WorldWideScience

Sample records for mucking

  1. 30 CFR 77.1902 - Drilling and mucking operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drilling and mucking operations. 77.1902... COAL MINES Slope and Shaft Sinking § 77.1902 Drilling and mucking operations. Diesel-powered equipment used in the drilling, mucking, or other excavation of any slope or shaft shall be permissible, and such...

  2. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR MUCK HANDLING SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Garrett

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) muck handling system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 1998). This QA classification incorporates the current MGR design and the results of the ''Preliminary Preclosure Design Basis Event Calculations for the Monitored Geologic Repository (CRWMS M and O 1998a)

  3. Title III Evaluation Report for the Muck Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H.R. Montalvo

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Muck Storage System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, the technical baseline requirements, and the baseline design are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guide lines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility

  4. The relationship between dissolved organic carbon and hydro-climatic factors in peat-muck soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaszczyński Jacek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in soil solution related to groundwater table, soil temperature, moisture, redox potential and intensive storm rain and their changes during ten years (2001–2010. The studies were localized in drained and agriculturally used Kuwasy Mire situated in the middle basin of the Biebrza River, north-eastern Poland. The study site was situated on a low peat soil managed as intensively used grassland. The soil was recognized as peat-muck in the second stage of the mucking process. DOC concentration was determined by means of the flow colorimetric method using the Skalar equipment.

  5. The Use of Tunnel Muck as Industrial Raw Material: Two Case-Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, P.; Bellopede, R.

    2013-03-01

    The re-use of rock as an industrial material requires more treatments than those foreseen for the reuse of muck as an aggregate for concrete and for road construction. The treatments always start with comminution, which has the goal of liberating the rock-forming minerals. Liberation is achieved with the appearance of grains which are composed of only one mineral. The subsequent treatment steps are based on the physical-mechanical-chemical properties of the different minerals, that is, density, magnetic susceptibility, wettability etc. Magnetic separation and flotation, the two techniques examined in this research, are the two most common techniques used in industrial mineral production plants. The mucks that were analysed are from the Omegna and Brennero tunnels, both of which are granitic rocks with different textures. From the analysis and comparison of the preliminary treatment results, it has been possible to optimise the treatment method. Petrographic, mineralogic and firing tests have been conducted to evaluate the obtained results. High-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) on defined grain sizes appears to be suitable to obtain a product with a high feldspar-quartz content which could be used in the ceramic field.

  6. Gas and particle concentrations in horse stables with individual boxes as a function of the bedding material and the mucking regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, K; Hessel, E F; Van den Weghe, H F A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different types of bedding and mucking regimens used in horse stables on the generation of airborne particulate matter bedding material (wheat straw, straw pellets, and wood shavings) used for horses were assessed according to their ammonia generation. Each type of bedding was used for 2 wk, with 3 repetitions. The mean ammonia concentrations within the stable were 3.07 +/- 0.23 mg/m(3) for wheat straw, 4.79 +/- 0.23 mg/m(3) for straw pellets, and 4.27 +/- 0.17 mg/m(3) for wood shavings. In Exp. 2, the effects of the mucking regimen on the generation of ammonia and PM10 from wheat straw (the bedding with the least ammonia generation in the previous experiment) were examined using 3 different daily regimens: 1) no mucking out, 2) complete mucking out, and 3) partial mucking out (removing only feces). The mean ammonia concentrations in the stable differed significantly among all 3 mucking regimens (P bedding regimen without mucking out was evaluated with regard to gas and airborne particle generation. The ammonia values were found not to increase constantly during the course of the 6-wk period. The average weekly values for PM10 also did not increase constantly but varied between approximately 90 and 140 microg/m. It can be concluded from the particle and gas generation patterns found in the results of all 3 experiments that wheat straw was the most suitable bedding of the 3 types investigated and that mucking out completely on a daily basis should not be undertaken in horse stables.

  7. Hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin as non-exhaustive extractant for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in muck soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Fiona [Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 6248 Eighth Line, Egbert, Ontario, L0L 1N0 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada); Bidleman, Terry F., E-mail: terry.bidleman@ec.gc.c [Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 6248 Eighth Line, Egbert, Ontario, L0L 1N0 (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    Hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) was used as a non-exhaustive extractant for organochlorine pesticides (OCs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in muck soil. An optimized extraction method was developed which involved using a HPCD to soil mass ratio of 5.8 with a single extraction period of 20 h. An aging experiment was performed by spiking a muck soil with {sup 13}C-labeled OCs and non-labeled PCBs. The soil was extracted with the optimized HPCD method and Soxhlet apparatus with dichloromethane over 550 d periodically. The HPCD extractability of the spiked OCs was greater than of the native OCs. A decreased in HPCD extractability was observed for the spiked OCs after 550 d of aging and their extractability approached those of the natives. The partition coefficient between HPCD and soil (log K{sub CD-Soil}) was negatively correlated with the octanol-water partition coefficient (log K{sub OW}) with r{sup 2} = 0.67 and p < 0.05. - The effect of aging on the extractability of organochlorine chemicals in muck soil was investigated using hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin as a mild extractant.

  8. Time to stop mucking around? Impacts of underwater photography on cryptobenthic fauna found in soft sediment habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brauwer, Maarten; Saunders, Benjamin J; Ambo-Rappe, Rohani; Jompa, Jamaluddin; McIlwain, Jennifer L; Harvey, Euan S

    2018-07-15

    Scuba diving tourism is a sustainable source of income for many coastal communities, but can have negative environmental impacts if not managed effectively. Diving on soft sediment habitats, typically referred to as 'muck diving', is a growing multi-million dollar industry with a strong focus on photographing cryptobenthic fauna. We assessed how the environmental impacts of scuba divers are affected by the activity they are engaged in while diving and the habitat they dive in. To do this, we observed 66 divers on coral reefs and soft sediment habitats in Indonesia and the Philippines. We found diver activity, specifically interacting with and photographing fauna, causes greater environmental disturbances than effects caused by certification level, gender, dive experience or age. Divers touched the substrate more often while diving on soft sediment habitats than on coral reefs, but this did not result in greater environmental damage on soft sediment sites. Divers had a higher impact on the substrate and touch animals more frequently when observing or photographing cryptobenthic fauna. When using dSLR-cameras, divers spent up to five times longer interacting with fauna. With the unknown, long-term impacts on cryptobenthic fauna or soft sediment habitats, and the increasing popularity of underwater photography, we argue for the introduction of a muck diving code of conduct. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. "Stuck in the muck": an eco-idiom of distress from childhood respiratory diseases in an urban mangrove in Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Marilyn; Gondim, Ana Paula Soares

    2013-02-01

    Situated in neo-democratic globalizing Northeast Brazil, this anthropological study probes the role of ecological context in framing, experiencing, and expressing human distress. Ethnographic interviews, narratives, and "contextualized semantic analysis" reveal the lived experience of childhood respiratory diseases among 22 urban mangrove dwellers. Informants speak an "eco-idiom of respiratory distress" based on a popular "eco-logic", reflecting the harsh reality of "living in dampness". "Higher-up" residents legitimize their feelings of superiority by stigmatizing "lowlanders" as taboo, diseased (with porcine cysticercosis, swine flu) "filthy pigs, stuck in the muck" (atolados na lama). Animalizing inhabitants' identities demotes them to nonpersons. Besides infections, children suffer social stigma, ostracism, and barriers for accessing care. Promoting a "favorable environment" requires reducing ecological risk, challenging class-based prejudice, and restoring human dignity.

  10. Irrigation Water Sources and Time Intervals as Variables on the Presence of Campylobacter spp. and Listeria monocytogenes on Romaine Lettuce Grown in Muck Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guévremont, Evelyne; Lamoureux, Lisyanne; Généreux, Mylène; Côté, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    Irrigation water has been identified as a possible source of vegetable contamination by foodborne pathogens. Risk management for pathogens such as Campylobacter spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in fields can be influenced by the source of the irrigation water and the time interval between last irrigation and harvest. Plots of romaine lettuce were irrigated with manure-contaminated water or aerated pond water 21, 7, or 3 days prior to harvesting, and water and muck soil samples were collected at each irrigation treatment. Lettuce samples were collected at the end of the trials. The samples were tested for the presence of Campylobacter spp. and L. monocytogenes. Campylobacter coli was isolated from 33% of hog manure samples (n = 9) and from 11% of the contaminated water samples (n = 27), but no lettuce samples were positive (n = 288). L. monocytogenes was not found in manure, and only one sample of manure-contaminated irrigation water (n = 27) and one lettuce sample (n = 288) were positive. No Campylobacter or L. monocytogenes was recovered from the soil samples (n = 288). Because of the low incidence of pathogens, it was not possible to link the contamination of either soil or lettuce with the type of irrigation water. Nevertheless, experimental field trials mimicking real conditions provide new insights into the survival of two significant foodborne pathogens on romaine lettuce.

  11. The in-situ experiment for performance confirmation of engineered barrier system at Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory. Examination of backfill material using muck from URL construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Masashi; Ohno, Hirokazu; Tanai, Kenji; Fujita, Tomoo; Sugita, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    The Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL) Project has being pursued by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to enhance the reliability of relevant disposal technologies through investigations of the deep geological environment within the host sedimentary formation at Horonobe, northern Hokkaido. The URL Project consists of two major research areas, “Geoscientific Research” and “Research and Development on Geological Disposal Technologies”, and proceeds in three overlapping phases, “Phase I: Surface-based investigations”, “Phase II: Investigations during tunnel excavation” and “Phase III: Investigations in the underground facilities”, over a period of around 20 years. Phase III investigation was started in 2010 fiscal year. The in-situ experiment for performance confirmation of engineered barrier system (EBS experiment) was prepared from 2013 to 2014 fiscal year at G.L.-350m gallery (Niche No.4), and heating by electric heater in simulated overpack started in January, 2015. One of objectives of the experiment is acquiring data concerned with Thermal – Hydrological – Mechanical – Chemical (THMC) coupled behavior. These data will be used in order to confirm the performance of engineered barrier system. In EBS experiment, the backfill material using mixture of bentonite and muck from Horonobe URL construction was used for backfilling a part of Niche No.4. This report shows the results of properties of the backfill material, confirmation test of compaction method and making backfill material block, and so on. From these results, it was confirmed that the backfill material would satisfy target value of the permeability and the swelling pressure. (author)

  12. Changes in the spore numbers of AM fungi and in AM colonisation of roots of clovers and grasses on a peat-muck soil with respect to mineral fertilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalska, T. K.; Kwiatkowaska, E.

    2016-01-01

    A 4-year plot experiment was conducted to determine the dynamics of changes in the spore density of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and of the degree of endomycorrhizal colonisation of roots of clovers and meadow grasses on an organic peat-muck soil in a post-marshy habitat, taking into account the effect of mineral fertilisation (NPK). The experimental object comprised four plots that represented the fertilisation treatments, sown with white clover (Trifolium repens L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), smooth meadow-grass (Poa pratensis L.), and a mix of grasses composed of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds.), smooth meadow-grass (Poa pratensis L.), and cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata L.). Analogous sowing was performed on control (non-fertilised) plots. It was found that spores of AMF occurred in 100 percent of the samples of the soil studied, and the average total number of AMF spores isolated from soil under the particular plant combinations was high and amounted to 1858 spores (range from 1392 to 2443) in 100 g of air-dried soil. The percentage share of the clover and grass roots colonised by indigenous endomycorrhizal fungi was very low and varied from 0 to 46 (average from 4.1 percent to 12.2 percent). No correlation was found between the spore numbers of AMF in the soil and the degree of mycorrhized roots of the clovers and grasses. Mineral fertilisation stimulated the sporulation of AM fungi but had no effect on root colonisation by these fungi. (author)

  13. "Stuck in the muck": an eco-idiom of distress from childhood respiratory diseases in an urban mangrove in Northeast Brazil "Atrapado en el fango": ecoidioma del sufrimiento con enfermedades respiratorias infantiles en un manglar urbano del Nordeste de Brasil "Atolado na lama": ecoidioma de sofrimento com doenças respiratórias infantis em um manguezal urbano do Nordeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Nations

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Situated in neo-democratic globalizing Northeast Brazil, this anthropological study probes the role of ecological context in framing, experiencing, and expressing human distress. Ethnographic interviews, narratives, and "contextualized semantic analysis" reveal the lived experience of childhood respiratory diseases among 22 urban mangrove dwellers. Informants speak an "eco-idiom of respiratory distress" based on a popular "eco-logic", reflecting the harsh reality of "living in dampness". "Higher-up" residents legitimize their feelings of superiority by stigmatizing "lowlanders" as taboo, diseased (with porcine cysticercosis, swine flu "filthy pigs, stuck in the muck" (atolados na lama. Animalizing inhabitants' identities demotes them to nonpersons. Besides infections, children suffer social stigma, ostracism, and barriers for accessing care. Promoting a "favorable environment" requires reducing ecological risk, challenging class-based prejudice, and restoring human dignity.Situado en el neo-democrático globalizado Nordeste brasileño, este estudio antropológico analiza el papel del contexto ecológico en el encuadramiento para experimentar y expresar la miseria humana. Entrevistas etnográficas, narrativas y un "análisis semántico contextualizado" revelan la experiencia vivida a causa de enfermedades respiratorias infantiles en 22 residentes de manglares urbanos. Los informantes hablan en un "eco-lenguaje de incomodidad respiratoria", basado en una "eco-lógica" popular, reflejando la dura realidad de "vivir en la humedad, en el manglar." Residentes de áreas elevadas legitiman sus sentimientos de superioridad, estigmatizando los residentes en la "Baixada" como un tabú, como enfermos (cisticercosis porcina, gripe porcina, etc., como "cerdos inmundos, atrapados en el fango". Animalizando las identidades de sus habitantes, despreciándolos a la categoría de no-personas. Además de infecciones, los niños sufren barreras sociales derivadas

  14. The Brown Muck of $B^0$ and $B^0_s$ Mixing: Beyond the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Christopher Michael [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Standard Model contributions to neutral $B$ meson mixing begin at the one loop level where they are further suppressed by a combination of the GIM mechanism and Cabibbo suppression. This combination makes $B$ meson mixing a promising probe of new physics, where as yet undiscovered particles and/or interactions can participate in the virtual loops. Relating underlying interactions of the mixing process to experimental observation requires a precise calculation of the non-perturbative process of hadronization, characterized by hadronic mixing matrix elements. This thesis describes a calculation of the hadronic mixing matrix elements relevant to a large class of new physics models. The calculation is performed via lattice QCD using the MILC collaboration's gauge configurations with $2+1$ dynamical sea quarks.

  15. Bullying, "Cussing" and "Mucking About": Complexities in Tackling Homophobia in Three Secondary Schools in South London, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Ian; Aggleton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In countries such as the UK, schools have a responsibility to prevent all forms of bullying, including those related to sexual orientation. However, relatively little is known about how schools go about this work successfully. This study aimed to identify how three secondary schools in south London, England, were addressing homophobia. Three…

  16. Peering Through the Muck: Notes on the the Influence of the Galactic Interstellar Medium on Extragalactic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockman, Felix J.

    This paper considers some effects of foreground Galactic gas on radiation received from extragalactic objects, with an emphasis on the use of the 21cm line to determine the total N(HI). In general, the opacity of the 21cm line makes it impossible to derive an accurate value of N(HI) by simply applying a formula to the observed emission, except in directions where there is very little interstellar matter. The 21cm line can be used to estimate the likelihood that there is significant molecular hydrogen in a particular direction, but carries little or no information on the amount of ionized gas, which can be a major source of foreground effects. Considerable discussion is devoted to the importance of small-scale angular structure in HI, with the conclusion that it will rarely contribute significantly to the total error compared to other factors (such as the effects of ionized gas) for extragalactic sight lines at high Galactic latitude. The direction of the Hubble/Chandra Deep Field North is used as an example of the complexities that might occur even in the absence of opacity or molecular gas.

  17. Increased productivity in construction of civil and mining tunnels through the use of high-capacity tunnel-boring machines and continuous belt conveyor muck haulage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, J.G.; Ganey, R.J.; Killingsworth, J.E. [Perini Corp., Chicago, IL (United States). US Heavy Division

    1994-12-31

    The use of a large diameter high production tunnel boring machine interfaced with a high capacity continuous belt conveyor system provides a highly productive and cost effective construction system for both civil and mining tunnels. Continuous advance of the tunnel boring machine for a distance of 1,000 feet (305 m) allows for very efficient operation of the system. The available cost reductions will likely prove that this approach to waste handling will make marginally viable projects economically feasible. 9 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Where there's muck, there's brass: Creating sustainable franchise micro-businesses to do water services operation and maintenance in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Partnerships, using the basic principles of social franchising, could address many challenges in the operation and/or maintenance of water services. Development of this concept in South Africa is moving from research into practice....

  19. Experimental Verification of a Pneumatic Transport System for the Rapid Evacuation of Tunnels, Part II - Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    This study is the final phase of a muck pipeline program begun in 1973. The objective of the study was to evaluate a pneumatic pipeline system for muck haulage from a tunnel excavated by a tunnel boring machine. The system was comprised of a muck pre...

  20. CHIPS. Volume 29, Issue 1, January - March 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    SPAWARSYSCEN Atlantic ___________________________________________ Columnists Sharon Anderson, Terry Halvorsen, Mike Hernon, Tom Kidd, Steve Muck...that users need. might be changes to the IP officer page. Additionally, pages should have Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds. An RSS feed

  1. Faculty Workload: An Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussions of practices in higher education have tended toward muck-raking and self-styled exposure of cynical self-indulgence by faculty and administrators at the expense of students and their families, as usually occurs during periods of economic duress, rather than toward analytical studies designed to foster understanding This article…

  2. Spiritual and Religious Supports Part 10: Congruence in Faith and Action--Inclusivity in New Orleans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The First Congregational Church has a heart of mission. Yet, when the mission hits a situation that's personal and makes one squirm a bit, it becomes more of a challenge. Seven teams have been sent from the church to help the rebuilding in New Orleans. The first teams did the mucking, getting all of the belongings out of the house and putting them…

  3. Soils of peatlands: histosols and gelisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy Kolka; Scott D. Bridgham; Chien-Lu. Ping

    2016-01-01

    Peatlands are a subset of wetlands that have accumulated significant amounts of soil organic matter. Soils of peatlands are colloquially known as peat, with mucks referring to peats that are decomposed to the point that the original plant remains are altered beyond recognition (Chapter 6, SSSA 2008). Generally, soils with a surface organic layer >40 cm thick...

