WorldWideScience

Sample records for mu-synchrotron radiation excited

  1. Suppression of radiation excitation in focusing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.; Ruth, R.D.

    1996-12-01

    Radiation damping and quantum excitation in an electron damping ring and a straight focusing channel are reviewed. They are found to be the two limiting cases in the study of a general bending and focusing combined system. In the intermediate regime where the radiation formation length is comparable to the betatron wavelength, quantum excitation can be exponentially suppressed by focusing field. This new regime may have interesting applications in the generation of ultra-low emittance beams

  2. Excitation of nuclear states by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, Albert

    2003-01-01

    We study the excitation of nuclear states by gamma ray beams of energy up to 200 keV produced as synchrotron radiation. We consider the possibility to populate an excited state |i> in two steps, from the ground state |g> to an intermediary state |n> which decays by gamma emission or internal conversion to a lower state |i>. The aim of this study is to establish that the probability P 2 of the two-step transition |g> → |n> → |i> should be greater than the probability P 1 of the direct transition |g> → |i>. The probabilities P 1 and P 2 correspond to a radiation pulse of duration equal to the half-time of the state |i>. We have written a computer program in C++ which computes the probability P 2 , the ratio P 2 /P 1 and the rate C 2 of the two-step transitions for any nuclei and different configurations of states. The program uses a database which contains information on the energy levels, half-lives, spins and parities of nuclear states and on the relative intensities of the nuclear transitions. If the half-lives or the relative intensities are not known the program uses the Weisskopf estimates for the transition half-lives. An interpolation program of internal conversion coefficients has also been used. We listed the values obtained for P 2 , P 2 /P 1 and C 2 in a number of cases in which P 2 is significant from the 2900 considered cases. The states |i> and |n> have the energies E i and E n , the corresponding half-lives being t i and t n . The spectral density of the synchrotron radiation has been considered to be 10 12 photons cm -2 s -1 eV -1 . We listed only the cases for which the relative intensities of the transitions from levels |n> and |i> to lower states are known. The calculations carried out in this study allowed us to identify nuclei for which P 2 has relatively great values. In the listed cases P 2 /P 1 >>1, so that the two-step excitation by synchrotron radiation is more efficient than the direct excitation |g> → |i>. For a sample having 10

  3. Radiative and Excited State Charmonium Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozef Dudek

    2007-07-30

    Renewed interest in the spectroscopy of charmonium has arisen from recent unexpected observations at $e^+e^-$ colliders. Here we report on a series of works from the previous two years examining the radiative physics of charmonium states as well as the mass spectrum of states of higher spin and internal excitation. Using new techniques applied to Domain-Wall and Clover quark actions on quenched isotropic and anisotropic lattices, radiative transitions and two-photon decays are considered for the first time. Comparisons are made with experimental results and with model approaches. Forthcoming application to the light-quark sector of relevance to experiments like Jefferson Lab's GlueX is discussed.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation of ultrarelativistic particles at scattering in excited medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyshevskij, V.S.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between relativistic particles and a gaseous or condensed medium with a high density of nondegenerate excited quantum states involves the coherent conversion of atomic or molecular excitations into electromagnetic radiation

  5. Synchrotron radiation excited silicon epitaxy using disilane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Housei; Utsumi, Yuichi

    1995-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) excited chemical reactions provide new crystal growth methods suitable for low-temperature Si epitaxy. The growth kinetics and film properties were investigated by atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) and photochemical vapor deposition (CVD) modes using Si 2 H 6 . SR-ALE, isolating the surface growth channel mediated by photon stimulated hydrogen desorption, achieves digital growth independent of gas exposure time, SR irradiation time, and substrate temperature. On the other hand in SR-CVD, photolysis of Si 2 H 6 is predominant. In the nonirradiated region, Eley-Rideal type reaction between the photofragments and the surface deposit Si adatoms in a layer-by-layer fashion. In the irradiated region, however, multi-layer photolysis and rebounding occurs within the condensed Si 2 H 6 layer. The pertinent elementary processes were identified by using the high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The SR-CVD can grow a uniform and epitaxial Si film down to 200degC. The surface morphology is controlled by the surfactant effect of hydrogen atoms. (author)

  6. Radiation from an excited vortex in the Abelian Higgs model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arodź, H.; Hadasz, L.

    1996-09-01

    An excited vortex in the Abelian Higgs model is investigated with the help of a polynomial approximation. The excitation consists of the longitudinal component of a vector field trapped by the vortex. The energy and profile of the excitation as well as its back reaction on the vortex are found in the case of small κ. It turns out that the width of the excited vortex oscillates in time. Moreover, the vector field has a radiative long range component. Also, an upper bound on the amplitude of the excitation is found.

  7. Radiation from an excited vortex in the Abelian Higgs model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arodz, H.; Hadasz, L.

    1996-01-01

    An excited vortex in the Abelian Higgs model is investigated with the help of a polynomial approximation. The excitation consists of the longitudinal component of a vector field trapped by the vortex. The energy and profile of the excitation as well as its back reaction on the vortex are found in the case of small κ. It turns out that the width of the excited vortex oscillates in time. Moreover, the vector field has a radiative long range component. Also, an upper bound on the amplitude of the excitation is found. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Non-linear excitation of gravitational radiation antennae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanism of non-linear excitation is proposed to explain observed excess noise in gravitational radiation antennae, driven by low frequency vibration. The mechanism is analogous to the excitation of a violin string by low frequency bowing. Numerical estimates for Weber bars suspended by cables are in good agreement with observations. (Auth.)

  9. Radiation damage in nonmetallic solids under dense electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Noriaki; Tanimura, Katsumi; Nakai, Yasuo

    1992-01-01

    Basic processes of radiation damage of insulators by dense electronic excitation are reviewed. First it is pointed out that electronic excitation of nonmetallic solids produces the self-trapped excitons and defect-related metastable states having relatively long lifetimes, and that the excitation of these metastable states, produces stable defects. The effects of irradiation with heavy ions, including track registration, are surveyed on the basis of the microscopic studies. It is pointed out also that the excitation of the metastable states plays a role in laser-induced damage at relatively low fluences, while the laser damage has been reported to be governed by heating of free electrons produced by multiphoton excitation. Difference in the contributions of the excitation of metastable defects to laser-induced damage of surfaces, or laser ablation, and laser-induced bulk damage is stressed. (orig.)

  10. Charges and Electromagnetic Radiation as Topological Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfried Faber

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a model with stable topological solitons in Minkowski space with only three degrees of freedom, the rotational angles of a spatial Dreibein. This model has four types of solitons differing in two topological quantum numbers which we identify with electric charge and spin. The vacuum has a two-dimensional degeneracy leading to two types of massless excitations, characterised by a topological quantum number which could have a physical equivalent in the photon number.

  11. Prospects for coherently driven nuclear radiation by Coulomb excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamyan, S.A.; Carroll, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Possible experiments are discussed in which the Coulomb excitation of nuclear isomers would be followed by sequential energy release. The possibility of the coherent Coulomb excitation of nuclei ensconced in a crystal by channeled relativistic heavy projectiles is considered. The phase shift between neighbor-nuclei excitations can be identical to the photon phase shift for emission in forward direction. Thus, the elementary string of atoms can radiate coherently with emission of characteristic nuclear γ rays and the intensity of the radiation could be increased due to the summation of amplitudes. The Moessbauer conditions should be important for this new type of collective radiation that could be promising in the context of the γ-lasing problem

  12. Excitation in the radiation chemistry of inorganic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, C.; Boyd, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    Gas phase radiation chemistry yield data and electron impact cross-section data are used to derive excitation mechanisms and to discuss the role of excited states in the radiation chemistry of O 2 , N 2 , N 2 O, CO, CO 2 , H 2 S, H 2 O and NH 3 . For each of these systems available cross-sections for ionization and neutral excitation are listed, together with relevant reaction rate data and a summary of the radiation chemistry studies at both high and low dose rates. In general, fairly complete mechanisms are derived and further tested by energy balance calculations. In order to present as complete a picture as possible, a summary of rates and products of ion-neutralization reactions is given at the end of the paper. (author)

  13. Selective reflection of resonance radiation from excited media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veklenko, B.A.; Gusarov, R.B.; Sherkunov, Yu.B.

    1998-01-01

    According to quantum electrodynamics, the cross section for resonant scattering of radiation on an aggregate of excited atoms can be written as a sum of positive definite terms. This type of structure is not consistent with the Fresnel formulas for the reflection coefficient of radiation from thermally excited media. The difference shows up on a macroscopic level and indicates that semiclassical radiation theory cannot be used. A study of the correlation between elastic scattering and stimulated emission processes clarifies the reason for the discrepancies. The resulting singularities require summing of Feynman diagrams which appear beginning in the sixth order of perturbation theory. A lower bound estimate for the reflection coefficient from a plane layer is given, including processes which violate the statistics of radiation. The contribution of stimulated emission processes caused by the initially scattered photon are examined specifically. An experiment is proposed which would settle the choice of theories

  14. Sound Radiation of Aerodynamically Excited Flat Plates into Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Osterziel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibrations and the sound radiation of flexible plate structures of different thickness mounted in a rigid plate are experimentally investigated. Therefore, flow properties and turbulent boundary layer parameters are determined through measurements with a hot-wire anemometer in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel. Furthermore, the excitation of the vibrating plate is examined by laser scanning vibrometry. To describe the sound radiation and the sound transmission of the flexible aluminium plates into cavities, a cuboid-shaped room with adjustable volume and 34 flush-mounted microphones is installed at the non flow-excited side of the aluminium plates. Results showed that the sound field inside the cavity is on the one hand dependent on the flow parameters and the plate thickness and on the other hand on the cavity volume which indirectly influences the level and the distribution of the sound pressure behind the flexible plate through different excited modes.

  15. Electronic-excitation induced radiation damage in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigouroux, J P

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the microscopic nature of radiation induced defects in insulators, we have studied localization of negative and positive charges in amorphous and monocrystalline SiO2. The behaviour of these charges is linked to creation of point defects by electronic excitation. The role of intense electric fields under irradiation is pointed out.

  16. Photonuclear excitation of 103Rh by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshihara, Kenji; Kaji, Harumi; Sekine, Tsutomu; Mukoyama, Takeshi

    1989-01-01

    Photonuclear excitation of the 103 Rh nucleus was studied using synchrotron radiation. Formation of the excited state was confirmed by observing K X-rays emitted following the isomeric transition of the 103m Rh with a low-energy photon spectrometer. The intensity of induced activity due to 103 Rh(γ,γ') 103m Rh reaction was determined carefully by subtracting the fluorescent K X-rays due to natural background radiation. The integral cross-section for isomer production of 103m Rh by resonance absorption of photons at 295 keV is found to be (2.1±0.8) x 10 -28 cm 2 eV and is compared with that estimated from the previous experimental value for the 1277-keV level. (author)

  17. Photonuclear excitation of 103Rh by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Harumi; Yoshihara, Kenji; Mukoyama, Takeshi; Nakajima, Tetsuo

    1989-01-01

    Photonuclear excitation of 103 Rh nucleus was studied by the use of synchrotron radiation at KEK. Formation of excited state was confirmed by observing Rh K X-rays emitted following the isomeric transition of 103m Rh with a low-energy photon spectrometer. The induced activity due to 103 Rh(γ,γ') 103m Rh reaction was determined carefully by subtracting the fluorescent K X-rays due to natural background radiation. The integral cross-section for 103m Rh by resonance absorption at 295 keV is found to be (1∼2)x10 -28 cm 2 ·eV and is compared with that estimated from the previous experimental value for the 1277-keV level and the calculated value

  18. Trapped electronic states in YAG crystal excited by femtosecond radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavedeev, E.V.; Kononenko, V.V.; Konov, V.I. [General Physics Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    The excitation of an electronic subsystem of an yttrium aluminum garnet by 800 nm femtosecond radiation was studied theoretically and experimentally. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the refractive index (n) inside the beam waist was explored by means of the pump-probe interferometric technique with a submicron resolution. The observed increase in n indicated the formation of bound electronic states relaxed for ∝ 150 ps. We showed that the experimental data agreed with the computational simulation based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation only if these transient states were considered to arise from a direct light-induced process but not from the decay of radiatively generated free-electron-hole pairs. (orig.)

  19. Partial radiative recombination cross sections for excited states of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    In calculating the radiative recombination cross sections for interstellar H II regions, usually only the electric dipole term in the expansion of the interaction Hamiltonian is kept. The dipole and quadrupole transition strengths in closed analytical form are calculated here using the Coulomb wave functions because results for any electron energy and for recombination into any angular momentum state of hydrogen are needed. Several interesting effects are found. First, the transition probabilities are maximum for recombination into specific intermediate angular momentum states at low energies (w < 2eV) and where the free state angular momentum is greater than that of the bound state. Further, that specific intermediate angular momentum state depends on the kinetic energy of the free electron. This behavior is in contrast to the normal behavior of the transition strengths where recombination into s states is greatest and decreases with increasing angular momentum. Second, the quadrupole matrix elements vanish for certain velocities of the free electron. This leads to minima in the corresponding quadrupole cross sections when plotted as a function of the free electron's kinetic energy. Finally, the partial cross sections for highly excited states are greater than previously calculated because of the additional effects of the quadrupole transitions

  20. Estimation of the contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petin, V.G.; Komarov, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A simple theoretical model is proposed for estimating the differential contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation. Numerical results were obtained on the basis of published experimental data on the ability of bacterial cells Escherichia coli to undergo photoreactivation of radiation-induced damage. It was shown that inactivation by excitation may be highly significant for UV-hypersensitive cells capable of photoreactivation; inactivation by excitation increased with the energy of ionizing radiation and the volume of irradiated suspensions. The data are in qualitative agreement with the assumption of a possible contribution of the UV-component of Cerenkov radiation to the formation of excitations responsible for the lethal effect and the phenomenon of photoreactivation after ionizing radiation. Some predictions from the model are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Combination transition radiation in a medium excited by an electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikova, Yu.S.

    1976-01-01

    The radiation emitted by a uniformly moving charged particle in a medium excited by an electromagnetic field is considered by taking into account the interaction between the electromagnetic waves and optical phonon wave. The frequencies are found, in the vicinity of which the two-wave approximation should be applied in order to determine the radiation field. It is shown that in the vicinity of these frequencies the radiation considerably differs from the Cherenkov radiation

  2. Radiative and nonradiative lifetimes in excited states of Ar, Kr and Xe atoms in Ne matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, U.; Schwentner, N.

    1979-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation with its intense continuum and its excellent time structure has been exploited for time resolved luminescence spectroscopy in the solid state. By selective excitation of n = 1, n' = 1 and n = 2 exciton states of Xe, Kr and Ar atoms in Ne matrix we were able to identify the emitting states involved. Lifetimes within the cascade of radiative and radiationless relaxation between excited states as well as the radiative lifetimes for transitions to the ground state have been derived from the decay curves. Energy positions and radiative lifetimes of the emitting states correspond quite well with those of the free atoms. Radiative and radiationless relaxation processes take place within the manifold of excited states of the guest atoms. The rate constants for radiationless decay confirm an energy gap law. The order of the radiationless processes reaches in some cases extremely high values. Selection rules for spin and angular momentum are essential to understand the observed radiationless transition rates. (orig.)

  3. Electromagnetic field, excited by monodirected X-radiation pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhemerov, A.V.; Metelkin, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    Parameters of electromagnetic field, generated in the atmosphere by monodirected pulse source of X radiation located at the altitude of approximately several kilometers have been estimated by the method of delayed potentials. The source radiation is directed towards the Earth surface. The conclusion was made that restricted areas of approximately 1 km with considerable pulse electromagnetic fields can be created on the Earth surface

  4. Interference between radiative emission and autoionization in the decay of excited states of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, L. Jr.; Theodosiou, C.E.; Wall, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    An excited state of an atom which can autoionize can also undergo radiative decay. We consider the interaction between the final states resulting from these two modes of decay, and its effects on such quantities as the fluorescence yield of the excited state, excitation profile of the excited state, and the spectra of the emitted photons and electrons. It is shown that the fraction of decays of the excited state resulting in a photon (fluorescence yield) is particularly sensitive to the details of the final-state interaction. In lowest order in the final-state interaction, the fluorescence yield is increased by a factor (1 + 1/q 2 ) from the traditional value, where q is the Fano q parameter relating to the excited state and the final atomic state

  5. Luminiscent emission of molecular levels excited by ionizant radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Ramis, M.

    1977-01-01

    The emission spectra and the time dependence of scintillations produced by alpha particles, gamma rays and ultraviolet light in some organic compounds crystals and liquids solutions normally used as radiation detectors has been studied. (author) [es

  6. Excitation of intense shock waves by soft X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branitskij, A.V.; Fortov, V.E.; Danilenko, K.N.; Dyabilin, K.S.; Grabovskij, E.V.; Vorobev, O. Yu.; Lebedev, M.E.; Smirnov, V.P.; Zakharov, A.E.; Persyantsev, I.V.

    1996-01-01

    Investigation of the shock waves generated by soft x radiation in Al, Sn, Fe, and Pb targets is reported. The soft x radiation was induced by the dynamic compression and heating of the cylindrical z-pinch plasma generated in the ANGARA-5-1 pulsed power machine. The temperature of the z-pinch plasma was as high as 60 - 120 eV, and the duration of the x-ray pulse reached 30 ns FWHM. Thick stepped Al/Pb, Sn/Pb, and pure Pb targets were used. The results of experiments show that uniform intense shock waves can be generated by z-pinch plasma soft x-ray radiation. The uniformity of the shock is very high. At a flux power of the order of several TW/cm 2 , a shock pressure of some hundreds of GPa was achieved. (J.U.). 3 figs., 11 refs

  7. Excitation of intense shock waves by soft X-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branitskij, A V; Fortov, V E; Danilenko, K N; Dyabilin, K S; Grabovskij, E V; Vorobev, O Yu; Lebedev, M E; Smirnov, V P; Zakharov, A E; Persyantsev, I V [Troitsk Inst. of Innovative and Fusion Research, Troitsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Investigation of the shock waves generated by soft x radiation in Al, Sn, Fe, and Pb targets is reported. The soft x radiation was induced by the dynamic compression and heating of the cylindrical z-pinch plasma generated in the ANGARA-5-1 pulsed power machine. The temperature of the z-pinch plasma was as high as 60 - 120 eV, and the duration of the x-ray pulse reached 30 ns FWHM. Thick stepped Al/Pb, Sn/Pb, and pure Pb targets were used. The results of experiments show that uniform intense shock waves can be generated by z-pinch plasma soft x-ray radiation. The uniformity of the shock is very high. At a flux power of the order of several TW/cm{sup 2}, a shock pressure of some hundreds of GPa was achieved. (J.U.). 3 figs., 11 refs.

  8. Origin of the low frequency radiation emitted by radiative polaritons excited by infrared radiation in planar La2O3 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Johnson, Anita J; Schwab, Yosyp; Mann, Harkirat S; Francoeur, Mathieu; Hammonds, James S; Scarel, Giovanna

    2013-01-23

    Upon excitation in thin oxide films by infrared radiation, radiative polaritons are formed with complex angular frequency ω, according to the theory of Kliewer and Fuchs (1966 Phys. Rev. 150 573). We show that radiative polaritons leak radiation with frequency ω(i) to the space surrounding the oxide film. The frequency ω(i) is the imaginary part of ω. The effects of the presence of the radiation leaked out at frequency ω(i) are observed experimentally and numerically in the infrared spectra of La(2)O(3) films on silicon upon excitation by infrared radiation of the 0TH type radiative polariton. The frequency ω(i) is found in the microwave to far infrared region, and depends on the oxide film chemistry and thickness. The presented results might aid in the interpretation of fine structures in infrared and, possibly, optical spectra, and suggest the study of other similar potential sources of electromagnetic radiation in different physical scenarios.

  9. Excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, B.

    1996-01-01

    A short introduction to instrumental resolution is followed by a discussion of visibilities of phonon modes due to their eigenvectors. High precision phonon dispersion curves in GaAs are presented together with 'ab initio' calculations. Al 2 O 3 is taken as an example of selected visibility due to group theory. By careful determination of phonon intensities eigenvectors can be determined, such as in Silicon and Diamond. The investigation of magnon modes is shown for the garnet Fe 2 Ca 3 (GeO 4 ) 3 , where also a quantum gap due to zero point spin fluctuations was observed. The study of the splitting of excitons in CsFeCl 3 in an applied magnetic field demonstrates the possibilities of neutron polarisation analysis, which made it possible to observe a mode crossing. An outlook to inelastic X-ray scattering with very high energy resolution of synchrotron radiation is given with the examples of phonons in Beryllium and in water. (author) 19 figs., 36 refs

  10. Synthesis of ultrawideband radiation of combined antenna arrays excited by nanosecond bipolar voltage pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshelev, V I; Plisko, V V; Sevostyanov, E A

    2017-01-01

    To broaden the spectrum of high-power ultrawideband radiation, it is suggested to synthesize an electromagnetic pulse summing the pulses of different length in free space. On the example of model pulses corresponding to radiation of combined antennas excited by bipolar voltage pulses of the length of 2 and 3 ns, the possibility of twofold broadening of the radiation spectrum was demonstrated. Radiation pulses with the spectrum width exceeding three octaves were obtained. Pattern formation by the arrays of different geometry excited by the pulses having different time shifts was considered. Optimum array structure with the pattern maximum in the main direction was demonstrated on the example of a 2×2 array. (paper)

  11. Decay, excitation, and ionization of lithium Rydberg states by blackbody radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Glukhov, I. L.

    2010-09-01

    Details of interaction between the blackbody radiation and neutral lithium atoms were studied in the temperature ranges T = 100-2000 K. The rates of thermally induced decays, excitations and ionization were calculated for S-, P- and D-series of Rydberg states in the Fues' model potential approach. The quantitative regularities for the states of the maximal rates of blackbody-radiation-induced processes were determined. Approximation formulas were proposed for analytical representation of the depopulation rates.

  12. Radiative transport and collisional transfer of excitation energy in Cs vapors mixed with Ar or He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadla, Cedomil; Horvatic, Vlasta; Niemax, Kay

    2003-01-01

    This paper is a review (with a few original additions) on the radiative transport and collisional transfer of energy in laser-excited cesium vapors in the presence of argon or helium. Narrow-band excitation of lines with Lorentz, Doppler and Voigt profiles is studied in order to calculate effective rates for pumping of spectral lines with profiles comprising inhomogeneous broadening components. The radiative transport of excitation energy is considered, and a new, simple and robust, but accurate theoretical method for quantitative treatment of radiation trapping in relatively optically thin media is presented. Furthermore, comprehensive lists of experimental values for the excitation energy transfer cross-sections related to thermal collisions in Cs-Ar and Cs-He mixtures are given. Within the collected cross-section data sets, specific regularities with respect to the energy defect, as well as the temperature, are discerned. A particular emphasis is put on the radiative and collisional processes important for the optimization of resonance-fluorescence imaging atomic filters based on Cs-noble gas systems

  13. Induction of the 'in vivo' chlorophyll fluorescence excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhidov, Eh.A.; Zakhidov, M.A.; Kasymdzhanov, M.A.; Khabibullaev, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    Inductional changes of fluorescence of the native chlorophyll molecules in plant leaves excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation are studied. The opportunity of controlling of the photosynthesis efficiency through fluorescence response at different rates of the electron flow in charge transfer chain of the photosynthetic apparatus of plant is shown. (author). 13 refs.; 4 refs

  14. Test of the neoclassical theory of radiation in a weakly excited atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, G.O.

    1975-01-01

    The neoclassical theory of radiation predicts that the decay rate of an excited atomic state depends on the population density of the lower state. Experimental evidence is presented here which shows that in the case of 39 K the decay rate is in agreement with the predictions of quantum electrodynamics and definitely in disagreement with the neoclassical theory

  15. Computer simulation of the spatial distribution of optical radiation arising from knocked-out excited particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokov, S.P.; Gritsyna, V.V.; Koval', A.G.; Kovtunenko, Yu.I.; Shevchenko, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    The new approach for the explanation of the spatial distribution of the optical radiation arising from knocked-out excited particles is given. Calculated and experimental data for Al (λ=396.1 nm) and Mg (λ=383.8 nm) knocked-out by Ar + (20 keV) beam from MgAl 2 O 4 surface are compared [ru

  16. Electronic excitations and their effect on the interionic forces in simulations of radiation damage in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Race, C P; Mason, D R; Sutton, A P

    2009-01-01

    Using time-dependent tight-binding simulations of radiation damage cascades in a model metal we directly investigate the nature of the excitations of a system of quantum mechanical electrons in response to the motion of a set of classical ions. We furthermore investigate the effect of these excitations on the attractive electronic forces between the ions. We find that the electronic excitations are well described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution at some elevated temperature, even in the absence of the direct electron-electron interactions that would be required in order to thermalize a non-equilibrium distribution. We explain this result in terms of the spectrum of characteristic frequencies of the ionic motion. Decomposing the electronic force into four well-defined components within the basis of instantaneous electronic eigenstates, we find that the effect of accumulated excitations in weakening the interionic bonds is mostly (95%) accounted for by a thermal model for the electronic excitations. This result justifies the use of the simplifying assumption of a thermalized electron system in simulations of radiation damage with an electronic temperature dependence and in the development of temperature-dependent classical potentials.

  17. Electronic excitations and their effect on the interionic forces in simulations of radiation damage in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, C P; Mason, D R; Sutton, A P

    2009-03-18

    Using time-dependent tight-binding simulations of radiation damage cascades in a model metal we directly investigate the nature of the excitations of a system of quantum mechanical electrons in response to the motion of a set of classical ions. We furthermore investigate the effect of these excitations on the attractive electronic forces between the ions. We find that the electronic excitations are well described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution at some elevated temperature, even in the absence of the direct electron-electron interactions that would be required in order to thermalize a non-equilibrium distribution. We explain this result in terms of the spectrum of characteristic frequencies of the ionic motion. Decomposing the electronic force into four well-defined components within the basis of instantaneous electronic eigenstates, we find that the effect of accumulated excitations in weakening the interionic bonds is mostly (95%) accounted for by a thermal model for the electronic excitations. This result justifies the use of the simplifying assumption of a thermalized electron system in simulations of radiation damage with an electronic temperature dependence and in the development of temperature-dependent classical potentials.

  18. Effect resonance radiation transfer of excitation porous silicon to I sub 2 molecules sorbed in pores

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharchenko, K V; Kuznetsov, M B; Chistyakov, A A; Karavanskij, V A

    2001-01-01

    One studies the effect of resonance radiation-free transfer of electronic excitation between silicon nanocrystals and iodine molecules sorbed in pores. The experiment procedure includes laser-induced luminescence and laser desorption mass spectrometry. One analyzes photoluminescence spectra prior to and upon iodine sorption. Excitation of iodine through the mechanism of resonance transfer is determined to result in desorption of the iodine sorbed molecules with relatively high kinetic energies (3-1 eV). One evaluated the peculiar distance of resonance transfer the approximate value of which was equal to 2 nm

  19. On excitation and radiation of detector moving in vacuum with acceleration or moving rectilinearly with superluminal velocity in a medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.; Frolov, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of excitation of a detector moving in vacuum with constant acceleration is being discussed in recent years. It is noted in the paper that this excitation and radiation associated with it are similar to those taking place in the range of anomalous Doppler effect occurring during motion of the detector with constant superluminal velocity in medium

  20. Excitation of different chromium centres by synchrotron radiation in MgO:Cr single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shablonin, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila Str. 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Popov, A.I., E-mail: popov@latnet.lv [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Lushchik, A., E-mail: aleksandr.lushchik@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila Str. 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Kotlov, A. [Photon Science at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Dolgov, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila Str. 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2015-11-15

    The excitation spectra for the emissions of chromium-containing centres have been measured at 10 K using synchrotron radiation of 4–32 eV in MgO single crystals with different content of Cr{sup 3+} (5–850 ppm) and Ca{sup 2+} impurity ions. Both virgin crystals and the samples preliminarily irradiated with x-rays at 295 K have been studied. The role of complex chromium centres containing two Cr{sup 3+} and a cation vacancy (sometimes nearby a Ca{sup 2+} ion) on the luminescence processes and the transformation/creation of structural defects has been analysed. Such anharmonic complex centres could serve as the seeds for the creation of 3D defects that facilitate the cracking and brittle destruction of MgO crystals under their irradiation with ∼GeV heavy ions providing extremely high excitation density within cylindrical ion tracks.

