues

  6. The MIVS [Modular Integrated Video System] Image Processing System (MIPS) for assisting in the optical surveillance data review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The MIVS (Modular Integrated Video System) Image Processing System (MIPS) is designed to review MIVS surveillance data automatically and identify IAEA defined objects of safeguards interest. To achieve this, MIPS uses both digital image processing and neural network techniques to detect objects of safeguards interest in an image and assist an inspector in the review of the MIVS video tapes. MIPS must be ''trained'' i.e., given example images showing the objects that it must recognize, for each different facility. Image processing techniques are used to first identify significantly changed areas of the image. A neural network is then used to determine if the image contains the important object(s). The MIPS algorithms have demonstrated the capability to detect when a spent fuel shipping cask is present in an image after MIPS is properly trained to detect the cask. The algorithms have also demonstrated the ability to reject uninteresting background activities such as people and crane movement. When MIPS detects an important object, the corresponding image is stored to another media and later replayed for the inspector to review. The MIPS algorithms are being implemented in commercially available hardware: an image processing subsystem and an 80386 Personal Computer. MIPS will have a high-level easy-to-use system interface to allow inspectors to train MIPS on MIVS data from different facilities and on various safeguards significant objects. This paper describes the MIPS algorithms, hardware implementation, and system configuration. 3 refs., 10 figs

  7. A New Effort for Atmospherical Forecast: Meteorological Image Processing Software (MIPS) for Astronomical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameoni Niaei, M.; Kilic, Y.; Yildiran, B. E.; Yüzlükoglu, F.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2016-12-01

    We have described a new software (MIPS) about the analysis and image processing of the meteorological satellite (Meteosat) data for an astronomical observatory. This software will be able to help to make some atmospherical forecast (cloud, humidity, rain) using meteosat data for robotic telescopes. MIPS uses a python library for Eumetsat data that aims to be completely open-source and licenced under GNU/General Public Licence (GPL). MIPS is a platform independent and uses h5py, numpy, and PIL with the general-purpose and high-level programming language Python and the QT framework.

  8. Communication behaviours of skilled and less skilled oncologists: a validation study of the Medical Interaction Process System (MIPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Sarah; Hall, Angela

    2004-09-01

    The Medical Interaction Process System (MIPS) was originally developed in order to create a reliable observation tool for analysing doctor-patient encounters in the oncology setting. This paper reports a series of analyses carried out to establish whether the behaviour categories of the MIPS can discriminate between skilled and less skilled communicators. This involved the use of MIPS coded cancer consultations to compare the MIPS indices of 10 clinicians evaluated by an independent professional as skilled communicators with 10 who were considered less skilled. Eleven out of the 15 MIPS variables tested were able to distinguish the skilled from the less skilled group. Although limitations to the study are discussed, the results indicate that the MIPS has satisfactory discriminatory power and the results provide validity data that meet key objectives for developing the system. There is an ever-increasing need for reliable methods of assessing doctors' communication skills and evaluating medical interview teaching programmes. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Hydrogeological and multi-isotopic approach to define nitrate pollution and denitrification processes in a coastal aquifer (Sardinia, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittalis, Daniele; Carrey, Raul; Da Pelo, Stefania; Carletti, Alberto; Biddau, Riccardo; Cidu, Rosa; Celico, Fulvio; Soler, Albert; Ghiglieri, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    Agricultural coastal areas are frequently affected by the superimposition of various processes, with a combination of anthropogenic and natural sources, which degrade groundwater quality. In the coastal multi-aquifer system of Arborea (Italy)—a reclaimed morass area identified as a nitrate vulnerable zone, according to Nitrate Directive 91/676/EEC—intensive agricultural and livestock activities contribute to substantial nitrate contamination. For this reason, the area can be considered a bench test for tuning an appropriate methodology aiming to trace the nitrate contamination in different conditions. An approach combining environmental isotopes, water quality and hydrogeological indicators was therefore used to understand the origins and attenuation mechanisms of nitrate pollution and to define the relationship between contaminant and groundwater flow dynamics through the multi-aquifer characterized by sandy (SHU), alluvial (AHU), and volcanic hydrogeological (VHU) units. Various groundwater chemical pathways were consistent with both different nitrogen sources and groundwater dynamics. Isotope composition suggests a mixed source for nitrate (organic and synthetic fertilizer), especially for the AHU and SHU groundwater. Moreover, marked heterotrophic denitrification and sulfate reduction processes were detected; although, for the contamination related to synthetic fertilizer, the attenuation was inefficient at removing NO3 - to less than the human consumption threshold of 50 mg/L. Various factors contributed to control the distribution of the redox processes, such as the availability of carbon sources (organic fertilizer and the presence of lagoon-deposited aquitards), well depth, and groundwater flow paths. The characterization of these processes supports water-resource management plans, future actions, and regulations, particularly in nitrate vulnerable zones.

  10. Multi-isotopic study (15N, 34S, 18O, 13C) to identify processes affecting nitrate and sulfate in response to local and regional groundwater mixing in a large-scale flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, R.; Folch, A.; Menció, A.; Soler, A.; Mas-Pla, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied a range-and-basin area where different scale flow systems converge. ► Pig manure and chemical fertilizers are the main nitrate and sulfate sources. ► Mixing between regional and local groundwater can favor denitrification processes. - Abstract: The integrated use of hydrogeologic and multi-isotopic approaches (δ 15 N, δ 18 O NO3 , δ 34 S, δ 18 O SO4 and δ 13 C HCO3 ) was applied in the Selva basin area (NE Spain) to characterize NO 3 - and SO 4 2- sources and to evaluate which geochemical processes affect NO 3 - in groundwater. The studied basin is within a basin-and-range physiographic province where natural hydrodynamics have been modified and different scale flow systems converge as a consequence of recent groundwater development and exploitation rates. As a result, groundwaters related to the local recharge flow system (affected by anthropogenic activities) and to the generally deeper regional flow system (recharged from the surrounding ranges) undergo mixing processes. The δ 15 N, δ 18 O NO3 and δ 34 S indicated that the predominant sources of contamination in the basin are pig manure and synthetic fertilizers. Hydrochemical data along with δ 15 N, δ 18 O NO3 , δ 34 S, δ 18 O SO4 and δ 13 C HCO3 of some wells confirmed mixing between regional and local flow systems. Apart from dilution processes that can contribute to the decrease of NO 3 - concentrations, the positive correlation between δ 15 N and δ 18 O NO3 agreed with the occurrence of denitrification processes. The δ 34 S and δ 18 O SO4 indicated that pyrite oxidation is not linked to denitrification, and δ 13 C HCO3 did not clearly point to a role of organic matter as an electron donor. Therefore, it is proposed that the mixing processes between deeper regional and local surface groundwater allow denitrification to occur due to the reducing conditions of the regional groundwater. Thus, isotopic data add useful complementary information to hydrochemical

  11. Dust Processing in Supernova Remnants: Spitzer MIPS SED and IRS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, John W.; Petre, Robert; Katsuda Satoru; Andersen, M.; Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Bernard, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer MIPS SED and IRS observations of 14 Galactic Supernova Remnants previously identified in the GLIMPSE survey. We find evidence for SNR/molecular cloud interaction through detection of [OI] emission, ionic lines, and emission from molecular hydrogen. Through black-body fitting of the MIPS SEDs we find the large grains to be warm, 29-66 K. The dust emission is modeled using the DUSTEM code and a three component dust model composed of populations of big grains, very small grains, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We find the dust to be moderately heated, typically by 30-100 times the interstellar radiation field. The source of the radiation is likely hydrogen recombination, where the excitation of hydrogen occurred in the shock front. The ratio of very small grains to big grains is found for most of the molecular interacting SNRs to be higher than that found in the plane of the Milky Way, typically by a factor of 2--3. We suggest that dust shattering is responsible for the relative over-abundance of small grains, in agreement with prediction from dust destruction models. However, two of the SNRs are best fit with a very low abundance of carbon grains to silicate grains and with a very high radiation field. A likely reason for the low abundance of small carbon grains is sputtering. We find evidence for silicate emission at 20 $\\mu$m in their SEDs, indicating that they are young SNRs based on the strong radiation field necessary to reproduce the observed SEDs.

  12. MIPs in Aqueous Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ying-chun; Ma, Hui-ting; Lu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    When organic solvent-compatible molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are used in aqueous environment, how to reduce nonspecific binding is a major challenge. By modifying the binding solvents and introducing appropriate washing and elution steps, even relatively hydrophobic MIPs can gain optimal rebinding selectivity in aqueous conditions. Furthermore, water-compatible MIPs that can be used to treat aqueous samples directly have been prepared. The use of hydrophilic co-monomers, the controlled surface modification through controlled radical polymerization, and the new interfacial molecular imprinting methods are different strategies to prepare water-compatible MIPs. By combining MIPs with other techniques, both organic solvent-compatible and water-compatible MIPs can display better functional performances in aqueous conditions. Intensive studies on MIPs in aqueous conditions can provide new MIPs with much-improved compatibilities that will lead to more interesting applications in biomedicine and biotechnology.

  13. The Development and Validation of Scores on the Mathematics Information Processing Scale (MIPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessant, Kenneth C.

    1997-01-01

    This study reports on the development and psychometric properties of a new 87-item Mathematics Information Processing Scale that explores learning strategies, metacognitive problem-solving skills, and attentional deployment. Results with 340 college students support the use of the instrument, for which factor analysis identified five theoretically…

  14. Reducing operational costs through MIPS management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwiatkowski, L.M.; Verhoef, C.

    2015-01-01

    We focus on an approach to reducing the costs of running applications. MIPS, which is a traditional acronym for millions of instructions per second, have evolved to become a measurement of processing power and CPU resource consumption. The need for controlling MIPS attributed costs is indispensable

  15. Treatment of diabetic mice with undenatured whey protein accelerates the wound healing process by enhancing the expression of MIP-1α, MIP-2, KC, CX3CL1 and TGF-β in wounded tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr Gamal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous diabetes-associated complications are a major source of immune system exhaustion and an increased incidence of infection. Diabetes can cause poor circulation in the feet, increasing the likelihood of ulcers forming when the skin is damaged and slowing the healing of the ulcers. Whey proteins (WPs enhance immunity during childhood and have a protective effect on some immune disorders. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of camel WP on the healing and closure of diabetic wounds in a streptozotocin (STZ-induced type I diabetic mouse model. Results Diabetic mice exhibited delayed wound closure characterized by a significant decrease in an anti-inflammatory cytokine (namely, IL-10 and a prolonged elevation of the levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in wound tissue. Moreover, aberrant expression of chemokines that regulate wound healing (MIP-1α, MIP-2, KC and CX3CL1 and growth factors (TGF-β were observed in the wound tissue of diabetic mice compared with control nondiabetic mice. Interestingly, compared with untreated diabetic mice, supplementation with WP significantly accelerated the closure of diabetic wounds by limiting inflammatory stimuli via the restoration of normal IL-10, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels. Most importantly, the supplementation of diabetic mice with WP significantly modulated the expression of MIP-1α, MIP-2, KC, CX3CL1 and TGF-β in wound tissue compared with untreated diabetic mice. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the benefits of WP supplementation for improving the healing and closure of diabetic wounds and restoring the immune response in diabetic mice.

  16. Quantitating subcellular metabolism with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Bailey, Andrew; Senyo, Samuel E.; Guillermier, Christelle; Perlstein, Todd S.; Gould, Alex P.; Lee, Richard T.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry with stable isotope labels has been seminal in discovering the dynamic state of living matter 1,2 but is limited to bulk tissues or cells. We developed multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) that allowed us to view and measure stable isotope incorporation with sub-micron resolution 3,4 . Here we apply MIMS to diverse organisms, including Drosophila, mice, and humans. We test the “immortal strand hypothesis,” which predicts that during asymmetric stem cell division ch...

  17. Physical forms of MIPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffis, Andrea; Dvorakova, Gita; Falcimaigne-Cordin, Aude

    2012-01-01

    The current state of the art in the development of methodologies for the preparation of MIPs in predetermined physical forms is critically reviewed, with particular attention being paid to the forms most widely employed in practical applications, such as spherical beads in the micro- to nanometer range, microgels, monoliths, membranes. Although applications of the various MIP physical forms are mentioned, the focus of the paper is mainly on the description of the various preparative methods. The aim is to provide the reader with an overview of the latest achievements in the field, as well as with a mean for critically evaluating the various proposed methodologies towards an envisaged application. The review covers the literature up to early 2010, with special emphasis on the developments of the last 10 years.

  18. MIPS værktøjer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollestrup, Christian; Eriksen, Kaare

    Innovation i Pleje- og Sundhedssektoren (MIPS). Projektets hensigt er at styrke medarbejderne i rollen som aktive innovatører for derved at udvikle optimerede produkter, bedre services og mere effektive arbejdsgange. I udviklingen af nye produkter, services og processer har design i samspil med medarbejderne......, service og brugsværdi i en helhedsorienteret løsning. MIPS tager afsæt i en antagelse om, at en designtilgang baseret på brugerorienterede metodikker kan adapteres til sundhedssektoren for at stimulere problemformulering og idéudvikling blandt medarbejderne og føre til bæredygtige produkter, services og...... processer. Denne mappe er værktøjskassen for medarbejderdreven innovation der er udviklet i MIPS projektet i perioden 2010-2011....

  19. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans. PMID:23660233

  20. Quantitating subcellular metabolism with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Bailey, Andrew; Senyo, Samuel E.; Guillermier, Christelle; Perlstein, Todd S.; Gould, Alex P.; Lee, Richard T.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry with stable isotope labels has been seminal in discovering the dynamic state of living matter1,2 but is limited to bulk tissues or cells. We developed multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) that allowed us to view and measure stable isotope incorporation with sub-micron resolution3,4. Here we apply MIMS to diverse organisms, including Drosophila, mice, and humans. We test the “immortal strand hypothesis,” which predicts that during asymmetric stem cell division chromosomes containing older template DNA are segregated to the daughter destined to remain a stem cell, thus insuring lifetime genetic stability. After labeling mice with 15N-thymidine from gestation through post-natal week 8, we find no 15N label retention by dividing small intestinal crypt cells after 4wk chase. In adult mice administered 15N-thymidine pulse-chase, we find that proliferating crypt cells dilute label consistent with random strand segregation. We demonstrate the broad utility of MIMS with proof-of-principle studies of lipid turnover in Drosophila and translation to the human hematopoietic system. These studies show that MIMS provides high-resolution quantitation of stable isotope labels that cannot be obtained using other techniques and that is broadly applicable to biological and medical research. PMID:22246326

  1. MIRATE: MIps RATional dEsign Science Gateway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busato, Mirko; Distefano, Rosario; Bates, Ferdia; Karim, Kal; Bossi, Alessandra Maria; López Vilariño, José Manuel; Piletsky, Sergey; Bombieri, Nicola; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2018-06-13

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are high affinity robust synthetic receptors, which can be optimally synthesized and manufactured more economically than their biological equivalents (i.e. antibody). In MIPs production, rational design based on molecular modeling is a commonly employed technique. This mostly aids in (i) virtual screening of functional monomers (FMs), (ii) optimization of monomer-template ratio, and (iii) selectivity analysis. We present MIRATE, an integrated science gateway for the intelligent design of MIPs. By combining and adapting multiple state-of-the-art bioinformatics tools into automated and innovative pipelines, MIRATE guides the user through the entire process of MIPs' design. The platform allows the user to fully customize each stage involved in the MIPs' design, with the main goal to support the synthesis in the wet-laboratory. MIRATE is freely accessible with no login requirement at http://mirate.di.univr.it/. All major browsers are supported.

  2. Thermometric MIP sensor for fructosyl valine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Rajagopal; Katterle, Martin; Warsinke, Axel; Möhwald, Helmuth; Scheller, Frieder W

    2008-02-28

    Interactions of molecularly imprinted polymers containing phenyl boronic acid residues with fructosyl valine, fructose and pinacol, respectively are analysed in aqueous solution (pH 11.4) by using a flow calorimeter. The reversible formation of (two) cyclic boronic acid diesters per fructosyl molecule generates a 40-fold higher exothermic signal as compared to the control polymer. Whereas binding of pinacol to either the MIP or the control polymer generates a very small endothermic signal reflecting a negligible contribution of the esterification to the overall process. An "apparent imprinting factor" of 41 is found which exceeds the respective value of batch binding procedures by a factor of 30. Furthermore, the MIP sensor was used to characterise the crossreactivity. The influence of shape selective molecular recognition is discussed.

  3. Identification of the geographical place of origin of an unidentified individual by multi-isotope analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font Morales, L.; van der Peijl, G.J.Q.; van Leeuwen, C.; van Wetten, I.A.; Davies, G.R.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-isotope investigation (Sr and Pb isotopes and δ18O, δ13C and δ15N) was applied to bone and teeth from an unidentified male found drowned in the"IJ" Ruyterkade in Amsterdam, The Netherlands in March of 1999. The individual remained unidentified until mid 2013, after the isotope study was

  4. Chlamydia trachomatis Mip-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, AG; Rousch, DA; Birkelund, Svend

    1992-01-01

    A 27 kDa Chlamydia trachomatis Mip-like protein with homology of a 175-amino-acid C-terminal fragment to the surface-exposed Legionella pneumophila mip-gene product has previously been described. In this paper the entire chlamydia Mip-like sequence of C. trachomatis serovar L2 (lymphogranuloma...... venereum (LGV) biovar) is presented. The sequence shows high similarity to the legionella Mip protein and its C-terminal region, like that of the legionella Mip, has high amino acid similarity to eukaryotic and prokaryotic FK506-binding proteins. The chlamydial mip-like gene was detected by polymerase...... chain reaction (PCR) in other C. trachomatis serovars and by sequencing of the mip-like genes of serovars B and E (trachoma biovar) was shown to be highly conserved within the two major biovars of C. trachomatis. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant Mip-like protein failed...

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis Mip-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, AG; Rousch, DA; Birkelund, Svend

    1992-01-01

    venereum (LGV) biovar) is presented. The sequence shows high similarity to the legionella Mip protein and its C-terminal region, like that of the legionella Mip, has high amino acid similarity to eukaryotic and prokaryotic FK506-binding proteins. The chlamydial mip-like gene was detected by polymerase...

  6. Kinetic quantification of vertical solid matter transfers in soils by a multi-isotopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagercikova, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Clay translocation is one of the major soil forming processes, however it is poorly quantified and modeled. We propose to quantify it together with bioturbation by combining different isotopic systems ( 137 Cs, 210 Pb (xs), meteoric 10 Be, 206/207 Pb, δ 13 C, 14 C) with numerical modeling based on a nonlinear diffusion-convection equation with depth dependent parameters. This novel method has been applied on Luvisol anthropo-sequences developed on loess, differing by their land use (cropping versus grassland or forest) and their agricultural practices (reduced tillage, no tillage and manure input). Our results show that as much as 91 ± 9 % and 80 ± 9 % of 137 Cs and 10 Be, respectively, are associated to the clay size fraction (0-2 μm) and can thus effectively trace vertical solid matter transfers in soils with pH > 5 and low organic carbon. Lead partitioning between different solid phases is more complex. Considering two spatial distributions of isotopes (macro-pores or soil matrix), we built up a multi-isotopic modelling approach that simulates the experimental data with the common set of transfer parameters and allowed us to quantify the relative contributions of vertical solid matter transfers to present-day 0-2 μm vertical distributions. Clay translocation is responsible for 9 to 66 % of the clay accumulations in the Bt-horizon. The diffusion coefficient also quantifies the rate of soil mixing by bioturbation. Modeling of the kinetics of solid matter transfer at multiple spatio-temporal scales should become a method of predilection in modern pedogenic and critical zone studies. (author) [fr

  7. Cu-Zn-Pb multi isotopic characterization of a small watershed (Loire river basin, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaulty, A. M.; Millot, R.; Perret, S.; Bourrain, X.

    2015-12-01

    Combating metal pollution in surface water is a major environmental, public health and economic issue. Knowledge of the behavior of metals, such as copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) in sediments and dissolved load, is a key factor to improve the management of rivers. Recent advances in mass spectrometry related to the development of MC-ICPMS allow to analyze the isotopic composition of these elements, and previous studies show the effectiveness of isotopic analyses to determine the anthropogenic sources of pollution in environment. The goal of this study is to use the Cu-Zn-Pb multi-isotopic signature to track the pollutions in surface water, and to understand the complex processes causing the metals mobilization and transport in environment. More particularly we investigate the mechanisms of distribution between the dissolved load and particulate load, known to play an important role in the transport of metals through river systems. As case study, we chose a small watershed, poorly urbanized in the Loire river basin. Its spring is in a pristine area, while it is only impacted some kilometers further by the releases rich in metals coming from a hospital water treatment plant. First a sampling of these liquid effluents as well as dissolved load and sediment from upstream to downstream was realized and their concentrations and isotopic data were determined. Then to simulate a lot of potential natural and anthropogenic modifications of environmental conditions, we made sequential extraction protocol using various reagents on the sediments. Isotopic analyzes were performed also on the various extracting solutions. Isotopic ratios were measured using a Neptune MC-ICPMS at the BRGM, after a protocol of purification for Zn and Cu. The results showed that, these isotopic systematics reveal important informations about the mechanists of mobilization and transport of metals through river systems. However experiments performed under laboratory conditions will be necessary

  8. Utilizing the Cross-Reactivity of MIPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ecevit; Billing, Johan; Nilsson, Carina; Boyd, Brian; Kecili, Rüstem; Nivhede, David; Axelsson, Sara; Rees, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The crossreactivity of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and its practical implications are discussed. Screening of MIP libraries is presented as a fasttrack route to discovery of resins selective towards new targets, exploiting the fact that MIPs imprinted with one type of template molecule also show recognition to related and sometimes also to apparently unrelated molecules. Several examples from our own and others' studies are presented that illustrate this crossreactivity and the pattern of recognition is discussed for selected examples.

  9. MIPS plant genome information resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spannagl, Manuel; Haberer, Georg; Ernst, Rebecca; Schoof, Heiko; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2007-01-01

    The Munich Institute for Protein Sequences (MIPS) has been involved in maintaining plant genome databases since the Arabidopsis thaliana genome project. Genome databases and analysis resources have focused on individual genomes and aim to provide flexible and maintainable data sets for model plant genomes as a backbone against which experimental data, for example from high-throughput functional genomics, can be organized and evaluated. In addition, model genomes also form a scaffold for comparative genomics, and much can be learned from genome-wide evolutionary studies.

  10. Pb-Zn-Cd-Hg multi isotopic characterization of the Loire River Basin, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, R.; Widory, D.; Innocent, C.; Guerrot, C.; Bourrain, X.; Johnson, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    metal pollutants. The main objective of this study is to characterize the sources and the behavior of these heavy metals in the aquatic environment, and their spatial distribution using a multi-isotope approach. Each of these isotope systematics on their own reveals important information about their geogenic or anthropogenic origin but, considered together, provide a more integrated understanding of the budgets of these pollutants within the Loire River Basin.

  11. MIP sensors--the electrochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malitesta, Cosimino; Mazzotta, Elisabetta; Picca, Rosaria A; Poma, Alessandro; Chianella, Iva; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2012-02-01

    This review highlights the importance of coupling molecular imprinting technology with methodology based on electrochemical techniques for the development of advanced sensing devices. In recent years, growing interest in molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in the preparation of recognition elements has led researchers to design novel formats for improvement of MIP sensors. Among possible approaches proposed in the literature on this topic, we will focus on the electrosynthesis of MIPs and on less common hybrid technology (e.g. based on electrochemistry and classical MIPs, or nanotechnology). Starting from the early work reported in this field, an overview of the most innovative and successful examples will be reviewed.

  12. Algal MIPs, high diversity and conserved motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderberg, Hanna I; Danielson, Jonas Å H; Johanson, Urban

    2011-04-21

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) also named aquaporins form channels facilitating the passive transport of water and other small polar molecules across membranes. MIPs are particularly abundant and diverse in terrestrial plants but little is known about their evolutionary history. In an attempt to investigate the origin of the plant MIP subfamilies, genomes of chlorophyte algae, the sister group of charophyte algae and land plants, were searched for MIP encoding genes. A total of 22 MIPs were identified in the nine analysed genomes and phylogenetic analyses classified them into seven subfamilies. Two of these, Plasma membrane Intrinsic Proteins (PIPs) and GlpF-like Intrinsic Proteins (GIPs), are also present in land plants and divergence dating support a common origin of these algal and land plant MIPs, predating the evolution of terrestrial plants. The subfamilies unique to algae were named MIPA to MIPE to facilitate the use of a common nomenclature for plant MIPs reflecting phylogenetically stable groups. All of the investigated genomes contained at least one MIP gene but only a few species encoded MIPs belonging to more than one subfamily. Our results suggest that at least two of the seven subfamilies found in land plants were present already in an algal ancestor. The total variation of MIPs and the number of different subfamilies in chlorophyte algae is likely to be even higher than that found in land plants. Our analyses indicate that genetic exchanges between several of the algal subfamilies have occurred. The PIP1 and PIP2 groups and the Ca2+ gating appear to be specific to land plants whereas the pH gating is a more ancient characteristic shared by all PIPs. Further studies are needed to discern the function of the algal specific subfamilies MIPA-E and to fully understand the evolutionary relationship of algal and terrestrial plant MIPs.

  13. Algal MIPs, high diversity and conserved motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanson Urban

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs also named aquaporins form channels facilitating the passive transport of water and other small polar molecules across membranes. MIPs are particularly abundant and diverse in terrestrial plants but little is known about their evolutionary history. In an attempt to investigate the origin of the plant MIP subfamilies, genomes of chlorophyte algae, the sister group of charophyte algae and land plants, were searched for MIP encoding genes. Results A total of 22 MIPs were identified in the nine analysed genomes and phylogenetic analyses classified them into seven subfamilies. Two of these, Plasma membrane Intrinsic Proteins (PIPs and GlpF-like Intrinsic Proteins (GIPs, are also present in land plants and divergence dating support a common origin of these algal and land plant MIPs, predating the evolution of terrestrial plants. The subfamilies unique to algae were named MIPA to MIPE to facilitate the use of a common nomenclature for plant MIPs reflecting phylogenetically stable groups. All of the investigated genomes contained at least one MIP gene but only a few species encoded MIPs belonging to more than one subfamily. Conclusions Our results suggest that at least two of the seven subfamilies found in land plants were present already in an algal ancestor. The total variation of MIPs and the number of different subfamilies in chlorophyte algae is likely to be even higher than that found in land plants. Our analyses indicate that genetic exchanges between several of the algal subfamilies have occurred. The PIP1 and PIP2 groups and the Ca2+ gating appear to be specific to land plants whereas the pH gating is a more ancient characteristic shared by all PIPs. Further studies are needed to discern the function of the algal specific subfamilies MIPA-E and to fully understand the evolutionary relationship of algal and terrestrial plant MIPs.

  14. Immunocytochemical distribution of locustamyoinhibiting peptide (Lom-MIP) in the nervous system of Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoofs, L; Veelaert, D; Broeck, J V; De Loof, A

    1996-07-05

    Locustamyoinhibiting peptide (Lom-MIP) is one of the 4 identified myoinhibiting neuropeptides, isolated from brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata-suboesophageal ganglion complexes of the locust, Locusta migratoria. An antiserum was raised against Lom-MIP for use in immunohistochemistry. Locustamyoinhibiting peptide-like immunoreactivity (Lom-MIP-LI) was visualized in the nervous system and peripheral organs of Locusta migratoria by means of the peroxidase-antiperoxidase method. A total of 12 specific immunoreactive neurons was found in the brain. Processes of these neurons innervate the protocerebral bridge the central body complex and distinct neuropil areas in the proto- and tritocerebrum but not in the deuterocerebrum nor in the optic lobes. The glandular cells of the corpora cardiaca, known to produce adipokinetic hormones, are contacted by Lom-MIP-LI fibers. The corpora allata were innervated by the nervus corporis allati I containing immunoreactive fibers. Lom-MIP-LI cell bodies were also found in the subesophageal ganglion, the metathoracic ganglion and the abdominal ganglia I-IV. In peripheral muscles, Lom-MIP-LI fibers innervate the heart, the oviduct, and the hindgut. In the salivary glands, Lom-MIP-LI was detected in the intracellular ductule of the parietal cells. Possible functions of Lom-MIP are discussed.

  15. Segmentation of Multi-Isotope Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data for Semi-Automatic Detection of Regions of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poczatek, J. Collin; Turck, Christoph W.; Lechene, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) associates secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with detection of several atomic masses, the use of stable isotopes as labels, and affiliated quantitative image-analysis software. By associating image and measure, MIMS allows one to obtain quantitative information about biological processes in sub-cellular domains. MIMS can be applied to a wide range of biomedical problems, in particular metabolism and cell fate [1], [2], [3]. In order to obtain morphologically pertinent data from MIMS images, we have to define regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs are drawn by hand, a tedious and time-consuming process. We have developed and successfully applied a support vector machine (SVM) for segmentation of MIMS images that allows fast, semi-automatic boundary detection of regions of interests. Using the SVM, high-quality ROIs (as compared to an expert's manual delineation) were obtained for 2 types of images derived from unrelated data sets. This automation simplifies, accelerates and improves the post-processing analysis of MIMS images. This approach has been integrated into “Open MIMS,” an ImageJ-plugin for comprehensive analysis of MIMS images that is available online at http://www.nrims.hms.harvard.edu/NRIMS_ImageJ.php. PMID:22347386

  16. Characterization of a Legionella micdadei mip mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, W A; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Legionella micdadei is dependent upon its ability to infect alveolar phagocytes. To better understand the basis of intracellular infection by this organism, we examined the importance of its Mip surface protein. In Legionella pneumophila, Mip promotes infection of both human...

  17. Highly selective BSA imprinted polyacrylamide hydrogels facilitated by a metal-coding MIP approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharif, H F; Yapati, H; Kalluru, S; Reddy, S M

    2015-12-01

    hydrogel-based MIPs for the selective recognition of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Specifically, Co(II)-complex based MIPs exhibited a 66% enhancement (in comparison to our normal MIPs) exhibiting 92 ± 1% specific binding with Q values of 5.7 ± 0.45 mg BSA/g polymer and imprinting factors (IF) of 14.8 ± 1.9 (MIP/ non-imprinted (NIP) control). The proposed metal-coded MIPs for protein recognition are intended to lead to unprecedented improvement in MIP selectivity and for future biosensor development that rely on an electrochemical redox processes. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MIPS: The good, the bad and the useful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jerry K.

    1987-01-01

    Many authors are critical of the use of MIPS (Millions of Instructions per Second) as a measure of computer power. Some feel that MIPS are meaningless. While there is justification for some of the criticism of MIPS, sometimes the criticism is carried too far. MIPS can be a useful number for planning and estimating purposes when used in a homogeneous computer environmnet. Comparisons between published MIPS ratings and benchmark results reveal that there does exist a high positive correlation between MIPS and tested performance, given a homogeneous computer environment. MIPS should be understood so as not to be misused. It is not correct that the use of MIPS is always inappropriate or inaccurate

  19. MIPS - The Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lada, C.; Lebofsky, M.; Low, F.; Strittmatter, P.; Young, E.; Beichman, C.; Gautier, T. N.; Mould, J.; Werner, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Multiband Imaging Photometer System (MIPS) for SIRTF is to be designed to reach as closely as possible the fundamental sensitivity and angular resolution limits for SIRTF over the 3 to 700 microns spectral region. It will use high performance photoconductive detectors from 3 to 200 microns with integrating JFET amplifiers. From 200 to 700 microns, the MIPS will use a bolometer cooled by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Over much of its operating range, the MIPS will make possible observations at and beyond the conventional Rayleigh diffraction limit of angular resolution.

  20. The effects of the 'key' molar mass on the design of a cascade handling a multi-isotopic mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichura, R.C.; Al-Janabi, M.A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The parameters required for describing the characteristics of separating units and cascades handling a multi-isotope mixture are first reviewed from previous work and then expressed in terms of a newly defined parameter called the 'Key' molar mass. The effects of the latter on the operating and economic parameters of a gas centrifuge cascade handling a multi-isotopic mixture are studied. Only cascades of the 'primitive' type, i.e. those in which the feed of a stage is made up of the light and heavy fractions of neighbouring stages, are considered. The costs incurred in obtaining outputs with specified concentrations are then discussed. (author)

  1. MIPS: a database for protein sequences, homology data and yeast genome information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Albermann, K; Heumann, K; Liebl, S; Pfeiffer, F

    1997-01-01

    The MIPS group (Martinsried Institute for Protein Sequences) at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Martinsried near Munich, Germany, collects, processes and distributes protein sequence data within the framework of the tripartite association of the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database (,). MIPS contributes nearly 50% of the data input to the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database. The database is distributed on CD-ROM together with PATCHX, an exhaustive supplement of unique, unverified protein sequences from external sources compiled by MIPS. Through its WWW server (http://www.mips.biochem.mpg.de/ ) MIPS permits internet access to sequence databases, homology data and to yeast genome information. (i) Sequence similarity results from the FASTA program () are stored in the FASTA database for all proteins from PIR-International and PATCHX. The database is dynamically maintained and permits instant access to FASTA results. (ii) Starting with FASTA database queries, proteins have been classified into families and superfamilies (PROT-FAM). (iii) The HPT (hashed position tree) data structure () developed at MIPS is a new approach for rapid sequence and pattern searching. (iv) MIPS provides access to the sequence and annotation of the complete yeast genome (), the functional classification of yeast genes (FunCat) and its graphical display, the 'Genome Browser' (). A CD-ROM based on the JAVA programming language providing dynamic interactive access to the yeast genome and the related protein sequences has been compiled and is available on request. PMID:9016498

  2. Advances in the manufacture of MIP nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Alessandro; Turner, Anthony P F; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2010-12-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are prepared by creating a three-dimensional polymeric matrix around a template molecule. After the matrix is removed, complementary cavities with respect to shape and functional groups remain. MIPs have been produced for applications in in vitro diagnostics, therapeutics and separations. However, this promising technology still lacks widespread application because of issues related to large-scale production and optimization of the synthesis. Recent developments in the area of MIP nanoparticles might offer solutions to several problems associated with performance and application. This review discusses various approaches used in the preparation of MIP nanoparticles, focusing in particular on the issues associated with large-scale manufacture and implications for the performance of synthesized nanomaterials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CAMEX-4 MIPS SODAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) is a mobile atmospheric profiling system. It includes a 915 MHz Doppler...

  4. MIPS bacterial genomes functional annotation benchmark dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetko, Igor V; Brauner, Barbara; Dunger-Kaltenbach, Irmtraud; Frishman, Goar; Montrone, Corinna; Fobo, Gisela; Ruepp, Andreas; Antonov, Alexey V; Surmeli, Dimitrij; Mewes, Hans-Wernen

    2005-05-15

    Any development of new methods for automatic functional annotation of proteins according to their sequences requires high-quality data (as benchmark) as well as tedious preparatory work to generate sequence parameters required as input data for the machine learning methods. Different program settings and incompatible protocols make a comparison of the analyzed methods difficult. The MIPS Bacterial Functional Annotation Benchmark dataset (MIPS-BFAB) is a new, high-quality resource comprising four bacterial genomes manually annotated according to the MIPS functional catalogue (FunCat). These resources include precalculated sequence parameters, such as sequence similarity scores, InterPro domain composition and other parameters that could be used to develop and benchmark methods for functional annotation of bacterial protein sequences. These data are provided in XML format and can be used by scientists who are not necessarily experts in genome annotation. BFAB is available at http://mips.gsf.de/proj/bfab

  5. Symplectic Tracking of Multi-Isotopic Heavy-Ion Beams in SixTrack

    CERN Document Server

    Hermes, Pascal; De Maria, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The software SixTrack provides symplectic proton tracking over a large number of turns. The code is used for the tracking of beam halo particles and the simulation of their interaction with the collimators to study the efficiency of the LHC collimation system. Tracking simulations for heavy-ion beams require taking into account the mass to charge ratio of each particle because heavy ions can be subject to fragmentation at their passage through the collimators. In this paper we present the derivation of a Hamiltonian for multi-isotopic heavy-ion beams and symplectic tracking maps derived from it. The resulting tracking maps were implemented in the tracking software SixTrack. With this modification, SixTrack can be used to natively track heavy-ion beams of multiple isotopes through a magnetic accelerator lattice.

  6. Real-time software for multi-isotopic source term estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goloubenkov, A.; Borodin, R.; Sohier, A.

    1996-01-01

    Consideration is given to development of software for one of crucial components of the RODOS - assessment of the source rate (SR) from indirect measurements. Four components of the software are described in the paper. First component is a GRID system, which allow to prepare stochastic meteorological and radioactivity fields using measured data. Second part is a model of atmospheric transport which can be adapted for emulation of practically any gamma dose/spectrum detectors. The third one is a method which allows space-time and quantitative discrepancies in measured and modelled data to be taken into account simultaneously. It bases on the preference scheme selected by an expert. Last component is a special optimization method for calculation of multi-isotopic SR and its uncertainties. Results of a validation of the software using tracer experiments data and Chernobyl source estimation for main dose-forming isotopes are enclosed in the paper

  7. Multi isotopic characterization (Li-Cu-Zn-Pb) of waste waters pollution in a small watershed (Loire River basin, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, R.; Desaulty, A. M.; Perret, S.; Bourrain, X.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this study is to use multi-isotopic signature to track the pollution in surface waters, and to understand the complex processes causing the metals mobilization and transport in the environment. In the present study, we investigate waste water releases from a hospital water treatment plant and its potential impact in a small river basin near Orléans in France (Egoutier watershed: 15 km²and 5 km long). We decided to monitor this small watershed which is poorly urbanized in the Loire river basin. Its spring is located in a pristine area (forested area), while it is only impacted some kilometers further by the releases rich in metals coming from a hospital water treatment plant. A sampling of these liquid effluents as well as dissolved load and sediment from upstream to downstream was realized and their concentrations and isotopic data were determined. Isotopic ratios were measured using a MC-ICP-MS at BRGM, after a specific protocol of purification for each isotopic systematics. Lithium isotopic compositions are rather homogeneous in river waters along the main course of the stream. The waste water signal is very different from the natural background with significant heavy lithium contribution (high δ7Li). Lead isotopic compositions are rather homogenous in river waters and sediments with values close to geologic background. For Zn, the sediments with high concentrations and depleted isotopic compositions (low δ66Zn), typical of an anthropic pollution, are strongly impacted. The analyses of Cu isotopes in sediments show the impact of waster waters, but also isotopic fractionations due to redox processes in the watershed. To better understand these processes controlling the release of metals in water, sequential extractions on sediments are in progress under laboratory conditions and will provide important constraints for metal distribution in this river basin.

  8. Pyro shock simulation: Experience with the MIPS simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Thomas J.; Moul, David S.

    1988-01-01

    The Mechanical Impulse Pyro Shock (MIPS) Simulator at GE Astro Space Division is one version of a design that is in limited use throughout the aerospace industry, and is typically used for component shock testing at levels up to 10,000 response g's. Modifications to the force imput, table and component boundary conditions have allowed a range of test conditions to be achieved. Twelve different designs of components with weights up to 23 Kg are in the process or have completed qualification testing in the Dynamic Simulation Lab at GE in Valley Forge, Pa. A summary of the experience gained through the use of this simulator is presented as well as examples of shock experiments that can be readily simulated at the GE Astro MIPS facility.

  9. MIPS: analysis and annotation of genome information in 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Dietmann, S; Frishman, D; Gregory, R; Mannhaupt, G; Mayer, K F X; Münsterkötter, M; Ruepp, A; Spannagl, M; Stümpflen, V; Rattei, T

    2008-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS-GSF, Neuherberg, Germany) combines automatic processing of large amounts of sequences with manual annotation of selected model genomes. Due to the massive growth of the available data, the depth of annotation varies widely between independent databases. Also, the criteria for the transfer of information from known to orthologous sequences are diverse. To cope with the task of global in-depth genome annotation has become unfeasible. Therefore, our efforts are dedicated to three levels of annotation: (i) the curation of selected genomes, in particular from fungal and plant taxa (e.g. CYGD, MNCDB, MatDB), (ii) the comprehensive, consistent, automatic annotation employing exhaustive methods for the computation of sequence similarities and sequence-related attributes as well as the classification of individual sequences (SIMAP, PEDANT and FunCat) and (iii) the compilation of manually curated databases for protein interactions based on scrutinized information from the literature to serve as an accepted set of reliable annotated interaction data (MPACT, MPPI, CORUM). All databases and tools described as well as the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS web server (http://mips.gsf.de).

  10. Mongoose: Creation of a Rad-Hard MIPS R3000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Dan; Smith, Brian

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a 32 Bit, full MIPS R3000 code-compatible Rad-Hard CPU, code named Mongoose. Mongoose progressed from contract award, through the design cycle, to operational silicon in 12 months to meet a space mission for NASA. The goal was the creation of a fully static device capable of operation to the maximum Mil-883 derated speed, worst-case post-rad exposure with full operational integrity. This included consideration of features for functional enhancements relating to mission compatibility and removal of commercial practices not supported by Rad-Hard technology. 'Mongoose' developed from an evolution of LSI Logic's MIPS-I embedded processor, LR33000, code named Cobra, to its Rad-Hard 'equivalent', Mongoose. The term 'equivalent' is used to infer that the core of the processor is functionally identical, allowing the same use and optimizations of the MIPS-I Instruction Set software tool suite for compilation, software program trace, etc. This activity was started in September of 1991 under a contract from NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)-Flight Data Systems. The approach affected a teaming of NASA-GSFC for program development, LSI Logic for system and ASIC design coupled with the Rad-Hard process technology, and Harris (GASD) for Rad-Hard microprocessor design expertise. The program culminated with the generation of Rad-Hard Mongoose prototypes one year later.

  11. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, Jordi; Marchesi, Massimo; Chambon, Julie C.C.; Aravena, Ramon; Canals, Àngels; Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L.; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ 13 C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ 37 Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ 37 Cl and δ 13 C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA ( 13 C, 35 Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer

  12. MIP- MULTIMISSION INTERACTIVE PICTURE PLANNING PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Multimission Interactive Picture Planner, MIP, is a scientifically accurate and fast, 3D animation program for deep space. MIP is also versatile, reasonably comprehensive, portable, and will run on microcomputers. New techniques were developed to rapidly perform the calculations and transformations necessary to animate scientifically accurate 3D space. At the same time, portability is maintained, as the transformations and clipping have been written in FORTRAN 77 code. MIP was primarily designed to handle Voyager, Galileo, and the Space Telescope. It can, however, be adapted to handle other missions. The space simulation consists of a rotating body (usually a planet), any natural satellites, a spacecraft, the sun, stars, descriptive labelling, and field of view boxes. The central body and natural satellites are tri-axial wireframe representations with terminators, limbs, and landmarks. Hidden lines are removed for the central body and natural satellites, but not for the scene as a whole so that bodies may be seen behind one another. The program has considerable flexibility in its step time, observer position, viewed object, field of view, etc. Most parameters may be changed from the keyboard while the simulation is running. When MIP is executed it will ask the user for a control file, which should be prepared before execution. The control file identifies which mission MIP should simulate, the star catalog files, the ephemerides files to be used, the central body, planets, asteroids, and comets, and solar system landmarks and constants such as planets, asteroids, and comets. The control file also describes the fields of view. Control files are included to simulate the Voyager 1 encounter at Jupiter and the Giotto spacecraft's flyby of Halley's comet. Data is included for Voyager 1 and 2 (all 6 planetary encounters) and Giotto. MIP was written for an IBM PC or compatibles. It requires 512K of RAM, a CGA or compatible graphics adapter, and DOS 2.0 or higher. Users

  13. Towards water compatible MIPs for sensing in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horemans, F; Weustenraed, A; Spivak, D; Cleij, T J

    2012-06-01

    When synthesizing molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), a few fundamental principles should be kept in mind. There is a strong correlation between porogen polarity, MIP microenvironment polarity and the imprinting effect itself. The combination of these parameters eventually determines the overall binding behavior of a MIP in a given solvent. In addition, it is shown that MIP binding is strongly influenced by the polarity of the rebinding solvent. Because the use of MIPs in biomedical environments is of considerable interest, it is important that these MIPs perform well in aqueous media. In this article, various approaches are explored towards a water compatible MIP for the target molecule l-nicotine. To this end, the imprinting effect together with the MIP matrix polarity is fine-tuned during MIP synthesis. The binding behavior of the resulting MIPs is evaluated by performing batch rebinding experiments that makes it possible to select the most suitable MIP/non-imprinted polymer couple for future application in aqueous environments. One method to achieve improved compatibility with water is referred to as porogen tuning, in which porogens of varying polarities are used. It is demonstrated that, especially when multiple porogens are mixed, this approach can lead to superior performance in aqueous environments. Another method involves the incorporation of polar or non-polar comonomers in the MIP matrix. It is shown that by carefully selecting these monomers, it is also possible to obtain MIPs, which can selectively bind their target in water. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry quantifies stem cell division and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Bailey, Andrew P; Senyo, Samuel E; Guillermier, Christelle; Perlstein, Todd S; Gould, Alex P; Lee, Richard T; Lechene, Claude P

    2012-01-15

    Mass spectrometry with stable isotope labels has been seminal in discovering the dynamic state of living matter, but is limited to bulk tissues or cells. We developed multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) that allowed us to view and measure stable isotope incorporation with submicrometre resolution. Here we apply MIMS to diverse organisms, including Drosophila, mice and humans. We test the 'immortal strand hypothesis', which predicts that during asymmetric stem cell division chromosomes containing older template DNA are segregated to the daughter destined to remain a stem cell, thus insuring lifetime genetic stability. After labelling mice with (15)N-thymidine from gestation until post-natal week 8, we find no (15)N label retention by dividing small intestinal crypt cells after a four-week chase. In adult mice administered (15)N-thymidine pulse-chase, we find that proliferating crypt cells dilute the (15)N label, consistent with random strand segregation. We demonstrate the broad utility of MIMS with proof-of-principle studies of lipid turnover in Drosophila and translation to the human haematopoietic system. These studies show that MIMS provides high-resolution quantification of stable isotope labels that cannot be obtained using other techniques and that is broadly applicable to biological and medical research.

  15. CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ DOPPLER WIND PROFILER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ Doppler Wind Profiler dataset was collected by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS),...

  16. 24 CFR 203.264 - Payment of periodic MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Payment § 203.264 Payment of periodic MIP. The mortgagee shall pay each MIP in twelve equal monthly installments. Each monthly installment shall be due and payable to the Commissioner no later than the tenth day...

  17. 3D Multi-isotope Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Penetration of 18O-Trehalose in Mouse Sperm Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Lechene, Claude P.; Lee, Gloria Y.; Poczatek, J. Collin; Toner, Mehmet; Biggers, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of genetically engineered mice in medical research has led to ever increasing storage costs. Trehalose has a significant beneficial effect in preserving the developmental potential of mouse sperm following partial desiccation and storage at temperatures above freezing. Using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry, we are able to image and measure trehalose in individual spermatozoa. We provide the first evidence that trehalose penetrates the nucleus of a mammalian cell, permit...

  18. Disentangling the complexity of nitrous oxide cycling in coastal sediments: Results from a novel multi-isotope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, S. D.; Buchwald, C.; Charoenpong, C.; Ziebis, W.

    2014-12-01

    with water in influencing the O isotope composition of N2O from the sediment-water interface. A steady-state multi-isotope flux model will help to constraining rates and isotope effects of these processes and improve our understanding of the dynamics and pathways of N2O production and emission under varying scenarios of environmental change.

  19. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the Legionella micdadei mip gene, encoding a 30-kilodalton analog of the Legionella pneumophila Mip protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P; Hindersson, P

    1991-01-01

    After the demonstration of analogs of the Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein in other Legionella species, the Legionella micdadei mip gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis of the L. micdadei mip gene contained in the plasmid p...... homology with the mip-like genes of several Legionella species. Furthermore, amino acid sequence comparisons revealed significant homology to two eukaryotic proteins with isomerase activity (FK506-binding proteins)....

  20. Soluble salt sources in medieval porous limestone sculptures: A multi-isotope (N, O, S) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloppmann, W., E-mail: w.kloppmann@brgm.fr [BRGM, Direction des Laboratoires, Unité Isotopes, BP 6009, F-45060 Orléans cedex 2 (France); Rolland, O., E-mail: olivierrolland@wanadoo.fr [Montlouis-sur-Loire (France); Proust, E.; Montech, A.T. [BRGM, Direction des Laboratoires, Unité Isotopes, BP 6009, F-45060 Orléans cedex 2 (France)

    2014-02-01

    The sources and mechanisms of soluble salt uptake by porous limestone and the associated degradation patterns were investigated for the life-sized 15th century “entombment of Christ” sculpture group located in Pont-à-Mousson, France, using a multi-isotope approach on sulphates (δ{sup 34}S and δ{sup 18}O) and nitrates (δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 18}O). The sculpture group, near the border of the Moselle River, is within the potential reach of capillary rise from the alluvial aquifer. Chemical analyses show a vertical zonation of soluble salts with a predominance of sulphates in the lower parts of the statues where crumbling and blistering prevail, and higher concentrations of nitrates and chloride in the high parts affected by powdering and efflorescence. Isotope fingerprints of sulphates suggest a triple origin: (1) the lower parts are dominated by capillary rise of dissolved sulphate from the Moselle water with characteristic Keuper evaporite signatures that progressively decreases with height; (2) in the higher parts affected by powdering the impact of atmospheric sulphur becomes detectable; and (3) locally, plaster reparations impact the neighbouring limestone through dissolution and re-precipitation of gypsum. Nitrogen and oxygen isotopes suggest an organic origin of nitrates in all samples. N isotope signatures are compatible with those measured in the alluvial aquifer of the Moselle River further downstream. This indicates contamination by sewage or organic fertilisers. Significant isotopic contrasts are observed between the different degradation features depending on the height and suggest historical changes of nitrate sources. - Highlights: • We use S, N and O isotopes to distinguish salt sources in limestone sculptures. • Vertical zonation of degradation is linked to capillary rise and air pollution. • Sulphate salts in lower parts are derived from river/groundwater. • Sulphate salts in higher parts show signature of air pollution. • Nitrates

  1. Methanol Gas-Sensing Properties of SWCNT-MIP Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Qin; Zhang, Yumin; Zhu, Zhongqi; Liu, Qingju

    2016-11-01

    The single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-molecularly imprinted powder (MIP) composites in this paper were prepared by mixing SWCNTs with MIPs. The structure and micrograph of the as-prepared SWCNTs-MIPs samples were characterized by XRD and TEM. The gas-sensing properties were tested through indirect-heating sensors based on SWCNT-MIP composites fabricating on an alumina tube with Au electrodes and Pt wires. The results showed that the structure of SWCNTs-MIPs is of orthogonal perovskite and the average particle size of the SWCNTs-MIPs was in the range of 10-30 nm. SWCNTs-MIPs exhibit good methanol gas-sensitive properties. At 90 °C, the response to 1 ppm methanol is 19.7, and the response to the interferent is lower than 5 to the other interferent gases (ethanol, formaldehyde, toluene, acetone, ammonia, and gasoline). The response time and recovery time are 50 and 58 s, respectively.

  2. Final Evaluation of MIPS M/500

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    recognizing common subexpressions by changing the code to read: acke (n,m) If (, - 0) return *+I; return a ker(n-1, 0 ? 1 aaker (n,.-1)); I the total code...INSTITUTE JPO PTTTSBURCH. PA 15213 N/A N/A N/O 11 TITLE (Inciude Security Class.iication) Final Evaluation of MIPS M/500 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Daniel V

  3. MIPs as Tools in Environmental Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiasson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imprints are potentially fantastic constructions. They are selective, robust, and nonbiodegradable if produced from stable polymers. A range of different applications has been presented, everything from separation of enantiomers, via adsorbents for sample preparation before analysis to applications in wastewater treatment. This chapter deals with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as tools in environmental biotechnology, a field that has the potential to become very important in the future.

  4. Surface-modified multifunctional MIP nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Ewa; Poma, Alessandro; Guerreiro, Antonio; Perez de Vargas Sansalvador, Isabel; Caygill, Sarah; Canfarotta, Francesco; Whitcombe, Michael J.; Piletsky, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    The synthesis of core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIP NPs) has been performed using a novel solid-phase approach on immobilised templates. The same solid phase also acts as a protective functionality for high affinity binding sites during subsequent derivatisation/shell formation. This procedure allows for the rapid synthesis, controlled separation and purification of high-affinity materials, with each production cycle taking just 2 hours. The aim of this approach is to synthesise uniformly sized imprinted materials at the nanoscale which can be readily grafted with various polymers without affecting their affinity and specificity. For demonstration purposes we grafted anti-melamine MIP NPs with coatings which introduce the following surface characteristics: high polarity (PEG methacrylate); electro-activity (vinylferrocene); fluorescence (eosin acrylate); thiol groups (pentaerythritol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate)). The method has broad applicability and can be used to produce multifunctional imprinted nanoparticles with potential for further application in the biosensors, diagnostics and biomedical fields and as an alternative to natural receptors.The synthesis of core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIP NPs) has been performed using a novel solid-phase approach on immobilised templates. The same solid phase also acts as a protective functionality for high affinity binding sites during subsequent derivatisation/shell formation. This procedure allows for the rapid synthesis, controlled separation and purification of high-affinity materials, with each production cycle taking just 2 hours. The aim of this approach is to synthesise uniformly sized imprinted materials at the nanoscale which can be readily grafted with various polymers without affecting their affinity and specificity. For demonstration purposes we grafted anti-melamine MIP NPs with coatings which introduce the following surface characteristics: high polarity

  5. 3D multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry reveals penetration of 18O-trehalose in mouse sperm nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude P Lechene

    Full Text Available The prevalence of genetically engineered mice in medical research has led to ever increasing storage costs. Trehalose has a significant beneficial effect in preserving the developmental potential of mouse sperm following partial desiccation and storage at temperatures above freezing. Using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry, we are able to image and measure trehalose in individual spermatozoa. We provide the first evidence that trehalose penetrates the nucleus of a mammalian cell, permitting tolerance to desiccation. These results have broad implications for long-term storage of mammalian cells.

  6. 3D multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry reveals penetration of 18O-trehalose in mouse sperm nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechene, Claude P; Lee, Gloria Y; Poczatek, J Collin; Toner, Mehmet; Biggers, John D

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of genetically engineered mice in medical research has led to ever increasing storage costs. Trehalose has a significant beneficial effect in preserving the developmental potential of mouse sperm following partial desiccation and storage at temperatures above freezing. Using multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry, we are able to image and measure trehalose in individual spermatozoa. We provide the first evidence that trehalose penetrates the nucleus of a mammalian cell, permitting tolerance to desiccation. These results have broad implications for long-term storage of mammalian cells.

  7. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.palau@unine.ch [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Marchesi, Massimo [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chambon, Julie C.C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Aravena, Ramon [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canals, Àngels [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ{sup 13}C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ{sup 37}Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ{sup 37}Cl and δ{sup 13}C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA ({sup 13}C,{sup 35}Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer.

  8. [Effects of lipopolysaccharides from Porphyromonas endodontalis on the expression of MIP-1α in mouse osteoblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ya-Qiong; Li, Xiao-Lin; Qiu, Li-Hong; Guo, Jia-Jie; Yang, Di; Guo, Yan

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharides(LPS) extracted from Porphyromonas endodontalis(P.e) on the expression of macrophageinflammatoryprotein-1α (MIP-1α) mRNA and protein levels in MC3T3-E1 cells and the influence of curcumin in the process. MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with 20 mg/L P.e-LPS for different times (0-48 h). The expression of MIP-1α mRNA and protein was detected by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA). MC3T3-E1 cells were pretreated with inhibitor of (curcumin) for 1 h, and then treated with 20 mg/L P.e-LPS. The expression of MIP-1α was also detected by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA.Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Dunnett's t test with SPSS 13.0 software package. In the observation time (0-48 h), the impact of 20 P.e-LPS mg/L on induction of MIP-1α in MC3T3-El cells exhibited a time-dependent manner. The expression of MIP-1α mRNA and protein decreased significantly after pretreatment with 10 μmol/L curcumin for 1 h. The results suggest that P.e-LPS may mediate MIP-1α expression in MC3T3-E1 cells, and curcumin has a significant inhibitory effect on this process.

  9. Constraints of costal aquifer functioning in a deeply antropized area through a multi-isotope fingerprinting (Recife, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Cary, Lise; Bertrand, Guillaume; Hirata, Ricardo; Martins, Veridiana; Montenegro, Suzana; Pauwels, Hélène; Kloppmann, Wolfram; Aquilina, Luc

    2014-05-01

    The Metropolitan Region of Recife (RMR) went through large changes of water and land uses over the last decades due to an increasing demographic pressure (1.5 M of inhabitants). These evolutions gave rise to numerous environmental consequences, such as a dramatic decline of the water levels, groundwater salinization and contamination. This degradation of natural resources is linked to the increase of water demand that is also punctually amplified by drought periods, inducing the construction of thousands of private wells. Recife city was built on an estuarine area, at the geological limits of the two sedimentary basins of Pernambuco (north of the city) and Paraíba (south of the city) separated by a famous shear zone (the Pernambuco lineament). Tectonic and sedimentary events involved in the genesis and evolution of these basins were mainly controlled by the opening of the Atlantic Ocean leading to the deposition of cretaceous sediments which now constitute the two main exploited aquifers, the Beberibe and Cabo aquifers. These two deep aquiferous formations are topped by the unconfined Boa Viagem aquifer of quaternary sediments. It is the most directly exposed to contamination, since it is connected to mangroves, rivers, estuaries and highly urbanized areas. Both the Beberibe and Cabo aquifers contain large clay levels and are separated by a rather continuous clayed formation which seems to play a consistent role of screen and to interfere in the hydraulic connections between the three aquifers. Previous isotopic studies have shown that recharge processes are similar in the aquifers, suggesting that exchanges may occur and may be modified or amplified by overexploitation. This very complex aquifer system is studied through more than 60 water samples, including some surface water samples from the main rivers. A methodology based on multi-isotopes fingerprinting is applied, including stable isotopes of the water molecule, strontium isotopes, boron isotopes, sulfur

  10. AgMIP 1.5°C Assessment: Mitigation and Adaptation at Coordinated Global and Regional Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2016-12-01

    The AgMIP 1.5°C Coordinated Global and Regional Integrated Assessments of Climate Change and Food Security (AgMIP 1.5 CGRA) is linking site-based crop and livestock models with similar models run on global grids, and then links these biophysical components with economics models and nutrition metrics at regional and global scales. The AgMIP 1.5 CGRA assessment brings together experts in climate, crop, livestock, economics, nutrition, and food security to define the 1.5°C Protocols and guide the process throughout the assessment. Scenarios are designed to consistently combine elements of intertwined storylines of future society including socioeconomic development (Shared Socioeconomic Pathways), greenhouse gas concentrations (Representative Concentration Pathways), and specific pathways of agricultural sector development (Representative Agricultural Pathways). Shared Climate Policy Assumptions will be extended to provide additional agricultural detail on mitigation and adaptation strategies. The multi-model, multi-disciplinary, multi-scale integrated assessment framework is using scenarios of economic development, adaptation, mitigation, food policy, and food security. These coordinated assessments are grounded in the expertise of AgMIP partners around the world, leading to more consistent results and messages for stakeholders, policymakers, and the scientific community. The early inclusion of nutrition and food security experts has helped to ensure that assessment outputs include important metrics upon which investment and policy decisions may be based. The CGRA builds upon existing AgMIP research groups (e.g., the AgMIP Wheat Team and the AgMIP Global Gridded Crop Modeling Initiative; GGCMI) and regional programs (e.g., AgMIP Regional Teams in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia), with new protocols for cross-scale and cross-disciplinary linkages to ensure the propagation of expert judgment and consistent assumptions.

  11. Identification of mip-like genes in the genus Legionella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cianciotto, N P; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Eisenstein, B I

    1990-01-01

    The mip gene of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strain AA100 encodes a 24-kilodalton surface protein (Mip) and enhances the abilities of L. pneumophila to parasitize human macrophages and to cause pneumonia in experimental animals. To determine whether this virulence factor is conserved in the...