  4. Assessment of Blasting Performance Using Electronic Vis-à-Vis Shock Tube Detonators in Strong Garnet Biotite Sillimanite Gneiss Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suresh Kumar; Rai, Piyush

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative investigation of the shock tube and electronic detonating systems practised in bench blasting. The blast trials were conducted on overburden rocks of Garnet Biotite Sillimanite Gneiss formations in one of the largest metalliferous mine of India. The study revealed that the choice of detonating system was crucial in deciding the fragment size and its distribution within the blasted muck-piles. The fragment size and its distribution affected the digging rate of excavators. Also, the shape of the blasted muck-pile was found to be related to the degree of fragmentation. From the present work, it may be inferred that in electronic detonation system, timely release of explosive energy resulted in better overall blasting performance. Hence, the precision in delay time must be considered in designing blast rounds in such overburden rock formations. State-of-art image analysis, GPS based muck-pile profile plotting techniques were rigorously used in the investigation. The study revealed that a mean fragment size (K50) value for shock tube detonated blasts (0.55-0.59 m) was higher than that of electronically detonated blasts (0.43-0.45 m). The digging rate of designated shovels (34 m3) with electronically detonated blasts was consistently more than 5000 t/h, which was almost 13 % higher in comparison to shock tube detonated blasts. Furthermore, favourable muck-pile shapes were witnessed in electronically detonated blasts from the observations made on the dozer performance.

  5. 30 CFR 56.9315 - Dust control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dust control. 56.9315 Section 56.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... control. Dust shall be controlled at muck piles, material transfer points, crushers, and on haulage roads...

  6. Aqueous phase partitioning of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers by biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa WH-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Suman; Singh, Partapbir; Raj, Mayil; Chadha, Bhupinder Singh; Saini, Harvinder Singh

    2009-01-01

    The different isomers of technical-grade hexachlorocyclohexane (t-HCH) including the insecticidal γ-isomer, commonly known as lindane, have been reported to be toxic, carcinogenic and endocrine disrupters. The spatial arrangements of the chlorine atoms on different isomers and low aqueous phase solubility contribute to their persistence in environment, β-HCH being the most resistance to transformation. The biosurfactant preparation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate WH-2 was evaluated for its ability to improve the aqueous phase partitioning of different isomers of HCH-muck. Further, the ability of biosurfactant preparation to emulsify HCH and n-hexadecane was checked under different conditions, usually characteristic of sites contaminated with pollutants viz. wide range of pH, temperature, and salinity. The data obtained from this study will be helpful in designing suitable bioremediation strategies for huge stock piles of HCH-muck and sites polluted by reckless use/disposal of HCH-isomers.

  7. Enjoy Yourself by Listening in——To Get One’s Goat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于国凤

    1987-01-01

    Like every language American English is full of strange expressions, phrases that come from day to day life of the people and develop in their own way. Where did these expressions come from, and how did they get into the language? Our expression today is 'to get one’s goat' and other phrases that come from the goat. The goat is an ancient creature that has done muck for man, providing milk, meat, cheese, and other good and useful things.

  8. Physical and Neuropsychiatric Trauma-Wound Healing and Tissue Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Neurosurg Spine 99:188-197. Hall A (1998) Rho GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton. Science 279:509-514. Holtje M, Hoffmann A, Hofmann F, Mucke C...cytokines and receptors. Annu. Rev. Immunol. 22, 929–979 (2004). 21. S. J. Rodda, A. P. McMahon, Distinct roles for Hedgehog and canonical Wnt signaling in...Swain, M. S. Razzaque, S. Mackem, B. Lanske, Indian Hedgehog produced by postnatal chondrocytes is essen- tial for maintaining a growth plate and

  9. Force-controlled adjustment of car body fixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Production technology in modern car body assembling is affected by highly automated and complex facilities. However, in mounting car body assemblies adjustments are always necessary to react on quality instabilities of the input parts. Today these adjustments are made according to experience and with a high content of manual operation. This paper describes an innovative method that detects part deformations in a force sensitive way following the works of Dr. Muck, who developed a force sensit...

  10. Evaluation of Koontz Lake (North Indiana) Ecological Restoration Options - Comparison of Dredging and Aeration - and Broad Application to USACE Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    necessity of dredging, special water treatment, and maintenance of shipping and stream channels (Glassner-Shwayder 1993). Influxes of sediment have an...eutrophication, harmful algae, invasive plants, and shallowing due to accumulation of sediment and muck. A study was conducted to assist in evaluating... sediments . (The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center does not endorse any specific products or brands). DISCLAIMER: The contents of this

  11. Diversification in an image retrieval system based on text and image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Iftene

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an image retrieval system created within the research project MUCKE (Multimedia and User Credibility Knowledge Extraction, a CHIST-ERA research project where UAIC{\\footnote{"Alexandru Ioan Cuza" University of Iasi}} is one of the partners{\\footnote{Together with Technical University from Wienna, Austria, CEA-LIST Institute from Paris, France and BILKENT University from Ankara, Turkey}}. Our discussion in this work will focus mainly on components that are part of our image retrieval system proposed in MUCKE, and we present the work done by the UAIC group. MUCKE incorporates modules for processing multimedia content in different modes and languages (like English, French, German and Romanian and UAIC is responsible with text processing tasks (for Romanian and English. One of the problems addressed by our work is related to search results diversification. In order to solve this problem, we first process the user queries in both languages and secondly, we create clusters of similar images.

  12. Residues of Avermectin B1a in rotational crops and soils following soil treatment with [14C]Avermectin B1a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moye, H.A.; Malagodi, M.H.; Yoh, H.; Leibee, G.L.; Ku, C.C.; Wislocki, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    [ 14 C]Avermectin B 1 a was applied twelve times to muck and sandy loam soils and three times to sandy soil at 0.025-0.030 lb/acre per application. These applications simulated the intended use of avermectin B 1 a on celery, vegetables, and cotton, respectively. Following three aging periods in each soil type, sorghum, lettuce, and carrot or turnip seeds were planted and harvested at one-fourth, half, and full size. Analysis of these crops by oxidative combustion demonstrated that crops grown in muck, sandy loam, and sandy soils contained radiolabeled residues ranging from below the limit of quantitation (BLQ) to 7.4 μg/kg of avermectin B 1 a equivalents, BLQ to 11.6 μg/kg, and BLQ to 3.54 μg/kg, respectively. There was a general trend of decreasing residue concentrations with increasing preharvest intervals in crops grown in all soils. The radioactivity present in muck and sandy loam soils disappeared with half-lives ranging from 103 to 267 days and from 102 to 132 days, respectively

  13. International patenting in ophthalmology: An analysis of its structure and relevance for the development of drugs and diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann AM Mucke

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Hermann AM Mucke, Peter Mucke, Eva MuckeHM Pharma Consultancy, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: While investigative ophthalmologists access peer-reviewed journals as part of their daily routine, and while they regularly visit scientific congresses, they rarely peruse patent documents as an information source. Among the reasons for this negligence are the incompatibility of patent search algorithms with those known from journal databases, a legalistic and frequently redundant language, and misconceptions about the nature of the patenting system. Here we present key data and analyses from the ophthalmology module of a patent database system that we are developing to address some of these problems. We show that international patent applications consistently reflect developer interest in the ocular drug and diagnostics field; that they are technically focused lead indicators of developments that frequently feature in peer-reviewed patenting only much later; and that patenting targets are well aligned with the unmet therapeutic needs of populations in industrialized countries. Most applications (74%–78% in years since 2006 are supported with experimental data, and most (on average, 80%–90% faced at least one objection to patentability during their initial stage of examination. In contrast to the peer-reviewed scenery that is highly diverse, the corresponding patenting arena shows a pronounced focus on the United States.Keywords: ophthalmology, eye diseases, iontophoresis, intellectual property, patents as topic, bibliographic databases

  14. New techniques for improved performance in surface blasting operation and optimisation of blast design parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.P. [Central Mining Research Institute, Dhanbad (India). Blasting Dept.

    1999-02-01

    Experimental blasts were conducted for optimisation of blasting parameters using separate technologies involving non-electric initiation systems, air decking accessories in conjunction with different explosive products like emulsion (cartridge and site-mixed), slurries (cartridge and site-mixed) and ANFO. The cost associated with each such technology was then compared with the conventional methods of drilling and blasting operations. The results of cost analyses are given. Theoretical and practical aspects of such technologies and their best possible usage in order to establish the desired fragmentation, muck profile, wall control and ultimately the accepted level of costs are mentioned in subsequent sections. 16 refs., 17 figs., 8 plates, 11 tabs.

  15. Copper and lead levels in crops and soils of the Holland Marsh Area-Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czuba, M.; Hutchinson, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the occurrence, distribution, and concentrations of the heavy metals copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) in the soils and crops of the important horticultural area north of Toronto known as the Holland Marsh. The soils are deep organic mucks (> 85% organic matter), derived by the drainage of black marshland soils, which has been carried out over the past 40 years. A comparison is made between the Pb and Cu concentrations in undrained, uncultivated areas of the marsh and in the intensively used horticultural area. Analyses show a marked accumulation of Cu in surface layers of cultivated soils, with a mean surface concentration of 130 ppM, declining to 20 ppM at a 32-cm depth. Undrained (virgin) soils of the same marshes had < 20 ppM at all depths. Lead concentrations also declined through the profile, from concentrations of 22 to 10 ppM. In comparison, undrained areas had elevated Pb levels. Cultivation appeared to have increased Cu, but lowered Pb in the marsh. Copper and lead levels found in the crops were generally higher in the young spring vegetables than in the mature fall ones. Leafy crops, especially lettuce (Lactuca L.) and celery (Apium graveolens), accumulated higher Pb levels in their foliage compared with levels in root crops. Cultivation procedures, including past pesticide applications and fertilizer additions, appeared to be principal sources of Cu. Mobility from the soil and into the plant for these elements in the marsh muck soils is discussed.

  16. Shaft Boring Machine: A method of mechanized vertical shaft excavation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodell, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Shaft Boring Machine (SBM) is a vertical application of proven rock boring technology. The machine applies a rotating cutter wheel with disk cutters for shaft excavation. The wheel is thrust against the rock by hydraulic cylinders and slews about the shaft bottom as it rotates. Cuttings are removed by a clam shell device similar to conventional shaft mucking and the muck is hoisted by buckets. The entire machine moves down (and up) the shaft through the use of a system of grippers thrust against the shaft wall. These grippers and their associated cylinders also provide the means to maintain verticality and stability of the machine. The machine applies the same principles as tunnel boring machines but in a vertical mode. Other shaft construction activities such as rock bolting, utility installation and shaft concrete lining can be accomplished concurrent with shaft boring. The method is comparable in cost to conventional sinking to a depth of about 460 meters (1500 feet) beyond which the SBM has a clear host advantage. The SBM has a greater advantage in productivity in that it can excavate significantly faster than drill and blast methods

  17. Evaluation of engineering aspects of backfill placement for high level nuclear waste (HLW) deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberds, W.; Kleppe, J.; Gonano, L.

    1984-04-01

    This report includes the identification and subjective evaluation of alternative schemes for backfilling around waste packages and within emplacement rooms. The aspects of backfilling specifically considered in this study include construction and testing; costs have not been considered. However, because construction and testing are simply implementation and verification of design, a design basis for backfill is required. A generic basis has been developed for this study by first identifying qualitative performance objectives for backfill and then weighting each with respect to its potential influence on achieving the repository system performance objectives. Alternative backfill materials and additives have been identified and evaluated with respect to the perceived extent to which each combination can be expected to achieve the backfill design basis. Several distinctly different combinations of materials and additives which are perceived to have the highest potential for achieving the backfill design basis have been selected for further study. These combinations include zeolite/clinoptilolite, bentonite, muck, and muck mixed with bentonite. Feasible alternative construction and testing procedures for each selected combination have been discussed. Recommendations have been made regarding appropriate backfill schemes for hard rock (i.e., basalt at Hanford, Washington, tuff at Nevada Test Site, and generic granite) and salt (i.e., domal salt on the Gulf Coast and generic bedded salt). 27 references, 8 figures, 31 tables

  18. Cost-effective mapping of benthic habitats in inland reservoirs through split-beam sonar, indicator kriging, and historical geologic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik R Venteris

    Full Text Available Because bottom substrate composition is an important control on the temporal and spatial location of the aquatic community, accurate maps of benthic habitats of inland lakes and reservoirs provide valuable information to managers, recreational users, and scientists. Therefore, we collected vertical, split-beam sonar data (roughness [E1], hardness [E2], and bathymetry and sediment samples to make such maps. Statistical calibration between sonar parameters and sediment classes was problematic because the E1:E2 ratios for soft (muck and clay sediments overlapped a lower and narrower range for hard (gravel substrates. Thus, we used indicator kriging (IK to map the probability that unsampled locations did not contain coarse sediments. To overcome the calibration issue we tested proxies for the natural processes and anthropogenic history of the reservoir as potential predictive variables. Of these, a geologic map proved to be the most useful. The central alluvial valley and mudflats contained mainly muck and organic-rich clays. The surrounding glacial till and shale bedrock uplands contained mainly poorly sorted gravels. Anomalies in the sonar data suggested that the organic-rich sediments also contained trapped gases, presenting additional interpretive issues for the mapping. We extended the capability of inexpensive split-beam sonar units through the incorporation of historic geologic maps and other records as well as validation with dredge samples. Through the integration of information from multiple data sets, were able to objectively identify bottom substrate and provide reservoir users with an accurate map of available benthic habitat.

  19. Cost-Effective Mapping of Benthic Habitats in Inland Reservoirs through Split-Beam Sonar, Indicator Kriging, and Historical Geologic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venteris, Erik R.; May, Cassandra

    2014-04-23

    Because bottom substrate composition is an important control on the temporal and spatial location of the aquatic community, accurate maps of benthic habitats of inland lakes and reservoirs provide valuable information to managers, recreational users, and scientists. Therefore, we collected vertical, split-beam sonar data (roughness [E1], hardness [E2], and bathymetry) and sediment samples to make such maps. Statistical calibration between sonar parameters and sediment classes was problematic because the E1:E2 ratios for soft (muck and clay) sediments overlapped a lower and narrower range for hard (gravel) substrates. Thus, we used indicator kriging (IK) to map the probability that unsampled locations did not contain coarse sediments. To overcome the calibration issue we tested proxies for the natural processes and anthropogenic history of the reservoir as potential predictive variables. Of these, a geologic map proved to be the most useful. The central alluvial valley and mudflats contained mainly muck and organic-rich clays. The surrounding glacial till and shale bedrock uplands contained mainly poorly sorted gravels. Anomalies in the sonar data suggested that the organic-rich sediments also contained trapped gases, presenting additional interpretive issues for the mapping. We extended the capability of inexpensive split-beam sonar units through the incorporation of historic geologic maps and other records as well as validation with dredge samples. Through the integration of information from multiple data sets, were able to objectively identify bottom substrate and provide reservoir users with an accurate map of available benthic habitat.

  20. Opening of Hokuriku Shinkansen to Nagano; Nagano kaigyo wo mukaeta Hokuriku Shinkansen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okami, T. [Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-10

    This paper describes civil infrastructure of the Hokuriku Shinkansen between Takasaki and Nagano, which started on 1st, October in 1997. This territory with a distance of 125.4 km consists of 15% of soil road-beds, 51% of tunnels, 9% of bridges, and 25% of high bridges. Crossing of the Usui Pass with an altitude difference of 660 m was a problem. For the previous Shinkansen, 15 per mil was the largest gradient. To gain a distance, 30 per mil continuous steep gradient operation in the distance of 22 km could be achieved due to the advancement of rolling stock technology. As a result, the route distance was reduced in 20 km, and the cost was also remarkably reduced. PC cable stayed bridges were adopted for bridges by considering grand views, workability and safety. The Hokuriku Shinkansen is branched from the Joetsu Shinkansen at a point 3.3 km from Takasaki Station. A high-speed turnout was developed, by which rolling stocks can be driven without limiting speed of 160 km/h. To bring out a great deal of muck generated with excavation/shielding translation rapid construction of tunnels, muck transportation system using air capsules was introduced. This is a labor-saving long distance and a great deal transportation system with low noise and without dust. To save the maintenance works, concrete slab track was also adopted for road bed structure intervals. Cost reduction was realized through new technologies and construction methods. 10 figs.

  1. The influence of the sorptive properties of organic soils on the migration rate of 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibowski, S.; Zygmunt, J.

    2002-01-01

    Using a compartment model, the migration rates of 137 Cs were calculated for two types of organic soils: a low peat-muck soil and a black earth. The migration rates of 137 Cs in the tested soils turned out to be significantly higher than in mineral types examined earlier and ranged from 0.6 to 12.3 cm/year. The partition coefficients (K d ) were also determined for samples with varying organic matter content (OM) that were taken from different layers of the studied soils. The experimental results indicate that there is a clear relationship between K d values and OM. The investigation was widened by microcalorimetric measurements which confirmed that the adsorption of 137 Cs on the organic soils is low

  2. How air quality can be monitored in an underground uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.; Gangal, M.; Knight, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mining of uranium ores in underground uranium mines releases and produces a great variety of substances which readily become airborne, posing a potential health hazard to occupational workers. The substances are either released, or their 'normal' rate of release when no mining activity is present is increased as a consequence of certain mining operations, including blasting, drilling, and mucking. They may also be produced as a result of the use of tools, artifacts, and machinery utilized in mining operations. This paper reports on parallel measurements of radiation, dust and meteorological variables during several mining operations in a Canadian underground mine. Measurements were conducted at three uranium mines for a combined period of several weeks

  3. Heap leaching for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Denison Mines Ltd. is using two bacterial leaching processes to combat the high cost of extracting uranium from low grade ore in thin reefs. Both processes use thiobacillus ferro-oxidans, a bacterium that employs the oxidation of ferrous iron and sulphur as its source of energy for growth. The first method is flood leaching, in which ore is subjected to successive flood, drain and rest cycles. The second, trickle leaching, uses sprinklers to douse the broken muck continuously with leaching solution. In areas where grades are too low to justify the expense of hauling the ore to the surface, the company is using this biological process underground to recover uranium. In 1987 Denison recovered 840 000 lb of uranium through bacterial heap leaching. It plans to have biological in-place leaching contribute 25% of the total uranium production by 1990. (fig.)