  1. Native protein excited by low doses of γ-radiation serves as a source of secondary biogenic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Surkenova, G.N.; Revin, A.F.

    1996-01-01

    In is demonstrated that native protein of egg-white after being γ-irradiated with law doses is able to stimulate transition of cells of remote biological detector from non-cycling state to proliferation even if irradiated protein is separated from detector by quartz-glass. Animal tissues which have a high protein content (freshly cut hair, insect bodies) reveal the same ability. The role of natural background radiation in the maintenance excitation, state of living tissue proteins is discussed. 13 refs.; 1 figs.; 4 tabs

  2. Use of spectra from foil-excited heavy-ion beams to interpret radiation from plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1978-01-01

    Spectra from foil-excited heavy ion beams can be used to investigate the relative abundance and charge state composition of heavy metal contaminants which cause severe radiative energy losses in tokamak-produced plasmas. The degree of ionization of these metals in the tokamak plasma is not well known because of uncertainties in ionization and recombination rates and particle confinement times. Only a few stages of ionization are typically prominent in foil-excited spectra, however, and both the most probable charge state and distribution width are well known. Highly ionized heavy ions (e.g., Ti, Mo, W and Au) which span the range of charge states found in present tokamaks were produced by passing beams from the Brookhaven MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility through 20 μg/cm 2 carbon stripping foils. EUV radiation was recorded with a grazing incidence spectrometer. Comparisons of the beam-foil spectra with radiation from plasmas, and recent direct determinations of atomic oscillator strengths for principal resonance lines of such highly ionized species as Li-like iron (Fe 23+ ), Na-like bromine (Br 24+ ), and Cu-like iodine (I 24+ ) are discussed

  3. Excited meson radiative transitions from lattice QCD using variationally optimized operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultz, Christian J. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Dudek, Jozef J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Edwards, Robert G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-06-02

    We explore the use of 'optimized' operators, designed to interpolate only a single meson eigenstate, in three-point correlation functions with a vector-current insertion. These operators are constructed as linear combinations in a large basis of meson interpolating fields using a variational analysis of matrices of two-point correlation functions. After performing such a determination at both zero and non-zero momentum, we compute three-point functions and are able to study radiative transition matrix elements featuring excited state mesons. The required two- and three-point correlation functions are efficiently computed using the distillation framework in which there is a factorization between quark propagation and operator construction, allowing for a large number of meson operators of definite momentum to be considered. We illustrate the method with a calculation using anisotopic lattices having three flavors of dynamical quark all tuned to the physical strange quark mass, considering form-factors and transitions of pseudoscalar and vector meson excitations. In conclusion, the dependence on photon virtuality for a number of form-factors and transitions is extracted and some discussion of excited-state phenomenology is presented.

  4. Enhancement of deposition rate at cryogenic temperature in synchrotron radiation excited deposition of silicon film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Yasuo; Sugita, Yoshihiro; Ito, Takashi; Kato, Hiroo; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro

    1989-01-01

    The authors have investigated the synchrotron radiation excited deposition of silicon films on the SiO 2 substrate by using SiH 4 /He mixture gas at BL-12C at Photon Factory. They used VUV light from the multilayer mirror with the center photon energy from 97 to 123eV, which effectively excites L-core electrons of silicon. Substrate temperature was widely varied from -178 degree C to 500 degree C. At -178 degree C, the deposition rate was as high as 400nm/200mAHr (normalized at the storage ring current at 200mA). As increasing the substrate temperature, the deposition rate was drastically decreased. The number of deposited silicon atoms is estimated to be 4 to 50% of incident photons, while the number of photo generated species in the gas phase within the mean free path from the surface is calculated as few as about 10 -3 of incident photons. These experimental results show that the deposition reaction is governed by the dissociation of surface adsorbates by the synchrotron radiation

  5. Radiative charge-transfer lifetime of the excited state of (NaCa)+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Oleg P.; Cote, R.; Michels, H.; Smith, W.W.

    2003-01-01

    New experiments were proposed recently to investigate the regime of cold atomic and molecular ion-atom collision processes in a special hybrid neutral-atom-ion trap under high-vacuum conditions. We study the collisional cooling of laser precooled Ca + ions by ultracold Na atoms. Modeling this process requires knowledge of the radiative lifetime of the excited singlet A 1 Σ + state of the (NaCa) + molecular system. We calculate the rate coefficient for radiative charge transfer using a semiclassical approach. The dipole radial matrix elements between the ground and the excited states, and the potential curves were calculated using complete active space self-consistent field and Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory with an extended Gaussian basis, 6-311+G (3df). The semiclassical charge-transfer rate coefficient was averaged over a thermal Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we also present elastic collision cross sections and the spin-exchange cross section. The rate coefficient for charge transfer was found to be 2.3x10 -16 cm 3 /sec, while those for the elastic and spin-exchange cross sections were found to be several orders of magnitude higher (1.1x10 -8 cm 3 /sec and 2.3x10 -9 cm 3 /sec, respectively). This confirms our assumption that the milli-Kelvin regime of collisional cooling of calcium ions by sodium atoms is favorable with the respect to low loss of calcium ions due to the charge transfer

  6. Parametric excitation electromagnetic radiation in a bounded non-equilibrium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakirev, V.A.; Tolstoluzhskij, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    An excitation mechanism of electromagnetic radiation in a bounded plasma-beam system which is based on the process of induced scattering of electron beam-strengthened high-frequency wave (HF) of a plasma waveguide with an ion-sound wave, is investigated. It is shown that the process under investigation is an effective mechanism of electromagnetic radiation production. Up to 73 % of the beam power is trabsformed to the electromagnetic radiation under the conditions considered. As the frequency of the irradiated wave is close to the plasma frequency it can vary within wide limits by the change in plasma density. It is noted that the necessary condition of electromagnetic radiation production in the mechanism under consideration has the form of inequality ωsub(l)-ωsub(s)/(ksub(l)-ksub(s)>c (ωsub(l) - frequency of HF wave, ωsub(s)- frequency of ion-sound wave) and is less rigid as compared with the synchronism conditions for three-wave resonant interaction of proper oscillations. Therefore, the considered induced scattering process is less sensitive to a possible inhomogeneity of plasma density [ru

  7. The thermotidal exciting function for water vapour absorption of solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. BONAFEDE

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermotidal exciting function J is considered, for
    the absorption of solar radiation by water vapour, according to the model
    derived by Siebert. The Mugge-Moller formula for water vapour absorption
    is integrated numerically, using experimental data for the water vapour
    concentration in the troposphere and the stratosphere. It appears that
    Siebort's formula is a reasonable approximation at low tropospheric levels
    but it dramatically overestimates the water vapour thermotidal heating
    in the upper troposphere and in the stratosphere. It seems thus possible
    that, if the correct vertical profile is employed for J , the amplitudes and
    phases of the diurnal temperature oscillations and of the tidal wind speeds
    may suffer significant changes from those previously calculated and possibly explain the three hours delay of the observed phases from the computed values.

  8. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  9. Photoluminescence properties of ZnTe homoepitaxial films deposited by synchrotron-radiation-excited growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Mitsuhiro; Hayashida, Kazuki; Harada, Hiroki; Mitsuishi, Yoshiaki; Guo Qixin; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    ZnTe homoepitaxial films have been deposited at substrate temperatures between 27 deg. C and 100 deg. C by synchrotron-radiation-excited growth using diethylzinc and diethyltelluride. Effects of diethylzinc transport rate and substrate temperature upon the photoluminescence properties of the ZnTe films have been clarified. Strong deep level emissions centered at 1.85 and 2.1 eV related to defects such as vacancy-impurity complex become emerged with increasing diethylzinc transport rate or substrate temperature. A sharply excitonic emission at 2.375 eV associated with shallow acceptors is observed and neither a donor-acceptor pair recombination nor a deep level luminescence signal is detected in the spectrum of the film grown under the nearly stoichiometric condition, which indicates that ZnTe films of good quality can be grown even at room temperature by this growth technique

  10. Radiative-lifetime measurements and calculations of odd-parity highly excited levels in Ba i

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Du Shan; Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile; Dai Zhenwen

    2010-01-01

    Natural radiative lifetime measurements have been performed for 70 odd-parity highly excited levels of neutral barium in the energy range from 308 15.512 to 417 59.93 cm -1 by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in a laser-produced plasma. The lifetime values measured in this paper are in the range from 11.3 to 901 ns. They are compared with the published lifetimes of four levels. Two of them are in good agreement, whereas for the other two our measurements are slightly longer than the published data. The reasons for the discrepancies are discussed. Comparisons with theoretical results of the Hartree-Fock method with relativistic corrections illustrate the difficulties associated with the use of Cowan's codes for obtaining accurate branching fractions for transitions depopulating highly excited levels along the Rydberg series of heavy neutral elements. This work will be useful to extend the set of oscillator strengths available in Ba i.

  11. Radiation excited by a charged-particle bunch on a planar periodic wire structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Tyukhtin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic field of a bunch moving in the presence of a plane grid composed of thin parallel wires is considered by using the averaged boundary conditions method. Two different cases of motion are examined. In the first one, the bunch moves at a constant distance from the grid orthogonally to the wires. The excited surface wave is presented in the form of a spectral integral for a thin bunch with an arbitrary longitudinal profile. The wave propagates along the wires and does not decay with distance (if dissipation is negligible. Energy losses of the bunch over a unit path are obtained. In the second case, the bunch orthogonally crosses the wire grid. The volume and surface waves are separately analyzed. Properties of the spectral angular density of energy of volume radiation in the far-field zone are described. The energy losses due to the volume and surface radiation are determined. It is demonstrated that the structure of the surface waves in both cases allows determination of the length of the bunch.

  12. The isovector quadrupole resonance in yttrium excited by neutron radiative capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorro, R.; Bergqvist, I.

    1987-01-01

    In order to investigate the properties of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance (ΔT=1, ΔS=0) in the A=90 mass region, gamma-ray spectra from the reaction 89 Y(n,γ) 90 Y were recorded at several neutron energies in the energy range 12 to 27 MeV at 55 0 , 90 0 and 125 0 . The measured fore-aft asymmetry for the ground-state transition is very small in the low-energy region, but becomes appreciable above a neutron energy of 18 MeV. The observed asymmetry is attributed to interference between radiation from the isovector giant quadrupole resonance and radiation of opposite parity (from the high-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance and direct E1 capture). The data obtained in the present work, interpreted in terms of the direct-semidirect capture model, indicate that the excitation energy of the isovector E2 resonance in 90 Y is 26 ± 1 MeV. The data are consistent with a resonance width of 10 ± 2 MeV and with complete exhaustion of the energy-weighted sum rule for the lower isospin component of the resonance. (orig.)

  13. Effect of electron-excitation on radiation damage in ion-irradiated FCC metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwase, Akihiro

    1989-06-01

    FCC metals (Al, Cu, Ag, Ni) were irradiated with 0.5-1.8 MeV H, He, N and Ar ions, and 84-126 MeV C, F, Si, Cl, Br and I ions at liquid helium temperatures. After the irradiations, thermal annealing experiments were performed up to 300 K. Anomalous reduction of Stage-I recovery was observed in Al and Ni irradiated with high-energy (∼100 MeV) heavy ions. Radiation annealing by 100 MeV I ions was studied in predoped Ni and Cu. The experimental results were analyzed by using a new model which describes the production and radiation annealing of two or more types of defects. The extraordinarily large cross sections for subthreshold recombination of Stage-I defects were obtained in Ni. These results show that in Al and Ni, the energies transferred from the excited electrons to lattice through the electron-lattice interaction contribute to the annihilations of defects during irradiation. (author)

  14. Quantum deformation of the angular distributions of synchrotron radiation. Emission from particles in the first excited state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); SB RAS, Tomsk Institute of High Current Electronics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Burimova, A.N. [Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gitman, D.M.; Levin, A.D. [University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-02-15

    The exact expressions for the characteristics of synchrotron radiation of charged particles in the first excited state are obtained in analytical form using quantum theory methods. We performed a detailed analysis of the angular distribution structure of radiation power and its polarization for particles with spin 0 and 1/2. It is shown that the exact quantum calculations lead to results that differ substantially from the predictions of classical theory. (orig.)

  15. EXCITATION TEMPERATURE OF THE WARM NEUTRAL MEDIUM AS A NEW PROBE OF THE Lyα RADIATION FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Claire E.; Lindner, Robert R.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Pingel, Nickolas M.; Lawrence, Allen; Babler, Brian L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Goss, W. M.; Jencson, Jacob [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dickey, John [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Hennebelle, Patrick, E-mail: cmurray@astro.wisc.edu [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp—CNRS—Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-02-01

    We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to conduct a high-sensitivity survey of neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption in the Milky Way. In combination with corresponding H I emission spectra obtained mostly with the Arecibo Observatory, we detect a widespread warm neutral medium component with excitation temperature 〈T{sub s}〉=7200{sub −1200}{sup +1800} K (68% confidence). This temperature lies above theoretical predictions based on collisional excitation alone, implying that Lyα scattering, the most probable additional source of excitation, is more important in the interstellar medium (ISM) than previously assumed. Our results demonstrate that H I absorption can be used to constrain the Lyα radiation field, a critical quantity for studying the energy balance in the ISM and intergalactic medium yet notoriously difficult to model because of its complicated radiative transfer, in and around galaxies nearby and at high redshift.

  16. LIME - a flexible, non-LTE line excitation and radiation transfer method for millimeter and far-infrared wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Christian; Hogerheijde, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    We present a new code for solving the molecular and atomic excitation and radiation transfer problem in a molecular gas and predicting emergent spectra. This code works in arbitrary three dimensional geometry using unstructured Delaunay latices for the transport of photons. Various physical model...

  17. Analytical model for electromagnetic radiation from a wakefield excited by intense short laser pulses in an unmagnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu; Chen Shi; Dan Jiakun; Li Jianfeng; Peng Qixian, E-mail: ziyuch@gmail.com [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2011-10-15

    A simple one-dimensional analytical model for electromagnetic emission from an unmagnetized wakefield excited by an intense short-pulse laser in the nonlinear regime has been developed in this paper. The expressions for the spectral and angular distributions of the radiation have been derived. The model suggests that the origin of the radiation can be attributed to the violent sudden acceleration of plasma electrons experiencing the accelerating potential of the laser wakefield. The radiation process could help to provide a qualitative interpretation of existing experimental results, and offers useful information for future laser wakefield experiments.

  18. Analytical model for electromagnetic radiation from a wakefield excited by intense short laser pulses in an unmagnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ziyu; Chen Shi; Dan Jiakun; Li Jianfeng; Peng Qixian

    2011-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional analytical model for electromagnetic emission from an unmagnetized wakefield excited by an intense short-pulse laser in the nonlinear regime has been developed in this paper. The expressions for the spectral and angular distributions of the radiation have been derived. The model suggests that the origin of the radiation can be attributed to the violent sudden acceleration of plasma electrons experiencing the accelerating potential of the laser wakefield. The radiation process could help to provide a qualitative interpretation of existing experimental results, and offers useful information for future laser wakefield experiments.

  19. New method to measure the angular antispring effect in a Fabry–Perot cavity with remote excitation using radiation pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Koji, E-mail: knagano@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Enomoto, Yutaro; Nakano, Masayuki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kawamura, Seiji [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-03-06

    In experiments with Fabry–Perot cavities consisting of suspended mirrors, an angular antispring effect on the mirror of the cavity is caused by radiation pressure from resonant light in the cavity. A new method was invented to measure the effect precisely with remote excitation on the mirror using the radiation pressure. This method was found to be available for the suspended 23 mg mirror and improved the measurement accuracy by a factor of two, compared with the previous method. This result leads to stable control systems to eliminate the angular instability of the mirror caused by the effect. - Highlights: • A method to measure an angular antispring effect on a suspended mirror was proposed. • Remote excitation on the mirror with radiation pressure of resonant light is used. • This method provides better measurement accuracy compared with the previous method.

  20. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2014-09-15

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca(2+) imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25-1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm(2) resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca(2+)] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca(2+) involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca(2+)]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca(2+) release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Kinetics of non-equilibrium processes in non-linear crystals of lithium borates excited with synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ogorodnikov, I N; Isaenko, L I; Zinin, E I; Kruzhalov, A V

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a study of the LiB sub 3 O sub 5 and Li sub 2 B sub 4 O sub 7 crystals by the use of the luminescent spectroscopy with the sub-nanosecond time resolution under excitation of the high-power synchrotron radiation. The commonness in the origin of the non-equilibrium processes in these crystals as well as the observed differences in the luminescence manifestations is discussed.

  2. Kinetics of non-equilibrium processes in non-linear crystals of lithium borates excited with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikov, I.N. E-mail: ogo@dpt.ustu.ru; Pustovarov, V.A.; Isaenko, L.I.; Zinin, E.I.; Kruzhalov, A.V

    2000-06-21

    The paper presents the results of a study of the LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} crystals by the use of the luminescent spectroscopy with the sub-nanosecond time resolution under excitation of the high-power synchrotron radiation. The commonness in the origin of the non-equilibrium processes in these crystals as well as the observed differences in the luminescence manifestations is discussed.

  3. Evidence for the formation of a triple radiative exciplex between excited aqua-uranyl(VI) and thallous ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcantonatos, M.D.; Deschaux, M.

    1981-01-01

    Results from steady-state and transient photokinetic and spectroscopic measurements, show the formation in aqueous solution of a triple radiative exciplex between excited UO 2+ 2 and T1 + . Rate constants of exciplex formation and deactivation are evaluated. The nature of bonding and the emittive properties of this species, of probable sup(*)(T1 x O identical U identical O x T1) 4+ structure, are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Parametric excitation of very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic whistler waves and interaction with energetic electrons in radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Caplinger, J.; Main, D.; Mishin, E.; Gershenzon, N.; Genoni, T.; Paraschiv, I.; Rose, D.

    2018-04-01

    The concept of a parametric antenna in ionospheric plasma is analyzed. Such antennas are capable of exciting electromagnetic radiation fields, specifically the creation of whistler waves generated at the very low frequency (VLF) range, which are also capable of propagating large distances away from the source region. The mechanism of whistler wave generation is considered a parametric interaction of quasi-electrostatic whistler waves (also known as low oblique resonance (LOR) oscillations) excited by a conventional loop antenna. The interaction of LOR waves with quasi-neutral density perturbations in the near field of an antenna gives rise to electromagnetic whistler waves on combination frequencies. It is shown in this work that the amplitude of these waves can considerably exceed the amplitude of whistler waves directly excited by a loop. Additionally, particle-in-cell simulations, which demonstrate the excitation and spatial structure of VLF waves excited by a loop antenna, are presented. Possible applications including the wave-particle interactions to mitigate performance anomalies of low Earth orbit satellites, active space experiments, communication via VLF waves, and modification experiments in the ionosphere will be discussed.

  5. The EMP excitation of radiation by the pulsed relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakirev, V.A.; Sidelnikov, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of excitation of ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses (EMP) by short pulses of high-current relativistic electron beams were proposed and investigated. It is shown that the transformation efficiency of the bunch kinetic energy to the excited energy of the EMP can be very significant. (author). 2 figs., 4 refs

  6. The EMP excitation of radiation by the pulsed relativistic electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakirev, V A; Sidelnikov, G L [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The mechanisms of excitation of ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses (EMP) by short pulses of high-current relativistic electron beams were proposed and investigated. It is shown that the transformation efficiency of the bunch kinetic energy to the excited energy of the EMP can be very significant. (author). 2 figs., 4 refs.

  7. Theory of propagation of spectrum and correlations of radiation in optically dense gas in the case of the closed excitation contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barantsev, K.A.; Litvinov, A.N.; Popov, E.N.

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to generalization of the semi-classical theory of interaction of broadband laser radiation with the atomic gas at the room temperature in the cell in the case of the closed excitation contour. The atomic density matrix equations and spectrum and correlations transport equations have been derived for excitation by fluctuating field with Gaussian statistics. It is shown that the spatial oscillations of radiation intensity and atomic density matrix can be excited. It was found that such medium can serve as a filter of incoherent part of the radiation.

  8. Excitation processes in organic systems under irradiation with vacuum ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shefer, Y.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of this work is the fluorescence of organic systems in the excitation range where phenomena of photon multiplication begin. It was hoped to reach the excitation energy above which the distribution of the various phenomena was constant and as a result, a linear function between the variation of the fluorescence intensity with variations of the excitation, would be obtained. The experimental set-up consisted mainly of suitable light sources, monochromators and detectors. The gated measuring system consisted of an oscilloscope, integrator and recorder. The material predominantly used in the experiments was anthracene whose absorption spectrum was investigated and calculated. The absorption spectra of various polycrystalline layers were also calculated. The absorption spectrum of a randomly ordered polycrystalline layer was compared with that of a hexane solution and a good correlation between the two spectra was obtained. For the study of the relationship between the excitation spectrum of anthracene and the order of crystal, the excitation spectrum of single crystals of anthracene was measured from 4 eV to 107 eV. For the excitation region from 10 eV to 23 eV the efficiency of exciting a singlet level by a photoelectron was calculated as a function of the kinetic energy of the photoelectron, assuming the efficiency of the recombination to be constant. The excitation spectra of single crystals of p-terphenyl, pyrene and phenanthrene were also examined. In all four crystals the excitation spectrum rises monotonically with an increase in the energy of the exciting photon. (author)

  9. Angular distribution of hypersatellite and satellite radiation emitted after resonant and excitation into $U^{91+}$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Zakowicz, S; Harman, Z; Scheid, W

    2003-01-01

    In collisions of heavy few-electron projectile ions with light targets, an electron can be transferred from the target with the simultaneous excitation of a projectile electron. We study the angular distribution of de-excitation X rays following the resonant capture process. Our results are compared to experimental values of Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. A (joint to this issue)] for collisions of U91+ ions with a hydrogen gas target.

  10. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  11. White light emission from Er2O3 nano-powder excited by infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanli, Sevcan; Eryurek, Gonul; Di Bartolo, Baldassare

    2017-07-01

    Phosphors of Er2O3 nano-crystalline powders were synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structural properties of the nano-powders were investigated with XRD and HRTEM measurements. The cubic phase with a = 10.540 Å was the only phase observed. The average crystalline sizes and the widths of the grain size distribution curves were determined to be 27.2, 18.7 and 9.7 nm, respectively. The spectroscopic properties of the Er2O3 nano-powder were studied by measuring the luminescence, decay and rise patterns under 808 and 975 nm diode laser excitations. A peculiar effect of the pressure was observed since an optically active ion (Er) is part of the complex and not a dopant. A broad band of the white light emission combined with blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands of Er3+ ions were observed at 0.03 mbar pressure under both excitation wavelengths. Only, an intense broad band white light emission was observed from these nanocrystals at atmospheric pressure. Rising patterns show that the white light intensity reaches its maximum value more rapidly under 975 nm excitation although it decays slower than that of 808 nm excitation. The color quality parameters such as the color coordinate (CRI), correlated color temperature and the color rendering index were found to vary with both the excitation wavelength and the ambient pressure indicating that these nanocrystals could be considered good white light emitting source under the infrared excitations.

  12. Even-parity resonances with synchrotron radiation from Laser Excited Lithium at 1s^22p State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Tie; Wehlitz, Ralf

    2010-03-01

    Correlated many-body dynamics is still one of the unsolved fundamental problems in physics. Such correlation effects can be most clearly studied in processes involving single atoms for their simplicity.Lithium, being the simplest open shell atom, has been under a lot of study. Most of the studies focused on ground state lithium. However, only odd parity resonances can be populated through single photon (synchrotron radiation) absorption from ground state lithium (1s^22s). Lithium atoms, after being laser excited to the 1s^22p state, allow the study of even parity resonances. We have measured some of the even parity resonances of lithium for resonant energies below 64 eV. A single-mode diode laser is used to excite lithium from 1s^22s ground state to 1s^22p (^2P3/2) state. Photoions resulting from the interaction between the excited lithium and synchrotron radiation were analyzed and collected by an ion time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer with a Z- stack channel plate detector. The Li^+ ion yield was recorded while scanning the undulator along with the monochromator. The energy scans have been analyzed regarding resonance energies and parameters of the Fano profiles. Our results for the observed resonances will be presented.

  13. Use of synchrotron and laser radiations for present and future photoionization studies in excited atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuilleumier, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    The status of experiments in photoionization of atoms in excited states is reviewed, with emphasis given to synchrotron and laser photon sources. A technique for exciting the photoionization spectrum of Na atoms using the flux emitted from the bending magnetic of a storage ring is discussed in detail. Some problems in interpreting photoionization spectrum of Ba in the excited state, due to the presence of higher orders are considered. A design approach for a positron storage ring to produce coherent radiation in the VUV is described. It is shown that combined use of a CW dye laser and the positron storage ring will allow new progress to be made in photoionization studies of excited atoms. Some of the experiments to be carried out using the positron storage ring include: measurements of collisional ionization in rare earth metal atoms of low atomic density; photoionization measurements at lower laser powers, leading to an extension of the CW tunability range; and photoionization studies of multiply charged positive ions. 21 references

  14. TH-C-17A-05: Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen (CEPhOx) Imaging During Multi-Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Pogue, B [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Holt, R [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH - New Hampshire (United States); Esipova, T; Vinogradov, S [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gladstone, D [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, City of Lebanon (Lebanon)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cherenkov radiation is created during external beam radiation therapy that can excite phosphorescence in tissue from oxygen-sensitive, bio-compatible probes. Utilizing the known spatial information of the treatment plan with directed multiple beam angles, Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen (CEPhOx) imaging was realized from the reconstructions of Cherenkov excited phosphorescence lifetime. Methods: Platinum(II)-G4 (PtG4) was used as the oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe and added to a oxygenated cylindrical liquid phantom with a oxygenated/deoxygenated cylindrical anomaly. Cherenkov excited phosphorescence was imaged using a time-gated ICCD camera temporallysynchronized to the LINAC pulse output. Lifetime reconstruction was carried out in NIRFAST software. Multiple angles of the incident radiation beam was combined with the location of the prescribed treatment volume (PTV) to improve the tomographic recovery as a function of location. The tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the background and PTV was calculated based on the recovered lifetime distribution and Stern-Volmer equation. Additionally a simulation study was performed to examine the accuracy of this technique in the setting of a human brain tumor. Results: Region-based pO2 values in the oxygenated background and oxygenated/deoxygenated PTV were correctly recovered, with the deoxygenated anomaly (15.4 mmHg) easily distinguished from the oxygenated background (143 mmHg). The data acquisition time could be achieved within the normal irradiation time for a human fractionated plan. The simulations indicated that CEPhOx would be a sufficient to sample tumor pO2 sensing from tumors which are larger than 2cm in diameter or within 23mm depth from the surface. Conclusion: CEPhOx could be a novel imaging tool for pO2 assessment during external radiation beam therapy. It is minimally invasive and should work within the established treatment plan of radiation therapy with multiple beams in

  15. Abnormal photothermal effect of laser radiation on highly defect oxide bronze nanoparticles under the sub-threshold excitation of absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaev, P.; Kotvanova, M.; Omelchenko, A.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanism of abnormal photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on nanoparticles of oxide bronzes has been proposed in this paper. The basic features of the observed effect are: a) sub-threshold absorption of laser radiation by the excitation of donor-like levels formed in the energy gap due to superficial defects of the oxide bronze nano-crystals; b) an interband radiationless transition of energy of excitation on deep triplet levels and c) consequent recombination occurring at the plasmon absorption. K or Na atoms thermally intercalated to the octahedral crystal structure of TiO2 in the wave SHS combustion generate acceptor levels in the gap. The prepared oxide bronzes of the non-stoichiometric composition NaxTiO2 and KxTiO2 were examined by high resolution TEM, and then grinded in a planetary mill with powerful dispersion energy density up to 4000 J/g. This made it possible to obtain nanoparticles about 50 nm with high surface defect density (1017-1019 cm-2 at a depth of 10 nm). High photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on the defect nanocrystals observed after its impregnation into cartilaginous tissue exceeds 7 times in comparison with the intact ones.