  12. High quality copy number and genotype data from FFPE samples using Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuker; Carlton, Victoria E.H.; Karlin-Neumann, George; Sapolsky, Ronald; Zhang, Li; Moorhead, Martin; Wang, Zhigang C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Warren, Robert; Walther, Axel; Bondy, Melissa; Sahin, Aysegul; Krahe, Ralf; Tuna, Musaffe; Thompson, Patricia A.; Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Faham, Malek

    2009-02-24

    A major challenge facing DNA copy number (CN) studies of tumors is that most banked samples with extensive clinical follow-up information are Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE). DNA from FFPE samples generally underperforms or suffers high failure rates compared to fresh frozen samples because of DNA degradation and cross-linking during FFPE fixation and processing. As FFPE protocols may vary widely between labs and samples may be stored for decades at room temperature, an ideal FFPE CN technology should work on diverse sample sets. Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) technology has been applied successfully to obtain high quality CN and genotype data from cell line and frozen tumor DNA. Since the MIP probes require only a small ({approx}40 bp) target binding site, we reasoned they may be well suited to assess degraded FFPE DNA. We assessed CN with a MIP panel of 50,000 markers in 93 FFPE tumor samples from 7 diverse collections. For 38 FFPE samples from three collections we were also able to asses CN in matched fresh frozen tumor tissue. Using an input of 37 ng genomic DNA, we generated high quality CN data with MIP technology in 88% of FFPE samples from seven diverse collections. When matched fresh frozen tissue was available, the performance of FFPE DNA was comparable to that of DNA obtained from matched frozen tumor (genotype concordance averaged 99.9%), with only a modest loss in performance in FFPE. MIP technology can be used to generate high quality CN and genotype data in FFPE as well as fresh frozen samples.

  13. CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ DOPPLER WIND PROFILER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) is a mobile atmospheric profiling system. It includes a 915 MHz Doppler...

  14. CAMEX-4 MIPS SURFACE STATION 2 V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) is a mobile atmospheric profiling system. It includes a 915 MHz Doppler...

  15. New Results from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.; Kravitz, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) was designed to determine robust climate system model responses to Solar Radiation Management (SRM). While mitigation (reducing greenhouse gases emissions) is the most effective way of reducing future climate change, SRM (the deliberate modification of incoming solar radiation) has been proposed as a means of temporarily alleviating some of the effects of global warming. For society to make informed decisions as to whether SRM should ever be implemented, information is needed on the benefits, risks, and side effects, and GeoMIP seeks to aid in that endeavor. GeoMIP has organized four standardized climate model simulations involving reduction of insolation or increased amounts of stratospheric sulfate aerosols to counteract increasing greenhouse gases. Thirteen comprehensive atmosphere-ocean general circulation models have participated in the project so far. GeoMIP is a 'CMIP Coordinated Experiment' as part of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) and has been endorsed by SPARC (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate). GeoMIP has held three international workshops and has produced a number of recent journal articles. GeoMIP has found that if increasing greenhouse gases could be counteracted with insolation reduction, the global average temperature could be kept constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform. The tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without SRM. If SRM were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5-10 times the rates from gradual global warming. SRM combined with CO2 fertilization would have small impacts on rice production in China, but would increase maize production

  16. Imprinted Oxide and MIP/Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors †.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Adeel; Dickert, Franz L

    2018-04-20

    The oxides of transition, post-transition and rare-earth metals have a long history of robust and fast responsive recognition elements for electronic, optical, and gravimetric devices. A wide range of applications successfully utilized pristine or doped metal oxides and polymer-oxide hybrids as nanostructured recognition elements for the detection of biologically relevant molecules, harmful organic substances, and drugs as well as for the investigative process control applications. An overview of the selected recognition applications of molecularly imprinted sol-gel phases, metal oxides and hybrid nanomaterials composed of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) and metal oxides is presented herein. The formation and fabrication processes for imprinted sol-gel layers, metal oxides, MIP-coated oxide nanoparticles and other MIP/oxide nanohybrids are discussed along with their applications in monitoring bioorganic analytes and processes. The sensor characteristics such as dynamic detection range and limit of detection are compared as the performance criterion and the miniaturization and commercialization possibilities are critically discussed.

  17. Preparation of a multi-isotope plutonium AMS standard and preliminary results of a first inter-lab comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittmann, B.-A.; Dunai, T.J. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, Greinstr. 4-6, 50939 Cologne (Germany); Dewald, A.; Heinze, S.; Feuerstein, C. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Strub, E. [Division of Nuclear Chemistry, University of Cologne, Zülpicher Str. 45, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Fifield, L.K.; Froehlich, M.B.; Tims, S.G.; Wallner, A. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics & Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Christl, M. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    The motivation of this work is to establish a new multi-isotope plutonium standard for isotopic ratio measurements with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), since stocks of existing solutions are declining. To this end, certified reference materials (CRMs) of each of the individual isotopes {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 244}Pu were obtained from JRC IRMM (Joint Research Center Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements). These certified reference materials (IRMM-081a, IRMM-083, IRMM-043 and IRMM-042a) were diluted with nitric acid and mixed to obtain a stock standard solution with an isotopic ratio of approximately 1.0:1.0:1.0:0.1 ({sup 239}Pu:{sup 240}Pu:{sup 242}Pu:{sup 244}Pu). From this stock solution, samples were prepared for measurement of the plutonium isotopic composition by AMS. These samples have been measured in a round-robin exercise between the AMS facilities at CologneAMS, at the ANU Canberra and ETH Zurich to verify the isotopic ratio and to demonstrate the reproducibility of the measurements. The results show good agreement both between the different AMS measurements and with the gravimetrically determined nominal ratios.

  18. Coastal groundwater salinization: Focus on the vertical variability in a multi-layered aquifer through a multi-isotope fingerprinting (Roussillon Basin, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle, E-mail: e.petelet@brgm.fr [BRGM, Avenue C. Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Négrel, Philippe [BRGM, Avenue C. Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Aunay, Bertrand [BRGM, Réunion Agency, 5, rue Sainte-Anne, CS 51016, 97404 Saint Denis Cedex (France); Ladouche, Bernard; Bailly-Comte, Vincent [BRGM Montpellier Agency, 1039, rue de Pinville, 34000 Montpellier (France); Guerrot, Catherine; Flehoc, Christine [BRGM, Avenue C. Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Pezard, Philippe; Lofi, Johanna [Géosciences Montpellier, UMR 5243, Université de Montpellier, cc069, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05 (France); Dörfliger, Nathalie [BRGM, Avenue C. Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 02 (France)

    2016-10-01

    ), we discuss the possible future evolution of this aquifer system under global change, as well as the potential management strategies needed to preserve quantitatively and qualitatively this water resource. - Highlights: • Groundwater salinization in a Mediterranean costal aquifer • Multilevel investigation in a multi-layered aquifer with a Westbay (Nova Metrix LLC) • Chemical and multi-isotope fingerprinting of salinization sources and processes • No evidence of present-day seawater intrusion along the vertical profile of BAR1 • Coupling geochemistry and models for a sustainable preservation of coastal aquifer.

  19. Mesoporous structured MIPs@CDs fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive detection of TNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoufang; Lu, Hongzhi

    2016-11-15

    A facile strategy was developed to prepare mesoporous structured molecularly imprinted polymers capped carbon dots (M-MIPs@CDs) fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive and selective determination of TNT. The strategy using amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer" for imprinting simplify the imprinting process and provide well recognition sites accessibility. The as-prepared M-MIPs@CDs sensor, using periodic mesoporous silica as imprinting matrix, and amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer", exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity toward TNT with detection limit of 17nM. The recycling process was sustainable for 10 times without obvious efficiency decrease. The feasibility of the developed method in real samples was successfully evaluated through the analysis of TNT in soil and water samples with satisfactory recoveries of 88.6-95.7%. The method proposed in this work was proved to be a convenient and practical way to prepare high sensitive and selective fluorescence MIPs@CDs sensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystal structure of a trapped catalytic intermediate suggests that forced atomic proximity drives the catalysis of mIPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelon, Kelly; Roberts, Mary F; Stec, Boguslaw

    2011-12-07

    1-L-myo-inositol-phosphate synthase (mIPS) catalyzes the first step of the unique, de novo pathway of inositol biosynthesis. However, details about the complex mIPS catalytic mechanism, which requires oxidation, enolization, intramolecular aldol cyclization, and reduction, are not fully known. To gain further insight into this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the wild-type mIPS from Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.7 Å, as well as the crystal structures of three active-site mutants. Additionally, we obtained the structure of mIPS with a trapped 5-keto-glucose-6-phosphate intermediate at 2 Å resolution by a novel (to our knowledge) process of activating the crystal at high temperature. A comparison of all of the crystal structures of mIPS described in this work suggests a novel type of catalytic mechanism that relies on the forced atomic proximity of functional groups. The lysine cluster is contained in a small volume in the active site, where random motions of these side chains are responsible for the progress of the complex multistep reaction as well as for the low rate of catalysis. The mechanism requires that functional groups of Lys-274, Lys-278, Lys-306, and Lys-367 assume differential roles in the protonation/deprotonation steps that must occur during the mIPS reaction. This mechanism is supported by the complete loss of activity of the enzyme caused by the Leu-257 mutation to Ala that releases the lysine containment. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. FIB and MIP: understanding nanoscale porosity in molecularly imprinted polymers via 3D FIB/SEM tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neusser, G; Eppler, S; Bowen, J; Allender, C J; Walther, P; Mizaikoff, B; Kranz, C

    2017-10-05

    We present combined focused ion beam/scanning electron beam (FIB/SEM) tomography as innovative method for differentiating and visualizing the distribution and connectivity of pores within molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and non-imprinted control polymers (NIPs). FIB/SEM tomography is used in cell biology for elucidating three-dimensional structures such as organelles, but has not yet been extensively applied for visualizing the heterogeneity of nanoscopic pore networks, interconnectivity, and tortuosity in polymers. To our best knowledge, the present study is the first application of this strategy for analyzing the nanoscale porosity of MIPs. MIPs imprinted for propranolol - and the corresponding NIPs - were investigated establishing FIB/SEM tomography as a viable future strategy complementing conventional isotherm studies. For visualizing and understanding the properties of pore networks in detail, polymer particles were stained with osmium tetroxide (OsO 4 ) vapor, and embedded in epoxy resin. Staining with OsO 4 provides excellent contrast during high-resolution SEM imaging. After optimizing the threshold to discriminate between the stained polymer matrix, and pores filled with epoxy resin, a 3D model of the sampled volume may be established for deriving not only the pore volume and pore surface area, but also to visualize the interconnectivity and tortuosity of the pores within the sampled polymer volume. Detailed studies using different types of cross-linkers and the effect of hydrolysis on the resulting polymer properties have been investigated. In comparison of MIP and NIP, it could be unambiguously shown that the interconnectivity of the visualized pores in MIPs is significantly higher vs. the non-imprinted polymer, and that the pore volume and pore area is 34% and approx. 35% higher within the MIP matrix. This confirms that the templating process not only induces selective binding sites, but indeed also affects the physical properties of such

  2. AgMIP Training in Multiple Crop Models and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boote, Kenneth J.; Porter, Cheryl H.; Hargreaves, John; Hoogenboom, Gerrit; Thornburn, Peter; Mutter, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has the goal of using multiple crop models to evaluate climate impacts on agricultural production and food security in developed and developing countries. There are several major limitations that must be overcome to achieve this goal, including the need to train AgMIP regional research team (RRT) crop modelers to use models other than the ones they are currently familiar with, plus the need to harmonize and interconvert the disparate input file formats used for the various models. Two activities were followed to address these shortcomings among AgMIP RRTs to enable them to use multiple models to evaluate climate impacts on crop production and food security. We designed and conducted courses in which participants trained on two different sets of crop models, with emphasis on the model of least experience. In a second activity, the AgMIP IT group created templates for inputting data on soils, management, weather, and crops into AgMIP harmonized databases, and developed translation tools for converting the harmonized data into files that are ready for multiple crop model simulations. The strategies for creating and conducting the multi-model course and developing entry and translation tools are reviewed in this chapter.

  3. MIPS: a database for protein sequences and complete genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Hani, J; Pfeiffer, F; Frishman, D

    1998-01-01

    The MIPS group [Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences of the German National Center for Environment and Health (GSF)] at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Martinsried near Munich, Germany, is involved in a number of data collection activities, including a comprehensive database of the yeast genome, a database reflecting the progress in sequencing the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, the systematic analysis of other small genomes and the collection of protein sequence data within the framework of the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database (described elsewhere in this volume). Through its WWW server (http://www.mips.biochem.mpg.de ) MIPS provides access to a variety of generic databases, including a database of protein families as well as automatically generated data by the systematic application of sequence analysis algorithms. The yeast genome sequence and its related information was also compiled on CD-ROM to provide dynamic interactive access to the 16 chromosomes of the first eukaryotic genome unraveled. PMID:9399795

  4. Preliminary economic feasibility study of MIP (Medical Isotopes Producer)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mon, G. H.; O, S. Y.

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary economic feasibility study of MIP (Medical Isotopes Producer), which is used liquid nuclear fuel to produce medical isotopes of Mo-99 and Sr-89, was performed. To do this, this study was estimated the IRR(Internal Rate of Return) and PBP(Pay-back Period) about optimistic and pessimistic cases for market penetration of Asia and U.S.A. isotope markets. And sensitivity analysis is also performed about capital cost and price of Mo-99 and Sr-89. According to the results, IRR was between 14.9% and 24.3%, and PBP was between 4.8 years and 7.8 years. These suggest that MIP has economic merits. MIP can produce other medical isotopes such as Sr-90, I-131, Xe-133, Cs-137. So, it is necessary to do cost-benefit analysis considering production of these other isotopes

  5. MACRA 2.0: are you ready for MIPS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Joshua A; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Ansari, Sameer A; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Nicola, Gregory N

    2017-07-01

    The annual cost of healthcare delivery in the USA now exceeds US$3 trillion. Fee for service methodology is often implicated as a cause of this exceedingly high figure. The Affordable Care Act created the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) to pilot test value based alternative payments for reimbursing physician services. In 2015, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) was passed into law. MACRA has dramatic implications for all US based healthcare providers. MACRA permanently repealed the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate so as to stabilize physician part B Medicare payments, consolidated pre-existing federal performance programs into the Merit based Incentive Payments System (MIPS), and legislatively mandated new approaches to paying clinicians. Neurointerventionalists will predominantly participate in MIPS. MIPS unifies, updates, and streamlines previously existing federal performance programs, thereby reducing onerous redundancies and overall administrative burden, while consolidating performance based payment adjustments. While MIPS may be perceived as a straightforward continuation of fee for service methodology with performance modifiers, MIPS is better viewed as a stepping stone toward eventually adopting alternative payment models in later years. In October 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released a final rule for MACRA implementation, providing greater clarity regarding 2017 requirements. The final rule provides a range of options for easing MIPS reporting requirements in the first performance year. Nonetheless, taking the newly offered 'minimum possible' approach toward meeting the requirements will still have negative consequences for providers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Obs4MIPS: Satellite Observations for Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, R.; Waliser, D. E.; Gleckler, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    This poster will review the current status of the obs4MIPs project, whose purpose is to provide a limited collection of well-established and documented datasets for comparison with Earth system models (https://www.earthsystemcog.org/projects/obs4mips/). These datasets have been reformatted to correspond with the CMIP5 model output requirements, and include technical documentation specifically targeted for their use in model output evaluation. The project holdings now exceed 120 datasets with observations that directly correspond to CMIP5 model output variables, with new additions in response to the CMIP6 experiments. With the growth in climate model output data volume, it is increasing more difficult to bring the model output and the observations together to do evaluations. The positioning of the obs4MIPs datasets within the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) allows for the use of currently available and planned online tools within the ESGF to perform analysis using model output and observational datasets without necessarily downloading everything to a local workstation. This past year, obs4MIPs has updated its submission guidelines to closely align with changes in the CMIP6 experiments, and is implementing additional indicators and ancillary data to allow users to more easily determine the efficacy of an obs4MIPs dataset for specific evaluation purposes. This poster will present the new guidelines and indicators, and update the list of current obs4MIPs holdings and their connection to the ESGF evaluation and analysis tools currently available, and being developed for the CMIP6 experiments.

  7. Using Multi-Isotope Tracer Methods to Understand the Sources of Nitrate in Aerosols, Fog and River Water in Podocarpus National Forest, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, L. A.; Dominguez, G.; Fabian, P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    sulfate and nitrate concentrations in rain and fog water by standard methods to investigate water and nutrient pathways along with data from satellite and ground based remote sensing, observations and numerical models. We hope to pair this with a multi-isotope tracer method and NOAA Hysplit Back trajectories, and satellite imagery for information about the number of fires burning in the region to help identify sources of the high nitrate deposition.

  8. The AgMIP Framework to Evaluate Agricultural Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This talk will describe the community and research framework that AgMIP has built to enable evidence-based adaptation investment. We provide expertise on the ground and connect various disciplines in order to allow specific adaptations to be evaluated for their biophysical and socio-economic ramifications.

  9. MIPS: curated databases and comprehensive secondary data resources in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H Werner; Ruepp, Andreas; Theis, Fabian; Rattei, Thomas; Walter, Mathias; Frishman, Dmitrij; Suhre, Karsten; Spannagl, Manuel; Mayer, Klaus F X; Stümpflen, Volker; Antonov, Alexey

    2011-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS at the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany) has many years of experience in providing annotated collections of biological data. Selected data sets of high relevance, such as model genomes, are subjected to careful manual curation, while the bulk of high-throughput data is annotated by automatic means. High-quality reference resources developed in the past and still actively maintained include Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Neurospora crassa and Arabidopsis thaliana genome databases as well as several protein interaction data sets (MPACT, MPPI and CORUM). More recent projects are PhenomiR, the database on microRNA-related phenotypes, and MIPS PlantsDB for integrative and comparative plant genome research. The interlinked resources SIMAP and PEDANT provide homology relationships as well as up-to-date and consistent annotation for 38,000,000 protein sequences. PPLIPS and CCancer are versatile tools for proteomics and functional genomics interfacing to a database of compilations from gene lists extracted from literature. A novel literature-mining tool, EXCERBT, gives access to structured information on classified relations between genes, proteins, phenotypes and diseases extracted from Medline abstracts by semantic analysis. All databases described here, as well as the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS WWW server (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de).

  10. MIPS: a database for genomes and protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Frishman, D; Güldener, U; Mannhaupt, G; Mayer, K; Mokrejs, M; Morgenstern, B; Münsterkötter, M; Rudd, S; Weil, B

    2002-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS-GSF, Neuherberg, Germany) continues to provide genome-related information in a systematic way. MIPS supports both national and European sequencing and functional analysis projects, develops and maintains automatically generated and manually annotated genome-specific databases, develops systematic classification schemes for the functional annotation of protein sequences, and provides tools for the comprehensive analysis of protein sequences. This report updates the information on the yeast genome (CYGD), the Neurospora crassa genome (MNCDB), the databases for the comprehensive set of genomes (PEDANT genomes), the database of annotated human EST clusters (HIB), the database of complete cDNAs from the DHGP (German Human Genome Project), as well as the project specific databases for the GABI (Genome Analysis in Plants) and HNB (Helmholtz-Netzwerk Bioinformatik) networks. The Arabidospsis thaliana database (MATDB), the database of mitochondrial proteins (MITOP) and our contribution to the PIR International Protein Sequence Database have been described elsewhere [Schoof et al. (2002) Nucleic Acids Res., 30, 91-93; Scharfe et al. (2000) Nucleic Acids Res., 28, 155-158; Barker et al. (2001) Nucleic Acids Res., 29, 29-32]. All databases described, the protein analysis tools provided and the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS World Wide Web server (http://mips.gsf.de).

  11. MIPs are ancestral ligands for the sex peptide receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joon; Bartalska, Katarina; Audsley, Neil; Yamanaka, Naoki; Yapici, Nilay; Lee, Ju-Youn; Kim, Yong-Chul; Markovic, Milica; Isaac, Elwyn; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-04-06

    Upon mating, females of many animal species undergo dramatic changes in their behavior. In Drosophila melanogaster, postmating behaviors are triggered by sex peptide (SP), which is produced in the male seminal fluid and transferred to female during copulation. SP modulates female behaviors via sex peptide receptor (SPR) located in a small subset of internal sensory neurons that innervate the female uterus and project to the CNS. Although required for postmating responses only in these female sensory neurons, SPR is expressed broadly in the CNS of both sexes. Moreover, SPR is also encoded in the genomes of insects that lack obvious SP orthologs. These observations suggest that SPR may have additional ligands and functions. Here, we identify myoinhibitory peptides (MIPs) as a second family of SPR ligands that is conserved across a wide range of invertebrate species. MIPs are potent agonists for Drosophila, Aedes, and Aplysia SPRs in vitro, yet are unable to trigger postmating responses in vivo. In contrast to SP, MIPs are not produced in male reproductive organs, and are not required for postmating behaviors in Drosophila females. We conclude that MIPs are evolutionarily conserved ligands for SPR, which are likely to mediate functions other than the regulation of female reproductive behaviors.

  12. MIPS: analysis and annotation of proteins from whole genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Amid, C; Arnold, R; Frishman, D; Güldener, U; Mannhaupt, G; Münsterkötter, M; Pagel, P; Strack, N; Stümpflen, V; Warfsmann, J; Ruepp, A

    2004-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS-GSF), Neuherberg, Germany, provides protein sequence-related information based on whole-genome analysis. The main focus of the work is directed toward the systematic organization of sequence-related attributes as gathered by a variety of algorithms, primary information from experimental data together with information compiled from the scientific literature. MIPS maintains automatically generated and manually annotated genome-specific databases, develops systematic classification schemes for the functional annotation of protein sequences and provides tools for the comprehensive analysis of protein sequences. This report updates the information on the yeast genome (CYGD), the Neurospora crassa genome (MNCDB), the database of complete cDNAs (German Human Genome Project, NGFN), the database of mammalian protein-protein interactions (MPPI), the database of FASTA homologies (SIMAP), and the interface for the fast retrieval of protein-associated information (QUIPOS). The Arabidopsis thaliana database, the rice database, the plant EST databases (MATDB, MOsDB, SPUTNIK), as well as the databases for the comprehensive set of genomes (PEDANT genomes) are described elsewhere in the 2003 and 2004 NAR database issues, respectively. All databases described, and the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS web server (http://mips.gsf.de).

  13. 24 CFR 206.111 - Due date of MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES HOME EQUITY CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums § 206.111 Due date... of closing and as a condition to the endorsement of the mortgage for insurance. (b) Monthly MIP. Each...

  14. Preparation and characterisation of core-shell CNTs@MIPs nanocomposites and selective removal of estrone from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruixia; Su, Xiaoqian; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-01-15

    This paper reports the preparation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for advanced removal of estrone. CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites with a well-defined core-shell structure were obtained using a semi-covalent imprinting strategy, which employed a thermally reversible covalent bond at the surface of silica-coated CNTs for a large-scale production. The morphology and structure of the products were characterised by transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adsorption properties were demonstrated by equilibrium rebinding experiments and Scatchard analysis. The results demonstrate that the imprinted nanocomposites possess favourable selectivity, high capacity and fast kinetics for template molecule uptake, yielding an adsorption capacity of 113.5 μmol/g. The synthetic process is quite simple, and the different batches of synthesized CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites showed good reproducibility in template binding. The feasibility of removing estrogenic compounds from environmental water using the CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites was demonstrated using water samples spiked with estrone. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrosynthesized MIPs for transferrin: Plastibodies or nano-filters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong; Yarman, Aysu; Erdossy, Júlia; Katz, Sagie; Zebger, Ingo; Jetzschmann, Katharina J; Altintas, Zeynep; Wollenberger, Ulla; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Scheller, Frieder W

    2018-05-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanofilms for transferrin (Trf) have been synthesized on gold surfaces by electro-polymerizing the functional monomer scopoletin in the presence of the protein target or around pre-adsorbed Trf. As determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) the film thickness was comparable with the molecular dimension of the target. The target (re)binding properties of the electro-synthesized MIP films was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) through the target-binding induced permeability changes of the MIP nanofilms to the ferricyanide redox marker, as well as by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) of the immobilized protein molecules. For Trf a linear concentration dependence in the lower micromolar range and an imprinting factor of ~5 was obtained by SWV and SPR. Furthermore, non-target proteins including the iron-free apo-Trf were discriminated by pronounced size and shape specificity. Whilst it is generally assumed that the rebinding of the target or of cross-reacting proteins exclusively takes place at the polymer here we considered also the interaction of the protein molecules with the underlying gold transducers. We demonstrate by SWV that adsorption of proteins suppresses the signal of the redox marker even at the bare gold surface and by SEIRAS that the treatment of the MIP with proteinase K or NaOH only partially removes the target protein. Therefore, we conclude that when interpreting binding of proteins to directly MIP-covered gold electrodes the interactions between the protein and the gold surface should also be considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. AgMIP: Next Generation Models and Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2014-12-01

    Next steps in developing next-generation crop models fall into several categories: significant improvements in simulation of important crop processes and responses to stress; extension from simplified crop models to complex cropping systems models; and scaling up from site-based models to landscape, national, continental, and global scales. Crop processes that require major leaps in understanding and simulation in order to narrow uncertainties around how crops will respond to changing atmospheric conditions include genetics; carbon, temperature, water, and nitrogen; ozone; and nutrition. The field of crop modeling has been built on a single crop-by-crop approach. It is now time to create a new paradigm, moving from 'crop' to 'cropping system.' A first step is to set up the simulation technology so that modelers can rapidly incorporate multiple crops within fields, and multiple crops over time. Then the response of these more complex cropping systems can be tested under different sustainable intensification management strategies utilizing the updated simulation environments. Model improvements for diseases, pests, and weeds include developing process-based models for important diseases, frameworks for coupling air-borne diseases to crop models, gathering significantly more data on crop impacts, and enabling the evaluation of pest management strategies. Most smallholder farming in the world involves integrated crop-livestock systems that cannot be represented by crop modeling alone. Thus, next-generation cropping system models need to include key linkages to livestock. Livestock linkages to be incorporated include growth and productivity models for grasslands and rangelands as well as the usual annual crops. There are several approaches for scaling up, including use of gridded models and development of simpler quasi-empirical models for landscape-scale analysis. On the assessment side, AgMIP is leading a community process for coordinated contributions to IPCC AR6

  17. Investigation of proliferation and migration of tongue squamous cell carcinoma promoted by three chemokines, MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hongxing Chu,1,* Bo Jia,1,* Xiaoling Qiu,2 Jie Pan,1 Xiang Sun,1 Zhiping Wang,1 Jianjiang Zhao1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stomatological Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 2Department of Endodontology, Stomatological Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The aim of this work was to investigate the role of chemokines in proliferation and migration of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC. Out of the 80 cytokines surveyed by a human cytokine antibody array, three chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β, and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10, showed elevated expression in TSCC cells (CAL-27 and UM-1, compared to the oral mucosal epithelial cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the high level of expression of MIP-3α in the TSCC tissues, especially in the high clinical stages. Furthermore, Western blot and immunofluorescence staining indicated that C-C chemokine receptor type 5, C-C chemokine receptor type 6, and C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 3, which are the receptors for MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10, respectively, were expressed in the TSCC cells. Viability assay showed MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10 led to the proliferation of the CAL-27 cells. Interestingly, MIP-1β and IP-10 also induced apoptosis in the TSCC cells. Transwell invasion assay showed MIP-3α and IP-10 could increase the invasive capability of TSCC cells; consistently, the enzymatic activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 increased in the MIP-3α- and IP-10-treated cells. In summary, our results indicate the expression of MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10 increased in the TSCC cells. The elevated expression of MIP-3α and IP-10 promoted proliferation and migration of TSCC. These chemokines, along with their receptors, could be potential biomarkers and

  18. UNDERWATER MAPPING USING GLORIA AND MIPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Pat S.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Schoonmaker, James W.

    1987-01-01

    Advances in digital image processing of the (GLORIA) Geological Long-Range Induced Asdic) sidescan-sonar image data have made it technically and economically possible to map large areas of the ocean floor including the Exclusive Economic Zone. Software was written to correct both geometric and radiometric distortions that exist in the original raw GLORIA data. A digital mosaicking technique was developed enabling 2 degree by 2 degree quadrangles to be generated.

  19. Temperature effects on MIPs in the BGO calorimeters of DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Peng; Wen, Si-Cheng; Jiang, Wei; Yue, Chuan; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wei, Yi-Feng; Zhang, YunLong; Zang, Jing-Jing; Wu, Jian

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present a study of temperature effects on BGO calorimeters using proton MIPs collected in the first year of operation of DAMPE. By directly comparing MIP calibration constants used by the DAMPE data production pipe line, we find an experimental relation between the temperature and signal amplitudes of each BGO bar: a general deviation of -1.162%/°C, and -0.47%/°C to -1.60%/°C statistically for each detector element. During 2016, DAMPE’s temperature changed by ˜8°C due to solar elevation angle, and the corresponding energy scale bias is about 9%. By frequent MIP calibration operation, this kind of bias is eliminated to an acceptable value. This work was supported by National Key Program for Research and Development (No. 2016YFA0400200) and by NSFC (11303105, 11673021). The DAMPE mission was funded by the strategic priority science and technology projects in space science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. XDA04040000 and No. XDA04040400)

  20. MIPs and Aptamers for Recognition of Proteins in Biomimetic Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Marcus; Yarman, Aysu; Erdőssy, Júlia; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Scheller, Frieder W

    2016-07-18

    Biomimetic binders and catalysts have been generated in order to substitute the biological pendants in separation techniques and bioanalysis. The two major approaches use either "evolution in the test tube" of nucleotides for the preparation of aptamers or total chemical synthesis for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The reproducible production of aptamers is a clear advantage, whilst the preparation of MIPs typically leads to a population of polymers with different binding sites. The realization of binding sites in the total bulk of the MIPs results in a higher binding capacity, however, on the expense of the accessibility and exchange rate. Furthermore, the readout of the bound analyte is easier for aptamers since the integration of signal generating labels is well established. On the other hand, the overall negative charge of the nucleotides makes aptamers prone to non-specific adsorption of positively charged constituents of the sample and the "biological" degradation of non-modified aptamers and ionic strength-dependent changes of conformation may be challenging in some application.

  1. MIPs and Aptamers for Recognition of Proteins in Biomimetic Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Menger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic binders and catalysts have been generated in order to substitute the biological pendants in separation techniques and bioanalysis. The two major approaches use either “evolution in the test tube” of nucleotides for the preparation of aptamers or total chemical synthesis for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs. The reproducible production of aptamers is a clear advantage, whilst the preparation of MIPs typically leads to a population of polymers with different binding sites. The realization of binding sites in the total bulk of the MIPs results in a higher binding capacity, however, on the expense of the accessibility and exchange rate. Furthermore, the readout of the bound analyte is easier for aptamers since the integration of signal generating labels is well established. On the other hand, the overall negative charge of the nucleotides makes aptamers prone to non-specific adsorption of positively charged constituents of the sample and the “biological” degradation of non-modified aptamers and ionic strength-dependent changes of conformation may be challenging in some application.

  2. The Scenario Model Intercomparison Project (ScenarioMIP) for CMIP6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Brian C.; Tebaldi, Claudia; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Eyring, Veronika; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Hurtt, George; Knutti, Reto; Kriegler, Elmar; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lowe, Jason; Meehl, Gerald A.; Moss, Richard; Riahi, Keywan; Sanderson, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Projections of future climate change play a fundamental role in improving understanding of the climate system as well as characterizing societal risks and response options. The Scenario Model Intercomparison Project (ScenarioMIP) is the primary activity within Phase 6 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6) that will provide multi-model climate projections based on alternative scenarios of future emissions and land use changes produced with integrated assessment models. In this paper, we describe ScenarioMIP's objectives, experimental design, and its relation to other activities within CMIP6. The ScenarioMIP design is one component of a larger scenario process that aims to facilitate a wide range of integrated studies across the climate science, integrated assessment modeling, and impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability communities, and will form an important part of the evidence base in the forthcoming Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessments. At the same time, it will provide the basis for investigating a number of targeted science and policy questions that are especially relevant to scenario-based analysis, including the role of specific forcings such as land use and aerosols, the effect of a peak and decline in forcing, the consequences of scenarios that limit warming to below 2 °C, the relative contributions to uncertainty from scenarios, climate models, and internal variability, and long-term climate system outcomes beyond the 21st century. To serve this wide range of scientific communities and address these questions, a design has been identified consisting of eight alternative 21st century scenarios plus one large initial condition ensemble and a set of long-term extensions, divided into two tiers defined by relative priority. Some of these scenarios will also provide a basis for variants planned to be run in other CMIP6-Endorsed MIPs to investigate questions related to specific forcings. Harmonized, spatially

  3. Value of selective MIP reconstructions of respiratory triggered 3D-TSE-MR cholangiography on a workstation versus standard MIP reconstructions and single-shot MRCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaible, R.; Textor, J.; Kreft, B.; Schild, H.; Neubrand, M.

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of anatomical visualisation and diagnostic value of selective MIP reconstructions of respiratory triggered 3D-TSE-MRCP versus standard MIP reconstructions and single-shot MRCP. Material and Methods: 50 patients with pancreaticobiliary disease were examined at 1.5 Tesla (ACS NT II, Philips Medical Systems) using a breath-hold single-shot (SS) and a respiratory triggered 3D-TSE-MRCP technique in 12 standard MIP projections. Additional selective MIP reconstructions with different slice thickness (2, 4, 10 cm) and projections were performed on a workstation. Visualization of the pancreaticobiliary system and the diagnostic value of the examinations were analysed. Results: Single-shot and 3D-TSE in standard projections showed comparable anatomical visualisation. On selective MIP reconstructions the biliary system (SS p [de

  4. Water-rock-tailings interactions and sources of sulfur and metals in the subtropical mining region of Taxco, Guerrero (southern Mexico): A multi-isotopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talavera Mendoza, Oscar; Ruiz, Joaquin; Díaz Villaseñor, Elvia; Ramírez Guzmán, Alejandro; Cortés, Alejandra; Salgado Souto, Sergio Adrián; Dótor Almazán, Azucena; Rivera Bustos, Reymundo

    2016-01-01

    Multi-isotope (H, O, S, Sr, Pb) systems coupled with conventional (major and trace element) hydrogeochemical analysis were applied to determine the origin of water, to model water-rock-tailings interactions and for source apportionment of sulfur and associated toxic metals in the mining region of Taxco, Guerrero in southern Mexico. Oxygen and H isotopes indicate that meteoric water in the zone is rainwater undergoing varying degrees of isotopic fractionation by atmospheric evaporation whereas Sr isotopes trace the interaction of pristine water from volcanics of the regional recharge zone and subsequently flowing through sandstone and shale to spring points. Leachates form from two distinctive sources (spring water and surface water) having differential interactions with bedrocks prior to entering the tailings. Compared to pristine water, leachates are enriched in sulfate, metals (e.g. Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn) and metalloids (e.g. As). The sulfur isotopic composition of ore-sulfides, leachates, secondary precipitates, regional surface water and hypogenic sulfates is described in terms of a two-component mixing model with shale of Mexcala and limestone of Morelos formations representing the light and heavy end-members, respectively, whereas Sr isotopic composition is bracketed combining three lithogenic (Mexcala/Morelos, Tilzapotla and Taxco Schist) sources. Finally, leachates have a mixture of lead from ore-sulfides and Taxco Schist Formation (Family I) or from ore-sulfides alone (Family II). The application of multiple environmental isotopic techniques is an outstanding tool for elucidating complex interactions of water with bedrocks and tailings and for determining the source of sulfur and toxic metal from mining and other metal polluted environments. - Highlights: • We applied multi-isotope techniques to model water-bedrocks-tailings interaction. • Spring water records fractionation by evaporation and interaction with local rocks. • The sulfur cycle is modeled in

  5. Building materials as intrinsic sources of sulphate: A hidden face of salt weathering of historical monuments investigated through multi-isotope tracing (B, O, S)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloppmann, W.; Bromblet, P.; Vallet, J.M.; Verges-Belmin, V.; Rolland, O.; Guerrot, C.; Gosselin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Sulphate neoformation is a major factor of degradation of stone monuments. Boron, sulphur and oxygen isotope signatures were investigated for five French historical monuments (Bourges, Chartres and Marseille cathedrals, Chenonceau castle, and Versailles garden statues) to investigate the role of intrinsic sulphate sources (gypsum plasters and mortars) in stone degradation, compared to the influence of extrinsic sources such as atmospheric pollution. Gypsum plasters and gypsum-containing mortars fall systematically in the δ 34 S and δ 18 O range of Paris Basin Eocene evaporites indicating the origin of the raw materials (so-called 'Paris plaster'). Black crusts show the typical S and O isotope signatures observed elsewhere in Europe that can be attributed to atmospheric pollution, together with a marine component for Marseille. Boron isotopes for black crusts indicate coal combustion as principal boron source. Mortar isotope compositions discriminate three types, one similar to gypsum plasters, one strongly depleted in 34 S, attributed to pyrite oxidation, and a third one close to atmospheric sulphates. The isotopic composition of sulphates and boron of most degraded building stones of the different monuments is well explained by the identified sulphate sources. In several cases (in particular for Chenonceau and Bourges, to some extent for Chartres), the impact of gypsum plaster as building and restoration material on the degradation of the stones in its vicinity was clearly demonstrated. The study illustrates the usefulness of multi-isotope studies to investigate stone degradation factors, as the combination of several isotope systematics increases the discriminatory power of isotope studies with respect to contaminant sources. - Research Highlights: → Insight in stone weathering mechanisms by multi-isotope fingerprinting (B, S, O). → Intrinsic sulphate sources (gypsum plaster, mortar) contribute to stone degradation. → Origin of building materials

  6. Building materials as intrinsic sources of sulphate: A hidden face of salt weathering of historical monuments investigated through multi-isotope tracing (B, O, S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloppmann, W., E-mail: w.kloppmann@brgm.fr [BRGM, BP 6009, F-45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Bromblet, P.; Vallet, J.M. [CICRP, 21, rue Guibal, F-13003 Marseille (France); Verges-Belmin, V. [LRMH, 29, rue de Paris, F-77420 Champs sur Marne (France); Rolland, O. [Independent restorer, 3, rue du Gue, 37270 Montlouis s/Loire (France); Guerrot, C. [BRGM, BP 6009, F-45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Gosselin, C. [BRGM, BP 6009, F-45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); LRMH, 29, rue de Paris, F-77420 Champs sur Marne (France)

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate neoformation is a major factor of degradation of stone monuments. Boron, sulphur and oxygen isotope signatures were investigated for five French historical monuments (Bourges, Chartres and Marseille cathedrals, Chenonceau castle, and Versailles garden statues) to investigate the role of intrinsic sulphate sources (gypsum plasters and mortars) in stone degradation, compared to the influence of extrinsic sources such as atmospheric pollution. Gypsum plasters and gypsum-containing mortars fall systematically in the {delta}{sup 34}S and {delta}{sup 18}O range of Paris Basin Eocene evaporites indicating the origin of the raw materials (so-called 'Paris plaster'). Black crusts show the typical S and O isotope signatures observed elsewhere in Europe that can be attributed to atmospheric pollution, together with a marine component for Marseille. Boron isotopes for black crusts indicate coal combustion as principal boron source. Mortar isotope compositions discriminate three types, one similar to gypsum plasters, one strongly depleted in {sup 34}S, attributed to pyrite oxidation, and a third one close to atmospheric sulphates. The isotopic composition of sulphates and boron of most degraded building stones of the different monuments is well explained by the identified sulphate sources. In several cases (in particular for Chenonceau and Bourges, to some extent for Chartres), the impact of gypsum plaster as building and restoration material on the degradation of the stones in its vicinity was clearly demonstrated. The study illustrates the usefulness of multi-isotope studies to investigate stone degradation factors, as the combination of several isotope systematics increases the discriminatory power of isotope studies with respect to contaminant sources. - Research Highlights: {yields} Insight in stone weathering mechanisms by multi-isotope fingerprinting (B, S, O). {yields} Intrinsic sulphate sources (gypsum plaster, mortar) contribute to stone degradation

  7. A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)-Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for Chemical Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0536 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)- Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for...ARL-RP-0536 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)- Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for Chemical...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)-Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for Chemical Detection 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  8. CCS-MIP: Low cost Customizable Control Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labezin, Christian; Vielcanet, Pierre

    1994-01-01

    The positioning and station keeping of French national satellites are among the main missions of CNES French Space Agency CNES. The related experience and skills of the Toulouse Space Centre are reknown and often required at international level for a wide range of missions. CISI, a software engineering company, has been contributing during the last 20 years to the development of the French space programs, particularly in the field of space missions ground control segments. The CCS-MIP system, presented here, is a satellite positioning and station-keeping system designed to answer the CNES multi-mission needs, easily adaptable for a wide range of applications.

  9. Implementació d'una Cache per a un processador MIPS d'una FPGA

    OpenAIRE

    Riera Villanueva, Marc

    2013-01-01

    [CATALÀ] Primer s'explicarà breument l'arquitectura d'un MIPS, la jerarquia de memòria i el funcionament de la cache. Posteriorment s'explicarà com s'ha dissenyat i implementat una jerarquia de memòria per a un MIPS implementat en VHDL en una FPGA. [ANGLÈS] First, the MIPS architecture, memory hierarchy and the functioning of the cache will be explained briefly. Then, the design and implementation of a memory hierarchy for a MIPS processor implemented in VHDL on an FPGA will be explained....

  10. The AgMIP Coordinated Climate-Crop Modeling Project (C3MP): Methods and Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sonali P.; Ruane, Alexander Clark

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is expected to alter a multitude of factors important to agricultural systems, including pests, diseases, weeds, extreme climate events, water resources, soil degradation, and socio-economic pressures. Changes to carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]), temperature, and water (CTW) will be the primary drivers of change in crop growth and agricultural systems. Therefore, establishing the CTW-change sensitivity of crop yields is an urgent research need and warrants diverse methods of investigation. Crop models provide a biophysical, process-based tool to investigate crop responses across varying environmental conditions and farm management techniques, and have been applied in climate impact assessment by using a variety of methods (White et al., 2011, and references therein). However, there is a significant amount of divergence between various crop models' responses to CTW changes (Rotter et al., 2011). While the application of a site-based crop model is relatively simple, the coordination of such agricultural impact assessments on larger scales requires consistent and timely contributions from a large number of crop modelers, each time a new global climate model (GCM) scenario or downscaling technique is created. A coordinated, global effort to rapidly examine CTW sensitivity across multiple crops, crop models, and sites is needed to aid model development and enhance the assessment of climate impacts (Deser et al., 2012). To fulfill this need, the Coordinated Climate-Crop Modeling Project (C3MP) (Ruane et al., 2014) was initiated within the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP; Rosenzweig et al., 2013). The submitted results from C3MP Phase 1 (February 15, 2013-December 31, 2013) are currently being analyzed. This chapter serves to present and update the C3MP protocols, discuss the initial participation and general findings, comment on needed adjustments, and describe continued and future development. AgMIP aims to improve

  11. MIPS Observations of the Fabulous Four Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, K. Y. L.; Stansberry, J. A.; Rieke, G. H.; Trilling, D. E.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Werner, M. W.; Beichman, C.; Chen, C.; Marengo, M.; Megeath, T.; Backman, D.; van Cleve, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) provides long-wavelength capability with imaging bands at 24, 70, and 160 um. We will present the MIPS images of the Fabulous Four Debris Disks: Beta Pictoris (A5 V), Epsilon Eridani (K2 V), Fomalhaut (A3 V) and Vega (A0 V). These systems discovered by IRAS possess large far-infrared excess emission above photosphere, indicating the existence of a circumstellar dusty disk. Given the main-sequence ages of these stars ( ˜12 Myr for Beta Pictoris, ˜730 Myr for Epsilon Eridani, ˜200 Myr for Fomalhaut, and ˜350 Myr for Vega), the dust in the systems could not be primordial as it would have been removed by radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag on relatively short time scales ( ˜1E4 yr). The second-generation dust in such debris disks is thought to arise primarily from collisions between planetesimals (asteroids) and from cometary activity; however, details about the debris formation and evolution are not well understood. With the sensitivity and angular resolution of the Spitizer Space Telescope, the structures of these nearby debris disks were mapped in great detail to study the disks' spatial structures at mid- to far-infrared wavelengths. These high spatial resolution images provide unprecedented new constraints on the the dust properties in the systems and limits on the origin of dusty debris. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Contract Number 960785 issued by JPL/Caltech.

  12. Biosynthesis of vanillin by the fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus MIP 95001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Moro Villela Pacheco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vanillin (a substance popularly known as vanilla flavor is one of the most widely used compounds, mainly by food and pharmaceutical industries. This substance can be obtained from the orchid Vanilla planifolia, but this is costly and time consuming. Thus, other methods for obtaining vanillin have been studied. Within this context, the aim of this work was to study the biosynthesis of vanillin by three strains of Pycnoporus sanguineus through the use of vanillic acid as a precursor. The strains were cultured in Petri dishes with a potato dextrose agar medium. Fragments of the media with the fungus were then inoculated in Erlenmeyer flasks with a liquid medium of potato broth and 0.3 g.L-1 of vanillic acid. The flasks remained in a shaker for eight days at 28°C and 120 rpm. Samples were withdrawn once a day (0.8 mL.day-1 for analysis of vanillin, glucose, total phenols, total proteins, and laccase. The results showed that only the MIP 95001 strain promoted the biosynthesis of vanillin. The highest concentration of vanillin was detected on the fourth day of cultivation (8.75 mg.dL-1. The results illustrate the ability to biosynthesize vanillin using Pycnoporus sanguineus (MIP 95001, which suggests a possible route for the biotechnological production of this flavor.

  13. A protocol for the intercomparison of marine fishery and ecosystem models: Fish-MIP v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Tittensor

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Model intercomparison studies in the climate and Earth sciences communities have been crucial to building credibility and coherence for future projections. They have quantified variability among models, spurred model development, contrasted within- and among-model uncertainty, assessed model fits to historical data, and provided ensemble projections of future change under specified scenarios. Given the speed and magnitude of anthropogenic change in the marine environment and the consequent effects on food security, biodiversity, marine industries, and society, the time is ripe for similar comparisons among models of fisheries and marine ecosystems. Here, we describe the Fisheries and Marine Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project protocol version 1.0 (Fish-MIP v1.0, part of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP, which is a cross-sectoral network of climate impact modellers. Given the complexity of the marine ecosystem, this class of models has substantial heterogeneity of purpose, scope, theoretical underpinning, processes considered, parameterizations, resolution (grain size, and spatial extent. This heterogeneity reflects the lack of a unified understanding of the marine ecosystem and implies that the assemblage of all models is more likely to include a greater number of relevant processes than any single model. The current Fish-MIP protocol is designed to allow these heterogeneous models to be forced with common Earth System Model (ESM Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5 outputs under prescribed scenarios for historic (from the 1950s and future (to 2100 time periods; it will be adapted to CMIP phase 6 (CMIP6 in future iterations. It also describes a standardized set of outputs for each participating Fish-MIP model to produce. This enables the broad characterization of differences between and uncertainties within models and projections when assessing climate and fisheries impacts on marine ecosystems

  14. A protocol for the intercomparison of marine fishery and ecosystem models: Fish-MIP v1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittensor, Derek P.; Eddy, Tyler D.; Lotze, Heike K.; Galbraith, Eric D.; Cheung, William; Barange, Manuel; Blanchard, Julia L.; Bopp, Laurent; Bryndum-Buchholz, Andrea; Büchner, Matthias; Bulman, Catherine; Carozza, David A.; Christensen, Villy; Coll, Marta; Dunne, John P.; Fernandes, Jose A.; Fulton, Elizabeth A.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Huber, Veronika; Jennings, Simon; Jones, Miranda; Lehodey, Patrick; Link, Jason S.; Mackinson, Steve; Maury, Olivier; Niiranen, Susa; Oliveros-Ramos, Ricardo; Roy, Tilla; Schewe, Jacob; Shin, Yunne-Jai; Silva, Tiago; Stock, Charles A.; Steenbeek, Jeroen; Underwood, Philip J.; Volkholz, Jan; Watson, James R.; Walker, Nicola D.

    2018-04-01

    Model intercomparison studies in the climate and Earth sciences communities have been crucial to building credibility and coherence for future projections. They have quantified variability among models, spurred model development, contrasted within- and among-model uncertainty, assessed model fits to historical data, and provided ensemble projections of future change under specified scenarios. Given the speed and magnitude of anthropogenic change in the marine environment and the consequent effects on food security, biodiversity, marine industries, and society, the time is ripe for similar comparisons among models of fisheries and marine ecosystems. Here, we describe the Fisheries and Marine Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project protocol version 1.0 (Fish-MIP v1.0), part of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP), which is a cross-sectoral network of climate impact modellers. Given the complexity of the marine ecosystem, this class of models has substantial heterogeneity of purpose, scope, theoretical underpinning, processes considered, parameterizations, resolution (grain size), and spatial extent. This heterogeneity reflects the lack of a unified understanding of the marine ecosystem and implies that the assemblage of all models is more likely to include a greater number of relevant processes than any single model. The current Fish-MIP protocol is designed to allow these heterogeneous models to be forced with common Earth System Model (ESM) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) outputs under prescribed scenarios for historic (from the 1950s) and future (to 2100) time periods; it will be adapted to CMIP phase 6 (CMIP6) in future iterations. It also describes a standardized set of outputs for each participating Fish-MIP model to produce. This enables the broad characterization of differences between and uncertainties within models and projections when assessing climate and fisheries impacts on marine ecosystems and the

  15. Automatic reactor for solid-phase synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (MIP NPs) in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Alessandro; Guerreiro, Antonio; Caygill, Sarah; Moczko, Ewa; Piletsky, Sergey

    We report the development of an automated chemical reactor for solid-phase synthesis of MIP NPs in water. Operational parameters are under computer control, requiring minimal operator intervention. In this study, "ready for use" MIP NPs with sub-nanomolar affinity are prepared against pepsin A, trypsin and α-amylase in only 4 hours.

  16. Automatic reactor for solid-phase synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (MIP NPs) in water

    OpenAIRE

    Poma, Alessandro; Guerreiro, Antonio; Caygill, Sarah; Moczko, Ewa; Piletsky, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of an automated chemical reactor for solid-phase synthesis of MIP NPs in water. Operational parameters are under computer control, requiring minimal operator intervention. In this study, “ready for use” MIP NPs with sub-nanomolar affinity are prepared against pepsin A, trypsin and α-amylase in only 4 hours.

  17. 24 CFR 203.260 - Amount of mortgage insurance premium (periodic MIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Mortgage Insurance Premiums-Periodic Payment § 203.260 Amount of mortgage insurance premium (periodic MIP... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amount of mortgage insurance premium (periodic MIP). 203.260 Section 203.260 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  18. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP): Overview and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.; Hatfield, J.; Jones, J. W.; Ruane, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is an international effort to assess the state of global agricultural modeling and to understand climate impacts on the agricultural sector. AgMIP connects the climate science, crop modeling, and agricultural economic modeling communities to generate probabilistic projections of current and future climate impacts. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of risk of hunger and world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. This presentation will describe the general approach of AgMIP and highlight its findings and activities. AgMIP crop model intercomparisons have been established for wheat (27 models participating), maize (25 models), and rice (15+ models), and are being established for sugarcane, soybean, sorghum/millet, and peanut. In coordination with these pilots, methodologies to utilize weather generators and downscaled climate simulations for agricultural applications are under development. An AgMIP global agricultural economics model intercomparison with participation of 11 international groups is ongoing, and a number of global biophysical models are currently being evaluated for future climate impacts on agricultural lands both as part of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP) and for contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). AgMIP is also organizing regional research efforts, and has already held workshops in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Europe, and North America. Outcomes from these meetings have informed AgMIP activities, and 10 research teams from Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia have been selected for project funding. Additional activities are planned for Australia and East Asia. As the AgMIP research community continues to work towards its goals, three key cross-cutting scientific challenges have emerged and are being

  19. MIPS: a calmodulin-binding protein of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Huiyue; Zang, Xiaonan; Gong, Le; Sun, Hengyi; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2014-08-01

    To study the Ca(2+)/Calmodulin (CaM) signal transduction pathway of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat stress, myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS), a calmodulin-binding protein, was isolated using the yeast two-hybrid system. cDNA and DNA sequences of mips were cloned from G. lemaneiformis by using 5'RACE and genome walking procedures. The MIPS DNA sequence was 2,067 nucleotides long, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,623 nucleotides with no intron. The mips ORF was predicted to encode 540 amino acids, which included the conserved MIPS domain and was 61-67 % similar to that of other species. After analyzing the amino acid sequence of MIPS, the CaM-Binding Domain (CaMBD) was inferred to be at a site spanning from amino acid 212 to amino acid 236. The yeast two-hybrid results proved that MIPS can interact with CaM and that MIPS is a type of calmodulin-binding protein. Next, the expression of CaM and MIPS in wild-type G. lemaneiformis and a heat-tolerant G. lemaneiformis cultivar, "981," were analyzed using real-time PCR under a heat shock of 32 °C. The expression level displayed a cyclical upward trend. Compared with wild type, the CaM expression levels of cultivar 981 were higher, which might directly relate to its resistance to high temperatures. This paper indicates that MIPS and CaM may play important roles in the high-temperature resistance of G. lemaneiformis.

  20. Identifying source and formation altitudes of nitrates in drinking water from Réunion Island, France, using a multi-isotopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Karyne M; Nicolini, Eric; Gauthier, Virginie

    2012-09-01

    Nitrate concentrations, water isotopes (δ(2)H and δ(18)O(water)) and associated nitrate isotopes (δ(15)N(nitrate) and δ(18)O(nitrate)) from 10 drinking water wells, 5 fresh water springs and the discharge from 3 wastewater treatment stations in Réunion Island, located in the Indian Ocean, were analysed. We used a multi isotopic approach to investigate the extent of nitrate contamination, nitrate formation altitude and source of nitrates in Réunion Island's principal aquifer. Water from these study sites contained between 0.1 and 85.3 mg/L nitrate. δ(15)N(nitrate) values between +6 and +14‰ suggested the main sources of contamination were animal and/or human waste, rather than inorganic (synthetic) fertilisers, infiltrating through the subsurface into the saturated zone, due to rainfall leaching of the unsaturated zone at various altitudes of precipitation. Based on δ(15)N(nitrate) values alone, it was not possible to distinguish between animal and human activities responsible for the contamination of each specific catchment. However, using a multi isotope approach (δ(18)O(water) and δ(15)N(nitrate)), it was possible to relate the average altitude of rainfall infiltration (δ(18)O(water)) associated with the nitrate contamination (δ(18)O(nitrate)). This relationship between land use, rainfall recharge altitude and isotopic composition (δ(15)N(nitrate) and δ(18)O(water)) discriminated between the influences of human waste at lower (below 600 m elevation) or animal derived contamination (at elevations between 600 and 1300 m). By further comparing the theoretical altitude of nitrate formation calculated by the δ(18)O(nitrate), it was possible to determine that only 5 out of 15 fresh water wells and springs followed the conservative nitrate formation mechanism of 2/3δ(18)O(water)+1/3δ(18)O(air), to give nitrate formation altitudes which corresponded to land use activities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. MPact: the MIPS protein interaction resource on yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldener, Ulrich; Münsterkötter, Martin; Oesterheld, Matthias; Pagel, Philipp; Ruepp, Andreas; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Stümpflen, Volker

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS) yeast protein-protein interaction (PPI) dataset has been used in numerous analyses of protein networks and has been called a gold standard because of its quality and comprehensiveness [H. Yu, N. M. Luscombe, H. X. Lu, X. Zhu, Y. Xia, J. D. Han, N. Bertin, S. Chung, M. Vidal and M. Gerstein (2004) Genome Res., 14, 1107-1118]. MPact and the yeast protein localization catalog provide information related to the proximity of proteins in yeast. Beside the integration of high-throughput data, information about experimental evidence for PPIs in the literature was compiled by experts adding up to 4300 distinct PPIs connecting 1500 proteins in yeast. As the interaction data is a complementary part of CYGD, interactive mapping of data on other integrated data types such as the functional classification catalog [A. Ruepp, A. Zollner, D. Maier, K. Albermann, J. Hani, M. Mokrejs, I. Tetko, U. Güldener, G. Mannhaupt, M. Münsterkötter and H. W. Mewes (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 5539-5545] is possible. A survey of signaling proteins and comparison with pathway data from KEGG demonstrates that based on these manually annotated data only an extensive overview of the complexity of this functional network can be obtained in yeast. The implementation of a web-based PPI-analysis tool allows analysis and visualization of protein interaction networks and facilitates integration of our curated data with high-throughput datasets. The complete dataset as well as user-defined sub-networks can be retrieved easily in the standardized PSI-MI format. The resource can be accessed through http://mips.gsf.de/genre/proj/mpact.

  2. The impact of geoengineering on vegetation in experiment G1 of the GeoMIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glienke, Susanne; Irvine, Peter J.; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2015-10-01

    Solar Radiation Management (SRM) has been proposed as a mean to partly counteract global warming. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) has simulated the climate consequences of a number of SRM techniques. Thus far, the effects on vegetation have not yet been thoroughly analyzed. Here the vegetation response to the idealized GeoMIP G1 experiment from eight fully coupled Earth system models (ESMs) is analyzed, in which a reduction of the solar constant counterbalances the radiative effects of quadrupled atmospheric CO2 concentrations (abrupt4 × CO2). For most models and regions, changes in net primary productivity (NPP) are dominated by the increase in CO2, via the CO2 fertilization effect. As SRM will reduce temperatures relative to abrupt4 × CO2, in high latitudes this will offset increases in NPP. In low latitudes, this cooling relative to the abrupt4 × CO2 simulation decreases plant respiration while having little effect on gross primary productivity, thus increasing NPP. In Central America and the Mediterranean, generally dry regions which are expected to experience increased water stress with global warming, NPP is highest in the G1 experiment for all models due to the easing of water limitations from increased water use efficiency at high-CO2 concentrations and the reduced evaporative demand in a geoengineered climate. The largest differences in the vegetation response are between models with and without a nitrogen cycle, with a much smaller CO2 fertilization effect for the former. These results suggest that until key vegetation processes are integrated into ESM predictions, the vegetation response to SRM will remain highly uncertain.

  3. HH-MIP: An Enhancement of Mobile IP by Home Agent Handover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chun-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an enhancement of Mobile IP (MIP called MIP with Home Agent Handover (HH-MIP to enjoy most of the advantages of Route Optimization MIP (ROMIP but with only a small increase of signaling overhead. In HH-MIP, the concept of Temporary HA (THA is proposed and the mobile host (MH registers the new CoA with its THA rather than its original HA. Since the THA of an MH is selected to be close to the current location of MH, HH-MIP reduces the handoff latency and shortens the signaling path of registration as well. Moreover, HH-MIP adopts an aggressive approach in selecting THA for an MH, that is, whenever an MH is moving away from its HA or previous THA, the MH triggers the handover of THA. Theoretical analysis demonstrates that the proposed scheme enjoys small handoff latency as well as routing efficiency, and the signaling cost of the proposed scheme is significantly less than that in ROMIP.

  4. Selectivity and Efficiency of Conductive Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (c-MIP Based on 5-Phenyl-Dipyrromethane and 5-Phenol-Dipyrromethane for Quorum Sensing Precursors Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Susmel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional polymers that selectively recognize target compounds are developed by imprinting polymerization. In the present paper, two different dipyrromethanes, 5-phenol-dipyrromethane (5-pOH-DP and 5-phenyl-dipyrromethane (5-ph-DP, are synthetized and investigated to develop conductive molecularly imprinted polymer (cMIP sensors. As target molecules, two homoserine lactone derivatives were templated by an electrochemically driven polymerization process. Acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs, also called homoserine lactones (HS, are a class of signaling molecules involved in bacterial quorum sensing (QS, which is a strategy of coordination among bacteria mediated by population density. The preparation of cMIP from 5-pOH-DP and 5-ph-DP in the presence of acetyl-homoserine lactone (Acetyl-HS or carboxybenzyl-homoserine lactone (Cbz-HS was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV. The cMIP selectivity and sensitivity were assessed by microgravimetry (QCM. Both series of measurements were performed with the aid of an Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (EQCM/QCM. The experimental evidences are discussed with respect to NMR measurements that were conducted to gain insight into the interactions established between monomers and templates. The NMR data interpretation offers preliminary information about the most probable positions involved in interaction development for both molecules and highlights the role of the hydration shell. The QCM-cMIP sensor was able to detect the analyte in the linear range from 10−8 mol·L−1 to 10−6 mol·L−1 and a limit of detection (LOD of 22.3 ng (3σ of the blank signal were evaluated. QCM rebinding tests demonstrated that cMIP selectivity was driven by the pendant group of dipyrromethane, which was also confirmed by the NMR data.