  4. Rock fill in a KBS-3 repository. Rock material for filling of shafts and ramps in a KBS-3V repository in the closure phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, Roland

    2008-09-01

    The content of large blocks in blasted rock makes it impossible to fill and compact the material effectively unless those larger than about 500 mm are removed. Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) muck gives flat chips, that are usually not longer than a couple of decimeters, and serves better as backfill. The granulometrical composition of both types can be more suitable for effective compaction by crushing, which is hence a preferable process. Use of unsorted, unprocessed blasted rock can only be accepted if the density and physical properties, like self-compaction, are not important. Crushing of blasted rock and TBM muck for backfilling can be made in one or two steps depending on the required gradation. Placement of rock fill is best made by use of tractors with blades that push the material forwards over already placed and compacted material. The dry density of well graded rock fill effectively compacted by very heavy vibratory rollers can be as high as 2,400 kg/m3. For road compaction by ordinary vibratory rollers common dry density values are in the interval 2,050 to 2,200 kg m 3 . Blasted rock dumped and moved on site by tractors can get an average dry density of 1,600-1,800 kg/m3 without compaction. Crushed, blasted rock and TBM muck placed by tractors in horizontal layers and compacted by 5-10 t vibrating rollers in the lower part of the rooms, and moved by tractors to form inclined layers compacted by vibrating plates in the upper part, would get a dry density of 1,900-2,000 kg/m 3 . Flushing water over the rock fill in conjunction with the compaction work gives more effective densification than dry compaction. Based on recorded settlement of Norwegian rock fill dams constructed with water flushing it is estimated that the self-compaction of a 5 m high backfill of crushed rock or TBM muck causes a settlement of the top of the backfill of about 8 mm while a 200 m high shaft fill would undergo compression by more than half a meter. Repeated, strong earthquakes may

  5. Effect of Stemming to Burden Ratio and Powder Factor on Blast Induced Rock Fragmentation- A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sandeep; Choudhary, B. S.; Mishra, A. K.

    2017-08-01

    Rock fragmentation size is very important parameters for economical point of view in any surface mining. Rock fragment size direct effects on the costs of drilling, blasting, loading, secondary blasting and crushing. The main purpose of this study is to investigate effect of blast design parameters such as burden, blast hole length, stemming length, and powder factor on rock fragmentation. The fragment sizes (MFS, K50, m), and maximum fragment size (K95, m) of rock were determined by using the computer software. For every blast, after blasting operation, the images of whole muck pile are captured and there images were used for fragmentation analysis by using the Fragalyst software. It was observed that the optimal fragment size (MFS, K50, m and maximum fragment size, K95, m) of rock depends strongly on the blast design parameters and explosive parameters.

  6. Controlled blasting experiments in a small drift at the CANMET experimental mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizotte, Y.C.

    1994-03-01

    Experiments on controlled blasting conducted at the CANMET Experimental Mine to develop suitable controlled blasting techniques for small development headings are described. The methods selected for study must maintain the drill-blast-muck cycle achieved each work shift. The experiments also examine blast damage mechanisms to formulate criteria for dilution minimization with blast designs in stopes. The drift faces are 2.4 m square, with 34 to 43 holes drilled 2.4 m deep. Cartridged water gels, emulsions, and semi-gelatin dynamite were used in the cuts and as primers, ANFO as the main explosive, and semi- gelatin dynamite in 19 mm diameter cartridges was used in perimeter holes. The results of the first set of experiments show the efficiency of controlled blasting techniques to reduce blast damage. 60 refs., 71 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Working through. A process of restitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman, D M

    A number of authors, including Freud, have written about the process of working through but have left unsettled what is actually involved. I have attempted to outline the step-by-step process of working through, starting with recollection and repetition and ending with restitution and resolution. I have introduced the term restitution in order to give more importance to an already existing step in the working-throught process; it should not be looked upon as an artificial device. Restitution allows the patient to find appropriate gratification in present reality, and this helps him to relinquish the past. Rather than allowing the patient to "wallow in the muck of guilt," as Eveoleen Rexford suggests society "wallows" in its inability to help its children, restitution gives appropriate direction for change. It is a natural step in the successful resolution of treatment.

  8. Rock fill in a KBS-3 repository. Rock material for filling of shafts and ramps in a KBS-3V repository in the closure phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland (Geodevelopment International AB/SWECO AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-09-15

    The content of large blocks in blasted rock makes it impossible to fill and compact the material effectively unless those larger than about 500 mm are removed. Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) muck gives flat chips, that are usually not longer than a couple of decimeters, and serves better as backfill. The granulometrical composition of both types can be more suitable for effective compaction by crushing, which is hence a preferable process. Use of unsorted, unprocessed blasted rock can only be accepted if the density and physical properties, like self-compaction, are not important. Crushing of blasted rock and TBM muck for backfilling can be made in one or two steps depending on the required gradation. Placement of rock fill is best made by use of tractors with blades that push the material forwards over already placed and compacted material. The dry density of well graded rock fill effectively compacted by very heavy vibratory rollers can be as high as 2,400 kg/m3. For road compaction by ordinary vibratory rollers common dry density values are in the interval 2,050 to 2,200 kg m3. Blasted rock dumped and moved on site by tractors can get an average dry density of 1,600-1,800 kg/m3 without compaction. Crushed, blasted rock and TBM muck placed by tractors in horizontal layers and compacted by 5-10 t vibrating rollers in the lower part of the rooms, and moved by tractors to form inclined layers compacted by vibrating plates in the upper part, would get a dry density of 1,900-2,000 kg/m3. Flushing water over the rock fill in conjunction with the compaction work gives more effective densification than dry compaction. Based on recorded settlement of Norwegian rock fill dams constructed with water flushing it is estimated that the self-compaction of a 5 m high backfill of crushed rock or TBM muck causes a settlement of the top of the backfill of about 8 mm while a 200 m high shaft fill would undergo compression by more than half a meter. Repeated, strong earthquakes may

  9. Improved process control through real-time measurement of mineral content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turler, Daniel; Karaca, Murat; Davis, William B.; Giauque, Robert D.; Hopkins, Deborah

    2001-11-02

    In a highly collaborative research and development project with mining and university partners, sensors and data-analysis tools are being developed for rock-mass characterization and real-time measurement of mineral content. Determining mineralogy prior to mucking in an open-pit mine is important for routing the material to the appropriate processing stream. A possible alternative to lab assay of dust and cuttings obtained from drill holes is continuous on-line sampling and real-time x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. Results presented demonstrate that statistical analyses combined with XRF data can be employed to identify minerals and, possibly, different rock types. The objective is to create a detailed three-dimensional mineralogical map in real time that would improve downstream process efficiency.

  10. Decommissioning and decontamination activity, Gnome Site, Eddy County, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to present a brief description of the proposed activity and its potential impacts on the environment. This assessment will constitute an evaluation as to whether or not a formal Environmental Statement need be prepared. As background to the proposed activity, Project Gnome was an underground nuclear test conducted in December 1961 as part of the PLOWSHARE Program. The project site is located about 25 miles southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. By means of an excavated shaft and tunnel, a 3-kiloton nuclear explosive was emplaced and detonated in a salt bed about 1200 feet below the surface. The uncontaminated rock and salt muck from the original excavation and subsequent contaminated muck and minor construction debris from reentry activities into the nuclear cavity is commingled and stored in a pile near the Gnome/Coach Shaft. Other areas on the site are known to have been contaminated. In 1969, a program was conducted to cleanup and dispose of all surface contamination to whatever depth it occurred in excess of 0.1 mR/hr. Contaminated materials and soil were collected and disposed into the Gnome shaft, which was filled and sealed. Since then, NV has proposed to DOE/HQ much lower criteria for residual radioactive contamination for the Gnome Site. These proposed criteria were to collect and dispose of surficial materials which contain more than 2 x 10 -5 microcuries per gram of soil for beta/gamma emitters and 3 x 10 -2 microcuries per milliliter of tritium in soil moisture. According to the latest reconnaissance in 1972, low concentrations of Cs-137, Sr-90 and tritium were present at various locations on the site in excess of these proposed guidelines. Other operational areas within the site are suspected of containing radioactive contamination in much lesser volume, which are to be determined by careful probing and monitoring, as described in the next section

  11. A Closer Look at the Design of Cutterheads for Hard Rock Tunnel-Boring Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Rostami

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The success of a tunnel-boring machine (TBM in a given project depends on the functionality of all components of the system, from the cutters to the backup system, and on the entire rolling stock. However, no part of the machine plays a more crucial role in the efficient operation of the machine than its cutterhead. The design of the cutterhead impacts the efficiency of cutting, the balance of the head, the life of the cutters, the maintenance of the main bearing/gearbox, and the effectiveness of the mucking along with its effects on the wear of the face and gage cutters/muck buckets. Overall, cutterhead design heavily impacts the rate of penetration (ROP, rate of machine utilization (U, and daily advance rate (AR. Although there has been some discussion in commonly available publications regarding disk cutters, cutting forces, and some design features of the head, there is limited literature on this subject because the design of cutterheads is mainly handled by machine manufacturers. Most of the design process involves proprietary algorithms by the manufacturers, and despite recent attention on the subject, the design of rock TBMs has been somewhat of a mystery to most end-users. This paper is an attempt to demystify the basic concepts in design. Although it may not be sufficient for a full-fledged design by the readers, this paper allows engineers and contractors to understand the thought process in the design steps, what to look for in a proper design, and the implications of the head design on machine operation and life cycle. Keywords: TBM cutterhead design, Cutterhead layout, Disk cutters, Cutting pattern, TBM efficiency

  12. Development of a tunnel backfilling concept for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, D.; Borgesson, L.

    2003-01-01

    In the main concept for disposal of the Swedish Nuclear Waste (KBS-3V) it is vital that the drifts can be backfilled with sufficiently good material at high density to fulfill the following requirements: - to obstruct upwards swelling of bentonite from the deposition holes, - to prevent or restrict the water flow in the tunnel and around the canister, - to resist chemical conversion for a long period of time, - not to cause any significant chemical conversion of the buffer surrounding the canister. Investigations and tests of backfill material and techniques have been running in the Swedish underground laboratory, Aspo HRL, since 1996. In the first test, Field Test of Tunnel Backfilling, the objectives were to test the manufacturing of backfill material, to develop and test a backfilling technique and to investigate what densities could be achieved with different backfill materials in the field. Horizontal layers were applied and compacted by a roller in 0.2 m thick layers to 1.5 m from the floor. The rest of the tunnel was backfilled with inclined layers. Five different backfill materials were tested; TBM-muck, TBM-muck crushed to a maximum grain size of 20 mm and crushed TBM-muck mixed with 10, 20 and 30% MX-80 bentonite. The main conclusions from these tests were that the technique for manufacturing backfill material and for backfilling the tunnel were suitable but that the horizontal backfill layers were sensitive to wet conditions, that the backfilling equipment needed to be improved to better reach the areas close to the rock walls and roof and that the durability of the equipment needed to be improved. For the continued development for the Backfill and Plug Test and the Prototype Repository it was decided that the backfilling should be made with inclined layers in the entire cross section of the tunnel in order to decrease the sensitivity to water inflow. The backfilling equipment was improved; two new compactors, the so-called slope compactor and the so

  13. Development of a tunnel backfilling concept for nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, D.; Borgesson, L. [Clay Technology AB, Ideon, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    In the main concept for disposal of the Swedish Nuclear Waste (KBS-3V) it is vital that the drifts can be backfilled with sufficiently good material at high density to fulfill the following requirements: - to obstruct upwards swelling of bentonite from the deposition holes, - to prevent or restrict the water flow in the tunnel and around the canister, - to resist chemical conversion for a long period of time, - not to cause any significant chemical conversion of the buffer surrounding the canister. Investigations and tests of backfill material and techniques have been running in the Swedish underground laboratory, Aspo HRL, since 1996. In the first test, Field Test of Tunnel Backfilling, the objectives were to test the manufacturing of backfill material, to develop and test a backfilling technique and to investigate what densities could be achieved with different backfill materials in the field. Horizontal layers were applied and compacted by a roller in 0.2 m thick layers to 1.5 m from the floor. The rest of the tunnel was backfilled with inclined layers. Five different backfill materials were tested; TBM-muck, TBM-muck crushed to a maximum grain size of 20 mm and crushed TBM-muck mixed with 10, 20 and 30% MX-80 bentonite. The main conclusions from these tests were that the technique for manufacturing backfill material and for backfilling the tunnel were suitable but that the horizontal backfill layers were sensitive to wet conditions, that the backfilling equipment needed to be improved to better reach the areas close to the rock walls and roof and that the durability of the equipment needed to be improved. For the continued development for the Backfill and Plug Test and the Prototype Repository it was decided that the backfilling should be made with inclined layers in the entire cross section of the tunnel in order to decrease the sensitivity to water inflow. The backfilling equipment was improved; two new compactors, the so-called slope compactor and the so

  14. SUBSURFACE CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.E. Kramer

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to identify appropriate construction methods and develop a feasible approach for construction and development of the repository subsurface facilities. The objective of this analysis is to support development of the subsurface repository layout for License Application (LA) design. The scope of the analysis for construction and development of the subsurface Repository facilities covers: (1) Excavation methods, including application of knowledge gained from construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). (2) Muck removal from excavation headings to the surface. This task will examine ways of preventing interference with other subsurface construction activities. (3) The logistics and equipment for the construction and development rail haulage systems. (4) Impact of ground support installation on excavation and other construction activities. (5) Examination of how drift mapping will be accomplished. (6) Men and materials handling. (7) Installation and removal of construction utilities and ventilation systems. (8) Equipping and finishing of the emplacement drift mains and access ramps to fulfill waste emplacement operational needs. (9) Emplacement drift and access mains and ramps commissioning prior to handover for emplacement operations. (10) Examination of ways to structure the contracts for construction of the repository. (11) Discussion of different construction schemes and how to minimize the schedule risks implicit in those schemes. (12) Surface facilities needed for subsurface construction activities

  15. Removal of obstacles during steel pipe pile driving for coal unloading piers for the construction of a Maizuru Power Plant; Maizuru hatsudensho shinsetsu koji ni okeru yotan sanbashi kokan kui uchikomiji no shogaibutsu taisaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsuka, R.; Nishi, M.; Kishimoto, T. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-11-05

    Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., is constructing in Maizuru City a coal-fired thermoelectric power plant to operate two 900,000kw generators. The result of a preliminary survey predicted an encounter with boulders 50-900mm in diameter to obstruct the pile driving process. In a basic pile driving arrangement, a boat mounted with a 1600tf capable fully rotatable crane and a boat carrying an automatic lift type working platform are operated, and a pile is driven under the guidance of a keeper aboard by a vibratory hammer down until it can stand erect on its own. Next, the vibratory hammer gives place to a 50tf-m capable hydraulic hammer, which drives the pile further down until it lands at a depth level with prescribed bearing power. In case pile penetration under a vibratory hammer becomes difficult (at a shallow level), the pile is pulled out, a casing pile is driven in, and then boulders are removed by hammer gloves. In case boulders emerge during hydraulic hammer operation (at a relatively deep level), since dealing with such is beyond the capacity of hammer gloves, pile installation by inner excavation is performed by driving with a heavy bob. The bob is provided with multiple blades on its head, with water and compressed air supplied continuously for the bob to fall freely to crush boulders and to perform excavation at the same time. Mucking is accomplished using an air lift type reversely circulating water system. 1 ref., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Introduction of microbial nutrients in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault as a result of excavation and operation activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Gascoyne, M.; Onagi, D.; Thomas, D.A.; Hamon, C.J.; Watson, R.; Porth, R.J.

    1996-08-01

    A nuclear fuel waste disposal vault would not likely be a sterile environment. Bacterial activity would be expected in those areas of the vault conducive to bacterial life, i.e., where effects of heat, moisture content, radiation and compaction would not prevent or severely restrict bacterial life and where suitable and sufficient nutrients would be present. An inventory of bacterial nutrients that would be emplaced 'intentionally' with vault materials (fuel waste, waste containers, buffer and backfill materials) has been made previously. This report assesses bacterial nutrients that would be added 'inadvertently' to a vault in the form of residues of materials used to excavate and operate a vault. Measurements of blasting material residues in the various water supplies, excavated broken rock (muck) and in cores drilled in old and new tunnel walls were made at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory. Results show that the largest potential nutrient addition (both carbon and nitrogen) to a vault would result from using untreated excavated broken rock as part of the backfill. (author). 16 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs

  17. The Argonauts in Slovenian Literature for Children and Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Mileva Blažić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ljubljana has been associated with literature since its beginning. The founda- tion of the city Emona, for example, which – according to myth – dates back to the 13th  century BC, is associated with the myth of the Argonauts, Jason and the Golden Fleece. In the process of literary reception, the ancient myth evolved into the fairy tale type ATU 513A, according to H.-J. Uther’s motif index of fairy tales. The motif of the Golden Fleece became a symbol of mythic search beyond time and space in Slovenian literature, including children’s literature: in the picture books by Dane Zajc and Miroslav Šuput: The Argonauts (Argonavti, Anton Komat: The Lake Fairy (Vila Jezerka, Desa Muck: The Giant Hen (Kokoš velikanka, Andreja Peklar: The Boy with the Red Cap (Fant z rdečo kapico. It is used with different meanings and in combination with various mythic, fabulous and realistic animal symbols.