  16. Photoinduced dynamics of a cyanine dye: parallel pathways of non-radiative deactivation involving multiple excited-state twisted transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Nuñez, Vicente; Espinoza, Eli M; Larsen, Jillian M; Bao, Duoduo; Shi, Dewen; Mac, Jenny T; Anvari, Bahman; Vullev, Valentine I

    2015-04-01

    Cyanine dyes are broadly used for fluorescence imaging and other photonic applications. 3,3'-Diethylthiacyanine (THIA) is a cyanine dye composed of two identical aromatic heterocyclic moieties linked with a single methine, -CH 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 . The torsional degrees of freedom around the methine bonds provide routes for non-radiative decay, responsible for the inherently low fluorescence quantum yields. Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we determined that upon photoexcitation, the excited state relaxes along two parallel pathways producing three excited-state transients that undergo internal conversion to the ground state. The media viscosity impedes the molecular modes of ring rotation and preferentially affects one of the pathways of non-radiative decay, exerting a dominant effect on the emission

  17. Thermal Dynamics of Xanthene Dye in Polymer Matrix Excited by Double Pulse Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samusev, Ilia; Borkunov, Rodion; Tsarkov, Maksim; Konstantinova, Elizaveta; Antipov, Yury; Demin, Maksim; Bryukhanov, Valery

    2018-01-01

    Double-pulse laser excitation of the eosin and silver nanoparticles embedded into polymer media is known to be a method of electronic-vibrational energy deactivation kinetic process information obtaining and polymer thermal dynamics investigation. We have studied the vibrational relaxation processes in dye molecules (eosin) and nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol after two time-shifted laser pulses with fast and delayed fluorescence kinetics study. In order to simulate thermal and photophysical processes caused by double photon excitation, we solved heat transfer and energy deactivation differential equations numerically. The simulation allowed us to obtain the value of heat conductivity coefficient of polymer matrix.

  18. Excitation of hybridized Dirac plasmon polaritons and transition radiation in multi-layer graphene traversed by a fast charged particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Kamran; Mišković, Zoran L.; Segui, Silvina; Gervasoni, Juana L.; Arista, Néstor R.

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the energy loss channels for a fast charged particle traversing a multi-layer graphene (MLG) structure with N layers under normal incidence. Focusing on a terahertz (THz) range of frequencies, and assuming equally doped graphene layers with a large enough separation d between them to neglect interlayer electron hopping, we use the Drude model for two-dimensional conductivity of each layer to describe hybridization of graphene’s Dirac plasmon polaritons (DPPs). Performing a layer decomposition of ohmic energy losses, which include excitation of hybridized DPPs (HDPPs), we have found for N = 3 that the middle HDPP eigenfrequency is not excited in the middle layer due to symmetry constraint, whereas the excitation of the lowest HDPP eigenfrequency produces a Fano resonance in the graphene layer that is first traversed by the charged particle. While the angular distribution of transition radiation emitted in the far field region also shows asymmetry with respect to the traversal order by the incident charged particle at supra-THz frequencies, the integrated radiative energy loss is surprisingly independent of both d and N for N ≤ 5, which is explained by a dominant role of the outer graphene layers in transition radiation. We have further found that the integrated ohmic energy loss in optically thin MLG scales as ∝1/N at sub-THz frequencies, which is explained by exposing the role of dissipative processes in graphene at low frequencies. Finally, prominent peaks are observed at supra-THz frequencies in the integrated ohmic energy loss for MLG structures that are not optically thin. The magnitude of those peaks is found to scale with N for N ≥ 2, while their shape and position replicate the peak in a double-layer graphene (N = 2), which is explained by arguing that plasmon hybridization in such MLG structures is dominated by electromagnetic interaction between the nearest-neighbor graphene layers.

  19. Higher order mode excitation in eccentric active nano-particles for tailoring of the near-field radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, R. O.; Arslanagic, Samel

    2015-01-01

    We examine the excitation of resonant modes inside eccentrically layered cylindrical active nano-particles. The nano-particle is a three-layer structure comprised of a silica core, a free-space middle layer, and an outer shell of silver. It is shown that a concentric configuration, initially desi...... of the gain constant, is shown to be controlled by the direction of the core displacement. The present eccentric active nano-particles may provide alternative strategies for directive near-field radiation relative to the existing designs....

  20. Electron correlation effect on radiative decay processes of the core-excited states of Be-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Cuicui, E-mail: sangcc@126.com [Department of Physics, Qinghai Normal University, Xining 810001 (China); Li, Kaikai [College of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing 100038 (China); Sun, Yan; Hu, Feng [School of Mathematic and Physical Science, Xuzhou Institute of Technology, Xuzhou 221400, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiative rates of the states 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} with Z = 8–54 are studied. • Electron correlation effect on the radiative transition rates is studied. • Forbidden transitions are explored. - Abstract: Energy levels and the radiative decay processes of the core-excited configurations 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} of Be-like ions with Z = 8–54 are studied. Electron correlation effect on the energy levels and the radiative transition rates are studied in detail. Except for E1 radiative transition rates, the E2, M1 and M2 forbidden transitions are also explored. Further relativistic corrections from the Breit interaction, quantum electrodynamics and the finite nuclear size are included in the calculations to make the results more precise. Good agreement is found between our results and other theoretical data.

  1. Luminescence of BaCl2:Eu2+ particles dispersed in the NaCl host excited by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushak, A.S.; Savchyn, P.V.; Vistovskyy, V.V.; Demkiv, T.M.; Dacyuk, J.R.; Myagkota, S.V.; Voloshinovskii, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    BaCl 2 :Eu 2+ microcrystals embedded in the NaCl host have been obtained in the NaCl–BaCl 2 (1 mol%)–EuCl 3 (0.02 mol%) crystalline system. The influence of the annealing conditions on the formation of such particles has been studied. In particular, long-term annealing (at 200 °S during 100 h) promotes the microcrystals formation in the NaCl–BaCl 2 –Eu crystalline system. The subsequent heat treatment (annealed at 600 °S during 72 h and quenched to room temperature) is shown to lead to the destruction of the majority of these particles. The luminescent-kinetic properties of BaCl 2 :Eu 2+ microcrystals have been studied upon the ultra-violet excitation by the synchrotron radiation. The X-ray excited luminescence has been measured in order to estimate the distribution of europium ions between microcrystals and the NaCl host. The excitation mechanisms of Eu 2+ ions in the NaCl–BaCl 2 –Eu crystalline system are discussed. - Highlights: ► The formation of BaCl 2 :Eu 2+ microcrystals of 1–100 μm size embedded in the NaCl host is revealed. ► Annealing at 600 °C leads to the destruction of significant number of embedded microcrystals. ► The luminescent parameters of microcrystals is similar to ones of single crystal analogs.

  2. Comparison of the luminescent properties of Lu3Al5O12:Pr crystals and films under synchrotron radiation excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorenko, Yu.; Gorbenko, V.; Zorenko, T.; Voznyak, T.; Nizankovskiy, S.

    2016-01-01

    The work is dedicated to comparative investigation of the luminescent properties of Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 :Pr(LuAG:Pr) single crystals and single crystalline films using excitation by synchrotron radiation with an energy of 3.7–25 eV in the exciton range of LuAG host. We have found that the differences in the excitation spectra and luminescence decay kinetics of LuAG:Pr crystals and films are caused by involving the LuAl antisite defects and oxygen vacancies in the crystals and Pb 2+ flux related dopants in the films in the excitation processes of the Pr 3+ luminescence. Taking into account these differences, we have determined the energy structure of the Pr 3+ ions in LuAG host and estimated the differences in the energies of creation of excitons bound with the isolated Pr 3+ ions in LuAG:Pr films and the dipole Pr–LuAl antisite defect centers in the crystal counterpart. - Highlights: • Comparison of the luminescent properties of LuAG:Pr single crystals and films. • Superposition of the Pr 3+ and defect centers luminescence of LuAG:Pr crystal. • Different creation energies of an excitons bound with the Pr 3+ in LuAG:Pr crystals and films. • More faster decay kinetics of the Pr 3+ luminescence in LuAG:Pr films. • Low content of slow emission component in LuAG:Pr films.

  3. Excitation of the giant resonance in the radiative pion capture on lp shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogotar', G.E.

    1978-01-01

    The spin-dipole transitions in the (π - ,γ) reaction on 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, 13 C and 14 N are calculated in the framework of shell model and are compared with experiment. The discussion includes the gross structure and the quantum numbers of the resonance, relative branchings, prominent partial transitions and total yields. General findings is that the calculated (π - ,γ) yield distributions describe the data well in those cases where also the photonuclear data are well reproduced, although the amplitudes of the elementary processes are different. In the case considered, the best agreement is obtained for A=9 and 14. The configurational splitting of the resonances is clearly seen in the A=6 and 7 cases, to somewhat less extent also for A=9. For heavier nuclei the contribution from hole excitation is small and is spread out. For A=7 and 11 the calculated main peaks are at too low intrinsic excitation energies as compared with histograms

  4. {gamma}-radiation of excited nuclear discrete levels in peripheral heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korotkikh, V.L.; Chikin, K.A. [Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2002-06-01

    A new process of a nuclear excitation to discrete states in peripheral heavy ion collisions is studied. High-energy photons are emitted by the exited nuclei with energies up to a few tens of GeV at angles of a few hundred microradians with respect to the beam direction. We show that a two-stage process, where an electron-positron pair is produced by virtual photons emitted by nuclei and then the electron or positron excites the nucleus, has a large cross-section. It is equal to about 5 b for CaCa collisions. On the one hand, it produces a significant {gamma}-rays background in the nuclear fragmentation region but, on the other hand, it could be used for monitoring the nuclear beam intensity at the LHC. These secondary nuclear photons could be a good signal for triggering peripheral nuclear collisions. (orig.)

  5. γ-radiation of excited nuclear discrete levels in peripheral heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkikh, V. L.; Chikin, K. A.

    A new process of a nuclear excitation to discrete states in peripheral heavy ion collisions is studied. High-energy photons are emitted by the exited nuclei with energies up to a few tens of GeV at angles of a few hundred microradians with respect to the beam direction. We show that a two-stage process, where an electron-positron pair is produced by virtual photons emitted by nuclei and then the electron or positron excites the nucleus, has a large cross-section. It is equal to about 5 b for CaCa collisions. On the one hand, it produces a significant γ-rays background in the nuclear fragmentation region but, on the other hand, it could be used for monitoring the nuclear beam intensity at the LHC. These secondary nuclear photons could be a good signal for triggering peripheral nuclear collisions.

  6. γ-radiation of excited nuclear discrete levels in peripheral heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotkikh, V.L.; Chikin, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    A new process of a nuclear excitation to discrete states in peripheral heavy ion collisions is studied. High-energy photons are emitted by the exited nuclei with energies up to a few tens of GeV at angles of a few hundred microradians with respect to the beam direction. We show that a two-stage process, where an electron-positron pair is produced by virtual photons emitted by nuclei and then the electron or positron excites the nucleus, has a large cross-section. It is equal to about 5 b for CaCa collisions. On the one hand, it produces a significant γ-rays background in the nuclear fragmentation region but, on the other hand, it could be used for monitoring the nuclear beam intensity at the LHC. These secondary nuclear photons could be a good signal for triggering peripheral nuclear collisions. (orig.)

  7. Radiative proton capture to the first excited state of sup 29 P nucleus at subbarrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matulewicz, T; Dabrowska, M; Decowski, P; Kicinska-Habior, M; Sikora, B [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Doswiadczalnej; Toke, J [Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Nuclear Structure Research Lab.; Somorjai, E [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Debrecen (Hungary). Atommag Kutato Intezete

    1985-08-01

    Differential cross sections at 0 deg and 90 deg measured for {sup 28}Si(p,{gamma}{sub 1}){sup 29}P reaction at proton energy range 2.3-2.9 MeV have been analyzed in terms of the direct-semidirect capture model extended by the effective potential approach. Spectroscopic factor of the first excited states of {sup 29}P nucleus was found to be 0.10+-0.05. 9 refs., 1 fig. (author).

  8. Cherenkov excited phosphorescence-based pO2 estimation during multi-beam radiation therapy: phantom and simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Robert W; Zhang, Rongxiao; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Glaser, Adam K; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-09-21

    Megavoltage radiation beams used in External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) generate Cherenkov light emission in tissues and equivalent phantoms. This optical emission was utilized to excite an oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe, PtG4, which has been developed specifically for NIR lifetime-based sensing of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). Phosphorescence emission, at different time points with respect to the excitation pulse, was acquired by an intensifier-gated CCD camera synchronized with radiation pulses delivered by a medical linear accelerator. The pO2 distribution was tomographically recovered in a tissue-equivalent phantom during EBRT with multiple beams targeted from different angles at a tumor-like anomaly. The reconstructions were tested in two different phantoms that have fully oxygenated background, to compare a fully oxygenated and a fully deoxygenated inclusion. To simulate a realistic situation of EBRT, where the size and location of the tumor is well known, spatial information of a prescribed region was utilized in the recovery estimation. The phantom results show that region-averaged pO2 values were recovered successfully, differentiating aerated and deoxygenated inclusions. Finally, a simulation study was performed showing that pO2 in human brain tumors can be measured to within 15 mmHg for edge depths less than 10-20 mm using the Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen imaging (CEPhOx) method and PtG4 as a probe. This technique could allow non-invasive monitoring of pO2 in tumors during the normal process of EBRT, where beams are generally delivered from multiple angles or arcs during each treatment fraction.

  9. Distribution of radiative strength with excitation energy: the E1 and M1 giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.E.; Speth, J.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations of the giant dipole resonance in the particle-hole model, employing empirical values for the unperturbed particle and hole energies, have been unsuccessful in pushing the dipole state to a sufficiently high energy. it is argued that unperturbed levels correspondign to an effective mass of m*/m approx. 0.6 to 0.7 should be employed. The couplings of particles and holes to vibrations are the crucial ingredients in these considerations. More generally, it is argued that the effective mass relevant to excitations near the Fermi surface is that corresponding to empirical single-particle levels, m*/m greater than or equal to 1.0. For particle-hole excitations above the Fermi surface, it is a decreasing function of excitation energy, reaching the above values 0.6 to 0.7 for E greater than or equal to 2 dirac constant/b omega, dirac constant/sub omega/ being the shell spacing. This has the consequence of spreading out the M1 strength. A new interpretation of experimental strengths is proposed

  10. Collisional-radiative model for neutral helium in plasma. Excitation cross section and singlet-triplet wavefunction mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Motoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Fujimoto, Takashi

    1997-10-01

    We have revised the collisional-radiative (CR) model code of neutral helium (T. Fujimoto, JQSRT 21, 1979). The spin-orbit interaction gives rise to mixing of the wavefunctions of the singlet and triplet states. The degree of the mixing depends on the magnetic field, and at the field strength of the level-anticrossings complete mixing, or complete breakdown of the L-S coupling scheme, occurs. We have approximately incorporated this effect into the code. We have reviewed the excitation cross section data for electron impacts. For transitions starting from the ground state, the recent assessment by the group led by Dr. de Heer is judged satisfactory. For transitions from the metastable levels the assessment by the same group appears rather conservative; there remains a question about the cross section values near the threshold. For transitions between different-l levels within the same multiplicity and same n, a semi-empirical formula based on the Born cross section gives a good agreement with experiment. Proton impacts are also considered for these transitions. We compare the new cross sections with those used in the original version. These cross sections for transitions starting from the metastable levels are fitted by analytical formulas and the parameter values are given. We also give parameter values for the excitation rate coefficient for these transitions as well as for transitions starting from the ground state. With all the above revisions incorporated into the CR model code, we have calculated the energy loss rates and the line intensity ratios for the purpose of plasma diagnostics, where the effect of a magnetic field is noted. The calculated population distribution over excited levels are compared with experiment, and a tentative conclusion is drawn concerning the excitation cross section from the metastable level. (author)

  11. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H 2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV 2+ , the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV + ; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV 2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 10 9 , 7.6 x 10 9 , and 8.5 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV + to be severely diminished

  12. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  13. Time dependence of resonance γ-radiation modulated by acoustic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, A.R.; Arakelyan, A.R.; Gabrielyan, R.G.; Kocharyan, L.A.; Grigoryan, G.R.; Slavinskii, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the time dependence of the γ-resonance absorption line intensity in case of modulation by acoustic waves are presented. 57 Co was used as source and a stainless steel foil was chosen as an absorber. The time dependences of the counting rate of the resonant γ-quanta corresponding to excitations with 3400 Hz and with 1.5 or 7 V at the vibrosystem transducer are plotted. The measurements show that the method has principal advantages over the conventional Moessbauer spectroscopy

  14. Radiative capture studies of the electromagnetic decays of highly excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snover, K. A. [Washington Univ., Seattle (USA). Dept. of Physics; Ikegami, H.; Muraoka, M. [eds.; Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    1980-01-01

    Selected examples of interesting E1, M1 and E2 resonance studies in (p, ..gamma..) and (..cap alpha.., ..gamma..) reactions are discussed. These include a unique determination of E1 amplitudes in the /sup 12/C(p,..gamma..sub(o))/sup 13/N reaction, E2 strength in light nuclei, M1 decays to the ground states and to the excited O/sup +/ states of the doubly magic /sup 16/O and /sup 40/Ca nuclei, ''second harmonic'' E1 resonances in (p, ..gamma..), and M1 ..gamma..-decay of stretched particle-hole states in /sup 16/O and /sup 28/Si.

  15. Elementary analysis of massive samples at excitation of characteristic x-radiation by proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altynov, V.A.; Blokhin, S.M.; Brazevich, Eh.; Brazevich, Ya.; Lyu Zaj Ik; Osetinskij, G.M.; Purehv, A.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified method is described for calculating the elementary composition in the massive samples in the case of the detection of the characteristic X-radiation emitted under the bombardment of the samples by a beam of protons. The method was experimentally verified by measuring the characteristic X-radiation from the elements with a known concentration entering the one-component and multi-component matrix. It was shown that within the experimental accuracy the discussed method gave results analogous to those obtained with the earlier used methods

  16. Branching ratios in the radiative decay of helium doubly excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coreno, M.; Prince, K. C.; Richter, R.; De Simone, M.; Bucar, K.; Zitnik, M.

    2005-01-01

    The doubly excited singlet states of He below the N=2 threshold may decay by autoionization or fluorescence. In the fluorescence decay channel, most decay cascades consist of emission of three photons, of which the first is a VUV photon, the second is in or near the visible range, and the last is another VUV photon. We have studied the fluorescence channel decay dynamics of the (2,0 n ) (2,1 n ) and (2,-1 n ) 1 P, n=3-7, states by wavelength dispersed photon-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. We have detected the photons in the second step of the cascade and determined the branching ratios for the strongest lines in this step. From these data we are able to calculate the branching ratios of the first step in the cascade. The results are in good agreement with calculations of the main decay channels of the higher resonances, but about 20-30 % lower, and so we are able to describe quantitatively the whole fluorescence cascade of the above-mentioned doubly excited states

  17. Sonic excitation by means of ultrasound; an experimental illustration of acoustic radiation forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, N.B.; Nuij, P.W.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves are known to induce a vibration of particles around an equilibrium position. However, for large acoustic amplitudes, due to non-linear acoustic effects, a rectified, net acoustic radiation force can occur. Experimental work is performed in which the non-linear behavior is

  18. Transition radiation excited by a load moving over the interface of two elastic layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, K.N.; Metrikine, A.; Tsouvalas, A.

    2014-01-01

    Transition radiation is emitted when a perturbation source (e.g., electric charge, mechanical load), which does not possess an inherent frequency, moves along a straight line at a constant velocity in or near an inhomogeneous medium. The phenomenon was described for the first time in

  19. The use of radiation trapping in the measurement of the electron excitation cross section for the production of the 1s4 (3P1) level of Ne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miers, R.E.; Gastineau, J.E.; Phillps, M.H.; Anderson, L.W.; Lin, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    The authors report the use of laser induced fluorescence for the first measurement of the electron excitation cross section for the production of the 1s 4 ( 3 P 1 ) level of Ne. Radiation trapping is used to lengthen the effective lifetime of the 1s 4 level allowing for the electron excitation cross section of the 1s 4 level to be measured in a manner similar to the measurement of electron excitation cross sections of the metastable 1s 3 and 1s 5 levels. (Auth.)

  20. Ionising radiation dosimetry by measuring thermally excited currents (TEC) in irradiated highpolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtol'ts, V.; Petermann, V.; Nigot, V.

    1976-01-01

    The first results are presented in measuring thermally excited currents (TEC) in 60 Co - gamma irradiated polyethylene and teflon. The design of measuring instruments is described. The maximum background currents in nonirradiated samples reached 10 -13 A. The TEC curves are presented which have obtained under irradiation up to 0.1-1000 rad followed by heating in the temperature range from 20 to 250 deg C. The curves exhibited maxima at about 90 deg C for polyethylene and about 200 deg C for teflon. The TEC dose range has been determined to be 0.1-1000 rad and 5-1000 rad for polyethylene and teflon, respectively. The fading at room temperature after 100 hrs has appeared to be 50% for polyethylene and 60% for teflon. The main merit of the technique is assumed to be the simplicity of the measuring instruments [ru

  1. The contribution of electronically excited states to the radiation chemistry of organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsky, S.

    1990-01-01

    The photocurrent from anthracene in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, 2.2- dimethylbutane, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, and tetramethylsilane has been studied as a function of excitation energy from the ionization threshold to the onset of strong solvent absorption. The fluroescence from solutions of hexafluorobenzene in cyclopentane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, 2,2-dimethylbutane and tetramethylsilane irradiated with β-particles has been studied as a function of the hexafluorobenzene concentration from c = 10 -3 -10 -1 M. The data are analyzed to permit extraction of the geminate ion-pair scavenging probability. The absorption of 160 nm light by cyclohexane in mixtures of cyclohexane, benzene and tetraphenylmethylenediamine results in an emission spectrum consisting of the simultaneous fluorescence from all three components. A mechanism for the development of this spectrum and its dependence on benzene concentration is constructed and shown to be quantitatively consistent with the results of independent measurements on the separate components. 55 refs

  2. Production and stability of radiation-induced defects in MgAl2O4 under electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Seki, S.; Shiiyama, K.; Matsumura, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the formation process of radiation-induced defects in magnesium aluminate spinel and their stability using transmission electron microscopy, with emphasis on the effects of electronic excitation. Small interstitial-type dislocation loops disappeared under electron-induced electronic excitation. The elimination rate of the loops was found to be one order higher than for α-alumina. The disappearance of dislocation loops by a dissociation mechanism into isolated interstitials is discussed through analysis of the growth-and-shrink process of the loops. HARECXS analysis on cross section specimens irradiated with 350 MeV Au ions has shown the progress of cation disordering along ion tracks to be a function of electronic stopping power, (dE/dx) e . Cations were found to exchange their sites toward a random configuration. Such disordering appears from (dE/dx) e = 10 keV/nm, and increases in size with increasing (dE/dx) e to reach nearly 10 nm in diameter at 30 keV/nm, under an assumption of a fully disordered configuration

  3. Remotely Exploring Deeper-Into-Matter by Non-Contact Detection of Audible Transients Excited by Laser Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Moros

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic spectroscopic approach to detect contents within different packaging, with substantially wider applicability than other currently available subsurface spectroscopies, is presented. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet pulsed laser (13 ns pulse length operated at 1 Hz was used to generate the sound field of a two-component system at a distance of 50 cm. The acoustic emission was captured using a unidirectional microphone and analyzed in the frequency domain. The focused laser pulse hitting the system, with intensity above that necessary to ablate the irradiated surface, transferred an impulsive force which led the structure to vibrate. Acoustic airborne transients were directly radiated by the vibrating elastic structure of the outer component that excited the surrounding air in contact with. However, under boundary conditions, sound field is modulated by the inner component that modified the dynamical integrity of the system. Thus, the resulting frequency spectra are useful indicators of the concealed content that influences the contributions originating from the wall of the container. High-quality acoustic spectra could be recorded from a gas (air, liquid (water, and solid (sand placed inside opaque chemical-resistant polypropylene and stainless steel sample containers. Discussion about effects of laser excitation energy and sampling position on the acoustic emission events is reported. Acoustic spectroscopy may complement the other subsurface alternative spectroscopies, severely limited by their inherent optical requirements for numerous detection scenarios.

  4. Study and characterization of phosphors excited in the V UV and UV range by the synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, I.

    1993-01-01

    A characterization tool using synchrotron radiation as a light source to record excitation spectra of the visible luminescence of phosphors induced by photons in the V UV and UV range, at several temperatures (10 to 300 K), is developed. The absorption and deexcitation mechanisms in Y F 3 , La F 3 and Th F 4 matrices doped with Eu 3+ , Tb 3+ , Dy 3+ and Er 3+ ions and polluted with oxygen ions, are examined; charge transfer bands appear clearly. The 4 f n to 4 f n-1 5 d transition bands are also observed on the excitation spectra of the visible luminescence of these compounds and two processes are proposed to interpret the energy relaxation. In order to determine the candidates for the color plasma display panel, measurements of luminous and external quantum yields for efficient phosphors are carried out. The Y F 3 :Eu 3+ compound is shown as a good candidate for the red emission in color plasma display panels

  5. Optimization of the parameters of power sources excited by β-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulyarskiy, S. V., E-mail: bulyar2954@mail.ru; Lakalin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nanotechnology of Microelectronics (Russian Federation); Abanin, I. E.; Amelichev, V. V. [Technological Center (Russian Federation); Svetuhin, V. V. [Ulyanovsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The experimental results and calculations of the efficiency of the energy conversion of Ni-63 β-radiation sources to electricity using silicon p–i–n diodes are presented. All calculations are performed taking into account the energy distribution of β-electrons. An expression for the converter open-circuit voltage is derived taking into account the distribution of high-energy electrons in the space-charge region of the p–i–n diode. Ways of optimizing the converter parameters by improving the technology of diodes and optimizing the emitter active layer and i-region thicknesses of the semiconductor converter are shown. The distribution of the conversion losses to the source and radiation detector and the losses to high-energy electron entry into the semiconductor is calculated. Experimental values of the conversion efficiency of 0.4–0.7% are in good agreement with the calculated parameters.

  6. Transition probabilities and radiative decay constants of the excited levels of Ne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wosinski, L.

    1981-01-01

    Transition probabilities for eight optical transitions between the 3p and 3d neon levels have been measured by the ''plasma transparency method''. The transitions probabilities are placed on an absolute scale by use of the recently reported values for the 4p→3s transitions. The measurements of induced changes in populations allowed the determination of the ratios of the radiative decay constants for the 4p and 3d levels. The experimental results are compared with the theoretically calculated transitions probabilities of Murphy and Lilly. (author)

  7. Radiative decay into the ground state of highly excited ions of neon isoelectronic series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogava, A.L.; Ivanova, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    Rates of first 14 dipole-permitted transitions in the main state: 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 -1s 2 2s 2 2p 5 3s, 3d, 4s, 4d; 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 -1s 2 2s2p 6 3p, 4p in Ne-similar ions are calculated on the basis of quantum-electrodynamic theory perturbations with model neutral approximation. The effect of strong interaction of levels closely placed is analysed. It leads to sharp redistribution of oscillator forces. It is shown that the rates of radiation decay as a function of nucleus charge at points of level approximation can have large extrema

  8. Study of radiative leptonic events with hard photons and search for excited charged leptons at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solokov, A; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    During the last 1995 data acquisition period at LEP, the DELPHI experiment collected an integrated luminosity of $5.9$ pb$^{-1}$ at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV and 136 GeV. Radiative leptonic events ($e, \\mu, \\tau$) with high energy photons were studied and compared to Standard Model predictions. The data were used to search for charged excited leptons decaying through an electromagnetic transition. No significant signal was found. From the search for pair produced excited leptons, the limits $m_{e^*} > 62.5$ GeV/$c^2$, $m_{\\mu^*} > 62.6$ GeV/$c^2$ and $m_{\\tau^*} > 62.2$ GeV/$c^2$ at 95\\% confidence level were established. For single excited lepton production, upper limits on the ratio $\\lambda/m_{\\ell^*}$ of the coupling of the excited charged lepton to its mass were derived.