  5. The Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins MIP1α (CCL3 and MIP2α (CXCL2 in Implant-Associated Osteomyelitis: Linking Inflammation to Bone Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Dapunt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections of bones remain a serious complication of endoprosthetic surgery. These infections are difficult to treat, because many bacterial species form biofilms on implants, which are relatively resistant towards antibiotics. Bacterial biofilms elicit a progressive local inflammatory response, resulting in tissue damage and bone degradation. In the majority of patients, replacement of the prosthesis is required. To address the question of how the local inflammatory response is linked to bone degradation, tissue samples were taken during surgery and gene expression of the macrophage inflammatory proteins MIP1α (CCL3 and MIP2α (CXCL2 was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. MIPs were expressed predominantly at osteolytic sites, in close correlation with CD14 which was used as marker for monocytes/macrophages. Colocalisation of MIPs with monocytic cells could be confirmed by histology. In vitro experiments revealed that, aside from monocytic cells, also osteoblasts were capable of MIP production when stimulated with bacteria; moreover, CCL3 induced the differentiation of monocytes to osteoclasts. In conclusion, the multifunctional chemokines CCL3 and CXCL2 are produced locally in response to bacterial infection of bones. In addition to their well described chemokine activity, these cytokines can induce generation of bone resorbing osteoclasts, thus providing a link between bacterial infection and osteolysis.

  6. Use of Maximum Intensity Projections (MIPs) for target outlining in 4DCT radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Rebecca; McNee, Stuart G; Featherstone, Carrie; Moore, Karen; Muscat, Sarah

    2008-12-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is currently being introduced to radiotherapy centers worldwide, for use in radical radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A significant drawback is the time required to delineate 10 individual CT scans for each patient. Every department will hence ask the question if the single Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) scan can be used as an alternative. Although the problems regarding the use of the MIP in node-positive disease have been discussed in the literature, a comprehensive study assessing its use has not been published. We compared an internal target volume (ITV) created using the MIP to an ITV created from the composite volume of 10 clinical target volumes (CTVs) delineated on the 10 phases of the 4DCT. 4DCT data was collected from 14 patients with NSCLC. In each patient, the ITV was delineated on the MIP image (ITV_MIP) and a composite ITV created from the 10 CTVs delineated on each of the 10 scans in the dataset. The structures were compared by assessment of volumes of overlap and exclusion. There was a median of 19.0% (range, 5.5-35.4%) of the volume of ITV_10phase not enclosed by the ITV_MIP, demonstrating that the use of the MIP could result in under-treatment of disease. In contrast only a very small amount of the ITV_MIP was not enclosed by the ITV_10phase (median of 2.3%, range, 0.4-9.8%), indicating the ITV_10phase covers almost all of the tumor tissue as identified by MIP. Although there were only two Stage I patients, both demonstrated very similar ITV_10phase and ITV_MIP volumes. These findings suggest that Stage I NSCLC tumors could be outlined on the MIP alone. In Stage II and III tumors the ITV_10phase would be more reliable. To prevent under-treatment of disease, the MIP image can only be used for delineation in Stage I tumors.

  7. MIPS - The Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF. [Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lada, C.; Lebofsky, M.; Low, F.; Strittmatter, P.; Young, E.; Arens, J.; Beichman, C.; Gautier, T. N.; Werner, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF (MIPS) is to be designed to reach as closely as possible the fundamental sensitivity and angular resolution limits for SIRTF over the 3 to 700 micron spectral region. It will use high performance photoconductive detectors from 3 to 200 micron with integrating JFET amplifiers. From 200 to 700 microns, the MIPS will use a bolometer cooled by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Over much of its operating range, the MIPS will make possible observations at and beyond the conventional Rayleigh diffraction limit of angular resolution.

  8. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) Town Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Alex; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Kyle, Page; Basso, Bruno; Winter, Jonathan; Asseng, Senthold

    2015-01-01

    AgMIP (www.agmip.org) is an international community of climate, crop, livestock, economics, and IT experts working to further the development and application of multi-model, multi-scale, multi-disciplinary agricultural models that can inform policy and decision makers around the world. This meeting will engage the AGU community by providing a brief overview of AgMIP, in particular its new plans for a Coordinated Global and Regional Assessment of climate change impacts on agriculture and food security for AR6. This Town Hall will help identify opportunities for participants to become involved in AgMIP and its 30+ activities.

  9. Household MIPS. Natural resource consumption of Finnish households and its reduction; KotiMIPS. Kotitalouksien luonnonvarojen kulutus ja sen pienentaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotakorpi, E.; Laehteenoja, S.; Lettenmeier, M.

    2008-10-15

    In the study the natural resource consumption of 27 Finnish households was calculated using the MIPS method (Material Input per Service unit). The households monitored their consumption over a 6-week period in seven sub-sectors - housing, mobility, tourism, foodstuffs, household goods and appliances, leisure time activities, and packaging and household wastes. In the consumption monitoring only the households' direct consumption was taken into account and not consumption due to, e.g. public services. MIPS figures were calculated for five natural resource categories: abiotic natural resources, biotic natural resources, water, air and erosion. Service performance was expressed as kilograms per person per year. The calculation of natural resource consumption was based, to a large extent, on previously carried out sub-studies under the main FIN-MIPS study on households. The sub-studies focused on foodstuffs, leisure time activities, tourism, household goods and appliances, and construction. All the people participating in the study were interested in environmental matters to a greater extent than the average Finn. Nevertheless, the difference between the household consuming the most natural resources, and the one consuming the least, was approximately 10-fold. Especially in mobility and tourism there were appreciable differences between the households. The most material-intensive sub-sectors of consumption with reference to the households studied are housing, mobility and tourism. The TMR (total material requirement, i.e. abiotic and biotic natural resources and erosion combined) is approximately 10,000 kg/person per year. In the case of foodstuffs the average TMR per person per year is around 4,000 kg, in relation to household goods, for appliances about 2,000 kg, and for packaging and household waste management approximately 200 kg. The precise definition of each sub-sector in the study has an influence on the results. The ranking of the different sub-sectors of

  10. Morphological pyramids in multiresolution MIP rendering of large volume data : Survey and new results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    We survey and extend nonlinear signal decompositions based on morphological pyramids, and their application to multiresolution maximum intensity projection (MIP) volume rendering with progressive refinement and perfect reconstruction. The structure of the resulting multiresolution rendering

  11. Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) membrane assisted direct spray ionization mass spectrometry for agrochemicals screening in foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Igor; Rodrigues, Marcella Ferreira; Chaves, Andréa Rodrigues; Vaz, Boniek Gontijo

    2018-02-01

    Paper spray ionization (PSI) has some limitations such as low sensitivity and ionization suppression when complex samples are analyzed. The use of sample preparation devices directly coupled to MS can avoid these restrictions. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are materials widely used as adsorbent in sample preparation methods such as solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction, and they can provide specifics cavities with affinity to a target molecule. Here, we introduce a new MIP membrane spray ionization method combining MIP and PSI. MIP was synthesized directly on a cellulose membrane. Monuron and 2,4,5-T (2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid) were used as template molecules in MIP synthesis for diuron and 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) analyte sequesters, respectively. Apple, banana and grape methanolic extracts were used as matrices. The MIP membrane spray showed signal intensities of diuron and 2,4-D that were much higher compared to those obtained by non-imprinted polymers(NIP). Calibration curves exhibited R 2 > 0.99 for diuron and 2,4-D in all fruit extracts analyzed. LODs were found less than 0.60µgL -1 and LLOQs were found less than 2.00µgL -1 . The coefficients of variation and relative errors were less than 15% for almost all analyses. The apparent recovery test results ranged between 92,5% and 116.9%. Finally, the MIP membrane spray method was employed for the quantification of diuron and 2,4-D in real samples. Diuron contents were only found in three bananas (4.0, 6.5, and 9.9µgL -1 ). The proposed MIP membrane spray ionization method was straightforward, fast to carry out and provided satisfactory results for analyses of diuron and 2,4-D in apple, banana and grape samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. MACRA, MIPS, and the New Medicare Quality Payment Program: An Update for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Nicola, Gregory N; Allen, Bibb; Hughes, Danny R; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-03-01

    The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) of 2015 advances the goal of tying Medicare payments to quality and value. In April 2016, CMS published an initial proposed rule for MACRA, renaming it the Quality Payment Program (QPP). Under QPP, clinicians receive payments through either advanced alternative payment models or the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), a consolidation of existing federal performance programs that applies positive or negative adjustments to fee-for-service payments. Most physicians will participate in MIPS. This review highlights implications of the QPP and MIPS for radiologists. Although MIPS incorporates radiology-specific quality measures, radiologists will also be required to participate in other practice improvement activities, including patient engagement. Recognizing physicians' unique practice patterns, MIPS will provide special considerations in performance evaluation for physicians with limited face-to-face patient interaction. Although such considerations will affect radiologists' likelihood of success under QPP, many practitioners will be ineligible for the considerations under currently proposed criteria. Reporting using qualified clinical data registries will benefit radiologists' performance by allowing expanded arrays of MIPS and non-MIPS specialty-specific measures. A group practice reporting option will substantially reduce administrative burden but introduce new challenges by requiring uniform determination of patient-facing status and performance measurement for all of the group's physicians (diagnostic radiologists, interventional radiologists, and nonradiologists) under the same taxpayer identification number. Given that the initial MIPS performance period begins in 2017, radiologists must begin preparing for QPP and taking actions to ensure their future success under this new quality-based payment system. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Multi-isotope tracing of CO2 leakage and water-rock interaction in a natural CCS analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Gemeni, Vasiliki; Lions, Julie; Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Humez, Pauline; Vasilatos, Charalampos; Millot, Romain; Pauwels, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    Natural analogues of CO2 accumulation and, potentially, leakage, provide a highly valuable opportunity to study (1) geochemical processes within a CO2-reservoir and the overlying aquifers or aquicludes, i.e. gas-water-rock interactions, (2) geology and tightness of reservoirs over geological timescales, (3) potential or real leakage pathways, (3) impact of leakage on shallow groundwater resources quality, and (4) direct and indirect geochemical indicators of gas leakage (Lions et al., 2014, Humez et al., 2014). The Florina Basin in NW Macedonia, Greece, contains a deep CO2-rich aquifer within a graben structure. The graben filling consists of highly heterogeneous Neogene clastic sediments constituted by components from the adjacent massifs including carbonates, schists, gneiss as well as some ultramafic volcanic rocks. Clay layers are observed that isolate hydraulically the deep, partly artesian aquifer. Organic matter, in form of lignite accumulations, is abundant in the Neogene series. The underlying bedrocks are metamorphic carbonates and silicate rocks. The origin of the CO2 accumulation is controversial (deep, partially mantle-derived D'Allessandro et al., 2008 or resulting from thermal decomposition of carbonates, Hatziyannis and Arvanitis, 2011). Groundwaters have been sampled from springs and borewells over 3 years at different depths. First results on major, minor and trace elements give evidence of water-rock interaction, mainly with carbonates but also with ultramafic components but do not indicate that CO2-seepage is the principal driver of those processes (Gemeni et al., submitted). Here we present isotope data on a selection of groundwaters (δ2H , δ18O, δ13CTDIC, 87Sr/86Sr, δ11B, δ7Li). Stable isotopes of water indicate paleo-recharge for some of the groundwaters, limited exchange with gaseous CO2 and, in one case, possibly thermal exchange processes with silicates. Sr isotope ratios vary between marine ratios and radiogenic values indicating

  14. Implementation of 4-way Superscalar Hash MIPS Processor Using FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahib Omran, Safaa; Fouad Jumma, Laith

    2018-05-01

    Due to the quick advancements in the personal communications systems and wireless communications, giving data security has turned into a more essential subject. This security idea turns into a more confounded subject when next-generation system requirements and constant calculation speed are considered in real-time. Hash functions are among the most essential cryptographic primitives and utilized as a part of the many fields of signature authentication and communication integrity. These functions are utilized to acquire a settled size unique fingerprint or hash value of an arbitrary length of message. In this paper, Secure Hash Algorithms (SHA) of types SHA-1, SHA-2 (SHA-224, SHA-256) and SHA-3 (BLAKE) are implemented on Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) in a processor structure. The design is described and implemented using a hardware description language, namely VHSIC “Very High Speed Integrated Circuit” Hardware Description Language (VHDL). Since the logical operation of the hash types of (SHA-1, SHA-224, SHA-256 and SHA-3) are 32-bits, so a Superscalar Hash Microprocessor without Interlocked Pipelines (MIPS) processor are designed with only few instructions that were required in invoking the desired Hash algorithms, when the four types of hash algorithms executed sequentially using the designed processor, the total time required equal to approximately 342 us, with a throughput of 4.8 Mbps while the required to execute the same four hash algorithms using the designed four-way superscalar is reduced to 237 us with improved the throughput to 5.1 Mbps.

  15. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIP for Selective Solid Phase Extraction of Celecoxib in Urine Samples Followed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ansari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, for the analysis of human urine samples, a novel method explained for the determination of celecoxib, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The synthesis of the MIP was performed by precipitation polymerization in methacrylic acid (MAA, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA, chloroform, 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN and celecoxib as the functional monomer, cross-linker monomer, solvent, initiator and target drug, respectively. The celecoxib imprinted polymer was utilized as a specific sorbent for the solid phase extraction (SPE of celecoxib from samples. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP performance was compared with the synthesized non-molecularly imprinted polymer (NIP. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG were used for characterizing the synthesized polymers. Moreover, the MISPE procedure parameters such as pH, eluent solvent flow rate, eluent volume and sorbent mass that probably influence the extraction process have been optimized to achieve the highest celecoxib extraction efficiency. The relative standard deviation (RSD %, recovery percent, limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ of this proposed method were 1.12%, 96%, 8 µg L-1 and 26.7 µg L-1, respectively. The proposed MISPE-HPLC-UV method can be used for the separation and enrichment of trace amounts of celecoxib in human urine and biological samples.

  16. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP): Progress and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is a distributed climate-scenario simulation exercise for historical model intercomparison and future climate change conditions with participation of multiple crop and agricultural trade modeling groups around the world. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of risk of hunger and world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. Recent progress and the current status of AgMIP will be presented, highlighting three areas of activity: preliminary results from crop pilot studies, outcomes from regional workshops, and emerging scientific challenges. AgMIP crop modeling efforts are being led by pilot studies, which have been established for wheat, maize, rice, and sugarcane. These crop-specific initiatives have proven instrumental in testing and contributing to AgMIP protocols, as well as creating preliminary results for aggregation and input to agricultural trade models. Regional workshops are being held to encourage collaborations and set research activities in motion for key agricultural areas. The first of these workshops was hosted by Embrapa and UNICAMP and held in Campinas, Brazil. Outcomes from this meeting have informed crop modeling research activities within South America, AgMIP protocols, and future regional workshops. Several scientific challenges have emerged and are currently being addressed by AgMIP researchers. Areas of particular interest include geospatial weather generation, ensemble methods for climate scenarios and crop models, spatial aggregation of field-scale yields to regional and global production, and characterization of future changes in climate variability.

  17. Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS): Harsh Choices For Interventional Pain Management Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Helm Ii, Standiford; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    The Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) was created by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) to improve the health of all Americans by providing incentives and policies to improve patient health outcomes. MIPS combines 3 existing programs, Meaningful Use (MU), now called Advancing Care Information (ACI), contributing 25% of the composite score; Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), changed to Quality, contributing 50% of the composite score; and Value-based Payment (VBP) system to Resource Use or cost, contributing 10% of the composite score. Additionally, Clinical Practice Improvement Activities (CPIA), contributing 15% of the composite score, create multiple strategic goals to design incentives that drive movement toward delivery system reform principles with inclusion of Advanced Alternative Payment Models (APMs). Under the present proposal, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has estimated approximately 30,000 to 90,000 providers from a total of over 761,000 providers will be exempt from MIPS. About 87% of solo practitioners and 70% of practitioners in groups of less than 10 will be subjected to negative payments or penalties ranging from 4% to 9%. In addition, MIPS also will affect a provider's reputation by making performance measures accessible to consumers and third-party physician rating Web sites.The MIPS composite performance scoring method, at least in theory, utilizes weights for each performance category, exceptional performance factors to earn bonuses, and incorporates the special circumstances of small practices.In conclusion, MIPS has the potential to affect practitioners negatively. Interventional Pain Medicine practitioners must understand the various MIPS measures and how they might participate in order to secure a brighter future. Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, merit-based incentive payment system, quality performance measures, resource use, clinical practice

  18. The development and implementation of MOSAIQ Integration Platform (MIP) based on the radiotherapy workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; He, Zhen-yu; Jiang, Xiao-bo; Lin, Mao-sheng; Zhong, Ning-shan; Hu, Jiang; Qi, Zhen-yu; Bao, Yong; Li, Qiao-qiao; Li, Bao-yue; Hu, Lian-ying; Lin, Cheng-guang; Gao, Yuan-hong; Liu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-yan; Deng, Xiao-wu; Xia, Yun-fei; Liu, Meng-zhong; Sun, Ying

    2017-03-01

    To meet the special demands in China and the particular needs for the radiotherapy department, a MOSAIQ Integration Platform CHN (MIP) based on the workflow of radiation therapy (RT) has been developed, as a supplement system to the Elekta MOSAIQ. The MIP adopts C/S (client-server) structure mode, and its database is based on the Treatment Planning System (TPS) and MOSAIQ SQL Server 2008, running on the hospital local network. Five network servers, as a core hardware, supply data storage and network service based on the cloud services. The core software, using C# programming language, is developed based on Microsoft Visual Studio Platform. The MIP server could offer network service, including entry, query, statistics and print information for about 200 workstations at the same time. The MIP was implemented in the past one and a half years, and some practical patient-oriented functions were developed. And now the MIP is almost covering the whole workflow of radiation therapy. There are 15 function modules, such as: Notice, Appointment, Billing, Document Management (application/execution), System Management, and so on. By June of 2016, recorded data in the MIP are as following: 13546 patients, 13533 plan application, 15475 RT records, 14656 RT summaries, 567048 billing records and 506612 workload records, etc. The MIP based on the RT workflow has been successfully developed and clinically implemented with real-time performance, data security, stable operation. And it is demonstrated to be user-friendly and is proven to significantly improve the efficiency of the department. It is a key to facilitate the information sharing and department management. More functions can be added or modified for further enhancement its potentials in research and clinical practice.

  19. Overexpression of MIP2, a novel WD-repeat protein, promotes proliferation of H9c2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xing; Song, Lan; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Guiliang; Luo, Xinjing; Zhang, Bin; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2010-01-01

    WD40 repeat proteins have a wide range of diverse biological functions including signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, RNA splicing, and transcription. Myocardial ischemic preconditioning up-regulated protein 2 (MIP2) is a novel member of the WD40 repeat proteins superfamily that contains five WD40 repeats. Little is known about its biological role, and the purpose of this study was to determine the role of MIP2 in regulating cellular proliferation. Transfection and constitutive expression of MIP2 in the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2 results in enhanced growth of those cells as measured by cell number and is proportional to the amount of MIP2 expressed. Overexpression of MIP2 results in a shorter cell cycle, as measured by flow cytometry. Collectively, these data suggest that MIP2 may participate in the progression of cell proliferation in H9c2 cells.

  20. Study on the usefulness of whole body SPECT coronal image, MIP image in 67Ga scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Seiji

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined the usefulness of whole body coronal images and whole body cine display MIP images (CMIP) upon which image processing was carried out after whole body SPECT in comparison to the usefulness of whole body images (WB/SC) compensated by scattered radiation in tumor/inflammation scintigraphy with 67 Ga-citrate ( 67 Ga). Image interpretation was performed for the 120 patients with confirmed diagnoses, and the accuracy of their diagnoses was studied by three nuclear medical physicians and two clinical radiological technologists by means of sensitivity, specificity and ROC analysis. The resultant data show that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and the area under the ROC curve Az in the WB/SC were approximately 65%, 86%, 74% and 0.724, respectively, whereas sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Az of the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method were approximately 93%, 95%, 94% and 0.860, respectively. Furthermore, coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method tended to be superior to those produced by the FBP method in both diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. In conclusion, the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method was shown to be superior in diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. Our data suggest that whole body SPECT is an excellent technique as an alternative to WB/SC. (author)

  1. Biomimetic polymers in analytical chemistry. Part 1: preparation and applications of MIP (Molecularly Imprinted Polymers) in extraction and separation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarley, Cesar Ricardo Teixeira; Sotomayor, Maria del Pilar Taboada; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    MIPs are synthetic polymers that are used as biomimetic materials simulating the mechanism verified in natural entities such as antibodies and enzymes. Although MIPs have been successfully used as an outstanding tool for enhancing the selectivity or different analytical approaches, such as separation science and electrochemical and optical sensors, several parameters must be optimized during their synthesis. Therefore, the state-of-the-art of MIP production as well as the different polymerization methods are discussed. The potential selectivity of MIPs in the extraction and separation techniques focusing mainly on environmental, clinical and pharmaceutical samples as applications for analytical purposes is presented. (author)

  2. Recombinant expression of a functional myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinyi; Hernick, Marcy

    2015-10-01

    Myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS, E.C. 5.5.1.4) catalyzes the first step in inositol production-the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6P) to myo-inositol-1-phosphate. While the three dimensional structure of MIPS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been solved, biochemical studies examining the in vitro activity have not been reported to date. Herein we report the in vitro activity of mycobacterial MIPS expressed in E. coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Recombinant expression in E. coli yields a soluble protein capable of binding the NAD(+) cofactor; however, it has no significant activity with the Glc-6P substrate. In contrast, recombinant expression in M. smegmatis mc(2)4517 yields a functionally active protein. Examination of structural data suggests that MtMIPS expressed in E. coli adopts a fold that is missing a key helix containing two critical (conserved) Lys side chains, which likely explains the inability of the E. coli expressed protein to bind and turnover the Glc-6P substrate. Recombinant expression in M. smegmatis may yield a protein that adopts a fold in which this key helix is formed enabling proper positioning of important side chains, thereby allowing for Glc-6P substrate binding and turnover. Detailed mechanistic studies may be feasible following optimization of the recombinant MIPS expression protocol in M. smegmatis.

  3. Molecular anatomy of CCR5 engagement by physiologic and viral chemokines and HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins: differences in primary structural requirements for RANTES, MIP-1 alpha, and vMIP-II Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navenot, J M; Wang, Z X; Trent, J O; Murray, J L; Hu, Q X; DeLeeuw, L; Moore, P S; Chang, Y; Peiper, S C

    2001-11-09

    Molecular analysis of CCR5, the cardinal coreceptor for HIV-1 infection, has implicated the N-terminal extracellular domain (N-ter) and regions vicinal to the second extracellular loop (ECL2) in this activity. It was shown that residues in the N-ter are necessary for binding of the physiologic ligands, RANTES (CCL5) and MIP-1 alpha (CCL3). vMIP-II, encoded by the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, is a high affinity CCR5 antagonist, but lacks efficacy as a coreceptor inhibitor. Therefore, we compared the mechanism for engagement by vMIP-II of CCR5 to its interaction with physiologic ligands. RANTES, MIP-1 alpha, and vMIP-II bound CCR5 at high affinity, but demonstrated partial cross-competition. Characterization of 15 CCR5 alanine scanning mutants of charged extracellular amino acids revealed that alteration of acidic residues in the distal N-ter abrogated binding of RANTES, MIP-1 alpha, and vMIP-II. Whereas mutation of residues in ECL2 of CCR5 dramatically reduced the binding of RANTES and MIP-1 alpha and their ability to induce signaling, interaction with vMIP-II was not altered by any mutation in the exoloops of the receptor. Paradoxically, monoclonal antibodies to N-ter epitopes did not block chemokine binding, but those mapped to ECL2 were effective inhibitors. A CCR5 chimera with the distal N-ter residues of CXCR2 bound MIP-1 alpha and vMIP-II with an affinity similar to that of the wild-type receptor. Engagement of CCR5 by vMIP-II, but not RANTES or MIP-1 alpha blocked the binding of monoclonal antibodies to the receptor, providing additional evidence for a distinct mechanism for viral chemokine binding. Analysis of the coreceptor activity of randomly generated mouse-human CCR5 chimeras implicated residues in ECL2 between H173 and V197 in this function. RANTES, but not vMIP-II blocked CCR5 M-tropic coreceptor activity in the fusion assay. The insensitivity of vMIP-II binding to mutations in ECL2 provides a potential rationale to its inefficiency as an

  4. The Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS): A Primer for Otolaryngologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Vinay K; Naunheim, Matthew R; Varvares, Mark A; Holmes, Kenneth; Gagliano, Nancy; Hartnick, Christopher J

    2018-05-01

    Following passage of the 2015 Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act, most clinicians caring for Medicare Part B patients were required to participate in a new value-based reimbursement system known as the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) beginning in 2017. The MIPS adjusts payment rates to providers based on a composite score of performance across 4 categories: quality, advancing care information, clinical practice improvement activities, and resource use. However, factors such as practice size, setting, informational capabilities, and patient population may pose challenges as otolaryngologists endeavor to adapt to this broad-reaching payment reform. Given potential barriers to adoption, otolaryngologists should be aware of several important initiatives to help optimize their performance, including advocacy efforts by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, the development of otolaryngology-specific MIPS quality measures, and the launch of a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services-qualified otolaryngology clinical data registry to facilitate reporting.

  5. Production of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha and MIP-1beta by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils stimulated with Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyun Jung; Lim, Sung Sam

    2002-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the capacity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) to secrete Macrophage Inflammatory Protein (MIP)-1alpha and MIP-1beta after stimulation with Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Escherichia coli LPS was used as a positive control. Venous blood was collected and PMNs were isolated from healthy volunteers. Cells were cultured with various concentrations of LPS for different periods of time. Cell supernatants were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of chemokine secretion in PMNs stimulated with each LPS were found to be significantly higher than in the unstimulated control cells (p endodontalis LPS. These findings demonstrated that P. endodontalis LPS is capable of stimulating PMNs to produce chemotactic cytokines and suggested that PMNs stimulated with P. endodontalis LPS may play a crucial role in the inflammatory and immunopathological reactions of pulpal and periapical diseases.

  6. From MIPS to Vicsek: A comprehensive phase diagram for self-propelled rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaqing

    Self-propelled rods interacting by volume exclusion is one of the simplest active matter systems. Despite years of effort, no comprehensive picture of their phase diagram is available. Furthermore, results on explicit rods are so far largely disconnected from those obtained on the relatively better understood cases of motility induced phase separation (MIPS) of (usually) isotropic active particles, and from our current knowledge of Vicsek-style aligning point particles. In this talk, I will present a complete phase diagram of a generic model of self-propelled rods and show how it is connected to both MIPS and Vicsek worlds.

  7. Differentiating adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism on the MMPI-2 and MIPS revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kenneth G; Stuart, Jennifer

    2010-03-01

    Although conceptualizations of perfectionism have emphasized adaptive as well as maladaptive expressions of the construct, how these different dimensions or types of perfectionists might be reflected in comprehensive personality assessment instruments is unknown. An initial sample of 267 university students completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 2001), Millon Index of Personality Styles Revised (MIPS-R; Millon, 2004), and Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (Slaney, Mobley, Trippi, Ashby, & Johnson, 1996). Analyses indicated that dimensions and types of perfectionism were associated, in expected directions, with select scores on the MMPI-2 and MIPS-R.

  8. How much of our environment do we need?. MIPS - a measuring method for an ecological economy; Wieviel Umwelt braucht der Mensch?. MIPS - Das Mass fuer oekologisches Wirtschaften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt-Bleek, F.; Klueting, R.

    1994-12-31

    This book illustrates how much of our environment we use up with the products and services associated with everyday life, how large the ecological impact of our consume society actually is; we build roads, dams, heavy goods vehicles, warehouses, factories, monocultures and rubbish tips. We take iron ore, sand, gravel, coal oil, water, air and wood from our environment in huge, ever-increasing qualities. Slag heaps, erosion and disrupted water flow are left behind. This man-made materialistic society is altering nature`s balance persistently and for the long term. This materialism is no longer ecologically sustainable. We must learn to prosper with less negative environmental impacts. The author has developed a means of measuring the intensity of environmental impact of products, processes and services, based on the material consumed to allow acurate comparisons. In this comprehensible informative book he reveals, for the first time publicly, the measure/formula by means of many practical examples and illustrations to show a way out of the crisis. (orig./UA) [Deutsch] Dieses Buch veranschaulicht, wieviel Umwelt wir fuer Produkte und Dienstleistungen des taeglichen Lebens verbrauchen, wie gross die `oekologischen Rucksaecke` unseres Konsums wirklich sind: Wir bauen Strassen, Daemme, Lastwagen, Lager, Fabriken, Supermaerkte, Legen Monokulturen und Abfalldeponien an. Aus der Umwelt holen wir Erze, Sand, Kies, Oel, Wasser, Luft und Holz in riesigen und immer wachsenden Mengen. Zurueck bleiben Abraumhalden, Erosionen und gestoerte Wasserlaeufe. Die menschengemachten Materialverschiebungen, die Stoffstroeme, veraendern die natuerlichen Balancen, nachhaltig und unaufhaltsam. Die Materialintensitaet unseres Wohlstandes ist oekologisch nicht mehr tragbar. Wir muessen lernen, Wohlstand mit weniger Umwelt zu erhalten und zu schaffen. Der Autor hat ein neues Mass (mips=Material-Intensitaet pro Serviceeinheit) entwickelt, dessen Basis der Stoffverbrauch ist und das es

  9. Chlamydia trachomatis contains a protein similar to the Legionella pneumophila mip gene product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, AG; Birkelund, Svend; Fey, SJ

    1991-01-01

    A 27kDa Chlamydia trachomatis L2 protein was characterized by the use of monoclonal antibodies and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The protein was shown to be located in the membrane of reticulate bodies as well as elementary bodies. Its synthesis could be detected from 10 hours post-infe...... potentiator (mip) gene of Legionella pneumophila....

  10. Detection of Legionella pneumophila by real-time PCR for the mip gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah A; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Reischl, Udo; Gordon, Steve M; Procop, Gary W

    2003-07-01

    A real-time PCR assay for the mip gene of Legionella pneumophila was tested with 27 isolates of L. pneumophila, 20 isolates of 14 other Legionella species, and 103 non-Legionella bacteria. Eight culture-positive and 40 culture-negative clinical specimens were tested. This assay was 100% sensitive and 100% specific for L. pneumophila.

  11. Simulating Snow in Canadian Boreal Environments with CLASS for ESM-SnowMIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Bartlett, P. A.; Derksen, C.; Ireson, A. M.; Essery, R.

    2017-12-01

    The ability of land surface schemes to provide realistic simulations of snow cover is necessary for accurate representation of energy and water balances in climate models. Historically, this has been particularly challenging in boreal forests, where poor treatment of both snow masking by forests and vegetation-snow interaction has resulted in biases in simulated albedo and snowpack properties, with subsequent effects on both regional temperatures and the snow albedo feedback in coupled simulations. The SnowMIP (Snow Model Intercomparison Project) series of experiments or `MIPs' was initiated in order to provide assessments of the performance of various snow- and land-surface-models at selected locations, in order to understand the primary factors affecting model performance. Here we present preliminary results of simulations conducted for the third such MIP, ESM-SnowMIP (Earth System Model - Snow Model Intercomparison Project), using the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) at boreal forest sites in central Saskatchewan. We assess the ability of our latest model version (CLASS 3.6.2) to simulate observed snowpack properties (snow water equivalent, density and depth) and above-canopy albedo over 13 winters. We also examine the sensitivity of these simulations to climate forcing at local and regional scales.

  12. Implementación de un procesador MIPS en una FPGA

    OpenAIRE

    Guillen Fandos, David

    2012-01-01

    L'objectiu del projecte és el disseny i implementació d'un computador al voltant d'un processador MIPS. Aquest computador ha de funcionar a una placa de demostració Terasic DE2-115, que disposa d'una FPGA Altera Cyclone IV.

  13. Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

    2012-01-01

    The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This…

  14. A novel mutation in MIP associated with congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai Jie; Li, Sha Sha; Yun, Bo; Ma, Wen Xian; Jiang, Tian Ge; Zhu, Si Quan

    2011-01-08

    To identify the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese family affected with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract. A four-generation Chinese family with inherited nuclear cataract phenotype was recruited. Detailed family history and clinical data were recorded. All reported nuclear cataract-related candidate genes were screened for causative mutations by direct DNA sequencing. Effects of amino acid changes on the structure and function of protein were predicted by bioinformatics analysis. All affected individuals in this family showed nuclear cataracts. Sequencing of the candidate genes revealed a heterozygous c.559C>T change in the coding region of the major intrinsic protein (MIP), which caused a substitution of highly conserved arginine by cysteine at codon 187 (p.R187C). This mutation co-segregated with all affected individuals and was not observed in unaffected family members or 110 ethnically matched controls. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the mutation was predicted to affect the function and secondary structure of MIP protein. This study identified a novel disease-causing mutation p.R187C in MIP in a Chinese cataract family, expanding the mutation spectrum of MIP causing congenital cataract.

  15. Magnetically separable polymer (Mag-MIP) for selective analysis of biotin in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuriaga-Sánchez, Rosario Josefina; Khan, Sabir; Wong, Ademar; Picasso, Gino; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Sotomayor, Maria Del Pilar Taboada

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an efficient method for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles modified with molecularly imprinted polymers (Mag-MIP) through core-shell method for the determination of biotin in milk food samples. The functional monomer acrylic acid was selected from molecular modeling, EGDMA was used as cross-linking monomer and AIBN as radical initiator. The Mag-MIP and Mag-NIP were characterized by FTIR, magnetic hysteresis, XRD, SEM and N2-sorption measurements. The capacity of Mag-MIP for biotin adsorption, its kinetics and selectivity were studied in detail. The adsorption data was well described by Freundlich isotherm model with adsorption equilibrium constant (KF) of 1.46 mL g(-1). The selectivity experiments revealed that prepared Mag-MIP had higher selectivity toward biotin compared to other molecules with different chemical structure. The material was successfully applied for the determination of biotin in diverse milk samples using HPLC for quantification of the analyte, obtaining the mean value of 87.4% recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 24 CFR 203.281 - Calculation of one-time MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums-One-Time Payment § 203.281 Calculation of one-time MIP. (a) The applicable premium percentage determined...

  17. 24 CFR 203.268 - Pro rata payment of periodic MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums-Periodic Payment § 203.268 Pro rata payment of periodic MIP. (a) If the insurance contract is terminated...

  18. 24 CFR 203.269 - Method of payment of periodic MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums..., that periodic MIP be remitted electronically. [60 FR 34138, June 30, 1995] Open-end Insurance Charges...

  19. THE DUST PROPERTIES OF z {approx} 3 MIPS-LBGs FROM PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, X. L. [School of Physics and Electronics Information, Hubei University of Education, 430205 Wuhan (China); Pipino, A. [Institut fur Astronomie, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Matteucci, F., E-mail: fan@oats.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sezione di Astronomia, Universit a di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-05-10

    The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 {mu}m Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an ''educated'' fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new ''fitting'' approach, we derive the total mass M{sub tot}, stellar mass M{sub *}, gas mass M{sub g} , dust mass M{sub d} , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M{sub *} = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z {approx} 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M{sub tot} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }), dusty (M{sub d} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }), and metal-rich (Z {approx} Z{sub Sun }) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR {approx} 200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). Our estimate of M{sub d} = 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and

  20. THE DUST PROPERTIES OF z ∼ 3 MIPS-LBGs FROM PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, X. L.; Pipino, A.; Matteucci, F.

    2013-01-01

    The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 μm Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an ''educated'' fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new ''fitting'' approach, we derive the total mass M tot , stellar mass M * , gas mass M g , dust mass M d , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M * = 8 × 10 10 of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z ∼ 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M tot ∼ 10 11 M ☉ ), dusty (M d ∼ 10 8 M ☉ ), and metal-rich (Z ∼ Z ☉ ) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR ∼ 200 M ☉ yr –1 ). Our estimate of M d = 7 × 10 7 M ☉ of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and local starburst templates. This discrepancy of SED shapes could in turn explain the non-detection at submillimeter wavelengths of IR luminous (L IR ⪰10 12 L ☉ ) MIPS-LBGs.

  1. Energy transport, polar amplification, and ITCZ shifts in the GeoMIP G1 ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Russotto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The polar amplification of warming and the ability of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ to shift to the north or south are two very important problems in climate science. Examining these behaviors in global climate models (GCMs running solar geoengineering experiments is helpful not only for predicting the effects of solar geoengineering but also for understanding how these processes work under increased carbon dioxide (CO2. Both polar amplification and ITCZ shifts are closely related to the meridional transport of moist static energy (MSE by the atmosphere. This study examines changes in MSE transport in 10 fully coupled GCMs in experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP, in which the solar constant is reduced to compensate for the radiative forcing from abruptly quadrupled CO2 concentrations. In G1, poleward MSE transport decreases relative to preindustrial conditions in all models, in contrast to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5 abrupt4xCO2 experiment, in which poleward MSE transport increases. We show that since poleward energy transport decreases rather than increases, and local feedbacks cannot change the sign of an initial temperature change, the residual polar amplification in the G1 experiment must be due to the net positive forcing in the polar regions and net negative forcing in the tropics, which arise from the different spatial patterns of the simultaneously imposed solar and CO2 forcings. However, the reduction in poleward energy transport likely plays a role in limiting the polar warming in G1. An attribution study with a moist energy balance model shows that cloud feedbacks are the largest source of uncertainty regarding changes in poleward energy transport in midlatitudes in G1, as well as for changes in cross-equatorial energy transport, which are anticorrelated with ITCZ shifts.

  2. The Agriculture Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is a distributed climate-scenario simulation exercise for historical model intercomparison and future climate change conditions with participation of multiple crop and world agricultural trade modeling groups around the world. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of risk of hunger and world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. Historical period results will spur model improvement and interaction among major modeling groups, while future period results will lead directly to tests of adaptation and mitigation strategies across a range of scales. AgMIP will consist of a multi-scale impact assessment utilizing the latest methods for climate and agricultural scenario generation. Scenarios and modeling protocols will be distributed on the web, and multi-model results will be collated and analyzed to ensure the widest possible coverage of agricultural crops and regions. AgMIP will place regional changes in agricultural production in a global context that reflects new trading opportunities, imbalances, and shortages in world markets resulting from climate change and other driving forces for food supply. Such projections are essential inputs from the Vulnerability, Impacts, and Adaptation (VIA) research community to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment (AR5), now underway, and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. They will set the context for local-scale vulnerability and adaptation studies, supply test scenarios for national-scale development of trade policy instruments, provide critical information on changing supply and demand for water resources, and elucidate interactive effects of climate change and land use change. AgMIP will not only provide crucially-needed new global estimates of how climate change will affect food supply and hunger in the

  3. MIPS PlantsDB: a database framework for comparative plant genome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Thomas; Martis, Mihaela M; Roessner, Stephan K; Pfeifer, Matthias; Bader, Kai C; Sharma, Sapna; Gundlach, Heidrun; Spannagl, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of plant genome (sequence) data enables powerful comparative analyses and integrative approaches and also requires structured and comprehensive information resources. Databases are needed for both model and crop plant organisms and both intuitive search/browse views and comparative genomics tools should communicate the data to researchers and help them interpret it. MIPS PlantsDB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/genomes.jsp) was initially described in NAR in 2007 [Spannagl,M., Noubibou,O., Haase,D., Yang,L., Gundlach,H., Hindemitt, T., Klee,K., Haberer,G., Schoof,H. and Mayer,K.F. (2007) MIPSPlantsDB-plant database resource for integrative and comparative plant genome research. Nucleic Acids Res., 35, D834-D840] and was set up from the start to provide data and information resources for individual plant species as well as a framework for integrative and comparative plant genome research. PlantsDB comprises database instances for tomato, Medicago, Arabidopsis, Brachypodium, Sorghum, maize, rice, barley and wheat. Building up on that, state-of-the-art comparative genomics tools such as CrowsNest are integrated to visualize and investigate syntenic relationships between monocot genomes. Results from novel genome analysis strategies targeting the complex and repetitive genomes of triticeae species (wheat and barley) are provided and cross-linked with model species. The MIPS Repeat Element Database (mips-REdat) and Catalog (mips-REcat) as well as tight connections to other databases, e.g. via web services, are further important components of PlantsDB.

  4. Malaria-specific metabolite hemozoin mediates the release of several potent endogenous pyrogens (TNF, MIP-1 alpha, and MIP-1 beta) in vitro, and altered thermoregulation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, B A; Alava, G; Tracey, K J; Martiney, J; Cerami, A; Slater, A F

    1995-01-01

    A characteristic feature of malaria infection is the occurrence of periodic bouts of fever. Experimental and clinical studies have strongly implicated inflammatory cytokines, like tumour necrosis factor (TNF), in the induction of these intermittent fevers [Clark et al., Infect Immunol 32:1058-1066, 1981; Clark et al., Am J Pathol 129:192-199, 1987; Karunaweera et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89:3200-3203, 1992], but the malaria-specific metabolite(s) which induce the production of such endogenous pyrogens have not yet been fully characterized. It is well known that during the course of malaria infection, a unique schizont component, alternatively referred to as "malaria pigment" or hemozoin, is released along with merozoites as the host erythrocyte bursts [Urquhart, Clin Infect Dis 19:117-131, 1994]. We have recently determined that the core structure of hemozoin comprises a novel insoluble polymer of heme units linked by iron-carboxylate bonds [Slater et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88:325-329, 1991; Slater et al., Nature 355:167-169, 1992]. We now report that purified native, as well as chemically synthesized, hemozoin crystals potently induce the release of several pyrogenic cytokines, including TNF, MIP-1 alpha, and MIP-1 beta, from murine macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. Also, intravenous administration of chemically synthesized preparations of hemozoin to anaesthetized rats results in a marked drop in body temperature. A similar drop in body temperature is observed following the intravenous injection of other well-characterized pyrogenic cytokines (e.g., TNF) which are known to induce a fever response in awake animals, and is thought to reflect the inability of rats to appropriately regulate their body temperature while anaesthetized. As a consequence of its ability to induce pyrogenic cytokines in vitro, and thermal dysregulation in vivo, we propose that this unique parasite metabolite is an important pyrogen released by malaria

  5. Appendix 2. Guide for Running AgMIP Climate Scenario Generation Tools with R in Windows, Version 2.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Nicholas; Ruane, Alexander Clark

    2013-01-01

    This Guide explains how to create climate series and climate change scenarios by using the AgMip Climate team's methodology as outlined in the AgMIP Guide for Regional Assessment: Handbook of Methods and Procedures. It details how to: install R and the required packages to run the AgMIP Climate Scenario Generation scripts, and create climate scenarios from CMIP5 GCMs using a 30-year baseline daily weather dataset. The Guide also outlines a workflow that can be modified for application to your own climate data.

  6. Crystal Structure of a Trapped Catalytic Intermediate Suggests that Forced Atomic Proximity Drives the Catalysis of mIPS

    OpenAIRE

    Neelon, Kelly; Roberts, Mary F.; Stec, Boguslaw

    2011-01-01

    1-L-myo-inositol-phosphate synthase (mIPS) catalyzes the first step of the unique, de novo pathway of inositol biosynthesis. However, details about the complex mIPS catalytic mechanism, which requires oxidation, enolization, intramolecular aldol cyclization, and reduction, are not fully known. To gain further insight into this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the wild-type mIPS from Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.7 Å, as well as the crystal structures of three active-site mutant...

  7. Chromatography, solid-phase extraction, and capillary electrochromatography with MIPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Blanka; Horvai, George

    2012-01-01

    Most analytical applications of molecularly imprinted polymers are based on their selective adsorption properties towards the template or its analogs. In chromatography, solid phase extraction and electrochromatography this adsorption is a dynamic process. The dynamic process combined with the nonlinear adsorption isotherm of the polymers and other factors results in complications which have limited the success of imprinted polymers. This chapter explains these problems and shows many examples of successful applications overcoming or avoiding the problems.

  8. HTTM - Design and Implementation of a Type-2 Hypervisor for MIPS64 Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ain, Qurrat ul; Anwar, Usama; Mehmood, Muhammad Amir; Waheed, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Virtualization has emerged as an attractive software solution for many problems in server domain. Recently, it has started to enrich embedded systems domain by offering features such as hardware consolidation, security, and isolation. Our objective is to bring virtualization to high-end MIPS64 based systems, such as network routers, switches, wireless base station, etc. For this purpose a Type-2 hypervisor is a viable software solution which is easy to deploy and requires no changes in host system. In this paper we present the internal design HTTM -A Type-2 hypervisor for MIPS64 based systems and demonstrate its functional correctness by using Linux Testing Project (LTP) tests. Finally, we performed LMbench tests for performance evaluation.

  9. Determination method for 129I in soil samples by MIP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uezu, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Masanao; Fujita, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Maruo, Yoshihiro

    2001-01-01

    The radioactive iodine-129 ( 129 I) is an important radionuclide for environmental assessment because it has a long half-life and is accumulated in the thyroid gland in humans. A new analytical technique by Microwave Induced Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MIP-MS) was applied to the determination of 129 I in soil samples. In environmental samples, a large amount of matrix elements are present. Therefore, the matrix elements were eliminated by ashing at 1000degC, and iodine isotopes were trapped by an activated charcoal and finally extracted by 10% tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). The concentration of 129 I in a soil samples were compared between results of neutron activation analysis and MIP-MS method. The results showed an excellent agreement. (author)

  10. Preparation of MIP grafts for quercetin by tandem aryl diazonium surface chemistry and photopolymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmi, Zakaria; Benmehdi, Houcine; Lamouri, Aazdine; Decorse, Philippe; Jouini, Mohamed; Chehimi, Mohamed M.; Yagci, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    The food antioxidant quercetin was used as a template in an ultrathin molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film prepared by photopolymerization. Indium tin oxide (ITO) plates were electrografted with aryl layers via a diazonium salt precursor bearing two terminal hydroxyethyl groups. The latter act as hydrogen donors for the photosensitizer isopropylthioxanthone and enabled the preparation of MIP grafts through radical photopolymerization of methacrylic acid (the functional monomer) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (the crosslinker) in the presence of quercetin (the template) on the ITO. The template was extracted, and the remaining ITO electrode used for the amperometric determination of quercetin at a working potential of 0.26 V (vs. SCE). The analytical range is from 5.10 −8 to 10 −4 mol L −1 , and the detection limit is 5.10 −8 mol L −1 . (author)

  11. Ship Routing with Pickup and Delivery for a Maritime Oil Transportation System: MIP Modeland Heuristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Vinicius Picanco; Morabito, Reinaldo; Yamashita, Denise

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines a ship routing problem with pickup and delivery and time windowsfor maritime oil transportation, motivated by the production and logistics activities of an oil companyoperating in the Brazilian coast. The transportation costs from offshore platforms to coastal terminalsare...... application of two tailor-made MIP heuristics, based on relax-and-fix and timedecomposition procedures. The model minimizes fuel costs of a heterogeneous fleet of oil tankersand costs related to freighting contracts. The model also considers company-specific constraints foroffshore oil transportation....... Computational experiments based on the mathematical models and therelated MIP heuristics are presented for a set of real data provided by the company, which confirmthe potential of optimization-based methods to find good solutions for problems of moderate sizes....

  12. A spatial mean-variance MIP model for energy market risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zuwei

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a short-term market risk model based on the Markowitz mean-variance method for spatial electricity markets. The spatial nature is captured using the correlation of geographically separated markets and the consideration of wheeling administration. The model also includes transaction costs and other practical constraints, resulting in a mixed integer programming (MIP) model. The incorporation of those practical constraints makes the model more attractive than the traditional Markowitz portfolio model with continuity. A case study is used to illustrate the practical application of the model. The results show that the MIP portfolio efficient frontier is neither smooth nor concave. The paper also considers the possible extension of the model to other energy markets, including natural gas and oil markets

  13. A spatial mean-variance MIP model for energy market risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuwei Yu

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a short-term market risk model based on the Markowitz mean-variance method for spatial electricity markets. The spatial nature is captured using the correlation of geographically separated markets and the consideration of wheeling administration. The model also includes transaction costs and other practical constraints, resulting in a mixed integer programming (MIP) model. The incorporation of those practical constraints makes the model more attractive than the traditional Markowitz portfolio model with continuity. A case study is used to illustrate the practical application of the model. The results show that the MIP portfolio efficient frontier is neither smooth nor concave. The paper also considers the possible extension of the model to other energy markets, including natural gas and oil markets. (author)

  14. MIP-Based Sensors: Promising New Tools for Cancer Biomarker Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Selvolini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Detecting cancer disease at an early stage is one of the most important issues for increasing the survival rate of patients. Cancer biomarker detection helps to provide a diagnosis before the disease becomes incurable in later stages. Biomarkers can also be used to evaluate the progression of therapies and surgery treatments. In recent years, molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP based sensors have been intensely investigated as promising analytical devices in several fields, including clinical analysis, offering desired portability, fast response, specificity, and low cost. The aim of this review is to provide readers with an overview on recent important achievements in MIP-based sensors coupled to various transducers (e.g., electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric for the determination of cancer biomarkers by selected publications from 2012 to 2016.

  15. A spatial mean-variance MIP model for energy market risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuwei Yu [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). Indiana State Utility Forecasting Group and School of Industrial Engineering

    2003-05-01

    The paper presents a short-term market risk model based on the Markowitz mean-variance method for spatial electricity markets. The spatial nature is captured using the correlation of geographically separated markets and the consideration of wheeling administration. The model also includes transaction costs and other practical constraints, resulting in a mixed integer programming (MIP) model. The incorporation of those practical constraints makes the model more attractive than the traditional Markowitz portfolio model with continuity. A case study is used to illustrate the practical application of the model. The results show that the MIP portfolio efficient frontier is neither smooth nor concave. The paper also considers the possible extension of the model to other energy markets, including natural gas and oil markets. (author)

  16. A spatial mean-variance MIP model for energy market risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zuwei [Indiana State Utility Forecasting Group and School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, Room 334, 1293 A.A. Potter, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    The paper presents a short-term market risk model based on the Markowitz mean-variance method for spatial electricity markets. The spatial nature is captured using the correlation of geographically separated markets and the consideration of wheeling administration. The model also includes transaction costs and other practical constraints, resulting in a mixed integer programming (MIP) model. The incorporation of those practical constraints makes the model more attractive than the traditional Markowitz portfolio model with continuity. A case study is used to illustrate the practical application of the model. The results show that the MIP portfolio efficient frontier is neither smooth nor concave. The paper also considers the possible extension of the model to other energy markets, including natural gas and oil markets.

  17. Photovoltaic module with integrated power conversion and interconnection system - the European project PV-MIPS

    OpenAIRE

    Henze, N.; Engler, A.; Zacharias, P.

    2006-01-01

    Within the 6th framework program funded by the European Commission the project PV-MIPS (Photovoltaic Module with Integrated Power Conversion System) was launched in November 2004. Together with eleven European partners from Germany, Austria, Greece and the Netherlands a solar module with integrated in-verter shall be developed that can feed solar electricity directly into the grid. The challenging objective of the project is to reduce the total costs of a PV system. At the same time lifetime ...

  18. Performance of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIP) in Allele CopyNumber Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuker; Moorhead, Martin; Karlin-Neumann, George; Wang,Nicolas J.; Ireland, James; Lin, Steven; Chen, Chunnuan; Heiser, LauraM.; Chin, Koei; Esserman, Laura; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Faham,Malek

    2007-05-14

    We have developed a new protocol for using MolecularInversion Probes (MIP) to accurately and specifically measure allele copynumber (ACN). The new protocol provides for significant improvementsincluding the reduction of input DNA (from 2?g) by more than 25 fold (to75ng total genomic DNA), higher overall precision resulting in one orderof magnitude lower false positive rate, and greater dynamic range withaccurate absolute copy number up to 60 copies.

  19. The Proposed MACRA/MIPS Threshold for Patient-Facing Encounters: What It Means for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Hirsch, Joshua A; Allen, Bibb; Wang, Wenyi; Hughes, Danny R; Nicola, Gregory N

    2017-03-01

    In implementing the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), CMS will provide special considerations to physicians with infrequent face-to-face patient encounters by reweighting MIPS performance categories to account for the unique circumstances facing these providers. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of varying criteria on the fraction of radiologists who are likely to receive special considerations for performance assessment under MIPS. Data from the 2014 Medicare Physician and Other Supplier file for 28,710 diagnostic radiologists were used to determine the fraction of radiologists meeting various proposed criteria for receiving special considerations. For each definition, the fraction of patient-facing encounters among all billed codes was determined for those radiologists not receiving special considerations. When using the criterion proposed by CMS that physicians will receive special considerations if billing ≤25 evaluation and management services or surgical codes, 72.0% of diagnostic radiologists would receive special considerations, though such encounters would represent only 2.1% of billed codes among remaining diagnostic radiologists without special considerations. If CMS were to apply an alternative criterion of billing ≤100 evaluation and management codes exclusively, 98.8% of diagnostic radiologists would receive special considerations. At this threshold, patient-facing encounters would represent approximately 10% of billed codes among remaining radiologists without special considerations. The current CMS proposed criterion for special considerations would result in a considerable fraction of radiologists being evaluated on the basis of measures that are not reflective of their practice and beyond their direct control. Alternative criteria could help ensure that radiologists are provided a fair opportunity for success in performance review under the MIPS. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier

  20. Measurement of Photomultipier Plateau Curves and Single MIP response in the AD detector at ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez Falero, Sebastian De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    The Alice Diffractive (AD) detector is a forward detector in the ALICE experiment at CERN. It is aimed to the triggering on diffractive events and extends the pseudorapidity coverage to about 4.9 < /n/ < 6.3. In this work, a PMT's efficiency plateau and single MIP response are measured using a replica of the detector's scintillator modules, electronic and data acquisition system and cosmic rays as particle source.

  1. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in acute lung injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanley, T P; Schmal, H; Friedl, H P

    1995-01-01

    in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids by Western blot analysis. Anti-MIP-1 alpha administered at commencement of IgG immune complex- or LPS-induced injury resulted in significant reductions in BAL neutrophils as well as in injury as measured by pulmonary vascular permeability. Under such conditions, in both models...... to production of TNF-alpha, which in turn up-regulates vascular adhesion molecules required for neutrophil influx....

  2. WCRP COordinated Regional Downscaling EXperiment (CORDEX: a diagnostic MIP for CMIP6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Gutowski Jr.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The COordinated Regional Downscaling EXperiment (CORDEX is a diagnostic model intercomparison project (MIP in CMIP6. CORDEX builds on a foundation of previous downscaling intercomparison projects to provide a common framework for downscaling activities around the world. The CORDEX Regional Challenges provide a focus for downscaling research and a basis for making use of CMIP6 global climate model (GCM output to produce downscaled projected changes in regional climates and assess sources of uncertainties in the projections, all of which can potentially be distilled into climate change information for vulnerability, impacts and adaptation studies. CORDEX Flagship Pilot Studies advance regional downscaling by targeting one or more of the CORDEX Regional Challenges. A CORDEX-CORE framework is planned that will produce a baseline set of homogeneous high-resolution, downscaled projections for regions worldwide. In CMIP6, CORDEX coordinates with ScenarioMIP and is structured to allow cross comparisons with HighResMIP and interaction with the CMIP6 VIACS Advisory Board.

  3. AgMIP: New Results from Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia Regional Integrated Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2014-12-01

    AgMIP conducted the first set of comprehensive regional integrated assessments of climate change impacts on smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia led by researchers from the regions themselves. The project developed new methods integrating climate, crop, livestock and economic models to conduct climate change impact assessments that characterize impacts on smallholder groups. AgMIP projections of climate change impacts on agriculture are more realistic than previous assessments because they take agricultural development into account. Using the best available data and models, the assessments directly evaluated yield, income, and poverty outcomes including the effects of adaptation packages and development pathways. Results show that even with agricultural development, climate change generally will exert negative pressure on yields of smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Without adaptation, climate change leads to increased poverty in some locations in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia compared to a future in which climate change does not occur. Adaptation can significantly improve smallholder farmer responses to climate change. AgMIP expert teams identified improved varieties, sowing practices, fertilizer application, and irrigation applications as prioritized adaptation strategies. These targeted adaptation packages were able to overcome a portion of detrimental impacts but could not compensate completely in many locations. Even in cases where average impact is near zero, vulnerability (i.e., those at risk of loss) can be substantial even when mean impacts are positive.

  4. Ship Routing with Pickup and Delivery for a Maritime Oil Transportation System: MIP Model and Heuristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius P. Rodrigues

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a ship routing problem with pickup and delivery and time windows for maritime oil transportation, motivated by the production and logistics activities of an oil company operating in the Brazilian coast. The transportation costs from offshore platforms to coastal terminals are an important issue in the search for operational excellence in the oil industry, involving operations that demand agile and effective decision support systems. This paper presents an optimization approach to address this problem, based on a mixed integer programming (MIP model and a novel and exploratory application of two tailor-made MIP heuristics, based on relax-and-fix and time decomposition procedures. The model minimizes fuel costs of a heterogeneous fleet of oil tankers and costs related to freighting contracts. The model also considers company-specific constraints for offshore oil transportation. Computational experiments based on the mathematical models and the related MIP heuristics are presented for a set of real data provided by the company, which confirm the potential of optimization-based methods to find good solutions for problems of moderate sizes.

  5. A virus-MIPs fluorescent sensor based on FRET for highly sensitive detection of JEV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Caishuang; Wang, Huan; He, Kui; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang; Cai, Changqun

    2016-11-01

    Major stumbling blocks in the recognition and detection of virus are the unstable biological recognition element or the complex detection means. Here a fluorescent sensor based on virus-molecular imprinted polymers (virus-MIPs) was designed for specific recognition and highly sensitive detection of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). The virus-MIPs were anchored on the surface of silica microspheres modified by fluorescent dye, pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde (PC). The fluorescence intensity of PC can be enhanced by the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), where virus acted as energy donor and PC acted as energy acceptor. The enhanced fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of virus in the range of 24-960pM, with a limit of detection (LOD, 3σ) of 9.6pM, and the relative standard deviation was 1.99%. In additional, the specificity study confirmed the resultant MIPs has high-selectivity for JEV. This sensor would become a new key for the detection of virus because of its high sensitive, simple operation, high stability and low cost. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. MIPS: analysis and annotation of proteins from whole genomes in 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Frishman, D; Mayer, K F X; Münsterkötter, M; Noubibou, O; Pagel, P; Rattei, T; Oesterheld, M; Ruepp, A; Stümpflen, V

    2006-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS at the GSF), Neuherberg, Germany, provides resources related to genome information. Manually curated databases for several reference organisms are maintained. Several of these databases are described elsewhere in this and other recent NAR database issues. In a complementary effort, a comprehensive set of >400 genomes automatically annotated with the PEDANT system are maintained. The main goal of our current work on creating and maintaining genome databases is to extend gene centered information to information on interactions within a generic comprehensive framework. We have concentrated our efforts along three lines (i) the development of suitable comprehensive data structures and database technology, communication and query tools to include a wide range of different types of information enabling the representation of complex information such as functional modules or networks Genome Research Environment System, (ii) the development of databases covering computable information such as the basic evolutionary relations among all genes, namely SIMAP, the sequence similarity matrix and the CABiNet network analysis framework and (iii) the compilation and manual annotation of information related to interactions such as protein-protein interactions or other types of relations (e.g. MPCDB, MPPI, CYGD). All databases described and the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS WWW server (http://mips.gsf.de).

  7. Anvendelse af MIP ved kildekarakterisering og vurdering af nedbrydning af chlorerede opløsningsmidler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette Martina; Janniche, Gry Sander; Damgaard, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Membrane Interface Probing (MIP) er et 'direct push' screeningsværktøj, som kan anvendes ved karakterisering af forurenede grunde. Karakterisering af kildeområder med chlorerede opløsningsmidler (som DNAPL) udgør et vigtigt led i udviklingen af den konceptuelle forståelse, som er essentiel...... for risikovurdering og valg af afværgestrategi. Integreret karakterisering med en række metoder for direkte såvel som indirekte dokumentation af DNAPL i moræneler, herunder MIP, er beskrevet i Kerrn-Jespersen et al. (2013). Det samlede DNAPL-karakteriseringsprojekt er beskrevet i detaljer i Janniche et al. (2013). En...... vurdering af anvendte detektorer for MIP er foretaget af Olsson (2013). Ved karakterisering af forurening med bl.a. chlorerede opløsningsmidler er der behov for en vurdering af forureningssammensætning og nedbrydning. Tilsvarende vurdering er nødvendig, når udviklingen af stimuleret reduktiv dechlorering...