  18. ESF [Exploratory Shaft Facility] flexibility analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusenback, R.W.

    1987-03-01

    This report directs that uncertainty allowances be included within the ESF facilities. The recommendations herein developed are intended as input to Title II Design criteria. Flexibility is measured first by lineal ft of drift, and then by hoisting rate and capacity of supporting utilities and services. A defined probability of need shows an extra 10,000 ft of drift for the first level of flexibility responding to testing and operations, and over 60,000 ft of drift for the second level of flexibility which recognizes possible need for perimeter drifting to investigate geologic stratigraphy. Observing there will be time constraints, a single shaft muck hoisting rate up to 170 to 250 tons per hour is recommended. The potential hoisting rate recommended for flexibility should be satisfied by a hoist approximately equivalent to, or conveniently upgraded from those being considered for sinking and construction, or 1000 horsepower. The cost of flexibility is limited to engineering planning and design (mostly conceptual) which makes later expansion achievable, and to selected items for initial construction where later upgrading would be impractical, impossible, or very costly. The cost is fixed to the level of flexibility and does not vary with excavated footage. The incremental margin is only a small fraction of the additional footage made available. Flexibility presents a strategy and not a position of design or technology. Examples used in this report are intended to be illustrative only, and not to lead design or cost estimates. 7 tabs

  19. A passion for hands-on troubleshooting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollinsky, N.

    2010-09-01

    This article discussed a state-of-the-art ventilation-on-demand (VOD) system that was installed at Vale's Creighton mine. RFID tracking technology was installed on some 60 pieces of mobile equipment. Instead of the conventional approach of installing tags on mobile equipment and exciters at check points, the tags were mounted in stationary locations while the exciters were hardened for mounting on mobile equipment. This arrangement was found to be more effective. It was also determined that variable frequency tags are not always necessary in VOD deployments; turning fans off and on based on the position of the vehicle was found to work well. The resolution to another VOD challenge associated with load-haul-dump machines was also discussed. These machines typically traverse several ventilation zones while going back and forth from the ore zones. It is impractical for the fans to be turned off or on as a loader proceeds through every zone, which is the normal practice. Instead, the system was programmed to distinguish between a loader and a bolter, ensuring that the fans remain on during the entire load-haul-dump operation. Tracking technology was also used to automatically turn on a water spray system for dust suppression during mucking operations. Wi-Fi and monitors in the cabs allow drivers to pinpoint the location of the trucks ahead of them, which is less cumbersome than radio communication. 1 fig.

  20. Report for slot cutter proof-of-principle test, Buried Waste Containment System project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Several million cubic feet of hazardous and radioactive waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches within many US Department of Energy (US DOE) sites. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. Many of the hazardous materials in these waste sites are migrating into groundwater systems through plumes and leaching. On-site containment is one of the options being considered for prevention of waste migration. This report describes the results of a proof-of-principle test conducted to demonstrate technology for containing waste. This proof-of-principle test, conducted at the RAHCO International, Inc., facility in the summer of 1997, evaluated equipment techniques for cutting a horizontal slot beneath an existing waste site. The slot would theoretically be used by complementary equipment designed to place a cement barrier under the waste. The technology evaluated consisted of a slot cutting mechanism, muck handling system, thrust system, and instrumentation. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate the performance parameters

  1. Selectivity of thiobencarb between two lettuce (Lactuca sativa, L.) cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, S.

    1987-01-01

    Thiobencarb [S-(4-chlorobenzyl)N,N-diethylthiocarbamate] was examined for weed control on muck grown lettuce. Weed control results were erratic though differential lettuce tolerance was observed in the field. This led to the testing of five lettuce cultivars for tolerance to the herbicide. Of the five lettuce cultivars evaluated, two were selected with the widest tolerance differences: Great Lakes 366 (GLA) (tolerant) and Dark Green Boston (BOS) (susceptible). Studies examining the mechanism of thiobencarb tolerance were conducted with these two cultivars. Within four days after the addition of thiobencarb to the nutrient solution, BOS had significant reductions in the foliar dry weight. In addition, growth abnormalities including fused leaves were observed, indicating inhibition early in leaf development. Greater amounts of 14 C-thiobencarb were absorbed from nutrient solution by BOS, likely due to a significantly greater root system at the time of treatment. The greater uptake and accumulation of 14 C-label in the leaves, as well as significantly greater amounts of unmetabolized 14 C-thiobencarb in the foliage of BOS may account for the selectivity observed. A thiobencarb sulfoxide was not identified in these studies. This indicates that the metabolism of thiobencarb in lettuce differs from other members of the thiocarbamate family of herbicides

  2. Base-line data on everglades soil-plant systems: elemental composition, biomass, and soil depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volk, B.G.; Schemnitz, S.D.; Gamble, J.F.; Sartain, J.B.

    1975-01-01

    Plants and soils from plots in the Everglades Wildlife Management Area, Conservation Area 3, were examined. Chemical composition (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, Co, Sr, Pb, Ni, Cr, Al, and Si) of most plant and soil digests was determined. Cladium jamaicense was the predominant plant species contributing to biomass in all plots except the wet prairie, where Rhynchospora sp. and Panicum hemitomon were most common. The biomass of dead C. jamaicense was greater than that of the living plants in unburned saw-grass plots. The burned saw grass, muck burn, and wet prairie were characterized by a large number of plant species per square meter but smaller average biomass production than the unburned saw-grass locations. Levels of Cu, Mn, Ca, Mg, K, and N in C. jamaicense differed significantly across locations. Highly significant differences in elemental composition existed between plant species. Concentrations of several elements (particularly Zn, Ca, Mg, P, and N) were low in live C. jamaicense compared with other plant species. Cesium-137 levels ranged from 670 to 3100 pCi/kg in sandy and in organic soils, respectively. Polygonum had a 137 Cs level of 11,600 pCi/kg. Dead C. jamaicense indicated a rapid leaching loss of 137 Cs from dead tissue

  3. Report for slot cutter proof-of-principle test, Buried Waste Containment System project. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-21

    Several million cubic feet of hazardous and radioactive waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches within many US Department of Energy (US DOE) sites. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. Many of the hazardous materials in these waste sites are migrating into groundwater systems through plumes and leaching. On-site containment is one of the options being considered for prevention of waste migration. This report describes the results of a proof-of-principle test conducted to demonstrate technology for containing waste. This proof-of-principle test, conducted at the RAHCO International, Inc., facility in the summer of 1997, evaluated equipment techniques for cutting a horizontal slot beneath an existing waste site. The slot would theoretically be used by complementary equipment designed to place a cement barrier under the waste. The technology evaluated consisted of a slot cutting mechanism, muck handling system, thrust system, and instrumentation. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate the performance parameters.

  4. Herbaceous energy crops in humid lower South USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prine, G.M.; Woodard, K.R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The humid lower South has the long warm growing season and high rainfall conditions needed for producing high-yielding perennial herbaceous grasses and shrubs. Many potential biomass plants were evaluated during a ten-year period. Perennial tall grasses such as elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum), sugarcane and energycane (Saccharum spp.) and the leguminous shrub Leucaena leucocephala were the highest in biomass production. These perennial crops often have top growth killed by winter freezes and regenerate from underground parts. The tall grasses have high yields because of linear crop growth rates of 18 to 27 g m{sup 2} d{sup {minus}1} for long periods (140 to 196 d) each season. Tall grasses must be planted vegetatively, which is more costly than seed propagation, however, once established, they may persist for many seasons. Oven dry biomass yields have varied from 20 to 45 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} in colder subtropical to mild temperate locations to over 60 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} in the lower portion of the Florida peninsular. Highest biomass yields have been produced when irrigated with sewage effluent or when grown on phosphatic clay and muck soils in south Florida. The energy content of 1 Mg of oven dry tall grass and leucaena is equivalent to that of about 112 and 123 gallons of number 2 diesel fuel, respectively.

  5. Introduction of microbial nutrients in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault as a result of excavation and operation activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S; Gascoyne, M; Onagi, D; Thomas, D A; Hamon, C J; Watson, R; Porth, R J

    1996-08-01

    A nuclear fuel waste disposal vault would not likely be a sterile environment. Bacterial activity would be expected in those areas of the vault conducive to bacterial life, i.e., where effects of heat, moisture content, radiation and compaction would not prevent or severely restrict bacterial life and where suitable and sufficient nutrients would be present. An inventory of bacterial nutrients that would be emplaced `intentionally` with vault materials (fuel waste, waste containers, buffer and backfill materials) has been made previously. This report assesses bacterial nutrients that would be added `inadvertently` to a vault in the form of residues of materials used to excavate and operate a vault. Measurements of blasting material residues in the various water supplies, excavated broken rock (muck) and in cores drilled in old and new tunnel walls were made at AECL`s Underground Research Laboratory. Results show that the largest potential nutrient addition (both carbon and nitrogen) to a vault would result from using untreated excavated broken rock as part of the backfill. (author). 16 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs.

  6. A Study of Digging Productivity of an Electric Rope Shovel for Different Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Babaei Khorzoughi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A performance monitoring study of an electric rope shovel operating in an open pit coal mine was conducted. As the mining industry moves toward higher productivity, profitability and predictability, the need for more reliable, productive and efficient mining shovels increases. Consequently, it is critical to study the productivity of these machines and to understand the effect of different operational parameters on that. In this paper a clustering analysis is performed to classify shovel digging effort and behaviour based on digging energy, dig time and payload per pass. Then the influence of the operator on the digging efficiency and productivity of the machine is analyzed with a focus on operator technique during digging. A statistical analysis is conducted on different cycle time components (dig time, swing time, return time for different operators. In addition to time components, swing and return angles as well as loading rate and mucking rate are observed and analyzed. The results of this study help to understand the effect of different operators on the digging productivity of the shovel and then to set the best operator practice.

  7. Determinants of fuel consumption in mining trucks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dindarloo, Saeid R.; Siami-Irdemoosa, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of fuel consumption in a large surface mine, during more than 5000 cycles of material transportation, revealed considerable variability in the data. Truck fuel estimation based on the mining truck manufacturers' manuals/estimates is not capable of capturing this variability in the fuel consumption data. Partial least squares regression and autoregressive integrated moving average methods were employed to examine the effect of cyclic activities on fuel consumption, and to recommend relevant remedies for consumption reduction. Proper modifications of the operation can result in improved cycle times. Consequently, minimizing some cyclic activities would enhance energy efficiency. The truck “empty idle time” was a major contributor to unnecessary fuel consumption. Since the truck queues at shovels are a major component of the “empty idle time”, decisions should be reviewed to reduce the truck queues at loading points. Improved dispatching strategies, optimal muck pile shape and size distribution, and improved shovel/loader operator skills are effective preventive measures to minimize truck flow bottlenecks at loading points, and thus to improve energy efficiency at mines. - Highlights: • A large fleet of mining trucks consumes considerable amounts of energy. • Current energy models do not consider the effect of site-specific mining conditions. • A new methodology based on material handling cyclic activities is proposed. • Fuel consumption rates in different truck operating modes are determined. • The new model is compared with the truck manufacturer's energy consumption guideline.

  8. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Application of zero-valence iron and palladized iron for treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene and technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.E.; Muck, M.T.; Zutman, J.L.; Schlosser, R.M.; Liang, L.; Gu, B.; Houk, T.C.; Fernando, Q.

    1997-04-01

    The overall goal of this portion of the project was to package one or more unit processes, as modular components in vertical and/or horizontal recirculation wells, for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [e.g., trichloroethene (TCE)] and radionuclides [e.g., technetium (Tc) 99 ] in groundwater. The project was conceived, in part, because the coexistence of chlorinated hydrocarbons and radionuclides has been identified as the predominant combination of groundwater contamination in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Thus, a major component of the project was the development of modules that provide simultaneous treatment of hydrocarbons and radionuclides. The project objectives included: (1) evaluation of horizontal wells for inducing groundwater recirculation, (2) development of below-ground treatment modules for simultaneous removal of VOCs and radionuclides, and (3) demonstration of a coupled system (treatment module with recirculation well) at a DOE field site where both VOCs and radionuclides are present in the groundwater. This report is limited to the innovative treatment aspects of the program. A report on pilot testing of the horizontal recirculation system was the first report of the series (Muck et al. 1996). A comprehensive report that focuses on the engineering, cost and hydrodynamic aspects of the project has also been prepared (Korte et al. 1997a)

  9. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Application of zero-valence iron and palladized iron for treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene and technetium-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.; Muck, M.T.; Zutman, J.L.; Schlosser, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Liang, L.; Gu, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Houk, T.C. [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Fernando, Q. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The overall goal of this portion of the project was to package one or more unit processes, as modular components in vertical and/or horizontal recirculation wells, for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [e.g., trichloroethene (TCE)] and radionuclides [e.g., technetium (Tc){sup 99}] in groundwater. The project was conceived, in part, because the coexistence of chlorinated hydrocarbons and radionuclides has been identified as the predominant combination of groundwater contamination in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Thus, a major component of the project was the development of modules that provide simultaneous treatment of hydrocarbons and radionuclides. The project objectives included: (1) evaluation of horizontal wells for inducing groundwater recirculation, (2) development of below-ground treatment modules for simultaneous removal of VOCs and radionuclides, and (3) demonstration of a coupled system (treatment module with recirculation well) at a DOE field site where both VOCs and radionuclides are present in the groundwater. This report is limited to the innovative treatment aspects of the program. A report on pilot testing of the horizontal recirculation system was the first report of the series (Muck et al. 1996). A comprehensive report that focuses on the engineering, cost and hydrodynamic aspects of the project has also been prepared (Korte et al. 1997a).

  10. Assessment of radiological status of Bagjata underground uranium mine operating in the east Singhbhum District of Jharkhand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, B.K.; Meena, J.S.; Thakur, V.K.; Sahoo, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.

    2012-01-01

    Bagjata uranium mine deposits (22 °28’ 07”N and 86°29’ 36” E) is located in Dhalmugarh subdivision of East Singhbhum district of Jharkhand. This mine was commissioned in 2008 and presently it is operating with a production capacity of 500 tonne/day. The mining of uranium ores can lead to both internal and external exposures of workers. Internal exposure arises from the inhalation of radon gas and its decay products and radionuclides in ore dust. The contribution of respirable ore dust toward internal exposure has been reported to be insignificant in a low ore grade uranium mines by several authors. Radon gas is produced by the alpha decay of 226 Ra, which is a product of the long lived antecedent uranium ( 238 U), is present in the rocks, decays to a number of short-lived decay products that are themselves radioactive. Radon gas diffuses into the mine air through cracks and fissures present in the ore body, during blasting, mucking and fragmentation of ore body in mine. The short-lived daughters, 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, are the principal contributor to internal exposure to mine workers. Radon has been recognized as a radiation hazard causing excess lung cancer among underground miners (NAS, 1988; ATSDR, 1990). 222 Rn concentration in the mine air was estimated by using a scintillation cell technique

  11. Road drainage system using highly compressible and long-term permeable geotextile. Evaluation of long-term permeability and application to trafficability in a tunnel; Kotaiatsu mezumari taikyugata geotextile haisuizai wo mochiita roban haisui taisaku. Mezumari taikyusei no hyoka to tunnel konai kasetsu doro no trafficability kaizen koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S.; Yamagishi, K.; Hirama, K.; Ueno, T. [Obayashi Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-10

    A geotextile drainage material called ART-DRAIN has been developed. It was applied to temporary roads in a tunnel, to evaluate its permeability through a long-term permeability test using a model. The ART-DRAIN is a drainage material for protecting the roads from muddy conditions in a tunnel due to spring water. A filter for permeating fine soil particles was employed to keep the permeability. From the long-term permeability test using a model, appropriate permeability of ART-DRAIN was maintained for three years without blinding. There was only a slight inflow of fine grain soils into the ART-DRAIN. It was confirmed that the permeability was not obstructed by the fine grain soils. The ART-DRAIN was applied to tunnel construction works for the high-speed railway in Kyoto and the national road in mountains. From these applications, factors for enhancing the permeability effect were confirmed, which includes the selection of high quality muck, insurance of the road-bed strength by the initial compaction, use of road drainage materials with high compressible property and permeability of filter, and intervals of drainage. 1 ref., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Experiences in running solvent extraction plant for thorium compounds [Paper No. : V-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalkrishnan, C.R.; Bhatt, J.P.; Kelkar, G.K.

    1979-01-01

    Indian Rare Earths Ltd. operates a Plant using thorium concentrates as raw material, employing hydrocarbonate route, for the manufacture of thorium compounds. A small demonstration solvent extraction plant designed by the Chemical Engineering Division, B.A.R.C. is also being operated for the same purpose using a partly purified thorium hydrocarbonate as raw material. In the solvent extraction process, separation of pure thorium is done in mixer settlers using 40% mixture of tri-butyl phosphate in kerosene. Though a comparatively purer raw material of hydrocarbonate than thorium concentrate is used, heavy muck formation is encountered in the extraction stage. Production of nuclear grade thorium oxide has been successful so far as quality is concerned. The quality of thorium nitrate suffers in the yellow colouration and high phosphate content, the former being only partly controlled through the use of pretreated kerosene. When a larger solvent extraction plant is to be designed to use thorium concentrates as raw material, some of the problems encountered will be considered. (author)

  13. Construction of semi-underground type power plant in close vicinity of existing structures. Kisetsu kozobutsu ni kinsetsu shita han chika shiki hatsudensho no seko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K [Toshiba Ceramics Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Suda, H [Nippon Koei CO. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kanazawa, S [Hazama-Gumi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-01-30

    The second Akashiba power station is of a semi-underground type and located on a steep slope between the Arakawa River and a national road. Therefore, there were many such problems to be solved for its construction as safety precaution for steep slope ground including the closely located national road, underwater work for the intake and outlet works, construction of tunnel below the present water level of the river in which deluges can be expected. Very severe conditions were imposed for the plan of the retaining walls, which are required for the prevention of landslide on the national road side, because of the problems of boundaries of the site, proprietary right, etc. The plan and design were studied for 3 cases, i.e. during drilling, at regular time and at the time of earthquake occurrence. Outlines of the drilling of the power plant shaft, mucking, timbering, spraying and spring water treatment are given. In connection with the control of measurement, subjects for measurement and the result of measurement are reported. Although this construction work was carried out under very severe conditions, it was completed in August, 1990 with no serious disaster. 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Distribution and habitat properties of Carex pulicaris and Pedicularis sylvatica at their range margin in NW Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Sotek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the distribution dynamics, soil and phytocoenotical conditions of the occurrence of Carex pulicaris and Pedicularis sylvatica at the margin of their range in NW Poland. Dynamic cartograms of these species were made on the basis of our field studies and available contemporary and historical records. The studies showed that the plants grow on organic hemic-muck soils, mucky soils and typical muckous soils. The occurrence of these two species on different types of soils proves that they are able to adapt easily to varying habitat conditions of post-bog areas. Populations of C. pulicaris and P. sylvatica were most frequently not numerous and occurred in small community patches. Analyzed phytocoenoses with C. pulicaris have been classified as the community of the alliance Caricion davallianae or the alliance Molinion. Phytocoenoses with P. sylvatica are represented by the association Nardo-Juncetum squarrosi and the community of the class Molinio-Arrhenatheretea. The distribution dynamics of these species shows that they are disappearing from some parts of this region, which proves the recessive trends. This process is more intensive for P. sylvatica, which should be included in the red list of Polish plants like C. pulicaris. The disappearance of the populations of both species has been caused by worsening habitat conditions (insufficient moisture, eutrophication, expansion of competitive plant species and land abandonment.