  9. Study of excited states in 48Ti, 49Ti and 50Ti by means of radiative neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyl, J.F.A.G.

    1983-12-01

    The γ radiation produced by thermal neutron capture in a natural Ti target and in enriched 47 Ti and 49 Ti targets has been investigated. In the analysis 57 excited states of 48 Ti, 28 of 49 Ti and 31 of 50 Ti have been identified. The values for the 48 Ti and 49 Ti neutron binding energy agree with previous data, the value for 50 Ti differs by five standard deviations. The nature of the neutron capture mechanism has been investigated by comparing the present results with those from previous (d,p) work. It appears that in 47 Ti capture proceeds through a doorway state and that the potential capture mechanism is valid for 48 Ti and 49 Ti. The Fermi gas model gives a good representation of the nuclear level density in all three nuclei. From a measurement of the γ-ray circular polarization resulting from the capture of polarized neutrons, combined with previous (d,p) work, the spins of five 49 Ti levels could be determined, and those of 13 other 49 Ti levels could be confirmed. The combination of nuclear orientation measurements and circular polarization measurements had yielded the unambiguous determination of the spins of one 48 Ti state and of five 50 Ti states. Further spin and parity determinations for six 48 Ti and for five 50 Ti states have been obtained from the analysis of the identified branches together with the results of previous experiments. Shell-model calculations, which yielded excitation energies, branching ratios, lifetimes and (d,p) spectroscopic factors, give a good representation of the experimental data for the low-lying states in both even-even nuclei. (Auth.)

  10. Direct evidence for radiative charge transfer after inner-shell excitation and ionization of large clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Andreas; Stumpf, Vasili; Holzapfel, Xaver; Wiegandt, Florian; Schmidt, Philipp; Ozga, Christian; Reiß, Philipp; Ben Ltaief, Ltaief; Küstner-Wetekam, Catmarna; Jahnke, Till; Ehresmann, Arno; Demekhin, Philipp V.; Gokhberg, Kirill; Knie, André

    2018-01-01

    We directly observe radiative charge transfer (RCT) in Ne clusters by dispersed vacuum-ultraviolet photon detection. The doubly ionized Ne2+-{{{N}}{{e}}}n-1 initial states of RCT are populated after resonant 1s-3p photoexcitation or 1s photoionization of Ne n clusters with ≈ 2800. These states relax further producing Ne+-Ne+-{{{N}}{{e}}}n-2 final states, and the RCT photon is emitted. Ab initio calculations assign the observed RCT signal to the{}{{{N}}{{e}}}2+(2{{{p}}}-2{[}1{{D}}]){--}{{{N}}{{e}}}n-1 initial state, while transitions from other possible initial states are proposed to be quenched by competing relaxation processes. The present results are in agreement with the commonly discussed scenario, where the doubly ionized atom in a noble gas cluster forms a dimer which dissipates its vibrational energy on a picosecond timescale. Our study complements the picture of the RCT process in weakly bound clusters, providing information which is inaccessible by charged particle detection techniques.

  11. Pulsed currents carried by whistlers. IV. Electric fields and radiation excited by an electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.; Rousculp, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic properties of current pulses carried by whistler wave packets are obtained from a basic laboratory experiment. While the magnetic field and current density are described in the preceding companion paper (Part III), the present analysis starts with the electric field. The inductive and space charge electric field contributions are separately calculated in Fourier space from the measured magnetic field and Ohm's law along B 0 . Inverse Fourier transformation yields the total electric field in space and time, separated into rotational and divergent contributions. The space-charge density in whistler wave packets is obtained. The cross-field tensor conductivity is determined. The frozen-in condition is nearly satisfied, E+v e xB congruent 0. The dissipation is obtained from Poynting's theorem. The waves are collisionally damped; Landau damping is negligible. A radiation resistance for the electrode is determined. Analogous to Poynting's theorem, the transport of helicity is analyzed. Current helicity is generated by a flow of helicity between pulses traveling in opposite directions which carry opposite signs of helicity. Helicity is dissipated by collisions. These observations complete a detailed description of whistler/current pulses which can occur in various laboratory and space plasmas. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  12. Spread of cochlear excitation during stimulation with pulsed infrared radiation: inferior colliculus measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, C.-P.; Rajguru, S. M.; Matic, A. I.; Moreno, E. L.; Fishman, A. J.; Robinson, A. M.; Suh, E.; Walsh, J. T., Jr.

    2011-10-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has received considerable attention over the last few years. It provides an alternative method to artificially stimulate neurons without electrical current or the introduction of exogenous chromophores. One of the primary benefits of INS could be the improved spatial selectivity when compared with electrical stimulation. In the present study, we have evaluated the spatial selectivity of INS in the acutely damaged cochlea of guinea pigs and compared it to stimulation with acoustic tone pips in normal-hearing animals. The radiation was delivered via a 200 µm diameter optical fiber, which was inserted through a cochleostomy into the scala tympani of the basal cochlear turn. The stimulated section along the cochlear spiral ganglion was estimated from the neural responses recorded from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). ICC responses were recorded in response to cochlear INS using a multichannel penetrating electrode array. Spatial tuning curves (STCs) were constructed from the responses. For INS, approximately 55% of the activation profiles showed a single maximum, ~22% had two maxima and ~13% had multiple maxima. The remaining 10% of the profiles occurred at the limits of the electrode array and could not be classified. The majority of ICC STCs indicated that the spread of activation evoked by optical stimuli is comparable to that produced by acoustic tone pips.

  13. A parameter quantifying radiation damping of bay oscillations excited by incident tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Takahiro; Inazu, Daisuke; Waseda, Takuji; Hibiya, Toshiyuki

    2018-04-01

    The transient response of a bay with a narrow mouth to incident tsunamis is interpreted as the convolution of the input signal with the impulse response obtained by an inverse Fourier transform of the response curve of the oscillatory system with one degree of freedom. The rate of radiation damping associated with energy escaping seaward through the bay mouth is expressed in terms of the quality factor Q, which determines the decaying envelope of the impulse response. The value of Q of the resonant peak is approximated by the ratio of the resonant frequency ω0 to the bandwidth between frequencies at which the power spectral density of sea level within the bay drops to half of the peak value. Since the shape of the frequency power spectrum during the tsunami event is almost similar to that in the normal state in the neighborhood of ω0, Q can be estimated from sea level datasets in the normal state. Although the amplitude and phase of the impulse response need to be adjusted using the first crest or trough of the observed leading wave, this approach proves to work well in examining the transient responses of Miyako Bay and Kushimoto Bay on the Japanese Pacific coast to incident tsunamis.

  14. Evidence for Radiative Recombination of O+ Ions as a Significant Source of O 844.6 nm Emission Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, L.; Kerr, R. B.; Huang, Y.

    2018-04-01

    Photoelectron (PE) impact on ground-state O(3P) atoms is well known as a major source of twilight 844.6 nm emission in the midlatitude thermosphere. Knowledge of the PE flux can be used to infer thermospheric oxygen density, [O], from photometric measurements of 844.6 nm airglow, provided that PE impact is the dominant process generating the observed emission. During several spring observational campaigns at Arecibo Observatory, however, we have observed significant 844.6 nm emission throughout the night, which is unlikely to arise from PE impact excitation which requires solar illumination of either the local or geomagnetically conjugate thermosphere. Here we show that radiative recombination (RR) of O+ ions is likely responsible for the observed nighttime emission, based on model predictions of electron and O+ ion density and temperature by the Incoherent Scatter Radar Ionosphere Model. The calculated emission brightness produced by O + RR exhibits good agreement with the airglow data, in that both decay approximately monotonically throughout the night at similar rates. We conclude that the conventional assumption of a pure PE impact source is most likely to be invalid during dusk twilight, when RR-generated emission is most significant. Estimation of [O] from measurements of 844.6 nm emission demands isolation of the PE impact source via coincident estimation of the RR source, and the effective cross section for RR-generated emission is found here to be consistent with optically thin conditions.

  15. Photobleaching Response of Different Sources of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Exposed to Natural Solar Radiation Using Absorption and Excitation?Emission Matrix Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L.; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrea...

  16. Elemental-composition analysis by the measurement of characteristic X-ray radiation excited by the 1-3.5 MeV proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braziewicz, E.; Braziewicz, J.; Lyu Zaj Ik; Osetinskij, G.M.; Purehv, A.

    1981-01-01

    A method is reported for the determination of elemental composition of thin and thick targets from biological, geological and semiconducting materials. The composition is investigated by measuring the characteristic X-ray radiation after the targets were excited by a beam of protons from the electrostatic accelerator (JINR, Dubna). The accuracy of determination for thin targets was within the interval 3-5x10 -9 g/g, for thick targets - 5x10 -7 g/g [ru

  17. Synchrotron radiation induced TXRF of low Z elements on Si wafer surfaces at SSRL-comparison of excitation geometries and condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.; Pepponi, G.; Pianetta, P.; Pahlke, S.; Fabry, L.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of low Z elements, like Na and Al at ultra trace levels on Si wafer surfaces is demanded by semiconductor industry. SR-TXRF is a promising method to fulfill the task, if a special energy dispersive detector with an ultra thin window is used. Synchrotron radiation is the ideal suited excitation source for TXRF of low Z elements due to its intensive, natural collimated and linear polarized radiation with wide spectral range down to low energies even below 1 keV. TXRF offers some advantages for wafer surface analysis like nondestructive investigation and mapping capability. Experiments have been performed at SSRL beamline 3-4, a bending magnet beamline using white (<3 keV) and monochromatic radiation, as well as on beamline 3-3, using a crystal monochromator as well as a multilayer monochromator. A comparison of excitation detection geometries was performed, using a sidelooking detector with vertical positioned wafer as well as a downlooking detector with a horizontally arranged wafer. The advantages and disadvantages of the various geometries and excitation conditions are presented and the results compared. Detection limits are in the 100 fg range for Na, determined with droplet samples on Si wafer surfaces. (author)

  18. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M; Keenan, Francis P

    2013-01-01

    We report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation cross sections and rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV. The grasp (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) is adopted for calculating energy levels and radiative rates. For determining the collision strengths, and subsequently the excitation rates, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (darc) is used. Oscillator strengths, radiative rates and line strengths are reported for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions among the lowest 49 levels of each ion. Additionally, theoretical lifetimes are provided for all 49 levels of the above five ions. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and the effective collision strengths obtained listed over a wide temperature range up to 10 8 K. Comparisons are made with similar data obtained using the flexible atomic code (fac) to highlight the importance of resonances, included in calculations with darc, in the determination of effective collision strengths. Discrepancies between the collision strengths from darc and fac, particularly for some forbidden transitions, are also discussed. Finally, discrepancies between the present results for effective collision strengths with the darc code and earlier semi-relativistic R-matrix data are noted over a wide range of electron temperatures for many transitions in all ions. (paper)

  19. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2013-04-01

    We report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation cross sections and rates for transitions in He-like Ga XXX, Ge XXXI, As XXXII, Se XXXIII and Br XXXIV. The grasp (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) is adopted for calculating energy levels and radiative rates. For determining the collision strengths, and subsequently the excitation rates, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (darc) is used. Oscillator strengths, radiative rates and line strengths are reported for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions among the lowest 49 levels of each ion. Additionally, theoretical lifetimes are provided for all 49 levels of the above five ions. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and the effective collision strengths obtained listed over a wide temperature range up to 108 K. Comparisons are made with similar data obtained using the flexible atomic code (fac) to highlight the importance of resonances, included in calculations with darc, in the determination of effective collision strengths. Discrepancies between the collision strengths from darc and fac, particularly for some forbidden transitions, are also discussed. Finally, discrepancies between the present results for effective collision strengths with the darc code and earlier semi-relativistic R-matrix data are noted over a wide range of electron temperatures for many transitions in all ions.

  20. Mathematical simulation of the amplification of 1790-nm laser radiation in a nuclear-excited He - Ar plasma containing nanoclusters of uranium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosarev, V. A.; Kuznetsova, E. E.

    2014-02-01

    The possibility of applying dusty active media in nuclearpumped lasers has been considered. The amplification of 1790-nm radiation in a nuclear-excited dusty He - Ar plasma is studied by mathematical simulation. The influence of nanoclusters on the component composition of the medium and the kinetics of the processes occurring in it is analysed using a specially developed kinetic model, including 72 components and more than 400 reactions. An analysis of the results indicates that amplification can in principle be implemented in an active laser He - Ar medium containing 10-nm nanoclusters of metallic uranium and uranium dioxide.

  1. Applications of high order harmonic radiation to UVX-solids interaction: high excitation density in electronic relaxation dynamics and surface damaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Grazia, M.

    2007-12-01

    The new sources of radiation in the extreme-UV (X-UV: 10-100 nm), which deliver spatially coherent, ultra-short and intense pulses, allow studying high flux processes and ultra-fast dynamics in various domains. The thesis work presents two applications of the high-order laser harmonics (HH) to solid state physics. In Part I, we describe the optimization of the harmonic for studies of X-UV/solids interaction. In Part II, we investigate effects of high excitation density in the dynamics of electron relaxation in dielectric scintillator crystals - tungstates and fluorides, using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Quenching of luminescence at short time gives evidence of the competition between radiative and non-radiative recombination of self-trapped excitons (STE). The non-radiative channel is identified to mutual interaction of STE at high excitation density. In Part III, we study the X-UV induced damage mechanism in various materials, either conductor (amorphous carbon) or insulators (organic polymers, e.g., PMMA). In PMMA-Plexiglas, in the desorption regime (0.2 mJ/cm 2 , i.e., below damage threshold), the surface modifications reflect X-UV induced photochemical processes that are tentatively identified, as a function of dose: at low dose, polymer chain scission followed by the blow-up of the volatile, low-molecular fragments leads to crater formation; at high dose, cross-linking in the near-surface layer of remaining material leads to surface hardening. These promising results have great perspectives considering the performances already attained and planned in the next future in the development of the harmonic sources. (author)

  2. Analysis of trace in Rhododendron ferrigineum leaves for monitoring of urban atmospheric pollution by x-ray fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation Excitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Jefferson F.; Simabuco, Silvana M.; Jesus, E.F.O. de

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work was perform the biomonitoring of the atmospheric pollution in Campinas City (SP), applying the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation Excitation technique. For this were performed the elemental analysis of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se and Pb in Rhododendron ferrigineum leaves, employed here as bioindicator from environmental pollution in order to evaluate the effects of spatial and climatic contribution on the elemental concentration on the vegetable. Urban and rural sites were sampling in different seasons. The collected leaves were divided in two parts, one of them was washed by detergent and deionized water, in order to quantify the losses due the washing, and the second one was not washed, following the both parts of material were dried in stove, crushed and so the samples were submitted to an nitric-perchloric digestion. The samples were preconcentrated with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC), and the suspension was separated by filtration in cellulose membrane, then the samples were analyzed with X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation excitations. The results obtained shown that the vehicle flow can be associated to the distribution of the elements in the Rhododendrom ferrigineum leaves therefore the climatic contribution was not conclusive. (author)

  3. Study of the excited states of 28Si using the 27Al(p,γ)28Si radiative capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmas, Jean.

    1974-01-01

    The gamma decay of 28 Si levels excited in the 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si reaction has been investigated in the energy range Esub(p) 3 classification. A part from the K=0 + rotational band based on the ground state, the SU 3 previsions are not substantiated, but can not definitely rejected, and a few experiment are suggested. On the other band, many results are consistent with the shell model calculations [fr

  4. Cryogenic exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  5. Excitation energies, radiative and autoionization rates, dielectronic satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination rates for excited states of Rb-like W from Kr-like W [Relativistic atomic data for Rb-like tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, University I.; Safronova, A. S.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities, and autoionization rates for [Ni]4s 2 4p 6 nl, [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 4l ′ nl (l ′ =d,f,n = 4–7), [Ni]4s4p 6 4l ′ nl, (l ′ =d,f,n = 4–7), [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 5l ′ nl (n = 5–7), and [Ni]4s4p 6 6l ′ nl (n = 6–7) states in Rb-like tungsten (W37+) are calculated using the relativistic many-body perturbation theory method (RMBPT code) and the Hartree–Fock-relativistic method (COWAN code). Autoionizing levels above the [Ni]4s 2 4p 6 threshold are considered. It is found that configuration mixing among [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 4l ′ nl and [Ni]4s4p 6 4l ′ nl plays an important role for all atomic characteristics. Branching ratios relative to the first threshold and intensity factors are calculated for satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients are determined for the [Ni]4s 2 4p 6 nl (n = 4–7) singly excited states, as well as the [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 4dnl, [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 4fnl, [Ni]4s4p 6 4dnl, [Ni]4s 2 4p 6 4fnl, (n = 4–6), and [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 5l ′ 5l doubly excited nonautoionizing states in Rb-like W37+ ion. Contributions from the [Ni]4s24p 6 4fnl (n = 6–7), [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 5l ′ nl (n = 5–6), and [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 6l ′ nl (n = 6–7) doubly excited autoionizing states are evaluated numerically. The high-n state (with n up to 500) contributions are very important for high temperatures. These contributions are determined by using a scaling procedure. Synthetic dielectronic satellite spectra from Rb-like W are simulated in a broad spectral range from 8 to 70 Å. Here, these calculations provide highly accurate values for a number of W 37+ properties useful for a variety of applications including for fusion applications.

  6. Photodegradation of the herbicide azimsulfuron using nanocrystalline titania films as photocatalyst and low intensity Black Light radiation or simulated solar radiation as excitation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelentridou, Katerina; Stathatos, Elias; Karasali, Helen; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of the herbicide azimsulfuron have been treated by a photocatalytic process employing titania nanocrystalline films as photocatalyst. Results showed that solutions of this herbicide at maximum possible concentration can be photodegraded in a time of a few hours by using low intensity UVA radiation comparable with that of the UVA of solar noon. Similar results have also been obtained with simulated solar radiation. Thus heterogeneous photocatalysis can be employed for the treatment of waters polluted by this herbicide

  7. Coulomb excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, F.K.; Stelson, P.H.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of Coulomb excitation and a brief review of pertinent treatments of the Coulomb excitation process that are useful for the analysis of experiments are given. Examples demonstrating the scope of nuclear structure information obtainable from gamma spectroscopy are presented. Direct Elambda excitation of 232 Th is discussed in terms of the one phonon octupole vibrational spectrum. B(MI) reduced transition probabilities resulting from Coulomb excitation of odd-A deformed nuclei with heavy ions are presented as a test of the rotational model. The use of gamma ray coincidence and particle-gamma coincidence as tools for investigating Coulomb excitation is discussed. (U.S.)

  8. Zeeman effect on disalignment of excited atoms by radiation re-absorption: neon 2p2 atoms in a discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, K; Imagawa, T; Shikama, T; Hasuo, M

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the relaxation rate of alignment of neon atoms in a 2p 2 (in Paschen notation) level, which were excited by a linearly polarized laser pulse in a glow discharge plasma at 77 K, in a magnetic field of up to 3 T in the Voigt configuration. The relaxation rate decreased with an increase in the magnetic field strength of up to 0.5 T and showed no magnetic field dependence above 0.5 T. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate alignment relaxation, or disalignment, by radiation re-absorption of atomic resonance lines in a magnetic field. The simulated result was found to be consistent with the observed magnetic field dependence. We analysed the results of the simulation from a point of competition between the Zeeman splitting and the Doppler broadening of the transition lines from the 2p 2 level.

  9. Evolution of energy deposition processes in anthracene single crystal from photochemistry to radiation chemistry under excitation with synchrotron radiation from 3 to 700 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Jin, Zhaohui; Shimoyama, Iwao; Miyake, Yasuyuki; Ueno, Madoka; Kishigami, Yoichi; Horiuchi, Hiroki; Tanaka, Masahito; Kaneko, Fusae; Nishimagi, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Absolute values of quantum yield Φ(hν) of singlet exciton formation in anthracene single crystals were measured as a function of photon energy hν, with the usage of synchrotron radiation (SR) in 3-700 eV region. Values of Φ(hν) were found to increase linearly for hν≥75 eV. For hν≤40 eV, values of Φ(hν) gave a wealth of structures and are not linear to hν. Because number of secondary electrons produced by radiation is thought to increase in proportional to the incident photon energy, it is natural to conclude that the radiation chemistry effect becomes dominant above 75 eV. On the other hand, values of Φ(hν) showed response due to resonance rather than linear dependence with hν, which implies that the photochemical effect is dominant below 40 eV

  10. Thermodynamic and Radiative properties of Plasma Excited in EDM process Through N2 Taking Into Account Fe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adineh, V.R.; Coufal, O.; Živný, Oldřich

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 10 (2012), s. 2723-2735 ISSN 0093-3813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Electrical discharge machining * net emission coefficient * nitrogen-iron reaction products * plasma modeling, radiative heat transfer * thermodynamic properties Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.868, year: 2012

  11. Measurements of Channelling Radiation and its Polarization, X-Ray Excitation, together with Deviations from Landau Distributions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a continuation of the channelling experiments PS164 and WA64. The following points are investigated : \\item a)~Radiation from channelled 1 to 10 GeV/c positrons and electrons. The results clearly show that the region of 1-10 GeV/c is a very important and interesting momentum range where the onset of relativistic effects in connection with the unharmonicity of the channelling potential can give rise to very sharp pea photon spectra which could be used as a radiation source. With a detector opening angle which is large compared to 1/@g, these peaks appear sharp only on the high energy side. If, on the other hand, only forward emitted channelling radiation is detected, nearly symmetric peaks are expected to emerge. This is measured by means of a position sentitive @g-detector, consisting of an CdTe-array. Here each detector is 0.8~x~0.8~x~3~mm|3 and act as an active converter with the final shower absorbed in a large scintillator. Hereby an angular resolution of 1/3~@g around 40~@mrad is obtai...

  12. Exciter switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  13. Study on excitation of vibrational levels of osmium tetroxide molecule by the continuous CO2 laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kompanets, O.N.; Letokhov, V.S.; Minogin, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of nonlinear infrared absorption in OsO 4 has been studied using a single-frequence continuous-wave CO 2 laser (10.6 μ). Measured are relationships between the OsO 4 absorption coefficient and the laser radiation intensity, the week beam transmission through a cell filled with OsO 4 and the frequency of the intensity modulation of the strong beam which saturates the absorption. It is indicated that the thermal mechanism prevails in OsO 4 bleaching under pressure (>=) 1mm Hg. A strong infrared fluorescence observed and studied at 5.3 and 10.6 μ in the molecular OsO 4 in the field of the high-power CO 2 laser has supplied another proof of the conclusion. The thermal diffusion rate and the coefficient of thermal conductivity for OsO 4 vapours have been determined. It has been revealed that the hot bands represent a significant part in thermal mechanism of the laser radiation absorption by the molecule

  14. Voiced Excitations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holzricher, John

    2004-01-01

    To more easily obtain a voiced excitation function for speech characterization, measurements of skin motion, tracheal tube, and vocal fold, motions were made and compared to EM sensor-glottal derived...

  15. Exciting Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  16. Excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1974-01-01

    Excited States, Volume I reviews radiationless transitions, phosphorescence microwave double resonance through optical spectra in molecular solids, dipole moments in excited states, luminescence of polar molecules, and the problem of interstate interaction in aromatic carbonyl compounds. The book discusses the molecular electronic radiationless transitions; the double resonance techniques and the relaxation mechanisms involving the lowest triplet state of aromatic compounds; as well as the optical spectra and relaxation in molecular solids. The text also describes dipole moments and polarizab

  17. Angular Distribution and Linear Polarization of X-ray Radiation Resulting from Electron Impact Excitation of Highly Charged Ions in Debye Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanbin

    2018-05-01

    Plasma-screening effects on the 1s _{1/2} → 2l (l = s , p ) and 1s _{1/2} → 3d _{3/2} electron-impact excitation of highly charged ions are investigated, together with their subsequent radiative decay. The analysis is performed based on the multi-configuration Dirac-Fock method and the fully relativistic distorted-wave method incorporating the Debye-Hückel potential. To explore the nature of the effects, calculations are carried out based on detailed analyses of the integrated total and magnetic sublevel cross sections, the alignment parameters, the linear polarizations, and the angular distribution of the X-ray photoemission, as well as on corresponding data calculated in various Debye lengths/environments, taking the 2p _{3/2}→ 1s _{1/2} and 3d _{3/2}→ 1s _{1/2} characteristic lines of H-like Fe^{25+} ion as an example. The present results are compared with experimental data and other theoretical predictions where available.

  18. Electronic states of the θ' phase in Cu-Al alloys as compared to C16-CuAl2: Cu Lα emission excited directly by undulator radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallera, C.; de Michelis, B.; Puppin, E.; Braicovich, L.; Brookes, N. B.

    1996-01-01

    The electronic states of the θ' phase formed by thermal aging in the Al-Cu (0.5 at. %) alloy are compared with those in C16-CuAl2, which is the final phase separated at equilibrium. This is done by means of Cu Lα fluorescence spectroscopy. The high brilliance of undulator radiation used as an excitation source is exploited. The spectra are taken using the first harmonic of the undulator at 1.7 keV, with a full width half maximum of ~250 eV. A narrowing of around 0.5 eV of the Cu Lα spectra in the θ' phase is found. This is explained in terms of the differences in the Cu 3d-Cu 3d interaction in the two phases and of the hybridization between Cu 3d and the nearly free-electron-like electrons. The results demonstrate the future possibilities of fluorescence spectroscopy of minority species in inhomogeneous systems.

  19. Continuum emission of excited sodium dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Poyato, J.M.L.; Alonso, J.I.; Rico, F.R.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of the behaviour of excited molecular sodium using high-power Ar + laser radiation. A continuum emission was observed in the red wavelength region. This emission was thought to be caused by the formation of excited triatomic molecules. Energy transfer was observed from excited molecules to atoms. (orig.)

  20. Excited fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjema, F.; Djouadi, A.; Kneur, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The production of excited fermions with mass above 100 GeV is considered. f→Vf (1) decay widths are calculated where V=γ, Z or W. Excited fermion pair production in e + e - annihilation and in γγ collisions, and single production in e + e - annihilation, eγ and γγ collisions is also discussed. Cross sections are calculated for all these cases. The discovery potential of the NLC at 500 GeV is compared with that of other colliders. (K.A.) 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  2. Photoelectron spectra of N2+: Rotational line profiles studied with HeI-excited angle-resolved spectroscopy and with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohrwall, G.; Baltzer, P.; Bozek, J.

    2004-01-01

    We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outer most valence states in N+2, with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Sigma states, the X 2 Sigma +g and the B 2 Sigma +u, we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in beta value. The well-known difference in beta value for the nu=0 and nu =1 vibrations of the X 2 Sigma +g state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different beta values of the rotational branches. For the nu=0-2 vibrations of the A 2 Pi u state, the beta value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the nu=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Sigma +g and B 2 Sigma +u states where rotational line profiles are resolved. The intensities of the rotational branches were studied as function of photon energy, the X state between 23 and 65 eV, and We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outermost valence states in N+2, with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Sigma states, the X 2 Sigma +g and the B 2 Sigma +u, we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in beta value. The well-known difference in beta value for the nu=0 and nu=1 vibrations of the X 2 Sigma +g state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different beta values of the rotational branches. For the nu=0-2 vibrations of the A 2 Pi u state, the beta value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the nu=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Sigma +g and B 2 Sigma +u states where rotational line profiles a

  3. Photoelectron spectra of N2 +: Rotational line profiles studied with He;I endash excited angle-resolved spectroscopy and with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehrwall, G.; Baltzer, P.; Bozek, J.