  8. Resource Use in the Production and Consumption System—The MIPS Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Liedtke

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept Material Input per Service Unit (MIPS was developed 20 years ago as a measure for the overall natural resource use of products and services. The material intensity analysis is used to calculate the material footprint of any economic activities in production and consumption. Environmental assessment has developed extensive databases for life cycle inventories, which can additionally be adopted for material intensity analysis. Based on practical experience in measuring material footprints on the micro level, this paper presents the current state of research and methodology development: it shows the international discussions on the importance of accounting methodologies to measure progress in resource efficiency. The MIPS approach is presented and its micro level application for assessing value chains, supporting business management, and operationalizing sustainability strategies is discussed. Linkages to output-oriented Life Cycle Assessment as well as to Material Flow Analysis (MFA at the macro level are pointed out. Finally we come to the conclusion that the MIPS approach provides relevant knowledge on resource and energy input at the micro level for fact-based decision-making in science, policy, business, and consumption.

  9. An Efficient and Secure m-IPS Scheme of Mobile Devices for Human-Centric Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sik Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent rapid developments in wireless and mobile IT technologies have led to their application in many real-life areas, such as disasters, home networks, mobile social networks, medical services, industry, schools, and the military. Business/work environments have become wire/wireless, integrated with wireless networks. Although the increase in the use of mobile devices that can use wireless networks increases work efficiency and provides greater convenience, wireless access to networks represents a security threat. Currently, wireless intrusion prevention systems (IPSs are used to prevent wireless security threats. However, these are not an ideal security measure for businesses that utilize mobile devices because they do not take account of temporal-spatial and role information factors. Therefore, in this paper, an efficient and secure mobile-IPS (m-IPS is proposed for businesses utilizing mobile devices in mobile environments for human-centric computing. The m-IPS system incorporates temporal-spatial awareness in human-centric computing with various mobile devices and checks users’ temporal spatial information, profiles, and role information to provide precise access control. And it also can extend application of m-IPS to the Internet of things (IoT, which is one of the important advanced technologies for supporting human-centric computing environment completely, for real ubiquitous field with mobile devices.

  10. Predicted RNA Binding Proteins Pes4 and Mip6 Regulate mRNA Levels, Translation, and Localization during Sporulation in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang; Zhang, Kai; Sternglanz, Rolf; Neiman, Aaron M

    2017-05-01

    In response to starvation, diploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo meiosis and form haploid spores, a process collectively referred to as sporulation. The differentiation into spores requires extensive changes in gene expression. The transcriptional activator Ndt80 is a central regulator of this process, which controls many genes essential for sporulation. Ndt80 induces ∼300 genes coordinately during meiotic prophase, but different mRNAs within the NDT80 regulon are translated at different times during sporulation. The protein kinase Ime2 and RNA binding protein Rim4 are general regulators of meiotic translational delay, but how differential timing of individual transcripts is achieved was not known. This report describes the characterization of two related NDT80 -induced genes, PES4 and MIP6 , encoding predicted RNA binding proteins. These genes are necessary to regulate the steady-state expression, translational timing, and localization of a set of mRNAs that are transcribed by NDT80 but not translated until the end of meiosis II. Mutations in the predicted RNA binding domains within PES4 alter the stability of target mRNAs. PES4 and MIP6 affect only a small portion of the NDT80 regulon, indicating that they act as modulators of the general Ime2/Rim4 pathway for specific transcripts. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. The Spitzer survey of interstellar clouds in the gould belt. VI. The Auriga-California molecular cloud observed with IRAC and MIPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Nutter, David; Bourke, Tyler L.; DiFrancesco, James; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Allen, Lori E.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Dunham, Michael M.; Merín, Bruno; Terebey, Susan; Peterson, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70, and 160 μm observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg 2 with IRAC and 10.47 deg 2 with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors, and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkHα 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the relative fraction of YSOs in earlier (Class I and F) and later (Class II) classes compared to other clouds. We perform simple SED modeling of the YSOs with disks to compare the mid-IR properties to disks in other clouds and identify 14 classical transition disk candidates. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size, and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15-20 times fewer stars.

  12. The Spitzer Survey of Interstellar Clouds in the Gould Belt. VI. The Auriga-California Molecular Cloud Observed with IRAC and MIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Nutter, David; Bourke, Tyler L.; DiFrancesco, James; Jorgensen, Jes K.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70 and 160 micrometers observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg(exp 2) with IRAC and 10.47 deg2 with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkH(alpha) 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the fraction of YSOs in the region with disks relative to an estimate of the diskless YSO population. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15 - 20 times fewer stars.

  13. The Spitzer survey of interstellar clouds in the gould belt. VI. The Auriga-California molecular cloud observed with IRAC and MIPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Harvey, Paul M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Tothill, Nicholas F. H. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia); Nutter, David [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queen' s Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); DiFrancesco, James [National Research Council Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Jørgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø. (Denmark); Allen, Lori E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Chapman, Nicholas L. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Dunham, Michael M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Merín, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC-ESA, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Terebey, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Peterson, Dawn E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70, and 160 μm observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg{sup 2} with IRAC and 10.47 deg{sup 2} with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors, and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkHα 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the relative fraction of YSOs in earlier (Class I and F) and later (Class II) classes compared to other clouds. We perform simple SED modeling of the YSOs with disks to compare the mid-IR properties to disks in other clouds and identify 14 classical transition disk candidates. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size, and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15-20 times fewer stars.

  14. The AgMIP Wheat Pilot: A multi-model approach for climate change impact assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asseng, S.

    2012-12-01

    Asseng S., F. Ewert, C. Rosenzweig, J.W. Jones, J.L. Hatfield, A. Ruane, K.J. Boote, P. Thorburn, R.P. Rötter, D. Cammarano, N. Brisson, B. Basso, P. Martre, D. Ripoche, P. Bertuzzi, P. Steduto, L. Heng, M.A. Semenov, P. Stratonovitch, C. Stockle, G. O'Leary, P.K. Aggarwal, S. Naresh Kumar, C. Izaurralde, J.W. White, L.A. Hunt, R. Grant, K.C. Kersebaum, T. Palosuo, J. Hooker, T. Osborne, J. Wolf, I. Supit, J.E. Olesen, J. Doltra, C. Nendel, S. Gayler, J. Ingwersen, E. Priesack, T. Streck, F. Tao, C. Müller, K. Waha, R. Goldberg, C. Angulo, I. Shcherbak, C. Biernath, D. Wallach, M. Travasso, A. Challinor. Abstract: Crop simulation models have been used to assess the impact of climate change on agriculture. These assessments are often carried out with a single model in a limited number of environments and without determining the uncertainty of simulated impacts. There is a need for a coordinated effort bringing together multiple modeling teams which has been recognized by the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP; www.agmip.org). AgMIP aims to provide more robust estimates of climate impacts on crop yields and agricultural trade, including estimates of associated uncertainties. Here, we present the AgMIP Wheat Pilot Study, the most comprehensive model intercomparison of the response of wheat crops to climate change to date, including 27 wheat models. Crop model uncertainties in assessing climate change impacts are explored and compared with field experimental and Global Circulation Model uncertainties. Causes of impact uncertainties and ways to reduce these are discussed.

  15. Sex peptides and MIPs can activate the same G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Nachman, Ronald J; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2013-07-01

    In many animal species, copulation elicits a number of physiological and behavioral changes in the female partner. In Drosophila melanogaster, the main molecular effector of these physiological responses has been identified as sex peptide (SP). The sex peptide receptor (SPR) has been characterized and recently, its activation by Drosophila myoinhibiting peptides (MIPs)-in addition to SP-has been demonstrated. The myoinhibiting peptides are members of a conserved peptide family, also known as B-type allatostatins, which generally feature the C-terminal motif -WX6Wamide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeted Capture and High-Throughput Sequencing Using Molecular Inversion Probes (MIPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantsilieris, Stuart; Stessman, Holly A; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E

    2017-01-01

    Molecular inversion probes (MIPs) in combination with massively parallel DNA sequencing represent a versatile, yet economical tool for targeted sequencing of genomic DNA. Several thousand genomic targets can be selectively captured using long oligonucleotides containing unique targeting arms and universal linkers. The ability to append sequencing adaptors and sample-specific barcodes allows large-scale pooling and subsequent high-throughput sequencing at relatively low cost per sample. Here, we describe a "wet bench" protocol detailing the capture and subsequent sequencing of >2000 genomic targets from 192 samples, representative of a single lane on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform.

  17. Study on some factors affecting the results in the use of MIP method in concrete research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhattacharjee, B.

    2003-01-01

    Effects of rate of pressure application and forms and type of sample on porosity and pore size distribution of concrete estimated through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) are presented in this experimental work. Two different forms of concrete sample, namely, crushed chunks of concrete and small core drilled out from the concrete beam specimens, were used for this study. The results exhibit that the rate of pressure application in mercury porosimetry has little effect on porosity and pore size distribution of concrete. It is also demonstrated that small cores drilled out from large concrete specimens are preferable as samples for performing porosimetry test on concrete

  18. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP): Protocols and Pilot Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J. W.; Hatfield, J. L.; Ruane, A. C.; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, P.; Antle, J. M.; Nelson, G. C.; Porter, C.; Janssen, S.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is a major international effort linking the climate, crop, and economic modeling communities with cutting-edge information technology to produce improved crop and economic models and the next generation of climate impact projections for the agricultural sector. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. Analyses of the agricultural impacts of climate variability and change require a transdisciplinary effort to consistently link state-of-the-art climate scenarios to crop and economic models. Crop model outputs are aggregated as inputs to regional and global economic models to determine regional vulnerabilities, changes in comparative advantage, price effects, and potential adaptation strategies in the agricultural sector. Climate, Crop Modeling, Economics, and Information Technology Team Protocols are presented to guide coordinated climate, crop modeling, economics, and information technology research activities around the world, along with AgMIP Cross-Cutting Themes that address uncertainty, aggregation and scaling, and the development of Representative Agricultural Pathways (RAPs) to enable testing of climate change adaptations in the context of other regional and global trends. The organization of research activities by geographic region and specific crops is described, along with project milestones. Pilot results demonstrate AgMIP's role in assessing climate impacts with explicit representation of uncertainties in climate scenarios and simulations using crop and economic models. An intercomparison of wheat model simulations near Obregón, Mexico reveals inter-model differences in yield sensitivity to [CO2] with model uncertainty holding approximately steady as concentrations rise, while uncertainty related to choice of crop model increases with

  19. Study on the usefulness of whole body SPECT coronal image, MIP image in {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Seiji [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Hospital; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Kurata, Seiji; Morita, Seiichirou; Hayabuchi, Naofumi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Fukushima, Shigehiro [Kyushu Inst. of Design, Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Auditory and Visual Communication Sciences; Umezaki, Noriyoshi [Daiichi Coll. of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we examined the usefulness of whole body coronal images and whole body cine display MIP images (CMIP) upon which image processing was carried out after whole body SPECT in comparison to the usefulness of whole body images (WB/SC) compensated by scattered radiation in tumor/inflammation scintigraphy with {sup 67}Ga-citrate ({sup 67}Ga). Image interpretation was performed for the 120 patients with confirmed diagnoses, and the accuracy of their diagnoses was studied by three nuclear medical physicians and two clinical radiological technologists by means of sensitivity, specificity and ROC analysis. The resultant data show that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and the area under the ROC curve Az in the WB/SC were approximately 65%, 86%, 74% and 0.724, respectively, whereas sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Az of the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method were approximately 93%, 95%, 94% and 0.860, respectively. Furthermore, coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method tended to be superior to those produced by the FBP method in both diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. In conclusion, the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method was shown to be superior in diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. Our data suggest that whole body SPECT is an excellent technique as an alternative to WB/SC. (author)

  20. Model Evaluation and Uncertainty in Agricultural Impacts Assessments: Results and Strategies from the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.; Hatfield, J.; Jones, J. W.; Ruane, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is an international effort to assess the state of global agricultural modeling and to understand climate impacts on the agricultural sector. AgMIP connects the climate science, crop modeling, and agricultural economic modeling communities to generate probabilistic projections of current and future climate impacts. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of risk of hunger and world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. This presentation will describe the general approach of AgMIP, highlight AgMIP efforts to evaluate climate, crop, and economic models, and discuss AgMIP uncertainty assessments. Model evaluation efforts will be outlined using examples from various facets of AgMIP, including climate scenario generation, the wheat crop model intercomparison, and the global agricultural economics model intercomparison being led in collaboration with the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP). Strategies developed to quantify uncertainty in each component of AgMIP, as well as the propagation of uncertainty through the climate-crop-economic modeling framework, will be detailed and preliminary uncertainty assessments that highlight crucial areas requiring improved models and data collection will be introduced.

  1. Direct replacement of antibodies with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanoparticles in ELISA – development of a novel assay for vancomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianella, Iva; Guerreiro, Antonio; Moczko, Ewa; Caygill, J. Sarah; Piletska, Elena V.; Perez De Vargas Sansalvador, Isabel M.; Whitcombe, Michael J.; Piletsky, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    A simple and straightforward technique for coating microplate wells with molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) to develop ELISA type assays is presented here for the first time. NanoMIPs were synthesized by a solid phase approach with immobilized vancomycin (template) and characterized using Biacore 3000, dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Immobilization, blocking and washing conditions were optimized in microplate format. The detection of vancomycin was achieved in competitive binding experiments with a HRP-vancomycin conjugate. The assay was capable of measuring vancomycin in buffer and in blood plasma within the range 0.001-70 nM with a detection limit of 0.0025 nM (2.5 pM). The sensitivity of the assay was three orders of magnitude better than a previously described ELISA based on antibodies. In these experiments nanoMIPs have shown high affinity and minimal interference from blood plasma components. Immobilized nanoMIPs were stored for 1 month at room temperature without any detrimental effects to their binding properties. The high affinity of nanoMIPs and the lack of a requirement for cold chain logistics make them an attractive alternative to traditional antibodies used in ELISA. PMID:23947402

  2. Influence of the CCR-5/MIP-1 α axis in the pathogenesis of Rocio virus encephalitis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Juliana H; França, Rafael F O; Oliveira, Carlo J F; de Aquino, Maria T P; Farias, Kleber J S; Machado, Paula R L; de Oliveira, Thelma F M; Yokosawa, Jonny; Soares, Edson G; da Silva, João S; da Fonseca, Benedito A L; Figueiredo, Luiz T M

    2013-11-01

    Rocio virus (ROCV) caused an outbreak of human encephalitis during the 1970s in Brazil and its immunopathogenesis remains poorly understood. CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a chemokine receptor that binds to macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1 α). Both molecules are associated with inflammatory cells migration during infections. In this study, we demonstrated the importance of the CCR5 and MIP-1 α, in the outcome of viral encephalitis of ROCV-infected mice. CCR5 and MIP-1 α knockout mice survived longer than wild-type (WT) ROCV-infected animals. In addition, knockout mice had reduced inflammation in the brain. Assessment of brain viral load showed mice virus detection five days post-infection in wild-type and CCR5-/- mice, while MIP-1 α-/- mice had lower viral loads seven days post-infection. Knockout mice required a higher lethal dose than wild-type mice as well. The CCR5/MIP-1 α axis may contribute to migration of infected cells to the brain and consequently affect the pathogenesis during ROCV infection.

  3. Detection of trace microcystin-LR on a 20 MHz QCM sensor coated with in situ self-assembled MIPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Zhou, Lianqun; Wang, Yi; Li, Chuanyu; Yao, Jia; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Qingwen; Li, Mingyu; Li, Haiwen; Dong, Wen-fei

    2015-01-01

    A 20 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor coated with in situ self-assembled molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was presented for the detection of trace microcystin-LR (MC-LR) in drinking water. The sensor performance obtained using the in situ self-assembled MIPs was compared with traditionally synthesized MIPs on 20 MHz and normal 10 MHz QCM chip. The results show that the response increases by more than 60% when using the in situ self-assembly method compared using the traditionally method while the 20 MHz QCM chip provides four-fold higher response than the 10 MHz one. Therefore, the in situ self-assembled MIPs coated on a high frequency QCM chip was used in the sensor performance test to detect MC-LR in tap water. It showed a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.04 nM which is lower than the safety guideline level (1 nM MC-LR) of drinking water in China. The low sensor response to other analogs indicated the high specificity of the sensor to MC-LR. The sensor showed high stability and low signal variation less than 2.58% after regeneration. The lake water sample analysis shows the sensor is possible for practical use. The combination of the higher frequency QCM with the in situ self-assembled MIPs provides a good candidate for the detection of other small molecules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Tracking atmospheric sulphur pollution from the study of Racomitrium lanuginosum mosses in Iceland: A multi-isotope approach (δ34S, 206Pb/204Pb, δ13C and δ15N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, E.; Widory, D.; Gautason, B.; Rogers, K.; Morrison, J.

    2010-12-01

    Among terrestrial plants, the applicability of mosses as monitoring organisms of atmospheric pollutants is a world-wide accepted technique due to their special biological and morphologic characteristics as nonvascular plants. They are commonly regarded as the best bioindicators of air quality because they can accumulate sulphur (S) and other elements to a far greater level than is necessary for their physiological needs. This study aims at using different isotope systematics δ34S, 206Pb/204Pb, δ13C and δ15N) to help understand the origin of S in the atmophsere of Reykjavik and its vicinity, and especially the potential contribution of surrounding geothermal plants. The selected Icelandic woolly fringe moss (Racomitrium lanuginosum (Hedw.) Brid.) is extremely common in lava fields and gravely and stony areas. Samples were taken in four distinct sampling sites around the city of Reykjavik: Bláfjöll area (south-eastern suburb of the city), and close to three power plants: Hellisheioarvirkjun (northern suburb of the city), Svartsengi (south-western suburb of the city) and Nesjavellir (north-eastern suburb of the city). Results show that, whatever the sampling context is, S is controlled by a binary mixing, between i) a high δ34S (around 16‰) end-member, characteristic of mosses from Hellisheioarvirkjun, and ii) a low δ34S (around -2‰) end-member, characteristic of mosses from Nesjavellir. The multi-isotope approach, confirms this binary relation and helps to constrain the different end-members involved.

  5. The development of a MIP-optosensor for the detection of monoamine naphthalenes in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Navarro, Angel; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Fernández-Sánchez, Jorge F; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Mallavia, Ricardo; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2009-03-15

    To enhance the advantages of fluorescent flow-through sensing for drinking water we have designed a novel sensing matrix based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The synergic combination of a tailor-made MIP recognition with a selective room temperature fluorescence detection is a novel concept for optosensing devices and is assessed here for the simple and selective determination of pollutants in water. We describe a simple approach to preparing synthetic receptors for monoamine naphthalene compounds (MA-NCs) using non-covalent molecular imprinting techniques and naphthalene as template. We examine in detail the binding characteristics of the imprinted polymer and describe the flow-through sensor of MA-NCs by solid-surface fluorescence. Its detection limits for recognizing 1-naphthylamine (1-NA) and 2-naphthylamine (2-NA) separately are 26 ngmL(-1) and 50 ngmL(-1), respectively, and it also determines 1-NA and 2-NA simultaneously with a detection limit of 45 ngmL(-1). All the instrumental, chemical and flow variables were carefully optimized and an interference study was carried out to demonstrate its applicability and selectivity. Finally, we applied it to the analysis of 1-NA and 2-NA in tap and mineral waters, obtaining a 98% average recovery rate.

  6. MIP Models and Hybrid Algorithms for Simultaneous Job Splitting and Scheduling on Unrelated Parallel Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmutlu, H. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    We developed mixed integer programming (MIP) models and hybrid genetic-local search algorithms for the scheduling problem of unrelated parallel machines with job sequence and machine-dependent setup times and with job splitting property. The first contribution of this paper is to introduce novel algorithms which make splitting and scheduling simultaneously with variable number of subjobs. We proposed simple chromosome structure which is constituted by random key numbers in hybrid genetic-local search algorithm (GAspLA). Random key numbers are used frequently in genetic algorithms, but it creates additional difficulty when hybrid factors in local search are implemented. We developed algorithms that satisfy the adaptation of results of local search into the genetic algorithms with minimum relocation operation of genes' random key numbers. This is the second contribution of the paper. The third contribution of this paper is three developed new MIP models which are making splitting and scheduling simultaneously. The fourth contribution of this paper is implementation of the GAspLAMIP. This implementation let us verify the optimality of GAspLA for the studied combinations. The proposed methods are tested on a set of problems taken from the literature and the results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms. PMID:24977204

  7. MIP-graphene-modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of trimethoprim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Hélder; Pacheco, João G; Magalhães, Júlia M C S; Viswanathan, Subramanian; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2014-02-15

    A novel sensitive electrochemical sensor was developed by electropolymerization of pyrrole (PY) and molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) which was synthesized onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) in aqueous solution using cyclic voltammetry in the presence of Trimethoprim (TMP) as template molecules. Furthermore, a previous electrode modification was performed by deposition of a suspension of graphene on the electrode's surface. The performance of the imprinted and non-imprinted (NIP) films was evaluated by impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) of a ferric solution. The molecularly imprinted film exhibited a high selectivity and sensitivity toward TMP. The sensor presented a linear range, between peak current intensity and logarithm of TMP concentration between 1.0 × 10(-6) and 1.0 × 10(-4)M. The results were accurate (with recoveries higher than 94%), precise (with standard deviations less than 5%) and the detection limit was 1.3 × 10(-7)M. The new sensor is selective, simple to construct and easy to operate. The MIP sensor was successfully applied to quantify TMP in urine samples. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MIPS Arabidopsis thaliana Database (MAtDB): an integrated biological knowledge resource for plant genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoof, Heiko; Ernst, Rebecca; Nazarov, Vladimir; Pfeifer, Lukas; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Mayer, Klaus F. X.

    2004-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely studied model plant. Functional genomics is intensively underway in many laboratories worldwide. Beyond the basic annotation of the primary sequence data, the annotated genetic elements of Arabidopsis must be linked to diverse biological data and higher order information such as metabolic or regulatory pathways. The MIPS Arabidopsis thaliana database MAtDB aims to provide a comprehensive resource for Arabidopsis as a genome model that serves as a primary reference for research in plants and is suitable for transfer of knowledge to other plants, especially crops. The genome sequence as a common backbone serves as a scaffold for the integration of data, while, in a complementary effort, these data are enhanced through the application of state-of-the-art bioinformatics tools. This information is visualized on a genome-wide and a gene-by-gene basis with access both for web users and applications. This report updates the information given in a previous report and provides an outlook on further developments. The MAtDB web interface can be accessed at http://mips.gsf.de/proj/thal/db. PMID:14681437

  9. MIP models and hybrid algorithms for simultaneous job splitting and scheduling on unrelated parallel machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Duygu Yilmaz; Ozmutlu, H Cenk

    2014-01-01

    We developed mixed integer programming (MIP) models and hybrid genetic-local search algorithms for the scheduling problem of unrelated parallel machines with job sequence and machine-dependent setup times and with job splitting property. The first contribution of this paper is to introduce novel algorithms which make splitting and scheduling simultaneously with variable number of subjobs. We proposed simple chromosome structure which is constituted by random key numbers in hybrid genetic-local search algorithm (GAspLA). Random key numbers are used frequently in genetic algorithms, but it creates additional difficulty when hybrid factors in local search are implemented. We developed algorithms that satisfy the adaptation of results of local search into the genetic algorithms with minimum relocation operation of genes' random key numbers. This is the second contribution of the paper. The third contribution of this paper is three developed new MIP models which are making splitting and scheduling simultaneously. The fourth contribution of this paper is implementation of the GAspLAMIP. This implementation let us verify the optimality of GAspLA for the studied combinations. The proposed methods are tested on a set of problems taken from the literature and the results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  10. AgMIP's Transdisciplinary Agricultural Systems Approach to Regional Integrated Assessment of Climate Impacts, Vulnerability, and Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, John M.; Valdivia, Roberto O.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Janssen, Sander; Jones, James W.; Porter, Cheryl H.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Ruane, Alexander C.; Thorburn, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes methods developed by the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) to implement a transdisciplinary, systems-based approach for regional-scale (local to national) integrated assessment of agricultural systems under future climate, biophysical, and socio-economic conditions. These methods were used by the AgMIP regional research teams in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to implement the analyses reported in their respective chapters of this book. Additional technical details are provided in Appendix 1.The principal goal that motivates AgMIP's regional integrated assessment (RIA) methodology is to provide scientifically rigorous information needed to support improved decision-making by various stakeholders, ranging from local to national and international non-governmental and governmental organizations.

  11. Induction of C-Mip by IL-17 Plays an Important Role in Adriamycin-Induced Podocyte Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although the disturbance of T lymphocyte and glomerular podocyte exerts a crucial function in the pathogenesis of proteinuria, the potential link is still unclear. Methods: The balance of Treg and Th17 cells, and the expression of IL-17/IL-17R and c-mip were investigated in adrimycin-induced nephropathy (AN mice. The effect and mechanism of IL-17 on podocyte were explored in cultured podocytes. Results: The proportion of Th17 cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the amount of IL-17 in serum and kidney cortical homogenates, and the expression of IL-17R and c-mip in glomerular podocyte were increased obviously in AN mice. In cultured podocytes, recombinant IL-17 led to an induction of apoptosis and cytoskeletal disorganization, an overproduction of c-mip while down-regulation of phosphor-nephrin, and an increased binding of c-mip to NF-κB/RelA. Silence of c-mip prevented podocyte apoptosis and reduction of phosphor-nephrin by prompting nuclear translocation of NF-κB/RelA in IL-17 treated cells. Persistent activation of NF-κB up-regulated pro-survival protein Bcl-2 and decreased podocyte apoptosis, but had no effect on phosphor-nephrin level. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated that induction of IL-17 released by Th17 cells plays a key role in podocytopathy most likely through down-regulation of phosphor-nephrin and Bcl-2 level via overproduction of c-mip.

  12. Extended-gate field-effect transistor (EG-FET) with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film for selective inosine determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskierko, Zofia; Sosnowska, Marta; Sharma, Piyush Sindhu; Benincori, Tiziana; D'Souza, Francis; Kaminska, Izabela; Fronc, Krzysztof; Noworyta, Krzysztof

    2015-12-15

    A novel recognition unit of chemical sensor for selective determination of the inosine, renal disfunction biomarker, was devised and prepared. For that purpose, inosine-templated molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film was deposited on an extended-gate field-effect transistor (EG-FET) signal transducing unit. The MIP film was prepared by electrochemical polymerization of bis(bithiophene) derivatives bearing cytosine and boronic acid substituents, in the presence of the inosine template and a thiophene cross-linker. After MIP film deposition, the template was removed, and was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. Subsequently, the film composition was characterized by spectroscopic techniques, and its morphology and thickness were determined by AFM. The finally MIP film-coated extended-gate field-effect transistor (EG-FET) was used for signal transduction. This combination is not widely studied in the literature, despite the fact that it allows for facile integration of electrodeposited MIP film with FET transducer. The linear dynamic concentration range of the chemosensor was 0.5-50 μM with inosine detectability of 0.62 μM. The obtained detectability compares well to the levels of the inosine in body fluids which are in the range 0-2.9 µM for patients with diagnosed diabetic nephropathy, gout or hyperuricemia, and can reach 25 µM in certain cases. The imprinting factor for inosine, determined from piezomicrogravimetric experiments with use of the MIP film-coated quartz crystal resonator, was found to be 5.5. Higher selectivity for inosine with respect to common interferents was also achieved with the present molecularly engineered sensing element. The obtained analytical parameters of the devised chemosensor allow for its use for practical sample measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Verbetering acclimatisatie geënt uitgangsmateriaal : inventarisatie van stress bij enten van glasgroenten met MIPS en vermindering uitval tijdens acclimatisatie door Graft Promotors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J.; Stevens, L.H.; Schoor, van der R.; Davelaar, E.; Dijkhuis, P.; Jalink, H.; Krieken, van der W.M.

    2010-01-01

    In dit project zullen met MIPS nieuwe procedures ontwikkeld worden voor het conditioneren en acclimatiseren van enten van groentengewassen. Met MIPS kunnen de effecten van conditionering en acclimatisering op groei, stress en stressgevoeligheid van de enten in de kas nauwkeurig en snel gemeten

  14. Síntese e caracterização de MIP com fenilalanina visando sua aplicação na técnica de SPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Talita de Oliveira Alves

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polímeros Molecularmente Impressos (MIPs são polímeros sintéticos que apresentam alta seletividade a uma molécula de interesse. O objetivo deste trabalho foi a síntese e caracterização de MIPs para aplicação na extração em fase sólida (SPE, visando a determinação de fenilalanina. Os MIPs foram sintetizados a partir do MAA, fenilalanina, EGDMA, AIBN, em clorofórmio. Também foi sintetizado o polímero não-impresso (NIP, para controle da seletividade dos MIPs. A dessorção da fenilalanina foi realizada em extrator Soxhlet. Os MIPs e NIP foram caracterizados pelas técnicas de análise: FTIR, UV-Vis, MEV, DSC e TG. O MIP apresentou maior capacidade adsortiva à fenilalanina do que o NIP, com uma taxa média de adsorção de 55% comparada a 11% para o NIP. Por MEV o MIP apresentou superfície mais porosa, importante característica para aplicação em SPE. Os estudos realizados mostraram que o MIP sintetizado apresentou grande potencial para aplicação em técnica de SPE.

  15. microProtein Prediction Program (miP3) : A Software for Predicting microProteins and Their Target Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klein, Niek; Magnani, Enrico; Banf, Michael; Rhee, Seung Yon

    2015-01-01

    An emerging concept in transcriptional regulation is that a class of truncated transcription factors (TFs), called microProteins (miPs), engages in protein-protein interactions with TF complexes and provides feedback controls. A handful of miP examples have been described in the literature but the

  16. CXC-chemokines KC and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) synergistically induce leukocyte recruitment to the central nervous system in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenburg, Petra J. G.; Polfliet, Machteld M. J.; Florquin, Sandrine; van den Berg, Timo K.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; Roord, John J.; van der Poll, Tom; van Furth, A. Marceline

    2003-01-01

    Intracisternal injection of the CXC-chemokines KC or macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 induced a pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of rats in a dose dependent way. MIP-2 was much more potent than KC. The concurrent injection of both chemokines revealed a profound synergistic effect

  17. Evaluating the Sources and Fate of Nitrate in the Alluvial Aquifers in the Shijiazhuang Rural and Suburban Area, China: Hydrochemical and Multi-Isotopic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanpeng Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the sources and fate of NO\\(_{3}^{-}\\ contaminants is important to protect the water quality of aquifer systems. In this study, NO\\(_{3}^{-}\\ contaminated groundwater from the drinking water wells in the Shijiazhuang area, China, was chemically (NO\\(_{3}^{-}\\/Cl\\(^{\\rm{{-}}}\\ ratio and isotopically (\\(δ\\\\(^{\\rm{15}}\\N\\(_{\\rm{NO3}}\\, \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{18}}\\O\\(_{\\rm{NO3}}\\ and \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{13}}\\C\\(_{\\rm{DOC}}\\; \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{2}}\\H\\(_{\\rm{H2O}}\\, \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{18}}\\O\\(_{\\rm{H2O}}\\ characterized to identify the sources of NO\\(_{3}^{-}\\ and address subsequent biogeochemical processes. The positive correlations between dominant anions and cations suggested that the dissolution of calcium carbonate and gypsum minerals was the most effective process in the groundwater. Elevated concentrations of NO\\(_{3}^{-}\\, Cl\\(^{\\rm{{-}}}\\ and Mg\\(^{\\rm{2+}}\\ could be related to the wastewater irrigation and usage of fertilizers. The natural water in the study area originated primarily from precipitation and experienced a limited extent of evaporation, as demonstrated by measurements of \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{2}}\\H\\(_{\\rm{H2O}}\\ and \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{18}}\\O\\(_{\\rm{H2O}}\\. A cross-plot of \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{15}}\\N\\(_{\\rm{NO3}}\\ vs. \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{18}}\\O\\(_{\\rm{NO3}}\\ gave an enrichment of the 15N isotope relative to the 18O isotope by a factor of 2. A further insight into the denitrification process was obtained by the synergistic changes in \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{13}}\\C\\(_{\\rm{DOC}}\\ and \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{15}}\\N\\(_{\\rm{NO3}}\\ values, confirming that a low extent of denitrification occurred. Nitrification processes were evaluated by means of \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{18}}\\O\\(_{\\rm{NO3}}\\ and \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{18}}\\O\\(_{\\rm{H2O}}\\. The initial \\(\\delta\\\\(^{\\rm{15}}\\N\\(_{\\rm{NO3}}\\ value(s of the NO\\(_{3}^{-}\\ source

  18. Downregulation of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 with praziquantel treatment in Schistosoma haematobium and HIV-1 co-infected individuals in a rural community in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinyama-Gutsire, Rbl; Gomo, E.; Kallestrup, P

    2009-01-01

    influence. METHODS: To determine levels of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 chemokine in plasma of S. haematobium and HIV-1 co-infected and uninfected individuals in a rural black Zimbabwean community.A cohort was established of HIV-1 and schistosomiasis infection and co-infection comprising 379 participants. Outcome...... measures consisted of HIV-1 and schistosomiasis status and levels of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 in plasma at baseline and three months post treatment. An association was established between MIP-1alpha/CCL3 plasma levels with HIV-1 and S. haematobium infections. RESULTS: A total of 379 adults formed the established...... cohort comprising 76 (20%) men and 303 (80%) women. Mean age was 33.25, range 17 - 62 years. The median MIP-1alpha/CCL3 plasma concentration was significantly higher in S. haematobium infected compared with uninfected individuals (p = 0.029). In contrast, there was no difference in the median MIP-1alpha...

  19. nonlinMIP contribution to CMIP6: model intercomparison project for non-linear mechanisms: physical basis, experimental design and analysis principles (v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Good

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available nonlinMIP provides experiments that account for state-dependent regional and global climate responses. The experiments have two main applications: (1 to focus understanding of responses to CO2 forcing on states relevant to specific policy or scientific questions (e.g. change under low-forcing scenarios, the benefits of mitigation, or from past cold climates to the present day, or (2 to understand the state dependence (non-linearity of climate change – i.e. why doubling the forcing may not double the response. State dependence (non-linearity of responses can be large at regional scales, with important implications for understanding mechanisms and for general circulation model (GCM emulation techniques (e.g. energy balance models and pattern-scaling methods. However, these processes are hard to explore using traditional experiments, which explains why they have had so little attention in previous studies. Some single model studies have established novel analysis principles and some physical mechanisms. There is now a need to explore robustness and uncertainty in such mechanisms across a range of models (point 2 above, and, more broadly, to focus work on understanding the response to CO2 on climate states relevant to specific policy/science questions (point 1. nonlinMIP addresses this using a simple, small set of CO2-forced experiments that are able to separate linear and non-linear mechanisms cleanly, with a good signal-to-noise ratio – while being demonstrably traceable to realistic transient scenarios. The design builds on the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and CMIP6 DECK (Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima protocols, and is centred around a suite of instantaneous atmospheric CO2 change experiments, with a ramp-up–ramp-down experiment to test traceability to gradual forcing scenarios. In all cases the models are intended to be used with CO2 concentrations rather than CO2 emissions as the input. The

  20. nonlinMIP contribution to CMIP6: model intercomparison project for non-linear mechanisms: physical basis, experimental design and analysis principles (v1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Peter; Andrews, Timothy; Chadwick, Robin; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Lowe, Jason A.; Schaller, Nathalie; Shiogama, Hideo

    2016-11-01

    nonlinMIP provides experiments that account for state-dependent regional and global climate responses. The experiments have two main applications: (1) to focus understanding of responses to CO2 forcing on states relevant to specific policy or scientific questions (e.g. change under low-forcing scenarios, the benefits of mitigation, or from past cold climates to the present day), or (2) to understand the state dependence (non-linearity) of climate change - i.e. why doubling the forcing may not double the response. State dependence (non-linearity) of responses can be large at regional scales, with important implications for understanding mechanisms and for general circulation model (GCM) emulation techniques (e.g. energy balance models and pattern-scaling methods). However, these processes are hard to explore using traditional experiments, which explains why they have had so little attention in previous studies. Some single model studies have established novel analysis principles and some physical mechanisms. There is now a need to explore robustness and uncertainty in such mechanisms across a range of models (point 2 above), and, more broadly, to focus work on understanding the response to CO2 on climate states relevant to specific policy/science questions (point 1). nonlinMIP addresses this using a simple, small set of CO2-forced experiments that are able to separate linear and non-linear mechanisms cleanly, with a good signal-to-noise ratio - while being demonstrably traceable to realistic transient scenarios. The design builds on the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) and CMIP6 DECK (Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima) protocols, and is centred around a suite of instantaneous atmospheric CO2 change experiments, with a ramp-up-ramp-down experiment to test traceability to gradual forcing scenarios. In all cases the models are intended to be used with CO2 concentrations rather than CO2 emissions as the input. The understanding

  1. Conversion of ADC pulse heights into MIP units (NUMASS test data, September 1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q.P.

    1993-04-01

    ADC calibration is an important part of the data analysis in particle physics. Data analysis of ADC pulse heights is based on a physical unit which is called MIP (most probable energy loss of Minimum Ionization Particles). This paper describes the ADC calibration work for the September 1991 NUMASS test data, which were produced at CERN at the SPS facility. The Vavilov function is used to fit the energy loss distributions of minimum ionizing particles traversing the time of flight scintillators embedded in the uranium scintillator calorimeter. It is assumed that the energy loss distribution is the same for identical scintillators and the value at the peak of these distributions is used, i.e., the most probable energy loss, as a physical unit to derive the gains of the individual readout channels

  2. Spitzer MIPS Limits on Asteroidal Dust in the Pulsar Planetary System PSR B1257+12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryden, G.; Beichman, C. A.; Rieke, G. H.; Stansberry, J. A.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Trilling, D. E.; Turner, N. J.; Wolszczan, A.

    2006-01-01

    With the MIPS camera on Spitzer, we have searched for far-infrared emission from dust in the planetary system orbiting pulsar PSR B1257+12. With accuracies of 0.05 mJy at 24 microns and 1.5 mJy at 70 microns, photometric measurements find no evidence for emission at these wavelengths. These observations place new upper limits on the luminosity of dust with temperatures between 20 and 1000 K. They are particularly sensitive to dust temperatures of 100-200 K, for which they limit the dust luminosity to below 3 x 10(exp -5) of the pulsar's spin-down luminosity, 3 orders of magnitude better than previous limits. Despite these improved constraints on dust emission, an asteroid belt similar to the solar system's cannot be ruled out.

  3. Interaction between shallow and deep aquifers in the Tivoli Plain (Central Italy) enhanced by groundwater extraction: A multi-isotope approach and geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carucci, Valentina; Petitta, Marco; Aravena, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    In the Tivoli Plain (Rome, Central Italy) the interaction between shallow and deep groundwater flow systems enhanced by groundwater extraction has been investigated using isotopic and chemical tracers. A conceptual model of the groundwater flowpaths has been developed and verified by geochemical modeling. A combined hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigation using ion relationships such as DIC/Cl − , Ca/(Ca + Mg)/SO 4 /(SO 4 + HCO 3 ), and environmental isotopes (δ 18 O, δ 2 H, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr, δ 34 S and δ 13 C) was carried out in order to determine the sources of recharge of the aquifer, the origin of solutes and the mixing processes in groundwater of Tivoli Plain. Multivariate statistical methods such as principal component analysis and Cluster analyses have confirmed the existence of different geochemical facies and the role of mixing in the chemical composition of the groundwater. Results indicate that the hydrochemistry of groundwater is characterized by mixing between end-members coming directly from carbonate recharge areas and to groundwater circulating in a deeply buried Meso-Cenozoic carbonate sequence. The travertine aquifer is fed by both flow systems, but a local contribution by direct input in the Plain has also been recognized. The stable isotope data ( 18 O, 2 H, 13 C and 34 S) supports the flow system conceptual model inferred from the geochemical data and represents key data to quantify the geochemical mixing in the different groundwaters of the Plain. The results of numerical modeling (PHREEQC) are consistent with the flowpaths derived from the hydrogeochemical conceptual model. The inverse models performed generated the main geochemical processes occurring in the groundwater flow system, which also included mixing. Geochemical and isotope modeling demonstrate an increasing influence of groundwater from the deeply buried aquifer in the travertine aquifer, enhanced by lowering of the travertine aquifer water table due to quarry pumping.

  4. Diagnostic potential of virtual bronchoscopy: advantages in comparison with axial CT slices, MPR and mIP?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp-Bernhardt, U.; Doehring, W.; Bernhardt, T.M.; Welte, T.; Kropf, S.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of virtual endoscopy (VE) and to compare it with axial CT slices, multiplanar reconstructions (MPR), minimal intensity projections (mIP), and bronchoscopy in patients diagnosed with bronchogenic carcinoma. Thirty patients underwent a spiral CT. Axial CT images were transferred to an Onyx workstation (Silicon Graphics, Sun Microsystems, Mountain View, Calif.) for performing virtual endoscopy. Accuracy for this procedure was tested by three radiologists on a monitor in comparison with axial CT slices, MPR, mIP, and bronchoscopy concerning the localization and degree of stenoses. Endoluminal tumors were identified by virtual bronchoscopy with no statistically significant difference of localization or grading of stenosis in comparison with bronchoscopy, axial CT slices, MPR and mIP. Axial CT slices, MPR, and mIP showed poorer results with over- or underestimation of stenoses compared with VE and bronchoscopy. Passing of stenoses was only possible with VE in 5 patients. Virtual endoscopy is a non-invasive method for identification of endoluminal tumors and is comparable to real bronchoscopy. (orig.)

  5. Diagnostic potential of virtual bronchoscopy: advantages in comparison with axial CT slices, MPR and mIP?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp-Bernhardt, U.; Doehring, W.; Bernhardt, T.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany); Welte, T. [Department of Cardiology, Angiology, and Pneumology, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany); Kropf, S. [Department of Biometrics and Medical Informatics, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of virtual endoscopy (VE) and to compare it with axial CT slices, multiplanar reconstructions (MPR), minimal intensity projections (mIP), and bronchoscopy in patients diagnosed with bronchogenic carcinoma. Thirty patients underwent a spiral CT. Axial CT images were transferred to an Onyx workstation (Silicon Graphics, Sun Microsystems, Mountain View, Calif.) for performing virtual endoscopy. Accuracy for this procedure was tested by three radiologists on a monitor in comparison with axial CT slices, MPR, mIP, and bronchoscopy concerning the localization and degree of stenoses. Endoluminal tumors were identified by virtual bronchoscopy with no statistically significant difference of localization or grading of stenosis in comparison with bronchoscopy, axial CT slices, MPR and mIP. Axial CT slices, MPR, and mIP showed poorer results with over- or underestimation of stenoses compared with VE and bronchoscopy. Passing of stenoses was only possible with VE in 5 patients. Virtual endoscopy is a non-invasive method for identification of endoluminal tumors and is comparable to real bronchoscopy. (orig.)

  6. Molecular typing of Legionella pneumophila from air-conditioning cooling waters using mip gene, SBT, and FAFLP methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiangli; Li, Juntao; Zhang, Ying; Hou, Shuiping; Qu, Pinghua; Yang, Zhicong; Chen, Shouyi

    2017-08-01

    Legionella spp. are important waterborne pathogens. Molecular typing has become an important method for outbreaks investigations and source tracking of Legionnaires. In a survey program conducted by the Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple serotypes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) were isolated from waters in air-conditioning cooling towers in urban Guangzhou region, China between 2008 and 2011. Three genotyping methods, mip (macrophage infectivity potentiator) genotyping, SBT (sequence-based typing), and FAFLP (fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis) were used to type these waterborne L. pneumophila isolates. The three methods were capable of typing all the 134 isolates and a reference strain of L. pneumophila (ATCC33153), with discriminatory indices of 0.7034, 0.9218, and 0.9376, for the mip, SBT, and FAFLP methods respectively. Among the 9 serotypes of the 134 isolates, 10, 50, and 34 molecular types were detected by the mip, SBT, and FAFLP methods respectively. The mip genotyping and SBT typing are more feasible for inter-laboratory results sharing and comparison of different types of L. pneumophila. The SBT and FAFLP typing methods were rapid with higher discriminatory abilities. Combinations of two or more of the typing methods enables more accurate typing of Legionella isolates for outbreak investigations and source tracking of Legionnaires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The virus-encoded chemokine vMIP-II inhibits virus-induced Tc1-driven inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Nansen, Anneline; Bartholdy, Christina

    2003-01-01

    The human herpesvirus 8-encoded protein vMIP-II is a potent in vitro antagonist of many chemokine receptors believed to be associated with attraction of T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile. For the present report we have studied the in vivo potential of this viral chemokine antagonist to inhib...

  8. Biossíntese de vanilina pelo fungo Pycnoporus sanguineus MIP 95001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Moro Villela Pacheco

    2013-06-01

    A vanilina (substância popularmente conhecida como aroma de baunilha é um dos compostos mais utilizados, principalmente pelas indústrias alimentícias e farmacêuticas. Esta substância pode ser obtida da orquídea Vanilla planifolia, porém, este é um processo oneroso e demorado. Por esse motivo, outros métodos para a obtenção da vanilina vêm sendo estudados. Dentro deste contexto, o objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a biossíntese de vanilina por três isolados de Pycnoporus sanguineus através do uso de ácido vanílico como precursor. Os isolados foram cultivados em placas de Petri com meio ágar batata dextrose. Fragmentos destes cultivos foram inoculados em Erlenmeyers com meio líquido de caldo de batata e 0,3 g.L-1 de ácido vanílico. Os frascos permaneceram em shaker por oito dias a 28oC e 120 rpm. Foram retiradas diárias (0,8 mL.dia-1 para análise de vanilina, glicose, fenois totais, enzima lacase e proteínas totais. Os resultados revelaram que apenas a cepa MIP 95001 promoveu a biossíntese da vanilina. A maior concentração de vanilina foi detectada no quarto dia de cultivo (8,75 mg.dL-1. De forma geral, os resultados apresentados ilustram a possibilidade de biossintetizar a vanilina pelo Pycnoporus sanguineus (MIP 95001, evidenciando uma possível rota biotecnológica para a produção deste aroma.

  9. Legionella-protozoa-nematode interactions in aquatic biofilms and influence of Mip on Caenorhabditis elegans colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Janine; Krüger, Stefanie; Fontvieille, Dominique; Ünal, Can M; Michel, Rolf; Labrosse, Aurélie; Steinert, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaireś disease, is naturally found in aquatic habitats. The intracellular life cycle within protozoa pre-adapted the "accidental" human pathogen to also infect human professional phagocytes like alveolar macrophages. Previous studies employing the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that also nematodes might serve as a natural host for L. pneumophila. Here, we report for the first time from a natural co-habitation of L. pneumophila and environmental nematode species within biofilms of a warm water spring. In addition, we identified the protozoan species Oxytricha bifaria, Stylonychia mytilus, Ciliophrya sp. which have never been described as potential interaction partners of L. pneumophila before. Modeling and dissection of the Legionella-protozoa-nematode interaction revealed that C. elegans ruptures Legionella-infected amoebal cells and by this means incorporate the pathogen. Further infection studies revealed that the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein of L. pneumophila, which is known to bind collagen IV during human lung infection, promotes the colonization of the intestinal tract of L4 larvae of C. elegans and negatively influences the life span of the worms. The Mip-negative L. pneumophila mutant exhibited a 32-fold reduced colonization rate of the nematodes after 48h when compared to the wild-type strain. Taken together, these studies suggest that nematodes may serve as natural hosts for L. pneumophila, promote their persistence and dissemination in the environment, and co-evolutionarily pre-adapt the pathogen for interactions with extracellular constituents of human lung tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Standardization of MIP technique in three-dimensional CT portography: usefulness in evaluation of portosystemic collaterals in cirrhotic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Gi; Kim, Yong; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Suk Hong

    2003-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of three-dimensional CT portography using a standardized maximum intensity projection (MIP) technique for the evaluation of portosystemic collaterals in cirrhotic patients. In 25 cirrhotic patients with portosystemic collaterals, three-phase CT using a multide-tector-row helical CT scanner was performed to evaluate liver disease. Late arterial-phase images were transferred to an Advantage Windows 3.1 workstation (Gener Electric). Axial images were reconstructed by means of three-dimensional CT portography, using both a standardized and a non-standardized MIP technique, and the respective reconstruction times were determined. Three-dimensional CT portography with the standardized technique involved eight planes, namely the spleno-portal confluence axis (coronal, lordotic coronal, lordotic coronal RAO 30 .deg. C, and lordotic coronal LAO 30 .deg. C), the left renal vein axis (lordotic coronal), and axial MIP images (lower esophagus level, gastric fundus level and splenic hilum). The eight MIP images obtained in each case were interpreted by two radiologists, who reached a consensus in their evaluation. The portosystemic collaterals evaluated were as follows: left gastric vein dilatation; esophageal, paraesophageal, gastric, and splenic varix; paraumbilical vein dilatation; gastro-renal, spleno-renal, and gastro-spleno-renal shunt; mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and omental collaterals. The average reconstruction time using the non-standardized MIP technique was 11 minutes 23 seconds, and with the standardized technique, the time was 6 minutes 5 seconds. Three-dimensional CT portography with the standardized technique demonstrated left gastric vein dilatation (n=25), esophageal varix (n=18), paraesophageal varix (n=13), gastric varix (n=4), splenic varix (n=4), paraumbilical vein dilatation (n=4), gastro-renal shunt (n=3), spleno-renal shunt (n=3), and gastro-spleno-renal shunt (n=1). Using three-dimensional CT protography and the non

  11. Biomimetic polymers in analytical chemistry. Part 1: preparation and applications of MIP (Molecularly Imprinted Polymers) in extraction and separation techniques; Polimeros biomimeticos em quimica analitica. Parte 1: preparo e aplicacoes de MIP ('Molecularly Imprinted Polymers') em tecnicas de extracao e separacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarley, Cesar Ricardo Teixeira; Sotomayor, Maria del Pilar Taboada; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Analitica]. E-mail: kubota@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-11-15

    MIPs are synthetic polymers that are used as biomimetic materials simulating the mechanism verified in natural entities such as antibodies and enzymes. Although MIPs have been successfully used as an outstanding tool for enhancing the selectivity or different analytical approaches, such as separation science and electrochemical and optical sensors, several parameters must be optimized during their synthesis. Therefore, the state-of-the-art of MIP production as well as the different polymerization methods are discussed. The potential selectivity of MIPs in the extraction and separation techniques focusing mainly on environmental, clinical and pharmaceutical samples as applications for analytical purposes is presented. (author)

  12. The AgMIP Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA) of Climate Change Impacts on Agriculture and Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Alex; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Elliott, Joshua; Antle, John

    2015-01-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has been working since 2010 to construct a protocol-based framework enabling regional assessments (led by regional experts and modelers) that can provide consistent inputs to global economic and integrated assessment models. These global models can then relay important global-level information that drive regional decision-making and outcomes throughout an interconnected agricultural system. AgMIPs community of nearly 800 climate, crop, livestock, economics, and IT experts has improved the state-of-the-art through model intercomparisons, validation exercises, regional integrated assessments, and the launch of AgMIP programs on all six arable continents. AgMIP is now launching Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA) of climate change impacts on agriculture and food security to link global and regional crop and economic models using a protocol-based framework. The CGRA protocols are being developed to utilize historical observations, climate projections, and RCPsSSPs from CMIP5 (and potentially CMIP6), and will examine stakeholder-driven agricultural development and adaptation scenarios to provide cutting-edge assessments of climate changes impact on agriculture and food security. These protocols will build on the foundation of established protocols from AgMIPs 30+ activities, and will emphasize the use of multiple models, scenarios, and scales to enable an accurate assessment of related uncertainties. The CGRA is also designed to provide the outputs necessary to feed into integrated assessment models (IAMs), nutrition and food security assessments, nitrogen and carbon cycle models, and additional impact-sector assessments (e.g., water resources, land-use, biomes, urban areas). This presentation will describe the current status of CGRA planning and initial prototype experiments to demonstrate key aspects of the protocols before wider implementation ahead of the IPCC Sixth Assessment

  13. The AgMIP Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA) of Climate Change Impacts on Agriculture and Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, A. C.; Rosenzweig, C.; Antle, J. M.; Elliott, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has been working since 2010 to construct a protocol-based framework enabling regional assessments (led by regional experts and modelers) that can provide consistent inputs to global economic and integrated assessment models. These global models can then relay important global-level information that drive regional decision-making and outcomes throughout an interconnected agricultural system. AgMIP's community of nearly 800 climate, crop, livestock, economics, and IT experts has improved the state-of-the-art through model intercomparisons, validation exercises, regional integrated assessments, and the launch of AgMIP programs on all six arable continents. AgMIP is now launching Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA) of climate change impacts on agriculture and food security to link global and regional crop and economic models using a protocol-based framework. The CGRA protocols are being developed to utilize historical observations, climate projections, and RCPs/SSPs from CMIP5 (and potentially CMIP6), and will examine stakeholder-driven agricultural development and adaptation scenarios to provide cutting-edge assessments of climate change's impact on agriculture and food security. These protocols will build on the foundation of established protocols from AgMIP's 30+ activities, and will emphasize the use of multiple models, scenarios, and scales to enable an accurate assessment of related uncertainties. The CGRA is also designed to provide the outputs necessary to feed into integrated assessment models (IAMs), nutrition and food security assessments, nitrogen and carbon cycle models, and additional impact-sector assessments (e.g., water resources, land-use, biomes, urban areas). This presentation will describe the current status of CGRA planning and initial prototype experiments to demonstrate key aspects of the protocols before wider implementation ahead of the IPCC Sixth Assessment

  14. Diclofenac, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits DMH-induced colon tumorigenesis through suppression of MCP-1, MIP-1α and VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Sanyal, S N

    2011-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a physiological process involving growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones; however, it also plays a critical role in tumor progression. It favors the transition from hyperplasia to neoplasia, that is, from a state of cellular multiplication to uncontrolled proliferation. Therefore targeting angiogenesis will be profitable as a mechanism to inhibit tumor's lifeline. Further, it is important to understand the cross-communication between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-master switch in angiogenesis and other molecules in the neoplastic and pro-inflammatory milieu. We studied the role of two important chemokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-lα] alongwith VEGF and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)-induced chemopreventive effect in experimental colon cancer in rat. 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH, 30 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneously (s.c.) once-a-week) for 18 wk was used as pro-carcinogen and diclofenac (8 mg/kg body weight, orally daily) as the preferential cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor. Expression of COX-2 and VEGF was found to be significantly elevated in the DMH-treated group as compared to the control, which was lowered notably by Diclofenac co-administration with DMH. Gelatin zymography showed prominent MMP-9 activity in the DMH-treated rats, while the activity was nearly absent in all the other groups. Expression of MCP-1 was found to be markedly increased whereas MIP-1α expression was found to be decreased in colonic mucosa from DMH-treated rats, which was reversed in the DMH + Diclofenac group. Our results indicate potential role of chemokines alongwith VEGF in angiogenesis in DMH-induced cancer and its chemoprevention with diclofenac. Copyright ©2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. The hydro- and multi-isotope geochemistry of iron-rich ground waters emerging at the southern Baltic Sea coast line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Marko; Wu, Zijun; Escher, Peter; Struck, Ulrich; Dellwig, Olaf; Schafmeister, Maria; Böttcher*, Michael E.

    2013-04-01

    Iron-rich groundwater springs emerging at the shore zone of the southern Baltic Sea (BS; Site Meschendorf) were examined on a seasonal base for a period of about two years. Besides major, minor, and trace elements, stable isotopes of water (H-2, O-18), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; C-13), and sulfate (S-34) were analyzed. The stream bed sediment was extracted for the geochemistry of the newly formed precipitates and further characterized via SEM-EDAX. Subsequently, the hydrogeochemical results were subjected to a thermodynamic analysis via the PHREEQC speciation model. The springs emerge from small pits (about 60 cm diameter; up to 15cm depth). Surrounding sediments are sandy with gravels found at depth and corresponding high permeabilities. The positions of different springs on the shore zone were stable during the investigation period while the shape of the pits and the stream beds may vary due to wind- and wave-driven forces. Selected measurements of spring yield discharges close to 10 L/min. The H-2 and O-18 contents of the spring waters indicate the ground water to originate from relatively young mixed meteoric waters. The hydrochemistry of the springs was similar and showed some variability in between which indicates that the genetic processes for the ground water before reaching the surface may slightly differ. The springs are characterized by dissolved Ca, Mg, Na, DIC and sulfate, mainly reflecting the interaction with soils and bedrocks in the recharge area that is dominated by marly till. The oxygen-free ground water is rich in Fe, P, and DIC. Iron and dissolved sulfate originate from the oxidation of pyrite, as further confirmed by the 34-S signature of sulfate. The carbon isotope signature of DIC indicates a mixture of biogenic CO2 from the soil zone with some water-rock interaction with carbonate minerals. The streams flow towards the BS and, in contact with the atmosphere, outgas carbon dioxide and takes up oxygen. Upon CO2-degassing, C-12 is

  16. Expression analysis of a heat-inducible, Myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) gene from wheat and the alternatively spliced variants of rice and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Neetika; Chauhan, Harsh; Khurana, Paramjit

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dissection and a deeper analysis of the heat stress response mechanism in wheat have been poorly understood so far. This study delves into the molecular basis of action of TaMIPS, a heat stress-inducible enzyme that was identified through PCR-select subtraction technology, which is named here as TaMIPS2. MIPS (L-Myo-inositol-phosphate synthase) is important for the normal growth and development in plants. Expression profiling showed that TaMIPS2 is expressed during different developing seed stages upon heat stress. Also, the transcript levels increase in unfertilized ovaries and significant amounts are present during the recovery period providing evidence that MIPS is crucial for its role in heat stress recovery and flower development. Alternatively spliced forms from rice and Arabidopsis were also identified and their expression analysis revealed that apart from heat stress, some of the spliced variants were also inducible by drought, NaCl, Cold, ABA, BR, SA and mannitol. In silico promoter analysis revealed various cis-elements that could contribute for the differential regulation of MIPS in different plant systems. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MIPS are highly conserved among monocots and dicots and TaMIPS2 grouped specifically with monocots. Comparative analyses was undertaken by different experimental approaches, i.e., semi-quantitative RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, Genevestigator as a reference expression tool and motif analysis to predict the possible function of TaMIPS2 in regulating the different aspects of plant development under abiotic stress in wheat.

  17. MIPS Arabidopsis thaliana Database (MAtDB): an integrated biological knowledge resource based on the first complete plant genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoof, Heiko; Zaccaria, Paolo; Gundlach, Heidrun; Lemcke, Kai; Rudd, Stephen; Kolesov, Grigory; Arnold, Roland; Mewes, H. W.; Mayer, Klaus F. X.

    2002-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the first plant for which the complete genome has been sequenced and published. Annotation of complex eukaryotic genomes requires more than the assignment of genetic elements to the sequence. Besides completing the list of genes, we need to discover their cellular roles, their regulation and their interactions in order to understand the workings of the whole plant. The MIPS Arabidopsis thaliana Database (MAtDB; http://mips.gsf.de/proj/thal/db) started out as a repository for genome sequence data in the European Scientists Sequencing Arabidopsis (ESSA) project and the Arabidopsis Genome Initiative. Our aim is to transform MAtDB into an integrated biological knowledge resource by integrating diverse data, tools, query and visualization capabilities and by creating a comprehensive resource for Arabidopsis as a reference model for other species, including crop plants. PMID:11752263

  18. New immobilisation protocol for the template used in solid-phase synthesis of MIP nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Muhammad, Turghun; Yakup, Burabiye; Piletsky, Sergey A.

    2017-06-01

    As a novel imprinting method, solid-phase synthesis has proven to be a promising approach to prepare polymer nanoparticles with specific recognition sites for a template molecule. In this method, imprinted polymer nanoparticles were synthesized using template immobilized on a solid support. Herein, preparation of immobilized templates on quartz chips through homogeneous route was reported as an efficient alternative strategy to heterogeneous one. The template molecule indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) was reacted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to produce silylated template (IBA-APTES), and it was characterized by IR, 1H NMR and GC-MS. Then, the silylated template molecule was grafted onto the activated surfaces of quartz chip to prepare immobilized template (SiO2@IBA-APTES). The immobilization was confirmed by contact angle, XPS, UV and fluorescence measurement. Immobilization protocol has shown good reproducibility and stability of the immobilized template. MIP nanoparticles were prepared with high selectivity toward the molecule immobilized onto the solid surface. This provides a new approach for the development of molecularly imprinted nanoparticles.