  15. Radiation, ventilation and dust studies at Agnew Lake mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.; Gangal, M.; Knight, G.; Regan, R.; Stefanich, W.

    1980-08-01

    Measurements of radon gas, radon and thoron decay products, ventilation, and aerosol (<= 0.13 μm) and respirable dust (<= 10 μm) concentrations were conducted at an underground uranium mine in the Agnew Lake, Ontario, area. Radon gas measurements were carried out with a radon gas continuous monitoring system, whereas the other variables were determined by grab-sampling techniques. Studies were conducted at three mine locations: a working stope, an exhaust area near the stope and a general intake area supplying fresh air to several stopes. Radiation and dust studies were carried out for different mining operations (mainly mucking and drilling) and environmental conditions. Underground barometric pressure did not seem to affect radon gas levels. No obvious effect on radiation and dust levels was readily observed nor could be correlated with underground meteorological data within the relatively narrow range the (meteorological) variables changed. Theoretical calculations for some radiation variables were done and compared with experimental values. Within the limitations of some of the calculations, overall fair agreement between experimental and theoretical data was found

  16. Beneficiation of power grade coals: its relevance to future coal use in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    With consumption increasing from the current level of 220 mt. to over 600 mt. by the year 2010 A.D., coal will continue to enjoy a prime position in the overall energy scene in India. India being endowed with coal resources of high ash content, the major coal consuming industries have, by and large, adjusted the combustion techniques to suit the quality of coal available. However, wide fluctuations in the quality of coal supplies adversely affect their plant performance. With the coal deposits being localised in the eastern and central parts of peninsular India, the load on railway network in carrying coal to other parts of the country will continue to increase and this will emerge as a major constraint in managing the coal supply to the consuming centres located away from the coal fields. It is in this context, the author has discussed the need of setting up of coal cleaning facilities at the pit heads. The extent to which the transport network will be relieved of carrying avoidable muck in coal has been quantified along with the benefits that will accrue in the form of extra transport capacity, better power plant performance and reduced air pollution and solid waste at consumer end. (author). 5 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs

  17. Carbon Footprint of Biofuel Sugarcane Produced in Mineral and Organic Soils in Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izursa, Jose-Luis; Hanlon, Edward; Amponsah, Nana; Capece, John

    2013-02-06

    Ethanol produced from sugarcane is an existing and accessible form of renewable energy. In this study, we applied the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach to estimate the Carbon Footprint (CFP) of biofuel sugarcane produced on mineral (sandy) and organic (muck) soils in Florida. CFP was estimated from greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) during the biofuel sugarcane cultivation. The data for the energy (fossil fuels and electricity), equipment, and chemical fertilizers were taken from enterprise budgets prepared by the University of Florida based on surveys and interviews obtained from local growers during the cropping years 2007/2008 and 2009/2010 for mineral soils and 2008/2009 for organic soils. Emissions from biomass burning and organic land use were calculated based on the IPCC guidelines. The results show that the CFP for biofuel sugarcane production is 0.04 kg CO2e kg-1y-1 when produced in mineral soils and 0.46 kg CO2e kg-1y-1 when produced in organic soils. Most of the GHG emissions from production of biofuel sugarcane in mineral soils come from equipment (33%), fertilizers (28%), and biomass burning (27%); whereas GHG emissions from production in organic soils come predominantly from the soil (93%). This difference should be considered to adopt new practices for a more sustainable farming system if biofuel feedstocks are to be considered.

  18. Characterization of aquifer heterogeneity using Cyclostratigraphy and geophysical methods in the upper part of the Karstic Biscayne Aquifer, Southeastern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Carlson, Janine L.; Wingard, G. Lynn; Robinson, Edward; Wacker, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    , permeability, formation electrical conductivity, and GPR reflection amplitudes? as porosity and permeability increase, formation electrical conductivity increases and reflection amplitude decreases. This relation was observed throughout the entire vertical and lateral section of the upper part of the Biscayne aquifer in the study area. Further, upward-shallowing brackish- or freshwatercapped cycles of the upper part of the Fort Thompson Formation show low-amplitude reflections near their base that correspond to relatively higher porosity and permeability. This distribution is related to a systematic vertical stacking of rock-fabric facies within the cycle. Inferred flow characteristics of the porosity distribution within the upper part of the Biscayne aquifer were used to identify four ground-water flow classes, with each characterized by a discrete pore system that affects vertical and horizontal groundwater flow: (1) a low-permeability peat, muck, and marl ground-water flow class; (2) a horizontal conduit ground-water flow class; (3) a leaky, low-permeability ground-water flow class; and (4) a diffuse-carbonate ground-water flow class. At the top of the Biscayne aquifer, peat, muck, and marl can combine to form a relatively low-permeability layer of Holocene sediment that water moves through slowly. Most horizontal conduit flow is inferred to occur along touching vugs in portions of the following rock-fabric facies: (1) touchingvug pelecypod floatstone and rudstone, (2) sandy touching-vug pelecypod floatstone and rudstone, (3) vuggy wackestone and packstone, (4) laminated peloid grainstone and packstone, (5) peloid grainstone and packstone, and (6) peloid wackestone and packstone. Gastropod floatstone and rudstone, mudstone and wackestone, and pedogenic limestone rock-fabric facies are the main hosts for leaky, low-permeability units. This study provides evidence that the limestone that spans the base of the Miami Limestone and top of the Fort Thompson

  19. Effects of Different Cutting Patterns and Experimental Conditions on the Performance of a Conical Drag Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copur, Hanifi; Bilgin, Nuh; Balci, Cemal; Tumac, Deniz; Avunduk, Emre

    2017-06-01

    This study aims at determining the effects of single-, double-, and triple-spiral cutting patterns; the effects of tool cutting speeds on the experimental scale; and the effects of the method of yield estimation on cutting performance by performing a set of full-scale linear cutting tests with a conical cutting tool. The average and maximum normal, cutting and side forces; specific energy; yield; and coarseness index are measured and compared in each cutting pattern at a 25-mm line spacing, at varying depths of cut per revolution, and using two cutting speeds on five different rock samples. The results indicate that the optimum specific energy decreases by approximately 25% with an increasing number of spirals from the single- to the double-spiral cutting pattern for the hard rocks, whereas generally little effect was observed for the soft- and medium-strength rocks. The double-spiral cutting pattern appeared to be more effective than the single- or triple-spiral cutting pattern and had an advantage of lower side forces. The tool cutting speed had no apparent effect on the cutting performance. The estimation of the specific energy by the yield based on the theoretical swept area was not significantly different from that estimated by the yield based on the muck weighing, especially for the double- and triple-spiral cutting patterns and with the optimum ratio of line spacing to depth of cut per revolution. This study also demonstrated that the cutterhead and mechanical miner designs, semi-theoretical deterministic computer simulations and empirical performance predictions and optimization models should be based on realistic experimental simulations. Studies should be continued to obtain more reliable results by creating a larger database of laboratory tests and field performance records for mechanical miners using drag tools.

  20. Chemical characterization and ecotoxicity of three soil foaming agents used in mechanized tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baderna, Diego; Lomazzi, Eleonora; Passoni, Alice; Pogliaghi, Alberto; Petoumenou, Maria Ifigeneia; Bagnati, Renzo; Lodi, Marco; Viarengo, Aldo; Sforzini, Susanna; Benfenati, Emilio; Fanelli, Roberto

    2015-10-15

    The construction of tunnels and rocks with mechanized drills produces several tons of rocky debris that are today recycled as construction material or as soil replacement for covering rocky areas. The lack of accurate information about the environmental impact of these excavated rocks and foaming agents added during the excavation process has aroused increasing concern for ecosystems and human health. The present study proposes an integrated approach to the assessment of the potential environmental impact of three foaming agents containing different anionic surfactants and other polymers currently on the market and used in tunnel boring machines. The strategy includes chemical characterization with high resolution mass spectrometry techniques to identify the components of each product, the use of in silico tools to perform a similarity comparison among these compounds and some pollutants already listed in regulatory frameworks to identify possible threshold concentrations of contamination, and the application of a battery of ecotoxicological assays to investigate the impact of each foaming mixture on model organisms of soil (higher plants and Eisenia andrei) and water communities (Daphnia magna). The study identified eleven compounds not listed on the material safety data sheets for which we have identified possible concentrations of contamination based on existing regulatory references. The bioassays allowed us to determine the no effect concentrations (NOAECs) of the three mixtures, which were subsequently used as threshold concentration for the product in its entirety. The technical mixtures used in this study have a different degree of toxicity and the predicted environmental concentrations based on the conditions of use are lower than the NOAEC for soils but higher than the NOAEC for water, posing a potential risk to the waters due to the levels of foaming agents in the muck. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sorption of selected organic compounds from water to a peat soil and its humic-acid and humin fractions: Potential sources of the sorption nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.; Rutherford, D.W.; Sheng, G.; Boyd, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The sorption isotherms of ethylene dibromide (EDB), diuron (DUN), and 3,5-dichlorophenol (DCP) from water on the humic acid and humin fractions of a peat soil and on the humic-acid of a muck soil have been measured. The data were compared with those of the solutes with the whole peat from which the humic-acid (HA) and humin (HM) fractions were derived and on which the sorption of the solutes exhibited varying extents of nonlinear capacities at low relative concentrations (C(e)/S(w)). The HA fraction as prepared by the density-fractionated method is relatively pure and presumably free of high- surface-area carbonaceous material (HSACM) that is considered to be responsible for the observed nonlinear sorption for nonpolar solutes (e.g., EDB) on the peat; conversely, the base-insoluble HM fraction as prepared is presumed to be enriched with HSACM, as manifested by the greatly higher BET- (N2) surface area than that of the whole peat. The sorption of EDB on HA exhibits no visible nonlinear effect, whereas the sorption on HM shows an enhanced nonlinearity over that on the whole peat. The sorption of polar DUN and DCP on HA and HM display nonlinear effects comparable with those on the whole peat; the effects are much more significant than those with nonpolar EDB. These results conform to the hypothesis that adsorption onto a small amount of strongly adsorbing HSACM is largely responsible for the nonlinear sorption of nonpolar solutes on soils and that additional specific interactions with the active groups of soil organic matter are responsible for the generally higher nonlinear sorption of the polar solutes.

  2. Current status and future trends in Cryptosporidium and Giardia epidemiology in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Y A L; Ahmad, R A; Smith, H V

    2008-06-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are major causes of diarrhoeal diseases of humans worldwide, and are included in the World Health Organisation's 'Neglected Diseases Initiative'. Cryptosporidium and Giardia occur commonly in Malaysian human and non-human populations, but their impact on disease, morbidity and cost of illness is not known. The commonness of contributions from human (STW effluents, indiscriminate defaecation) and non-human (calving, lambing, muck spreading, slurry spraying, pasturing/grazing of domestic animals, infected wild animals) hosts indicate that many Malaysian environments, particularly water and soil, are sufficiently contaminated to act as potential vehicles for the transmission of disease. To gain insight into the morbidity and mortality caused by human cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis, they should be included into differential diagnoses, and routine laboratory testing should be performed and (as for many infectious diseases) reported to a centralised public health agency. To understand transmission routes and the significance of environmental contamination better will require further multidisciplinary approaches and shared resources, including raising national perceptions of the parasitological quality of drinking water. Here, the detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia should be an integral part of the water quality requirement. A multidisciplinary approach among public health professionals in the water industry and other relevant health- and environment-associated agencies is also required in order to determine the significance of Cryptosporidium and Giardia contamination of Malaysian drinking water. Lastly, adoption of validated methods to determine the species, genotype and subgenotype of Cryptosporidium and Giardia present in Malaysia will assist in developing effective risk assessment, management and communication models.

  3. An Experimental Study of Cutting Performances of Worn Picks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogruoz, Cihan; Bolukbasi, Naci; Rostami, Jamal; Acar, Cemil

    2016-01-01

    The best means to assess rock cuttability and efficiency of cutting process for using mechanical excavation is specific energy (SE), measured in full-scale rock cutting test. This is especially true for the application of roadheaders, often fitted with drag-type cutting tools. Radial picks or drag bits are changed during the operation as they reach a certain amount of wear and become blunt. In this study, full-scale cutting tests in different sedimentary rock types with bits having various degree of wear were used to evaluate the influence of bit wear on cutting forces and specific energy. The relationship between the amount of wear as represented by the size of the wear flats at the tip of the bit, and cutting forces as well as specific energy was examined. The influence of various rock properties such as mineral content, uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength, indentation index, shore hardness, Schmidt hammer hardness, and density with required SE of cutting using different levels of tool wear was also studied. The preliminary analysis of the data shows that the mean cutting forces increase 2-3 times and SE by 4-5 times when cutting with 4 mm wear flat as compared to cutting with new or sharp wedge shape bits. The grain size distribution of the muck for cutting different rock types and different level of bit wear was analyzed and discussed. The best fit prediction models for SE based on statistical analysis of laboratory test results are introduced. The model can be used for estimating the performance of mechanical excavators using radial tools, especially roadheaders, continuous miners and longwall drum shearers.

  4. Laboratory and field investigations of pestiferous Chironomidae (Diptera) in some man-made wetlands in central Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad; Leckel, Robert J; Jahan, Nusrad; Al-Shami, Salman A; Rawi, Che Salmah Md

    2009-03-01

    A 1-year larval and adult population survey of pestiferous chironomids was conducted in 4 man-made wetlands in a resort area of central Florida, USA. Benthic samples were randomly collected from each wetland at least once every month. Geocoordinates, water depth, and physical composition of substrates at each larval sample location were noted. Adult midge populations were sampled weekly around the wetlands by employing 10 New Jersey light traps permanently placed in the area. Chironominae and Tanypodinae midges occurred in the larval and adult samples; a few Orthocladiinae were also taken. Among Chironominae, Chironomini (mostly Polypedilum spp., Cryptochironomus spp., Glyptotendipes paripes, and Goeldichironomus carus) and Tanytarsini (mostly Tanytarsus spp.), and some other Chironomidae were recorded. Tanypodinae were quantitatively not important. Monthly mean number of total adults per trap-night ranged from 23 in February to 211 in October. Annual mean larval density and range of total chironomids in the study wetlands amounted to 1,128/m2, range: 0-12,332/m2. The total larvae were most abundant in May. Tanytarsus spp. and Polypedilum spp. were numerically the most predominant spatially as well as temporally. Mean water depth at the sampled locations was 1.83 m (range: 1-m-deep water. Of all sampled locations, substrates such as sand, mixed substrates, and muck were respectively encountered at 656, 371, and 299 locations. The predominance of sand and mixed substrates was conducive to supporting the numerically dominant Tanytarsus spp. and Polypedilum spp. In laboratory bioassays, Tanytarsus spp., Polypedilum spp., Glyptotendipes paripes, and Goeldichironomus carus were highly susceptible to temephos, as well as to s-methoprene. Bacillus thuringiensis serovar. israelensis was most effective against Tanytarsus spp. and least against Goeldichironomus carus.