    1999-01-01

    We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outermost valence states in N 2 + , with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Σ states, the X 2 Σ g + and the B 2 Σ u + , we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in β value. The well-known difference in β value for the ν=0 and ν=1 vibrations of the X 2 Σ g + state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different β values of the rotational branches. For the ν=0 endash 2 vibrations of the A 2 Π u state, the β value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the ν=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Σ g + and B 2 Σ u + states where rotational line profiles are resolved. The intensities of the rotational branches were studied as function of photon energy, the X state between 23 and 65 eV, and the B state between 23 and 45 eV. The results for the X state have recently been presented in a Letter [G. Oehrwall, P. Baltzer, and J. Bozek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 546, 1998]. The rotational branching ratios of the two states have very different behaviors as functions of photon energy. The relative intensities of the rotational branches in the X state change significantly over the studied energy range. The 3σ g →kσ u shape resonance apparently gives rise to a non-Franck-Condon-like behavior for the rotational branching ratio of the X state. In the B state, the rotational branching ratios remain essentially constant over the studied energy range. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  4. Photobleaching response of different sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter exposed to natural solar radiation using absorption and excitation-emission matrix spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN:TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN:TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0-9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%-5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  5. Beta-Excited Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation; Sources de rayonnements electromagnetiques excites par des particules beta; Vozbuzhdennye beta-chastitsami istochniki ehlektromagnitnogo izlucheniya; Fuentes de radiacion electromagnetica excitadas por particulas beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, J F; Rhodes, J R [Physics Group, Isotope Research Division, (AERE), Wantage Research Laboratory, Wantage, Berks (United Kingdom)

    1962-01-15

    Beta-excited sources of electromagnetic radiation covering the energy region 1-200 keV and suitable for industrial use are described. H{sup 3}, Pm{sup 147}, Kr{sup 85}, Tl{sup 204} and (Sr+Y){sup 90} were chosen as sources of beta particles by the criteria of long half-life, low price, ready availability and high specific activity. The {beta}-excited sources have been designed on the basis of a compromise between practical source construction and the best theoretical efficiency in a given energy region. In their paper, the authors calculate the number of photons produced per beta particle and consider how the results must be corrected for self-absorption of the X-rays. In the calculations account is taken of both bremsstrahlung and characteristic {alpha}-radiation; optimum characteristic X-ray yield is achieved for targets with an atomic number between 40 and 60. ''Sandwich'' targets of 1-2 beta half-value thicknesses are found to give maximum photon-yields in the desired energy region. Al, Ag and Au are suitable from the manufacturing point of view as source coverings. They were also found to give satisfactory bremsstrahlung and X-ray yields and distribution for various energy regions in the range 1-200 keV when correctly combined with the above-mentioned D-emitters. Some energy spectra are given and absorption curves in Al and Fe are shown for the best source-target combinations. The difference between sources constructed of {beta}-emitters sandwiched between target foils and intimate source-target mixtures was found to be small. Tables are given as a guide to the best source to be used for a particular absorber thickness range. (author) [French] Les auteurs decrivent des sources de rayonnements electromagnetiques excites par des particules beta, couvrant une gamme d'energies allant de 1 a 200 keV et convenant aux usages industriels. Comme sources de particules beta on a choisi le tritium, le {sup 147}Pm, le {sup 85}Kr, le {sup 204}Tl et le {sup 90}(Sr+Y), en

  6. Excited baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested

  7. Excited baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  8. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  9. Spectral photoluminescence for the characterization of excitation states in semiconductors and fluorescence solar collectors with manipulation of the in and out coupling of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knabe, Sebastian

    2011-05-20

    In this thesis results of different experiments are presented (e.g. angular dependent photoluminescence) to characterize the propagation of electro-magnetic radiation inside and out of absorbers using the examples of crystalline silicon and fluorescence collectors with and without manipulation of the in- and out-coupling of the radiation by photonic structures (opal and edge filters). Experimental results were compared with results from simulations of the propagation of radiation, which are based on the fundamental equations for the properties of electro-magnetic radiation like reflection, transmission, absorption or phase accumulation.

  10. Spectrochemical analysis using laser plasma excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on analyses of gases, liquids, particles, and surfaces in which laser plasma is used to vaporize and excite a material. The authors present a discussion of the interaction between laser radiation and a solid and some recent analytical results using laser plasma excitation on metals. The use of laser plasmas as an ablation source is also discussed

  11. Experimental investigation of dissociation pathways of cooled HeH+ following valence electron excitation at 32 nm by intense free-electron-laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, H. B.; Lammich, L.; Domesle, C.; Jordon-Thaden, B.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.; Heber, O.; Treusch, R.; Guerassimova, N.

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation pathways of HeH + have been investigated below the first ionization continuum by photoabsorption at 32 nm, using fragment momentum imaging in a crossed-beams experiment at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Investigations were done both for ions with several vibrational levels excited in the ion source and for ions vibrationally cooled in an electrostatic ion trap prior to the irradiation. The product channels He + (1s)+H(nl) and He(1snl)+H + were separated and the He(1snl)+H + channel was particularly studied by coincidence detection of the He and H + fragments on two separate fragment detectors. At 32 nm excitation, the branching ratio between the product channels was found to be σ He + +H /σ He+H + =0.96±0.11 for vibrationally hot and 1.70±0.48 for vibrationally cold ions. The spectra of kinetic energy releases for both channels revealed that photodissociation at 32 nm leads to high Rydberg states (n > or approx. 3-4) of the emerging atomic fragments irrespective of the initial vibrational excitation of HeH + . The fragment angular distributions showed that dissociation into the He+H + channel mostly (∼70%) proceeds through 1 Π states, while for the He + +H channel 1 Σ and 1 Π states are of about equal importance.

  12. Laser excitation spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solarz, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Laser excitation spectroscopy, recently applied to uranium enrichment research at LLL, has produced a wealth of new and vitally needed information about the uranium atom and its excited states. Among the data amassed were a large number of cross sections, almost a hundred radiative lifetimes, and many level assignments. Rydberg states, never before observed in uranium or any of the actinides, have been measured and cataloged. This work puts a firm experimental base under laser isotope separation, and permits a choice of the laser frequencies most appropriate for practical uranium enrichment

  13. A study of the fluorescence of the rare gases excited by nuclear particles. Use of the principle for the detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.

    1959-12-01

    In the first part is studied the properties of atoms excited by the passage of α particles through the various rare gases at atmospheric pressure. A spectral analysis of the emitted light showed that certain impurities play an important part in producing the fluorescence, and it has led to the conclusion that the light emission contains at least two components - one very short - lived due to the direct deexcitation of the rare gas, the other relatively slower due to the energy transfers to the impurity. The measurement of the life-time of the excited states has confirmed this foregoing hypothesis, the rapid part of the impulse is extremely short: less than 2,25.10 -9 s in the case of xenon; the slower part has a life-time depending directly on the nitrogen concentration, nitrogen being the impurity giving the largest effect in all cases. The study of rare gases under the influence of an electric field has made it possible to show that the amount of light produced by an α particle can be multiplied (by 60, for example, in a field of 600 V:cm) so that the luminescent efficiency is greater than in the case of INaTI. In the second part the characteristics of the rare gases acting as scintillators is examined, the most important property being the absence of fluorescence saturation when the intensity of the excitation incident on the gas is very large. This, together with the very short time of scintillation has made it possible to study a certain number of nuclear physical applications (heavy particle energy-measurements, kinetic studies on nuclear reactors, neutron spectroscopy). (author) [fr

  14. Resonant Raman scattering in Nd2O3 and the electronic structure of Sr2RuO4 studied by synchrotron radiation excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ederer, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is intended to illustrate two points. The first being the extensive growth of resonant Raman soft x-ray scattering due to the emergence of third-generation x-ray sources. With these sources, the ubiquitous presence of Raman scattering near the 3d and 4d ionization thresholds has been used to elucidate the excitation process in a number of rare earth and transition metal compounds. Such scattering can produce dramatic changes in the emission spectrum, as we show in our example of inelastic scattering at the 3d threshold of Nd 2 O 3 . Photon-in photon-out soft x-ray spectroscopy is adding a new dimension to soft x-ray spectroscopy by providing many opportunities for exciting research, especially at third-generation synchrotrons light sources. Second, it is very effective to use theory and experiment to characterize the electronic properties of materials. In particular we confirmed in-plane oxygen-ruthenium bonding in Sr 2 RuO 4 , this first copperless perovskite superconductor, by analyses using calculations, soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (SXE) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Measurements of this type illustrate the importance of combining SXE and PES measurements with theoretical calculations

  15. Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  16. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  17. Back reaction of excitations on a vortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arodz, H.; Hadasz, L.

    1997-01-01

    Excitations of a vortex are usually considered in a linear approximation neglecting their back reaction on the vortex. In the present paper we investigate back reaction of Proca-type excitations on a straight linear vortex in the Abelian Higgs model. We propose an exact ansatz for fields of the excited vortex. From an initial set of six nonlinear field equations we obtain (in a limit of weak excitations) two linear wave equations for the back reaction corrections. Their approximate solutions are found in the cases of plane wave and wave-packet-type excitations. We find that the excited vortex radiates the vector field and that the Higgs field has a very broad oscillating component. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  18. Back reaction of excitations on a vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arodź, Henryk; Hadasz, Leszek

    1997-01-01

    Excitations of a vortex are usually considered in a linear approximation neglecting their back reaction on the vortex. In the present paper we investigate back reaction of Proca-type excitations on a straight linear vortex in the Abelian Higgs model. We propose an exact ansatz for fields of the excited vortex. From an initial set of six nonlinear field equations we obtain (in a limit of weak excitations) two linear wave equations for the back reaction corrections. Their approximate solutions are found in the cases of plane wave and wave-packet-type excitations. We find that the excited vortex radiates the vector field and that the Higgs field has a very broad oscillating component.

  19. Orientation of nuclei excited by polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshits, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    Polarization and radiation angular distribution of oriented nuclei in inelastic scattering of polarized neutrons were investigated. Nucleus orientation in the final state was described by polarization density matrix (PDM). If PDM is known, angular distributions, linear and circular polarization of γ-quanta emitted by a nucleus can be determined. Analytical expression for PDM, conditions of its diagonalization in the case of direct nucleus excitation and excitation by the stage of compound nucleus were obtained. Orientation of 12 C nuclei in the excited state 4.439 MeV, 2 + at energy of incident neutrons in the laboratory system from 4.8 MeV (excitation threshold) upt to 9 MeV was calculated as an example. Neutrons in initial state are completely polarized along Z axis. Calculations showed that excitation proceeds mainly by the stage of compound nucleus formation and 12 C nucleus is highly polarized in excited state

  20. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, J.F.; Ulbak, K.; Dreyer, L.; Pukkala, E.; Oesterlind, A.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  1. A study of K x-ray hyper-satellites and KMM radiative Auger effect (RAE) of the elements 19≤Z≤25 by photon excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, S.S.; Seetharami Reddy, B.; Murti, M.V.R.; Mombasawala, L.

    2007-01-01

    K x-ray emission spectra were generated by photon excitation to study the Kα hyper-satellites, KβL 1 , Kβ 5 satellites and KMM RAE structures of the elements 19≤Z≤25 using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer with LiF 200 and LiF 220 crystals. The Z-dependence of the energy shift and relative intensity of these lines with respect to the diagram lines were studied except in the case of KMM RAE constituent peaks, for which only energy shifts were examined. The measured energy shifts and relative intensities are compared with the available theoretical predictions. Three of the constituent peaks in the KMM RAE structure are assigned K-M 1 M 2 ( 3 P), K-M 1 M 2 ( 1 P) and K-M 1 M 1 ( 1 S) transitions. (authors)

  2. Tunnel effect in excited and ionized states of nucleic acid bases and some aspects of radiation-induced point gene mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleticha-Lansky, R.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation induced perturbations of the genetic code are discussed from the standpoint of the frequency and specificity of mutations. According to Lowdin's theory of tautomeric rearrangement of nucleic acid base pairs through the tunnel effect, it is probable, that the proton potential in hydrogen bridges can be also effected by the incorporation of some radiolytic products of purines and pyrimidines into DNA as mistake bases. In this way it is possible, to eliminate any exo-or endogeneous energetic irradiation of the biological material and so to eliminate various undesirable damages of DNA. Thus higher specificity in the controlling of the genetic code changes would result. (F.G.)

  3. Numerical modelling of radiation in 2+ and- systems of nitrogen accounting non-stationary excited states population in a streamer discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djakov, A.F.; Bobrov, J.K.; Jourguelenas, J.V.

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of spectral bands intensity allows to obtain a valuable information on plasma temperature and electron density - the parameters having critical influence on chemical reactions and efficiency of plasma chemistry applications. At present the interest in streamer discharges is becoming more important because of their applications to flue gas treatment and ozone generation. For a streamer discharge in air the molecular spectral bands of the second positive and first negative systems of nitrogen are the most intensive ones. However, both the registration of radiation and interpretation of the received data are very complicated problems. (Authors)

  4. MOCVD growth and characterization of near-surface InGaN/GaN single quantum wells for non-radiative coupling of optical excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S.; Sintonen, S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a study of the structural and optical properties of near‐surface InGaN/GaN single quantum wells, grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition, as a function of underneath layer structure and GaN capping thickness. Special attention is paid to characterize properties which...... are important for non‐radiative coupling applications, such as emission intensity at peak wavelength and surface morphology. We observe that utilization of indium containing underneath structures results in high optical quality while increasing surface roughness. Optical performance can be further improved...

  5. The role of radiative de-excitation in the neutralization process of highly charged ions interacting with a single layer of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwestka, J.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Gruber, E.; Heller, R.; Kozubek, R.; Schleberger, M.; Facsko, S.; Aumayr, F.

    2018-05-01

    X-ray emission of slow (graphene. To discriminate against X-ray emission originating from the graphene's support grid a coincidence technique is used. X-ray emission of 75 keV Ar17+ and Ar18+ ions with either one or two K-shell vacancies is recorded. Using a windowless Bruker XFlash detector allows us to measure additionally Ar KLL and KLM Auger electrons and determine the branching ratio of radiative vs. non-radiative decay of Ar K-shell holes. Furthermore, X-ray spectra for 100 keV Xe22+-Xe35+ ions are compared, showing a broad M-line peak for all cases, where M-shell vacancies are present. All these peaks are accompanied by emission lines at still higher energies indicating the presence of a hollow atom during X-ray decay. We report a linear shift of the main M-line peak to higher energies for increasing incident charge state, i.e. increasing number of M-shell holes.

  6. Probability of collective excited state decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manykin, Eh.A.; Ozhovan, M.I.; Poluehktov, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    Decay mechanisms of condensed excited state formed of highly excited (Rydberg) atoms are considered, i.e. stability of so-called Rydberg substance is analyzed. It is shown that Auger recombination and radiation transitions are the basic processes. The corresponding probabilities are calculated and compared. It is ascertained that the ''Rydberg substance'' possesses macroscopic lifetime (several seconds) and in a sense it is metastable

  7. Excited charmed mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.; Shukla, S.

    1995-05-01

    The experimental status of excited charmed mesons is reviewed and is compared to theoretical expectations. Six states have been observed and their properties are consistent with those predicted for excited charmed states with orbital angular momentum equal to one

  8. Portable vibration exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  9. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected

  10. Hyperon excitation in nuclear coulomb field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanyashin, A.V.; Nikitin, Yu.P.; Shan'gin, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    A possibility is studied to measure radiative decay partial widths from the 3/2 + decuplet hyperon resonances by means of the Coulomb excitation method of the octet hyperons. The expected contributions from the strong and electromagnetic interactions in the coherence range to the hyperon excitation cross sections on heavy nuclei and on the 4 He nucleus are estimated. The particle angular distributions in the reactions Σ-+A→Σ-(1385)+A and Λ+A→Σ 0 (1385)+A are analysed in order to determine the energy range where the background conditions are the most favorable to extract the electromagnetic mechanism of the hyperon excitation [ru

  11. Two-photon excitation of argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pindzola, P.S.; Payne, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    The authors calculate two photon excitation parameters for various excited states of argon assuming the absorption of near resonance broad-bandwidth laser radiation. Results are given for the case of two photons absorbed for the same laser beam as well as the case of absorbing photons of different frequency from each of two laser beams. The authors use multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock wave functions to evaluate the second-order sums over matrix elements. Various experimental laser schemes are suggested for the efficient excitation and subsequent ionization of argon

  12. Elementary excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmer, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The role of elementary quasi-particle and quasi-hole excitations is reviewed in connection with the analysis of data involving high-lying nuclear states. This article includes discussions on: (i) single quasi-hole excitations in pick-up reactions, (ii) the formation of single quasi-hole and quasi-particle excitations (in different nuclei) during transfer reactions, followed by (iii) quasi-particle quasi-hole excitations in the same nucleus that are produced by photon absorption. Finally, the question of photon absorption in the vicinity of the elementary Δ resonance is discussed, where nucleonic as well as nuclear degrees of freedom can be excited

  13. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-03-10

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected for the device based on the natural frequency. Additionally, a second voltage amplitude of a second source of excitation can be selected for the device, and the first and second sources of excitation can be applied to the device. After applying the first and second sources of excitation, a frequency of the second source of excitation can be swept. Using the methods of multi- frequency excitation described herein, new operating frequencies, operating frequency ranges, resonance frequencies, resonance frequency ranges, and/or resonance responses can be achieved for devices and systems.

  14. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 79}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, C.J.; Blumenthal, D.; Davids, C.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The technical challenges expected in experiments with radioactive beams can already be explored by using ions produced in primary reactions. In addition, the re-excitation of these ions by Coulomb excitation allows a sensitive search for collective states that are well above the yrast line. We are building an experiment to study Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions which are separated from beam particles by the Fragment Mass Analyzer. An array of gamma detectors will be mounted at the focal plane to measure the gamma radiation following re-excitation. Five Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and five planar LEPS detectors will be used. The optimum experiment of this type appears to be the study of {sup 79}Rb following the {sup 24}Mg ({sup 58}Ni,3p) reaction. We calculate that about 5 x 10{sup 5} {sup 79}Rb nuclei/second will reach the excitation foil. This rubidium isotope was selected for study as it is strongly produced and is highly deformed, so easily re-excited. The use of a {sup 58}Ni re-excitation foil offers the best yields. After re-excitation the ions will be subsequently transported into a shielded beamdump to prevent the accumulation of activity.

  15. a simple a simple excitation control excitation control excitation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    field voltages determined follow a simple quadratic relationship that offer a very simple control scheme, dependent on only the stator current. Keywords: saturated reactances, no-load field voltage, excitation control, synchronous generators. 1. Introduction. Introduction. Introduction. The commonest generator in use today is ...

  16. Excited states in stochastic electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, H.M.; Marshall, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    It is shown that the set of Wigner functions associated with the excited states of the harmonic oscillator constitute a complete set of functions over the phase space. An arbitraty distribution can be expanded in terms of these Wigner functions. By studying the time evolution, according to Stochastic Electrodynamics, of the expansion coefficients, becomes feasible to separate explicity the contributionsof the radiative reaction and the vaccuum field to the Einsten. A coefficients for this system. A simple semiclassical explanation of the Weisskopf-Heitler phenomenon in resonance fluorescence is also supplied. (author) [pt

  17. On isospin excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenfei; Zhang Fengshou; Chen Liewen

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of Hartree-Fock theory using the extended Skyrme effective interaction, the isospin excitation energy as a function of relative neutron excess δ was investigated at different temperatures and densities. It was found that the isospin excitation energy decreased with the increment of temperature and/or the decrement of density. The authors pointed out that the decrement of isospin excitation energy was resulted from the weakening of quantum effect with increment of temperature and/or decrement of density. Meanwhile, the relationship between the isospin excitation energy and the symmetry energy was discussed and found that the symmetry energy was just a part of the isospin excitation energy. With increasing temperature and decreasing density, the contribution of the symmetry energy to the isospin excitation energy becomes more and more important. The isospin excitation energy as a function of relative neutron excess was also investigated using different potential parameters. The results shows that the isospin excitation energy is almost independent of the incompressibility and the effective mass, but strongly depends on the symmetry energy strength coefficient, which indicates that it is possible to extract the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state by investigating the isospin excitation energy in experiments

  18. Excited states 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that deals with molecules in the excited states. The book describes the geometries of molecules in the excited electronic states. One paper describes the geometries of a diatomic molecule and of polyatomic molecules; it also discusses the determination of the many excited state geometries of molecules with two, three, or four atoms by techniques similar to diatomic spectroscopy. Another paper introduces an ordered theory related to excitons in pure and mixed molecular crystals. This paper also presents some experimental data such as those invo

  19. Excited states v.6

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1982-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 6 is a collection of papers that discusses the excited states of molecules. The first paper discusses the linear polyene electronic structure and potential surfaces, considering both the theoretical and experimental approaches in such electronic states. This paper also reviews the theory of electronic structure and cites some experimental techniques on polyene excitations, polyene spectroscopic phenomenology, and those involving higher states of polyenes and their triplet states. Examples of these experimental studies of excited states involve the high-resolution one-pho

  20. Nuclear excited power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, R.Z.; Cox, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    A power generation system is described, comprising: a gaseous core nuclear reactor; means for passing helium through the reactor, the helium being excited and forming alpha particles by high frequency radiation from the core of the gaseous core nuclear reactor; a reaction chamber; means for coupling chlorine and hydrogen to the reaction chamber, the helium and alpha particles energizing the chlorine and hydrogen to form a high temperature, high pressure hydrogen chloride plasma; means for converting the plasma to electromechanical energy; means for coupling the helium back to the gaseous core nuclear reactor; and means for disassociating the hydrogen chloride to form molecular hydrogen and chlorine, to be coupled back to the reaction chamber in a closed loop. The patent also describes a power generation system comprising: a gaseous core nuclear reactor; means for passing hydrogen through the reactor, the hydrogen being excited by high frequency radiation from the core; means for coupling chlorine to a reaction chamber, the hydrogen energizing the chlorine in the chamber to form a high temperature, high pressure hydrogen chloride plasma; means for converting the plasma to electromechanical energy; means for disassociating the hydrogen chloride to form molecular hydrogen and chlorine, and means for coupling the hydrogen back to the gaseous core nuclear reactor in a closed loop

  1. Excitation of spin-1 states in 166168170Er using bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, F.R.

    1976-01-01

    Some 40 states in 166 , 168 , 170 Er, most of them previously unknown, have been excited using bremsstrahlung with < or =4.2 MeV endpoint energy. For all but three of these levels, the angular distribution of the resonantly scattered radiation favors the assignment of spin 1. For some of the strongly excited levels, linear polarization measurements have been performed. They indicate that these levels have positive parity. The branching ratios further characterize them as K=1 excitations

  2. Sound radiation quantities arising from a resilient circular radiator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, R.M.; Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Power series expansions in ka are derived for the pressure at the edge of a radiator, the reaction force on the radiator, and the total radiated power arising from a harmonically excited, resilient, flat, circular radiator of radius a in an infinite baffle. The velocity profiles on the radiator are

  3. Electron-impact excitation of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, D.A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    A simple expression is derived that relates the rate coefficient for dipole-allowed electron-impact excitation of a molecular ion in the Coulomb-Born approximation to the Einstein A coefficient for the corresponding radiative decay. Results are given for several molecular ions of astrophysical interest. A general analytic expression is obtained for the equilibrium rotational level populations in the ground vibrational state of any molecular ion excited by collisions with electrons. The expression depends only upon the electron temperature, the electron density, and the rotational constant of the molecular ion. A similar expression is obtained for neutral polar molecules

  4. Spectra from foil-excited molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Cecchi, J.L.; Kruse, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet spectra (5 to 55 nm) for foil-excited molybdenum ions have been measured using 22 to 200 MeV beams from the Brookhaven National Laboratory MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility, 20 μg/cm 2 C stripping foils, and a grazing incidence spectrometer. The mean ion charge states (13 to 28) and the narrow distribution widths (about 2 charge states) were accurately predictable from experimental parameters. Where possible, comparisons are given with Mo radiation from tokamaks, vacuum sparks, and laser-excited plasmas

  5. Dissociative Excitation of Adenine by Electron Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, J. William; Trocchi, Joshuah; Dech, Jeffery; Kedzierski, Wladek

    2017-04-01

    Dissociative excitation of adenine (C6H5NH2) into excited atomic fragments has been studied in the electron impact energy range from threshold to 300 eV. A crossed beam system coupled to a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) monochromator is used to study emissions in the wavelength range from 110 to 200 nm. The beam of adenine vapor from a stainless steel oven is crossed at right angles by the electron beam and the resultant UV radiation is detected in a mutually orthogonal direction. The strongest feature in the spectrum is H Lyman- α. Financial support from NSERC and CFI, Canada, is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Harmonic excitations in quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luck, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    The harmonic excitations (phonons) of quasicrystals are studied in a simple one-dimensional model. The spectrum is a Cantor set, which exhibits selfsimilarity properties. The eigenstates are generically ''critical'', i.e. neither extended nor localized

  7. Radio frequency plasma excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burden, M.St.J.; Cross, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation into the use of rf sputtering for ion cleaning of insulating substrates before ion plating is reported. Initial experiments consisted of sputtering metals with rf power followed by the deposition of copper onto glass slides using rf plasma excitation and biasing supply. It was found that good quality films were obtained by rf ion plating onto plastics with excellent adhesion over a wide operating pressure range. A block schematic of the rf plasma excitation system is shown. (UK)

  8. High energy nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogny, D.; Decharge, J.

    1983-09-01

    The main purpose of this talk is to see whether a simple description of the nuclear excitations permits one to characterize some of the high energy structures recently observed. The discussion is based on the linear response to different external fields calculated using the Random Phase Approximation. For those structure in heavy ion collisions at excitation energies above 50 MeV which cannot be explained with such a simple approach, we discuss a possible mechanism for this heavy ion scattering

  9. Dissociative Excitation of Acetylene Induced by Electron Impact: Excitation-emission Cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Országh, Juraj; Danko, Marián; Čechvala, Peter; Matejčík, Štefan, E-mail: matejcik@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina F-2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-05-20

    The optical emission spectrum of acetylene excited by monoenergetic electrons was studied in the range of 190–660 nm. The dissociative excitation and dissociative ionization associated with excitation of the ions initiated by electron impact were dominant processes contributing to the spectrum. The spectrum was dominated by the atomic lines (hydrogen Balmer series, carbon) and molecular bands (CH(A–X), CH(B–X), CH{sup +}(B–A), and C{sub 2}). Besides the discrete transitions, we have detected the continuum emission radiation of ethynyl radical C{sub 2}H(A–X). For most important lines and bands of the spectrum we have measured absolute excitation-emission cross sections and determined the energy thresholds of the particular dissociative channels.

  10. How many atoms get excited when they decay?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blocher, Philip Daniel; Mølmer, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the time evolution of a two-level system prepared in a superposition of its ground state and radiatively unstable excited state. We show that by choosing appropriate means of detection of the radiated field, we can steer the evolution of the emitter and herald its preparation in the fu...

  11. Systematics in Rydberg state excitations for ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, B.; Jensen, K.; Petersen, N.B.; Veje, E.

    1976-01-01

    Rydberg state excitations in the Ne + , Mg + -He collisions have been studied in the projectile energy range 10-75 keV by means of optical spectrometry in a search for systematic trends. The relative excitation cross sections for levels of a Rydberg term series are found to follow a general (nsup(x))sup(P) behaviour with P < approximately -3 varying with collision energy and particles, regardless of whether the excited state population results from direct excitation, single electron transfer, or double electron transfer. At higher collision energies P is approximately -3 as predicted by theory. Polarization of the emitted line radiation indicates that there is no general rule for the relative excitation of the different magnetic substates of the same level. A statistical distribution of excitation is found for levels within the same term when the fine structure splitting is small. (Auth.)

  12. Giant resonances on excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besold, W.; Reinhard, P.G.; Toepffer, C.

    1984-01-01

    We derive modified RPA equations for small vibrations about excited states. The temperature dependence of collective excitations is examined. The formalism is applied to the ground state and the first excited state of 90 Zr in order to confirm a hypothesis which states that not only the ground state but every excited state of a nucleus has a giant resonance built upon it. (orig.)