  19. PGSB/MIPS Plant Genome Information Resources and Concepts for the Analysis of Complex Grass Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spannagl, Manuel; Bader, Kai; Pfeifer, Matthias; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology; formerly MIPS-Munich Institute for Protein Sequences) has been involved in developing, implementing and maintaining plant genome databases for more than a decade. Genome databases and analysis resources have focused on individual genomes and aim to provide flexible and maintainable datasets for model plant genomes as a backbone against which experimental data, e.g., from high-throughput functional genomics, can be organized and analyzed. In addition, genomes from both model and crop plants form a scaffold for comparative genomics, assisted by specialized tools such as the CrowsNest viewer to explore conserved gene order (synteny) between related species on macro- and micro-levels.The genomes of many economically important Triticeae plants such as wheat, barley, and rye present a great challenge for sequence assembly and bioinformatic analysis due to their enormous complexity and large genome size. Novel concepts and strategies have been developed to deal with these difficulties and have been applied to the genomes of wheat, barley, rye, and other cereals. This includes the GenomeZipper concept, reference-guided exome assembly, and "chromosome genomics" based on flow cytometry sorted chromosomes.

  20. The Chemokine MIP-1α/CCL3 impairs mouse hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Elodie; Faivre, Emilie; Dutar, Patrick; Alves Pires, Claire; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Laloux, Charlotte; Buée, Luc; Blum, David; Humez, Sandrine

    2015-10-29

    Chemokines are signaling molecules playing an important role in immune regulations. They are also thought to regulate brain development, neurogenesis and neuroendocrine functions. While chemokine upsurge has been associated with conditions characterized with cognitive impairments, their ability to modulate synaptic plasticity remains ill-defined. In the present study, we specifically evaluated the effects of MIP1-α/CCL3 towards hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and spatial memory. We found that CCL3 (50 ng/ml) significantly reduced basal synaptic transmission at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse without affecting NMDAR-mediated field potentials. This effect was ascribed to post-synaptic regulations, as CCL3 did not impact paired-pulse facilitation. While CCL3 did not modulate long-term depression (LTD), it significantly impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), an effect abolished by Maraviroc, a CCR5 specific antagonist. In addition, sub-chronic intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of CCL3 also impair LTP. In accordance with these electrophysiological findings, we demonstrated that the icv injection of CCL3 in mouse significantly impaired spatial memory abilities and long-term memory measured using the two-step Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks. These effects of CCL3 on memory were inhibited by Maraviroc. Altogether, these data suggest that the chemokine CCL3 is an hippocampal neuromodulator able to regulate synaptic plasticity mechanisms involved in learning and memory functions.

  1. Discovery and antiplatelet activity of a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor (MIPS-9922).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaohua; Pinson, Jo-Anne; Mountford, Simon J; Orive, Stephanie; Schoenwaelder, Simone M; Shackleford, David; Powell, Andrew; Nelson, Erin M; Hamilton, Justin R; Jackson, Shaun P; Jennings, Ian G; Thompson, Philip E

    2016-10-21

    A series of amino-substituted triazines were developed and examined for PI3Kβ inhibition and anti-platelet function. Structural adaptations of a morpholine ring of the prototype pan-PI3K inhibitor ZSTK474 yielded PI3Kβ selective compounds, where the selectivity largely derives from an interaction with the non-conserved Asp862 residue, as shown by site directed mutagenesis. The most PI3Kβ selective inhibitor from the series was studied in detail through a series of in vitro and in vivo functional studies. MIPS-9922, 10 potently inhibited ADP-induced washed platelet aggregation. It also inhibited integrin αIIbβ3 activation and αIIbβ3 dependent platelet adhesion to immobilized vWF under high shear. It prevented arterial thrombus formation in the in vivo electrolytic mouse model of thrombosis without inducing prolonged bleeding or excess blood loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Highly Selective Polypyrrole MIP-Based Gravimetric and Electrochemical Sensors for Picomolar Detection of Glyphosate

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    Zouhour Mazouz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a global debate and concern about the use of glyphosate (Gly as an herbicide. New toxicological studies will determine its use in the future under new strict conditions or its replacement by alternative synthetic or natural herbicides. In this context, we designed biomimetic polymer sensing layers for the selective molecular recognition of Gly. Towards this end, complementary surface acoustic wave (SAW and electrochemical sensors were functionalized with polypyrrole (PPy-imprinted polymer for the selective detection of Gly. Their corresponding limits of detection were on the order of 1 pM, which are among the lowest values ever reported in literature. The relevant dissociation constants between PPy and Gly were estimated at [Kd1 = (0.7 ± 0.3 pM and Kd2 = (1.6 ± 1.4 µM] and [Kd1 = (2.4 ± 0.9 pM and Kd2 = (0.3 ± 0.1 µM] for electrochemical and gravimetric measurements, respectively. Quantum chemical calculations permitted to estimate the interaction energy between Gly and PPy film: ΔE = −145 kJ/mol. Selectivity and competitivity tests were investigated with the most common pesticides. This work conclusively shows that gravimetric and electrochemical results indicate that both MIP-based sensors are perfectly able to detect and distinguish glyphosate without any ambiguity.

  3. Understanding the Reach of Agricultural Impacts from Climate Extremes in the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has been working since 2010 to build a modeling framework capable of representing the complexities of agriculture, its dependence on climate, and the many elements of society that depend on food systems. AgMIP's 30+ activities explore the interconnected nature of climate, crop, livestock, economics, food security, and nutrition, using common protocols to systematically evaluate the components of agricultural assessment and allow multi-model, multi-scale, and multi-method analysis of intertwining changes in socioeconomic development, environmental change, and technological adaptation. AgMIP is now launching Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA) with a particular focus on unforeseen consequences of development strategies, interactions between global and local systems, and the resilience of agricultural systems to extreme climate events. Climate extremes shock the agricultural system through local, direct impacts (e.g., droughts, heat waves, floods, severe storms) and also through teleconnections propagated through international trade. As the climate changes, the nature of climate extremes affecting agriculture is also likely to change, leading to shifting intensity, duration, frequency, and geographic extents of extremes. AgMIP researchers are developing new scenario methodologies to represent near-term extreme droughts in a probabilistic manner, field experiments that impose heat wave conditions on crops, increased resolution to differentiate sub-national drought impacts, new behavioral functions that mimic the response of market actors faced with production shortfalls, analysis of impacts from simultaneous failures of multiple breadbasket regions, and more detailed mapping of food and socioeconomic indicators into food security and nutrition metrics that describe the human impact in diverse populations. Agricultural models illustrate the challenges facing agriculture, allowing

  4. The microwave induced plasma with optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) in 23 elements determination in geological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, P; Kozak, L; Wachelka, M; Jakubowski, K; Wybieralska, J

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the optimisation, validation and application of the microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) dedicated for a routine determination of Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl, Zn, in the geological samples. The three procedures of sample preparation has been proposed: sample digestion with the use of hydrofluoric acid for determination of total concentration of elements, extraction by aqua regia for determination of the quasi-total element concentration and extraction by hydrochloric acid solution to determine contents of the elements in acid leachable fraction. The detection limits were on the level 0.001-0.121 mg L(-1) (from 0.010-0.10 to 1.2-12 mg kg(-1) depend on the samples preparation procedure); the precision: 0.20-1.37%; accuracy 85-115% (for recovery for certified standards materials analysis and parallel analysis by independent analytical techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS)). The conformity of the results obtained by MIP-OES analytical procedures with the results obtained by XRF and FAAS analysis allows to propose the procedures for studies of elemental composition of the fraction of the geological samples. Additionally, the MIP-OES technique is much less expensive than ICP techniques and much less time-consuming than AAS techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrated Assessment by the People: Insights from AgMIP Regional Teams in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    AgMIP has developed innovative protocol-based methods for regional integrated assessment (RIA) that can be implemented by national researchers working with local and national stakeholders (http://www.agmip.org/regional-integrated-assessments-handbook/). The approach has been implemented by regional teams in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. This presentation first summarizes novel elements of the AgMIP RIA methods, and their strengths and limitations, based on their application by AgMIP researchers. Key insights from the application of these methods for climate impact and adaptation in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia are presented. A major finding is that detailed, site-specific, systems-based analysis show much more local and regional variation in impacts than studies based on analysis of individual crops, and provide the basis for analysis of multi-faceted technology and policy options to facilitate the transition to sustainable and resilient development pathways. The presentation concludes with observations about advancing integrated assessments carried out by and for national and local researchers and stakeholders.

  6. New Insights into the Pro-Inflammatory Activities of Ang1 on Neutrophils: Induction of MIP-1β Synthesis and Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Dumas

    Full Text Available We reported the expression of angiopoietin Tie2 receptor on human neutrophils and the capacity of angiopoietins (Ang1 and Ang2 to induce pro-inflammatory activities, such as platelet-activating factor synthesis, β2-integrin activation and neutrophil migration. Recently, we observed differential effects between both angiopoietins, namely, the capacity of Ang1, but not Ang2, to promote rapid interleukin-8 synthesis and release, as well as neutrophil viability. Herein, we addressed whether Ang1 and/or Ang2 could modulate the synthesis and release of macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β by neutrophils. Neutrophils were isolated from blood of healthy volunteers; intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β protein concentrations were assessed by ELISA. After 24 hours, the basal intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β protein concentrations were ≈500 and 100 pg/106 neutrophils, respectively. Treatment with Ang1 (10 nM increased neutrophil intracellular and extracellular MIP-1β concentrations by 310 and 388% respectively. Pretreatment with PI3K (LY294002, p38 MAPK (SB203580 and MEK (U0126 inhibitors completely inhibited Ang1-mediated increase of MIP-1β intracellular and extracellular protein levels. Pretreatment with NF-κB complex inhibitors, namely Bay11-7085 and IKK inhibitor VII or with a transcription inhibitor (actinomycin D and protein synthesis inhibitor (cycloheximide, did also abrogate Ang1-mediated increase of MIP-1β intracellular and extracellular protein levels. We validated by RT-qPCR analyses the effect of Ang1 on the induction of MIP-1β mRNA levels. Our study is the first one to report Ang1 capacity to induce MIP-1β gene expression, protein synthesis and release from neutrophils, and that these effects are mediated by PI3K, p38 MAPK and MEK activation and downstream NF-κB activation.

  7. Type I J-domain NbMIP1 proteins are required for both Tobacco mosaic virus infection and plant innate immunity.

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    Yumei Du

    Full Text Available Tm-2² is a coiled coil-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat resistance protein that confers durable extreme resistance against Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV by recognizing the viral movement protein (MP. Here we report that the Nicotiana benthamiana J-domain MIP1 proteins (NbMIP1s associate with tobamovirus MP, Tm-2² and SGT1. Silencing of NbMIP1s reduced TMV movement and compromised Tm-2²-mediated resistance against TMV and ToMV. Furthermore, silencing of NbMIP1s reduced the steady-state protein levels of ToMV MP and Tm-2². Moreover, NbMIP1s are required for plant resistance induced by other R genes and the nonhost pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000. In addition, we found that SGT1 associates with Tm-2² and is required for Tm-2²-mediated resistance against TMV. These results suggest that NbMIP1s function as co-chaperones during virus infection and plant immunity.

  8. Inactivation of nuclear factor κB by MIP-based drug combinations augments cell death of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam M

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Menaga Subramaniam,1 Su Ki Liew,1 Lionel LA In,2 Khalijah Awang,3,4 Niyaz Ahmed,5 Noor Hasima Nagoor1,6 1Institute of Biological Science (Genetics & Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, UCSI University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Centre for Natural Product Research and Drug Discovery (CENAR, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 5Pathogen Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India; 6Centre for Research in Biotechnology for Agriculture (CEBAR, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Drug combination therapy to treat cancer is a strategic approach to increase successful treatment rate. Optimizing combination regimens is vital to increase therapeutic efficacy with minimal side effects. Materials and methods: In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of double and triple combinations consisting of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA, Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP and cisplatin (CDDP against 14 various human cancer cell lines to address the need for more effective therapy. Our data show synergistic effects in MCF-7 cells treated with MIP:ACA, MIP:CDDP and MIP:ACA:CDDP combinations. The type of interaction between MIP, ACA and CDDP was evaluated based on combination index being <0.8 for synergistic effect. Identifying the mechanism of cell death based on previous studies involved intrinsic apoptosis and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and tested in Western blot analysis. Inactivation of NF-κB was confirmed by p65 and IκBα, while intrinsic apoptosis pathway activation was confirmed by caspase-9 and Apaf-1 expression Results: All combinations confirmed intrinsic apoptosis activation and NF-κB inactivation. Conclusion: Double and triple

  9. An AgMIP framework for improved agricultural representation in integrated assessment models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Alex C.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Asseng, Senthold; Boote, Kenneth J.; Elliott, Joshua; Ewert, Frank; Jones, James W.; Martre, Pierre; McDermid, Sonali P.; Müller, Christoph; Snyder, Abigail; Thorburn, Peter J.

    2017-12-01

    Integrated assessment models (IAMs) hold great potential to assess how future agricultural systems will be shaped by socioeconomic development, technological innovation, and changing climate conditions. By coupling with climate and crop model emulators, IAMs have the potential to resolve important agricultural feedback loops and identify unintended consequences of socioeconomic development for agricultural systems. Here we propose a framework to develop robust representation of agricultural system responses within IAMs, linking downstream applications with model development and the coordinated evaluation of key climate responses from local to global scales. We survey the strengths and weaknesses of protocol-based assessments linked to the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), each utilizing multiple sites and models to evaluate crop response to core climate changes including shifts in carbon dioxide concentration, temperature, and water availability, with some studies further exploring how climate responses are affected by nitrogen levels and adaptation in farm systems. Site-based studies with carefully calibrated models encompass the largest number of activities; however they are limited in their ability to capture the full range of global agricultural system diversity. Representative site networks provide more targeted response information than broadly-sampled networks, with limitations stemming from difficulties in covering the diversity of farming systems. Global gridded crop models provide comprehensive coverage, although with large challenges for calibration and quality control of inputs. Diversity in climate responses underscores that crop model emulators must distinguish between regions and farming system while recognizing model uncertainty. Finally, to bridge the gap between bottom-up and top-down approaches we recommend the deployment of a hybrid climate response system employing a representative network of sites to bias

  10. New AgMIP Scenarios: Impacts of Volcanic Eruptions, Geoengineering, or Nuclear War on Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.; Xia, L.

    2016-12-01

    Climate is one of the most important factors determining crop yields and world food supplies. To be well prepared for possible futures, it is necessary to study yield changes of major crops in response to different climate forcings. Previous studies mainly focus on the impact from global warming. Here we propose that the AgMIP community also study the impacts of stratospheric aerosols on agriculture. While nature can load the stratosphere with sulfate aerosols for several years from large volcanic eruptions, humans could also put sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere on purpose through geoengineering or soot as a result of the fires from a nuclear war. Stratospheric aerosols would change the temperature, precipitation, total insolation, and fraction of diffuse radiation due to their radiative impacts, and could produce more ultraviolet radiation by ozone destruction. Surface ozone concentration could also change by changed transport from the stratosphere as well as changed tropospheric chemistry. As a demonstration of these effects, using the crop model in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM-crop), we have studied sulfate injection geoengineering and nuclear war impacts on global agriculture in response to temperature, precipitation and radiation changes, and found significant changes in patterns of global food production. With the new ozone module in CLM-crop, we simulated how surface ozone concentration change under sulfate injection geoengineering would change the agriculture response. Agriculture would benefit from less surface ozone concentration associated with the specific geoengineering scenario comparing with the global warming scenario. Here, we would like to encourage more crop modelers to improve crop models in terms of crop responses to ozone, ultraviolet radiation, and diffuse radiation. We also invite more global crop modeling groups to use the climate forcing we would be happy to provide to gain a better understanding of global agriculture responses

  11. In vitro progesterone modulation on bacterial endotoxin-induced production of IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MIP-1α, and MMP-9 in pre-labor human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruíz, G; Flores-Espinosa, P; Preciado-Martínez, E; Bermejo-Martínez, L; Espejel-Nuñez, A; Estrada-Gutierrez, G; Maida-Claros, R; Flores-Pliego, A; Zaga-Clavellina, Veronica

    2015-10-07

    During human pregnancy, infection/inflammation represents an important factor that increases the risk of developing preterm labor. The purpose of this study was to determine if pre-treatment with progesterone has an immunomodulatory effect on human placenta production of endotoxin-induced inflammation and degradation of extracellular matrix markers. Placentas were obtained under sterile conditions from pregnancies delivered at term before the onset of labor by cesarean section. Explants from central cotyledons of 10 human placentas were pre-treated with different concentrations of progesterone (0.01, 01, 1.0 μM) and then stimulated with 1000 ng/mL of LPS of Escherichia coli. Cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1α, IL-10 concentrations in the culture medium were then measured by specific ELISA. Secretion profile of MMP-9 was evaluated by ELISA and zymogram. Statistical differences were determined by one-way ANOVA followed by the appropriate ad hoc test; P progesterone significantly blunted (73, 56, 56, 75, 25, 48 %) the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1α, IL-10, respectively. The MMP-9 induced by LPS treatment was inhibited only with the highest concentration of progesterone. Mifepristone (RU486) blocked the immunosuppressive effect of progesterone. The present results support the concept that progesterone could be part of the compensatory mechanism that limits the inflammation-induced cytotoxic effects associated with an infection process during gestation.

  12. Detection of malachite green in fish based on magnetic fluorescent probe of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Le; Lin, Zheng-Zhong; Zeng, Jun; Zhong, Hui-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Mei; Huang, Zhi-Yong

    2018-05-01

    A magnetic fluorescent probe of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs was prepared using CdTe QDs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as co-nucleus and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as specific recognition sites based on a reverse microemulsion method. With the specific enrichment and magnetic separation properties, the probe of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs was used to detect malachite green (MG) in fish samples. The TEM analysis showed that the particles of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs were spherical with average diameter around 53 nm, and a core-shell structure was well-shaped with several Fe3O4 nanoparticles and CdTe QDs embedded in each of the microsphere. Quick separation of the probes from solutions could be realized with a magnet, indicating the excellent magnetic property of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs. The probe exhibited high specific adsorption towards MG and excellent fluorescence emission at λem 598 nm. The fluorescence of CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs could be linearly quenched by MG at the concentrations from 0.025 to 1.5 μmol L-1. The detection limit was 0.014 μmol L-1. The average recovery of spiked MG in fish samples was 105.2%. The result demonstrated that the as-prepared CdTe QDs/nano-Fe3O4@MIPs could be used as a probe to the detection of trace MG in fish samples.

  13. MiR-125b Inhibits LPS-Induced Inflammatory Injury via Targeting MIP-1α in Chondrogenic Cell ATDC5

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    Jinling Jia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chondrocyte apoptosis is largely responsible for cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in chondrogenesis and cartilage remodeling. This study explored the effect of miR-125b on inflammatory injury in chondrogenic cells. Methods: LPS was used to simulate inflammatory injury in murine chondrogenic ATDC5 cell lines. Targeting effect of miR-125b on MIP-1α 3’UTR was assessed by dual luciferase activity assay. Regulatory effect of miR-125b on MIP-1α expression and the potential regulatory mechanism on inflammatory injury were assessed by Western blot. Results: miR-125b expression was decreased in LPS-induced ATDC5 cells and overexpression of miR-125b inhibited LPS-induced cell viability decline, the rise of apoptosis and inflammatory factors’ productions. MIP-1α expression was negatively related to miR-125b, and miR-125b directly targeted with 3’UTR of MIP-1α. Knockdown of miR-125b promoted LPS-induced inflammatory response via upregulation of MIP-1α. miR-125b expression in LPS-induced ATDC5 cells was negatively related with activations of NF-κB and JNK signaling pathways. Overexpression of miR-125b inhibited LPS-induced inflammation injury via suppressing MIP-1α expression and inhibiting activations of NF-κB and JNK signaling pathways. Conclusion: miR-125b could play an important role in inflammatory injury of chondrogenic cells and miR-125b affected inflammatory injury of ATDC5 cells via regulating expression of MIP-1α and regulating NF-κB and JNK signaling pathways.

  14. Perspectives on Climate Effects on Agriculture: The International Efforts of AgMIP in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Job; MacCarthy, Dilys S.; Bationo, Andre; Koala, Saidou; Hickman, Jonathon; Koo, Jawoo; Vanya, Charles; Adiku, Samuel; Beletse, Yacob; Masikate, Patricia; hide

    2012-01-01

    Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is experiencing climate change-related effects that call for integrated regional assessments, yet capacity for these assessments has been low. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is advancing research on integrated regional assessments of climate change that include climate, crop, and economic modeling and analysis. Through AgMIP, regional integrated assessments are increasingly gaining momentum in SSA, and multi-institutional regional research teams (RRTs) centered in East, West, and Southern· Africa are generating new information on climate change impacts and adaptation in selected agricultural systems. The research in Africa is organized into four RRTs and a coordination team. Each of the RRTs in SSA is composed of scientists from the Consultative Group of International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) institutions, National Agriculture Research institutes (NARs), and universities consisting of experts in crop and economic modeling, climate, and information technology. Stakeholder involvement to inform specific agricultural systems to be evaluated, key outputs, and the representative agricultural pathways (RAPs), is undertaken at two levels: regional and national, in order to contribute to decision making at these levels. Capacity building for integrated assessment (lA) is a key component that is undertaken continuously through interaction with experts in regional and SSA-wide workshops, and through joint creation of tools. Many students and research affiliates have been identified and entrained as part of capacity building in IA. Bi-monthly updates on scholarly publications in climate change in Africa also serve as a vehicle for knowledge-sharing. With 60 scientists already trained and actively engaged in IA and over 80 getting monthly briefs on the latest information on climate change, a climate-informed community of experts is gradually taking shape in SSA. (See Part 2, Appendices 3-5 in

  15. Asia-MIP: Multi Model-data Synthesis of Terrestrial Carbon Cycles in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichii, K.; Kondo, M.; Ito, A.; Kang, M.; Sasai, T.; SATO, H.; Ueyama, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Saigusa, N.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    Asia, which is characterized by monsoon climate and intense human activities, is one of the prominent understudied regions in terms of terrestrial carbon budgets and mechanisms of carbon exchange. To better understand terrestrial carbon cycle in Asia, we initiated multi-model and data intercomparison project in Asia (Asia-MIP). We analyzed outputs from multiple approaches: satellite-based observations (AVHRR and MODIS) and related products, empirically upscaled estimations (Support Vector Regression) using eddy-covariance observation network in Asia (AsiaFlux, CarboEastAsia, FLUXNET), ~10 terrestrial biosphere models (e.g. BEAMS, Biome-BGC, LPJ, SEIB-DGVM, TRIFFID, VISIT models), and atmospheric inversion analysis (e.g. TransCom models). We focused on the two difference temporal coverage: long-term (30 years; 1982-2011) and decadal (10 years; 2001-2010; data intensive period) scales. The regions of covering Siberia, Far East Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia (60-80E, 10S-80N), was analyzed in this study for assessing the magnitudes, interannual variability, and key driving factors of carbon cycles. We will report the progress of synthesis effort to quantify terrestrial carbon budget in Asia. First, we analyzed the recent trends in Gross Primary Productivities (GPP) using satellite-based observation (AVHRR) and multiple terrestrial biosphere models. We found both model outputs and satellite-based observation consistently show an increasing trend in GPP in most of the regions in Asia. Mechanisms of the GPP increase were analyzed using models, and changes in temperature and precipitation play dominant roles in GPP increase in boreal and temperate regions, whereas changes in atmospheric CO2 and precipitation are important in tropical regions. However, their relative contributions were different. Second, in the decadal analysis (2001-2010), we found that the negative GPP and carbon uptake anomalies in 2003 summer in Far East Asia is one of the largest

  16. Intravenous spiral CT angiography for assessment before orthotopic liver transplantation: Comparison between tomography, MIP, 3-dimensional surface imaging and intraarterial DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidajat, N.; Vogl, T.J.; Moeller, M.; Bechstein, W.O.; Felix, R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To analyse the efficacy of intravenous spiral CT angiography (SCTA) for the evaluation before orthotopic liver transplantation (oLT) compared with DSA. Methods: Spiral CT was performed on 31 potential recipients of a liver graft in order to examine hepatic vessels, coeliac axis, splenic artery and superior mesenteric artery. The arterial vessels were reconstructed in 'Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP)' and 'Shaded Surface Display (SSD)'-technique. The axial images, MIP and SSD were compared in 25 patients with DSA with regard to the visualisation of the vascular anatomy, detectability of stenosis and vascular diameters. Results: The type of arterial liver supply could be determined via SCTA in all patients. Stenosis of the coeliac axis was seen in ten patients on the DSA, MIP and SSD and in eight patients on the axial images. Occlusion of the hepatic artery was clearly visualised in two patients on the DSA, axial images and MIP and in one patient on the SSD. There was no false positive diagnosis with SCTA. SSD was seen as the best technique to visualise the vessels without overshadowing. There were no significant differences between the diamters measured from the axial images, MIP and SSD images in transversal direction and the DSA images (p>0.05). Conclusion: SCTA is a greatly promising method for the imaging of vessels supplying the liver before oLT, and may convey more diagnostic information than DSA. (orig.) [de

  17. MCK1 is a novel regulator of myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS that is required for inhibition of inositol synthesis by the mood stabilizer valproate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxi Yu

    Full Text Available Myo-inositol, the precursor of all inositol compounds, is essential for the viability of eukaryotes. Identifying the factors that regulate inositol homeostasis is of obvious importance to understanding cell function and the pathologies underlying neurological and metabolic resulting from perturbation of inositol metabolism. The current study identifies Mck1, a GSK3 homolog, as a novel positive regulator of inositol de novo synthesis in yeast. Mck1 was required for normal activity of myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of inositol synthesis. mck1Δ cells exhibited a 50% decrease in MIPS activity and a decreased rate of incorporation of [13C6]glucose into [13C6]-inositol-3-phosphate and [13C6]-inositol compared to WT cells. mck1Δ cells also exhibited decreased growth in the presence of the inositol depleting drug valproate (VPA, which was rescued by supplementation of inositol. However, in contrast to wild type cells, which exhibited more than a 40% decrease in MIPS activity in the presence of VPA, the drug did not significantly decrease MIPS activity in mck1Δ cells. These findings indicate that VPA-induced MIPS inhibition is Mck1-dependent, and suggest a model that unifies two current hypotheses of the mechanism of action of VPA-inositol depletion and GSK3 inhibition.

  18. MCK1 is a novel regulator of myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS) that is required for inhibition of inositol synthesis by the mood stabilizer valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenxi; Daniel, Joshua; Mehta, Dhara; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2017-01-01

    Myo-inositol, the precursor of all inositol compounds, is essential for the viability of eukaryotes. Identifying the factors that regulate inositol homeostasis is of obvious importance to understanding cell function and the pathologies underlying neurological and metabolic resulting from perturbation of inositol metabolism. The current study identifies Mck1, a GSK3 homolog, as a novel positive regulator of inositol de novo synthesis in yeast. Mck1 was required for normal activity of myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of inositol synthesis. mck1Δ cells exhibited a 50% decrease in MIPS activity and a decreased rate of incorporation of [13C6]glucose into [13C6]-inositol-3-phosphate and [13C6]-inositol compared to WT cells. mck1Δ cells also exhibited decreased growth in the presence of the inositol depleting drug valproate (VPA), which was rescued by supplementation of inositol. However, in contrast to wild type cells, which exhibited more than a 40% decrease in MIPS activity in the presence of VPA, the drug did not significantly decrease MIPS activity in mck1Δ cells. These findings indicate that VPA-induced MIPS inhibition is Mck1-dependent, and suggest a model that unifies two current hypotheses of the mechanism of action of VPA-inositol depletion and GSK3 inhibition.

  19. To remove or not to remove? The challenge of extracting the template to make the cavities available in Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Rosa A; Carro, Antonia M; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Concheiro, Angel

    2011-01-01

    Template removal is a critical step in the preparation of most molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The polymer network itself and the affinity of the imprinted cavities for the template make its removal hard. If there are remaining template molecules in the MIPs, less cavities will be available for rebinding, which decreases efficiency. Furthermore, if template bleeding occurs during analytical applications, errors will arise. Despite the relevance to the MIPs performance, template removal has received scarce attention and is currently the least cost-effective step of the MIP development. Attempts to reach complete template removal may involve the use of too drastic conditions in conventional extraction techniques, resulting in the damage or the collapse of the imprinted cavities. Advances in the extraction techniques in the last decade may provide optimized tools. The aim of this review is to analyze the available data on the efficiency of diverse extraction techniques for template removal, paying attention not only to the removal yield but also to MIPs performance. Such an analysis is expected to be useful for opening a way to rational approaches for template removal (minimizing the costs of solvents and time) instead of the current trial-and-error methods.

  20. Managing complex processing of medical image sequences by program supervision techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crubezy, Monica; Aubry, Florent; Moisan, Sabine; Chameroy, Virginie; Thonnat, Monique; Di Paola, Robert

    1997-05-01

    Our objective is to offer clinicians wider access to evolving medical image processing (MIP) techniques, crucial to improve assessment and quantification of physiological processes, but difficult to handle for non-specialists in MIP. Based on artificial intelligence techniques, our approach consists in the development of a knowledge-based program supervision system, automating the management of MIP libraries. It comprises a library of programs, a knowledge base capturing the expertise about programs and data and a supervision engine. It selects, organizes and executes the appropriate MIP programs given a goal to achieve and a data set, with dynamic feedback based on the results obtained. It also advises users in the development of new procedures chaining MIP programs.. We have experimented the approach for an application of factor analysis of medical image sequences as a means of predicting the response of osteosarcoma to chemotherapy, with both MRI and NM dynamic image sequences. As a result our program supervision system frees clinical end-users from performing tasks outside their competence, permitting them to concentrate on clinical issues. Therefore our approach enables a better exploitation of possibilities offered by MIP and higher quality results, both in terms of robustness and reliability.

  1. Development of a highly sensitive MIP based-QCM nanosensor for selective determination of cholic acid level in body fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gültekin, Aytaç; Karanfil, Gamze; Sönmezoğlu, Savaş; Say, Rıdvan

    2014-01-01

    Determination of cholic acid is very important and necessary in body fluids due to its both pharmaceutical and clinical significance. In this study, a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) nanosensor, which is imprinted cholic acid, has been developed for the assignation of cholic acid. The cholic acid selective memories have been generated on QCM electrode surface by using molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based on methacryloylamidohistidine-copper (II) (MAH-Cu(II)) pre-organized monomer. The cholic acid imprinted nanosensor was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and then analytical performance of the cholic acid imprinted QCM nanosensor was studied. The detection limit was found to be 0.0065 μM with linear range of 0.01–1000 μM. Moreover, the high value of Langmuir constant (b) (7.3 * 10 5 ) obtained by Langmuir graph showed that the cholic acid imprinted nanosensor had quite strong binding sites affinity. At the last step of this procedure, cholic acid levels in body fluids were determined by the prepared imprinted QCM nanosensor. - Graphical abstract: QCM responses of the cholic acid imprinted and non-imprinted nanosensors (C CA = 0.1 μM). - Highlights: • The purpose is to synthesize a new cholic acid imprinted QCM nanosensor by MIP. • Analytical applications of QCM nanosensor were investigated. • The cholic acid levels in body fluids were determined by prepared QCM nanosensor

  2. Development of a sensor prepared by entrapment of MIP particles in electrosynthesised polymer films for electrochemical detection of ephedrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, E; Picca, R A; Malitesta, C; Piletsky, S A; Piletska, E V

    2008-02-28

    A voltammetric sensor for (-)-ephedrine has been prepared by a novel approach based on immobilisation of an imprinted polymer for ephedrine (MIPE) in an electrosynthesised polypyrrole (PPY) film. Composite films were grown potentiostatically at 1.0 V vs. Pt (QRE) on a glassy carbon electrode using an unconventional "upside-down" (UD) geometry for the three-electrode cell. As a consequence, a high MIP loading was obtained, as revealed by SEM. The sensor response was evaluated, after overoxidation of PPY matrix, by cyclic voltammetry after pre-concentration in a buffered solution of analyte in 0.5-3 mM concentration range. An ephedrine peak at approximately 0.9 V increasing with concentration and saturating at high concentrations was evident. PPY-modified electrode showed a response, which was distinctly lower than the MIP response for the same concentration of the template. The effect of potential interferences including compounds usually found in human fluids (ascorbic acid, uric acid, urea, glucose, sorbitol, glycine, dopamine) was examined.

  3. Comparison of helical, maximum intensity projection (MIP), and averaged intensity (AI) 4D CT imaging for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Nofal, Ahmed N.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Lu, Wei; Liu, Jubei; Hubenschmidt, James; Low, Daniel A.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Khullar, Divya

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To compare helical, MIP and AI 4D CT imaging, for the purpose of determining the best CT-based volume definition method for encompassing the mobile gross tumor volume (mGTV) within the planning target volume (PTV) for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in stage I lung cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with medically inoperable peripheral stage I lung cancer were planned for SBRT. Free-breathing helical and 4D image datasets were obtained for each patient. Two composite images, the MIP and AI, were automatically generated from the 4D image datasets. The mGTV contours were delineated for the MIP, AI and helical image datasets for each patient. The volume for each was calculated and compared using analysis of variance and the Wilcoxon rank test. A spatial analysis for comparing center of mass (COM) (i.e. isocenter) coordinates for each imaging method was also performed using multivariate analysis of variance. Results: The MIP-defined mGTVs were significantly larger than both the helical- (p 0.001) and AI-defined mGTVs (p = 0.012). A comparison of COM coordinates demonstrated no significant spatial difference in the x-, y-, and z-coordinates for each tumor as determined by helical, MIP, or AI imaging methods. Conclusions: In order to incorporate the extent of tumor motion from breathing during SBRT, MIP is superior to either helical or AI images for defining the mGTV. The spatial isocenter coordinates for each tumor were not altered significantly by the imaging methods

  4. NMR structures of anti-HIV D-peptides derived from the N-terminus of viral chemokine vMIP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Mayuko; Liu Dongxiang; Kumar, Santosh; Huang Ziwei

    2005-01-01

    The viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus has unique biological activities in that it blocks the cell entry by several different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains via chemokine receptors including CXCR4 and CCR5. In this paper, we report the solution structure of all-D-amino acid peptides derived from the N-terminus of vMIP-II, which have been shown to have strong CXCR4 binding activity and potently inhibit HIV-1 entry via CXCR4, by using long mixing time two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiments. Both of all-D-peptides vMIP-II (1-10) and vMIP-II (1-21), which are designated as DV3 and DV1, respectively, have higher CXCR4 binding ability than their L-peptide counterparts. They are partially structured in aqueous solution, displaying a turn-like structure over residues 5-8. The small temperature coefficients of His-6 amide proton for both peptides also suggest the formation of a small hydrophobic pocket centered on His-6. The structural features of DV3 are very similar to the reported solution structure of all-L-peptide vMIP-II (1-10) [M.P. Crump, E. Elisseeva, J. Gong, I. Clark-Lewis, B.D. Sykes, Structure/function of human herpesvirus-8 MIP-II (1-71) and the antagonist N-terminal segment (1-10), FEBS Lett. 489 (2001) 171], which is consistent with the notion that D- and L-enantiomeric peptides can adopt mirror image conformations. The NMR structures of the D-peptides provide a structural basis to understand their mechanism of action and design new peptidomimetic analogs to further explore the structure-activity relationship of D-peptide ligand binding to CXCR4

  5. Regional and global climate for the mid-Pliocene using the University of Toronto version of CCSM4 and PlioMIP2 boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chandan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project Phase 2 (PlioMIP2 is an international collaboration to simulate the climate of the mid-Pliocene interglacial, corresponding to marine isotope stage KM5c (3.205 Mya, using a wide selection of climate models with the objective of understanding the nature of the warming that is known to have occurred during the broader mid-Pliocene warm period. PlioMIP2 builds on the successes of PlioMIP by shifting the focus to a specific interglacial and using a revised set of geographic and orbital boundary conditions. In this paper, we present the details of the mid-Pliocene simulations that we have performed with a slightly modified version of the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4 and the enhanced variant of the PlioMIP2 boundary conditions. We discuss the simulated climatology through comparisons to our control simulations and to proxy reconstructions of the mid-Pliocene climate. With the new boundary conditions, the University of Toronto version of the CCSM4 model simulates a mid-Pliocene that is more than twice as warm as that with the boundary conditions used for PlioMIP Phase 1. The warming is more enhanced near the high latitudes, which is where most of the changes to the PlioMIP2 boundary conditions have been made. The elevated warming in the high latitudes leads to a better match between the simulated climatology and proxy-based reconstructions than possible with the previous version of the boundary conditions.

  6. Increased cerebrospinal fluid levels of cytokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, H R; Escamilla-Ocañas, C E; Camara-Lemarroy, C R; González-Garza, M T; Moreno-Cuevas, J; García Sarreón, M A

    2017-10-10

    Neuroinflammation has recently been described in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the precise role of such proinflammatory cytokines as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) in ALS has not yet been determined. In this study, we determined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MCP-1 and MIP-1β levels and assessed their association with the duration and severity of ALS. Concentrations of MCP-1 and MIP-1β were determined in the CSF of 77 patients diagnosed with ALS and 13 controls. Cytokine levels were analysed in relation to ALS duration (12months) and severity (30points on the ALS Functional Rating Scale administered at hospital admission). Higher CSF MIP-1β (10.68pg/mL vs. 4.69pg/mL, P<.0001) and MCP-1 (234.89pg/mL vs. 160.95pg/mL, P=.011) levels were found in the 77 patients with ALS compared to controls. There were no differences in levels of either cytokine in relation to disease duration or severity. However, we did observe a significant positive correlation between MIP-1β and MCP-1 in patients with ALS. The increase in MIP-1β and MCP-1 levels suggests that these cytokines may have a synergistic effect on ALS pathogenesis. However, in our cohort, no association was found with either the duration or the clinical severity of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of the temporal expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors during experimental granulomatous inflammation: role and expression of MIP-1α and MCP-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carollo, Maria; Hogaboam, Cory M; Kunkel, Stephen L; Delaney, Stephen; Christie, Mark I; Perretti, Mauro

    2001-01-01

    Chemokine expression and function was monitored in an experimental model of granulomatous tissue formation after injection of croton oil in complete Freund's adjuvant (CO/CFA) into mouse dorsal air-pouches up to 28 days. In the first week, mast cell degranulation and leukocyte influx (mononuclear cell, MNC, and polymorphonuclear cell, PMN) were associated with CXCR2, KC and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 mRNA expression, as determined by TaqMan® reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. KC (∼400 pg mg protein−1, n=12) and MIP-2 (∼800 pg mg protein−1, n=12) proteins peaked at day 7, together with myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Highest MIP-1α (>1 ng mg protein−1, n=12) levels were measured at day 3. After day 7, a gradual increase in CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 mRNA and protein expression was measured. MCP-1 protein peaked at day 21 (∼150 pg mg protein−1, n=12) and was predominantly expressed by mast cells. A gradual increase in N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity (maximal at 28 days) was also measured. An antiserum against MIP-1α did not modify the inflammatory response measured at day 7 (except for a 50% reduction in MIP-1α levels), but provoked a significant increase in MPO, NAG and MCP-1 levels as measured at day 21 (n=6, Pvalues (n=8, P<0.05). In conclusion, we have shown that CO/CFA initiates a complex inflammatory reaction in which initial expression of MIP-1α serves a protective role whereas delayed expression of MCP-1 seems to have a genuine pro-inflammatory role. PMID:11704636

  8. Synthesis and characterization of the core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (Fe₃O₄@MIPs) adsorbents for effective extraction and determination of sulfonamides in the poultry feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xuan; Gao, Ruixia; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-07-06

    In this study, we present a general method to prepare the core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) nanoparticles (NPs) for sulfamethazine (SMZ). The resulting Fe₃O₄@MIPs NPs possess a highly improved imprinting effect, fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity, and can be applied to extract sulfonamide in the poultry feed. In this protocol, the magnetite NPs were synthesized by co-precipitating Fe²⁺ and Fe³⁺ in an ammonia solution first. Silica was then coated on the Fe₃O₄ NPs using a sol-gel method to obtain silica shell magnetic NPs. Subsequently, the vinyl groups were grated onto silica-modified Fe₃O₄ surface by 3-methacryloyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. Finally, the MIPs films were formed on the surface of Fe₃O₄@SiO₂ by the copolymerization of vinyl end groups with functional monomer, methacrylic acid, cross-linking agent, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, the initiator azo-bis-isobutyronitrile and template molecule, sulfamethazine. The morphology, magnetic, adsorption and recognition properties of Fe₃O₄@MIPs NPs were characterized using transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and re-binding experiments. The results showed that the binding sites of Fe₃O₄@MIPs were good accessibility, fast adsorption rate and the maximum adsorption capacity of Fe₃O₄@MIPs to SMZ was 344.8 μg g⁻¹. The selectivity of the obtained Fe₃O₄@MIPs NPs were elucidated by the different rebinding capability of SMZ and structural related sulfonamides in the mixed solution. The results indicated that the Fe₃O₄@MIPs had high imprinting factor 9.5 and significant selectivity. A method was developed for enrichment and determination of SMZ in the poultry feed samples with recoveries of duck and chicken feed ranging from 63.3 to 76.5% and 68.7 to 74.7%, respectively and the relative standard deviations (RSD

  9. Engineering molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the selective extraction and quantification of the novel psychoactive substance (NPS) methoxphenidine and its regioisomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowdon, J W; Alkirkit, S M O; Mewis, R E; Fulton, D; Banks, C E; Sutcliffe, O B; Peeters, M

    2018-04-30

    In this communication, we present the first developed Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) for the specific detection of a New Psychoactive Substance (NPS); namely, methoxphenidine (MXP) and its regioisomers. Selectivity of the MIP towards MXP is studied by analysing mixtures and an acquired street sample with High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to UV detection. The study demonstrates that the engineered polymers selectively extract MXP from heterogeneous samples, which makes for a very powerful diagnostic tool that can detect traces of MXP in complicated NPS samples.

  10. Easy, fast and environmental friendly method for the simultaneous extraction of the 16 EPA PAHs using magnetic molecular imprinted polymers (mag-MIPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Navarro, Mercedes; Martín-Valero, María Jesús; Fernández-Torres, Rut Maria; Callejón-Mochón, Manuel; Bello-López, Miguel Ángel

    2017-02-15

    An easy and environmental friendly method, based on the use of magnetic molecular imprinted polymers (mag-MIPs) is proposed for the simultaneous extraction of the 16 U.S. EPA polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) priority pollutants. The mag-MIPs based extraction protocol is simple, more sensitive and low organic solvent consuming compared to official methods and also adequate for those PAHs more retained in the particulate matter. The new proposed extraction method followed by HPLC determination has been validated and applied to different types of water samples: tap water, river water, lake water and mineral water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lung region extraction based on the model information and the inversed MIP method by using chest CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshihiro; Miguchi, Ryosuke; Okumura, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Shinji; Matsumoto, Mitsuomi; Tateno, Yukio; Iinuma, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Toru.

    1997-01-01

    We developed a lung region extraction method based on the model information and the inversed MIP method in the Lung Cancer Screening CT (LSCT). Original model is composed of typical 3-D lung contour lines, a body axis, an apical point, and a convex hull. First, the body axis. the apical point, and the convex hull are automatically extracted from the input image Next, the model is properly transformed to fit to those of input image by the affine transformation. Using the same affine transformation coefficients, typical lung contour lines are also transferred, which correspond to rough contour lines of input image. Experimental results applied for 68 samples showed this method quite promising. (author)

  12. PGSB/MIPS PlantsDB Database Framework for the Integration and Analysis of Plant Genome Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2017-01-01

    Plant Genome and Systems Biology (PGSB), formerly Munich Institute for Protein Sequences (MIPS) PlantsDB, is a database framework for the integration and analysis of plant genome data, developed and maintained for more than a decade now. Major components of that framework are genome databases and analysis resources focusing on individual (reference) genomes providing flexible and intuitive access to data. Another main focus is the integration of genomes from both model and crop plants to form a scaffold for comparative genomics, assisted by specialized tools such as the CrowsNest viewer to explore conserved gene order (synteny). Data exchange and integrated search functionality with/over many plant genome databases is provided within the transPLANT project.

  13. Motivated information processing in organizational teams: Progress, puzzles, and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, B.A.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the research into group and team functioning looks at groups that perform cognitive tasks, such as decision making, problem solving, and innovation. The Motivated Information Processing in Groups Model (MIP-G; De Dreu, Nijstad, & Van Knippenberg, 2008) conjectures that information processing

  14. Team confidence, motivated information processing, and dynamic group decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Dreu, C.K.W.; Beersma, B.

    2010-01-01

    According to the Motivated Information Processing in Groups (MIP-G) model, groups should perform ambiguous (non-ambiguous) tasks better when they have high (low) epistemic motivation and concomitant tendencies to engage in systematic (heuristic) information processing and exchange. The authors

  15. The herpesvirus 8-encoded chemokine vMIP-II, but not the poxvirus-encoded chemokine MC148, inhibits the CCR10 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Lewis, I C; Gerstoft, J

    2001-01-01

    The viral chemokine antagonist vMIP-II encoded by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and MC148 encoded by the poxvirus - Molluscum contagiosum - were tested against the newly identified chemokine receptor CCR10. As the CCR10 ligand ESkine / CCL27 had the highest identity to MC148 and because both...

  16. The International Heat Stress Genotype Experiment for modeling wheat response to heat: field experiments and AgMIP-Wheat multi-model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martre, P.; Reynolds, M.P.; Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Alderman, P.D.; Cammarano, D.; Maiorano, Andrea; Ruane, A.C.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Anothai, J.; Supit, I.; Wolf, J.

    2017-01-01

    The data set contains a portion of the International Heat Stress Genotype Experiment (IHSGE) data used in the AgMIP-Wheat project to analyze the uncertainty of 30 wheat crop models and quantify the impact of heat on global wheat yield productivity. It includes two spring wheat cultivars grown during

  17. Data from the Hot Serial Cereal Experiment for modeling wheat response to temperature: field experiments and AgMIP-Wheat multi-model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martre, Pierre; Kimball, Bruce A.; Ottman, Michael J.; Wall, Gerard W.; White, Jeffrey W.; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Cammarano, Davide; Maiorano, Andrea; Aggarwal, Pramod K.; Supit, I.; Wolf, J.

    2018-01-01

    The dataset reported here includes the part of a Hot Serial Cereal Experiment (HSC) experiment recently used in the AgMIP-Wheat project to analyze the uncertainty of 30 wheat models and quantify their response to temperature. The HSC experiment was conducted in an open-field in a semiarid

  18. A SPITZER MIPS STUDY OF 2.5-2.0 M{sub Sun} STARS IN SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Christine H.; Bitner, Martin [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pecaut, Mark; Mamajek, Eric E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Su, Kate Y. L., E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We have obtained Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m observations of 215 nearby, Hipparcos B- and A-type common proper-motion single and binary systems in the nearest OB association, Scorpius-Centaurus. Combining our MIPS observations with those of other ScoCen stars in the literature, we estimate 24 {mu}m B+A-type disk fractions of 17/67 (25{sup +6}{sub -5}%), 36/131 (27{sup +4}{sub -4}%), and 23/95 (24{sup +5}{sub -4}%) for Upper Scorpius ({approx}11 Myr), Upper Centaurus Lupus ({approx}15 Myr), and Lower Centaurus Crux ({approx}17 Myr), respectively, somewhat smaller disk fractions than previously obtained for F- and G-type members. We confirm previous IRAS excess detections and present new discoveries of 51 protoplanetary and debris disk systems, with fractional infrared luminosities ranging from L{sub IR}/L{sub *} = 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -2} and grain temperatures ranging from T{sub gr} = 40 to 300 K. In addition, we confirm that the 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m excesses (or fractional infrared luminosities) around B+A-type stars are smaller than those measured toward F+G-type stars and hypothesize that the observed disk property dependence on stellar mass may be the result of a higher stellar companion fraction around B- and A-type stars at 10-200 AU. Finally, we note that the majority of the ScoCen 24 {mu}m excess sources also possess 12 {mu}m excess, indicating that Earth-like planets may be forming via collisions in the terrestrial planet zone at {approx}10-100 Myr.

  19. Design and results of the ice sheet model initialisation initMIP-Greenland: an ISMIP6 intercomparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Goelzer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Earlier large-scale Greenland ice sheet sea-level projections (e.g. those run during the ice2sea and SeaRISE initiatives have shown that ice sheet initial conditions have a large effect on the projections and give rise to important uncertainties. The goal of this initMIP-Greenland intercomparison exercise is to compare, evaluate, and improve the initialisation techniques used in the ice sheet modelling community and to estimate the associated uncertainties in modelled mass changes. initMIP-Greenland is the first in a series of ice sheet model intercomparison activities within ISMIP6 (the Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project for CMIP6, which is the primary activity within the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6 focusing on the ice sheets. Two experiments for the large-scale Greenland ice sheet have been designed to allow intercomparison between participating models of (1 the initial present-day state of the ice sheet and (2 the response in two idealised forward experiments. The forward experiments serve to evaluate the initialisation in terms of model drift (forward run without additional forcing and in response to a large perturbation (prescribed surface mass balance anomaly; they should not be interpreted as sea-level projections. We present and discuss results that highlight the diversity of data sets, boundary conditions, and initialisation techniques used in the community to generate initial states of the Greenland ice sheet. We find good agreement across the ensemble for the dynamic response to surface mass balance changes in areas where the simulated ice sheets overlap but differences arising from the initial size of the ice sheet. The model drift in the control experiment is reduced for models that participated in earlier intercomparison exercises.

  20. Design and results of the ice sheet model initialisation experiments initMIP-Greenland: an ISMIP6 intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelzer, Heiko; Nowicki, Sophie; Edwards, Tamsin; Beckley, Matthew; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Aschwanden, Andy; Calov, Reinhard; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Gregory, Jonathan; Greve, Ralf; Humbert, Angelika; Huybrechts, Philippe; Kennedy, Joseph H.; Larour, Eric; Lipscomb, William H.; Le clec'h, Sébastien; Lee, Victoria; Morlighem, Mathieu; Pattyn, Frank; Payne, Antony J.; Rodehacke, Christian; Rückamp, Martin; Saito, Fuyuki; Schlegel, Nicole; Seroussi, Helene; Shepherd, Andrew; Sun, Sainan; van de Wal, Roderik; Ziemen, Florian A.

    2018-04-01

    Earlier large-scale Greenland ice sheet sea-level projections (e.g. those run during the ice2sea and SeaRISE initiatives) have shown that ice sheet initial conditions have a large effect on the projections and give rise to important uncertainties. The goal of this initMIP-Greenland intercomparison exercise is to compare, evaluate, and improve the initialisation techniques used in the ice sheet modelling community and to estimate the associated uncertainties in modelled mass changes. initMIP-Greenland is the first in a series of ice sheet model intercomparison activities within ISMIP6 (the Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project for CMIP6), which is the primary activity within the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) focusing on the ice sheets. Two experiments for the large-scale Greenland ice sheet have been designed to allow intercomparison between participating models of (1) the initial present-day state of the ice sheet and (2) the response in two idealised forward experiments. The forward experiments serve to evaluate the initialisation in terms of model drift (forward run without additional forcing) and in response to a large perturbation (prescribed surface mass balance anomaly); they should not be interpreted as sea-level projections. We present and discuss results that highlight the diversity of data sets, boundary conditions, and initialisation techniques used in the community to generate initial states of the Greenland ice sheet. We find good agreement across the ensemble for the dynamic response to surface mass balance changes in areas where the simulated ice sheets overlap but differences arising from the initial size of the ice sheet. The model drift in the control experiment is reduced for models that participated in earlier intercomparison exercises.

  1. MipLAAO, a new L-amino acid oxidase from the redtail coral snake Micrurus mipartitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rey-Suárez

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available L-amino acid oxidases (LAAOs are ubiquitous enzymes in nature. Bioactivities described for these enzymes include apoptosis induction, edema formation, induction or inhibition of platelet aggregation, as well as antiviral, antiparasite, and antibacterial actions. With over 80 species, Micrurus snakes are the representatives of the Elapidae family in the New World. Although LAAOs in Micrurus venoms have been predicted by venom gland transcriptomic studies and detected in proteomic studies, no enzymes of this kind have been previously purified from their venoms. Earlier proteomic studies revealed that the venom of M. mipartitus from Colombia contains ∼4% of LAAO. This enzyme, here named MipLAAO, was isolated and biochemically and functionally characterized. The enzyme is found in monomeric form, with an isotope-averaged molecular mass of 59,100.6 Da, as determined by MALDI-TOF. Its oxidase activity shows substrate preference for hydrophobic amino acids, being optimal at pH 8.0. By nucleotide sequencing of venom gland cDNA of mRNA transcripts obtained from a single snake, six isoforms of MipLAAO with minor variations among them were retrieved. The deduced sequences present a mature chain of 483 amino acids, with a predicted pI of 8.9, and theoretical masses between 55,010.9 and 55,121.0 Da. The difference with experimentally observed mass is likely due to glycosylation, in agreement with the finding of three putative N-glycosylation sites in its amino acid sequence. A phylogenetic analysis of MmipLAAO placed this new enzyme within the clade of homologous proteins from elapid snakes, characterized by the conserved Serine at position 223, in contrast to LAAOs from viperids. MmipLAAO showed a potent bactericidal effect on S. aureus (MIC: 2 µg/mL, but not on E. coli. The former activity could be of interest to future studies assessing its potential as antimicrobial agent.

  2. Repeated PSMA-targeting radioligand therapy of metastatic prostate cancer with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Haberkorn, Uwe [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Zechmann, Christian; Mier, Walter; Spohn, Fabian; Debus, Nils; Kratochwil, Clemens [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Armor, Thomas [Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Inc., New York, NY (United States); Holland-Letz, Tim [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Babich, John [Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medicine, Citigroup Biomedical Imaging Center, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medicine, Meyer Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeting radioligand therapy (RLT) was introduced in 2011. The first report described the antitumor and side effects of a single dose. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate toxicity and antitumor activity after single and repetitive therapies. Thirty-four men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received PSMA-RLT with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095. Twenty-three patients received a second, and three patients a third dose, timed at PSA progression after an initial response to the preceding therapy. The applied doses were separated in three groups: <3.5, 3.5-5.0 and >5.0 GBq. Antitumor and side-effects were analyzed by blood samples and other clinical data. Follow-up was conducted for up to 5 years. The best therapeutic effect was achieved by the first therapy. A PSA decline of ≥50% was achieved in 70.6% of the patients. The second and third therapies were significantly less effective. There was neither an association between the applied activity and PSA response or the time-to-progression. Hematologic toxicities were less prevalent but presented in a higher percentage of patients with increasing number of therapies. After hematologic toxicities, xerostomia was the second most frequent side effect and presented more often and with higher intensity after the second or third therapy. The first dose of RLT with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095 presented with low side effects and could significantly reduce the tumor burden in a majority of patients. The second and third therapies were less effective and presented with more frequent and more intense side effects, especially hematologic toxicities and xerostomia. (orig.)

  3. 99m Tc-MIP-1404-SPECT/CT for the detection of PSMA-positive lesions in 225 patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidkonz, Christian; Hollweg, Claudia; Beck, Michael; Reinfelder, Julia; Goetz, Theresa I; Sanders, James C; Schmidt, Daniela; Prante, Olaf; Bäuerle, Tobias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Uder, Michael; Wullich, Bernd; Goebell, Peter; Kuwert, Torsten; Ritt, Philipp

    2018-01-01

    99m Tc-MIP-1404 (Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Inc., New York, NY) is a novel, SPECT-compatible 99m Tc-labeled PSMA inhibitor for the detection of prostate cancer. We present results of its clinical use in a cohort of 225 men with histologically confirmed prostate cancer referred for workup of biochemical relapse. From April 2013 to April 2017, 99m Tc-MIP1404-scintigraphy was performed in 225 patients for workup of PSA biochemical relapse of prostate cancer. Whole-body planar and SPECT/CT images of the lower abdomen and thorax were obtained 3-4 h p.i. of 710 ± 64 MBq 99m Tc-MIP-1404. Images were visually analyzed for presence and location of abnormal uptake. In addition, quantitative analysis of the SPECT/CT data was carried out on a subset of 125 patients. Follow-up reports of subsequent therapeutic interventions were available for 59% (139) of all patients. Tracer-positive lesions were detected in 77% (174/225) of all patients. Detections occurred at the area of local recurrence in the prostate in 25% of patients (or a total of 56), with metastases in lymph nodes in 47% (105), bone in 27% (60), lung in 5% (12), and other locations in 2% (4) of patients. Detection rates were 90% at PSA levels ≥2 ng/mL and 54% below that threshold. Lesional SUVmax values were, on average, 32.2 ± 29.6 (0.8-142.2), and tumor-to-normal ratios 146.6 ± 160.5 (1.9-1482.4). The PSA level correlated significantly with total uptake of MIP-1404 in tumors (P Tc-MIP-1404-imaging and other information, an interdisciplinary tumor board review recommended changes to treatment plans in 74% (104/139) of those patients for whom the necessary documentation was available. SPECT/CT with 99m Tc-labeled MIP-1404 has a high probability in detecting PSMA-positive lesions in patients with elevated PSA. Statistical analysis disclosed significant relationship between quantitative 99m Tc-MIP-1404 uptake, PSA level, and Gleason score. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Distribution and physiological effects of B-type allatostatins (myoinhibitory peptides, MIPs) in the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab Cancer borealis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Theresa M; Chen, Ruibing; Goeritz, Marie L; Maloney, Ryan T; Tang, Lamont S; Li, Lingjun; Marder, Eve

    2011-09-01

    The crustacean stomatogastric ganglion (STG) is modulated by a large number of amines and neuropeptides that are found in descending pathways from anterior ganglia or reach the STG via the hemolymph. Among these are the allatostatin (AST) B types, also known as myoinhibitory peptides (MIPs). We used mass spectrometry to determine the sequences of nine members of the AST-B family of peptides that were found in the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab Cancer borealis. We raised an antibody against Cancer borealis allatostatin-B1 (CbAST-B1; VPNDWAHFRGSWa) and used it to map the distribution of CbAST-B1-like immunoreactivity (-LI) in the stomatogastric nervous system. CbAST-B1-LI was found in neurons and neuropil in the commissural ganglia (CoGs), in somata in the esophageal ganglion (OG), in fibers in the stomatogastric nerve (stn), and in neuropilar processes in the STG. CbAST-B1-LI was blocked by preincubation with 10(-6) M CbAST-B1 and was partially blocked by lower concentrations. Electrophysiological recordings of the effects of CbAST-B1, CbAST-B2, and CbAST-B3 on the pyloric rhythm of the STG showed that all three peptides inhibited the pyloric rhythm in a state-dependent manner. Specifically, all three peptides at 10(-8) M significantly decreased the frequency of the pyloric rhythm when the initial frequency of the pyloric rhythm was below 0.6 Hz. These data suggest important neuromodulatory roles for the CbAST-B family in the stomatogastric nervous system. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Proline substitutions in a Mip-like peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase severely affect its structure, stability, shape and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumitra Polley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available FKBP22, an Escherichia coli-specific peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, shows substantial homology with the Mip-like virulence factors. Mip-like proteins are homodimeric and possess a V-shaped conformation. Their N-terminal domains form dimers, whereas their C-terminal domains bind protein/peptide substrates and distinct inhibitors such as rapamycin and FK506. Interestingly, the two domains of the Mip-like proteins are separated by a lengthy, protease-susceptible α-helix. To delineate the structural requirement of this domain-connecting region in Mip-like proteins, we have investigated a recombinant FKBP22 (rFKBP22 and its three point mutants I65P, V72P and A82P using different probes. Each mutant harbors a Pro substitution mutation at a distinct location in the hinge region. We report that the three mutants are not only different from each other but also different from rFKBP22 in structure and activity. Unlike rFKBP22, the three mutants were unfolded by a non-two state mechanism in the presence of urea. In addition, the stabilities of the mutants, particularly I65P and V72P, differed considerably from that of rFKBP22. Conversely, the rapamycin binding affinity of no mutant was different from that of rFKBP22. Of the mutants, I65P showed the highest levels of structural/functional loss and dissociated partly in solution. Our computational study indicated a severe collapse of the V-shape in I65P due to the anomalous movement of its C-terminal domains. The α-helical nature of the domain-connecting region is, therefore, critical for the Mip-like proteins.