  5. Contextual modulation of primary visual cortex by auditory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, L S; Paton, A T; Muckli, L

    2017-02-19

    Early visual cortex receives non-feedforward input from lateral and top-down connections (Muckli & Petro 2013 Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 23, 195-201. (doi:10.1016/j.conb.2013.01.020)), including long-range projections from auditory areas. Early visual cortex can code for high-level auditory information, with neural patterns representing natural sound stimulation (Vetter et al. 2014 Curr. Biol. 24, 1256-1262. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.020)). We discuss a number of questions arising from these findings. What is the adaptive function of bimodal representations in visual cortex? What type of information projects from auditory to visual cortex? What are the anatomical constraints of auditory information in V1, for example, periphery versus fovea, superficial versus deep cortical layers? Is there a putative neural mechanism we can infer from human neuroimaging data and recent theoretical accounts of cortex? We also present data showing we can read out high-level auditory information from the activation patterns of early visual cortex even when visual cortex receives simple visual stimulation, suggesting independent channels for visual and auditory signals in V1. We speculate which cellular mechanisms allow V1 to be contextually modulated by auditory input to facilitate perception, cognition and behaviour. Beyond cortical feedback that facilitates perception, we argue that there is also feedback serving counterfactual processing during imagery, dreaming and mind wandering, which is not relevant for immediate perception but for behaviour and cognition over a longer time frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Construction features of the exploratory shaft at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, G.W.; Fiore, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    The Exploratory Shaft (ES) at Yucca Mountain is planned to be constructed during 1985 and 1986 as part of the detailed site characterization for one of three sites which may be selected as candidates for location of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Conventional mining methods will be used for the shaft sinking phase of the ES project. The ES will be comprised of surface support facilities, a 1480-ft-deep circular shaft lined with concrete to a finished inside diameter of 12 ft, lateral excavations and test installations extending up to 200 ft from the shaft, and long lateral borings extending up to 2300 ft from the shaft. The estimated time for sinking the shaft to a total depth of about 1480 ft and completing the lateral excavations and borings is about two years. The major underground development planned for the primary test level at a depth of 1200 ft consists of the equivalent of 1150 ft of 15- by 15-ft drift. The total volume of rock to be removed from the shaft proper and the lateral excavations totals about 1/2 million cubic feet. Construction equipment for the shaft and underground excavation phases consists of conventional mine hoisting equipment, shot hole and rock bolt drilling jumbos, mucking machines, and hauling machines. The desire to maintain relatively uniform and even walls in selected shaft and drift intervals will require that controlled blasting techniques be employed. Certain lateral boring operations associated with tests to be conducted in the underground development may pose some unusual problems or require specialized equipment. One of the operations is boring and lining a 30-in.-diam by 600-ft-long horizontal hole with a boring machine being developed under the direction of Sandia National Laboratories. Another special operation is coring long lateral holes (500 to 2000 ft) with minimum use of liquid circulating fluids. 8 figures

  7. Effectiveness evaluation of existing noise controls in a deep shaft underground mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Eric A; Reed, Rustin J; Turner, Dylan; Littau, Sally R; Lee, Vivien; Hu, Chengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Noise exposures and hearing loss in the mining industry continue to be a major problem, despite advances in noise control technologies. This study evaluated the effectiveness of engineering, administrative, and personal noise controls using both traditional and in-ear dosimetry by job task, work shift, and five types of earplug. The noise exposures of 22 miners performing deep shaft-sinking tasks were evaluated during 56 rotating shifts in an underground mine. Miners were earplug-insertion trained, earplug fit-tested, and monitored utilizing traditional and in-ear dosimetry. The mean TWA8 noise exposure via traditional dosimetry was 90.1 ± 8.2 dBA, while the mean in-ear TWA8 was 79.6 ± 13.8 dBA. The latter was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) personal exposure limit (PEL) of 90 dBA. Dosimetry mean TWA8 noise exposures for bench blowing (103.5 ± 0.9 dBA), jumbo drill operation (103.0 ± 0.8 dBA), and mucking tasks (99.6 ± 4.7 dBA) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than other tasks. For bench blowing, cable pulling, grinding, and jumbo drill operation tasks, the mean in-ear TWA8 was greater than 85 dBA. Those working swing shift had a significantly higher (p < 0.001) mean TWA8 noise exposure (95.4 ± 7.3 dBA) than those working day shift. For percent difference between traditional vs. in-ear dosimetry, there was no significant difference among types of earplug used. Reflective of occupational hearing loss rate trends across the mining industry, this study found that, despite existing engineering and administrative controls, noise exposure levels exceeded regulatory limits, while the addition of personal hearing protection limited excessive exposures.

  8. Construction features of the Exploratory Shaft at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, G.W.; Fiore, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    The Exploratory Shaft (ES) at Yucca Mountain is planned to be constructed during 1985 and 1986 as part of the detailed site characterization for one of three sites which may be selected as candidates for location of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Conventional mining methods will be used for the shaft sinking phase of the ES project. The ES will be comprised of surface support facilities, a 1,480-foot-deep circular shaft lined with concrete to a finished inside diameter of 12 feet, lateral excavations and test installations extending up to 200 feet from the shaft, and long lateral borings extending up to 2,300 feet from the shaft. The estimated time for sinking the shaft to a total depth of about 1,480 feet and completing the lateral excavations and borings is about two years. The major underground development planned for the primary test level at a depth of 1,200 feet consists of the equivalent of 1,150 feet of 15- by 15-foot drift. The total volume of rock to be removed from the shaft proper and the lateral excavations totals about 1/2 million cubic feet. Construction equipment for the shaft and underground excavation phases consists of conventional mine hoisting equipment, shot hole and rock bolt drilling jumbos, mucking machines, and hauling machines. The desire to maintain relatively uniform and even walls in selected shaft and drift intervals will require that controlled blasting techniques be employed. Such techniques generally classified as ''smooth blasting'' are commonly used for excavation in the construction industry

  9. Evolution of gigantism in amphiumid salamanders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M Bonett

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Amphiumidae contains three species of elongate, permanently aquatic salamanders with four diminutive limbs that append one, two, or three toes. Two of the species, Amphiuma means and A. tridactylum, are among the largest salamanders in the world, reaching lengths of more than one meter, whereas the third species (A. pholeter, extinct amphiumids, and closely related salamander families are relatively small. Amphiuma means and A. tridactylum are widespread species and live in a wide range of lowland aquatic habitats on the Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States, whereas A. pholeter is restricted to very specialized organic muck habitats and is syntopic with A. means. Here we present analyses of sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear loci from across the distribution of the three taxa to assess lineage diversity, relationships, and relative timing of divergence in amphiumid salamanders. In addition we analyze the evolution of gigantism in the clade. Our analyses indicate three lineages that have diverged since the late Miocene, that correspond to the three currently recognized species, but the two gigantic species are not each other's closest relatives. Given that the most closely related salamander families and fossil amphiumids from the Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene are relatively small, our results suggest at least two extreme changes in body size within the Amphuimidae. Gigantic body size either evolved once as the ancestral condition of modern amphiumas, with a subsequent strong size reduction in A. pholeter, or gigantism independently evolved twice in the modern species, A. means and A. tridactylum. These patterns are concordant with differences in habitat breadth and range size among lineages, and have implications for reproductive isolation and diversification of amphiumid salamanders.

  10. Chemical characterization and ecotoxicity of three soil foaming agents used in mechanized tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baderna, Diego, E-mail: diego.baderna@marionegri.it [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Lomazzi, Eleonora [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Passoni, Alice [Unit of Analytical Instrumentation, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Pogliaghi, Alberto; Petoumenou, Maria Ifigeneia [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Bagnati, Renzo [Unit of Analytical Instrumentation, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Lodi, Marco [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Viarengo, Aldo; Sforzini, Susanna [Department of Sciences and Technological Innovation (DiSIT), University of Piemonte Orientale “A. Avogadro”, 15121 Alessandria (Italy); Benfenati, Emilio [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Fanelli, Roberto [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    and the predicted environmental concentrations based on the conditions of use are lower than the NOAEC for soils but higher than the NOAEC for water, posing a potential risk to the waters due to the levels of foaming agents in the muck.

  11. Midwest Joint Venture high-grade uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    Midwest Joint Venture (MJV) owns a high-grade uranium deposit in northern Saskatchewan. The deposit is located too deep below surface to be mined economically by open pit methods, and as a consequence, present plans are that it will be mined by underground methods. High-grade uranium ore of the type at MJV, encased in weak, highly altered ground and with radon-rich water inflows, has not before been mined by underground methods. The test mining phase of the project, completed in 1989, had three objectives: To evaluate radiation protection requirements associated with the handling of large quantities of radon-rich water and mining high-grade uranium ore in an underground environment; to investigate the quantity and quality of water inflows into the mine; and, to investigate ground conditions in and around the ore zone as an aid in determining the production mining method to be used. With information gained from the test mining project, a mining method for the production mine has been devised. Level plans have been drawn up, ventilation system designed, pumping arrangements made and methods of ore handling considered. All this is to be done in a manner that will be safe for those doing the work underground. Some of the mining methods planned are felt to be unique in that they are designed to cope with mining problems not known to have been encountered before. New problems underground have required new methods to handle them. Remote drilling, blasting, mucking and backfilling form the basis of the planned mining method

  12. Chemical characterization and ecotoxicity of three soil foaming agents used in mechanized tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baderna, Diego; Lomazzi, Eleonora; Passoni, Alice; Pogliaghi, Alberto; Petoumenou, Maria Ifigeneia; Bagnati, Renzo; Lodi, Marco; Viarengo, Aldo; Sforzini, Susanna; Benfenati, Emilio; Fanelli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    and the predicted environmental concentrations based on the conditions of use are lower than the NOAEC for soils but higher than the NOAEC for water, posing a potential risk to the waters due to the levels of foaming agents in the muck

  13. Determination of geohydrologic framework and extent of d- water contamination using surface geophysical techniques at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Pierre

    1986-01-01

    Seismic-refraction, electric-resistivity sounding, and electromagnetic conductivity techniques were used to determine the geohydrologic framework and extent of groundwater contamination at Picatinny Arsenal in northern New Jersey. The area studied encompasses about 4 sq mi at the southern end of the Arsenal. The bedrock surface beneath the glacial sediments was delineated by seismic-refraction techniques. Data for 12 seismic lines were collected using a 12-channel engineering seismograph. Competent bedrock crops out on both sides of the valley, but is about 290 ft below land surface in the deepest part of the topographic valley. Where the exposed bedrock surface forms steep slopes on the valley side, it remains steep below the valley fill. Likewise, gentle bedrock valley slopes have gentle subsurface slopes. The deepest part of the bedrock valley is along the southern extension of the Green Pond fault. The electric-resistivity sounding technique was used to determine the sediment types. Data were collected from four sites using the offset Wenner electrode configuration. Below the surface layer, the sediments have apparent and computed resistivity values of 120 to 170 ohm-meters. These values correspond to a saturated fine-grained sediment such as silt or interbedded sand and clay. Groundwater contamination was by electromagnetic conductivity techniques using transmitting and receiving coils separated by 32.8 ft and 12 ft. Thirteen sites have apparent conductivity values exceeding 15 millimhos/m. Of these, seven sites indicate groundwater contamination from a variety of sources including a sanitary landfill, pyrotechnic testing ground, burning area, former domestic sewage field, salt storage facility, hazardous waste disposal lagoon, sewage treatment plant, and fertilizer storage shed. Three areas underlain by clay or muck are interpreted to be free of contamination. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Impact of straw mulch on populations of onion thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in onion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larentzaki, E; Plate, J; Nault, B A; Shelton, A M

    2008-08-01

    Development of insecticide resistance in onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), populations in onion (Allium spp.) fields and the incidence of the T. tabaci transmitted Iris yellow spot virus have stimulated interest in evaluating alternative management tactics. Effects of straw mulch applied in commercial onion fields in muck areas of western New York were assessed in 2006 and 2007 as a possible onion thrips management strategy. In trials in which no insecticides were applied for thrips control, straw mulch-treated plots supported significantly lower T. tabaci populations compared with control plots. In both years, the action thresholds of one or three larvae per leaf were reached in straw mulch treatments between 7 and 14 d later than in the control. Ground predatory fauna, as evaluated by pitfall trapping, was not increased by straw mulch in 2006; however, populations of the common predatory thrips Aeolothrips fasciatus (L.) (Thysanoptera: Aeolothripidae) were significantly lower in straw mulch plots in both years. Interference of straw mulch in the pupation and emergence of T. tabaci was investigated in the lab and their emergence was reduced by 54% compared with bare soil. In the field the overall yield of onions was not affected by the straw mulch treatment; however, the presence of jumbo grade onions (>77 mm) was increased in 2006, but not in 2007. These results indicate that populations of T. tabaci adults and larvae can be significantly reduced by the use of straw mulch without compromising overall onion yield. The use of this cultural practice in an onion integrated pest management program seems promising.

  15. Heavy metals and manganese oxides in the genesee watershed, New York state: effects of geology and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Manganese oxide coatings on gravels from 255 sites on tributary streams in the Genesee River Watershed were analyzed for Mn, Fe, Zn, Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, and Cu. The results were compared with data on bedrock geology, surficial geology and land use, using factor analysis and stepwise multiple regression. All metals except Pb show strong positive correlation with Mn. This association results from the well-known tendency of Mn oxide precipitates to adsorb and incorporate dissolved trace metals. Pb may be present in a separate phase on the gravel surfaces; alternatively Pb abundance may be so strongly influenced by environmental factors that the effect of varying abundance of the carrier phase becomes relatively unimportant. When the effects of varying Mn abundance are allowed for, Pb and to a lesser extent Zn and Cu abundances are seen to be related to commercial, industrial and residential land use. In addition to this pollution effect, all the trace metals, Cd and Ni most strongly, tend to be more abundant in oxide coatings from streams in the forested uplands in the southern part of the area. This probably reflects increased geochemical mobility of the metals in the more acid soils and groundwater of the southern region. A strong Zn anomaly is present in streams draining areas underlain by the Lockport Formation. Oxide coatings in these streams contain up to 5% Zn, originating from disseminated sphalerite in the Lockport and secondary Zn concentrations in the overlying muck soils. The same group of metals, plus calcium and loss on ignition, were determined in the silt and clay (minus 230 mesh) fraction of stream sediments from 129 of the same sites, using a hot nitric acid leach. The amounts of manganese in the sediments are low (average 1020 ppm) and manganese oxides are, at most, of relatively minor significance in the trace-metal geochemistry of these sediments. The bulk of the trace metals in sediment appears to be associated with iron oxides, clays and organic

  16. Hydrogeologic framework, arsenic distribution, and groundwater geochemistry of the glacial-sediment aquifer at the Auburn Road landfill superfund site, Londonderry, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, James R.; Harte, Philip T.

    2013-01-01

    been observed in the wetland, streams, and pond downgradient of the landfills. Piezometers were installed in some of these locations to confirm groundwater discharge, measure vertical-flow gradients, and to provide a way to sample the discharging groundwater. Understanding the movement of leachate in groundwater is complicated by the presence of preferential flow paths through aquifer materials with differing hydraulic properties; these preferential flow paths can affect rates of recharge, geochemical conditions, and contaminant fluxes. In areas adjacent to the three capped landfills, infiltration of precipitation containing oxygenated water through permeable deltaic sediments in the former gravel pit area causes increases in dissolved oxygen concentrations and decreases in arsenic concentrations. Layered deltaic sediments produce anisotropic hydraulic characteristics and zones of high hydraulic conductivity. The glacial-sediment aquifer also includes glaciolacustrine sediments that have low permeability and limit infiltration at the surface Discharge of leachate-affected groundwater may be limited in areas of organic muck on the bottom of Whispering Pines Pond because the muck may act as a semiconfining layer. Geophysical survey results were used to identify several areas with continuous beds of muck and an underlying highresistivity layer on top of a layer of low resistivity that may represent leachate-affected groundwater. The high-resistivity layer is likely groundwater associated with oxygenated recharge, which would cause arsenic to adsorb onto aquifer sediments and reduce concentrations of dissolved arsenic in groundwater. Surface and borehole geophysical data collected in 2011 were used to identify potentially high-permeability or contaminated zones in the aquifer (preferential flowpaths) as well as low-permeability zones that may promote contamination through back diffusion. Some groundwater in parts of the glacial-sediment aquifer where the leachate plumes

  17. Microstructure and geochemical evidences for genesis of the Gol-Gohar iron deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahryar Mahmoudi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Gol-Gohar iron ore deposit located in 55 km South West of the city of Sirjan, in the Sanandaj-Sirjan structural zone. Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (SSZ is part of the Alpian-Hymalian orogenic belt and it is located in the west of the central Iran microplate. SSZ represented the metamorphic belt of the Zagros orogeny, that extends for 1500 km from Sirjan in the southeast to Sanandaj in the northwest of Iran (Mohajjel et al, 2003. The Gol-Gohar iron ore deposit is surrounded by a complex of igneous and metamorphic rocks mainly consisting of pelitic schists, basic schists, gneiss, amphibolite, marble, granodiorit, granite and mylonitic granite. In the early studies on the genesis of Gol-Gohr iron deposits, it was considered that sedimentary and tectonic processes were more effective in iron ore deposition. Later studies mainly confirmed a magmatic genesis for Gol-Gohar iron ore (Mucke and Golestaneh, 1982. Although some researchers argued that skarnisation process was the main cause of mineralisation (Hallaj and Jacobpor, 1991؛ Torabian, 2007, still some discussions on Gol-Gohr genesis are underway. Materials and methods – Gol-Gohar mine is divided into three blocks and several exploratory boreholes have been drilled down to 200 to 1400m depths in the third block. The representative samples were taken from exploration drill holes and outcrops around the mine. Microscopic observation (Zeiss Aksioscope in thin and polish sections show that the main ore mineral in the Gol-Gohar deposit is magnetite formed into two types with distinctive optical properties; the milky-gray magnetite (type1 named also “upper ore” and blue to brown magnetite (type2 named also “lower ore” (Mucke and Golestaneh, 1982. Mineralogy and microtectonic study were carried out on 100 thin and 30 polished sections using Zeiss research microscope. For geochemical analyses 20 samples were selected from 3 major exploration drill holes. After whole rock chemical

  18. Organic matter and soil structure in the Everglades Agricultural Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Alan L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hanlon, Edward A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This publication pertains to management of organic soils (Histosols) in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). These former wetland soils are a major resource for efficient agricultural production and are important globally for their high organic matter content. Recognition of global warming has led to considerable interest in soils as a repository for carbon. Soils rich in organic matter essentially sequester or retain carbon in the profile and can contribute directly to keeping that sequestered carbon from entering the atmosphere. Identification and utilization of management practices that minimize the loss of carbon from organic soils to the atmosphere can minimize effects on global warming and increase the longevity of subsiding Histosols for agricultural use. Understanding and predicting how these muck soils will respond to current and changing land uses will help to manage soil carbon. The objectives of this document are to: a. Discuss organic soil oxidation relative to storing or releasing carbon and nitrogen b. Evaluate effects of cultivation (compare structure for sugarcane vs. uncultivated soil) Based upon the findings from the land-use comparison (sugarcane or uncultivated), organic carbon was higher with cultivation in the lower depths. There is considerable potential for minimum tillage and residue management to further enhance carbon sequestration in the sugarcane system. Carbon sequestration is improved and soil subsidence is slowed with sugarcane production, and both of these are positive outcomes. Taking action to increase or maintain carbon sequestration appears to be appropriate but may introduce some risk to farming operations. Additional management methods are needed to reduce this risk. For both the longevity of these organic soils and from a global perspective, slowing subsidence through BMP implementation makes sense. Since these BMPs also have considerable societal benefit, it remains to be seen if society will help to offset a part or all