  13. Excitation of Nucleon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2001-01-01

    I discuss developments in the area of nucleon resonance excitation, both necessary and feasible, that would put our understanding of nucleon structure in the regime of strong QCD on a qualitatively new level. They involve the collection of high quality data in various channels, a more rigorous approach in the search for ''missing'' resonances, an effort to compute some critical quantities in nucleon resonance excitations from first principles, i.e. QCD, and a proposal focused to obtain an understanding of a fundamental quantity in nucleon structure

  14. The rotational excitation of HF by H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrousseaux, Benjamin; Lique, François

    2018-06-01

    The HF molecule is a key tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Accurate modelling of the HF abundance in such media requires one to model its excitation by both radiation and collisions. In diffuse ISM, the dominant collisional partners are atomic and molecular hydrogen. We report quantum time-independent calculations of collisional cross-sections and rate coefficients for the rotational excitation of HF by H. The reactive hydrogen exchange channels are taken into account in the scattering calculations. For the first time, HF-H rate coefficients are provided for temperature ranging from 10 to 500 K. The strongest collision-induced rotational HF transitions are those with Δj = 1, and the order of magnitude of the new HF-H rate coefficients is similar to that of the HF-H2 ones previously computed. As a first application, we simulate the excitation of HF by both H and H2 in typical diffuse ISM. We show that, depending on the rotational transition, hydrogen atoms increase or decrease the simulated excitation temperatures compared to collisional excitation only due to H2 molecules. Such results suggest that the new HF-H collisional data have to be used for properly modelling the abundance of HF in diffuse ISM.

  15. Electron-beam-excited gas laser research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.W.; Gerardo, J.B.; Patterson, E.L.; Gerber, R.A.; Rice, J.K.; Bingham, F.W.

    1975-01-01

    Net energy gain in laser fusion places requirements on the laser that are not realized by any existing laser. Utilization of relativistic electron beams (REB's), a relatively new source for the excitation of gas laser media, may lead to new lasers that could satisfy these requirements. Already REB's have been utilized to excite gas laser media and produce gas lasers that have not been produced as successfully any other way. Electron-beam-excitation has produced electronic-transition dimer lasers that have not yet been produced by any other excitation scheme (for example, Xe 2 / sup *(1)/, Kr:O(2 1 S)/sup 2/, KrF/sup *(3)/). In addition, REB's have initiated chemical reactions to produce HF laser radiation with unique and promising results. Relativistic-electron-beam gas-laser research is continuing to lead to new lasers with unique properties. Results of work carried out at Sandia Laboratories in this pioneering effort of electron-beam-excited-gas lasers are reviewed. (U.S.)

  16. Detection of interstellar vibrationally excited HCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziurys, L.M.; Turner, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrationally excited HCN has been observed for the first time in the interstellar medium. The J = 3-2 rotational transitions of the l-doubled (0,1/sup 1d/,1c, 0) bending mode of HCN have been detected toward Orion-KL and IRC +10216. In Orion, the overall column density in the (0,1,0) mode, which exclusively samples the ''hot core,'' is 1.7-10 16 cm -2 and can be understood in terms of the ''doughnut'' model for Orion. The ground-state HCN column density implied by the excited-state observations is 2.3 x 10 18 cm -2 in the hot core, at least one order of magnitude greater than the column densities derived for HCN in its spike and plateau/doughnut components. Radiative excitation by 14 μm flux from IRc2 accounts for the (0,1,0) population provided the hot core is approx.6-7 x 10 16 cm distant from IRc2, in agreement with the ''cavity'' model for KL. Toward IRC +10216 we have detected J = 3-2 transitions of both (0,1/sup 1c/,/sup 1d/,0) and (0,2 0 ,0) excited states. The spectral profiles have been modeled to yield abundances and excitation conditions throughout the expanding envelope

  17. Studies of interstellar vibrationally-excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziurys, L.M.; Snell, R.L.; Erickson, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    Several molecules thus far have been detected in the ISM in vibrationally-excited states, including H 2 , SiO, HC 3 N, and CH 3 CN. In order for vibrational-excitation to occur, these species must be present in unusually hot and dense gas and/or where strong infrared radiation is present. In order to do a more thorough investigation of vibrational excitation in the interstellar medium (ISM), studies were done of several mm-wave transitions originating in excited vibrational modes of HCN, an abundant interstellar molecule. Vibrationally-excited HCN was recently detected toward Orion-KL and IRC+10216, using a 12 meter antenna. The J=3-2 rotational transitions were detected in the molecule's lowest vibrational state, the bending mode, which is split into two separate levels, due to l-type doubling. This bending mode lies 1025K above ground state, with an Einstein A coefficient of 3.6/s. The J=3-2 line mode of HCN, which lies 2050K above ground state, was also observed toward IRC+10216, and subsequently in Orion-KL. Further measurements of vibrationally-excited HCN were done using a 14 meter telescope, which include the observations of the (0,1,0) and (0,2,0) modes towards Orion-KL, via their J=3-2 transitions at 265-267 GHz. The spectrum of the J=3-2 line in Orion taken with the 14 meter telescope, is shown, along with a map, which indicates that emission from vibrationally-excited HCN arises from a region probably smaller than the 14 meter telescope's 20 arcsec beam

  18. van der Waals interaction of excited media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherkunov, Yury

    2005-01-01

    The Casimir interaction between two media of ground-state atoms is well described with the help of the Lifshitz formula depending upon the permittivity of the media. We will show that this formula is in contradiction with experimental evidence for excited atoms. We calculate the Casimir force between two atoms if one or both of them are excited. We use methods of quantum electrodynamics specially derived for the problem. It enables us to take into account the excited-state radiation widths of atoms. Then we calculate the force between the excited atom and medium of ground-state atoms. The results are in agreement with the ones obtained by other authors who used perturbation theory or linear response theory. Generalization of our results to the case of the interaction between two media of excited atoms results in a formula, which is in not only in quantitative, but in qualitative contradiction with the Lifshitz formula. This contradiction disappears if the media of ground-state atoms are considered. Moreover, our result does not include the permittivity of the media. It includes a quantity which differs from the permittivity only for excited atoms. The main features of our results are as follows. The interaction is resonant, the force may be either attractive or repulsive depending on the resonant frequencies of the atoms of different media, and the value of the Casimir force may be several orders of magnitude lager than that predicted by the Lifshitz formula. The features mentioned here are in agreement with known experimental and theoretical evidence obtained by many authors for the interaction of a single excited atom with dielectric media

  19. Can Measured Synergy Excitations Accurately Construct Unmeasured Muscle Excitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Nicholas A; Patten, Carolynn; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2018-01-01

    Accurate prediction of muscle and joint contact forces during human movement could improve treatment planning for disorders such as osteoarthritis, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy. Recent studies suggest that muscle synergies, a low-dimensional representation of a large set of muscle electromyographic (EMG) signals (henceforth called "muscle excitations"), may reduce the redundancy of muscle excitation solutions predicted by optimization methods. This study explores the feasibility of using muscle synergy information extracted from eight muscle EMG signals (henceforth called "included" muscle excitations) to accurately construct muscle excitations from up to 16 additional EMG signals (henceforth called "excluded" muscle excitations). Using treadmill walking data collected at multiple speeds from two subjects (one healthy, one poststroke), we performed muscle synergy analysis on all possible subsets of eight included muscle excitations and evaluated how well the calculated time-varying synergy excitations could construct the remaining excluded muscle excitations (henceforth called "synergy extrapolation"). We found that some, but not all, eight-muscle subsets yielded synergy excitations that achieved >90% extrapolation variance accounted for (VAF). Using the top 10% of subsets, we developed muscle selection heuristics to identify included muscle combinations whose synergy excitations achieved high extrapolation accuracy. For 3, 4, and 5 synergies, these heuristics yielded extrapolation VAF values approximately 5% lower than corresponding reconstruction VAF values for each associated eight-muscle subset. These results suggest that synergy excitations obtained from experimentally measured muscle excitations can accurately construct unmeasured muscle excitations, which could help limit muscle excitations predicted by muscle force optimizations.

  20. Excitation of Stellar Pulsations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houdek, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this review I present an overview of our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that are responsible for the excitation of pulsations in stars with surface convection zones. These are typically cooler stars such as the δ Scuti stars, and stars supporting solar-like oscillations....

  1. Relativistic Coulomb excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, A.; Alder, K.

    1979-01-01

    Coulomb excitation of both target and projectile in relativistic heavy ion collisions is evaluated including the lowest order correction for the deviation from a straight line trajectory. Explicit results for differential and total cross sections are given in the form of tables and figures. (Auth.)

  2. Excited lepton search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrend, H.J.; Buerger, J.; Criegee, L.; Fenner, H.; Field, J.H.; Franke, G.; Fuster, J.; Holler, Y.; Meyer, J.; Schroeder, V.; Sindt, H.; Timm, U.; Winter, G.G.; Zimmermann, W.; Bussey, P.J.; Campbell, A.J.; Dainton, J.B.; Hendry, D.; McCurrach, G.; Scarr, J.M.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Blobel, V.; Poppe, M.; Spitzer, H.; Boer, W. de; Buschhorn, G.; Christiansen, W.; Grindhammer, G.; Gunderson, B.; Kiesling, C.; Kotthaus, R.; Kroha, H.; Lueers, D.; Oberlack, H.; Sack, B.; Schacht, P.; Shooshtari, G.; Wiedenmann, W.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Fournier, D.; Gaillard, M.; Grivaz, J.F.; Haissinski, J.; Janot, P.; Journe, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Ros, E.; Spadafora, A.; Veillet, J.J.; Aleksan, R.; Cozzika, G.; Ducros, Y.; Jarry, P.; Lavagne, Y.; Ould Saada, F.; Pamela, J.; Pierre, F.; Zacek, J.; Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Gnat, Y.; Grunhaus, J.

    1986-02-01

    Using the CELLO detector at PETRA we have searched for excited leptons by studying e + e - interactions which yield p + p - γγ, l + l - γ and γγ final states, where l = 3, μ or τ. We observe good agreement with QED and set new limits on e*, μ*, and τ* production. (orig.)

  3. Hardness and excitation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that the first excitation energy can be given by the Kohn-Sham hardness (i.e. the energy difference of the ground-state lowest unoccupied and highest occupied levels) plus an extra term coming from the partial derivative of the ensemble exchange-correlation energy with respect to the weighting factor in the ...

  4. Nonlinear excitations in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrard, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the workshop entitled ''Nonlinear Excitations in Biomolecules'' is to attempt to bridge the gap between the physicists and biologists communities which is mainly due to language and cultural barriers. The progress of nonlinear science in the last few decades which have shown that the combination of nonlinearity, which characterize most biological phenomena, and cooperative effects in a system having a large number of degrees of freedom, can give rise to coherent excitations with remarkable properties. New concepts, such as solitons nd nonlinear energy localisation have become familiar to physicists and applied mathematicians. It is thus tempting to make an analogy between these coherent excitations and the exceptional stability of some biological processes, such as for instance DNA transcription, which require the coordination of many events in the ever changing environment of a cell. Physicists are now invoking nonlinear excitations to describe and explain many bio-molecular processes while biologists often doubt that the seemingly infinite variety of phenomena that they are attempting to classify can be reduced to such simple concepts. A large part of the meeting is devoted to tutorial lectures rather than to latest research results. The book provides a pedagogical introduction to the two topics forming the backbone of the meeting: the theory of nonlinear excitations and solitons, and their application in biology; and the structure and function of biomolecules, as well as energy and charge transport in biophysics. In order to emphasize the link between physics and biology, the volume is not divided along these two topics but according to biological subjects. Each chapter starts with a short introduction attempting to help the reader to find his way among the contributions and point out the connection between them. 23 lectures over the 32 presented have been selected and refers to quantum properties of macro-molecules. (J.S.)

  5. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swallow, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction (defines scope of article as dealing with the chemistry of reactive species, (e.g. excess electrons, excited states, free radicals and inorganic ions in unusual valency states) as studied using radiation with radiation chemistry in its traditional sense and with biological and industrial applications); gases; water and simple inorganic systems; aqueous metallo-organic compounds and metalloproteins; small organic molecules in aqueous solution; microheterogeneous systems; non-aqueous liquids and solutions; solids; biological macromolecules; synthetic polymers. (U.K.)

  6. Exotic nuclear excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Pancholi, S C

    2011-01-01

    By providing the reader with a foundational background in high spin nuclear structure physics and exploring exciting current discoveries in the field, this book presents new phenomena in a clear and compelling way. The quest for achieving the highest spin states has resulted in some remarkable successes which this monograph will address in comprehensive detail. The text covers an array of pertinent subject matter, including the rotational alignment and bandcrossings, magnetic rotation, triaxial strong deformation and wobbling motion and chirality in nuclei. Dr. Pancholi offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. The prerequisites for a proper appreciation are courses in nuclear physics and nuclear models and measurement techniques of observables like gamma-ray energies, intensities, multi-fold coincidences, angular correlations or distributions, linear polarization, internal conversion coefficients, short lifetime (pico-second range) of excited states etc. and instrum...

  7. Excited nuclei fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, C.

    1986-11-01

    Experimental indications leading to the thought of a very excited nucleus fragmentation are resumed. Theoretical approaches are briefly described; they are used to explain the phenomenon in showing off they are based on a minimum information principle. This model is based on time dependent Thomas-Fermi calculation which allows the mean field effect description, and with a site-bound percolation model which allows the fluctuation description [fr

  8. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.

    1985-01-01

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs

  9. Radiation signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlynn, S.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    A new concept for modelling radiation risk is proposed. This concept is based on the proposal that the spectrum of molecular lesions, which we dub ''the radiation signature'', can be used to identify the quality of the causal radiation. If the proposal concerning radiation signatures can be established then, in principle, both prospective and retrospective risk determination can be assessed on an individual basis. A major goal of biophysical modelling is to relate physical events such as ionization, excitation, etc. to the production of radiation carcinogenesis. A description of the physical events is provided by track structure. The track structure is determined by radiation quality, and it can be considered to be the ''physical signature'' of the radiation. Unfortunately, the uniqueness characteristics of this signature are dissipated in biological systems in ∼10 -9 s. Nonetheless, it is our contention that this physical disturbance of the biological system eventuates later, at ∼10 0 s, in molecular lesion spectra which also characterize the causal radiation. (author)

  10. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palffy, Adriana; Scheid, Werner; Harman, Zoltan

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC), in which a continuum electron is captured into a bound state of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. In order to derive the cross section a Feshbach projection operator formalism is introduced. Nuclear states and transitions are described by a nuclear collective model and making use of experimental data. Transition rates and total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are calculated for various heavy-ion collision systems

  11. Formation and role of excited states in radiolysis - a foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that the choice of contributions to the special issue of this Journal has been limited to those which bear on the details of the mechanisms of excited state formation and are likely to be useful to radiation chemists. Since more than half the energy deposited in radiolysis goes into excitation, studies on the fate of the excited species formed are very important. A brief reference is made to the subject matter of each of the fifteen contributions, and its significance to the development of the technique of radiolysis is outlined. (U.K.)

  12. Radiation effects in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Problems in the studies of radiation effects in gases are discussed. By means of ionization- excitation- and electron-capture yields various applications are characterized: ionization detectors, X-ray detectors, radionuclide battery, and radiation-induced chemical gas-phase reactions. Some new results of basic research in respect to the SO 2 oxidation are discussed. (author)

  13. Excited QCD 2017

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This edition is the ninth in a series of workshops that had been previously organised in Poland (2009), Slovakia (2010 and 2015), France (2011), Portugal (2012 and 2016) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (2013 and 2014). In the year 2017 the workshop goes to the beautiful Sintra near Lisbon, Portugal. The workshop covers diverse aspects of QCD: (i) QCD at low energies: excited hadrons, new resonances, glueballs, multiquarks. (ii) QCD at high temperatures and large densities: heavy-ion collisions, jets, diffraction, hadronisation, quark-gluon plasma, holography, colour-glass condensate, compact stars, applications to astrophysics.

  14. Highly excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Littman, M.G.; Zimmerman, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Highly excited atoms are often called Rydberg atoms. These atoms have a wealth of exotic properties which are discussed. Of special interest, are the effects of electric and magnetic fields on Rydberg atoms. Ordinary atoms are scarcely affected by an applied electric or magnetic field; Rydberg atoms can be strongly distorted and even pulled apart by a relatively weak electric field, and they can be squeezed into unexpected shapes by a magnetic field. Studies of the structure of Rydberg atoms in electric and magnetic fields have revealed dramatic atomic phenomena that had not been observed before

  15. A study of the fluorescence of the rare gases excited by nuclear particles. Use of the principle for the detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation; Etude de la fluorescence des gaz rares excites par des particules nucleaires. Utilisation pour la detection des rayonnements nucleaires par scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-12-15

    In the first part is studied the properties of atoms excited by the passage of {alpha} particles through the various rare gases at atmospheric pressure. A spectral analysis of the emitted light showed that certain impurities play an important part in producing the fluorescence, and it has led to the conclusion that the light emission contains at least two components - one very short - lived due to the direct deexcitation of the rare gas, the other relatively slower due to the energy transfers to the impurity. The measurement of the life-time of the excited states has confirmed this foregoing hypothesis, the rapid part of the impulse is extremely short: less than 2,25.10{sup -9} s in the case of xenon; the slower part has a life-time depending directly on the nitrogen concentration, nitrogen being the impurity giving the largest effect in all cases. The study of rare gases under the influence of an electric field has made it possible to show that the amount of light produced by an {alpha} particle can be multiplied (by 60, for example, in a field of 600 V:cm) so that the luminescent efficiency is greater than in the case of INaTI. In the second part the characteristics of the rare gases acting as scintillators is examined, the most important property being the absence of fluorescence saturation when the intensity of the excitation incident on the gas is very large. This, together with the very short time of scintillation has made it possible to study a certain number of nuclear physical applications (heavy particle energy-measurements, kinetic studies on nuclear reactors, neutron spectroscopy). (author) [French] On etudie dans la premiere partie les proprietes des atomes excites par le passage de particules {alpha} dans les differents gaz rares a la pression atmospherique. L'etude spectrale de la lumiere emise a montre que certaines impuretes jouent un role considerable dans la fluorescence et on a ete amene a penser que l'emission de lumiere comporte au moins deux

  16. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  17. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  18. Excitation equilibria in plasmas: a classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, J.-J.A.M. van der.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis the author presents a classification of plasmas based on the atomic state distribution function. The study is based on the relation between the distribution function and the underlying processes and starts with the proper understanding of thermodynamic equilibrium (TE). Four types of proper balances are relevant: The 'Maxwell balance' of kinetic energy transfer, the 'Boltzmann balance' of excitation/deexcitation, the 'Saha balance' of ionization/recombination and the 'Planck balance' for interaction of atoms with radiation. Special attention is paid to the distribution function of the ionizing excitation saturation balance. The classification theory of the distribution functions in relation with underlying balances is supported by experimental evidence in an ionizing argon plasma. The AR I system provides a pertinent support of the theory. Experimental facts found in the AR II system can be interpreted in global terms. (Auth.)

  19. The triplet excited state of bilirubin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, E.J.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of benzene solutions of 40 μM bilirubin alone or with 0.1 M biphenyl has yielded evidence for the formation of the triplet excited state of bilirubin. Measurements were made of a number of properties, including the absorption spectrum (lambdasub(max)500nm), lifetime 9μs), extinction coefficient (8800 M -1 cm -1 ), energy level (approximately 150 kJ mol -1 ) and the rate of quenching by oxygen (rate constant, 8.2 x 10 8 M -1 s -1 ). An upper limit of 0.1 has also been obtained for the singlet to triplet crossover efficiency of bilirubin following excitation by 353 nm radiation. Consideration is given to the relevance of these data to the mechanism of bilirubin photo-destruction, both in vivo and in vitro. (U.K.)

  20. Electron excitation cross sections for some Ar I 5d (J = 2) levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Sanchez, J.A.; Campos, J.

    1992-01-01

    Absolute excitation cross sections by electron impact for some 5d levels with J = 2 of Ar I have been measured by the optical method. Excitation functions for electron energies in the range from the excitation threshold to 1000 eV are also reported. A delayed coincidence analysis of the de-excitation at 100 eV electron energy allowed for the subtraction of radiative cascades. The resulting excitation cross sections are between 7.3 and 12x10 -20 cm 2 . (author)

  1. Some studies on the formation of excited states of aromatic solutes in hydrocarbons and other solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, G A [Leeds Univ. (UK). Cookridge High Energy Radiation Research Centre

    1976-01-01

    This paper reviews the work of the author and his co-workers on the radiation-induced formation of excited states of aromatic compounds in solution. The experimental methods used are surveyed and in particular the method of measuring the yields of triplet and singlet excited states of the solute are described. The problems discussed are: (1) the effect of solvent on the yields of excited states, (2) formation of excited states in cyclohexane and other alicyclic hydrocarbons, (3) the formation of excited states in benzene and (4) the identification of T-T absorption spectra.

  2. Soliton excitation in superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Mensah, N.G.; Twum, A.K.

    1995-10-01

    Excitation of soliton in superlattice has been investigated theoretically. It is noted that the soliton velocity u and the length L depend on the amplitude E 0 and that an increase in the amplitude causes soliton width L to approach zero and the velocity u to that of light V in homogeneous medium. The characteristic parameters of soliton u, L and E 0 are related by expression u/L E 0 = ed/2(h/2π) which is constant depending only on the SL period d. It is observed also that the soliton has both energy E = 8V 2 (1 - u 2 /V 2 ) -1/2 and momentum P = u/V 2 E which makes it behave as relativistic free particle with rest energy 8V 2 . Its interaction with electrons can cause the soliton electric effect in SL. (author). 27 refs

  3. Photobiological aspects of radiation damage to bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasnik, M.N.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Sokolov, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    In this report, we, submit a critical analysis of experiments aimed to estimate the contribution of the processes of ionization and electron excitation to lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. In discussing the phenomenon of photoreactivation after the effect of ionizing radiation, we arrived at a conclusion that the processes of electron excitation, initiated by either Vavilov-Cerenkov light or the direct reaction of radiation energy with the substance, play an important role in the biological effect of ionizing radiation [ru

  4. Compact cryogenic attachment for Moessbauer spectroscopy with microwave excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didenko, N.P.; Amelin, G.P.; Zelentsov, V.I.; Kaminskii, V.L.; Fedorov, N.P.; Fal'kovich, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    A compact cryogenic attachment is described that is placed on a standard helium Dewar flask and permits recording of Moessbauer spectra with excitation by millimeter-band radiation in the temperature range of 4.3-300 K. The design of the attachment allows operation with various gamma-radiation detectors in both horizontal and vertical Moessbauer measurement geometries and its placement in superconducting magnets with a large warm zone

  5. Charmonium non-potential excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borue, V.Y.; Khokhlachev, S.B.

    1990-01-01

    Within the framework of an effective theory of quantum gluodynamics formulated earlier in terms of the glueball degrees of freedom, the excitations of gluon bunch formed by heavy quark and antiquark are considered. It is shown that these excitations correspond to the vibration of the gluon bunch shape and lie nearly 800 MeV higher than the charmonium ground state. The consequences of the existence of these excitations are discussed

  6. Fission fragment excited laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  7. Subsurface excitations in a metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate internal hot carrier excitations in a Au thin film bombarded by hyperthermal and low energy alkali and noble gas ions. Excitations within the thin film of a metal-oxide-semiconductor device are measured revealing that ions whose velocities fall below the classical threshold given...... by the free-electron model of a metal still excite hot carriers. Excellent agreement between these results and a nonadiabatic model that accounts for the time-varying ion-surface interaction indicates that the measured excitations are due to semilocalized electrons near the metal surface....

  8. Vibrational-rotational excitation: chemical reactions of vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.B.; Smith, I.W.M.

    1979-03-01

    This review considers a limited number of systems, particularly gas-phase processes. Excited states and their preparation, direct bimolecular reactions, reactions of highly excited molecules, and reactions in condensed phases are discussed. Laser-induced isotope separation applications are mentioned briefly. 109 references

  9. On satellite lines anomalies in OH excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elitzur, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is argued that different pumps produce similar distributions of populations in the first two excited states of OH. The pattern observed recently in G 219.3 - 07 by Whiteoak and Gardner can be due either to radiative or collisional pump. (author)

  10. Long-wave UVA radiation excited warm white-light emitting NaGdTiO4: Tm3+/Dy3+/Eu3+ ions tri-doped phosphors: Synthesis, energy transfer and color tunable properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharat, L. Krishna; Du, Peng; Yu, Jae Su

    2016-01-01

    NaGdTiO 4 (NGT) phosphors doped with different activator ions (Tm 3+ , Dy 3+ , and Eu 3+ ) were synthesized by a conventional solid-state reaction method in an ambient atmosphere. These phosphors were characterized by scanning electron microscope images, transmission electron microscope images, X-ray diffraction patterns, Fourier transform infrared spectra, and photoluminescence spectra. All the samples were crystallized in an orthorhombic phase with a space group of Pbcm (57). In Tm 3+ /Dy 3+ ions co-doped samples, white-light emission was observed under near-ultraviolet (NUV) excitation. In addition, the energy transfer between Tm 3+ and Dy 3+ ions was proved to be a resonant type via an electric dipole–dipole mechanism and the critical distance of energy transfer was calculated to be 19.91 Å. Furthermore, Tm 3+ /Dy 3+ /Eu 3+ ions tri-doped NGT phosphors demonstrated warm white-light emission by appropriately tuning the activator content, based on the principle of energy transfer. These NUV wavelength excitable phosphors exhibit great potential as a single-phase full-color emitting phosphor for white light-emitting diode applications. - Highlights: • The pebble shaped NaGdTiO 4 particles were prepared by solid-state reaction method. • Tm 3+ and Dy 3+ single doping gives respective blue and cool white light emission. • The Tm 3+ /Dy 3+ ions co-doped samples give CIE values near to standard white light. • Addition of Eu 3+ ions shifts the CIE values towards warm white light region. • This single phase white light emitting phosphors have lower CCT values (<5000 K).

  11. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vankan, P.J.W.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Döbele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has

  12. Electron-collision excitation cross section of the silver atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasavin, A.Y.; Kuchenev, A.N.; Smirnov, Y.M.

    1983-01-01

    The cross sections for direct excitation by electron collision were measured for fifteen transitions of the silver atom. For thirteen of these transitions the optical excitation functions were recorded, varying the energy of the exciting electrons from the threshold energy to 250 eV. The operating region of the spectrum was 2000--5500 A. The excitation cross sections of the two principal lines exceeded the excitation cross sections of all the remaining lines by more than an order of magnitude. Reabsorption of the resonance lines was detected from the change in the ratio of intensities of the lines at 3280.68 and 3382.89 A, and so their intensity has been corrected relative to the intensities of the nonreabsorbed lines. All radiative transitions, with the exception of resonance transitions, participate in cascade population of the lowest resonance levels, making it possible to determine the resulting direct excitation cross sections of the 5p 2 P/sub 1/2/ and 5p 2 P/sub 3/2/ levels from the ground state of the silver atom. The part played by cascade population of the resonance levels is not large and is 2 P/sub 3/2/ level, and 10% for the 5p 2 P/sub 1/2/ level, of the excitation cross sections of the corresponding resonance transitions

  13. High energy magnetic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoh, Yasuo

    1988-01-01

    The report emphasizes that the current development in condensed matter physics opens a research field fit to inelastic neutron scattering experiments in the eV range which is easilly accessed by spallation neutron sources. Several important subjects adopted at thermal reactors are shown. It is desired to extend the implementation of the spectroscopic experiments for investigation of higher energy magnetic excitations. For La 2 CuO 4 , which is the mother crystal of the first high Tc materials found by Bednortz and Muller, it seems to be believed that the magnetism is well characterized by the two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic Hamiltonian, and it is widely accepted that the magnetism is a most probable progenitor of high Tc superconductors. The unusual properties of spin correlations in this crystal have been studied extensively by standard neutron scattering techniques with steady neutrons at BNL. FeSi is not ordered magnetically but shows a very unique feature of temperature induced magnetism, which also has been studied extensively by using the thermal neutron scattering technique at BNL. In these experiments, polarized neutrons are indispensable to extract the clean magnetic components out of other components of non-magnetic scattering. (N.K.)