  6. Synthesis of a new magnetic-MIP for the selective detection of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, a highly allergenic compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzuriaga-Sánchez, Rosario Josefina [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Laboratory of Physical Chemistry Research, Faculty of Science, National University of Engineering, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Rimac, Lima (Peru); Wong, Ademar; Khan, Sabir [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Pividori, Maria I. [Sensors and Biosensors Group, Department of Chemistry, Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB), 08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Picasso, Gino, E-mail: gpicasso@uni.edu.pe [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry Research, Faculty of Science, National University of Engineering, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Rimac, Lima (Peru); Sotomayor, Maria D.P.T., E-mail: mpilar@iq.unesp.br [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2017-05-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in combination with magnetic nanoparticles, in a core@shell format, were studied for selective detection of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), a powerful allergenic substance. Magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation method and mixed with oleic acid (OA). This material was then encapsulated in three types of hydrophobic polymeric matrix, poly-(MA-co-EDGMA), poly-(AA-co-EDGMA), and poly-(1-VN-co-EDGMA), by the mini-emulsion method. These matrices were used due to their ability to interact specifically with the functional groups of the analyte. Finally, the MIP-CDNB was obtained on the magnetic-hydrophobic surfaces using precipitation polymerization in the presence of the analyte. XRD diffraction patterns suggested the presence of magnetite in the composite and SEM analysis revealed a nanoparticle size between 10 and 18 nm. Under the optimized adsorption conditions, the magnetic-MIP material showed a higher adsorption capacity (5.1 mg g{sup −1}) than its non-magnetic counterpart (4.2 mg g{sup −1}). In tests of the selectivity of the magnetic-MIP towards CDNB, α-values of 2.5 and 10.4, respectively, were obtained for dichlorophenol and o-nitrophenol, two structurally similar compounds, and no adsorption was observed for any other non-analogous analyte. The magnetic-MIP and magnetic-NIP were applied using water enriched with 0.5 mg L{sup −1} of CDNB, achieving recovery values of 83.8(± 0.8)% and 66(± 1)%, respectively, revealing the suitability of the material for detection of CDNB. - Highlights: • Novel engineered magnetic nanoparticles selective for allergenic CDBN with potential environmental impact • Morphological and molecular recognition properties of imprinted materials • Direct magnetic separation, removal efficiency, and active remediation of real samples.

  7. Reaching for mechanistic consensus across life kingdoms: structure and insights into catalysis of the myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (mIPS) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Kimberly A; Yang, Hongying; Roberts, Mary F; Stec, Boguslaw

    2005-01-11

    myo-Inositol-1-phosphate synthase (mIPS) catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of l-myo-inositol-1-phosphate. We have solved and refined the structure of the mIPS from the hyperthermophilic sulfate reducer Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.9 A resolution. The enzyme crystallized from poly(ethylene glycol) in the P1 space group with one tetramer in the asymmetric unit and provided a view of the entire biologically active oligomer. Despite significant changes in sequence length and amino acid composition, the general architecture of the archaeal enzyme is similar to that of the eukaryotic mIPS from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and bacterial mIPS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The enhanced thermostability of the archaeal enzyme as compared to that from yeast is consistent with deletion of a number of surface loops that results in a significantly smaller protein. In the structure of the A. fulgidus mIPS, the active sites of all four subunits were fully ordered and contained NAD(+) and inorganic phosphate. The structure also contained a single metal ion (identified as K(+)) in two of the four subunits. The analysis of the electrostatic potential maps of the protein suggested the presence of a second metal-ion-binding site in close proximity to the first metal ion and NAD(+). The modeling of the substrate and known inhibitors suggests a critical role for the second metal ion in catalysis and provides insights into the common elements of the catalytic cycle in enzymes from different life kingdoms.

  8. Synthesis of a new magnetic-MIP for the selective detection of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, a highly allergenic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzuriaga-Sánchez, Rosario Josefina; Wong, Ademar; Khan, Sabir; Pividori, Maria I.; Picasso, Gino; Sotomayor, Maria D.P.T.

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in combination with magnetic nanoparticles, in a core@shell format, were studied for selective detection of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), a powerful allergenic substance. Magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation method and mixed with oleic acid (OA). This material was then encapsulated in three types of hydrophobic polymeric matrix, poly-(MA-co-EDGMA), poly-(AA-co-EDGMA), and poly-(1-VN-co-EDGMA), by the mini-emulsion method. These matrices were used due to their ability to interact specifically with the functional groups of the analyte. Finally, the MIP-CDNB was obtained on the magnetic-hydrophobic surfaces using precipitation polymerization in the presence of the analyte. XRD diffraction patterns suggested the presence of magnetite in the composite and SEM analysis revealed a nanoparticle size between 10 and 18 nm. Under the optimized adsorption conditions, the magnetic-MIP material showed a higher adsorption capacity (5.1 mg g −1 ) than its non-magnetic counterpart (4.2 mg g −1 ). In tests of the selectivity of the magnetic-MIP towards CDNB, α-values of 2.5 and 10.4, respectively, were obtained for dichlorophenol and o-nitrophenol, two structurally similar compounds, and no adsorption was observed for any other non-analogous analyte. The magnetic-MIP and magnetic-NIP were applied using water enriched with 0.5 mg L −1 of CDNB, achieving recovery values of 83.8(± 0.8)% and 66(± 1)%, respectively, revealing the suitability of the material for detection of CDNB. - Highlights: • Novel engineered magnetic nanoparticles selective for allergenic CDBN with potential environmental impact • Morphological and molecular recognition properties of imprinted materials • Direct magnetic separation, removal efficiency, and active remediation of real samples

  9. Pinatubo Emulation in Multiple Models (POEMs): co-ordinated experiments in the ISA-MIP model intercomparison activity component of the SPARC Stratospheric Sulphur and it's Role in Climate initiative (SSiRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lindsay; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Toohey, Matthew; Aquila, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    The World Climate Research Program's SPARC initiative has a new international activity "Stratospheric Sulphur and its Role in Climate" (SSiRC) to better understand changes in stratospheric aerosol and precursor gaseous sulphur species. One component of SSiRC involves an intercomparison "ISA-MIP" of composition-climate models that simulate the stratospheric aerosol layer interactively. Within PoEMS each modelling group will run a "perturbed physics ensemble" (PPE) of interactive stratospheric aerosol (ISA) simulations of the Pinatubo eruption, varying several uncertain parameters associated with the eruption's SO2 emissions and model processes. A powerful new technique to quantify and attribute sources of uncertainty in complex global models is described by Lee et al. (2011, ACP). The analysis uses Gaussian emulation to derive a probability density function (pdf) of predicted quantities, essentially interpolating the PPE results in multi-dimensional parameter space. Once trained on the ensemble, a Monte Carlo simulation with the fast Gaussian emulator enabling a full variance-based sensitivity analysis. The approach has already been used effectively by Carslaw et al., (2013, Nature) to quantify the uncertainty in the cloud albedo effect forcing from a 3D global aerosol-microphysics model allowing to compare the sensitivy of different predicted quantities to uncertainties in natural and anthropogenic emissions types, and structural parameters in the models. Within ISA-MIP, each group will carry out a PPE of runs, with the subsequent analysis with the emulator assessing the uncertainty in the volcanic forcings predicted by each model. In this poster presentation we will give an outline of the "PoEMS" analysis, describing the uncertain parameters to be varied and the relevance to further understanding differences identified in previous international stratospheric aerosol assessments.

  10. Radiation dosimetry and first therapy results with a 124I/131I-labeled small molecule (MIP-1095) targeting PSMA for prostate cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zechmann, Christian M.; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Mier, Walter; Armor, Tom; Joyal, John; Stubbs, James B.; Hadaschik, Boris; Kopka, Klaus; Debus, Juergen; Babich, John W.; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Since the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is frequently over-expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) several PSMA-targeting molecules are under development to detect and treat metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We investigated the tissue kinetics of a small molecule inhibitor of PSMA ((S)-2-(3-((S)-1-carboxy-5-(3-(4-[ 124 I]iodophenyl)ureido)pentyl)ureido) pentan edioicacid; MIP-1095) using PET/CT to estimate radiation dosimetry for the potential therapeutic use of 131 I-MIP-1095 in men with mCRPC. We also report preliminary safety and efficacy of the first 28 consecutive patients treated under a compassionate-use protocol with a single cycle of 131 I-MIP-1095. Sixteen patients with known prostate cancer underwent PET/CT imaging after i.v. administration of 124 I-MIP-1095 (mean activity: 67.4 MBq). Each patient was scanned using PET/CT up to five times at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h post injection. Volumes of interest were defined for tumor lesions and normal organs at each time point followed by dose calculations using the OLINDA/EXM software. Twenty-eight men with mCRPC were treated with a single cycle of 131 I-MIP-1095 (mean activity: 4.8 GBq, range 2 to 7.2 GBq) and followed for safety and efficacy. Baseline and follow up examinations included a complete blood count, liver and kidney function tests, and measurement of serum PSA. I-124-MIP-1095 PET/CT images showed excellent tumor uptake and moderate uptake in liver, proximal intestine and within a few hours post-injection also in the kidneys. High uptake values were observed only in salivary and lacrimal glands. Dosimetry estimates for I-131-MIP-1095 revealed that the highest absorbed doses were delivered to the salivary glands (3.8 mSv/MBq), liver (1.7 mSv/MBq) and kidneys (1.4 mSv/MBq). The absorbed dose calculated for the red marrow was 0.37 mSv/MBq. PSA values decreased by >50 % in 60.7 % of the men treated. Of men with bone pain, 84.6 % showed complete or moderate reduction in pain

  11. Radiation dosimetry and first therapy results with a {sup 124}I/{sup 131}I-labeled small molecule (MIP-1095) targeting PSMA for prostate cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zechmann, Christian M.; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Mier, Walter [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Armor, Tom; Joyal, John [Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Boston, MA (United States); Stubbs, James B. [Radiation Dosimetry Systems RDS, Inc., Apharetta, GA (United States); Hadaschik, Boris [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopka, Klaus [Division Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Babich, John W. [Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Boston, MA (United States); Cornell University, Division of Radiopharmacy, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Since the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is frequently over-expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) several PSMA-targeting molecules are under development to detect and treat metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We investigated the tissue kinetics of a small molecule inhibitor of PSMA ((S)-2-(3-((S)-1-carboxy-5-(3-(4-[{sup 124}I]iodophenyl)ureido)pentyl)ureido) pentan edioicacid; MIP-1095) using PET/CT to estimate radiation dosimetry for the potential therapeutic use of {sup 131}I-MIP-1095 in men with mCRPC. We also report preliminary safety and efficacy of the first 28 consecutive patients treated under a compassionate-use protocol with a single cycle of {sup 131}I-MIP-1095. Sixteen patients with known prostate cancer underwent PET/CT imaging after i.v. administration of {sup 124}I-MIP-1095 (mean activity: 67.4 MBq). Each patient was scanned using PET/CT up to five times at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h post injection. Volumes of interest were defined for tumor lesions and normal organs at each time point followed by dose calculations using the OLINDA/EXM software. Twenty-eight men with mCRPC were treated with a single cycle of {sup 131}I-MIP-1095 (mean activity: 4.8 GBq, range 2 to 7.2 GBq) and followed for safety and efficacy. Baseline and follow up examinations included a complete blood count, liver and kidney function tests, and measurement of serum PSA. I-124-MIP-1095 PET/CT images showed excellent tumor uptake and moderate uptake in liver, proximal intestine and within a few hours post-injection also in the kidneys. High uptake values were observed only in salivary and lacrimal glands. Dosimetry estimates for I-131-MIP-1095 revealed that the highest absorbed doses were delivered to the salivary glands (3.8 mSv/MBq), liver (1.7 mSv/MBq) and kidneys (1.4 mSv/MBq). The absorbed dose calculated for the red marrow was 0.37 mSv/MBq. PSA values decreased by >50 % in 60.7 % of the men treated. Of men with bone pain, 84.6 % showed complete or

  12. Motivated information processing in group judgement and decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Dreu, C.K.W.; Nijstad, B.A.; van Knippenberg, D.

    2008-01-01

    This article expands the view of groups as information processors into a motivated information processing in groups (MIP-G) model by emphasizing, first, the mixedmotive structure of many group tasks and, second, the idea that individuals engage in more or less deliberate information search and

  13. Motivated information processing in group judgment and decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; van Knippenberg, Daan

    This article expands the view of groups as information processors into a motivated information processing in groups (MIP-G) model by emphasizing, first, the mixed-motive structure of many group tasks and, second, the idea that individuals engage in more or less deliberate information search and

  14. MIPs-graphene nanoplatelets-MWCNTs modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of cardiac troponin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ya; Shen, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Hai-Shui; Tao, Jia; Huang, Jian-Zhi; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Li-Shi

    2017-03-01

    An electrochemical sensor with high selectivity in addition to sensitivity was developed for the determination of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), based on the modification of cTnI imprinted polymer film on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The sensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer assembled graphene nanoplatelets (GS), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), chitosan (CS), glutaraldehyde (GA) composites, which can increase the electronic transfer rate and the active surface area to capture a larger number of antigenic proteins. MWCNTs/GS based imprinted polymers (MIPs/MWCNTs/GS) were synthesized by means of methacrylic acid (MAA) as the monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linker α,α'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator and cTnI as the template. In comparison with conventional methods, the proposed electrochemical sensor is highly sensitive for cTnI, providing a better linear response range from 0.005 to 60 ng cm -3 and a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 0.0008 ng cm -3 under optimal experimental conditions. In addition, the electrochemical sensor exhibited good specificity, acceptable reproducibility and stability. Moreover, satisfactory results were obtained in real human serum samples, indicating that the developed method has the potential to find application in clinical detection of cTnI as an alternative approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in the preconcentration of disperse red 73 dye prior to photoelectrocatalytic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Jefferson Honorio; Aissa, Alejandra Ben; Bessegato, Guilherme Garcia; Fajardo, Laura Martinez; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin; Pividori, María Isabel; Del Pilar Taboada Sotomayor, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a research hotspot due to their two important characteristics: target recognition and magnetic separation. This paper presents the preparation, characterization, and optimization of an MMIP for the preconcentration of disperse red 73 dye (DR73) and its subsequent efficient degradation by photoelectrocatalytic treatment. The MMIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which revealed homogeneous distribution of the particles. Excellent encapsulation of magnetite was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A study of dye binding showed that the dye was retained more selectively in the MIP, compared to the NIP. The release of DR73 from the imprinted polymers into methanol and acetic acid was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The extracts showed higher absorbance values for MMIP, compared to MNIP, confirming greater adsorption of dye in the MMIP material. The extracts were then subjected to photoelectrocatalytic treatment. LC-MS/MS analysis following this treatment showed that the dye was almost completely degraded. Hence, the combination of MMIP extraction and photoelectrocatalysis offers an alternative way of selectively removing an organic contaminant, prior to proceeding with its complete degradation.

  16. Galactic Bulge Giants: Probing Stellar and Galactic Evolution. 1. Catalogue of Spitzer IRAC and MIPS Sources (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttenthaler, Stefan; Stute, Matthias; Sahai, Raghvendra; Blommaert, Joris A.; Schultheis, Mathias; Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Groenewegen, Martin A.; Price, Stephan D.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. We aim at measuring mass-loss rates and the luminosities of a statistically large sample of Galactic bulge stars at several galactocentric radii. The sensitivity of previous infrared surveys of the bulge has been rather limited, thus fundamental questions for late stellar evolution, such as the stage at which substantial mass-loss begins on the red giant branch and its dependence on fundamental stellar properties, remain unanswered. We aim at providing evidence and answers to these questions. Methods. To this end, we observed seven 15 15 arcmin2 fields in the nuclear bulge and its vicinity with unprecedented sensitivity using the IRAC and MIPS imaging instruments on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope. In each of the fields, tens of thousands of point sources were detected. Results. In the first paper based on this data set, we present the observations, data reduction, the final catalogue of sources, and a detailed comparison to previous mid-IR surveys of the Galactic bulge, as well as to theoretical isochrones. We find in general good agreement with other surveys and the isochrones, supporting the high quality of our catalogue.

  17. Forcings and feedbacks in the GeoMIP ensemble for a reduction in solar irradiance and increase in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneeus, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Alterskjær, Kari; Cole, Jason N. S.; Curry, Charles L.; Ji, Duoying; Jones, Andy; Kravitz, Ben; Kristjánsson, Jón Egill; Moore, John C.; Muri, Helene; Niemeier, Ulrike; Rasch, Phil; Robock, Alan; Singh, Balwinder; Schmidt, Hauke; Schulz, Michael; Tilmes, Simone; Watanabe, Shingo; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-05-01

    The effective radiative forcings (including rapid adjustments) and feedbacks associated with an instantaneous quadrupling of the preindustrial CO2 concentration and a counterbalancing reduction of the solar constant are investigated in the context of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). The forcing and feedback parameters of the net energy flux, as well as its different components at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface, were examined in 10 Earth System Models to better understand the impact of solar radiation management on the energy budget. In spite of their very different nature, the feedback parameter and its components at the TOA and surface are almost identical for the two forcing mechanisms, not only in the global mean but also in their geographical distributions. This conclusion holds for each of the individual models despite intermodel differences in how feedbacks affect the energy budget. This indicates that the climate sensitivity parameter is independent of the forcing (when measured as an effective radiative forcing). We also show the existence of a large contribution of the cloudy-sky component to the shortwave effective radiative forcing at the TOA suggesting rapid cloud adjustments to a change in solar irradiance. In addition, the models present significant diversity in the spatial distribution of the shortwave feedback parameter in cloudy regions, indicating persistent uncertainties in cloud feedback mechanisms.

  18. Effects of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid and cold water immersion on expression of CR3 and MIP-1β following resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Fragala, Maren S; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Wells, Adam J; Beyer, Kyle S; Boone, Carleigh H; Pruna, Gabriel J; Mangine, Gerald T; Bohner, Jonathan D; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R

    2014-04-01

    The inflammatory response to muscle-damaging exercise requires monocyte mobilization and adhesion. Complement receptor type 3 (CR3) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β enables monocyte recruitment, adhesion, and subsequent infiltration into damaged muscle tissue. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) and/or β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid (HMB-FA) on CR3 expression and MIP-1β concentration after four sets of up to 10 repetitions of squat, dead lift, and split squat exercises at 70-80% 1-repetition maximum. Thirty-nine resistance-trained men (22.2 ± 2.5 yr) were randomly divided into four groups: 1) placebo (PL), 2) HMB-FA, 3) HMB-FA-CWI, and 4) PL-CWI. The HMB-FA groups ingested 3 g/day, and CWI groups were submersed into 10-12°C water for 10 min after exercise. Blood was sampled at baseline (PRE), immediately post- (IP), 30 min post- (30P), 24 h post- (24P), and 48 h post (48P)-exercise. Circulating MIP-1β was assayed and CR3 expression on CD14+ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry. Without treatment, CR3 expression significantly elevated at 30P compared with other time points (P = 0.030-0.047). HMB-FA significantly elevated the percentage of monocytes expressing CR3 between IP and 24P (P = 0.046) and between IP and 48P (P = 0.046). No time effect was observed for MIP-1β concentration. The recovery modalities showed to attenuate the rise in CR3 following exercise. Additionally, supplementation with HMB-FA significantly elevated the percentage of monocytes expressing CR3 during recovery. Although the time course that inflammatory responses are most beneficial remains to be determined, recovery modalities may alter immune cell mobilization and adhesion mechanisms during tissue recovery.

  19. Introducing Thermal Wave Transport Analysis (TWTA): A Thermal Technique for Dopamine Detection by Screen-Printed Electrodes Functionalized with Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP) Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marloes M; van Grinsven, Bart; Foster, Christopher W; Cleij, Thomas J; Banks, Craig E

    2016-04-26

    A novel procedure is developed for producing bulk modified Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP) screen-printed electrodes (SPEs), which involves the direct mixing of the polymer particles within the screen-printed ink. This allowed reduction of the sample preparation time from 45 min to 1 min, and resulted in higher reproducibility of the electrodes. The samples are measured with a novel detection method, namely, thermal wave transport analysis (TWTA), relying on the analysis of thermal waves through a functional interface. As a first proof-of-principle, MIPs for dopamine are developed and successfully incorporated within a bulk modified MIP SPE. The detection limits of dopamine within buffer solutions for the MIP SPEs are determined via three independent techniques. With cyclic voltammetry this was determined to be 4.7 × 10(-6) M, whereas by using the heat-transfer method (HTM) 0.35 × 10(-6) M was obtained, and with the novel TWTA concept 0.26 × 10(-6) M is possible. This TWTA technique is measured simultaneously with HTM and has the benefits of reducing measurement time to less than 5 min and increasing effect size by nearly a factor of two. The two thermal methods are able to enhance dopamine detection by one order of magnitude compared to the electrochemical method. In previous research, it was not possible to measure neurotransmitters in complex samples with HTM, but with the improved signal-to-noise of TWTA for the first time, spiked dopamine concentrations were determined in a relevant food sample. In summary, novel concepts are presented for both the sensor functionalization side by employing screen-printing technology, and on the sensing side, the novel TWTA thermal technique is reported. The developed bio-sensing platform is cost-effective and suitable for mass-production due to the nature of screen-printing technology, which makes it very interesting for neurotransmitter detection in clinical diagnostic applications.

  20. The optical spectra of 24 mu m galaxies in the cosmos field. I. Spitzer MIPS bright sources in the zCOSMOS-bright 10k catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caputi, K. I.; Lilly, S. J.; Aussel, H.; Sanders, D.; Frayer, D.; Le Fevre, O.; Renzini, A.; Zamorani, G.; Scodeggio, M.; Contini, T.; Scoville, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Hasinger, G.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Floc'h, E.; Maier, C.; Mainieri, V.; Mignoli, M.; Salvato, M.; Schiminovich, D.; Silverman, J.; Surace, J.; Tasca, L.; Abbas, U.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bottini, D.; Capak, P.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Kampczyk, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Kneib, J. -P.; Knobel, C.; Kovac, K.; Lamareille, F.; Leauthaud, A.; Le Borgne, J. F.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H.; Meneux, B.; Oesch, P.; Pello, R.; Perez-Montero, E.; Porciani, C.; Ricciardelli, E.; Scaramella, R.; Scarlata, C.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Walcher, J.; Zamojski, M.; Zucca, E.

    2008-01-01

    We study zCOSMOS-bright optical spectra for 609 Spitzer MIPS 24 mu m-selected galaxies with S-24 (mu m) > 0: 30 mJy and I <22.5 (AB mag) over 1.5 deg(2) of the COSMOS field. From emission-line diagnostics we find the following: (1) SFRs derived from the observed H alpha lambda 6563 and H beta lambda

  1. Maturation and Mip-1β Production of Cytomegalovirus-Specific T Cell Responses in Tanzanian Children, Adolescents and Adults: Impact by HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Co-Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Portevin

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that aging and HIV infection are associated with quantitative and functional changes of CMV-specific T cell responses. We studied here the expression of Mip-1β and the T cell maturation marker CD27 within CMVpp65-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells in relation to age, HIV and active Tuberculosis (TB co-infection in a cohort of Tanzanian volunteers (≤ 16 years of age, n = 108 and ≥ 18 years, n = 79. Independent of HIV co-infection, IFNγ(+ CMVpp65-specific CD4(+ T cell frequencies increased with age. In adults, HIV co-infection further increased the frequencies of these cells. A high capacity for Mip-1β production together with a CD27(low phenotype was characteristic for these cells in children and adults. Interestingly, in addition to HIV co-infection active TB disease was linked to further down regulation of CD27 and increased capacity of Mip-1β production in CMVpp65-specific CD4+ T cells. These phenotypic and functional changes of CMVpp65-specific CD4 T cells observed during HIV infection and active TB could be associated with increased CMV reactivation rates.

  2. Monitoring of Low Levels of Furfural in Power Transformer Oil with a Sensor System Based on a POF-MIP Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Cennamo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work an innovative, miniaturized and low cost optical chemical sensor (POF-MIP platform, based on a molecular imprinted polymer (MIP and surface plasmon resonance in a plastic optical fiber (POF, is presented and preliminarily tested for monitoring of furfural (furan-2-carbaldehyde in transformer oil. To this end, the optical platform was coupled to an MIP layer, highly selective for furfural. The ability of the developed sensor to directly detect furfural in the insulating oil was investigated. The detection limit of the sensor has been found to be 9 ppb, with a linear response up to about 30 ppb. However there is a sensible response up to 0.15 ppm. Because of the small linearity range, the Hill equation is suggested for the quantification. The sensor has been effectively tested in real oil samples collected from aged electrical equipment removed from service. The assessed concentration of furfural is in good agreement with that evaluated by a high pressure liquid chromatography (HLPC method, confirming the good selectivity of the proposed sensor.

  3. Monitoring of Low Levels of Furfural in Power Transformer Oil with a Sensor System Based on a POF-MIP Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, Nunzio; De Maria, Letizia; D’Agostino, Girolamo; Zeni, Luigi; Pesavento, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this work an innovative, miniaturized and low cost optical chemical sensor (POF-MIP platform), based on a molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) and surface plasmon resonance in a plastic optical fiber (POF), is presented and preliminarily tested for monitoring of furfural (furan-2-carbaldehyde) in transformer oil. To this end, the optical platform was coupled to an MIP layer, highly selective for furfural. The ability of the developed sensor to directly detect furfural in the insulating oil was investigated. The detection limit of the sensor has been found to be 9 ppb, with a linear response up to about 30 ppb. However there is a sensible response up to 0.15 ppm. Because of the small linearity range, the Hill equation is suggested for the quantification. The sensor has been effectively tested in real oil samples collected from aged electrical equipment removed from service. The assessed concentration of furfural is in good agreement with that evaluated by a high pressure liquid chromatography (HLPC) method, confirming the good selectivity of the proposed sensor. PMID:25871719

  4. Monitoring of low levels of furfural in power transformer oil with a sensor system based on a POF-MIP platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, Nunzio; De Maria, Letizia; D'Agostino, Girolamo; Zeni, Luigi; Pesavento, Maria

    2015-04-13

    In this work an innovative, miniaturized and low cost optical chemical sensor (POF-MIP platform), based on a molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) and surface plasmon resonance in a plastic optical fiber (POF), is presented and preliminarily tested for monitoring of furfural (furan-2-carbaldehyde) in transformer oil. To this end, the optical platform was coupled to an MIP layer, highly selective for furfural. The ability of the developed sensor to directly detect furfural in the insulating oil was investigated. The detection limit of the sensor has been found to be 9 ppb, with a linear response up to about 30 ppb. However there is a sensible response up to 0.15 ppm. Because of the small linearity range, the Hill equation is suggested for the quantification. The sensor has been effectively tested in real oil samples collected from aged electrical equipment removed from service. The assessed concentration of furfural is in good agreement with that evaluated by a high pressure liquid chromatography (HLPC) method, confirming the good selectivity of the proposed sensor.

  5. Physician Reimbursement: From Fee-for-Service to MACRA, MIPS and APMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Phillip; Mosley, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    To a significant degree, "healthcare reform" is a movement to change how both physicians and healthcare facilities are compensated, with value replacing volume as the key compensation metric. The goal of this movement has not yet been accomplished, but the process is accelerating. In this article, we track how the arc of physician compensation is bending, how the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act will drive further changes to physician compensation models, and how these changes may affect physician practice patterns and physician staffing in the future.

  6. How much of our environment do we need?. MIPS - a measuring method for an ecological economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Bleek, F.; Klueting, R.

    1994-01-01

    This book illustrates how much of our environment we use up with the products and services associated with everyday life, how large the ecological impact of our consume society actually is; we build roads, dams, heavy goods vehicles, warehouses, factories, monocultures and rubbish tips. We take iron ore, sand, gravel, coal oil, water, air and wood from our environment in huge, ever-increasing qualities. Slag heaps, erosion and disrupted water flow are left behind. This man-made materialistic society is altering nature's balance persistently and for the long term. This materialism is no longer ecologically sustainable. We must learn to prosper with less negative environmental impacts. The author has developed a means of measuring the intensity of environmental impact of products, processes and services, based on the material consumed to allow acurate comparisons. In this comprehensible informative book he reveals, for the first time publicly, the measure/formula by means of many practical examples and illustrations to show a way out of the crisis. (orig./UA) [de

  7. Virtual imprinting as a tool to design efficient MIPs for photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Florent; Rouillon, Regis; Piletska, Elena V; Karim, Kal; Guerreiro, Antonio; Chianella, Iva; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2007-04-15

    Molecular modelling and computational screening were used to identify functional monomers capable of interacting with several different photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides. The process involved the design of a virtual library of molecular models of functional monomers containing polymerizable residues and residues able to interact with the template through electrostatic, hydrophobic, Van der Waals forces and dipole-dipole interactions. Each of the entries in the virtual library was probed for its possible interactions with molecular models of the template molecules. It was anticipated that the monomers giving the highest binding score would represent good candidates for the preparation of affinity polymers. Strong interactions were computationally determined between acidic functional monomers like methacrylic acid (MAA) or itaconic acid (IA) with triazines, and between vinylimidazole with bentazone and bromoxynil. Nevertheless, weaker interactions were seen with phenylureas. The corresponding blank polymers were prepared using the selected monomers and tested in the solid phase extraction (SPE) of herbicides from chloroform solutions. A good correlation was found between the binding score of the monomers and the affinities of the corresponding polymers. The use of computationally designed blanks can potentially eliminate the need for molecular imprinting, (adding a template to the monomer mixture to create specific binding sites). Data also showed that some monomers have a natural selectivity for some herbicides, which can be further enhanced by imprinting. Thus, in regard to retention on the blank polymer, we can estimate if the resulting imprinted polymer will be effective or not.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: High quality Spitzer/MIPS obs. of F4-K2 stars (Sierchio+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierchio, J. M.; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Gaspar, A.

    2016-11-01

    We used specific criteria to draw samples of stars from the entire Spitzer Debris Disk Database (see section 2.1.1). V magnitudes were taken from Hipparcos and transformed to Johnson V. All stars were also required to have observations on the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) Ks system. Additional measurements were obtained at SAAO on the 0.75m telescope using the MarkII Infrared Photometer (transformed as described by Koen et al. 2007MNRAS.380.1433K), and at the Steward Observatory 61 in telescope using a NICMOS2-based camera with a 2MASS filter set and a neutral density filter to avoid saturation. These measurements will be described in a forthcoming paper (K. Y. L. Su et al., in preparation). The original programs in which our sample stars were measured are identified in Table 1. A large majority (93%) come from seven Spitzer programs: (1) the MIPS Guaranteed Time Observer (GTO) Sun-like star observations (Trilling+ 2008ApJ...674.1086T); (2) Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS; Meyer+ 2006, J/PASP/118/1690); (3) Completing the Census of Debris Disks (Koerner+ 2010ApJ...710L..26K); (4) potential Space Interferometry Mission/Terrestrial Planet Finder (SIM/TPF) targets (Beichman+ 2006ApJ...652.1674B); (5) an unbiased sample of F-stars (Trilling+ 2008ApJ...674.1086T); and (6) two coordinated programs selecting stars on the basis of indicators of youth (Low+ 2005ApJ...631.1170L; Plavchan+ 2009ApJ...698.1068P). See section 2.1.2. (1 data file).

  9. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. IV. LUPUS V AND VI OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezzi, Loredana; Vernazza, Pierre; Merin, Bruno; Allen, Lori E.; Evans, Neal J. II; Harvey, Paul M.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Peterson, Dawn; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nick F. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer C ore to Disk(c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including two transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main-sequence star from previous optical, near-IR, and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; ∼79% in Lupus V and ∼87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photoevaporation due to nearby OB stars is not responsible for the high fraction of Class III objects. The gas surface densities measured for Lupus V and VI lie below the star formation threshold (A V ∼ 8.6 mag), while this is not the case for other Lupus clouds. Thus, few Myr older age for the YSOs in Lupus V and VI with respect to other Lupus clouds is the most likely explanation of the high fraction of Class III objects in these clouds, while a higher characteristic stellar mass might be a contributing factor. Better constraints on the age and binary fraction of the Lupus clouds might solve the puzzle but require further observations.

  10. Three-dimensional display of peripheral nerves in the wrist region based on MR diffusion tensor imaging and maximum intensity projection post-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wen Quan, E-mail: dingwenquan1982@163.com [Department of Hand Surgery, Hand Surgery Research Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Xue Jun, E-mail: zxj0925101@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Tang, Jin Bo, E-mail: jinbotang@yahoo.com [Department of Hand Surgery, Hand Surgery Research Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Gu, Jian Hui, E-mail: gujianhuint@163.com [Department of Hand Surgery, Hand Surgery Research Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Jin, Dong Sheng, E-mail: jindongshengnj@aliyun.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Province Official Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • 3D displays of peripheral nerves can be achieved by 2 MIP post-processing methods. • The median nerves’ FA and ADC values can be accurately measured by using DTI6 data. • Adopting 6-direction DTI scan and MIP can evaluate peripheral nerves efficiently. - Abstract: Objectives: To achieve 3-dimensional (3D) display of peripheral nerves in the wrist region by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) post-processing methods to reconstruct raw images acquired by a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scan, and to explore its clinical applications. Methods: We performed DTI scans in 6 (DTI6) and 25 (DTI25) diffusion directions on 20 wrists of 10 healthy young volunteers, 6 wrists of 5 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, 6 wrists of 6 patients with nerve lacerations, and one patient with neurofibroma. The MIP post-processing methods employed 2 types of DTI raw images: (1) single-direction and (2) T{sub 2}-weighted trace. The fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the median and ulnar nerves were measured at multiple testing sites. Two radiologists used custom evaluation scales to assess the 3D nerve imaging quality independently. Results: In both DTI6 and DTI25, nerves in the wrist region could be displayed clearly by the 2 MIP post-processing methods. The FA and ADC values were not significantly different between DTI6 and DTI25, except for the FA values of the ulnar nerves at the level of pisiform bone (p = 0.03). As to the imaging quality of each MIP post-processing method, there were no significant differences between DTI6 and DTI25 (p > 0.05). The imaging quality of single-direction MIP post-processing was better than that from T{sub 2}-weighted traces (p < 0.05) because of the higher nerve signal intensity. Conclusions: Three-dimensional displays of peripheral nerves in the wrist region can be achieved by MIP post-processing for single-direction images and T{sub 2}-weighted trace images for both DTI6 and DTI25

  11. Simultaneous Detection of Human C-Terminal p53 Isoforms by Single Template Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) Coupled with Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-Based Targeted Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenting; Liu, Liang; Chen, Yun

    2018-03-06

    Abnormal expression of C-terminal p53 isoforms α, β, and γ can cause the development of cancers including breast cancer. To date, much evidence has demonstrated that these isoforms can differentially regulate target genes and modulate their expression. Thus, quantification of individual isoforms may help to link clinical outcome to p53 status and to improve cancer patient treatment. However, there are few studies on accurate determination of p53 isoforms, probably due to sequence homology of these isoforms and also their low abundance. In this study, a targeted proteomics assay combining molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for simultaneous quantification of C-terminal p53 isoforms. Isoform-specific surrogate peptides (i.e., KPLDGEYFTLQIR (peptide-α) for isoform α, KPLDGEYFTLQDQTSFQK (peptide-β) for isoform β, and KPLDGEYFTLQMLLDLR (peptide-γ) for isoform γ) were first selected and used in both MIPs enrichment and mass spectrometric detection. The common sequence KPLDGEYFTLQ of these three surrogate peptides was used as single template in MIPs. In addition to optimization of imprinting conditions and characterization of the prepared MIPs, binding affinity and cross-reactivity of the MIPs for each surrogate peptide were also evaluated. As a result, a LOQ of 5 nM was achieved, which was >15-fold more sensitive than that without MIPs. Finally, the assay was validated and applied to simultaneous quantitative analysis of C-terminal p53 isoforms α, β, and γ in several human breast cell lines (i.e., MCF-10A normal cells, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells, and drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cancer cells). This study is among the first to employ single template MIPs and cross-reactivity phenomenon to select isoform-specific surrogate peptides and enable simultaneous quantification of protein isoforms in LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics.

  12. A key region in the human parietal cortex for processing proprioceptive hand feedback during reaching movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Thielscher, Axel; Peer, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    of proprioceptive-only and of multi-sensory information about hand position when reaching for a visual target. TMS over two distinct stimulation sites elicited differential effects: TMS applied over the posterior part of the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) compromised reaching accuracy when proprioception...... was the only sensory information available for correcting the reaching error. When visual feedback of the hand was available, TMS over the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) prolonged reaching time. Our results show for the first time the causal involvement of the posterior mIPS in processing proprioceptive...

  13. Geochemical and multi-isotopic (87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 238U/235U) perspectives of sediment sources, depositional conditions, and diagenesis of the Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thai T.; Gardiner, James B.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate sediment sources, depositional conditions and diagenetic processes affecting the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin, eastern USA, a major target of natural gas exploration. Multiple proxies, including trace metal contents, rare earth elements (REE), the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope systems, and U isotopes were applied to whole rock digestions and sequentially extracted fractions of the Marcellus shale and adjacent units from two locations in the Appalachian Basin. The narrow range of εNd values (from -7.8 to -6.4 at 390 Ma) is consistent with derivation of the clastic sedimentary component of the Marcellus Shale from a well-mixed source of fluvial and eolian material of the Grenville orogenic belt, and indicate minimal post-depositional alteration of the Sm-Nd system. While silicate minerals host >80% of the REE in the shale, data from sequentially extracted fractions reflect post-depositional modifications at the mineralogical scale, which is not observed in whole rock REE patterns. Limestone units thought to have formed under open ocean (oxic) conditions have δ238U values and REE patterns consistent with modern seawater. The δ238U values in whole rock shale and authigenic phases are greater than those of modern seawater and the upper crust. The δ238U values of reduced phases (the oxidizable fraction consisting of organics and sulfide minerals) are ∼0.6‰ greater than that of modern seawater. Bulk shale and carbonate cement extracted from the shale have similar δ238U values, and are greater than δ238U values of adjacent limestone units. We suggest these trends are due to the accumulation of chemically and, more likely, biologically reduced U from anoxic to euxinic bottom water as well as the influence of diagenetic reactions between pore fluids and surrounding sediment and organic matter during diagenesis and catagenesis.

  14. A cross-sectional study: serum CCL3/MIP-1α levels may reflect lumbar intervertebral disk degeneration in Han Chinese people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YL

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Li Zhang,1,2,* Bei Li,1,2,* Zeng-Huan Zhou1 1School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Health Services Management, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α, also named chemokine cytokine ligand 3 (CCL3, has been detected in nucleus pulposus and increased following cytokine stimulation. Objective: The current study was performed to explore the relationship between serum CCL3/MIP-1α levels with lumbar intervertebral disk degeneration (IDD. Patients and methods: A total of 132 disk degeneration patients confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and 126 healthy controls were enrolled in the current study. Radiological evaluation of the IDD was conducted using a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner for entire lumbar vertebra region. Degeneration of intervertebral disk was assessed by Schneiderman criteria. Serum CCL3/MIP-1α levels were investigated using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The Visual Analog Scale scores and Oswestry Disability Index index were recorded for clinical severity. Results: Elevated concentrations of CCL3 in serum were found in IDD patients compared with asymptomatic volunteers. The case group included 49 IDD patients with grade 1, 42 with grade 2, and 41 with grade 3. Grade 3 and 2 had significantly higher CCL3 concentrations in serum compared with those with grade 1. The serum CCL3 levels were positively related to the degree of disk degeneration. In addition, the serum CCL3 levels also demonstrated a significant correlation with the clinical severity determined by Visual Analog Scale scores and Oswestry Disability Index index. Conclusion: Serum CCL3 may serve as a biomarker of IDD. Keywords: chemokine cytokine ligand 3, intervertebral disk degeneration, cross

  15. The International Heat Stress Genotype Experiment for modeling wheat response to heat: field experiments and AgMIP-Wheat multi-model simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martre, Pierre; Reynolds, Matthew; Asseng, Senthold

    2017-01-01

    The data set contains a portion of the International Heat Stress Genotype Experiment (IHSGE) data used in the AgMIP-Wheat project to analyze the uncertainty of 30 wheat crop models and quantify the impact of heat on global wheat yield productivity. It includes two spring wheat cultivars grown...... dates. Data include local daily weather data, soil characteristics and initial soil conditions, crop measurements (anthesis and maturity dates, anthesis and final total above ground biomass, final grain yields and yields components), and cultivar information. Simulations include both daily in-season...... and end-of-season results from 30 wheat models....

  16. Synthese und Charakterisierung von potenziellen Inhibitoren des „Macrophage infectivity potentiator“ (Mip) Proteins von Legionella pneumophila - Ein neuer Ansatz in der Legionellose-Therapie

    OpenAIRE

    Juli, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Synthese und Charakterisierung potenzieller Inhibitoren des Oberflächenproteins Mip von Legionella pneumophila. Der gramnegative Mikroorganismus ist der ursächliche Erreger der Legionellose. Die Erkrankung kann in zwei verschiedenen Formen auftreten, dem Pontiac-Fieber, einer Grippe-ähnlichen Atemwegserkrankung, und der Legionärskrankheit, einer schweren Lungenentzündung mit einer Mortalitätsrate von bis zu 30 %. Natürliche und künstlich geschaf...

  17. Analysis of scalability of high-performance 3D image processing platform for virtual colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Wu, Yin; Cai, Wenli

    2014-03-19

    One of the key challenges in three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging is to enable the fast turn-around time, which is often required for interactive or real-time response. This inevitably requires not only high computational power but also high memory bandwidth due to the massive amount of data that need to be processed. For this purpose, we previously developed a software platform for high-performance 3D medical image processing, called HPC 3D-MIP platform, which employs increasingly available and affordable commodity computing systems such as the multicore, cluster, and cloud computing systems. To achieve scalable high-performance computing, the platform employed size-adaptive, distributable block volumes as a core data structure for efficient parallelization of a wide range of 3D-MIP algorithms, supported task scheduling for efficient load distribution and balancing, and consisted of a layered parallel software libraries that allow image processing applications to share the common functionalities. We evaluated the performance of the HPC 3D-MIP platform by applying it to computationally intensive processes in virtual colonoscopy. Experimental results showed a 12-fold performance improvement on a workstation with 12-core CPUs over the original sequential implementation of the processes, indicating the efficiency of the platform. Analysis of performance scalability based on the Amdahl's law for symmetric multicore chips showed the potential of a high performance scalability of the HPC 3D-MIP platform when a larger number of cores is available.

  18. Elucidation of the CCR1- and CCR5-binding modes of MIP-1α by application of an NMR spectra reconstruction method to the transferred cross-saturation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Kofuku, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Masahiko; Okude, Junya; Kondo, Keita; Shiraishi, Yutaro; Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    C–C chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) and CCR5 are involved in various inflammation and immune responses, and regulate the progression of the autoimmune diseases differently. However, the number of residues identified at the binding interface was not sufficient to clarify the differences in the CCR1- and CCR5-binding modes to MIP-1α, because the NMR measurement time for CCR1 and CCR5 samples was limited to 24 h, due to their low stability. Here we applied a recently developed NMR spectra reconstruction method, Conservation of experimental data in ANAlysis of FOuRier, to the amide-directed transferred cross-saturation experiments of chemokine receptors, CCR1 and CCR5, embedded in lipid bilayers of the reconstituted high density lipoprotein, and MIP-1α. Our experiments revealed that the residues on the N-loop and β-sheets of MIP-1α are close to both CCR1 and CCR5, and those in the C-terminal helix region are close to CCR5. These results suggest that the genetic influence of the single nucleotide polymorphisms of MIP-1α that accompany substitution of residues in the C-terminal helix region, E57 and V63, would provide clues toward elucidating how the CCR5–MIP-1α interaction affects the progress of autoimmune diseases.

  19. Establishing an international reference image database for research and development in medical image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, A.D.; Prinz, M.; Schneider, S.; Sipilä, O; Spinnler, K.; Vallée, J-P; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I; Vogl, R.; Wittenberg, T.; Zahlmann, G.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The lack of comparability of evaluation results is one of the major obstacles of research and development in Medical Image Processing (MIP). The main reason for that is the usage of different image datasets with different quality, size and Gold standard. OBJECTIVES: Therefore, one of

  20. DEEP MIPS OBSERVATIONS OF THE IC 348 NEBULA: CONSTRAINTS ON THE EVOLUTIONARY STATE OF ANEMIC CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS AND THE PRIMORDIAL-TO-DEBRIS DISK TRANSITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, Thayne; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    We describe new, deep MIPS photometry and new high signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy of the 2.5 Myr old IC 348 Nebula. To probe the properties of the IC 348 disk population, we combine these data with previous optical/infrared photometry and spectroscopy to identify stars with gas accretion, to examine their mid-IR colors, and to model their spectral energy distributions. IC 348 contains many sources in different evolutionary states, including protostars and stars surrounded by primordial disks, two kinds of transitional disks, and debris disks. Most disks surrounding early/intermediate spectral-type stars (>1.4 M sun at 2.5 Myr) are debris disks; most disks surrounding solar and subsolar-mass stars are primordial disks. At the 1-2 σ level, more massive stars also have a smaller frequency of gas accretion and smaller mid-IR luminosities than lower-mass stars. These trends are suggestive of a stellar mass-dependent evolution of disks, where most disks around high/intermediate-mass stars shed their primordial disks on rapid, 2.5 Myr timescales. The frequency of MIPS-detected transitional disks is ∼15%-35% for stars plausibly more massive than 0.5 M sun . The relative frequency of transitional disks in IC 348 compared to that for 1 Myr old Taurus and 5 Myr old NGC 2362 is consistent with a transition timescale that is a significant fraction of the total primordial disk lifetime.

  1. Ultrasensitive, highly selective, and real-time detection of protein using functionalized CNTs as MIP platform for FOSPR-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Anisha; Parveen, Shama; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2017-09-01

    A facile approach is presented for the detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA), based on fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (FOSPR) combined with molecular imprinting (MI). The probe is fabricated by exploiting the plasmonic property of silver thin film and vinyl-functionalised carbon nanotube-based MIP platform. BSA template molecules are imprinted on the MIP layer coated over multi-walled carbon nanotubes to ensure high specificity of the probe in the interfering environments. In addition, FOSPR endorses the sensor capability of real-time and remote sensing along with very high sensitivity due to the use of nanostructured MI platform. The response of the probe is considered in terms of the absorbance spectrum recorded for various concentrations of BSA. The sensor shows a wide dynamic range of 0-350 ng l-1 with a considerably linear response up to 100 ng l-1 in the peak absorbance wavelength with BSA concentration. A highest sensitivity of 0.862 nm per ng l-1 is achieved for the lowest concentration of BSA and it decreases with the increase in BSA concentration. The performance of the present sensor is compared with those reported in the literature in terms of the limit of detection. It is found that the probe possesses a lowest LOD of 0.386 ng l-1 in addition to other advantages such as real-time online monitoring, high sensitivity, high specificity, and remote sensing.

  2. Fast and Noninvasive Characterization of Suspicious Lesions Detected at Breast Cancer X-Ray Screening: Capability of Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging with MIPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Laun, Frederik B; Tesdorff, Jana; Lederer, Wolfgang; Daniel, Heidi; Stieber, Anne; Delorme, Stefan; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the ability of a diagnostic abbreviated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol consisting of maximum intensity projections (MIPs) from diffusion-weighted imaging with background suppression (DWIBS) and unenhanced morphologic sequences to help predict the likelihood of malignancy on suspicious screening x-ray mammograms, as compared with an abbreviated contrast material-enhanced MR imaging protocol and a full diagnostic breast MR imaging protocol. This prospective institutional review board-approved study included 50 women (mean age, 57.1 years; range, 50-69 years), who gave informed consent and who had suspicious screening mammograms and an indication for biopsy, from September 2014 to January 2015. Before biopsy, full diagnostic contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed that included DWIBS (b = 1500 sec/mm(2)). Two abbreviated protocols (APs) based on MIPs were evaluated regarding the potential to exclude malignancy: DWIBS (AP1) and subtraction images from the first postcontrast and the unenhanced series (AP2). Diagnostic indexes of both methods were examined by using the McNemar test and were compared with those of the full diagnostic protocol and histopathologic findings. Twenty-four of 50 participants had a breast carcinoma. With AP1 (DWIBS), the sensitivity was 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73, 0.98), the specificity was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.99), the negative predictive value (NPV) was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.99), and the positive predictive value (PPV) was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.99). The mean reading time was 29.7 seconds (range, 4.9-110.0 seconds) and was less than 3 seconds (range, 1.2-7.6 seconds) in the absence of suspicious findings on the DWIBS MIPs. With the AP2 protocol, the sensitivity was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.95), the specificity was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.97), the NPV was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.95), the PPV was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.97), and the mean reading time was 29.6 seconds (range, 6.0-100.0 seconds). Unenhanced diagnostic

  3. Software/hardware distributed processing network supporting the Ada environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard J.; Pryk, Zen

    1993-09-01

    A high-performance, fault-tolerant, distributed network has been developed, tested, and demonstrated. The network is based on the MIPS Computer Systems, Inc. R3000 Risc for processing, VHSIC ASICs for high speed, reliable, inter-node communications and compatible commercial memory and I/O boards. The network is an evolution of the Advanced Onboard Signal Processor (AOSP) architecture. It supports Ada application software with an Ada- implemented operating system. A six-node implementation (capable of expansion up to 256 nodes) of the RISC multiprocessor architecture provides 120 MIPS of scalar throughput, 96 Mbytes of RAM and 24 Mbytes of non-volatile memory. The network provides for all ground processing applications, has merit for space-qualified RISC-based network, and interfaces to advanced Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools for application software development.

  4. Applicability of solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography atomic emission detection (GC-MIP AED) for the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpinteiro, J.; Rodriguez, I.; Cela, R. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2004-11-01

    The performance of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) applied to the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples is systematically evaluated. Matrix effects and influence of blank signals on the detection limits of the method are studied in detail. The interval of linear response is also evaluated in order to assess the applicability of the method to sediments polluted with butyltin compounds over a large range of concentrations. Advantages and drawbacks of including an SPME step, instead of the classic liquid-liquid extraction of the derivatized analytes, in the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples are considered in terms of achieved detection limits and experimental effort. Analytes were extracted from the samples by sonication using glacial acetic acid. An aliquot of the centrifuged extract was placed on a vial where compounds were ethylated and concentrated on a PDMS fiber using the headspace mode. Determinations were carried out using GC-MIP AED. (orig.)

  5. The International Heat Stress Genotype Experiment for Modeling Wheat Response to Heat: Field Experiments and AgMIP-Wheat Multi-Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martre, Pierre; Reynolds, Matthew P.; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Alderman, Phillip D.; Cammarano, Davide; Maiorano, Andrea; Ruane, Alexander C.; Aggarwal, Pramod K.; Anothai, Jakarat; hide

    2017-01-01

    The data set contains a portion of the International Heat Stress Genotype Experiment (IHSGE) data used in the AgMIP-Wheat project to analyze the uncertainty of 30 wheat crop models and quantify the impact of heat on global wheat yield productivity. It includes two spring wheat cultivars grown during two consecutive winter cropping cycles at hot, irrigated, and low latitude sites in Mexico (Ciudad Obregon and Tlaltizapan), Egypt (Aswan), India (Dharwar), the Sudan (Wad Medani), and Bangladesh (Dinajpur). Experiments in Mexico included normal (November-December) and late (January-March) sowing dates. Data include local daily weather data, soil characteristics and initial soil conditions, crop measurements (anthesis and maturity dates, anthesis and final total above ground biomass, final grain yields and yields components), and cultivar information. Simulations include both daily in-season and end-of-season results from 30 wheat models.

  6. In vivo inhibition of CC and CX3C chemokine-induced leukocyte infiltration and attenuation of glomerulonephritis in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats by vMIP-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Bacon, K B; Li, L; Garcia, G E; Xia, Y; Lo, D; Thompson, D A; Siani, M A; Yamamoto, T; Harrison, J K; Feng, L

    1998-07-06

    Chemokines play a central role in immune and inflammatory responses. It has been observed recently that certain viruses have evolved molecular piracy and mimicry mechanisms by encoding and synthesizing proteins that interfere with the normal host defense response. One such viral protein, vMIP-II, encoded by human herpesvirus 8, has been identified with in vitro antagonistic activities against CC and CXC chemokine receptors. We report here that vMIP-II has additional antagonistic activity against CX3CR1, the receptor for fractalkine. To investigate the potential therapeutic effect of this broad-spectrum chemokine antagonist, we studied the antiinflammatory activity of vMIP-II in a rat model of experimental glomerulonephritis induced by an antiglomerular basement membrane antibody. vMIP-II potently inhibited monocyte chemoattractant protein 1-, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta-, RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted)-, and fractalkine-induced chemotaxis of activated leukocytes isolated from nephritic glomeruli, significantly reduced leukocyte infiltration to the glomeruli, and markedly attenuated proteinuria. These results suggest that molecules encoded by some viruses may serve as useful templates for the development of antiinflammatory compounds.

  7. Mid-Pliocene global climate simulation with MRI-CGCM2.3: set-up and initial results of PlioMIP Experiments 1 and 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kamae

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mid-Pliocene (3.3 to 3.0 million yr ago, a globally warm period before the Quaternary, is recently attracting attention as a new target for paleoclimate modelling and data-model synthesis. This paper reports set-ups and results of experiments proposed in Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP using a global climate model, MRI-CGCM2.3. We conducted pre-industrial and mid-Pliocene runs by using the coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM and its atmospheric component (AGCM for the PlioMIP Experiments 2 and 1, respectively. In addition, we conducted two types of integrations in AOGCM simulation, with and without flux adjustments on sea surface. General characteristics of differences in the simulated mid-Pliocene climate relative to the pre-industrial in the three integrations are compared. In addition, patterns of predicted mid-Pliocene biomes resulting from the three climate simulations are compared in this study. Generally, difference of simulated surface climate between AGCM and AOGCM is larger than that between the two AOGCM runs, with and without flux adjustments. The simulated climate shows different pattern between AGCM and AOGCM particularly over low latitude oceans, subtropical land regions and high latitude oceans. The AOGCM simulations do not reproduce wetter environment in the subtropics relative to the present-day, which is suggested by terrestrial proxy data. The differences between the two types of AOGCM runs are small over the land, but evident over the ocean particularly in the North Atlantic and polar regions.

  8. Characterization of arterial stenosis using 3D imaging: comparison between three imaging techniques (MRA, spiral CTA and 3D DSA) and four display methods (MIP, SR, MPVR, VA) in a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendib, K.; Poirier, C.; Croisille, P.; Roux, J.P.; Devel, D.; Amiel, M.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction: accurate assessment of arterial stenosis is a major public health issue for the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The number of imaging techniques and types of software for display of imaging data is increasing. Few studies that compare these different techniques are available in the literature. Materials and methods: using phantoms to reproduce the main types of arterial stenosis, the authors compared three 3D acquisition techniques (MRA, CTA, and 3D DSA) and four types of display methods (MIP, SR, MPVR, and VA). The degree, the shape, and the location of different types of stenoses were analyzed by three experienced observers during two successive readings. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility were assessed. The results of the various acquisition techniques and display methods also were compared to the digital reference data (CFAO) of the physical phantoms. Results: the degree of intra- and inter-observer reproducibility for the assessment of shape and location of the stenoses was good. Visual assessment of the degree of stenosis showed significant differences between two observers as well as in two readings by one observer. The 3D DSA was the most accurate technique for assessing the degree of stenosis. CTA provided better results than MRA. MPVR provided an accurate assessment of the degree of the stenosis. 3D DSA and CTA assessed stenosis form and localization adequately, with no significant difference; both methods appeared to be more accurate than MRA. SR provided the best information on the eccentric nature of the stenosis. The shape was very well assessed by VA and MPVR. Conclusions: even though 3D DSA is the most accurate acquisition technique for visualization, the combined use of SR and MPVR appears to be the best compromise to describe the morphology and degree of stenosis. Further improvements in automatic 3D image processing could offer a better understanding and increased possibilities for assessing arterial

  9. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Patients: Rise in Interleukin 6 (IL-6) but not IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Lopes, Carlos [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Centro de Oncologia Radioterapica do Vale do Paraiba, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Callera, Fernando, E-mail: fcallera@gmail.com [Centro de Hematologia Onco-hematologia e Transplantes de Medula Ossea do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), macrophage inflammatory protein-1-alpha (MIP-1-{alpha}) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty eight patients with prostate cancer received three-dimensional conformal blocking radiation therapy with a linear accelerator. IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF levels were measured by the related immunoassay kit 1 day before the beginning of RT and during RT at days 15 and 30. Results: The mean IL-2 values were elevated before and during the RT in contrast with those of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF, which were within the normal range under the same conditions. Regarding markers IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF, comparisons among the three groups (before treatment and 15 and 30 days during RT) did not show significant differences. Although values were within the normal range, there was a significant rise in IL-6 levels at day 15 of RT (p = 0.0049) and a decline at day 30 to levels that were similar to those observed before RT. Conclusions: IL-6 appeared to peak after 15 days of RT before returning to pre-RT levels. In contrast, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF levels were not sensitive to irradiation. The increased levels of IL-6 following RT without the concurrent elevation of other cytokines involved in the acute phase reaction did not suggest a classical inflammatory response to radiation exposure. Further studies should be designed to elucidate the role of IL-6 levels in patients with prostate cancer treated with RT.

  10. SU-G-BRA-04: Simulation of Errors in Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP)-Based Lung Tumor Internal Target Volumes (ITV) Using Real-Time 2D MRI and Deformable Image Registration Based Lung Tumor Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D; Kishan, A; Santhanam, A; Min, Y; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Agazaryan, N; Yang, Y; Lee, P; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Ca (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the first frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric

  11. SU-G-BRA-04: Simulation of Errors in Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP)-Based Lung Tumor Internal Target Volumes (ITV) Using Real-Time 2D MRI and Deformable Image Registration Based Lung Tumor Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D; Kishan, A; Santhanam, A; Min, Y; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Agazaryan, N; Yang, Y; Lee, P; Low, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the first frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric

  12. Integrated Assessments of the Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture: An Overview of AgMIP Regional Research in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, Sonali P.; Dileepkumar, Guntuku; Murthy, K. M. Dakshina; Nedumaran, S.; Singh, Piara; Srinivasa, Chukka; Gangwar, B.; Subash, N.; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Zubair, Lareef; hide

    2015-01-01

    South Asia's growing population. In order to assess the future of food and livelihood security across South Asia, the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has undertaken integrated climate-crop-economic assessments of the impact of climate change on food security and poverty in South Asia, encompassing Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. AgMIP has funded, on a competitive basis, four South Asian regional research teams (RRTs) and one South Asian coordination team (CT) to undertake climate-crop-economic integrated assessments of food security for many districts in each of these countries, with the goal of characterizing the state of food security and poverty across the region, and projecting how these are subject to change under future climate change conditions.

  13. Multi-scale characteristics of coal structure by x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ting-ting; Feng, Zeng-chao; Zhou, Dong

    2018-02-01

    It is of great benefit to study the material and structural heterogeneity of coal for better understanding the coalbed methane (CBM) storage and enrichment. In this paper, multi-scale X-ray computed tomography (CT), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) at multi scales were conducted to thoroughly study the material distribution, heterogeneity, pore development, porosity and permeability of coal. It is suitable and reasonable to divide the testing samples into three structural categories by average density and heterogeneity degree, and the meso structure in the three categories accords with the morphology on SEM images. The pore size distribution and pore development of each subsample cannot be correspondingly related to their respective structure category or morphology due to different observation scales, while the macro pore size development, accumulated macro pore volume and macro pores porosity accord with the meso structure category and morphology information by CT and SEM at the same scale very well. Given the effect of macro pores on permeability and the contribution of micro pores to CBM storage capacity, reservoirs with developed micro pores and macro pores may be the most suitable coal reservoir for CBM exploitation.