  19. 7. heat pump forum. Lectures; 7. Forum Waermepumpe. Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Within the 7th heat pump forum of the German Federal Association for heat pumps e.V. (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) between 22nd and 23rd March, 2009, at the Ellington Hotel in Berlin, the following lectures were held: (1) Potentials of the near-surface geothermics in Germany (H. Gassner); (2) Significance of renewable energy sources after the Bundestag election (D. Schuetz); (3) European draft laws in survey: EE regulation, EPBD, EuP (M. Ferber); (4) My personal experiences with heat pumps (G. Nuesslein); (5) European energy policy with relevance to the German heating market (A. Luecke); (6) Do we economize sustainable? - Reactions of companies on the challenge of a sustainable development (C. Berg); (7) Utilize the crisis now - the economic chances of a sustainable energy supply (C. Kemfert); (8) EE regulation: Status quo. Report of the National Renewable Eneregy Action Plan (NREAP) (K. Freier); (9) A legal evaluation of the EE regulation for the energy market (T. Mueller); (10) MAP funding guidelines (U. Sattler); (11) Utilization of renewable energies for heat generation - Experiences of the housing industry (I. Vogler); (12) Combination o the central near-heat supply and decentral drinking water heating in multi-storey new buildings (M.-J. Mucke); (13) Eddicient contracting for heat pumps (A. Kaemmerer); (14) Eco-Design - EU-guidelines and their effects on the heat pump (M. Roffe-Vidal); (15) The quality seal for heat pumps in the Swiss promotion policy (R. Phillips); (16) Enhancement of the significance of the EHPA quality seal in Europe (K. Ochsner); (17) Chances and benefit of export initiatives for the heat pump industry (C. Wittig); (18) The heat pump market in Ireland (P. Murphy); (19) Quantum heat pumps in double capacitors (M. Enzensperger); (20) First CO{sub 2}-free football stadium worldwide thanks to heat pumps (A. Poehlmann); (21) The heat pump in turnkey solid-construction house (C. Schmidt); (22) Instruments of quality requirement and

  20. Horonobe underground research laboratory project investigation report for the 2005 fiscal year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hiroya; Niizato, Tadafumi; Yamaguchi, Takehiro

    2006-11-01

    The investigations in 2005 fiscal year (2005/2006) were focused on the Hokushin area, which was selected as the area for laboratory construction. The main investigation region extends over approximately 3 km x 3 km. Geophysical, geological and surface hydrogeological investigations are carried out to acquire the geoscientific data needed to develop techniques for investigating the geological environment. And the borehole investigation at HDB-11 was finished in 2005. About development of techniques for long-term monitoring of the geological environment, long-term monitoring systems were operative in boreholes drilled in a previous investigation, and were also installed in the remaining boreholes (HDB-9, 10; drilled in 2004). A remotely operated monitoring system (ACROSS) was also installed and tested. About study on long-term stability of the geological environment, for tracing tectonic changes at Horonobe, geological survey and ground penetrating radar were carried out. Observations using seismograph, global positioning system (GPS) and electromagnetic exploration system installed until 2006 were continuing. About improving the reliability of disposal technology, laboratory tests of low alkaline concrete, shotcrete test at full-size simulated tunnel were carried out. Applicability confirmation of EBS designing methods was carried out with geological environmental data of Phase 1. About sophistication of safety assessment methodologies, Sorption test using drill core was carried out. Solute transport analysis was also carried out. In parallel with these investigations, Phase 2 investigation program were planned. About surface facility, Research and Administration Facility and Test Facility were constructed and started to use since February 2006. Public information house was begun to construct. About underground facility, temporary surplus soil (muck) yard was constructed. Surplus soil yard and drainage line were designed. These caused by toxic substance founded in

  1. Dusts, scale, slags, sludges... Not wastes, but sources of profits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koros, Peter J.

    2003-12-01

    Historically, the steel industry has focused on the need for and the many benefits of recycling steel that is discarded either in its own or in its customers’ manufacturing processes, as well as in recovery and reuse of steel scrap that arises after the product has served its intended purpose. In fact, modern steelmaking relies on the use of recycled iron units for at least half of its production. The other side of the story is the fate of the non-steel by-products (e.g., oxide dusts, sludges, scales, slags, spent refractories and the contained “low grade” energy units that are generated as natural adjuncts to iron and steelmaking processes). These valuable by-products often are classified as “wastes” and are discarded to landfills, at significant cost, although in reality they offer significant potential for cost savings or profit if reintroduced into the industrial arena via well planned programs. Examples of such instances will be presented, including energy credit issues, in the hope of pointing the way for future expansion of benefits from these opportunities. Preparing for a challenge and honor such as the Howe Memorial Lecture, one has to stand in awe of the accomplishments of the predecessor we honor in this forum. He worked in the early days of our industry without the benefits of the many technological improvements he and his successors brought to play as the years went by. John Stubbles, in his Howe Memorial Lecture in 1997,[1] presented a masterful and entertaining biography of Howe and his very active and prolific life. Perhaps the most telling quotation he attributed to Howe is very pertinent to the topic we will address presently: “Metallurgy lives by profit, not logic,” to which I would like to add a comment that bears on the topic of this lecture from the 1991 Howe lecturer, my friend and mentor Bill Dennis, “Where there is muck, there is money.” There are numerous examples of “one hand washes the other” in this business; that

  2. Geochemistry of Standard Mine Waters, Gunnison County, Colorado, July 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Manning, Andrew H.; Graves, Jeffrey T.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Todorov, Todor I.; Lamothe, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    suggesting that water-rock interaction between Levels 3 and 1 can account for the elevated concentration of metals and other constituents in Level 1 portal effluent. Ore minerals (sphalerite, argentiferous galena, and chalcopyrite) are the likely sources of zinc, cadmium, lead, and copper and are present within the mine in unmined portions of the vein system, within plugged ore chutes, and in muck piles.

  3. A greenhouse study on arsenic remediation potential of Vetiver grass (Vetiveria Zizanioides) as a function of soil physico-chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe, M. A.; Datta, R.; Sarkar, D.; Sharma, S.

    2006-05-01

    Arsenic is one of the most harmful and toxic metals, being a Group A human carcinogen. Mining activities as well as the use of arsenic-containing pesticides have resulted in the contamination of a wide variety of sites including mine tailings, cattle dip sites, wood treatment sites, pesticide treatment areas, golf courses, etc. Phytoremediation has emerged as a novel and promising technology, which uses plants to clean up contaminated soil and water taking advantage of plant's natural abilities to extract and accumulate various contaminants. This method has distinct advantages, since it maintains the biological properties and physical structure of the soil, is environment friendly, and above all, inexpensive. However, effective remediation of contaminated residential soils using a specific plant species is an immensely complex task whose success depends on a multitude of factors including the ability of the target plant to uptake, translocate, detoxify, and accumulate arsenic in its system. One of the major challenges in phytoremediation lies in identifying a fast- growing, high biomass plant that can accumulate the contaminant in its harvestable parts. vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) is a fast-growing perennial grass with strong ecological adaptability and large biomass. While this plant is not a hyperaccumulator of arsenic, it has been reported to be able to tolerate and accumulate considerable amounts of arsenic. Being a high biomass, fast-growing plant, vetiver has the potential to be used for arsenic remediation. The present study investigates the potential of vetiver grass to tolerate and accumulate arsenic in soils with varying physico-chemical properties. A greenhouse study is in progress to study the uptake, tolerance and stress response of vetiver grass to inorganic arsenical pesticide. A column study was set up using 5 soils (Eufaula, Millhopper, Orelia, Orla, and Pahokee Muck) contaminated with sodium arsenite at 4 different concentrations of

  4. A Major Facilitator Superfamily protein encoded by TcMucK gene is not required for cuticle pigmentation, growth and development in Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Seulgi; Noh, Mi Young; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Kramer, Karl J; Arakane, Yasuyuki

    2014-06-01

    Insect cuticle pigmentation and sclerotization (tanning) are vital physiological processes for insect growth, development and survival. We have previously identified several colorless precursor molecules as well as enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and processing to yield the mature intensely colored body cuticle pigments. A recent study indicated that the Bombyx mori (silkmoth) gene, BmMucK, which encodes a protein orthologous to a Culex pipiens quiquefasciatus (Southern house mosquito) cis,cis, muconate transporter, is a member of the "Major Facilitator Superfamily" (MFS) of transporter proteins and is associated with the appearance of pigmented body segments of naturally occurring body color mutants of B. mori. While RNA interference of the BmMucK gene failed to result in any observable phenotype, RNAi using a dsRNA for an orthologous gene from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, was reported to result in molting defects and darkening of the cuticle and some body parts, leading to the suggestion that orthologs of MucK genes may differ in their functions among insects. To verify the role and essentiality of the ortholog of this gene in development and body pigmentation function in T. castaneum we obtained cDNAs for the orthologous gene (TcMucK) from RNA isolated from the GA-1 wild-type strain of T. castaneum. The sequence of a 1524 nucleotides-long cDNA for TcMucK which encodes the putatively full-length protein, was assembled from two overlapping RT-PCR fragments and the expression profile of this gene during development was analyzed by real-time PCR. This cDNA encodes a 55.8 kDa protein consisting of 507 amino acid residues and includes 11 putative transmembrane segments. Transcripts of TcMucK were detected throughout all of the developmental stages analyzed. The function of this gene was explored by injection of two different double-stranded RNAs targeting different regions of the TcMucK gene (dsTcMucKs) into young larvae to down

  5. Petrography, Geochemistry and Proposed Genesis of Ordovician Oolitic Iron Formation Members of the Lashkarak Formation, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoore Maghsoudloo Mahalli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Oolitic iron formations are sedimentary rocks with >5 vol.% oolites and >15 wt.% iron, corresponding to 21.4 wt.% Fe2O3 (Young, 1989; Petranek and Van Houten, 1997; Mucke and Farshad, 2005. In Iran, new iron oolite-bearing members have been identified in the Lashkarak Formation (lower-middle Ordovician in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh sections, eastern Alborz (Ghobadi Pour et al., 2011. At present, the mineralogy and geochemistry of these members are not known. Consequently, research reported here was conducted to reveal the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Ordovician oolitic iron formationmembers and to discuss their genesis and economic importance. Materials and Analyses Field geology and sampling was carried out to collect 25 samples from the ooliticiron formation members in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh section in eastern Alborz. Samples were prepared for polished-thin sections (n=10, XRD analysis (n=15. Whole-rock chemical analysis (n=15 by XRF for major elements and by ICP-ES for trace elements was performed by laboratories at the SarCheshmeh copper mine complex, Kerman, Iran. One sample was analyzed by SEM at the Wales Museum, UK. Results Microscopic studies show that the oolitic iron formation members are hosted by carbonate argillite rocks. They are mainly composed of oolites rather than pisoliths (small bodies somewhat larger and more irregular than oolites, whereas oolites have mainly ellipsoidal forms and locally spherical shapes. Most (6 oolites show banding with a central core. Simple oolites without a core are scarce. Mineralogically, oolites are mainly chamositic and hematitic in composition; goethite, pyrite and glauconite occur in traces and siderite is absent. Quartz, calcite and zircon are accessory minerals which are present in the groundmass. Geochemically, TFeO % of the oolitic iron formation horizons ranges from 8 to 48 % with an average of 21%. The CaO content ranges from 2 to 37% and

  6. Results from the geological surveys carried out in the Bure laboratory's shafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebours, Herve; Righini, Celine

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. After the government's authorization to build and operate an underground laboratory, Andra started the investigation works in November 99 on the Meuse/Haute-Marne URL site. The Meuse/Haute-Marne URL is located at the border of the Champagne-Ardenne and Lorraine regions, on the township of Bure in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rich rock. On the URL site, the layer is about 135 m-thick and lies at a depth of 417 m to 552 m. The laboratory consists of two levels of experimental drifts at depths of 445 m and 490 m, respectively, with two vertical shafts crossing the 505 m-thick sedimentary cover of Kimeridgian (about 100 meters of marls and limestones), Oxfordian (about 300 meters of limestones) and Callovo-Oxfordian formations. The construction of the underground installations started in August 2000 with the sinking of the main shaft and was completed on the 27 April 2006 when it linked up with the southern drift of the laboratory. The two access shafts are sunk with a drill and blast method with steps of 2.4 to 3.1 m. A temporary support with grouted bolts and wire mesh is set immediately after the blasting and removal of the muck. The definitive concrete lining is installed about 12 to 20 m behind the face. The excavated diameter of the main shaft where the geological surveys and experiments have been undertaken is of 6 m (5 m after lining). The second shaft (auxiliary shaft for the ventilation of the URL) is sunk in a smaller diameter (5 m). The aims of the geological surveys carried out during the shaft sinking are to describe the vertical and lateral (between the two shafts) variations of the lithology, to confirm the absence of fault and the geometry of the argillaceous rocks formation. These surveys allow to characterize the natural or inducted fracturing by a sedimentary and structural follow-up of the excavation face. This follow-up was carried out every 2.4 to 3.0 meters in the shafts. During the shaft

  7. A dynamical systems approach to characterizing the contribution of neurogenesis to neural coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merav Stern

    2014-03-01

    that agreed with experimental measurements (Cameron and McKay, 2001; Deng et al., 2010; Tashiro et al., 2007, with no adjustable parameters. It is also important to note that the optimal regime for encoding input signals is often poised near an instability associated with chaotic dynamics (Aljadeff et al., 2013; Sompolinsky et al., 1988. This observation could explain the frequent occurrence of seizures at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (Palop and Mucke, 2010a; Palop and Mucke, 2010b. To that extent, we analytically derive conditions for observing chaotic dynamics in networks with of an arbitrary number of neuron types. The analytical results accurately mirrored simulation in predicting the composition of the network (fraction of young neurons and the difference in their excitability and number of synapses when the networks undergoes transformation from stable to chaotic dynamics (Figure 2. Overall, these results demonstrate how a small fraction of neurons can increase the representational capacity of the neural circuit as a whole in a distributed way and provide a quantitative framework for characterizing more heterogeneous networks composed of multiple types of neurons. Figure 1. The representational capacity of a heterogeneous network. Results are shown as a function of the fraction of young neurons (y-axis and the ratio of their hyper-excitability relatively to mature neurons (x-axis. The synaptic weights between neurons are initially set to random values drawn from a Gaussian distribution. In the case of young neurons we used a distribution with larger variance compared to the value used for mature neurons. The networks were tasked with encoding a desired input pattern; the connection weights were adjusted using the algorithm from (Sussillo and Abbott, 2009. The average representation error divided by the average activity of the network is the “learning capacity index” (color. Black lines are contour plots of equal magnitude. The learning capacity

  8. Ten years of experience in technology development... What use for the Cigeo project?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosgiraud, Jean-Michel; Delort, Daniel [Andra, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2015-07-01

    the muck dumps. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overall view of the Cigeo Project development plan (structure, administrative calendar, work schedule, organizational set-up prevailing for the engineering phase) and then to explicit the link between this design phase and the Andra experience gained during the past 10 years of technological tests. The presentation is also providing a prospective analysis to show how on-going engineering activities and anterior practice will be adapted and merged to found the credibility of Cigeo. These technological verifications on key elements of concepts are practical tools used to gain the confidence of stakeholders and the public in particular. Their results will facilitate the evaluators' assessment during the Cigeo license application instruction process. Finally, the presentation also elaborates how on-going activities at the URL will also help in the knowledge and monitoring basis needed to start the construction and operation of the disposal facility.

  9. Report Tunneling Cost Reduction Study prepared for Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    , typical of the Chicago area. The rock is generally competent with widely spaced jointing, and slowdown of the operation for the installation of rock support is expected to be minimal. The tunneling system will have to be equipped with the necessary equipment for an efficient response to poor rock conditions however. Because the ground conditions are expected to be very favorable, a state-of-the-art TBM should have no difficulty in excavating at a high penetration rate of 10 meters per hour or more in rock of the average of the range of strengths stated to exist. Disc cutter changes will be few as the rock has very low abrasivity. However, experience has shown that overall tunneling rates are a relatively low percentage of the machine's penetration rate capability. Therefore the main focus of improvement is guaranteeing that the support systems, including mucking and advance of the utilities do not impede the operation. Improved mechanization of the support systems, along with automation where practicable to reduce manpower, is seen as the best means of raising the overall speed of the operation, and reducing its cost. The first phase of the study is mainly involved with establishing the baseline for current performance, and in identifying areas of improvement. It contains information on existing machine design concepts and provides data on many aspects of the mechanical tunneling process, including costs and labor requirements. While it contains suggestions for technical improvements of the various system, the time limitations of this phase have not permitted any detailed concept development. This should be a major part of the next phase

  10. Ten years of experience in technology development... What use for the Cigeo project?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosgiraud, Jean-Michel; Delort, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the muck dumps. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overall view of the Cigeo Project development plan (structure, administrative calendar, work schedule, organizational set-up prevailing for the engineering phase) and then to explicit the link between this design phase and the Andra experience gained during the past 10 years of technological tests. The presentation is also providing a prospective analysis to show how on-going engineering activities and anterior practice will be adapted and merged to found the credibility of Cigeo. These technological verifications on key elements of concepts are practical tools used to gain the confidence of stakeholders and the public in particular. Their results will facilitate the evaluators' assessment during the Cigeo license application instruction process. Finally, the presentation also elaborates how on-going activities at the URL will also help in the knowledge and monitoring basis needed to start the construction and operation of the disposal facility.