  14. Interaction of the radiation with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This third chapter presents the ionization, excitation, activation and radiation breaking; radiation directly and indirectly ionizing; interaction of the electromagnetic radiation with matter; interaction of neutrons with matter; interaction of radiation directly ionizing with matter; interaction of electrons with matter, interaction of alpha particle with matter; interaction of fission fragments with matter; travel time and integrated processes of interaction: energy dissipation

  15. Topological excitations in magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D., E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Doria, M.M. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Rodrigues, E.I.B. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-05-20

    In this work we propose a new route to describe topological excitations in magnetic systems through a single real scalar field. We show here that spherically symmetric structures in two spatial dimensions, which map helical excitations in magnetic materials, admit this formulation and can be used to model skyrmion-like structures in magnetic materials.

  16. Trapping time statistics and efficiency of transport of optical excitations in dendrimers

    OpenAIRE

    Heijs, D.J.; Malyshev, V.A.; Knoester, J.

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically study the trapping time distribution and the efficiency of the excitation energy transport in dendritic systems. Trapping of excitations, created at the periphery of the dendrimer, on a trap located at its core, is used as a probe of the efficiency of the energy transport across the dendrimer. The transport process is treated as incoherent hopping of excitations between nearest-neighbor dendrimer units and is described using a rate equation. We account for radiative and non-r...

  17. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E; Glatstein, Eli

    2002-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an increasingly popular technical means of tightly focusing the radiation dose around a cancer. As with stereotactic radiotherapy, IMRT uses multiple fields and angles to converge on the target. The potential for total dose escalation and for escalation of daily fraction size to the gross cancer is exciting. The excitement, however, has greatly overshadowed a range of radiobiological and clinical concerns.

  18. Excited waves in shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  19. Excitation of neutron star oscillations by an orbiting mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruoff, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this contribution, I present results from a numerical study of the even-parity gravitational radiation generated from a particle orbiting a neutron star. The investigation is focused on those conditions on the orbital parameters that favor the excitation of w-modes. It is found that, for astrophysically realistic conditions, there is practically no w-mode contribution to the emitted radiation. Only for particles with ultra-relativistic orbital speeds ≥ 0.9c, the w-mode does significantly contribute to the total emitted gravitational energy. To obtain reliable results, a way is presented to construct consistent initial data which contain as little as possible initial radiation. (author)

  20. Local excitation of surface plasmon polaritons by second-harmonic generation in crystalline organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Esben; Søndergaard, Thomas; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Coherent local excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by second-harmonic generation (SHG) in aligned crystalline organic functionalized para-phenylene nanofibers deposited on a thin silver film is demonstrated. The excited SPPs are characterized using angle-resolved leakage radiation...

  1. Cine: Line excitation by infrared fluorescence in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-03-01

    CINE is a Python module for calculating infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. Excitation by solar radiation of vibrational bands followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state is one of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets. This code calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Line transitions are queried from the latest version of the HITRAN spectroscopic repository using the astroquery affiliated package of astropy. Molecular data are obtained from the LAMDA database. These coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  2. Electronically excited C 2 from laser photodissociated C 60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, S.; Scott, C. D.; Nikolaev, P.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-03-01

    Spectral and transient emission measurements are made of radiation from products of laser excitation of buckminsterfullerene (C 60) vapor diluted in argon at 973 K. The principal radiation is from the Swan band system of C 2 and, at early times, also from a black-body continuum. Transient measurements indicate two characteristic periods of decay 2 and 50 μs long, with characteristic decay times of ˜0.3 and 5 μs, respectively. The first period is thought to be associated with decomposition and radiative cooling of C 60 molecules or nano-sized carbon particles and the second period continues with decomposition products of laser excited C 60, C 58, C 56, etc.

  3. Scientific projection paper for radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    Together with radiation physics, an understanding of radiation chemistry is necessary for full appreciation of biological effects of high and low energy radiations, and for the development of prophylactic, therapeutic and potentiating methods and techniques in biological organisms. Areas covered in some detail in this report include: the early chemical events involved in the deposition of radiation energy; the kinetics of free radical and excited state reactions; the application of radiation chemistry to radiation biology; and the availability of instrumentation

  4. Process and system for isotope separation using the selective vibrational excitation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns the separation of isotopes by using the isotopically selective vibrational excitation and the vibration-translation reactions of the excited particles. UF 6 molecular mixed with a carrier gas, such as argon, are directed through a refrigerated chamber lighted by a laser radiation tuned to excite vibrationally the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a particular uranium isotope. The density of the carrier gas is preferably maintained above the density of the uranium hexafluoride to allow a greater collision probability of the vibrationally excited molecules with a carried molecule. In such a case, the vibrationally excited uranium hexafluoride will collide with a carrier gas molecule provoking the conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, resulting in thermal energy or greater diffusibility than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules [fr

  5. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.; Wuilleumier, F.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter discusses applications of synchrotron light in atomic and molecular physics. Use of the radiation from storage rings has expanded and lent access to new areas of absorption and photoemission spectroscopy and scattering experiments. Techniques applied in connection with synchrotron radiation are discussed including absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Problem areas that are being studied by the techniques mentioned above are discussed. Synchrotron radiation has provided the means for measuring the threshold-excitation and interference effects that signal the breakdown of the two-step model of atomic excitation/deexcitation. Synchrotron radiation provides more means of excited-state photoionization measurements

  6. Excited cooper pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Arrietea, M. G.; Solis, M. A.; De Llano, M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F (Mexico)

    2001-02-01

    Excited cooper pairs formed in a many-fermion system are those with nonzero total center-of mass momentum (CMM). They are normally neglected in the standard Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity for being too few compared with zero CMM pairs. However, a Bose-Einstein condensation picture requires both zero and nonzero CMM pairs. Assuming a BCS model interaction between fermions we determine the populations for all CMM values of Cooper pairs by actually calculating the number of nonzero-CMM pairs relative to that of zero-CMM ones in both 2D and 3D. Although this ratio decreases rapidly with CMM, the number of Cooper pairs for any specific CMM less than the maximum (or breakup of the pair) momentum turns out to be typically larger than about 95% of those with zero-CMM at zero temperature T. Even at T {approx}100 K this fraction en 2D is still as large as about 70% for typical quasi-2D cuprate superconductor parameters. [Spanish] Los pares de cooper excitados formados en un sistema de muchos electrones, son aquellos con momentos de centro de masa (CMM) diferente de cero. Normalmente estos no son tomados en cuenta en la teoria estandar de la superconductividad de Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) al suponer que su numero es muy pequeno comparados con los pares de centro de masa igual a cero. Sin embargo, un esquema de condensacion Bose-Einstein requiere de ambos pares, con CMM cero y diferente de cero. Asumiendo una interaccion modelo BCS entre los fermiones, determinamos la poblacion de pares cooper con cada uno de todos los posibles valores del CMM calculando el numero de pares con momentos de centro de masa diferente de cero relativo a los pares de CMM igual a cero, en 2D y 3D. Aunque esta razon decrece rapidamente con el CMM, el numero de pares de cooper para cualquier CMM especifico menor que el momento maximo (o rompimiento de par) es tipicamente mas grande que el 95% de aquellos con CMM cero. Aun a T {approx}100 K esta fraccion en 2D es

  7. Uniform excitations in magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Frandsen, Cathrine; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2010-01-01

    We present a short review of the magnetic excitations in nanoparticles below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. In this temperature regime, the magnetic dynamics in nanoparticles is dominated by uniform excitations, and this leads to a linear temperature dependence of the magnetization...... and the magnetic hyperfine field, in contrast to the Bloch T3/2 law in bulk materials. The temperature dependence of the average magnetization is conveniently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The energy of the uniform excitations of magnetic nanoparticles can be studied by inelastic neutron scattering....

  8. Uniform excitations in magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steen Mørup

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a short review of the magnetic excitations in nanoparticles below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. In this temperature regime, the magnetic dynamics in nanoparticles is dominated by uniform excitations, and this leads to a linear temperature dependence of the magnetization and the magnetic hyperfine field, in contrast to the Bloch T3/2 law in bulk materials. The temperature dependence of the average magnetization is conveniently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The energy of the uniform excitations of magnetic nanoparticles can be studied by inelastic neutron scattering.

  9. Excited states in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilento, G.; Zinner, K.; Bechara, E.J.H.; Duran, N.; Baptista, R.C. de; Shimizu, Y.; Augusto, O.; Faljoni-Alario, A.; Vidigal, C.C.C.; Oliveira, O.M.M.F.; Haun, M.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of bioluminescence related to bioenergetics are discussed: 1. chemical generation of excited species, by means of two general processes: electron transference and cyclic - and linear peroxide cleavage; 2. biological systems capable of generating excited states and 3. biological functions of these states, specially the non-emissive ones (tripletes). The production and the role of non-emissive excited states in biological systems are analysed, the main purpose of the study being the search for non-emissive states. Experiences carried out in biological systems are described; results and conclusions are given. (M.A.) [pt

  10. Do static atoms outside a Schwarzschild black hole spontaneously excite?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongwei; Zhou Wenting

    2007-01-01

    The spontaneous excitation of a two-level atom held static outside a four dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and in interaction with a massless scalar field in the Boulware, Unruh, and Hartle-Hawking vacuums is investigated, and the contributions of the vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction to the rate of change of the mean atomic energy are calculated separately. We find that, for the Boulware vacuum, the spontaneous excitation does not occur and the ground-state atoms are stable, while the spontaneous emission rate for excited atoms in the Boulware vacuum, which is well behaved at the event horizon, is not the same as that in the usual Minkowski vacuum. However, for both the Unruh vacuum and the Hartle-Hawking vacuum, our results show that the atom would spontaneously excite, as if there were an outgoing thermal flux of radiation or as if it were in a thermal bath of radiation at a proper temperature which reduces to the Hawking temperature in the spatial asymptotic region, depending on whether the scalar field is in the Unruh or Hartle-Hawking vacuum

  11. Excitation of propagating surface plasmons with a scanning tunnelling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T; Boer-Duchemin, E; Zhang, Y; Comtet, G; Dujardin, G

    2011-04-29

    Inelastic electron tunnelling excitation of propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a thin gold film is demonstrated. This is done by combining a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) with an inverted optical microscope. Analysis of the leakage radiation in both the image and Fourier planes unambiguously shows that the majority (up to 99.5%) of the detected photons originate from propagating SPPs with propagation lengths of the order of 10  µm. The remaining photon emission is localized under the STM tip and is attributed to a tip-gold film coupled plasmon resonance as evidenced by the bimodal spectral distribution and enhanced emission intensity observed using a silver STM tip for excitation.

  12. Efficiency of local surface plasmon polariton excitation on ridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, I.P.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Brucoli, G.

    2008-01-01

    The issue of efficient local coupling of light into surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes is an important concern in miniaturization of plasmonic components. Here we present experimental and numerical investigations of efficiency of local SPP excitation on gold ridges of rectangular profile...... positioned on a gold film. The excitation is accomplished by illuminating the metal surface normally with a focused laser beam. Wavelength dependence and dependence of the efficiency on geometrical parameters of ridges are examined. Using leakage radiation microscopy, the efficiency of ˜20% is demonstrated...

  13. Hanle effect at forward scattering in excited media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veklenko, B.A.

    2001-01-01

    One introduces a new method to calculate matrix of density of quantized electromagnetic field interacting with environment with kinetic processes in the medium. This method alongside with the accurate account of photon-photon quantum correlators has a number of symmetry features essentially facilitating summing up of appearing Feynman diagrams. Forward scattering of resonance radiation by gas two-level atoms within magnetic field was studied as a supplement. It is shown that inadequacy of semiclassical description of this coherent process in the excited media using unique tensor factor of refraction follows from quantum electrodynamics. One more function depending on frequency of irradiation and on concentration of excited atoms should be introduced [ru

  14. Cross sections for the vibrational excitation of the H2 X 1Σ+g(v) levels generated by electron collisional excitation of the higher singlet states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation cross sections, σ(v,v double-prime), for an H 2 molecule initially in any one of the 15 vibrational levels, v belonging to the ground electronic state and excited to a final vibrational level, v double-prime are evaluated for direct excitations via all members of the excited electronic singlet spectrum. Account is taken of predissociation, autoionization, and radiative decay of the excited electronic spectrum that leads to a final population distribution for the ground electronic state, X 1 Σ + g (v double-prime). For v=0, account is taken explicitly of transitions via the B, C, B', and D electronic states in evaluating the cross sections. The additional contribution of excitations via all Rydberg states lying above the D state enhances these cross sections by approximately 10%. For v>0, cross sections are evaluated taking explicit account of transitions through the B and C states; higher singlet excitations enhance these values by 25%. The choice of the reference total cross sections remains a subjective one, causing the values calculated here to have a possible uncertainty of +20% -30% . For excitations occurring within a hydrogen discharge, collisional excitation-ionization events among the intermediate singlet states will effectively quench the v, v double-prime excitation process for discharge densities in excess of the range 10 15 --10 16 electrons/cm -3

  15. Electron-impact excitation of the potassium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, J.O.; Solomon, J.E.; Korff, D.F.; Lin, C.C.; Lee, E.T.P.

    1979-01-01

    Absolute optical electron-impact excitation functions for 24 transitions of the sharp, principal, diffuse, and fundamental spectral series of potassium have been measured. The determination of the density of the potassium vapor in the collision chamber was made by measuring the degree of transmission, by the vapor, of potassium resonance radiation generated externally in a fluorescence cell. Direct excitation functions were determined for 14 states (5S, 6S, 7S, 8S, 4P, 5P, 6P, 7P, 3D, 5D, 6D, 5F, 6F, and 7F) with the aid of known radiative-transition probabilities. Theoretical calculations of these same 14 excitation functions, as well as 4D and 4F, were carried out by means of the Born approximation. The 4P, 5P, 5S, 3D, and 4D direct excitation functions at intermediate energies (10--25 eV) were also calculated by the method of multistate close coupling, neglecting projectile--target-electron exchange. The high-energy (above 100 eV) Born-approximation cross sections agree with the experimental results for 4P and for all S states, but are lower than experimental results, by 30--40%, for the D and F states. At intermediate energies the close-coupling excitation calculations agree well with the experimental excitation functions for 4P and 5P, but are significantly higher than experimental values for 5S and 3D. The discrepancies between the experimental and theoretical results are probably due to a combination of systematic experimental errors, errors in the available transition-probability values, and errors in the theoretical excitation functions introduced by the use of approximate excited-state wave functions (Hartree-Fock-Slater), by the neglect of projectile--target-electron exchange. The polarization of the 4P-4S and 3D-4P radiation produced by electron impact was measured, and the results were used to determine the direct excitation functions of the separate magnetic sublevels of the 4P state

  16. Scattering of highly excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raith, W.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental methods to excite atomic beams into Rydberg states and the first results of collision experiments with such beams are reported. For further information see hints under relevant topics. (orig.) [de

  17. High power laser exciter accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    Recent developments in untriggered oil and water switching now permit the construction of compact, high energy density pulsed power sources for laser excitation. These accelerators, developed principally for electron beam fusion studies, appear adaptable to laser excitation and will provide electron beams of 10 13 to 10 14 W in the next several years. The accelerators proposed for e-beam fusion essentially concentrate the available power from the outside edge of a disk into the central region where the electron beam is formed. One of the main problem areas, that of power flow at the vacuum diode insulator, is greatly alleviated by the multiplicity of electron beams that are allowable for laser excitation. A proposal is made whereby the disk-shaped pulsed power sections are stacked vertically to form a series of radially flowing electron beams to excite the laser gas volume. (auth)

  18. Autowaves in moving excitable media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A.Davydov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of kinematic theory of autowaves we suggest a method for analytic description of stationary autowave structures appearing at the boundary between the moving and fixed excitable media. The front breakdown phenomenon is predicted for such structures. Autowave refraction and, particulary, one-side "total reflection" at the boundary is considered. The obtained analytical results are confirmed by computer simulations. Prospects of the proposed method for further studies of autowave dynamics in the moving excitable media are discussed.

  19. Magnetic excitations in amorphous ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continentino, M.A.

    The propagation of magnetic excitations in amorphous ferromagnets is studied from the point of view of the theory of random frequency modulation. It is shown that the spin waves in the hydrodynamic limit are well described by perturbation theory while the roton-like magnetic excitations with wavevector about the peak in the structure factor are not. A criterion of validity of perturbation theory is found which is identical to a narrowing condition in magnetic resonance. (author) [pt

  20. Excitations of strange bottom baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloshyn, R.M. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    The ground-state and first-excited-state masses of Ω{sub b} and Ω{sub bb} baryons are calculated in lattice QCD using dynamical 2 + 1 flavour gauge fields. A set of baryon operators employing different combinations of smeared quark fields was used in the framework of the variational method. Results for radial excitation energies were confirmed by carrying out a supplementary multiexponential fitting analysis. Comparison is made with quark model calculations. (orig.)

  1. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 CFR 110.10-1). In particular, no static exciter may be used for excitation of an emergency generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has the...

  2. Laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles as a source of excitation of dye luminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Zelensky, S

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of pulsed YAG-Nd sup 3 sup + laser radiation with submicron light-absorbing particles suspended in an aqueous solution of Rhodamine 6G is investigated experimentally. The experiments demonstrate that the laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles excites the luminescence of the dissolved dye molecules. The mechanism of the luminescence excitation consists in the reabsorption of the thermal radiation within the volume of the sample cell. On the ground of this mechanism of excitation, a method of measurement of the luminescence quantum yield is proposed and realized. The method requires the knowledge of the geometrical parameters of the cell and does not require the use of reference samples.

  3. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  4. Photodissociation and excitation of interstellar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dishoeck, E.F. van.

    1984-01-01

    Apart from a rather long introduction containing some elementary astrophysics, quantum chemistry and spectroscopy and an incomplete, historical review of molecular observations, this thesis is divided into three sections. In part A, a rigorous quantum chemical and dynamical study is made of the photodissociation processes in the OH and HCl molecules. In part B, the cross sections obtained in part A are used in various astrophysical problems such as the study of the abundances of the OH and HCl molecules in interstellar clouds, the use of the OH abundance as a measure of the cosmic ray ionization rate, the lifetime of the OH radical in comets and the abundance of OH in the solar photosphere. Part C discusses the excitation of the C 2 molecule under interstellar conditions, its use as a diagnostic probe of the temperature, density and strength of the radiation field in interstellar clouds. Quadrupole moments and oscillator strengths are analyzed. (Auth.)

  5. Cross sections for energy transfer in collisions between two excited sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huennekens, J.; Gallagher, A.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured cross sections, sigma/sub n/L, for the excitation transfer process Na(3P)+Na(3P)→Na(3S)+Na(nL), where nL is the 4D or 5S level. Our results are sigma/sub 4D/ = 23 A 2 +- 35% and sigma/sub 5S/ = 16 A 2 +- 35% at Tapprox.600 K. To obtain these cross sections we have used pulsed excitation and measured the intensities of 4D, 5S, and 3P fluorescence emissions, and the spatial distribution of excited atoms resulting from radiation diffusion, as well as the excited atom density as a function of time. Additionally, we have accounted for (time-dependent) radiation trapping of 3P and nL level radiation and for the resulting anisotropies of these fluorescence emissions. Comparisons of our results with theory have been made, and their relevance to other experiments is discussed

  6. Photodissociation of CS from Excited Rovibrational Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattillo, R. J.; Cieszewski, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Forrey, R. C.; Babb, J. F.; McCann, J. F.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate photodissociation cross sections have been computed for transitions from the X 1Σ+ ground electronic state of CS to six low-lying excited electronic states. New ab initio potential curves and transition dipole moment functions have been obtained for these computations using the multi-reference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson correction (MRCI+Q) and aug-cc-pV6Z basis sets. State-resolved cross sections have been computed for transitions from nearly the full range of rovibrational levels of the X 1Σ+ state and for photon wavelengths ranging from 500 Å to threshold. Destruction of CS via predissociation in highly excited electronic states originating from the rovibrational ground state is found to be unimportant. Photodissociation cross sections are presented for temperatures in the range between 1000 and 10,000 K, where a Boltzmann distribution of initial rovibrational levels is assumed. Applications of the current computations to various astrophysical environments are briefly discussed focusing on photodissociation rates due to the standard interstellar and blackbody radiation fields.

  7. Multiple photoionization from 3p excitation of Kr and 4p excitation of Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayaishi, T.

    1986-01-01

    The photoionization cross sections for multiply charged ions produced by 3p excitation of Kr and 4p excitation of Xe have been obtained by means of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and synchrotron radiation. It is found that the main formation of doubly to quadruply charged ions in both Kr and Xe is caused from the each initial p-hole state through a Coster-Kronig transition followed by Auger of double Auger processes. The formation of singly charged ions in these excitation energy regions is caused by direct photoionization from outermost shell electrons in both Kr and Xe. Triply charged ions are prominently produced among the multiply charged ions. The quadruple photoionization cross sections show clearly the structures due to the Rydberg series, 3p -1 nl of Kr and 4p -1 nl of Xe. Their main structures were assigned to the 3p -1 nd series in Kr and the 4p -1 nd series in Xe. (orig.)

  8. Electromagnetic excitation of 136Xe in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.D.

    1991-11-01

    In the framework of the experimental program at the accelerator facilities SIS/ESR at the Society for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt a detector system for relativistic neutrons was developed, constructed, and applied in first experiments. An essential research aim is the study of collective states after electromagnetic excitation in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In peripheral collisions high-energy virtual photons are exchanged. This leads to the excitation of giant resonances, especially of the giant dipole and quadrupole resonance. An essential decay channel of giant resonances in heavy nuclei is the emission of neutrons, followed by the emission of γ radiation below the particle threshold. These decay channels were studied with the detector system developed by the LAND collaboration. A first experiment on the electromagnetic excitation was performed with a 136 Xe beam at an energy of 700 MeV/u and Pb respectively C targets. (orig./HSI) [de

  9. Artificial excitation of ELF waves with frequency of Schumann resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Guido, T.; Tulegenov, B.; Labenski, J.; Chang, C.-L.

    2014-11-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance. Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range 7.8-8.0 Hz when the ionosphere has a strong F layer, the frequency of the HF radiation is in the range 3.20-4.57 MHz, and the electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the ionosphere.

  10. Excited states rotational effects on the behavior of excited molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 7 is a collection of papers that discusses the excited states of molecules. The first paper reviews the rotational involvement in intra-molecular in vibrational redistribution. This paper analyzes the vibrational Hamiltonian as to its efficacy in detecting the manifestations of intra-molecular state-mixing in time-resolved and time-averaged spectroscopic measurements. The next paper examines the temporal behavior of intra-molecular vibration-rotation energy transfer (IVRET) and the effects of IVRET on collision, reaction, and the decomposition processes. This paper also

  11. Giant enhancement of sum-frequency yield by surface-plasmon excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, E. W. M.; Vrehen, Q. H. F.; Eliel, E. R.; Yakovlev, V. A.; Valieva, E. V.; Kuzik, L. A.; Petrov, J. E.; Sychugov, V. A.; van der Meer, A. F. G.

    1999-01-01

    We show experimentally that the radiation generated in infrared-visible sum-frequency mixing at an air-silver interface can be greatly enhanced when the visible input beam excites a surface plasmon-polariton at the interface. With either a prism or a grating used to couple the visible radiation with

  12. Synaptic control of motoneuronal excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Funk, G D; Bayliss, D A

    2000-01-01

    important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization......, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions...... and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K(+) current, cationic inward...

  13. Nuclear spin and isospin excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterfeld, F.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of our present knowledge of collective spin-isospin excitations in nuclei. Most of this knowledge comes from intermediate-energy charge-exchange reactions and from inelastic electron- and proton-scattering experiments. The nuclear-spin dynamics is governed by the spin-isospin-dependent two-nucleon interaction in the medium. This interaction gives rise to collective spin modes such as the giant Gamow-Teller resonances. An interesting phenomenon is that the measured total Gamow-Teller transition strength in the resonance region is much less than a model-independent sum rule predicts. Two physically different mechanisms have been discussed to explain this so-called quenching of the total Gamow-Teller strength: coupling to subnuclear degrees of freedom in the form of Δ-isobar excitation and ordinary nuclear configuration mixing. Both detailed nuclear structure calculations and extensive analyses of the scattering data suggest that the nuclear configuration mixing effect is the more important quenching mechanism, although subnuclear degrees of freedom cannot be ruled out. The quenching phenomenon occurs for nuclear-spin excitations at low excitation energies (ω∼10--20 MeV) and small-momentum transfers (q≤0.5 fm -1 ). A completely opposite effect is anticipated in the high (ω,q)-transfer region (0≤ω≤500 MeV, 0.5≤q≤3 fm -1 ). The nuclear spin-isospin response might be enhanced due to the attractive pion field inside the nucleus. Charge-exchange reactions at GeV incident energies have been used to study the quasifree peak region and the Δ-resonance region. An interesting result of these experiments is that the Δ excitation in the nucleus is shifted downwards in energy relative to the Δ excitation of the free proton

  14. Terahertz emission of Bloch oscillators excited by electromagnetic field in lateral semiconductor superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodin, E.P.; Zharov, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the strong high-frequency electromagnetic field on the lateral semiconductor superlattice is considered on the basis of the quasi-classical theory on the electron transport in the self-consistent wave arrangement. It is theoretically identified, that the lateral superlattice in the strong feed-up wave field may emit the terahertz radiation wave trains, which are associated with the periodical excitation of the Bloch oscillations in the superlattice. The conditions, required for the Bloch oscillators radiation observation, are determined. The spectral composition of the radiation, passing through the superlattice, and energy efficiency of multiplying the frequency, related to the Bloch oscillator excitation, are calculated [ru

  15. Multiphoton excitation and high-harmonics generation in topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetissian, H K; Avetissian, A K; Avchyan, B R; Mkrtchian, G F

    2018-05-10

    Multiphoton interaction of coherent electromagnetic radiation with 2D metallic carriers confined on the surface of the 3D topological insulator is considered. A microscopic theory describing the nonlinear interaction of a strong wave and metallic carriers with many-body Coulomb interaction is developed. The set of integrodifferential equations for the interband polarization and carrier occupation distribution is solved numerically. Multiphoton excitation of Fermi-Dirac sea of 2D massless carriers is considered for a THz pump wave. It is shown that in the moderately strong pump wave field along with multiphoton interband/intraband transitions the intense radiation of high harmonics takes place.

  16. Multiphoton excitation and high-harmonics generation in topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetissian, H. K.; Avetissian, A. K.; Avchyan, B. R.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2018-05-01

    Multiphoton interaction of coherent electromagnetic radiation with 2D metallic carriers confined on the surface of the 3D topological insulator is considered. A microscopic theory describing the nonlinear interaction of a strong wave and metallic carriers with many-body Coulomb interaction is developed. The set of integrodifferential equations for the interband polarization and carrier occupation distribution is solved numerically. Multiphoton excitation of Fermi–Dirac sea of 2D massless carriers is considered for a THz pump wave. It is shown that in the moderately strong pump wave field along with multiphoton interband/intraband transitions the intense radiation of high harmonics takes place.

  17. Resonator coupled Josephson junctions; parametric excitations and mutual locking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H. Dalsgaard; Larsen, A.; Mygind, Jesper

    1991-01-01

    Self-pumped parametric excitations and mutual locking in systems of Josephson tunnel junctions coupled to multimode resonators are reported. For the very large values of the coupling parameter, obtained with small Nb-Al2O3-Nb junctions integrated in superconducting microstrip resonators, the DC I......-V characteristic shows an equidistant series of current steps generated by subharmonic pumping of the fundamental resonator mode. This is confirmed by measurement of frequency and linewidth of the emitted Josephson radiation...

  18. Phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, A A; Efimkov, V F; Zubarev, I G; Mikhailov, S I [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-31

    It is shown experimentally that phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation calls for a stable difference in arm lengths, as in a classical Michelson interferometer. A scheme with automatic compensation for fluctuations of interferometer arm lengths has been proposed and experimentally implemented. This scheme makes it possible to perform stable phasing of two laser channels under standard laboratory conditions. (control of radiation parameters)

  19. Nuclear excitation in muonic gold

    CERN Document Server

    Robert Tissot, B; Debrunner, P; Engfer, R; Link, R; Schellenberg, L; Schneuwly, H; Walter, H K

    1973-01-01

    Energies and intensities of muonic X-rays in gold were measured at the CERN muon channel with an experimental set-up as described by Backe et al. (1972). The 2p-1s and 3d-2p transitions could only be analysed taking into account beside the static quadrupole interaction a dynamical hyperfine interaction of the 2p states, which leads to an excitation of the first four nuclear levels. The dynamical hyperfine interaction was calculated using the core excitation model (de Shalit, (1961)). (0 refs).