  14. A study on evaluation of portal vein by utilizing MIP reconstruction in the PC environment after abdomen CT of hepatic artery embolization patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Keun; Jang, Young Ill; Heo, Young Nam

    2001-01-01

    When most patients are diagnosed with the quiet progressed hepatoma which often would make the operation impossible, the Interventional Radiology hepatic artery embolization is an extremely useful method for such patients. An existence of the malfunction is evaluated by gaining a portal vein image as a delayed phase image after injecting a contrast media into the superior mesenteric artery. However, it is difficult to make a definite judgement due to the extended exposure time with the peristalsis and the intestine gas obstructing the sharpness of the image when the patient exposure time increases and due to the increased usage of contrast media and its side effect. The portal vein can be evaluated by obtaining the MIP image after reconstructing a 3-dimensional personal computer setting using the 2-dimensional from an enhancement abdomen CT image that is almost a requisite in operation to a hepatoma patient. Such method may prevent a decrease in the quality of image based upon the time delay and intestine gas; also, because the patient exposure dose and contrast media usage may be reduced, it is a new, valuable way to decide the operational matter of hepatic artery embolization on a pre-angiography

  15. Determination of urinary aromatic amines in smokers and nonsmokers using a MIPs-SPE coupled with LC-MS/MS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingjing; Wang, Sheng; Zhao, Ge; Wang, Bing; Ding, Li; Zhang, Xiaobing; Xie, Jianping; Xie, Fuwei

    2014-05-01

    Urinary aromatic amines (AAs) could be used as biomarkers for human exposure to AAs in cigarette smoke. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of urinary AAs (i.e. 1-naphthylamine (1-NA), 2-naphthylamine (2-NA), 3-aminobiphenyl (3-ABP) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP)) in smokers and nonsmokers. A molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge was applied to purify urine samples and no derivatization reaction was involved. Each analytes used respective stable isotope internal standards, which could well compensate matrix effect. Lower limit of detections (LODs) for four AAs were obtained and in the range of 1.5-5ngL(-1). Recovery ranged from 87.7±4.5% to 111.3±6.4% and precision were less than 9.9%. The method was applied to analyze urine samples of 40 smokers and 10 nonsmokers. The 24h urinary excretion amounts of total AAs were higher for smokers compared with nonsmokers. What's more, 1-NA, 3-ABP and 4-ABP excretion amounts showed significant differences (p<0.05) between smokers and nonsmokers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid ultrasound-assisted magnetic microextraction of gallic acid from urine, plasma and water samples by HKUST-1-MOF-Fe3O4-GA-MIP-NPs: UV-vis detection and optimization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Dashtian, Kheibar

    2017-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs)) HKUST-1 metal organic framework (MOF) composite as a support was used for surface imprinting of gallic acid imprinted polymer (HKUST-1-MOF-Fe 3 O 4 -GA-MIP) using vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMOS) as the cross-linker. Subsequently, HKUST-1-MOF-Fe 3 O 4 -NPs-GA-MIP characterized by FT-IR, XRD and FE-SEM analysis and applied for fast and selective and sensitive ultrasound assisted dispersive magnetic solid phase microextraction of gallic acid (GA) by UV-Vis (UA-DMSPME-UV-Vis) detection method. Plackett-Burman design (PBD) and central composite design (CCD) according to desirability function (DF) indicate the significant variables among the extraction factors vortex (mixing) time (min), sonication time (min), temperature (°C), eluent volume (L), pH and HKUST-1-MOF-Fe 3 O 4 -NPs-GA-MIP mass (mg) and their contribution on the response. Optimum conditions and values correspond to pH, HKUST-1-MOF-Fe 3 O 4 -NPs-GA-MIP mass, sonication time and the eluent volume were set as follow 3.0, 1.6mg, 4.0min and 180μL, respectively. The average recovery (ER%) of GA was 98.13% with desirability of 0.997, while the present method has best operational performance like wide linear range 8-6000ngmL -1 with a Limit of detection (LOD) of 1.377ngmL -1 , limit of quantification (LOQ) 4.591ngmL -1 and precision (<3.50% RSD). The recovery of GA in urine, human plasma and water samples within the range of 92.3-100.6% that strongly support high applicability of present method for real samples analysis, which candidate this method as promise for further application. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Short-term, serum-free, static culture of cord blood-derived CD34+ cells: effects of FLT3-L and MIP-1alpha on in vitro expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, G; Querol, S; Cancelas, J A; García, J

    1999-08-01

    The use of ex vivo expanded cells has been suggested as a possible means to accelerate the speed of engraftment in cord blood (CB) transplantation. The aim of this study was to fix the optimal condition for the generation of committed progenitors without affecting the stem cell compartment. Analysis of the effects of FLT3-L and MIP-1alpha when combined with SCF, IL-3 and IL-6, in short-term (6 days), serum-free expansion cultures of CB-selected CD34+ cells. An important expansion was obtained that ranged between 8-15 times for CFU-GM, 21-51 times for the BFU-E/CFU-Mix population and 11 to 30 times for CD34+ cells assessed by flow cytometry. From the combinations tested, those in which FLT3-L was present had a significant increase in the expansion of committed progenitors, while the presence of MIP-1alpha had a detrimental effect on the generation of more differentiated cells. However, stem cell candidates assessed by week 5 CAFC assay could be maintained in culture when both MIP-1a and FLT3-L were present (up to 91% recovery). This culture system was also able to expand megakaryocytic precursors as determined by the co-expression of CD34 and CD61 antigens (45-70 times), in spite of the use of cytokines non-specific for the megakaryocytic lineage. The results obtained point to the combination of SCF, IL-3, IL-6, FLT3-L and MIP-1alpha as the best suited for a pre-clinical short-term serum-free static ex vivo expansion protocol of CB CD34+ cells, since it can generate large numbers of committed progenitor cells as well as maintaining week 5 CAFC.

  18. Analysis of deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) arteries by using MDCTA: Comparison between 2 post-processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Luca; Atzeni, Matteo; Ribuffo, Diego; Mallarini, Giorgio; Suri, Jasjit S

    2012-08-01

    Our purpose was to compare two post-processing techniques, Maximum-Intensity-Projection (MIP) and Volume Rendering (VR) for the study of perforator arteries. Thirty patients who underwent Multi-Detector-Row CT Angiography (MDCTA) between February 2010 and May 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. For each patient and for each reconstruction method, the image quality was evaluated and the inter- and intra-observer agreement was calculated according to the Cohen statistics. The Hounsfield Unit (HU) value in the common femoral artery was quantified and the correlation (Pearson Statistic) between image quality and HU value was explored. The Pearson r between the right and left common femoral artery was excellent (r=0.955). The highest image quality score was obtained using MIP for both observers (total value 75, with a mean value 2.67 for observer 1 and total value of 79 and a mean value of 2.82 for observer 2). The highest agreement between the two observers was detected using the MIP protocol with a Cohen kappa value of 0.856. The ROC area under the curve (Az) for the VR is 0.786 (0.086 SD; p value=0.0009) whereas the ROC area under the curve (Az) for the MIP is 0.0928 (0.051 SD; p value=0.0001). MIP showed the optimal inter- and intra-observer agreement and the highest quality scores and therefore should be used as post-processing techniques in the analysis of perforating arteries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbon-Temperature-Water Change Analysis for Peanut Production Under Climate Change: A Prototype for the AgMIP Coordinated Climate-Crop Modeling Project (C3MP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Alex C.; McDermid, Sonali; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Baigorria, Guillermo A.; Jones, James W.; Romero, Consuelo C.; Cecil, L. DeWayne

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is projected to push the limits of cropping systems and has the potential to disrupt the agricultural sector from local to global scales. This article introduces the Coordinated Climate-Crop Modeling Project (C3MP), an initiative of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) to engage a global network of crop modelers to explore the impacts of climate change via an investigation of crop responses to changes in carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]), temperature, and water. As a demonstration of the C3MP protocols and enabled analyses, we apply the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) CROPGRO-Peanut crop model for Henry County, Alabama, to evaluate responses to the range of plausible [CO2], temperature changes, and precipitation changes projected by climate models out to the end of the 21st century. These sensitivity tests are used to derive crop model emulators that estimate changes in mean yield and the coefficient of variation for seasonal yields across a broad range of climate conditions, reproducing mean yields from sensitivity test simulations with deviations of ca. 2% for rain-fed conditions. We apply these statistical emulators to investigate how peanuts respond to projections from various global climate models, time periods, and emissions scenarios, finding a robust projection of modest (20%) losses and larger uncertainty at the end of the century under the more severe representative concentration pathway (RCP8.5). This projection is not substantially altered by the selection of the AgMERRA global gridded climate dataset rather than the local historical observations, differences between the Third and Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 and CMIP5), or the use of the delta method of climate impacts analysis rather than the C3MP impacts response surface and emulator approach.

  20. LakeMIP Kivu: evaluating the representation of a large, deep tropical lake by a set of one-dimensional lake models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIM Thiery

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The African great lakes are of utmost importance for the local economy (fishing, as well as being essential to the survival of the local people. During the past decades, these lakes experienced fast changes in ecosystem structure and functioning, and their future evolution is a major concern. In this study, for the first time a set of one-dimensional lake models are evaluated for Lake Kivu (2.28°S; 28.98°E, East Africa. The unique limnology of this meromictic lake, with the importance of salinity and subsurface springs in a tropical high-altitude climate, presents a worthy challenge to the seven models involved in the Lake Model Intercomparison Project (LakeMIP. Meteorological observations from two automatic weather stations are used to drive the models, whereas a unique dataset, containing over 150 temperature profiles recorded since 2002, is used to assess the model's performance. Simulations are performed over the freshwater layer only (60 m and over the average lake depth (240 m, since salinity increases with depth below 60 m in Lake Kivu and some lake models do not account for the influence of salinity upon lake stratification. All models are able to reproduce the mixing seasonality in Lake Kivu, as well as the magnitude and seasonal cycle of the lake enthalpy change. Differences between the models can be ascribed to variations in the treatment of the radiative forcing and the computation of the turbulent heat fluxes. Fluctuations in wind velocity and solar radiation explain inter-annual variability of observed water column temperatures. The good agreement between the deep simulations and the observed meromictic stratification also shows that a subset of models is able to account for the salinity- and geothermal-induced effects upon deep-water stratification. Finally, based on the strengths and weaknesses discerned in this study, an informed choice of a one-dimensional lake model for a given research purpose becomes possible.

  1. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules via 3D fast radial transform, scale space representation, and Zernike MIP classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Alessandro; Petkov, Todor Sergueev; Ferri, Gianluca; Masotti, Matteo; Campanini, Renato

    2011-04-01

    The authors presented a novel system for automated nodule detection in lung CT exams. The approach is based on (1) a lung tissue segmentation preprocessing step, composed of histogram thresholding, seeded region growing, and mathematical morphology; (2) a filtering step, whose aim is the preliminary detection of candidate nodules (via 3D fast radial filtering) and estimation of their geometrical features (via scale space analysis); and (3) a false positive reduction (FPR) step, comprising a heuristic FPR, which applies thresholds based on geometrical features, and a supervised FPR, which is based on support vector machines classification, which in turn, is enhanced by a feature extraction algorithm based on maximum intensity projection processing and Zernike moments. The system was validated on 154 chest axial CT exams provided by the lung image database consortium public database. The authors obtained correct detection of 71% of nodules marked by all radiologists, with a false positive rate of 6.5 false positives per patient (FP/patient). A higher specificity of 2.5 FP/patient was reached with a sensitivity of 60%. An independent test on the ANODE09 competition database obtained an overall score of 0.310. The system shows a novel approach to the problem of lung nodule detection in CT scans: It relies on filtering techniques, image transforms, and descriptors rather than region growing and nodule segmentation, and the results are comparable to those of other recent systems in literature and show little dependency on the different types of nodules, which is a good sign of robustness.

  2. The AgMIP GRIDded Crop Modeling Initiative (AgGRID) and the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison (GGCMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Joshua; Muller, Christoff

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is a significant risk for agricultural production. Even under optimistic scenarios for climate mitigation action, present-day agricultural areas are likely to face significant increases in temperatures in the coming decades, in addition to changes in precipitation, cloud cover, and the frequency and duration of extreme heat, drought, and flood events (IPCC, 2013). These factors will affect the agricultural system at the global scale by impacting cultivation regimes, prices, trade, and food security (Nelson et al., 2014a). Global-scale evaluation of crop productivity is a major challenge for climate impact and adaptation assessment. Rigorous global assessments that are able to inform planning and policy will benefit from consistent use of models, input data, and assumptions across regions and time that use mutually agreed protocols designed by the modeling community. To ensure this consistency, large-scale assessments are typically performed on uniform spatial grids, with spatial resolution of typically 10 to 50 km, over specified time-periods. Many distinct crop models and model types have been applied on the global scale to assess productivity and climate impacts, often with very different results (Rosenzweig et al., 2014). These models are based to a large extent on field-scale crop process or ecosystems models and they typically require resolved data on weather, environmental, and farm management conditions that are lacking in many regions (Bondeau et al., 2007; Drewniak et al., 2013; Elliott et al., 2014b; Gueneau et al., 2012; Jones et al., 2003; Liu et al., 2007; M¨uller and Robertson, 2014; Van den Hoof et al., 2011;Waha et al., 2012; Xiong et al., 2014). Due to data limitations, the requirements of consistency, and the computational and practical limitations of running models on a large scale, a variety of simplifying assumptions must generally be made regarding prevailing management strategies on the grid scale in both the baseline and

  3. Quantitative evaluation of high intensity signal on MIP images of carotid atherosclerotic plaques from routine TOF-MRA reveals elevated volumes of intraplaque hemorrhage and lipid rich necrotic core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kiyofumi; Song, Yan; Hippe, Daniel S; Sun, Jie; Dong, Li; Xu, Dongxiang; Ferguson, Marina S; Chu, Baocheng; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Chen, Min; Zhou, Cheng; Yuan, Chun

    2012-11-29

    Carotid intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH) and lipid rich necrotic core (LRNC) have been associated with accelerated plaque growth, luminal narrowing, future surface disruption and development of symptomatic events. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantitative relationships between high intensity signals (HIS) in the plaque on TOF-MRA and IPH or LRNC volumes as measured by multicontrast weighted CMR. Seventy six patients with a suspected carotid artery stenosis or carotid plaque by ultrasonography underwent multicontrast carotid CMR. HIS presence and volume were measured from TOF-MRA MIP images while IPH and LRNC volumes were separately measured from multicontrast CMR. For detecting IPH, HIS on MIP images overall had high specificity (100.0%, 95% CI: 93.0 - 100.0%) but relatively low sensitivity (32%, 95% CI: 20.8 - 47.9%). However, the sensitivity had a significant increasing relationship with underlying IPH volume (p = 0.033) and degree of stenosis (p = 0.022). Mean IPH volume was 2.7 times larger in those with presence of HIS than in those without (142.8 ± 97.7 mm(3) vs. 53.4 ± 56.3 mm(3), p = 0.014). Similarly, mean LRNC volume was 3.4 times larger in those with HIS present (379.8 ± 203.4 mm(3) vs. 111.3 ± 122.7 mm(3), p = 0.001). There was a strong correlation between the volume of the HIS region and the IPH volume measured from multicontrast CMR (r = 0.96, p routine, clinical TOF sequences. High intensity signals in carotid plaque on TOF-MRA MIP images are associated with increased intraplaque hemorrhage and lipid-rich necrotic core volumes. The technique is most sensitive in patients with moderate to severe stenosis.

  4. Medicare Program; Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and Alternative Payment Model (APM) Incentive Under the Physician Fee Schedule, and Criteria for Physician-Focused Payment Models. Final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) repeals the Medicare sustainable growth rate (SGR) methodology for updates to the physician fee schedule (PFS) and replaces it with a new approach to payment called the Quality Payment Program that rewards the delivery of high-quality patient care through two avenues: Advanced Alternative Payment Models (Advanced APMs) and the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) for eligible clinicians or groups under the PFS. This final rule with comment period establishes incentives for participation in certain alternative payment models (APMs) and includes the criteria for use by the Physician-Focused Payment Model Technical Advisory Committee (PTAC) in making comments and recommendations on physician-focused payment models (PFPMs). Alternative Payment Models are payment approaches, developed in partnership with the clinician community, that provide added incentives to deliver high-quality and cost-efficient care. APMs can apply to a specific clinical condition, a care episode, or a population. This final rule with comment period also establishes the MIPS, a new program for certain Medicare-enrolled practitioners. MIPS will consolidate components of three existing programs, the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), the Physician Value-based Payment Modifier (VM), and the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program for Eligible Professionals (EPs), and will continue the focus on quality, cost, and use of certified EHR technology (CEHRT) in a cohesive program that avoids redundancies. In this final rule with comment period we have rebranded key terminology based on feedback from stakeholders, with the goal of selecting terms that will be more easily identified and understood by our stakeholders.

  5. AgMIP Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments for 1.5°C and 2.0°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has developed novel methods for Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA) of agriculture and food security in a changing world. The present study performs a proof-of-concept of the CGRA to demonstrate advantages and challenges of the framework. This effort responds to the request by UNFCCC for the implications of limiting global temperature increases to 1.5°C and 2.0°C above pre-industrial conditions. The protocols for the 1.5°C/2.0°C assessment establish explicit and testable linkages across disciplines and scales, connecting outputs and inputs from the Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs), Representative Agricultural Pathways (RAPs), HAPPI and CMIP5 ensemble scenarios, global gridded crop models, global agricultural economic models, site-based crop models, and within-country regional economic models. CGRA results show that at the global scale, mixed areas of positive and negative simulated yield changes, with declines in some breadbasket regions led to overall declines in productivity at both 1.5°C and 2.0°C. These projected global yield changes resulted in increases in prices of major commodities in a global economic model. Simulations for 1.5°C and 2.0°C using site-based crop models had mixed results depending on region and crop, but with more negative effects on productivity at 2.0°C than at 1.5°C for the most part. In conjunction with price changes from the global economics models, these productivity declines resulted generally in small positive effects on regional farm livelihoods, showing that farming systems should continue to be viable under high mitigation scenarios. CGRA protocols focus on how mitigation actions and effects differ across scales, with main mechanisms studied in the integrated assessment models being policies and technologies that reduce direct non-CO2 emissions from agriculture, reduce CO2 emissions from land use change and forest sink enhancement

  6. Coordinating AgMIP data and models across global and regional scales for 1.5°C and 2.0°C assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Ruane, Alex C; Antle, John; Elliott, Joshua; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Chatta, Ashfaq Ahmad; Ewert, Frank; Folberth, Christian; Hathie, Ibrahima; Havlik, Petr; Hoogenboom, Gerrit; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; MacCarthy, Dilys S; Mason-D'Croz, Daniel; Contreras, Erik Mencos; Müller, Christoph; Perez-Dominguez, Ignacio; Phillips, Meridel; Porter, Cheryl; Raymundo, Rubi M; Sands, Ronald D; Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich; Valdivia, Roberto O; Valin, Hugo; Wiebe, Keith

    2018-05-13

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has developed novel methods for Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA) of agriculture and food security in a changing world. The present study aims to perform a proof of concept of the CGRA to demonstrate advantages and challenges of the proposed framework. This effort responds to the request by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) for the implications of limiting global temperature increases to 1.5°C and 2.0°C above pre-industrial conditions. The protocols for the 1.5°C/2.0°C assessment establish explicit and testable linkages across disciplines and scales, connecting outputs and inputs from the Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs), Representative Agricultural Pathways (RAPs), Half a degree Additional warming, Prognosis and Projected Impacts (HAPPI) and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) ensemble scenarios, global gridded crop models, global agricultural economics models, site-based crop models and within-country regional economics models. The CGRA consistently links disciplines, models and scales in order to track the complex chain of climate impacts and identify key vulnerabilities, feedbacks and uncertainties in managing future risk. CGRA proof-of-concept results show that, at the global scale, there are mixed areas of positive and negative simulated wheat and maize yield changes, with declines in some breadbasket regions, at both 1.5°C and 2.0°C. Declines are especially evident in simulations that do not take into account direct CO 2 effects on crops. These projected global yield changes mostly resulted in increases in prices and areas of wheat and maize in two global economics models. Regional simulations for 1.5°C and 2.0°C using site-based crop models had mixed results depending on the region and the crop. In conjunction with price changes from the global economics models, productivity declines in the Punjab, Pakistan, resulted in

  7. Coordinating AgMIP data and models across global and regional scales for 1.5°C and 2.0°C assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Ruane, Alex C.; Antle, John; Elliott, Joshua; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Chatta, Ashfaq Ahmad; Ewert, Frank; Folberth, Christian; Hathie, Ibrahima; Havlik, Petr; Hoogenboom, Gerrit; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; MacCarthy, Dilys S.; Mason-D'Croz, Daniel; Contreras, Erik Mencos; Müller, Christoph; Perez-Dominguez, Ignacio; Phillips, Meridel; Porter, Cheryl; Raymundo, Rubi M.; Sands, Ronald D.; Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich; Valdivia, Roberto O.; Valin, Hugo; Wiebe, Keith

    2018-05-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has developed novel methods for Coordinated Global and Regional Assessments (CGRA) of agriculture and food security in a changing world. The present study aims to perform a proof of concept of the CGRA to demonstrate advantages and challenges of the proposed framework. This effort responds to the request by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) for the implications of limiting global temperature increases to 1.5°C and 2.0°C above pre-industrial conditions. The protocols for the 1.5°C/2.0°C assessment establish explicit and testable linkages across disciplines and scales, connecting outputs and inputs from the Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs), Representative Agricultural Pathways (RAPs), Half a degree Additional warming, Prognosis and Projected Impacts (HAPPI) and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) ensemble scenarios, global gridded crop models, global agricultural economics models, site-based crop models and within-country regional economics models. The CGRA consistently links disciplines, models and scales in order to track the complex chain of climate impacts and identify key vulnerabilities, feedbacks and uncertainties in managing future risk. CGRA proof-of-concept results show that, at the global scale, there are mixed areas of positive and negative simulated wheat and maize yield changes, with declines in some breadbasket regions, at both 1.5°C and 2.0°C. Declines are especially evident in simulations that do not take into account direct CO2 effects on crops. These projected global yield changes mostly resulted in increases in prices and areas of wheat and maize in two global economics models. Regional simulations for 1.5°C and 2.0°C using site-based crop models had mixed results depending on the region and the crop. In conjunction with price changes from the global economics models, productivity declines in the Punjab, Pakistan, resulted in

  8. Prediction of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in patients with haematologic malignancies using a modified Infection Probability Score (mIPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Enrico; Hanus, Lynn; Färber, Jacqueline; Fischer, Thomas; Heidel, Florian H

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the probability of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in patients with haematologic malignancies using a modified version of the Infection Probability Score (mIPS). In order to perform a prospective, mono-centric surveillance of complications in clinical routine due to short-term central venous catheters (CVCs) in consecutive patients receiving chemotherapy from March 2013 to September 2014, IPS was calculated at CVC insertion and removal (mIPSin and mIPSex, respectively). We used the 2012 Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Haematology and Medical Oncology (AGIHO/DGHO) criteria to define CRBSI. In total, 143 patients (mean 59.5 years, 61.4 % male) with 267 triple-lumen CVCs (4044 CVC days; mean 15.1 days, range 1-60 days) were analysed. CVCs were inserted for therapy of acute leukaemia (53.2 %), multiple myeloma (24.3 %) or lymphoma (11.2 %), and 93.6 % were inserted in the jugular vein. A total of 66 CRBSI cases (24.7 %) were documented (12 definite/13 probable/41 possible). The incidence was 16.3/1000 CVC days (2.9/3.1/10.1 per 1000 CVC days for definite/probable/possible CRBSI, respectively). In CRBSI cases, the mIPSex was higher as compared to cases without CRBSI (13.1 vs. 7.1; p < 0.001). The best mIPSex cutoff for CRBSI prediction was 8 points (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.77; sensitivity = 84.9 %, specificity = 60.7 %, negative predictive value = 92.4 %). For patients with an mIPSex ≥8, the risk for a CRBSI was high (odds ratio [OR] = 5.9; p < 0.001) and even increased if, additionally, CVC had been in use for about 10 days (OR = 9.8; p < 0.001). In case other causes of infection are excluded, a mIPSex ≥8 and duration of CVC use of about 10 days predict a very high risk of CRBSI. Patients with a mIPSex <8 have a low risk of CRBSI of 8 %.

  9. Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m OBSERVATIONS OF HD 209458b: THREE ECLIPSES, TWO AND A HALF TRANSITS, AND A PHASE CURVE CORRUPTED BY INSTRUMENTAL SENSITIVITY VARIATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossfield, Ian J. M. [Department of Physics, and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Knutson, Heather [Caltech Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Deming, Drake, E-mail: ianc@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    We report the results of an analysis of all Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m observations of HD 209458b, one of the touchstone objects in the study of irradiated giant planet atmospheres. Altogether, we analyze two and a half transits, three eclipses, and a 58 hr near-continuous observation designed to detect the planet's thermal phase curve. The results of our analysis are: (1) a mean transit depth of 1.484% {+-} 0.033%, consistent with previous measurements and showing no evidence of variability in transit depth at the 3% level. (2) A mean eclipse depth of 0.338% {+-} 0.026%, somewhat higher than that previously reported for this system; this new value brings observations into better agreement with models. From this eclipse depth we estimate an average dayside brightness temperature of 1320 {+-} 80 K; the dayside flux shows no evidence of variability at the 12% level. (3) Eclipses in the system occur 32 {+-} 129 s earlier than would be expected from a circular orbit, which constrains the orbital quantity ecos {omega} to be 0.00004 {+-} 0.00033. This result is fully consistent with a circular orbit and sets an upper limit of 140 m s{sup -1} (3{sigma}) on any eccentricity-induced velocity offset during transit. The phase curve observations (including one of the transits) exhibit an anomalous trend similar to the detector ramp seen in previous Spitzer/IRAC observations; by modeling this ramp we recover the system parameters for this transit. The long-duration photometry which follows the ramp and transit exhibits a gradual {approx}0.2% decrease in flux over {approx}30 hr. This effect is similar to that seen in pre-launch calibration data taken with the 24 {mu}m array and is better fit by an instrumental model than a model invoking planetary emission. The large uncertainties associated with this poorly understood, likely instrumental effect prevent us from usefully constraining the planet's thermal phase curve. Our observations highlight the need for a thorough

  10. Quantitative evaluation of high intensity signal on MIP images of carotid atherosclerotic plaques from routine TOF-MRA reveals elevated volumes of intraplaque hemorrhage and lipid rich necrotic core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Kiyofumi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotid intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH and lipid rich necrotic core (LRNC have been associated with accelerated plaque growth, luminal narrowing, future surface disruption and development of symptomatic events. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantitative relationships between high intensity signals (HIS in the plaque on TOF-MRA and IPH or LRNC volumes as measured by multicontrast weighted CMR. Methods Seventy six patients with a suspected carotid artery stenosis or carotid plaque by ultrasonography underwent multicontrast carotid CMR. HIS presence and volume were measured from TOF-MRA MIP images while IPH and LRNC volumes were separately measured from multicontrast CMR. Results For detecting IPH, HIS on MIP images overall had high specificity (100.0%, 95% CI: 93.0 – 100.0% but relatively low sensitivity (32%, 95% CI: 20.8 – 47.9%. However, the sensitivity had a significant increasing relationship with underlying IPH volume (p = 0.033 and degree of stenosis (p = 0.022. Mean IPH volume was 2.7 times larger in those with presence of HIS than in those without (142.8 ± 97.7 mm3 vs. 53.4 ± 56.3 mm3, p = 0.014. Similarly, mean LRNC volume was 3.4 times larger in those with HIS present (379.8 ± 203.4 mm3 vs. 111.3 ± 122.7 mm3, p = 0.001. There was a strong correlation between the volume of the HIS region and the IPH volume measured from multicontrast CMR (r = 0.96, p  Conclusion MIP images are easily reformatted from three minute, routine, clinical TOF sequences. High intensity signals in carotid plaque on TOF-MRA MIP images are associated with increased intraplaque hemorrhage and lipid-rich necrotic core volumes. The technique is most sensitive in patients with moderate to severe stenosis.

  11. CARACTERIZAÇÃO ELEMENTAR DA CASCA DE ARROZ E SUAS CINZAS POR MIP OES APÓS DECOMPOSIÇÃO ÁCIDA COM SISTEMA DE REFLUXO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanoelli R. Lopes

    Full Text Available This paper describes the optimization of a sample preparation method using response surface methodology for Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni and Ti determinations in samples of rice husk and rice husk ash by MIP OES. Sample preparation was performed using a reflux system adapted to the digestion tubes. This system allowed the decomposition of the samples without the necessity of replacement of the acids during this step without any loss of volatile elements. The decompositions were performed with 3.6 mL of HNO3 and 1.4 mL of H2SO4 for 205 min in a digester block at 225 ºC. The detection limit for determination of respective analytes in both samples were satisfactory. The RSDs for the analytes were less than 10%. Moreover, the accuracy of the method can be verified by recovery tests, whose values ranged from 82 to 115% for husk samples and 82 to 120% for ashes. The proposed method was presented as a simple, safe and low cost procedure being suitable for sample preparation and subsequent determination of metals by MIP OES.

  12. Post-processing of digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Luca; Politi, Marco; Foschi, Raffaella; Masini, Valentina; Reale, Francesca; Costantini, Alessandro Maria; Marano, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    Post-processing of bi- and three-dimensional images plays a major role for clinicians and surgeons in both diagnosis and therapy. The new spiral (single and multislice) CT and MRI machines have allowed better quality of images. With the associated development of hardware and software, post-processing has become indispensable in many radiologic applications in order to address precise clinical questions. In particular, in CT the acquisition technique is fundamental and should be targeted and optimized to obtain good image reconstruction. Multiplanar reconstructions ensure simple, immediate display of sections along different planes. Three-dimensional reconstructions include numerous procedures: multiplanar techniques as maximum intensity projections (MIP); surface rendering techniques as the Shaded Surface Display (SSD); volume techniques as the Volume Rendering Technique; techniques of virtual endoscopy. In surgery computer-aided techniques as the neuronavigator, which with information provided by neuroimaging helps the neurosurgeon in simulating and performing the operation, are extremely interesting.

  13. Validation of new 3D post processing algorithm for improved maximum intensity projections of MR angiography acquisitions in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosmans, H; Verbeeck, R; Vandermeulen, D; Suetens, P; Wilms, G; Maaly, M; Marchal, G; Baert, A L [Louvain Univ. (Belgium)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a new post processing algorithm for improved maximum intensity projections (mip) of intracranial MR angiography acquisitions. The core of the post processing procedure is a new brain segmentation algorithm. Two seed areas, background and brain, are automatically detected. A 3D region grower then grows both regions towards each other and this preferentially towards white regions. In this way, the skin gets included into the final `background region` whereas cortical blood vessels and all brain tissues are included in the `brain region`. The latter region is then used for mip. The algorithm runs less than 30 minutes on a full dataset on a Unix workstation. Images from different acquisition strategies including multiple overlapping thin slab acquisition, magnetization transfer (MT) MRA, Gd-DTPA enhanced MRA, normal and high resolution acquisitions and acquisitions from mid field and high field systems were filtered. A series of contrast enhanced MRA acquisitions obtained with identical parameters was filtered to study the robustness of the filter parameters. In all cases, only a minimal manual interaction was necessary to segment the brain. The quality of the mip was significantly improved, especially in post Gd-DTPA acquisitions or using MT, due to the absence of high intensity signals of skin, sinuses and eyes that otherwise superimpose on the angiograms. It is concluded that the filter is a robust technique to improve the quality of MR angiograms.

  14. Validation of new 3D post processing algorithm for improved maximum intensity projections of MR angiography acquisitions in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosmans, H.; Verbeeck, R.; Vandermeulen, D.; Suetens, P.; Wilms, G.; Maaly, M.; Marchal, G.; Baert, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a new post processing algorithm for improved maximum intensity projections (mip) of intracranial MR angiography acquisitions. The core of the post processing procedure is a new brain segmentation algorithm. Two seed areas, background and brain, are automatically detected. A 3D region grower then grows both regions towards each other and this preferentially towards white regions. In this way, the skin gets included into the final 'background region' whereas cortical blood vessels and all brain tissues are included in the 'brain region'. The latter region is then used for mip. The algorithm runs less than 30 minutes on a full dataset on a Unix workstation. Images from different acquisition strategies including multiple overlapping thin slab acquisition, magnetization transfer (MT) MRA, Gd-DTPA enhanced MRA, normal and high resolution acquisitions and acquisitions from mid field and high field systems were filtered. A series of contrast enhanced MRA acquisitions obtained with identical parameters was filtered to study the robustness of the filter parameters. In all cases, only a minimal manual interaction was necessary to segment the brain. The quality of the mip was significantly improved, especially in post Gd-DTPA acquisitions or using MT, due to the absence of high intensity signals of skin, sinuses and eyes that otherwise superimpose on the angiograms. It is concluded that the filter is a robust technique to improve the quality of MR angiograms

  15. What is the difference between a 2, 3, 4, or 5 °C world and how good are we at telling this difference? Results from ISI-MIP the first Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieler, K.; Huber, V.; Piontek, F.; Schewe, J.; Serdeczny, O.; Warszawski, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Inter-sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP) aims to synthesize the state-of-the-art knowledge of climate change impacts at different levels of global warming. Over 25 climate impact modelling teams from around the world, working within the agriculture, water, biomes, infrastructure and health sectors, are collaborating to find answers to the question "What is the difference between a 2, 3, 4, or 5 °C world and how good are we at telling this difference?". The analysis is based on common, bias-corrected climate projections, and socio-economic pathways. The first, fast-tracked phase of the ISI-MIP has a focus on global impact models. The project's experimental design is formulated to distinguish the uncertainty introduced by the impact models themselves, from the inherent uncertainty in the climate projections and the variety of plausible socio-economic futures. Novel metrics, developed to emphasize societal impacts, will be used to identify regional 'hot-spots' of climate change impacts, as well as to quantify the cross-sectoral impact of the increasing frequency of extreme events in future climates. We present here first results from the Fast-Track phase of the project covering impact simulations in the biomes, agriculture and water sectors, in which the societal impacts of climate change are quantified for different levels of global warming. We also discuss the design of the scenario set-up and impact indicators chosen to suit the unique cross-sectoral, multi-model nature of the project.

  16. Swine Influenza Virus PA and Neuraminidase Gene Reassortment into Human H1N1 Influenza Virus Is Associated with an Altered Pathogenic Phenotype Linked to Increased MIP-2 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugolenski, Daniel; Jones, Les; Howerth, Elizabeth; Wentworth, David; Tompkins, S Mark; Tripp, Ralph A

    2015-05-01

    Swine are susceptible to infection by both avian and human influenza viruses, and this feature is thought to contribute to novel reassortant influenza viruses. In this study, the influenza virus reassortment rate in swine and human cells was determined. Coinfection of swine cells with 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (huH1N1) and an endemic swine H1N2 (A/swine/Illinois/02860/09) virus (swH1N2) resulted in a 23% reassortment rate that was independent of α2,3- or α2,6-sialic acid distribution on the cells. The reassortants had altered pathogenic phenotypes linked to introduction of the swine virus PA and neuraminidase (NA) into huH1N1. In mice, the huH1N1 PA and NA mediated increased MIP-2 expression early postinfection, resulting in substantial pulmonary neutrophilia with enhanced lung pathology and disease. The findings support the notion that swine are a mixing vessel for influenza virus reassortants independent of sialic acid distribution. These results show the potential for continued reassortment of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus with endemic swine viruses and for reassortants to have increased pathogenicity linked to the swine virus NA and PA genes which are associated with increased pulmonary neutrophil trafficking that is related to MIP-2 expression. Influenza A viruses can change rapidly via reassortment to create a novel virus, and reassortment can result in possible pandemics. Reassortments among subtypes from avian and human viruses led to the 1957 (H2N2 subtype) and 1968 (H3N2 subtype) human influenza pandemics. Recent analyses of circulating isolates have shown that multiple genes can be recombined from human, avian, and swine influenza viruses, leading to triple reassortants. Understanding the factors that can affect influenza A virus reassortment is needed for the establishment of disease intervention strategies that may reduce or preclude pandemics. The findings from this study show that swine cells provide a mixing vessel for influenza virus reassortment

  17. Medical Image Processing Server applied to Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara, C.; Graffigna, J.P.; Holleywell, P.; Marino, E.; Omati, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is framed within the area of medical image processing and aims to present the process of installation, configuration and implementation of a processing server of medical images (MIPS) in the Fundación Escuela de Medicina Nuclear located in Mendoza, Argentina (FUESMEN). It has been developed in the Gabinete de Tecnologia Médica (GA.TE.ME), Facultad de Ingeniería-Universidad Nacional de San Juan. MIPS is a software that using the DICOM standard, can receive medical imaging studies of different modalities or viewing stations, then it executes algorithms and finally returns the results to other devices. To achieve the objectives previously mentioned, preliminary tests were conducted in the laboratory. More over, tools were remotely installed in clinical enviroment. The appropiate protocols for setting up and using them in different services were established once defined those suitable algorithms. Finally, it’s important to focus on the implementation and training that is provided in FUESMEN, using nuclear medicine quality control processes. Results on implementation are exposed in this work. (paper)

  18. Medical Image Processing Server applied to Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, C.; Graffigna, J. P.; Marino, E.; Omati, S.; Holleywell, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is framed within the area of medical image processing and aims to present the process of installation, configuration and implementation of a processing server of medical images (MIPS) in the Fundación Escuela de Medicina Nuclear located in Mendoza, Argentina (FUESMEN). It has been developed in the Gabinete de Tecnologia Médica (GA.TE.ME), Facultad de Ingeniería-Universidad Nacional de San Juan. MIPS is a software that using the DICOM standard, can receive medical imaging studies of different modalities or viewing stations, then it executes algorithms and finally returns the results to other devices. To achieve the objectives previously mentioned, preliminary tests were conducted in the laboratory. More over, tools were remotely installed in clinical enviroment. The appropiate protocols for setting up and using them in different services were established once defined those suitable algorithms. Finally, it’s important to focus on the implementation and training that is provided in FUESMEN, using nuclear medicine quality control processes. Results on implementation are exposed in this work.

  19. Induced expression of mRNA for IL-5, IL-6, TNF-alpha, MIP-2 and IFN-gamma in immunologically activated rat peritoneal mast cells: inhibition by dexamethasone and cyclosporin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C M; Coleman, J W

    1995-10-01

    We examined the capacity of purified rat peritoneal connective tissue-type mast cells (PMC) to express mRNA for several cytokines. Stimulation of PMC with anti-IgE for 4 hr induced the expression of mRNA encoding interleukin-5 (IL-5), IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Unstimulated PMC expressed detectable mRNA for TNF-alpha but not for the other four cytokines. Incubation of PMC with cyclosporin A (CsA) or dexamethasone (DEX), each at 10(-6) M for 24 hr, significantly inhibited the induced expression of mRNA for each of the five cytokines, and also inhibited release of biologically active TNF-alpha. Throughout these experiments mRNA levels of the housekeeping gene G3PDH were not altered by stimulation with anti-IgE or incubation with CsA or DEX. We conclude that immunological activation of rat PMC induces gene expression of several cytokines and that expression of these genes can be inhibited by immunosuppressive drugs.

  20. RETRACTED: Development of electrode carbon paste/molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP with methacrylic acid as monomer to analyze glucose by potentiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miratul Khasanah

    Full Text Available This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors-in-Chief.After a thorough investigation, the Editors have concluded that the acceptance of this article was based upon the positive advice of two illegitimate reviewer reports. The reports were submitted from email accounts which were provided to the journal as suggested reviewers during the submission of the article. Although purportedly real reviewer accounts, the Editors have concluded that these were not of appropriate, independent reviewers.This manipulation of the peer-review process represents a clear violation of the fundamentals of peer review, our publishing policies, and publishing ethics standards. Apologies are offered to the reviewers whose identities were assumed and to the readers of the journal that this deception was not detected during the submission process.

  1. Multi-isotopic signatures of organic and conventional Italian pasta along the production chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bontempo, L.; Camin, F.; Paolini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The variability of stable isotope ratios (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N, δ18O and δ34S) along the production chain of pasta (durum wheat, flour and pasta) produced by using both conventional and organic farming systems in four Italian regions in 2 years was investigated. The aim was to evaluate if and how...... control procedures that can be used to check the geographical origin of Italian organic and conventional pasta and its raw materials....

  2. Multi-isotopic gamma-ray assay system for alpha-contaminated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, D.A.; Pratt, J.C.; Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Schultz, F.J.; Haff, K.W.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of an existing segmented gamma-ray system is being expanded for the analysis of alpha-contaminated waste drums. A cursory assay of 114 transuranic waste drums of 208-l capacity has been made. Analysis of these data indicates a detection limit better than 100 nCi/g of waste for 237 Np/ 233 Pa, 239 Pu, 241 Am, 243 Am/ 239 Np, 60 Co, 125 Sb, 134 137 Cs, and 154 Eu. A pending Code of Federal Regulation (10CFR61) stipulates that the nuclear industry quantify not only its transuranic waste, but also certain beta- and gamma-ray-emitting fission products. An assay system based on gamma-ray spectroscopy is the only system that can meet this requirement for the fission products

  3. Determination of geographic provenance of cotton fibres using multi-isotope profiles and multivariate statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeid, N. Nic; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of cotton fibres can be particularly challenging within a forensic science context where discrimination of one fibre from another is of importance. Normally cotton fibre analysis examines the morphological structure of the recovered material and compares this with that of a known fibre from a particular source of interest. However, the conventional microscopic and chemical analysis of fibres and any associated dyes is generally unsuccessful because of the similar morphology of the fibres. Analysis of the dyes which may have been applied to the cotton fibre can also be undertaken though this can be difficult and unproductive in terms of discriminating one fibre from another. In the study presented here we have explored the potential for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) to be utilised as an additional tool for cotton fibre analysis in an attempt to reveal further discriminatory information. This work has concentrated on un-dyed cotton fibres of known origin in order to expose the potential of the analytical technique. We report the results of a pilot study aimed at testing the hypothesis that multi-element stable isotope analysis of cotton fibres in conjunction with multivariate statistical analysis of the resulting isotopic abundance data using well established chemometric techniques permits sample provenancing based on the determination of where the cotton was grown and as such will facilitate sample discrimination. To date there is no recorded literature of this type of application of IRMS to cotton samples, which may be of forensic science relevance.

  4. Identifying the African Wintering Grounds of Hybrid Flycatchers Using a Multi-Isotope (d

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, T.; Hjernquist, M.B.; Van Wilgenburg, S.L.; Hobson, K.A.; Folmer, E.; Font, L.; Klaassen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different

  5. Multi-isotope and Hydrogeochemical approach for characterizing Saturnia thermal groundwater (Grosseto, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Barbagli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study is to define the groundwater flow of thermal area of Saturnia, through both chemical and isotope analyses. After a first detailed geological-geophysical survey and a quantification of the available groundwater resources, we analyzed several chemical compounds (Na, Ca, Mg, K, Chlorides, Sulfates, Nitrates, total alkalinity, Li, Sr, B, Fluorides, soluble Silica, free Carbon Dioxide, Sb, As, Se, H2S, Fe, Mn, Hg e Pb and isotopes (2H; 3H, 3He, 4He, 13C, 18O, 86Sr, 87Sr. Excluding the uncertainties mainly related to a large repetition of measures over time, we concluded the following conclusions. Both Lithium and Boron high values and 87Sr/86Sr values highlighted that “Calcare Cavernoso” limestone geological formation constitutes the Saturnia thermal aquifer. Such samples showed both the same chemical characteristics and source area. Boron, Lithium, δ2H, δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr show the Saturnia thermal aquifer is separated by those of Pitigliano (Latera- Bolsena thermal circuit and Bagni San Filippo (Mt. Amiata thermal circuit. 18O, 3H e δ13C measured in samples coming from Saturnia thermal spring respectively indicate that water feeding the thermal aquifer infiltrate at 350-440 m a.s.l., that they are almost 30 years old, and finally they that are isolated regarding to external infiltration. Low value of R/Ra tends to exclude the influence of Earth mantle to the geothermal anomaly of Saturnia area. The high content in Selenium indicates a possible interaction between Saturnia spring water and those coming from the Saturnia well, with volcanic fluids. However, considering also the evidence of the separation between the Saturnia groundwater flow and those of neighboring thermal fields (Bolsena and Mt. Amiata, we hypothesized that only a exchange among these volcanic complexes and the source area of thermal water points exists, but not among these complex and Saturnia aquifer.

  6. The effects of inspiratory muscle strengthening on MIP and quality of life of elderly nursing home patients. (Los efectos del beneficio de la fuerza del músculo inspiratorio en la PIM y la calidad de la vida de los pacientes mayores de la clínica de reposo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Correa Bacelar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objective of this study was to compare the effects of inspiratory muscle strengthening on maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP and on quality of life among elderly nursing home patients. The study population was divided in two groups: experimental group- EG (n=21, 76.48 2.12 years and control group- CG (n=13, 75.69 2.26 years. The World Health Organization Quality of Life Group (WHOQOL-100 questionnaire was used to evaluate the quality of life of the subjects. A Manovacuometer (analogical, with an operational interval of –150 to +150 cmH2O; Critical Med/USA-2002 was used to evaluate MIP. The study protocol consisted of a gradual increase in workload (50%-100%; the sessions lasted 20 minutes and were composed of 7 series of strengthening (2 minutes each with a 1-minute interval between the series, 3 times a week for 10 weeks. Variance analysis of multivariate repeated measurements demonstrated significant differences only for MIP between CG (32,69±17,03 cmH2O versus 23,08±10,71 cmH2O and EG (31,67±11,11 cmH2O versus 55,24±23,26 cmH2O, and the latter was higher than the former (p= 0,00000. Therefore, we concluded that inspiratory muscle strengthening led to an increase in MIP that did not improve quality of life. However, further studies should be done in this population to validate a quality of life questionnaire specific for the elderly.ResumenEl objetivo de este estudio era comparar los efectos del músculo inspiratorio que consolidaban en la presión inspiratoria máxima (PIM y en la calidad de la vida entre pacientes mayores de la clínica de reposo. Dividieron a la población del estudio en dos grupos: grupo experimental EG. (n=21,76.48 2.12 años y grupo de control CG (n=13, 75.69 2.26 años. La calidad de la Organización Mundial de la Salud del cuestionario del grupo de la vida(WHOQOL-100 fue utilizada para evaluar la calidad de la vida de los temas. Un Manovacuometer (analógico, con un intervalo operacional - de 150 a

  7. The CaloRIC ASIC: Signal Processing for High Granularity Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, L; Manen, S; Soumpholphakdy, X; Bonnard, J; Gay, P

    2013-01-01

    A readout ASIC called CaloRIC, has been developed to fulfil the signal processing requirements for the Silicon-Tungsten (Si-W) electromagnetic calorimeter of the International Linear Collider (ILC). This ASIC performs the complete processing of the signal delivered by the Si-PIN diode of the detector: charge sensitive amplification, shaping, analog memorization and digitization. Measurements show a global integral non-linearity better than 0.2% for low energy particles, and limited to 2% for high energy particles. The measured Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) is evaluated at 0.6 fC, which corresponds to 1/6 times the signal released by a Minimum Ionizing Particle (MIP). With the timing sequence of the ILC, the power consumption of the complete channel is evaluated at 43 μW using a power pulsing. A new ASIC (CaloRIC 4 ch) with four improved readout channels has been designed and is ready for manufacturing.

  8. Fuel processing. Wastes processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, M.

    2000-01-01

    The gaseous, liquid and solid radioactive effluents generated by the fuel reprocessing, can't be release in the environment. They have to be treated in order to respect the limits of the pollution regulations. These processing are detailed and discussed in this technical paper. A second part is devoted to the SPIN research program relative to the separation of the long life radionuclides in order to reduce the radioactive wastes storage volume. (A.L.B.)

  9. Process Accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbertson, Keith

    2002-01-01

    Standard utilities can help you collect and interpret your Linux system's process accounting data. Describes the uses of process accounting, standard process accounting commands, and example code that makes use of process accounting utilities.

  10. USC orthogonal multiprocessor for image processing with neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kai; Panda, Dhabaleswar K.; Haddadi, Navid

    1990-07-01

    This paper presents the architectural features and imaging applications of the Orthogonal MultiProcessor (OMP) system, which is under construction at the University of Southern California with research funding from NSF and assistance from several industrial partners. The prototype OMP is being built with 16 Intel i860 RISC microprocessors and 256 parallel memory modules using custom-designed spanning buses, which are 2-D interleaved and orthogonally accessed without conflicts. The 16-processor OMP prototype is targeted to achieve 430 MIPS and 600 Mflops, which have been verified by simulation experiments based on the design parameters used. The prototype OMP machine will be initially applied for image processing, computer vision, and neural network simulation applications. We summarize important vision and imaging algorithms that can be restructured with neural network models. These algorithms can efficiently run on the OMP hardware with linear speedup. The ultimate goal is to develop a high-performance Visual Computer (Viscom) for integrated low- and high-level image processing and vision tasks.

  11. Assessment of Potential Nitrate Pollution Sources in the Marano Lagoon (Italy) and its Catch Mentarea Using a Multi Isotope Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccon, P.; Leis, A. [Joanneum Research Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Institute for Water, Energy and Sustainability, Graz (Austria); Marca, A.; Kaiser, J.; Campisi, L. [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Savarino, J.; Erbland, J. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement, St.-Martin-d' Heres (France); Boettcher, M. E. [Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Geochemistry and Isotope Geochemistry Group, Marine Geology Section, Warnemuende (Germany); Eisenhauer, A. [IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany); Sueltenfuss, J. [University of Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics, Section of Oceanography, Bremen (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The aims of this study were mainly: (i) the identification and differentiation of the main anthropogenic nitrogen sources in the Marano Lagoon (Italy) and its catchment area; and (ii) the assessment of the intra-lagoonal water circulation, the morphological development of the lagoon and its anthropogenic pressure by applying a combined approach of hydrochemical, isotopic and remote sensing techniques. To achieve the aforementioned targets analyses of the stable isotope signatures of nitrate, boron, water and sulphate have been used. Moreover the residence times of groundwater were determined by the tritium-helium dating method. To characterize the chemical composition of the different water types the concentrations of the major ions and nutrients as well as the physicochemical parameters have been measured. Remote sensing techniques have been applied to assess the spatial distribution of the most superficial algal flora, water temperature as well as the key environmental and morphological changes of the lagoon since the beginning of the 1970s. (author)

  12. Investigating the provenance of un-dyed spun cotton fibre using multi-isotope profiles and chemometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daéid, Niamh Nic; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen F

    2011-07-15

    The analysis of un-dyed spun cotton fibres can be challenging within a forensic science context where discrimination of one fibre from another is of importance. Conventional microscopic and chemical analysis of these fibres is generally unsuccessful because of their similar morphology. In this work we have explored the potential of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) as a tool for spun cotton fibre analysis in an attempt to reveal any discriminatory information available. Seven different batches of un-dyed spun cotton fibre from four different countries were analysed. A combination of the hydrogen and oxygen isotopic data facilitated the correct association of the samples, demonstrating, for the first time, the applicability of IRMS to fibre analysis in this way. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Assessment of Potential Nitrate Pollution Sources in the Marano Lagoon (Italy) and its Catchment Area Using a Multi Isotope Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saccon, P.; Leis, A.; Marca, A.; Kaiser, J.; Campisi, L.; Savarino, J.; Erbland, J.; Boettcher, M.E.; Eisenhauer, A.; Sueltenfuss, J.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were mainly: (i) the identification and differentiation of the main anthropogenic nitrogen sources in the Marano Lagoon (Italy) and its catchment area; and (ii) the assessment of the intra-lagoonal water circulation, the morphological development of the lagoon and its anthropogenic pressure by applying a combined approach of hydrochemical, isotopic and remote sensing techniques. To achieve the aforementioned targets analyses of stable isotope signatures of nitrate, boron, water and sulphate have been used. Moreover the residence times of groundwater were determined by the tritium-helium dating method. To characterize the chemical composition of the different water types the concentrations of the major ions and nutrients as well as the physicochemical parameters have been measured. Remote sensing techniques have been applied to assess the spatial distribution of most superficial algal flora, water temperature as well as the key environmental and morphological changes of the lagoon since the beginning of the 1970s.

  14. Is it really organic? – Multi-isotopic analysis as a tool to discriminate between organic and conventional plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, K.H.; Mihailova, A.; Kelly, S.D.

    2013-01-01

    for discrimination of organically and conventionally grown plants. The study was based on wheat, barley, faba bean and potato produced in rigorously controlled long-term field trials comprising 144 experimental plots. Nitrogen isotope analysis revealed the use of animal manure, but was unable to discriminate between......Novel procedures for analytical authentication of organic plant products are urgently needed. Here we present the first study encompassing stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium and sulphur as well as compound-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate...... plants that were fertilised with synthetic nitrogen fertilisers or green manures from atmospheric nitrogen fixing legumes. This limitation was bypassed using oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate in potato tubers, while hydrogen isotope analysis allowed complete discrimination of organic and conventional...

  15. Massive arrival of desalinated seawater in a regional urban water cycle: A multi-isotope study (B, S, O, H).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppmann, W; Negev, Ido; Guttman, Joseph; Goren, Orly; Gavrieli, Ittai; Guerrot, Catherine; Flehoc, Christine; Pettenati, Marie; Burg, Avihu

    2018-04-01

    "Man-made" or unconventional freshwater, like desalinated seawater or reclaimed effluents, is increasingly introduced into regional water cycles in arid or semi-arid countries. We show that the breakthrough of reverse osmosis-derived freshwater in the largely engineered water cycle of the greater Tel Aviv region (Dan Region) has profoundly changed previous isotope fingerprints. This new component can be traced throughout the system, from the drinking water supply, through sewage, treated effluents, and artificially recharged groundwater at the largest Soil-Aquifer Treatment system in the Middle East (Shafdan) collecting all the Dan region sewage. The arrival of the new water type (desalinated seawater) in 2007 and its predominance since 2010 constitutes an unplanned, large-scale, long-term tracer test and the monitoring of the breakthrough of desalination-specific fingerprints in the aquifer system of Shafdan allowed to get new insights on the water and solute flow and behavior in engineered groundwater systems. Our approach provides an investigation tool for the urban water cycle, allowing estimating the contribution of diverse freshwater sources, and an environmental tracing method for better constraining the long-term behavior and confinement of aquifer systems with managed recharge. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Dual-channel amplification in a single-mode diode laser for multi-isotope laser cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, James L.; Van Dongen, Janelle; Lebel, Paul; Klappauf, Bruce G.; Madison, Kirk W.

    2007-01-01

    The output from two grating-stabilized external-cavity diode lasers were injected into a single-mode diode laser. Operating at a wavelength of 780 nm, this laser produced ∼50 mW of power with two main frequency components of the same spectral characteristics of the seed lasers. The power ratio of the amplified components was freely adjustable due to gain saturation, and amplification was observed for frequency differences of the two seed lasers in the range from 73 MHz to 6.6 GHz. This system was used to realize a dual isotope magneto-optic trap (MOT) for rubidium ( 85 Rb and 87 Rb). The resulting position and cloud size of the dual isotope MOT was the same as that of the single species MOTs to within ±10 and ±20 μm, respectively. We also characterized the additional spectral components produced by four wave mixing (FWM) in the diode laser amplifier and utilized a particular FWM sideband to realize hyperfine pumping and subsequent laser trapping of 85 Rb in the absence of a 'repump' laser dedicated to hyperfine pumping

  17. Meat Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This publication provides an introduction to meat processing for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in four chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the meat processing industry and the techniques of meat processing and butchering. The first chapter introduces the meat processing industry and…

  18. Process development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuegerl, K

    1984-01-01

    The item 'process development' comprises the production of acetonic/butonal with C. acetobylicum and the yeasting of potato waste. The target is to increase productivity by taking the following measures - optimation of media, on-line process analysis, analysis of reaction, mathematic modelling and identification of parameters, process simulation, development of a state estimator with the help of the on-line process analysis and the model, optimization and adaptive control.

  19. Poisson processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxma, O.J.; Yechiali, U.; Ruggeri, F.; Kenett, R.S.; Faltin, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    The Poisson process is a stochastic counting process that arises naturally in a large variety of daily life situations. We present a few definitions of the Poisson process and discuss several properties as well as relations to some well-known probability distributions. We further briefly discuss the

  20. Data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, T F

    2013-01-01

    Data Processing discusses the principles, practices, and associated tools in data processing. The book is comprised of 17 chapters that are organized into three parts. The first part covers the characteristics, systems, and methods of data processing. Part 2 deals with the data processing practice; this part discusses the data input, output, and storage. The last part discusses topics related to systems and software in data processing, which include checks and controls, computer language and programs, and program elements and structures. The text will be useful to practitioners of computer-rel

  1. Glossary of terms used in image processing for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolland, Y.; Ramee, A.; Morcet, N.; Collorec, R.; Bruno, A.; Haigron, P.

    1995-01-01

    We give the definition of 166 words used in image processing. Adaptivity, aliazing, analog-digital converter, analysis, approximation, arc, artifact, artificial intelligence, attribute, autocorrelation, bandwidth, boundary, brightness, calibration, class, classification, classify, centre, cluster, coding, color, compression, contrast, connectivity, convolution, correlation, data base, decision, decomposition, deconvolution, deduction, descriptor, detection, digitization, dilation, discontinuity, discretization, discrimination, disparity, display, distance, distortion distribution dynamic, edge, energy, enhancement, entropy, erosion, estimation, event, extrapolation, feature, file, filter, filter floaters, fitting, Fourier transform, frequency, fusion, fuzzy, Gaussian, gradient, graph, gray level, group, growing, histogram, Hough transform, Houndsfield, image, impulse response, inertia, intensity, interpolation, interpretation, invariance, isotropy, iterative, JPEG, knowledge base, label, Laplacian, learning, least squares, likelihood, matching, Markov field, mask, matching, mathematical morphology, merge (to), MIP, median, minimization, model, moire, moment, MPEG, neural network, neuron, node, noise, norm, normal, operator, optical system, optimization, orthogonal, parametric, pattern recognition, periodicity, photometry, pixel, polygon, polynomial, prediction, pulsation, pyramidal, quantization, raster, reconstruction, recursive, region, rendering, representation space, resolution, restoration, robustness, ROC, thinning, transform, sampling, saturation, scene analysis, segmentation, separable function, sequential, smoothing, Spline, split (to), shape, threshold, tree, signal, speckle, spectrum, stationarity, statistical, stochastic, structuring element, support, syntaxic, synthesis, texture, truncation, variance, vision, voxel, windowing. (Authors). 41 figs

  2. Stochastic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Parzen, Emanuel

    1962-01-01

    Well-written and accessible, this classic introduction to stochastic processes and related mathematics is appropriate for advanced undergraduate students of mathematics with a knowledge of calculus and continuous probability theory. The treatment offers examples of the wide variety of empirical phenomena for which stochastic processes provide mathematical models, and it develops the methods of probability model-building.Chapter 1 presents precise definitions of the notions of a random variable and a stochastic process and introduces the Wiener and Poisson processes. Subsequent chapters examine

  3. Magnetics Processing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Processing Lab equipped to perform testing of magnetometers, integrate them into aircraft systems, and perform data analysis, including noise reduction...

  4. Data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousot, P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Data Processing laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The laboratory research fields are: the semantics, the tests and the semantic analysis of the codes, the formal calculus, the software applications, the algorithms, the neuron networks and VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration). The investigations concerning the polynomial rings are performed by means of the standard basis approach. Among the research topics, the Pascal codes, the parallel processing, the combinatorial, statistical and asymptotic properties of the fundamental data processing tools, the signal processing and the pattern recognition. The published papers, the congress communications and the thesis are also included [fr

  5. Suppurative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinner, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Suppurative process in the case of bronchiectatic disease, abscess and gang rene of lungs, has been described. Characteristic signs of roentgenologic pictu re of the above-mentioned diseases are considered. It is shown,that in most cas es roentgenologic studies give a possibility to make a high-quality diagnosis of suppurative processes

  6. Design Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Nis

    2009-01-01

    Inspiration for most research and optimisations on design processes still seem to focus within the narrow field of the traditional design practise. The focus in this study turns to associated businesses of the design professions in order to learn from their development processes. Through interviews...... and emerging production methods....

  7. Process development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata G, G.

    1989-01-01

    Process development: The paper describes the organization and laboratory facilities of the group working on radioactive ore processing studies. Contains a review of the carried research and the plans for the next future. A list of the published reports is also presented

  8. Sustainable processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Heine

    2004-01-01

    Kristensen_NH and_Beck A: Sustainable processing. In Otto Schmid, Alexander Beck and Ursula Kretzschmar (Editors) (2004): Underlying Principles in Organic and "Low-Input Food" Processing - Literature Survey. Research Institute of Organic Agriculture FiBL, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. ISBN 3-906081-58-3...

  9. Food processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teodorowicz, Malgorzata; Neerven, Van Joost; Savelkoul, Huub

    2017-01-01

    The majority of foods that are consumed in our developed society have been processed. Processing promotes a non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and sugars, the Maillard reaction (MR). Maillard reaction products (MRPs) contribute to the taste, smell and color of many food products, and thus

  10. Membrane processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna

    2017-11-01

    The membrane processes have played important role in the industrial separation process. These technologies can be found in all industrial areas such as food, beverages, metallurgy, pulp and paper, textile, pharmaceutical, automotive, biotechnology and chemical industry, as well as in water treatment for domestic and industrial application. Although these processes are known since twentieth century, there are still many studies that focus on the testing of new membranes' materials and determining of conditions for optimal selectivity, i. e. the optimum transmembrane pressure (TMP) or permeate flux to minimize fouling. Moreover the researchers proposed some calculation methods to predict the membrane processes properties. In this article, the laboratory scale experiments of membrane separation techniques, as well their validation by calculation methods are presented. Because membrane is the "heart" of the process, experimental and computational methods for its characterization are also described.