  11. Ground-water flow in the surficial aquifer system and potential movement of contaminants from selected waste-disposal sites at Naval Station Mayport, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer system at Naval Station Mayport near Jacksonville, Florida, was simulated with a two-layer finite-difference model as part of an investigation conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. The model was calibrated to 229 water-level measurements from 181 wells during three synoptic surveys (July 17, 1995; July 31, 1996; and October 24, 1996). A quantifiable understanding of ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer was needed to evaluate remedial-action alternatives under consideration by the Naval Station Mayport to control the possible movement of contaminants from sites on the station. Multi-well aquifer tests, single-well tests, and slug tests were conducted to estimate the hydraulic properties of the surficial aquifer system, which was divided into three geohydrologic units?an S-zone and an I-zone separated by a marsh-muck confining unit. The recharge rate was estimated to range from 4 to 15 inches per year (95 percent confidence limits), based on a chloride-ratio method. Most of the simulations following model calibration were based on a recharge rate of 8 inches per year to unirrigated pervious areas. The advective displacement of saline pore water during the last 200 years was simulated using a particle-tracking routine, MODPATH, applied to calibrated steady-state and transient models of the Mayport peninsula. The surficial aquifer system at Naval Station Mayport has been modified greatly by natural and anthropogenic forces so that the freshwater flow system is expanding and saltwater is being flushed from the system. A new MODFLOW package (VAR1) was written to simulate the temporal variation of hydraulic properties caused by construction activities at Naval Station Mayport. The transiently simulated saltwater distribution after 200 years of displacement described the chloride distribution in the I-zone (determined from measurements made during 1993 and 1996) better than the steady-state simulation. The

  12. Toward an understanding of "Legacy P" - phosphorus sorption mechanisms in stream sediments as influenced by organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audette, Yuki; O'Halloran, Ivan P.; Nowell, Peter M.; Congreves, Katelyn; Voroney, R. Paul

    2017-04-01

    Water chemistry and phosphorus (P) forms were analyzed to determine the nature of legacy P in sediments of the West Holland River and the adjacent drainage canals of the Holland Marsh drainage system, located in southern Ontario, Canada. The river and canals route water from the intensively cropped muck polders of the Holland Marsh and drain Lake Simcoe. Sediment samples were characterized for mineralogy using X-ray diffraction techniques (XRD); total P (TP); and Ca, Fe, Mn, and Mg contents, as well as cation exchange capacity and organic matter (OM) content. Forms of sediment P in five depth sections (ranging from 0-15 cm depth) were characterized and quantified by sequential P fractionation chemistry. At all study sites, mobile P forms including organic P forms were found to be higher in surface sediments than in deeper sediments. The major P form within the sediments of the two canal sites, where the concentration of TP in the surface water was within the Ontario Provincial Water Quality Objectives (PWQO) of 0.03 mg P L-1, was Ca-bound P, indicating a low risk of soluble reactive P (SRP) release. A trace of apatite (a stable Ca-P mineral) was also detected in these sediments. Conversely, sediments collected from the West Holland River at sites located within the Holland Marsh exhibited a high risk of SRP release, and redox-sensitive P was the dominant P form in the sediment despite the surface water exhibiting higher concentration of Ca and alkaline pH. In addition, the concentrations of TP as measured in surface water samples taken from the site were 8 times greater than PWQO. In the sediments where the risk of SRP release was high, OM contents were also relatively high and traces of brushite (a labile Ca-P mineral) were detected. The formation of OM and cation complexes, such as OM-Fe complexes, may play an important role in regulating the fate of sediment-P forms through the adsorption of SRP. These OM-Fe complexes may inhibit the formation of more stable Ca

  13. Groundwater flux and nutrient loading in the northeast section of Bear Lake, Muskegon County, Michigan, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totten, Alexander R.; Maurer, Jessica A.; Duris, Joseph W.

    2017-11-30

    Bear Lake in North Muskegon, Michigan, is listed as part of the Muskegon Lake area of concern as designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This area of concern was designated as a result of eutrophication and beneficial use impairments. On the northeast end of Bear Lake, two man-made retention ponds (Willbrandt Pond East and Willbrandt Pond West), formerly used for celery farming, may contribute nutrients to Bear Lake. Willbrandt Ponds (East and West) were previously muck fields that were actively used for celery farming from the early 1900s until 2002. The restoration and reconnection of the Willbrandt Ponds into Bear Lake prompted concerns of groundwater nutrient loading into Bear Lake. Studies done by the State of Michigan and Grand Valley State University revised initial internal phosphorus load estimates and indicated an imbalance in the phosphorus budget in Bear Lake. From June through November 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) did an investigative study to quantify the load of nutrients from shallow groundwater around the Willbrandt Ponds in an effort to update the phosphorus budget to Bear Lake. Seven sampling locations were established, including five shallow groundwater wells and two surface-water sites, in the Willbrandt pond study area and Bear Lake. A total of 12 nutrient samples and discrete water-level measurements were collected from each site from June through November 2015. Continuous water-level data were recorded for both surface-water monitoring locations for the entire sampling period.Water-level data indicated that Willbrandt Pond West had the highest average water-level elevation of all sites monitored, which indicated the general direction of flux is from Willbrandt Pond West to Bear Lake. Nutrient and chloride loading from Willbrandt Pond West to Bear Lake was calculated using two distinct methods: Dupuit and direct seepage methods. Shallow groundwater loading calculations were determined by using groundwater levels to

  14. Geochemistry of the Nsuta Mn deposit in Ghana: Implications for the Paleoproterozoic atmosphere and ocean chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, K. T.; Ito, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kashiwabara, T.; Takaya, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Nozaki, T.; Kiyokawa, S.; Tetteh, G. M.; Nyame, F. K.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans has influenced the evolution of ocean chemistry and diversification of early life. A number of large manganese (Mn) deposits are distributed in the Paleoproterozoic sedimentary successions that were formed during the great oxidation event (GOE) around 2.4-2.2 Ga (Meynard, 2010). Due to the high redox potential of Mn, occurrences of Mn deposits have been regarded as important evidence for a highly oxidized environment during the Paleoproterozoic (Kirschvink et al., 2000). Furthermore, because Mn oxides strongly adsorb various elements, including bioessential elements such as Mo, formation of large Mn deposits may have affected the seawater chemical composition and ecology during the Paleoproterozoic. However, the genesis of each Mn deposit is poorly constrained, and the relationships among the formation of Mn deposits, the evolution of atmospheric and ocean chemistry, and the diversification of early life are still ambiguous. In this study, we report the Re-Os isotope compositions, rare earth element (REE) compositions, and abundance of manganophile elements in the Mn carbonate ore and host sedimentary rock samples collected from the Nsuta Mn deposit of the Birimian Supergroup, Ghana. The Nsuta deposit is one of the largest Paleoproterozoic Mn deposits, although its genesis remains controversial (Melcher et al., 1995; Mucke et al., 1999). The composite Re-Os isochron age (2149 × 130 Ma) of the Mn carbonate and sedimentary rock samples was consistent with the depositional age of the sedimentary rocks (~2.2 Ga) presumed from the U-Pb zircon age of volcanic rocks (Hirdes and Davis, 1998), suggesting that the timing of Mn ore deposition was almost equivalent to the host rock sedimentation. The PAAS-normalized REE pattern showed a positive Eu anomaly in all samples and a positive Ce anomaly only in the Mn carbonate ore. These REE patterns indicate the possible contribution of Eu-enriched fluids derived from hydrothermal activity

  15. Hydrology and Ecology of Freshwater Wetlands in Central Florida - A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.

    2010-01-01

    how wetlands are affected by human activities. Freshwater wetlands are unique and complex ecosystems defined by characteristic properties. Wetlands usually have standing water during at least part of the year, although water depths can vary from a few inches to as much as several feet from one wetland to another. The hydrologic behavior of wetlands is influenced by drainage basin characteristics, as well as by natural variations in climate. Wetlands in central Florida (especially forested wetlands) often have acidic waters that are darkly stained from organic substances released by decomposing leaves and other plant material. Wetlands are characterized by biogeochemical cycles in which vital elements such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and others are transformed as they move between wetland soils and sediments, the open water, and the atmosphere. Wetlands are populated with plants that can thrive under conditions of saturated soils and low dissolved-oxygen concentrations. The bottoms of many wetlands, especially marshes, are covered with decayed plant material that can accumulate over time to form brown peat or black muck soils. Wetlands are inhabited by animals that need standing water to complete some or all of their life cycles, and they also provide periodic food, water, and shelter for many other animals that spend most of their lives on dry land. The complex and interrelated components of wetlands directly affect one another and there are numerous feedback mechanisms.

  16. Solos da bacia de Taubaté (Vale do Paraíba: levantamento de reconhecimento. Séries monotípicas, suas propriedades genético-morfológicas, físicas e químicas Soils of Taubaté basin (Paraíba Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Verdade

    1961-01-01

    three soil types. As representative of an intergrarle (latosol and red-yellow podzolic soil is the Tumirim soil type. It represents an unique monotype series of the soil association D, but it is expected that other soil types will be defined in the detailed soil survey. Its profile is less than 1 meter deep, and clayey throughout. The Tumirim soil type is derived from Terciary mottled clays. The series associations E includes soils with poor drainage. Three soil types were determined representing Latosol imperfectly drained. Low Humic Glei and Humic Glei. The Terraces are represented by three soil types, forming the series association F. The texture goes from medium to sandy. The clay alluvial soils are in the series association (j, representing five soil types. According the topography position, some color layers and the kind of texture below 60 cm deep they have phases. The series associations H, I and J were plotted in a map but after mapping was done, the criterion for alluvial non-clay soils was changed and now the scries associations represent seven soil types. Bog and half bog are grouped in the soil association M. representing muck and peat-muck soils. Four soil types were identified. In Pre-cambrian area two series associations, N and O, were studied without soil type definitions. The former includes latosols with clay texture and the latter belongs to red-yellow podzolic soils with the same texture as the N. South of the town São José dos Campos a wide sandy soil area is represented by the serie association P, and it developed from sand deposits of Terciary, The soil type Putins may be considered as representative of the area. The serie association Q, is a group of mono-type-series belonging to the serie associations A and N in a intricate pattern only showed in detailed maps. When the alluvial soils are in a topographic position above the flood and the water table is almost permanently below one meter deep the soil types are grouped in the associations R

  17. Heavy-metal contamination of soils in Saxony/Germany by foundry fumes and low-cost rapid analyses of contaminated soils by XRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucke, D.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy-metal contamination of soils in Saxony/Germany by foundry fumes and low-cost rapid analysis of contaminated soils by XRF Dieter Mucke, Rolf Kumann, Sebastian Baldauf GEOMONTAN Gesellschaft für Geologie und Bergbau mbH&Co.KG, Muldentalstrasse 56, 09603 Rothenfurth, Saxony/Germany For hundreds of years in the Ore Mountains between Bohemia and Saxony silver and other ores are produced and smelted. Sulphide- and sulpharsenide-ores needed to be roasted first. In doing so the sulphide sulphur was oxidised under formation of sulphur dioxide SO2 and arsenide conversed into elemental arsenic and arsenide trioxide As2O3 respectively. Also the metals lead, cadmium and zinc are components of hut smokes, in the field of nickel foundries also nickel. The contents of soils basically reflect the geogenic conditions, which are caused by decomposition- and relocation-effects of the mineralisations, in the area of foundries also with influences by with the hut smokes anthropogenic mobilised elements. The Saxonian Agency for Environment and Geology drafted in 1992 a Soil Investigation Program with the aim of investigation of the contamination of Saxonian soils with arsenic and toxic heavy metals. In order of this Agency GEOMONTAN investigated 1164 measuring points in the grid 4 * 4 km.soil profiles and extracted soil samples for analysis. In the result of the laboratory examinations the Agency edited the "Soil atlas of the Free State of Saxony". 27 elements, pH and PAK are shown in detailed maps and allow in whole Saxony the first assessment of the contamination of soils with arsenic and toxic heavy metals. Each of the investigated soil profiles represent an area of 16 km2. Already by the different use of the districts (agricultural, industrial, urban) restricts representative values. GEOMONTAN in the meantime used at the exploration of a copper deposit in Brandenburg/Germany with approx. 50,000 single tests at drill cores a very fast low-cost method: the X Ray fluorescence

  18. Geohydrology of the stratified-drift aquifer system in the lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek trough, Tompkins County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd S.; Karig, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tompkins County Planning Department began a series of studies of the stratified-drift aquifers in Tompkins County to provide geohydrologic data for planners to develop a strategy to manage and protect their water resources. This aquifer study in lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek trough is the second in a series of aquifer studies in Tompkins County. The study area is within the northern area of the Appalachian Plateau and extends about 9 miles from the boundary between Tompkins County and Tioga County in the south to just south of the City of Ithaca in the north. In lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek trough, confined sand and gravel aquifers comprise the major water-bearing units while less extensive unconfined units form minor aquifers. About 600 people who live in lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek trough rely on groundwater from the stratified-drift aquifer system. In addition, water is used by non-permanent residents such as staff at commercial facilities. The estimated total groundwater withdrawn for domestic use is about 45,000 gallons per day (gal/d) or 0.07 cubic foot per second (ft3/s) based on an average water use of 75 gal/d per person for self-supplied water systems in New York. Scouring of bedrock in the preglacial lower Sixmile Creek and Willseyville Creek valleys by glaciers and subglacial meltwaters truncated hillside spurs, formed U-shaped, transverse valley profiles, smoothed valley walls, and deepened the valleys by as much as 300 feet (ft), forming a continuous trough. The unconsolidated deposits in the study area consist mostly of glacial drift, both unstratified drift (till) and stratified drift (laminated lake, deltaic, and glaciofluvial sediments), as well as some post-glacial stratified sediments (lake-bottom sediments that were deposited in reservoirs, peat and muck that were deposited in wetlands, and alluvium deposited by streams). Multiple advances and

  19. KBS-3H - Excavation of two horizontal drifts at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during year 2004-2005. Work description, summary of results and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckblom, Goeran; Lindgren, Erik

    2005-10-01

    drifts. The few measurements by the tape method show full compliance. Measurements by a dummy supercontainer in the 95 m drift show that around 90% of the 356 measurements were within the diameter limit 1,840-1,850 mm. Maximum value measured was 1,855 mm and minimum value 1,835 mm. It seems that there is systematic difference between measurements at the rear and at the front of the dummy, so the conclusions concerning these diameter measurements are preliminary. Inclination: The measurements show that the vertical inclination for the 95 m drift is within the limit 2 ±1 deg. To simplify mucking by flushing, the inclination should be minimum 2 deg. Deviation of the pilot hole: For this project it was decided that the end of the pilot hole for the 95 m drift should be within 22 cm of the theoretical line. The actual measurements show -61 cm deviation in the vertical direction and 11 cm deviation in the horizontal right direction due to the non-functional active steering. The stated requirement was not met, but the pilot hole was straight enough for the dummy of the super-container to be pushed to the end of the drift. The requirement should be restated as deviations horizontally would be worse than deviations vertically. Steps: A few steps in the drift surface have been recognized in the short 15 m drift and in general the data show steps < 5 mm in accordance with the requirement. However the measurement methods are not good enough to corroborate compliance for all drift surface area. Roughness: Roughness of the drift surface should be <5 mm, but the measurement methods are not good enough to corroborate compliance for all drift surface area. In general the surface is smooth. The measurement using profiler shows that the requirements were met for the data collected. The measurements based on evaluation of the gauges at the dummy show very few data points outside the range 5 mm. Straightness: Waviness or deviation from the centre line should be <2.5 mm over a distance of 6

  20. KBS-3H - Excavation of two horizontal drifts at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during year 2004-2005. Work description, summary of results and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckblom, Goeran [Conrox AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindgren, Erik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-10-15

    drifts. The few measurements by the tape method show full compliance. Measurements by a dummy supercontainer in the 95 m drift show that around 90% of the 356 measurements were within the diameter limit 1,840-1,850 mm. Maximum value measured was 1,855 mm and minimum value 1,835 mm. It seems that there is systematic difference between measurements at the rear and at the front of the dummy, so the conclusions concerning these diameter measurements are preliminary. Inclination: The measurements show that the vertical inclination for the 95 m drift is within the limit 2 {+-}1 deg. To simplify mucking by flushing, the inclination should be minimum 2 deg. Deviation of the pilot hole: For this project it was decided that the end of the pilot hole for the 95 m drift should be within 22 cm of the theoretical line. The actual measurements show -61 cm deviation in the vertical direction and 11 cm deviation in the horizontal right direction due to the non-functional active steering. The stated requirement was not met, but the pilot hole was straight enough for the dummy of the super-container to be pushed to the end of the drift. The requirement should be restated as deviations horizontally would be worse than deviations vertically. Steps: A few steps in the drift surface have been recognized in the short 15 m drift and in general the data show steps < 5 mm in accordance with the requirement. However the measurement methods are not good enough to corroborate compliance for all drift surface area. Roughness: Roughness of the drift surface should be <5 mm, but the measurement methods are not good enough to corroborate compliance for all drift surface area. In general the surface is smooth. The measurement using profiler shows that the requirements were met for the data collected. The measurements based on evaluation of the gauges at the dummy show very few data points outside the range 5 mm. Straightness: Waviness or deviation from the centre line should be <2.5 mm over a distance of

  1. "europe Towards the Stars"

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Headquarters in Garching near Munich (Germany) in mid-November 1995. Here they will experience front-line science and partake in the daily life of one of Europe's foremost scientific establishments. Assisted by professional astronomers, they will prepare and carry out real astronomical observations with the 1.4-metre CAT (Coude Auxiliary Telescope) and the very advanced 3.5-metre NTT (New Technology Telescope) from ESO's remote control centre. They will also begin the treatment of the registered data and, if possible, arrive at tentative interpretations. The week will undoubtedly be very hectic, but it will of course also include events of a more social character which will further emphasize the pan-European nature of this unique visit. ESO will provide more details about this programme in early November 1995, including the planned media coverage. ADDRESSES OF THE NATIONAL COMMITTEES For further information about the programme "Europe Towards The Stars", please contact the National Committee in your country. Austria: Prof. H. Mucke, Astronomisches Buero, Hasenwartgasse 32, A-1138 Vienna, Tel. 0043-1-8893541 Belgium: Dr. C. Sterken, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Campus Ofenplein, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels, Tel. 0032-2-6293469, Fax 0032-9-3623976, E-mail csterken@is1.vub.ac.be Denmark: Mr. B. F. Joergensen, Tycho Brahe Planetariet, Gl. Kongevej 10, DK-1610 Copenhagen V, Tel. 0045-33-144888, Fax 0045-33-142888, E-mail tycho@inet.uni-c.dk Finland: Mr. M. Hotakainen, Tahtitieteellinen Yhdistys Ursa Ry, Laivanvarustajankatu 9C 54, FIN-00140 Helsinki, Tel. 00358-0-174048, Fax 00358-0-657728 France: Mr. B. Pellequer, Geospace d'Aniane, Boîte Postale 22, F-34150 Aniane, Tel. 0033-6-7034949, Fax 0033-6-7752864 Germany: Dr. K.-H. Lotze, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena, Germany, Tel. +49-3641-635904/636654, Fax +49-3641-636728 Greece: Dr. D. Simopoulos, Eugenides Foundation, Astronomy Department, 387 Sygrou Avenue, Palaio Faliro, GR-175 64 Athens, Tel