  11. Process mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Aalst, W.M.P.; Rubin, V.; Verbeek, H.M.W.

    2010-01-01

    Process mining includes the automated discovery of processes from event logs. Based on observed events (e.g., activities being executed or messages being exchanged) a process model is constructed. One of the essential problems in process mining is that one cannot assume to have seen all possible...... behavior. At best, one has seen a representative subset. Therefore, classical synthesis techniques are not suitable as they aim at finding a model that is able to exactly reproduce the log. Existing process mining techniques try to avoid such “overfitting” by generalizing the model to allow for more...... support for it). None of the existing techniques enables the user to control the balance between “overfitting” and “underfitting”. To address this, we propose a two-step approach. First, using a configurable approach, a transition system is constructed. Then, using the “theory of regions”, the model...

  12. Partial processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This discussion paper considers the possibility of applying to the recycle of plutonium in thermal reactors a particular method of partial processing based on the PUREX process but named CIVEX to emphasise the differences. The CIVEX process is based primarily on the retention of short-lived fission products. The paper suggests: (1) the recycle of fission products with uranium and plutonium in thermal reactor fuel would be technically feasible; (2) it would, however, take ten years or more to develop the CIVEX process to the point where it could be launched on a commercial scale; (3) since the majority of spent fuel to be reprocessed this century will have been in storage for ten years or more, the recycling of short-lived fission products with the U-Pu would not provide an effective means of making refabrication fuel ''inaccessible'' because the radioactivity associated with the fission products would have decayed. There would therefore be no advantage in partial processing

  13. Process monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Many of the measurements and observations made in a nuclear processing facility to monitor processes and product quality can also be used to monitor the location and movements of nuclear materials. In this session information is presented on how to use process monitoring data to enhance nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A). It will be seen that SNM losses can generally be detected with greater sensitivity and timeliness and point of loss localized more closely than by conventional MC and A systems if process monitoring data are applied. The purpose of this session is to enable the participants to: (1) identify process unit operations that could improve control units for monitoring SNM losses; (2) choose key measurement points and formulate a loss indicator for each control unit; and (3) describe how the sensitivities and timeliness of loss detection could be determined for each loss indicator

  14. Process automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs

  15. Perceptual Processing Affects Conceptual Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dantzig, Saskia; Pecher, Diane; Zeelenberg, Rene; Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    According to the Perceptual Symbols Theory of cognition (Barsalou, 1999), modality-specific simulations underlie the representation of concepts. A strong prediction of this view is that perceptual processing affects conceptual processing. In this study, participants performed a perceptual detection task and a conceptual property-verification task…

  16. Sewer Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    Since the first edition was published over a decade ago, advancements have been made in the design, operation, and maintenance of sewer systems, and new problems have emerged. For example, sewer processes are now integrated in computer models, and simultaneously, odor and corrosion problems caused...... by hydrogen sulfide and other volatile organic compounds, as well as other potential health issues, have caused environmental concerns to rise. Reflecting the most current developments, Sewer Processes: Microbial and Chemical Process Engineering of Sewer Networks, Second Edition, offers the reader updated...... and valuable information on the sewer as a chemical and biological reactor. It focuses on how to predict critical impacts and control adverse effects. It also provides an integrated description of sewer processes in modeling terms. This second edition is full of illustrative examples and figures, includes...

  17. Electrochemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers

    1997-01-01

    The notes describe in detail primary and secondary galvanic cells, fuel cells, electrochemical synthesis and electroplating processes, corrosion: measurments, inhibitors, cathodic and anodic protection, details of metal dissolution reactions, Pourbaix diagrams and purification of waste water from...

  18. Dissolution processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    This review contains more than 100 observations and 224 references on the dissolution phenomenon. The dissolution processes are grouped into three categories: methods of aqueous attack, fusion methods, and miscellaneous observations on phenomena related to dissolution problems

  19. Renewal processes

    CERN Document Server

    Mitov, Kosto V

    2014-01-01

    This monograph serves as an introductory text to classical renewal theory and some of its applications for graduate students and researchers in mathematics and probability theory. Renewal processes play an important part in modeling many phenomena in insurance, finance, queuing systems, inventory control and other areas. In this book, an overview of univariate renewal theory is given and renewal processes in the non-lattice and lattice case are discussed. A pre-requisite is a basic knowledge of probability theory.

  20. Anatomic evaluation of the xiphoid process with 64-row multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, Kayihan; Kosehan, Dilek; Topcu, Adem; Koktener, Asli

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interindividual variations of the xiphoid process in a wide adult group using 64-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Included in the study were 500 consecutive patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP) images on coronal and sagittal planes, and three-dimensional volume rendering (VR) reconstruction images were obtained and used for the evaluation of the anatomic features of the xiphoid process. The xiphoid process was present in all patients. The xiphoid process was deviated ventrally in 327 patients (65.4%). In 11 of these 327 patients (2.2%), ventral curving at the end of the xiphoid process resembled a hook. The xiphoid process was aligned in the same axis as the sternal corpus in 166 patients (33.2%). The tip of the xiphoid process was curved dorsally like a hook in three patients (0.6%). In four patients (0.8%), the xiphoid process exhibited a reverse S shape. Xiphoidal endings were single in 313 (62.6%) patients, double in 164 (32.8%), or triple in 23 (4.6%). Ossification of the cartilaginous xiphoid process was fully completed in 254 patients (50.8 %). In total, 171 patients (34.2%) had only one xiphoidal foramen and 45 patients (9%) had two or more foramina. Sternoxiphoidal fusion was present in 214 of the patients (42.8%). Significant interindividual variations were detected in the xiphoid process. Excellent anatomic evaluation capacity of MDCT facilitates the detection of variations of the xiphoid process as well as the whole ribcage. (orig.)

  1. Fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The technical and economic viability of the fast breeder reactor as an electricity generating system depends not only upon the reactor performance but also on a capability to recycle plutonium efficiently, reliably and economically through the reactor and fuel cycle facilities. Thus the fuel cycle is an integral and essential part of the system. Fuel cycle research and development has focused on demonstrating that the challenging technical requirements of processing plutonium fuel could be met and that the sometimes conflicting requirements of the fuel developer, fuel fabricator and fuel reprocessor could be reconciled. Pilot plant operation and development and design studies have established both the technical and economic feasibility of the fuel cycle but scope for further improvement exists through process intensification and flowsheet optimization. These objectives and the increasing processing demands made by the continuing improvement to fuel design and irradiation performance provide an incentive for continuing fuel cycle development work. (author)

  2. Organizing Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hull Kristensen, Peer; Bojesen, Anders

    This paper invites to discuss the processes of individualization and organizing being carried out under what we might see as an emerging regime of change. The underlying argumentation is that in certain processes of change, competence becomes questionable at all times. The hazy characteristics...... of this regime of change are pursued through a discussion of competencies as opposed to qualifications illustrated by distinct cases from the Danish public sector in the search for repetitive mechanisms. The cases are put into a general perspective by drawing upon experiences from similar change processes...... in MNCs. The paper concludes by asking whether we can escape from a regime of competence in a world defined by a rhetoric of change and create a more promising world in which doubt and search serve as a strategy for gaining knowledge and professionalism that improve on our capability for mutualism....

  3. Welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    For the final chapter of this book, there is basic introduction on welding process. The good radiography must know somehow on welding process so that they can know what kind of welding that must rejected or not. All of the exposure technique that mention in earlier chapter almost applicable in this field because welding process is critical problem if there is no inspection will be done. So, for this chapter, all the discontinuity that usually appeared will be discussed and there is another discontinuity maybe not to important and do not give big impact if found it, do not described here. On top of that, the decision to accept or reject based on code, standard and specification that agreed by both to make sure that decision that agreed is corrected and more meaningful.

  4. Markov Processes in Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, E. P.; Kharina, N. L.

    2018-05-01

    Digital images are used as an information carrier in different sciences and technologies. The aspiration to increase the number of bits in the image pixels for the purpose of obtaining more information is observed. In the paper, some methods of compression and contour detection on the basis of two-dimensional Markov chain are offered. Increasing the number of bits on the image pixels will allow one to allocate fine object details more precisely, but it significantly complicates image processing. The methods of image processing do not concede by the efficiency to well-known analogues, but surpass them in processing speed. An image is separated into binary images, and processing is carried out in parallel with each without an increase in speed, when increasing the number of bits on the image pixels. One more advantage of methods is the low consumption of energy resources. Only logical procedures are used and there are no computing operations. The methods can be useful in processing images of any class and assignment in processing systems with a limited time and energy resources.

  5. Film processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    The processing was made not only to show what are in the film but also to produce radiograph with high quality where the information gathered really presented level of the quality of the object inspected. Besides that, good procedure will make the film with good quality can keep the film in long time for reference. Here, more detailed on how the dark room functioned and its design. So, the good procedure while processed the film will be discussed detailed in this chapter from entering the dark room to exit from there.

  6. Extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendall, J.S.; Cahalan, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for extracting at least two desired constituents from a mineral, using a liquid reagent which produces the constituents, or compounds thereof, in separable form and independently extracting those constituents, or compounds. The process is especially valuable for the extraction of phosphoric acid and metal values from acidulated phosphate rock, the slurry being contacted with selective extractants for phosphoric acid and metal (e.g. uranium) values. In an example, uranium values are oxidized to uranyl form and extracted using an ion exchange resin. (U.K.)

  7. Process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, E.G.; Suarez, P.S.; Pantaleon, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The search for an optimal design of a heavy water plant is done by means of a simulation model for the mass and enthalpy balances of the SH 2 -H 2 O exchange process. A symplified model for the simulation diagram where the entire plant is represented by a sole tray tower with recicles, and heat and mass feeds/extractions was used. The tower is simulated by the method developed by Tomich with the convergence part given by the algorithm of Broyden. The concluding part of the work is centered in setting the design parameters (flowrates, heat exchange rates, number of plates) wich give the desired process operating conditions. (author) [es

  8. Processing Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Anders Sebastian Rosenkrans

    -terminal of the scissile bond, leaving C-terminal fusions to have non-native C-termini after processing. A solution yielding native C-termini would allow novel expression and purification systems for therapeutic proteins and peptides.The peptidyl-Lys metallopeptidase (LysN) of the fungus Armillaria mellea (Am) is one...... of few known proteases to have substrate specificity for the C-terminal side of the scissile bond. LysN exhibits specificity for lysine, and has primarily been used to complement trypsin in to proteomic studies. A working hypothesis during this study was the potential of LysN as a processing protease...

  9. Novel method for the rapid and specific extraction of multiple β2 -agonist residues in food by tailor-made Monolith-MIPs extraction disks and detection by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haibo; Gan, Ning; Chen, Yinji; Ding, Qingqing; Huang, Jie; Lin, Saichai; Cao, Yuting; Li, Tianhua

    2016-09-01

    A quick and specific pretreatment method based on a series of extraction clean-up disks, consisting of molecularly imprinted polymer monoliths and C18 adsorbent, was developed for the specific enrichment of salbutamol and clenbuterol residues in food. The molecularly imprinted monolithic polymer disk was synthesized using salbutamol as a template through a one-step synthesis process. It can simultaneously and specifically recognize salbutamol and clenbuterol. The monolithic polymer disk and series of C18 disks were assembled with a syringe to form a set of tailor-made devices for the extraction of target molecules. In a single run, salbutamol and clenbuterol can be specifically extracted, cleaned, and eluted by methanol/acetic acid/H2 O. The target molecules, after a silylation derivatization reaction were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The parameters including solvent desorption, sample pH, and the cycles of reloading were investigated and discussed. Under the optimized extraction and clean-up conditions, the limits of detection and quantitation were determined as 0.018-0.022 and 0.042-0.049 ng/g for salbutamol and clenbuterol, respectively. The assay described was convenient, rapid, and specific; thereby potentially efficient in the high-throughput analysis of β2 -agonists residues in real food samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Processing Branches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler, Christoph; Tamke, Martin; Tabatabai, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Angled and forked wood – a desired material until 19th century, was swept away by industrialization and its standardization of processes and materials. Contemporary information technology has the potential for the capturing and recognition of individual geometries through laser scanning...

  11. BENTONITE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija Kutlić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite has vide variety of uses. Special use of bentonite, where its absorbing properties are employed to provide water-tight sealing is for an underground repository in granites In this paper, bentonite processing and beneficiation are described.

  12. Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starks, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    The following aspects of the Purex Process are discussed: head end dissolution, first solvent extraction cycle, second plutonium solvent extraction cycle, second uranium solvent extraction cycle, solvent recovery systems, primary recovery column for high activity waste, low activity waste, laboratory waste evaporation, vessel vent system, airflow and filtration, acid recovery unit, fume recovery, and discharges to seepage basin

  13. Innovation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolodovski, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose of this report: This report was prepared for RISO team involved in design of the innovation system Report provides innovation methodology to establish common understanding of the process concepts and related terminology The report does not includeRISO- or Denmark-specific cultural, econom...

  14. Processing Determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, William

    2015-01-01

    I propose that the course of development in first and second language acquisition is shaped by two types of processing pressures--internal efficiency-related factors relevant to easing the burden on working memory and external input-related factors such as frequency of occurrence. In an attempt to document the role of internal factors, I consider…

  15. Shale processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampton, W H

    1928-05-29

    The process of treating bituminiferous solid materials such as shale or the like to obtain valuable products therefrom, which comprises digesting a mixture of such material in comminuted condition with a suitable digestion liquid, such as an oil, recovering products vaporized in the digestion, and separating residual solid matter from the digestion liquid by centrifuging.

  16. Radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali

    2005-01-01

    This chapter covers the basic principle and application of radiation technology. The topic titled specific application discussed briefly the following subtopics: 1) Polymer modification - crosslinking, polymerisation, degradation, grafting; 2) Medical sterilisation; 3) Food irradiation; 4) Environmental protection - waste processing, pollutants treatment

  17. Leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, H.J.; McClelland, G.E.; Lindstrom, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A gold and uranium ore is heap leached in accordance with the process comprising initial agglomeration of fines in the feed by means of a binding agent and cyanide solution. The lixiviant comprises a compatible mixture of sodium cyanide and sodium bicarbonate

  18. Leaching process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinen, H J; McClelland, G E; Lindstrom, R E

    1982-10-18

    A gold and uranium ore is heap leached in accordance with the process comprising initial agglomeration of fines in the feed by means of a binding agent and cyanide solution. The lixiviant comprises a compatible mixture of sodium cyanide and sodium bicarbonate.

  19. Signal Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Signal processing techniques, extensively used nowadays to maximize the performance of audio and video equipment, have been a key part in the design of hardware and software for high energy physics detectors since pioneering applications in the UA1 experiment at CERN in 1979

  20. Process validation for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.

    1999-01-01

    Process validation concerns the establishment of the irradiation conditions that will lead to the desired changes of the irradiated product. Process validation therefore establishes the link between absorbed dose and the characteristics of the product, such as degree of crosslinking in a polyethylene tube, prolongation of shelf life of a food product, or degree of sterility of the medical device. Detailed international standards are written for the documentation of radiation sterilization, such as EN 552 and ISO 11137, and the steps of process validation that are described in these standards are discussed in this paper. They include material testing for the documentation of the correct functioning of the product, microbiological testing for selection of the minimum required dose and dose mapping for documentation of attainment of the required dose in all parts of the product. The process validation must be maintained by reviews and repeated measurements as necessary. This paper presents recommendations and guidance for the execution of these components of process validation. (author)

  1. Stochastic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Andrei N

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a rigorous yet accessible introduction to the theory of stochastic processes. A significant part of the book is devoted to the classic theory of stochastic processes. In turn, it also presents proofs of well-known results, sometimes together with new approaches. Moreover, the book explores topics not previously covered elsewhere, such as distributions of functionals of diffusions stopped at different random times, the Brownian local time, diffusions with jumps, and an invariance principle for random walks and local times. Supported by carefully selected material, the book showcases a wealth of examples that demonstrate how to solve concrete problems by applying theoretical results. It addresses a broad range of applications, focusing on concrete computational techniques rather than on abstract theory. The content presented here is largely self-contained, making it suitable for researchers and graduate students alike.

  2. Offshoring Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slepniov, Dmitrij; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum; Katayama, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to contribute to the knowledge on how production offshoring and international operations management vary across cultural contexts. The chapter attempts to shed light on how companies approach the process of offshoring in different cultural contexts. In order...... of globalisation. Yet there are clear differences in how offshoring is conducted in Denmark and Japan. The main differences are outlined in a framework and explained employing cultural variables. The findings lead to a number of propositions suggesting that the process of offshoring is not simply a uniform...... technical-rational calculation of the most efficient organisation of activities across national borders, but it is rather specific to the parent companies’ national contexts....

  3. Photobiomodulation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Yi Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photobiomodulation (PBM is a modulation of laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LI on biosystems. There is little research on PBM dynamics although its phenomena and mechanism have been widely studied. The PBM was discussed from dynamic viewpoint in this paper. It was found that the primary process of cellular PBM might be the key process of cellular PBM so that the transition rate of cellular molecules can be extended to discuss the dose relationship of PBM. There may be a dose zone in which low intensity LI (LIL at different doses has biological effects similar to each other, so that biological information model of PBM might hold. LIL may self-adaptively modulate a chronic stress until it becomes successful.

  4. Multiphoton processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manus, C.; Mainfray, G.

    1980-01-01

    The main features of multiphoton processes are described on a somewhat elementary basis. The emphasis is put on multiphoton ionization of atoms where the influence of resonance effects is given through typical examples. The important role played by the coherence of light is shown to produce a very dramatic influence on multiphoton absorption. Different observations concerning molecules, electrons, as well as solid surfaces illustrate the generality of these very non linear interaction between light and matter

  5. Process heat. Triggering the processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augsten, Eva

    2012-07-01

    If solar process heat is to find a market, then the decision makers in industrial companies need to be aware that it actually exists. This was one of the main goals of the So-Pro project, which officially drew to a close in April 2012. (orig.)

  6. Speech Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    The VDE system developed had the capability of recognizing up to 248 separate words in syntactic structures. 4 The two systems described are isolated...AND SPEAKER RECOGNITION by M.J.Hunt 5 ASSESSMENT OF SPEECH SYSTEMS ’ ..- * . by R.K.Moore 6 A SURVEY OF CURRENT EQUIPMENT AND RESEARCH’ by J.S.Bridle...TECHNOLOGY IN NAVY TRAINING SYSTEMS by R.Breaux, M.Blind and R.Lynchard 10 9 I-I GENERAL REVIEW OF MILITARY APPLICATIONS OF VOICE PROCESSING DR. BRUNO

  7. Markov processes

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkwood, James R

    2015-01-01

    Review of ProbabilityShort HistoryReview of Basic Probability DefinitionsSome Common Probability DistributionsProperties of a Probability DistributionProperties of the Expected ValueExpected Value of a Random Variable with Common DistributionsGenerating FunctionsMoment Generating FunctionsExercisesDiscrete-Time, Finite-State Markov ChainsIntroductionNotationTransition MatricesDirected Graphs: Examples of Markov ChainsRandom Walk with Reflecting BoundariesGambler’s RuinEhrenfest ModelCentral Problem of Markov ChainsCondition to Ensure a Unique Equilibrium StateFinding the Equilibrium StateTransient and Recurrent StatesIndicator FunctionsPerron-Frobenius TheoremAbsorbing Markov ChainsMean First Passage TimeMean Recurrence Time and the Equilibrium StateFundamental Matrix for Regular Markov ChainsDividing a Markov Chain into Equivalence ClassesPeriodic Markov ChainsReducible Markov ChainsSummaryExercisesDiscrete-Time, Infinite-State Markov ChainsRenewal ProcessesDelayed Renewal ProcessesEquilibrium State f...

  8. Coking processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, H K

    1917-11-20

    A gas suitable for use in containers or motor-vehicles, etc., and consisting mainly of methane, is obtained by distilling at a temperature not exceeding 500/sup 0/C bastard cannel coal, lignite, wood, peat, shale, etc., in an horizontal or vertical retort, through which the material is continuously fed in a thin layer or column by means of a screw conveyor or the like. Cracking or dissociation of the gaseous products is prevented by introducing into the retort part of the gas which is the result of the process and which is compressed to a pressure of at least 15 atmospheres and allowed to expand into the retort to cool and carry away the gaseous products produced. These are then passed through condensers for extracting liquid hydrocarbons, and other hydrocarbons are extracted by passage through washing-oils. The gas is then compressed by a water-cooled pump to a pressure of 15 atmospheres, whereby a spirit similar to petrol is formed, and a stable gas left which is mainly methane, part of the gas being used to carry out the process described above.

  9. Energy Efficient Multi-Core Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Leech

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the present state of the art of energy-efficient embedded processor design techniques and demonstrates, how small, variable-architecture embedded processors may exploit a run-time minimal architectural synthesis technique to achieve greater energy and area efficiency whilst maintaining performance. The picoMIPS architecture is presented, inspired by the MIPS, as an example of a minimal and energy efficient processor. The picoMIPS is a variablearchitecture RISC microprocessor with an application-specific minimised instruction set. Each implementation will contain only the necessary datapath elements in order to maximise area efficiency. Due to the relationship between logic gate count and power consumption, energy efficiency is also maximised in the processor therefore the system is designed to perform a specific task in the most efficient processor-based form. The principles of the picoMIPS processor are illustrated with an example of the discrete cosine transform (DCT and inverse DCT (IDCT algorithms implemented in a multi-core context to demonstrate the concept of minimal architecture synthesis and how it can be used to produce an application specific, energy efficient processor.

  10. Etherification process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1990-08-21

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figs.

  11. Oligomerization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1991-03-26

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figures.

  12. Lithospheric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldridge, W. [and others

    2000-12-01

    The authors used geophysical, geochemical, and numerical modeling to study selected problems related to Earth's lithosphere. We interpreted seismic waves to better characterize the thickness and properties of the crust and lithosphere. In the southwestern US and Tien Shari, crust of high elevation is dynamically supported above buoyant mantle. In California, mineral fabric in the mantle correlate with regional strain history. Although plumes of buoyant mantle may explain surface deformation and magmatism, our geochemical work does not support this mechanism for Iberia. Generation and ascent of magmas remains puzzling. Our work in Hawaii constrains the residence of magma beneath Hualalai to be a few hundred to about 1000 years. In the crust, heat drives fluid and mass transport. Numerical modeling yielded robust and accurate predictions of these processes. This work is important fundamental science, and applies to mitigation of volcanic and earthquake hazards, Test Ban Treaties, nuclear waste storage, environmental remediation, and hydrothermal energy.

  13. Lithospheric processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldridge, W.S.

    2000-01-01

    The authors used geophysical, geochemical, and numerical modeling to study selected problems related to Earth's lithosphere. We interpreted seismic waves to better characterize the thickness and properties of the crust and lithosphere. In the southwestern US and Tien Shari, crust of high elevation is dynamically supported above buoyant mantle. In California, mineral fabric in the mantle correlate with regional strain history. Although plumes of buoyant mantle may explain surface deformation and magmatism, our geochemical work does not support this mechanism for Iberia. Generation and ascent of magmas remains puzzling. Our work in Hawaii constrains the residence of magma beneath Hualalai to be a few hundred to about 1000 years. In the crust, heat drives fluid and mass transport. Numerical modeling yielded robust and accurate predictions of these processes. This work is important fundamental science, and applies to mitigation of volcanic and earthquake hazards, Test Ban Treaties, nuclear waste storage, environmental remediation, and hydrothermal energy

  14. Carbonizing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1923-11-22

    In the downward distillation of coal, shale, lignite, or the like, the heat is generated by the combustion of liquid or gaseous fuel above the charge the zone of carbonization thus initiated travelling downwards through the charge. The combustible gases employed are preferably those resulting from the process but gases such as natural gas may be employed. The charge is in a moistened and pervious state the lower parts being maintained at a temperature not above 212/sup 0/F until influenced by contact with the carbonization zone and steam may be admitted to increase the yield of ammonia. The combustible gases may be supplied with insufficient air so as to impart to them a reducing effect.

  15. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  16. Monitoring, controlling and safeguarding radiochemical streams at spent fuel reprocessing facilities with optical and gamma-ray spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, J.M.; Bryan, S.A.; Orton, C.R.; Levitskaia, T.G.; Fraga, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safeguards standards for fissionable material at spent fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. For large throughput nuclear facilities, it is difficult to satisfy the IAEA safeguards accountancy goal for detection of abrupt diversion. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MCA) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource intensive destructive assay (DA). Leveraging new on-line non-destructive assay (NDA) process monitoring techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide an additional measure to nuclear material accountancy which would potentially result in a more timely, cost-effective and resource efficient means for safeguards verification at such facilities. By monitoring process control measurements (e.g. flowrates, temperatures, or concentrations of reagents, products or wastes), abnormal plant operations can be detected. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies based upon gamma-ray and optical spectroscopic measurements to potentially reduce the time and resource burden associated with current techniques. The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor uses gamma spectroscopy and multivariate analysis to identify off-normal conditions in process streams. The spectroscopic monitor continuously measures chemical compositions of the process streams including actinide metal ions (U, Pu, Np), selected fission products, and major stable flowsheet reagents using UV-Vis, Near IR and Raman spectroscopy. Multi-variate analysis is also applied to the optical measurements in order to quantify concentrations of analytes of interest within a complex array of radiochemical streams. This paper will provide an overview of these methods and reports on-going efforts to develop

  17. Stochastic Dynamic Mixed-Integer Programming (SD-MIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    et al (2009), there is continuing interest in using SA methods for SP problems. This genre of methods creates a sequence of sampled subgradients...Sampling and Convergence) In current sampling-based methods motivated by Benders’ decomposition the essential role of sampling is to reduce the number of...Kleywegt, A, Shapiro, A, and Homem- de -Mello, T, (2002) SIAM Journal on Optimization archive, vol. 12Journal SIAM Journal on Optimization archive

  18. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    KAUST Repository

    Kravitz, Ben

    2011-01-31

    To evaluate the effects of stratospheric geoengineering with sulphate aerosols, we propose standard forcing scenarios to be applied to multiple climate models to compare their results and determine the robustness of their responses. Thus far, different modeling groups have used different forcing scenarios for both global warming and geoengineering, complicating the comparison of results. We recommend four experiments to explore the extent to which geoengineering might offset climate change projected in some of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 experiments. These experiments focus on stratospheric aerosols, but future experiments under this framework may focus on different means of geoengineering. © 2011 Royal Meteorological Society.

  19. AgMIP wheat pilot data 4 release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Martre, P.; Supit, I.; Wolf, J.

    2015-01-01

    The data set includes a current representative management treatment from detailed, quality-tested sentinel field experiments with wheat from four contrasting environments including Australia, The Netherlands, India and Argentina. Measurements include local daily climate data (solar radiation,

  20. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    KAUST Repository

    Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan; Boucher, Olivier; Schmidt, Hauke; Taylor, Karl E.; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Schulz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of stratospheric geoengineering with sulphate aerosols, we propose standard forcing scenarios to be applied to multiple climate models to compare their results and determine the robustness of their responses. Thus far

  1. Analytical applications of MIPs in diagnostic assays: future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedwell, Thomas S; Whitcombe, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Many efforts have been made to produce artificial materials with biomimetic properties for applications in binding assays. Among these efforts, the technique of molecular imprinting has received much attention because of the high selectivity obtainable for molecules of interest, robustness of the produced polymers, simple and short synthesis, and excellent cost efficiency. In this review, progress in the field of molecularly imprinted sorbent assays is discussed-with a focus on work conducted from 2005 to date.

  2. 9-(Guanidinomethyl)-10-vinylanthracene: a suitable fluorescent monomer for MIPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Huiqi; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David

    2001-01-01

    9-(Guanidinomethyl)anthracene derivatives with a bromo (6) or a vinyl group (10) at the 10-position have been prepared starting from 9-bromoanthracene (1). They show 1:1 complexation with carboxylic acids or carboxylates with K-values of 1.2–1.4×105 M−1 in deuteriomethanol. Copolymerization of

  3. Microproteins (miPs) - the next big thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Stephan

    2012-12-18

    With iPS cells, sncRNAs, chromatin modification regulation and cancer stem cells already cooling off again, i.e. not being guaranteed publications in the 'ultimate' journals anymore, what will be very soon the new red-hot (or super-cool, i.e. anything but lukewarm) 'kid on the block'? We would vote for microproteins.

  4. Microproteins (miPs – the next big thing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feller Stephan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With iPS cells, sncRNAs, chromatin modification regulation and cancer stem cells already cooling off again, i.e. not being guaranteed publications in the 'ultimate' journals anymore, what will be very soon the new red-hot (or super-cool, i.e. anything but lukewarm 'kid on the block'? We would vote for microproteins.

  5. MIP-based approaches for complex planning problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den J.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Plans and timetables can be found everywhere during our daily lives. Examples are the Dutch railway timetable, the schedule for the Dutch soccer league and the roster of nurses in hospitals or home care. Together with the increase in computing power, solution techniques for solving such real-world

  6. AgMIP wheat pilot data 4 release

    OpenAIRE

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Martre, P.; Supit, I.; Wolf, J.

    2015-01-01

    The data set includes a current representative management treatment from detailed, quality-tested sentinel field experiments with wheat from four contrasting environments including Australia, The Netherlands, India and Argentina. Measurements include local daily climate data (solar radiation, maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation, surface wind, dew point temperature, relative humidity, and vapor pressure), soil characteristics, frequent growth, nitrogen in crop and soil, crop and soi...

  7. 24 CFR 206.105 - Amount of MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES HOME EQUITY CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums § 206.105 Amount of...

  8. 24 CFR 203.261 - Calculation of periodic MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums...

  9. 24 CFR 203.262 - Due date of periodic MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums-Periodic...

  10. 24 CFR 203.259 - Method of payment of MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums-in General...

  11. 24 CFR 206.103 - Payment of MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES HOME EQUITY CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums § 206.103 Payment... cash, until the contract of insurance is terminated. ...

  12. 24 CFR 203.266 - Period covered by periodic MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums... with the date of the issuance of a Mortgage Insurance Certificate and ending on the next anniversary of...

  13. 24 CFR 203.267 - Duration of periodic MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums-Periodic... deed to the Commissioner is filed for record or the contract of insurance is terminated. [48 FR 28805...

  14. Processing Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    This Article argues that the practice of holding so many adjudicative proceedings related to disability in private settings (e.g., guardianship, special education due process, civil commitment, and social security) relative to our strong normative presumption of public access to adjudication may cultivate and perpetuate stigma in contravention of the goals of inclusion and enhanced agency set forth in antidiscrimination laws. Descriptively, the law has a complicated history with disability--initially rendering disability invisible; later, underwriting particular narratives of disability synonymous with incapacity; and, in recent history, promoting the full socio-economic visibility of people with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the marquee civil rights legislation for people with disabilities (about to enter its twenty-fifth year), expresses a national approach to disability that recognizes the role of society in its construction, maintenance, and potential remedy. However, the ADA’s mission is incomplete. It has not generated the types of interactions between people with disabilities and nondisabled people empirically shown to deconstruct deeply entrenched social stigma. Prescriptively, procedural design can act as an "ntistigma agent"to resist and mitigate disability stigma. This Article focuses on one element of institutional design--public access to adjudication--as a potential tool to construct and disseminate counter-narratives of disability. The unique substantive focus in disability adjudication on questions of agency provides a potential public space for the negotiation of nuanced definitions of disability and capacity more reflective of the human condition.

  15. [In process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasch, Michael; Kaasch, Joachim

    -increasing competitiveness which came to a head as an embroiled dispute resulting from differences in scientific and scientific policy views. In the process a battle was fought over research resources so that, what was at first an apparently personal quarrel, affected the course of research promotion at an institutional level in the area of life sciences in the GDR. Despite several attempts at mediation, old age finally forced the adversaries to put aside their differences.

  16. Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeat, P.

    A new area of biology has been opened up by nanoscale exploration of the living world. This has been made possible by technological progress, which has provided the tools needed to make devices that can measure things on such length and time scales. In a sense, this is a new window upon the living world, so rich and so diverse. Many of the investigative methods described in this book seek to obtain complementary physical, chemical, and biological data to understand the way it works and the way it is organised. At these length and time scales, only dedicated instrumentation could apprehend the relevant phenomena. There is no way for our senses to observe these things directly. One important field of application is molecular medicine, which aims to explain the mechanisms of life and disease by the presence and quantification of specific molecular entities. This involves combining information about genes, proteins, cells, and organs. This in turn requires the association of instruments for molecular diagnosis, either in vitro, e.g., the microarray or the lab-on-a-chip, or in vivo, e.g., probes for molecular biopsy, and tools for molecular imaging, used to localise molecular information in living organisms in a non-invasive way. These considerations concern both preclinical research for drug design and human medical applications. With the development of DNA and RNA chips [1], genomics has revolutionised investigative methods for cells and cell processes [2,3]. By sequencing the human genome, new ways have been found for understanding the fundamental mechanisms of life [4]. A revolution is currently under way with the analysis of the proteome [5-8], i.e., the complete set of proteins that can be found in some given biological medium, such as the blood plasma. The goal is to characterise certain diseases by recognisable signatures in the proteomic profile, as determined from a blood sample or a biopsy, for example [9-13]. What is at stake is the early detection of

  17. Hydrothermal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, C. R.; von Damm, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    What is Hydrothermal Circulation?Hydrothermal circulation occurs when seawater percolates downward through fractured ocean crust along the volcanic mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system. The seawater is first heated and then undergoes chemical modification through reaction with the host rock as it continues downward, reaching maximum temperatures that can exceed 400 °C. At these temperatures the fluids become extremely buoyant and rise rapidly back to the seafloor where they are expelled into the overlying water column. Seafloor hydrothermal circulation plays a significant role in the cycling of energy and mass between the solid earth and the oceans; the first identification of submarine hydrothermal venting and their accompanying chemosynthetically based communities in the late 1970s remains one of the most exciting discoveries in modern science. The existence of some form of hydrothermal circulation had been predicted almost as soon as the significance of ridges themselves was first recognized, with the emergence of plate tectonic theory. Magma wells up from the Earth's interior along "spreading centers" or "MORs" to produce fresh ocean crust at a rate of ˜20 km3 yr-1, forming new seafloor at a rate of ˜3.3 km2 yr-1 (Parsons, 1981; White et al., 1992). The young oceanic lithosphere formed in this way cools as it moves away from the ridge crest. Although much of this cooling occurs by upward conduction of heat through the lithosphere, early heat-flow studies quickly established that a significant proportion of the total heat flux must also occur via some additional convective process (Figure 1), i.e., through circulation of cold seawater within the upper ocean crust (Anderson and Silbeck, 1981). (2K)Figure 1. Oceanic heat flow versus age of ocean crust. Data from the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans, averaged over 2 Ma intervals (circles) depart from the theoretical cooling curve (solid line) indicating convective cooling of young ocean crust by circulating seawater

  18. Multidimensional process discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, J.T.S.

    2013-01-01

    Typically represented in event logs, business process data describe the execution of process events over time. Business process intelligence (BPI) techniques such as process mining can be applied to get strategic insight into business processes. Process discovery, conformance checking and

  19. PC image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwa, Mok Jin Il; Am, Ha Jeng Ung

    1995-04-01

    This book starts summary of digital image processing and personal computer, and classification of personal computer image processing system, digital image processing, development of personal computer and image processing, image processing system, basic method of image processing such as color image processing and video processing, software and interface, computer graphics, video image and video processing application cases on image processing like satellite image processing, color transformation of image processing in high speed and portrait work system.

  20. AN ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS : FENTON PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin GÜRTEKİN

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological wastewater treatment is not effective treatment method if raw wastewater contains toxic and refractory organics. Advanced oxidation processes are applied before or after biological treatment for the detoxification and reclamation of this kind of wastewaters. The advanced oxidation processes are based on the formation of powerful hydroxyl radicals. Among advanced oxidation processes Fenton process is one of the most promising methods. Because application of Fenton process is simple and cost effective and also reaction occurs in a short time period. Fenton process is applied for many different proposes. In this study, Fenton process was evaluated as an advanced oxidation process in wastewater treatment.

  1. Management of processes of electrochemical dimensional processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetov, I. D.; Zakirova, A. R.; Sadykov, Z. B.

    2017-09-01

    In different industries a lot high-precision parts are produced from hard-processed scarce materials. Forming such details can only be acting during non-contact processing, or a minimum of effort, and doable by the use, for example, of electro-chemical processing. At the present stage of development of metal working processes are important management issues electrochemical machining and its automation. This article provides some indicators and factors of electrochemical machining process.

  2. Extensible packet processing architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Hamlet, Jason R.; Pierson, Lyndon G.; Olsberg, Ronald R.; Chun, Guy D.

    2013-08-20

    A technique for distributed packet processing includes sequentially passing packets associated with packet flows between a plurality of processing engines along a flow through data bus linking the plurality of processing engines in series. At least one packet within a given packet flow is marked by a given processing engine to signify by the given processing engine to the other processing engines that the given processing engine has claimed the given packet flow for processing. A processing function is applied to each of the packet flows within the processing engines and the processed packets are output on a time-shared, arbitered data bus coupled to the plurality of processing engines.

  3. Innovations in the Assay of Un-Segregated Multi-Isotopic Grade TRU Waste Boxes with SuperHENC and FRAM Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, A. P.; Barber, S.; Abdurrahman, N. M.

    2006-01-01

    The Super High Efficiency Neutron Coincidence Counter (SuperHENC) was originally developed by BIL Solutions Inc., Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) for assay of transuranic (TRU) waste in Standard Waste Boxes (SWB) at Rocky Flats. This mobile system was a key component in the shipment of over 4,000 SWBs to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The system was WIPP certified in 2001 and operated at the site for four years. The success of this system, a passive neutron coincidence counter combined with high resolution gamma spectroscopy, led to the order of two new units, delivered to Hanford in 2004. Several new challenges were faced at Hanford: For example, the original RFETS system was calibrated for segregated waste streams such that metals, plastics, wet combustibles and dry combustibles were separated by 'Item Description Codes' prior to assay. Furthermore, the RFETS mission of handling only weapons grade plutonium, enabled the original SuperHENC to benefit from the use of known Pu isotopics. Operations at Hanford, as with most other DOE sites, generate un-segregated waste streams, with a wide diversity of Pu isotopics. Consequently, the new SuperHENCs are required to deal with new technical challenges. The neutron system's software and calibration methodology have been modified to encompass these new requirements. In addition, PC-FRAM software has been added to the gamma system, providing a robust isotopic measurement capability. Finally a new software package has been developed that integrates the neutron and gamma data to provide a final assay results and analysis report. The new system's performance has been rigorously tested and validated against WIPP quality requirements. These modifications, together with the mobile platform, make the new SuperHENC far more versatile in handling diverse waste streams and allow for rapid redeployment around the DOE complex. (authors)

  4. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palau, Jordi; Marchesi, Massimo; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia

    2014-01-01

    is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon......, showed a wide range in δ13C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ37Cl values for TCE...

  5. Multi-Isotopic (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N Tracing of Molt Origin for Red-Winged Blackbirds Associated with Agro-Ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Werner

    Full Text Available We analyzed stable-hydrogen (δ2H, carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ 15N isotope ratios in feathers to better understand the molt origin and food habits of Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus near sunflower production in the Upper Midwest and rice production in the Mid-South of the United States. Outer primary feathers were used from 661 after-second-year (ASY male blackbirds collected in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota (spring collection, and Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas (winter collection. The best-fit model indicated that the combination of feather δ2H, δ13C and δ15N best predicted the state of sample collections and thus supported the use of this approach for tracing molt origins in Red-winged Blackbirds. When considering only birds collected in spring, 56% of birds were classified to their collection state on the basis of δ2H and δ13C alone. We then developed feather isoscapes for δ13C based upon these data and for δ2H based upon continental patterns of δ2H in precipitation. We used 81 birds collected at the ten independent sites for model validation. The spatially-explicit assignment of these 81 birds to the δ2H isoscape resulted in relatively high rates (~77% of accurate assignment to collection states. We also modeled the spatial extent of C3 (e.g. rice, sunflower and C4 (corn, millet, sorghum agricultural crops grown throughout the Upper Midwest and Mid-South United States to predict the relative use of C3- versus C4-based foodwebs among sampled blackbirds. Estimates of C3 inputs to diet ranged from 50% in Arkansas to 27% in Minnesota. As a novel contribution to blackbird conservation and management, we demonstrate how such feather isoscapes can be used to predict the molt origin and interstate movements of migratory blackbirds for subsequent investigations of breeding biology (e.g. sex-specific philopatry, agricultural depredation, feeding ecology, physiology of migration and sensitivity to environmental change.

  6. Multi-Isotopic (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Tracing of Molt Origin for Red-Winged Blackbirds Associated with Agro-Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Scott J; Hobson, Keith A; Van Wilgenburg, Steven L; Fischer, Justin W

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed stable-hydrogen (δ2H), carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotope ratios in feathers to better understand the molt origin and food habits of Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) near sunflower production in the Upper Midwest and rice production in the Mid-South of the United States. Outer primary feathers were used from 661 after-second-year (ASY) male blackbirds collected in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota (spring collection), and Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas (winter collection). The best-fit model indicated that the combination of feather δ2H, δ13C and δ15N best predicted the state of sample collections and thus supported the use of this approach for tracing molt origins in Red-winged Blackbirds. When considering only birds collected in spring, 56% of birds were classified to their collection state on the basis of δ2H and δ13C alone. We then developed feather isoscapes for δ13C based upon these data and for δ2H based upon continental patterns of δ2H in precipitation. We used 81 birds collected at the ten independent sites for model validation. The spatially-explicit assignment of these 81 birds to the δ2H isoscape resulted in relatively high rates (~77%) of accurate assignment to collection states. We also modeled the spatial extent of C3 (e.g. rice, sunflower) and C4 (corn, millet, sorghum) agricultural crops grown throughout the Upper Midwest and Mid-South United States to predict the relative use of C3- versus C4-based foodwebs among sampled blackbirds. Estimates of C3 inputs to diet ranged from 50% in Arkansas to 27% in Minnesota. As a novel contribution to blackbird conservation and management, we demonstrate how such feather isoscapes can be used to predict the molt origin and interstate movements of migratory blackbirds for subsequent investigations of breeding biology (e.g. sex-specific philopatry), agricultural depredation, feeding ecology, physiology of migration and sensitivity to environmental change.

  7. Multi-isotopic determination of plutonium (239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 242Pu) in marine sediments using sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donard, O F X; Bruneau, F; Moldovan, M; Garraud, H; Epov, V N; Boust, D

    2007-03-28

    Among the transuranic elements present in the environment, plutonium isotopes are mainly attached to particles, and therefore they present a great interest for the study and modelling of particle transport in the marine environment. Except in the close vicinity of industrial sources, plutonium concentration in marine sediments is very low (from 10(-4) ng kg(-1) for (241)Pu to 10 ng kg(-1) for (239)Pu), and therefore the measurement of (238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu in sediments at such concentration level requires the use of very sensitive techniques. Moreover, sediment matrix contains huge amounts of mineral species, uranium and organic substances that must be removed before the determination of plutonium isotopes. Hence, an efficient sample preparation step is necessary prior to analysis. Within this work, a chemical procedure for the extraction, purification and pre-concentration of plutonium from marine sediments prior to sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) analysis has been optimized. The analytical method developed yields a pre-concentrated solution of plutonium from which (238)U and (241)Am have been removed, and which is suitable for the direct and simultaneous measurement of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu by SF-ICP-MS.

  8. Trace-element and multi-isotope geochemistry of Late-Archean black shales in the Carajas iron-ore district, Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabral, A. R.; Creaser, R. A.; Naegler, T.

    2013-01-01

    The 250-300-m-thick Carajas Formation in the Carajas mineral province, northern Brazil, consists of banded iron formation (including giant high-grade iron-ore deposits) and minor black shale, overlying a thick pile (2-3 km) of about 2.75-Ga-old metabasalt. Carbonaceous shale with pyrite-and local...

  9. Identifying the African wintering grounds of hybrid flycatchers using a multi-isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) assignment approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Thor; Hjernquist, Marten B.; Van Wilgenburg, Steven L.; Hobson, Keith A.; Folmer, Eelke; Font, Laura; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different

  10. Multi-isotopic composition (δ7Li-δ11B-δD-δ18O) of rainwaters in France: Origin and spatio-temporal characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millot, Romain; Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Guerrot, Catherine; Negrel, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → A contour map of France for δ 18 O was drawn after compiling data that included more than 400 values from all of France. → The seasonal effect (i.e. the month or rainfall amount) is not the main controlling factor for the Li and B isotopic variations. → Most Li and B in rainwaters does not have a marine origin. → Finally, this work also adds to the potential for use of Li and B isotopes as environmental tracers. - Abstract: In the present work, the first results are reported for both Li and B isotope ratios in rainwater samples collected over a long time period (i.e. monthly rainfall events over 1 a) at a national scale (from coastal and inland locations). In addition, the stable isotopes of the water molecule (δD and δ 18 O) are also reported here for the same locations so that the Li and B isotope data can be discussed in the same context. The range of Li and B isotopic variations in these rainwaters were measured to enable the determination of the origin of these elements in rainwaters and the characterization of both the seasonal and spatio-temporal effects for δ 7 Li and δ 11 B signatures in rainwaters. Lithium and B concentrations are low in rainwater samples, ranging from 0.004 to 0.292 μmol/L and from 0.029 to 6.184 μmol/L, respectively. δ 7 Li and δ 11 B values in rainwaters also show a great range of variation between +3.2 per mille and +95.6 per mille and between -3.3 per mille and +40.6 per mille over a period of 1 a, respectively, clearly different from the signature of seawater. Seasonal effects (i.e. rainfall amount and month) are not the main factors controlling element concentrations and isotopic variations. δ 7 Li and δ 11 B values in rainwaters are clearly different from one site to another, indicating the variable contribution of sea salts in the rainwater depending on the sampling site (coastal vs. inland: also called the distance-from-the-coast-effect). This is well illustrated when wind direction data (origin of air masses) is included. It was found that seawater is not the main supplier of dissolved atmospheric Li and B, and non-sea-salt sources (i.e. crustal, anthropogenic, biogenic) should also be taken into account when Li and B isotopes are considered in hydrogeochemistry as an input to surface waters and groundwater bodies as recharge. In parallel, the isotopic variations of the water molecule, vector of the dissolved B and Li, are also investigated and reported as a contour map for δ 18 O values based on compiled data including more than 400 δ 18 O values from throughout France. This δ 18 O map could be used as a reference for future studies dealing with δ 18 O recharge signature in relation to the characterization of surface waters and/or groundwater bodies.

  11. BPMN process views construction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yongchareon, S.; Liu, Chengfei; Zhao, X.; Kowalkiewicz, M.; Kitagawa, H.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Process view technology is catching more attentions in modern business process management, as it enables the customisation of business process representation. This capability helps improve the privacy protection, authority control, flexible display, etc., in business process modelling. One of

  12. Silicon integrated circuit process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Duck

    1985-12-01

    This book introduces the process of silicon integrated circuit. It is composed of seven parts, which are oxidation process, diffusion process, ion implantation process such as ion implantation equipment, damage, annealing and influence on manufacture of integrated circuit and device, chemical vapor deposition process like silicon Epitaxy LPCVD and PECVD, photolithography process, including a sensitizer, spin, harden bake, reflection of light and problems related process, infrared light bake, wet-etch, dry etch, special etch and problems of etching, metal process like metal process like metal-silicon connection, aluminum process, credibility of aluminum and test process.

  13. Silicon integrated circuit process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Duck

    1985-12-15

    This book introduces the process of silicon integrated circuit. It is composed of seven parts, which are oxidation process, diffusion process, ion implantation process such as ion implantation equipment, damage, annealing and influence on manufacture of integrated circuit and device, chemical vapor deposition process like silicon Epitaxy LPCVD and PECVD, photolithography process, including a sensitizer, spin, harden bake, reflection of light and problems related process, infrared light bake, wet-etch, dry etch, special etch and problems of etching, metal process like metal process like metal-silicon connection, aluminum process, credibility of aluminum and test process.

  14. The Newest Laser Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Baek Yeon

    2007-01-01

    This book mentions laser processing with laser principle, laser history, laser beam property, laser kinds, foundation of laser processing such as laser oscillation, characteristic of laser processing, laser for processing and its characteristic, processing of laser hole including conception of processing of laser hole and each material, and hole processing of metal material, cut of laser, reality of cut, laser welding, laser surface hardening, application case of special processing and safety measurement of laser.

  15. Minimal and careful processing

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Thorkild

    2004-01-01

    In several standards, guidelines and publications, organic food processing is strongly associated with "minimal processing" and "careful processing". The term "minimal processing" is nowadays often used in the general food processing industry and described in literature. The term "careful processing" is used more specifically within organic food processing but is not yet clearly defined. The concept of carefulness seems to fit very well with the processing of organic foods, especially if it i...

  16. Thinning spatial point processes into Poisson processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Schoenberg, Frederic Paik

    2010-01-01

    are identified, and where we simulate backwards and forwards in order to obtain the thinned process. In the case of a Cox process, a simple independent thinning technique is proposed. In both cases, the thinning results in a Poisson process if and only if the true Papangelou conditional intensity is used, and......In this paper we describe methods for randomly thinning certain classes of spatial point processes. In the case of a Markov point process, the proposed method involves a dependent thinning of a spatial birth-and-death process, where clans of ancestors associated with the original points......, thus, can be used as a graphical exploratory tool for inspecting the goodness-of-fit of a spatial point process model. Several examples, including clustered and inhibitive point processes, are considered....

  17. Thinning spatial point processes into Poisson processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Schoenberg, Frederic Paik

    , and where one simulates backwards and forwards in order to obtain the thinned process. In the case of a Cox process, a simple independent thinning technique is proposed. In both cases, the thinning results in a Poisson process if and only if the true Papangelou conditional intensity is used, and thus can......This paper describes methods for randomly thinning certain classes of spatial point processes. In the case of a Markov point process, the proposed method involves a dependent thinning of a spatial birth-and-death process, where clans of ancestors associated with the original points are identified...... be used as a diagnostic for assessing the goodness-of-fit of a spatial point process model. Several examples, including clustered and inhibitive point processes, are considered....

  18. A process insight repository supporting process optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Vetlugin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    Existing solutions for analysis and optimization of manufacturing processes, such as online analysis processing or statistical calculations, have shortcomings that limit continuous process improvements. In particular, they lack means of storing and integrating the results of analysis. This makes the valuable information that can be used for process optimizations used only once and then disposed. The goal of the Advanced Manufacturing Analytics (AdMA) research project is to design an integrate...

  19. Process mining: making knowledge discovery process centric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, van der W.M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the Task Force on Process Mining released the Process Mining Manifesto. The manifesto is supported by 53 organizations and 77 process mining experts contributed to it. The active contributions from end-users, tool vendors, consultants, analysts, and researchers illustrate the growing

  20. Business process model repositories : efficient process retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    As organizations increasingly work in process-oriented manner, the number of business process models that they develop and have to maintain increases. As a consequence, it has become common for organizations to have collections of hundreds or even thousands of business process models. When a

  1. Bioactive Fraction of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Decreases Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Franchin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion with endothelial cells. The levels of chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were not altered after treatment with EEGP and the aqueous fraction. It was found that the injection of NO pathway antagonists abolished the EEGP and the aqueous fraction inhibitory activity on the neutrophil migration. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1 was reduced, and nitrite levels increased after treatment with EEGP and aqueous fraction. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, EEGP and the aqueous fraction showed antiedema activity. No pattern of flavonoid and phenolic acid commonly found in propolis samples of Apis mellifera could be detected in the aqueous fraction samples. These data indicate that the aqueous fraction found has promising bioactive substances with anti-inflammatory activity.

  2. Bioactive Fraction of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Decreases Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchin, Marcelo; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Denny, Carina; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Matias de Alencar, Severino; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Luiz Rosalen, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO) pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion) with endothelial cells. The levels of chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were not altered after treatment with EEGP and the aqueous fraction. It was found that the injection of NO pathway antagonists abolished the EEGP and the aqueous fraction inhibitory activity on the neutrophil migration. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1) was reduced, and nitrite levels increased after treatment with EEGP and aqueous fraction. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, EEGP and the aqueous fraction showed antiedema activity. No pattern of flavonoid and phenolic acid commonly found in propolis samples of Apis mellifera could be detected in the aqueous fraction samples. These data indicate that the aqueous fraction found has promising bioactive substances with anti-inflammatory activity.

  3. Uranium enrichment. Enrichment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, M.; Quaegebeur, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the remarkable progresses made in the diversity and the efficiency of the different uranium enrichment processes, only two industrial processes remain today which satisfy all of enriched uranium needs: the gaseous diffusion and the centrifugation. This article describes both processes and some others still at the demonstration or at the laboratory stage of development: 1 - general considerations; 2 - gaseous diffusion: physical principles, implementation, utilisation in the world; 3 - centrifugation: principles, elementary separation factor, flows inside a centrifuge, modeling of separation efficiencies, mechanical design, types of industrial centrifuges, realisation of cascades, main characteristics of the centrifugation process; 4 - aerodynamic processes: vortex process, nozzle process; 5 - chemical exchange separation processes: Japanese ASAHI process, French CHEMEX process; 6 - laser-based processes: SILVA process, SILMO process; 7 - electromagnetic and ionic processes: mass spectrometer and calutron, ion cyclotron resonance, rotating plasmas; 8 - thermal diffusion; 9 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  4. The permanental process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCullagh, Peter; Møller, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    We extend the boson process first to a large class of Cox processes and second to an even larger class of infinitely divisible point processes. Density and moment results are studied in detail. These results are obtained in closed form as weighted permanents, so the extension i called a permanental...... process. Temporal extensions and a particularly tractable case of the permanental process are also studied. Extensions of the fermion process along similar lines, leading to so-called determinantal processes, are discussed....

  5. The permanent process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; McCullagh, Peter

    We extend the boson process first to a large class of Cox processes and second an even larger class of infinitely divisible point processes. Density and moment results are studied in detail. These results are obtained in closed form as weighted permanents, so the extension is called a permanent...... process. Temporal extensions and a particularly tractable case of the permanent process are also studied. Extensions of the ferminon process along similar lines, leading to so-called determinant processes, are discussed at the end. While the permanent process is attractive, the determinant process...

  6. Explosive processes in nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    There are many explosive processes in nucleosynthesis: big bang nucleosynthesis, the rp-process, the γ-process, the ν-process, and the r-process. However, I will discuss just the rp-process and the r-process in detail, primarily because both seem to have been very active research areas of late, and because they have great potential for studies with radioactive nuclear beams. I will also discuss briefly the γ-process because of its inevitability in conjunction with the rp-process. (orig.)

  7. Process Intensification: A Perspective on Process Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutze, Philip; Gani, Rafiqul; Woodley, John

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, process intensification (PI) has attracted considerable academic interest as a potential means for process improvement, to meet the increasing demands for sustainable production. A variety of intensified operations developed in academia and industry creates a large number...... of options to potentially improve the process but to identify the set of feasible solutions for PI in which the optimal can be found takes considerable resources. Hence, a process synthesis tool to achieve PI would potentially assist in the generation and evaluation of PI options. Currently, several process...... design tools with a clear focus on specific PI tasks exist. Therefore, in this paper, the concept of a general systematic framework for synthesis and design of PI options in hierarchical steps through analyzing an existing process, generating PI options in a superstructure and evaluating intensified...

  8. Mining processes in dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mans, R.S.; Reijers, H.A.; van Genuchten, M.; Wismeijer, D.

    2012-01-01

    Business processes in dentistry are quickly evolving towards "digital dentistry". This means that many steps in the dental process will increasingly deal with computerized information or computerized half products. A complicating factor in the improvement of process performance in dentistry,

  9. Realtime Color Stereovision Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Formwalt, Bryon

    2000-01-01

    .... This research takes a step forward in real time machine vision processing. It investigates techniques for implementing a real time stereovision processing system using two miniature color cameras...

  10. Business Process Customization using Process Merging Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulanov, Pavel; Lazovik, Alexander; Aiello, Marco

    2012-01-01

    One of the important application of service composition techniques lies in the field of business process management. Essentially a business process can be considered as a composition of services, which is usually prepared by domain experts, and many tasks still have to be performed manually. These

  11. From Process Understanding to Process Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefland, M.

    2010-01-01

    A licensed pharmaceutical process is required to be executed within the validated ranges throughout the lifetime of product manufacturing. Changes to the process usually require the manufacturer to demonstrate that the safety and efficacy of the product remains unchanged. Recent changes in the

  12. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Process Efficiency improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebenow, B.

    1996-03-01

    In response to decreasing funding levels available to support activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and a desire to be cost competitive, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company have increased their emphasis on cost-saving measures. The ICPP Effectiveness Improvement Initiative involves many activities to improve cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This report documents the methodology and results of one of those cost cutting measures, the Process Efficiency Improvement Activity. The Process Efficiency Improvement Activity performed a systematic review of major work processes at the ICPP to increase productivity and to identify nonvalue-added requirements. A two-phase approach was selected for the activity to allow for near-term implementation of relatively easy process modifications in the first phase while obtaining long-term continuous improvement in the second phase and beyond. Phase I of the initiative included a concentrated review of processes that had a high potential for cost savings with the intent of realizing savings in Fiscal Year 1996 (FY-96.) Phase II consists of implementing long-term strategies too complex for Phase I implementation and evaluation of processes not targeted for Phase I review. The Phase II effort is targeted for realizing cost savings in FY-97 and beyond

  13. Making process improvement 'stick'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Quint

    2014-06-01

    To sustain gains from a process improvement initiative, healthcare organizations should: Explain to staff why a process improvement initiative is needed. Encourage leaders within the organization to champion the process improvement, and tie their evaluations to its outcomes. Ensure that both leaders and employees have the skills to help sustain the sought-after process improvements.

  14. Fractional Poisson process (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaotian; Wen Zhixiong; Zhang Shiying

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic process W H (t)(H-bar (12,1)) which we call fractional Poisson process. The process W H (t) is self-similar in wide sense, displays long range dependence, and has more fatter tail than Gaussian process. In addition, it converges to fractional Brownian motion in distribution

  15. Genetic process mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Alves De Medeiros, A.K.; Weijters, A.J.M.M.; Ciardo, G.; Darondeau, P.

    2005-01-01

    The topic of process mining has attracted the attention of both researchers and tool vendors in the Business Process Management (BPM) space. The goal of process mining is to discover process models from event logs, i.e., events logged by some information system are used to extract information about

  16. Business process quality management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijers, H.A.; Mendling, J.; Recker, J.; Brocke, vom J.; Rosemann, M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Process modeling is a central element in any approach to Business Process Management (BPM). However, what hinders both practitioners and aca demics is the lack of support for assessing the quality of process models — let alone realizing high quality process models. Existing frameworks are

  17. Shell coal gasification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennekes, B. [Shell Global Solutions (US) Inc. (United States). Technology Marketing

    2002-07-01

    The presentation, on which 17 slides/overheads are included in the papers, explained the principles of the Shell coal gasification process and the methods incorporated for control of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulates and mercury. The economics of the process were discussed. The differences between gasification and burning, and the differences between the Shell process and other processes were discussed.

  18. Exploring processes and deviations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, S.J.J.; Fahland, D.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Fournier, F.; Mendling, J.

    2015-01-01

    In process mining, one of the main challenges is to discover a process model, while balancing several quality criteria. This often requires repeatedly setting parameters, discovering a map and evaluating it, which we refer to as process exploration. Commercial process mining tools like Disco,

  19. Distributed genetic process mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bratosin, C.C.; Sidorova, N.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Process mining aims at discovering process models from data logs in order to offer insight into the real use of information systems. Most of the existing process mining algorithms fail to discover complex constructs or have problems dealing with noise and infrequent behavior. The genetic process

  20. Dosimetry and process control for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mod Ali, N.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Accurate radiation dosimetry can provide quality assurance in radiation processing. Considerable relevant experiences in dosimetry by the SSDL-MINT has necessitate the development of methods making measurement at gamma plant traceable to the national standard. It involves the establishment of proper calibration procedure and selection of appropriate transfer system/technique to assure adequate traceability to a primary radiation standard. The effort forms the basis for irradiation process control, the legal approval of the process by the public health authorities (medical product sterilization and food preservation) and the safety and acceptance of the product