  20. Entanglement entropy of excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, Vincenzo; Fagotti, Maurizio; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    We study the entanglement entropy of a block of contiguous spins in excited states of spin chains. We consider the XY model in a transverse field and the XXZ Heisenberg spin chain. For the latter, we developed a numerical application of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. We find two main classes of states with logarithmic and extensive behavior in the dimension of the block, characterized by the properties of excitations of the state. This behavior can be related to the locality properties of the Hamiltonian having a given state as the ground state. We also provide several details of the finite size scaling

  1. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  2. Coulomb excitation of 189Os

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    The level structure of 189 Os has been studied by Coulomb excitation using 35 Cl, 28 Si, 16 O beams. GOSIA, a code written to analyze multiple Coulomb excitation, was used to obtain the reduced probabilities of transition B(E2). The results for interband and intraband turned out possible the classification of the states following Nilsson levels. Gamma-rays originating from deexcitation of 216.7 and 219.4 keV have been separated and the reduced probability of transition has been measured. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  3. Quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setser, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The two-body, thermal quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms are reviewed using excited states of Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms as examples. State-specific interstate relaxation and excitation-transfer reactions with atomic colliders are discussed first. These results then are used to discuss quenching reactions of excited-state atoms with diatomic and polyatomic molecules, the latter have large cross sections, and the reactions can proceed by excitation transfer and by reactive quenching. Excited states of molecules are not considered; however, a table of quenching rate constants is given for six excited-state molecules in an appendix

  4. Enhanced eumelanin emission by stepwise three-photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimo, Josef; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2011-03-01

    Eumelanin fluorescence from Sepia officinalis and black human hair was activated with near-infrared radiation and multiphoton excitation. A third order multiphoton absorption by a step-wise process appears to be the underlying mechanism. The activation was caused by a photochemical process since it could not be reproduced by simple heating. Both fluorescence and brightfield imaging indicate the near-infrared irradiation caused photodamage to the eumelanin and the activated emission originated from the photodamaged region. At least two different components with about thousand-fold enhanced fluorescence were activated and could be distinguished by their excitation properties. One component was excited with wavelengths in the visible region and exhibited linear absorption dependence. The second component could be excited with near-infrared wavelengths and had a third order dependence on the laser power. The third order dependence is explained by a step-wise excited state absorption (ESA) process since it could be observed equally with the CW and femtosecond lasers. The new method for photoactivating the eumelanin fluorescence was used to map the melanin content in human hair.

  5. Double-electron excitation above Xe K-edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Y.; Tochio, T.; Vlaicu, A.M.; Mutaguchi, K.; OhHashi, H.; Shigeoka, N.; Nakata, Y.; Akahama, Y.; Uruga, T.; Emura, Sh.

    2000-01-01

    When X-rays fall on any substance, whether solid, liquid, or gaseous, a photoabsorption occurs. Photoabsorption in atoms has been generally treated as a single-electron excitation process. However, the existence of the multi-electron excitation process, where the removal of a core electron by photoabsorption causes excitation of additional electrons in the same atoms, has been known in x-ray absorption spectra for a long time. In x-ray absorption spectra, experimental investigations of the shake processes in inner-shell ionization phenomena have been performed by detecting discontinuities. The shake effect which is a consequence of rearrangement of the atomic electrons, occurs in association with inner-shell excitation and ionization phenomena in x-ray absorption. The shake process has been studied extensively in various gases, because it is usually considered that the measurement of the multi-electron excitation is only possible for monatomic gases or vapors. The x-ray absorption spectra in Kr gas were measured by Ito et al. in order to observe precisely x-ray absorption spectra and to investigate the multi-electron excitation cross sections in Kr as a function of photon energy using synchrotron radiation. However, no suitable measured K x-ray absorption spectra was available to elucidate the shake processes. In the present work, the photoabsorption cross sections in Xe have been precisely measured in order to determine the features on the shake processes resulting from multiple electron excitations as a function of photon energy. Double-electron transitions of [1s4d], [1s4p], [1s4s], and [1s3d] are first detected. (author)

  6. Excitation temperature of a solution plasma during nanoparticle synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Genki, E-mail: genki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Nakasugi, Yuki; Akiyama, Tomohiro [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-08-28

    Excitation temperature of a solution plasma was investigated by spectroscopic measurements to control the nanoparticle synthesis. In the experiments, the effects of edge shielding, applied voltage, and electrode material on the plasma were investigated. When the edge of the Ni electrode wire was shielded by a quartz glass tube, the plasma was uniformly generated together with metallic Ni nanoparticles. The emission spectrum of this electrode contained OH, H{sub α}, H{sub β}, Na, O, and Ni lines. Without an edge-shielded electrode, the continuous infrared radiation emitted at the edge created a high temperature on the electrode surface, producing oxidized coarse particles as a result. The excitation temperature was estimated from the Boltzmann plot. When the voltages were varied at the edge-shielded electrode with low average surface temperature by using different electrolyte concentrations, the excitation temperature of current-concentration spots increased with an increase in the voltage. The size of the Ni nanoparticles decreased at high excitation temperatures. Although the formation of nanoparticles via melting and solidification of the electrode surface has been considered in the past, vaporization of the electrode surface could occur at a high excitation temperature to produce small particles. Moreover, we studied the effects of electrodes of Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag, W, Pt, Au, and various alloys of stainless steel and Cu–Ni alloys. With the exception of Ti, the excitation temperatures ranged from 3500 to 5500 K and the particle size depended on both the excitation temperature and electrode-material properties.

  7. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagyi-Palffy, A.

    2006-07-01

    The resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) in collisions involving highly-charged ions has been investigated theoretically. NEEC is a rare recombination process in which a free electron is captured into a bound shell of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. Total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are presented for various collision systems. The possibility to observe the NEEC in scattering experiments with trapped or stored ions was discussed focusing on the cases with the largest calculated resonance strength. As the photons emitted in different channels of the electron recombination process are indistinguishable in the total cross section, the interference between NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the nucleus and radiative recombination was investigated. The angular distribution of the emitted photons in the recombination process provides means to discern the two processes. Angular differential cross sections for the emitted photons in the case of E2 nuclear transitions were presented for several heavy elements. (orig.)

  8. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hebner, G A

    1999-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s sub 5 and 1s sub 4 , in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s sub 5 level is metastable and the 1s sub 4 level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the disch...

  9. Calibrated Noncontact Exciters for Optical Modal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik O. Saldner

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Two types of exciters were investigated experimentally One of the exciters uses a small permanent magnet fastened on the object. The force is introduced by the change in the electromagnetic field from a coil via an air gap. The second exciter is an eddy-current electromagnet one. The amplitude of the forces from these exciters are calibrated by using dynamic reciprocity in conjunction with electronic holography. These forces strongly depend upon the distance between the exciter and the object.

  10. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, V.E.; Haas, R.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Schlitt, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation

  11. Gluonic excitations in hadronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1983-09-01

    Theoretical expectations are described for new forms of hadronic matter containing gluons as excitable degrees of freedom. Particular attention is paid to hybrid states containing both quarks and gluons. Recent work on the spectroscopy of hybrid mesons and hybrid baryons is reviewed. Comparisons of bag model, lattice QCD and QCD sum rule predictions are made and some confrontation with data attempted. (author)

  12. Predictions for Excited Strange Baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, Ishara P.; Goity, Jose L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    An assessment is made of predictions for excited hyperon masses which follow from flavor symmetry and consistency with a 1/N c expansion of QCD. Such predictions are based on presently established baryonic resonances. Low lying hyperon resonances which do not seem to fit into the proposed scheme are discussed.

  13. Launch Excitement with Water Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Juan Carlos; Penick, John

    2007-01-01

    Explosions and fires--these are what many students are waiting for in science classes. And when they do occur, students pay attention. While we can't entertain our students with continual mayhem, we can catch their attention and cater to their desires for excitement by saying, "Let's make rockets." In this activity, students make simple, reusable…

  14. High excitation ISM and gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, E; Martinez-Hernandez, NL; Rodriguez-Fernandez, NJ; Tielens, [No Value

    An overview is given of ISO results on regions of high excitation ISM and gas, i.e. H II regions, the Galactic Centre and Supernova Remnants. IR emission due to fine-structure lines, molecular hydrogen, silicates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dust are summarised, their diagnostic

  15. High Excitation Gas and ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, E.; Martin-Hernandez, N. L.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview is given of ISO results on regions of high excitation ISM and gas, i.e. HII regions, the Galactic Centre and Supernovae Remnants. IR emission due to fine-structure lines, molecular hydrogen, silicates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dust are summarized, their diagnostic capabilities illustrated and their implications highlighted.

  16. Electron excitation of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormonde, S.

    1979-02-01

    The development and testing of a synthesized close-coupling effective model potential ten-channel electron-atom scattering code and some preliminary calculations of resonances in cross sections for the excitation of excited states of potassium by low energy electrons are described. The main results obtained are: identification of 1 S and 1 D structures in excitation cross sections below the 5 2 S threshold of neutral potassium; indications of additional structures - 1 P and 1 D between the 5 2 S and 5 2 D thresholds; and a suggested explanation of anomalously high interstate-electron impact excitation cross sections inferred from experiments on potassium-seeded plasmas. The effective potential model imbedded in the code can be used to simulate any atomic system that can be approximated by a single bound electron outside an ionic core. All that is needed is a set of effective potential parameters--experimental or theoretical. With minor modifications the code could be adapted to calculations of electron scattering by two-electron systems

  17. Proton exciting X ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinpei

    1986-04-01

    The analyzing capability of proton exciting X ray analysis for different elements in organisms was discussed, and dealing with examples of trace element analysis in the human body and animal organisms, such as blood serum, urine, and hair. The sensitivity, accuracy, and capability of multielement analysis were discussed. Its strong points for the trace element analysis in biomedicine were explained

  18. Electron impact excitation of the lowest doublet and quartet core-excited autoionizing states in Rb atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovik, A; Roman, V; Zatsarinny, O; Bartschat, K

    2013-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the (4p 5 5s 2 ) 2 P 3/2,1/2 and (4p 5 4d5s) 4 P 1/2,3/2,5/2 autoionizing states in rubidium atoms was studied experimentally by measuring the ejected-electron excitation functions and theoretically by employing a fully relativistic Dirac B-spline R-matrix (close-coupling) model. The experimental data were collected in an impact energy range from the respective excitation thresholds up to 50 eV with an incident electron energy resolution of 0.2 eV and an observation angle of 54.7°. Absolute values of the excitation cross sections were obtained by normalizing to the theoretical predictions. The observed near-threshold resonance structures were also analysed by comparison with theory. For the 2 P 3/2,1/2 doublet states, a detailed analysis of the R-matrix results reveals that the most intense resonances are related to odd-parity negative-ion states with dominant configurations 4p 5 5s5p 2 and 4p 5 4d5s6s. The measured excitation functions for the 2 P 1/2 and 4 P J states indicate a noticeable cascade population due to the radiative decay from high-lying autoionizing states. A comparative analysis with similar data for other alkali atoms is also presented.

  19. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEBNER, GREGORY A.; MILLER, PAUL A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s 5 and 1s 4 , in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s 5 level is metastable and the 1s 4 level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the discharge while the density at the edge of the discharge was unaffected. The spatially resolved excited state density measurements were combined with previous line integrated measurements in the same discharge geometry to derive spatially resolved, absolute densities of the 1s 5 and 1s 4 argon excited states and gas temperature spatial distributions. Fluorescence lifetime was a strong fi.mction of the rf power, pressure, argon fraction and spatial location. Increasing the power or pressure resulted in a factor of two decrease in the fluorescence lifetime while adding Cl 2 or BCl 3 increased the fluorescence lifetime. Excited state quenching rates are derived from the data. When Cl 2 or BCl 3 was added to the plasma, the maximum argon metastable density depended on the gas and ratio. When chlorine was added to the argon plasma, the spatial density profiles were independent of chlorine fraction. While it is energetically possible for argon excited states to dissociate some of the

  20. Power excitation by the use of a rf wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    It is well-known that there are difficulties to obtain rf power sources of significant amount for frequencies larger than 3 GHz. Yet, rf sources in the centimeter/millimeter wavelength range would be very useful to drive, for example, high-gradient accelerating linacs for electron-positron linear colliders. We would like to propose an alternative method to produce such radiation. It makes use of a short electron bunch traveling along the axis of a waveguide which is at the same time excited by a TM propagating electromagnetic wave. It is well known that radiation can be obtained by wiggling the motion of the electrons in a direction perpendicular to the main one. The wiggling action can be included by electromagnetic fields in a fashion similar to the one caused by wiggler magnets. We found that an interesting mode of operation is to drive the waveguide with an excitation frequency very close to the cut off. For such excitation, the corresponding e.m. wave travels with a very large phase velocity which in turn has the effect to increase the wiggling action on the electron bunch. Our method, to be effective, relies also on the coherence of the radiation; that is the bunch length is taken to be considerably shorter than the radiated wavelength. In this case, the total power radiated should be proportional to the square of the total number of electrons in the bunch. The paper concludes with possible modes of operation, a list of performance parameters and a proposed experimental set-up

  1. Excitation of high numbers harmonics by flows of oscillators in a periodic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buts, V.A.; Marekha, V.I.; Tolstoluzhsky, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the maximum of radiation spectrum of nonrelativistic oscillators, which move into a periodically inhomogeneous potential, can be in the region of high numbers harmonics. Spectrum of such oscillators radiation becomes similar to the radiation spectrum of relativistic oscillators. The equations, describing the non-linear self-consistent theory of excitations, of high numbers harmonics by ensemble of oscillators are formulated and its numerical analysis is conducted. The numerical analysis has confirmed the capability of radiation of high numbers of harmonics. Such peculiarity of radiation allows t expect of creation of nonrelativistic FEL

  2. Excitation of solar and stellar oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    In this report for an Accreditation to Supervise Research (HDR), and after an introduction which outlines the potential of helio-seismology, the author addresses the problem of excitation and amplitude of stellar oscillations with respect to their most important aspects, i.e. the theoretical framework of the present understanding of excitation mechanisms, and instrumental influences on measurements which are used to assess excitation rates, the difficulty to perform these measurements, and their analysis in some various cases. Thus, the author addresses excitation mechanisms of stellar oscillation (stochastic excitation, opacity- related excitation, and other excitation mechanisms), the excitation of solar modes (observation and theoretical predictions, influence of magnetic phenomena, solar g modes), and the excitation of modes in other stars (solar-type pulsators, red giants, and not so conventional pulsators such as HD180642 and Be stars like HD49330)

  3. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, F.; Rodgers, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book include: Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; Primary products in radiation chemistry; Theoretical aspects of radiation chemistry; Theories of the solvated electron; The radiation chemistry of gases; Radiation chemistry of colloidal aggregates; Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides; Radiation chemistry of polymers; Radiation chemistry of biopolymers; Radiation processing and sterilization; and Compound index

  4. Nonordinary excitation of hydroacoustic resonance in the hydroturbine circuit of the sayano-shushenskaya hydroelectric power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavosov, R. K.; Prozorov, A. G.

    2011-05-01

    Three cases of excitation of resonance oscillations in a circuit with an incompressible medium and a hydrodynamic source of narrow-band acoustic radiation are compared. It is asserted that the Francis turbine can transmit and reflect infrasonic disturbances. It is supposed that an array of immobile coaxial cylinders below the impeller will prevent hydroacoustic self-excitation in flow inside the water conduit.

  5. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Phillip W.K.; Sauer, Stephan P.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Oddershede, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sabin, John R., E-mail: sabin@qtp.ufl.edu [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state contributing to the mean excitation energy.

  6. Self-powered radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Playfoot, K.C.; Bauer, R.F.; Goldstein, N.P.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a self powered radiation detector requiring no excitation potential to generate a signal indicating a radiation flux. Such detectors comprise two electrically insulated electrodes, at a distance from each other. These electrodes are made of conducting materials having a different response for neutron and/or gamma ray radiation flux levels, as in nuclear power stations. This elongated detector generates an electric signal in terms of an incident flux of radiations cooperating with coaxial conductors insulated from each other and with different radiation reaction characteristics. The conductor with the greatest reaction to the radiations forms the central emitting electrode and the conductor with the least reaction to the radiations forms a tubular coaxial collecting electrode. The rhodium or cobalt tubular emitting electrode contains a ductile central conducting cable placed along the longitudinal axis of the detector. The latter is in high nickel steel with a low reaction to radiation [fr

  7. Supersonic Localized Excitations Mediate Microscopic Dynamic Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, H. O.; Griffith, W. A.; Pec, M.

    2017-12-01

    A moving rupture front activates a fault patch by increasing stress above a threshold strength level. Subsequent failure yields fast slip which releases stored energy in the rock. A fraction of the released energy is radiated as seismic waves carrying information about the earthquake source. While this simplified model is widely accepted, the detailed evolution from the onset of dynamic failure to eventual re-equilibration is still poorly understood. To study dynamic failure of brittle solids we indented thin sheets of single mineral crystals and recorded the emitted ultrasound signals (high frequency analogues to seismic waves) using an array of 8 to 16 ultrasound probes. The simple geometry of the experiments allows us to unravel details of dynamic stress history of the laboratory earthquake sources. A universal pattern of failure is observed. First, stress increases over a short time period (1 - 2 µs), followed by rapid weakening (≈ 15 µs). Rapid weakening is followed by two distinct relaxation phases: a temporary quasi-steady state phase (10 µs) followed by a long-term relaxation phase (> 50 µs). We demonstrate that the dynamic stress history during failure is governed by formation and interaction of local non-dispersive excitations, or solitons. The formation and annihilation of solitons mediates the microscopic fast weakening phase, during which extreme acceleration and collision of solitons lead to non-Newtonian behavior and Lorentz contraction, i.e. shortening of solitons' characteristic length. Interestingly, a soliton can propagate as fast as 37 km/s, much faster than the p-wave velocity, implying that a fraction of the energy transmits through soliton excitations. The quasi-steady state phase delays the long-term ageing of the damaged crystal, implying a potentially weaker material. Our results open new horizons for understanding the complexity of earthquake sources, and, more generally, non-equilibrium relaxation of many body systems.

  8. Uniform magnetic excitations in nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Britt Rosendahl

    2005-01-01

    We have used a spin-wave model to calculate the temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles. The uniform precession mode, corresponding to a spin wave with wave vector q=0, is predominant in nanoparticles and gives rise to an approximately linear temperature...... dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization well below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature for both ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic particles. This is in accordance with the results of a classical model for collective magnetic excitations in nanoparticles. In nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic...... materials, quantum effects give rise to a small deviation from the linear temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization at very low temperatures. The complex nature of the excited precession states of nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials, with deviations from antiparallel orientation...

  9. Receiver-exciter controller design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  10. International Meeting: Excited QCD 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Giacosa, Francesco; Malek, Magdalena; Marinkovic, Marina; Parganlija, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Excited QCD 2014 will take place on the beautiful Bjelasnica mountain located in the vicinity of the Bosnian capital Sarajevo. Bjelasnica was a venue of the XIV Winter Olympic Games and it is situated only 30 kilometers from Sarajevo International Airport. The workshop program will start on February 2 and finish on February 8, 2014, with scientific lectures taking place from February 3 to 7. Workshop participants will be accomodated in Hotel Marsal, only couple of minutes by foot from the Olympic ski slopes. ABOUT THE WORKSHOP This edition is the sixth in a series of workshops that were previously organised in Poland, Slovakia, France and Portugal. Following the succesful meeting in 2013, the Workshop is returning to Sarajevo Olympic mountains in 2014, exactly thirty years after the Games. The workshop covers diverse aspects of QCD: (i) QCD at low energies: excited hadrons, glueballs, multiquarks. (ii) QCD at high temperatures and large densities: heavy-ion collisions, jets, diffraction, hadronisation, quark-...

  11. Laser amplification in excited dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Thomas; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Sarpe, Cristian; Zielinski, Bastian; Götte, Nadine; Senftleben, Arne; Balling, Peter; Baumert, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Wide-bandgap dielectrics such as glasses or water are transparent at visible and infrared wavelengths. This changes when they are exposed to ultrashort and highly intense laser pulses. Different interaction mechanisms lead to the appearance of various transient nonlinear optical phenomena. Using these, the optical properties of dielectrics can be controlled from the transparent to the metal-like state. Here we expand this range by a yet unexplored mechanism in excited dielectrics: amplification. In a two-colour pump-probe experiment, we show that a 400 nm femtosecond laser pulse is coherently amplified inside an excited sapphire sample on a scale of a few micrometres. Simulations strongly support the proposed two-photon stimulated emission process, which is temporally and spatially controllable. Consequently, we expect applications in all fields that demand strongly localized amplification.

  12. Vibrational excitation from heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, G.D. III; Redmon, M.J.; Woken, G. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Classical trajectories have been used by numerous researchers to investigate the dynamics of exothermic chemical reactions (atom + diatom) with a view toward understanding what leads to vibrational excitation of the product molecule. Unlike these studies, the case where the reaction is catalyzed by a solid surface is considered. The trajectory studies indicate that there should be conditions under which considerable vibrational energy appears in the product molecules without being lost to the solid during the course of the reaction. 2 figures, 3 tables

  13. Magnetic excitations in thulium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.; Nicklow, R.M.; Rhyne, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    We have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on a single crystal specimen of Tm at wavevectors rvec κ = (1,1, ζ) and (0,0,2 + ζ) (ζ = 0, hor-ellipsis, 1). Most of the measurements have been made at T = 5K, where Tm exhibits a seven layer ferrimagnetic-antiphase-domain structure (four moments up, parallel to the c-axis, followed by three moments down). At this temperature the excitation spectra consist of three peaks. The two lower energy excitations have been identified as originating from magneto-vibrational scattering from the TA phonon, while the higher energy excitation is magnetic and exhibits only a weak dispersion (between 8.3 and 9.6 meV). At T = 50K, a temperature at which the system exhibits a c-axis sinusoidally modulated structure, the magnetic mode shows significant softening and broadening. The magneto-vibrational scattering vanishes above the Neel temperature (T N = 58.5K) while the magnetic mode persists at least up to T = 70K. These results suggest that the Hamiltonian in this system is dominated by the crystal-field-anistropy energy, and that the exchange interaction is relatively weak. 9 refs., 2 figs

  14. Photoionization cross-sections of ground and excited valence levels of actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarzhemsky Victor G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The photoionization cross-sections of ground and excited atomic states of actinide atoms were calculated by the Dirac-Fock-Slater method for two excitation energies of X-ray radiation (1253.6 eV and 1486.6 eV. These data are required for calculations of intensities of X-ray photoelectron spectra of actinide compound valence bands and interpretation of experimental spectra.

  15. Excitation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons by Fluorescent Light from Organic Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Jozefowski, Leszek; Kawalec, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    -coherent excitation indicates its prospect for future integrated systems. To support our experimental results, we investigate the proposed geometries by analytical calculations and finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) modelling. The experimentally obtained angular leakage radiation peak positions can readily...... be predicted by our analytical calculations. Nevertheless, the experimental results exhibit a distinct asymmetry in the peak intensities. In agreement with our FDTD calculations, we address this asymmetrical SPP excitation to the nanofiber molecular orientation. The proposed structure’s high flexibility...

  16. Ionization and excitation of uranium in a hollow-cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, J.M.; Pianarosa, P.; Larin, G.; Saint-Dizier, J.P.; Bouchard, P.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of different carrier gases (Ne,Ar,Kr,Xe) their pressure, and discharge current on the excitation and ionization of uranium atoms in a vapor generator of hollow-cathode design has been investigated by monitoring emission line intensities. From our measurements of line intensities as a function of the carrier gas we obtain an indication of the role of Penning collisions on the excitation of radiative levels in U II

  17. High efficiency detection technology on quantum action using radiation excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Masataka; Ukibe, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Isao; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Shoji, Akira; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2000-01-01

    In 1998 fiscal year, as a local quasi particle loss process, it was elucidated that there was a quasi particle loss induced with magnetic flux quantum trapped by a detector on its cooling. Hitherto, it was reported that action of a tunnel junction detector was different by its magnetic history. That is, the detector had unstability such as variation of its action on its cooling. Therefore, the quasi particle loss induced by magnetic flux quantum forming cause of the unstability was quantitatively evaluated. As a result, it was elucidated that output of the detector was reduced half only by trapping the magnetic flux quantum with numbers corresponding to weak magnetic field like geomagnetism. And, this phenomenon was also described by using a model concept with quasi particle trapping due to the magnetic flux quantum. (G.K.)

  18. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of {beta}-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar ({approx}1 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for {beta}-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower ({approx}0.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for {beta}-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number of conjugated double bonds, the longer chain systems having higher quenching rate constants. The efficiency of deactivation of singlet oxygen by three asymmetric carotenoids was measured via time-resolved luminescence detection. In benzene, the deactivation efficiency was found to fit the trend reported previously, in that quenching efficiency increases with increasing wavelength of {pi}{pi}* absorption of the maxima of carotenoids. Both hydroxyl and carbonyl groups were shown to lower the quenching ability. The singlet oxygen deactivation efficiency of carotenoids incorporated within the bilayer of dipalmitoyl phosphotidyl choline liposomes and water/alcohol mixtures was determined concluding that out of the two xanthophylls and one carotene investigated, {beta}-carotene was the most efficient at singlet oxygen deactivation. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids. (author)

  19. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, M.

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar (∼1 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 ) for β-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower (∼0.5 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 ) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for β-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number of conjugated double bonds, the longer chain systems having higher quenching rate constants. The efficiency of deactivation of singlet oxygen by three asymmetric carotenoids was measured via time-resolved luminescence detection. In benzene, the deactivation efficiency was found to fit the trend reported previously, in that quenching efficiency increases with increasing wavelength of ππ* absorption of the maxima of carotenoids. Both hydroxyl and carbonyl groups were shown to lower the quenching ability. The singlet oxygen deactivation efficiency of carotenoids incorporated within the bilayer of dipalmitoyl phosphotidyl choline liposomes and water/alcohol mixtures was determined concluding that out of the two xanthophylls and one carotene investigated, β-carotene was the most efficient at singlet oxygen deactivation. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids. (author)

  20. Analysis of Atomic Electronic Excitation in Nonequilibrium Air Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xin; Jia Hong-Hui; Yin Hong-Wei; Zhang Hai-Liang; Chang Sheng-Li; Yang Jun-Cai; Dang Wei-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Electronic excitation of atoms is studied in nonequilibrium air plasmas with the electronic temperature between 8000 K and 20000 K. By using the modified Saha—Boltzmann equation, our simplified method takes into account significant radiative processes and strong self-absorption of the vacuum ultraviolet lines. Calculations are carried out at three trajectory points of the Fire II flight experiment. Good agreement with the detailed collisional-radiative model is obtained, and the performance of this method in applications to highly nonequilibrium conditions is better than Park's quasi-steady-state model and Spradian-9.0. A short discussion on the influence of optical thickness of the vacuum ultraviolet radiation is also given. It costs about 2.9 ms on the average to solve one cell of the shock layer on a low cost computer, which shows that the present method is fast and efficient. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  1. Excitation of propagating magnetization waves by microstrip antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, V. F.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    1988-11-01

    We discuss the self-consistent theory of excitation of dipole-exchange magnetization waves by microstrip antennas in a metal-dielectric-ferrite-dielectric-metal stratified structure, magnetized under an arbitrary angle to the surface. Spin-wave Green's functions are derived, describing the response of the spin-system to a spatially inhomogeneous varying magnetic field. The radiative resistance of microstrip antenna is calculated. In this case the distribution of surface current density in the antenna is found on the basis of the analytic solution of a singular integral equation. The nature of the effect of metallic screens and redistributed surface current densities in the antenna on the frequency dependence of the resistive radiation is investigated. Approximate relations are obtained, convenient for practical calculations of radiative resistance of microstrip antennas both in a free and in a screened ferromagnetic film. The theoretical calculations are verified by data of experiments carried out on monocrystalline films of iron-yttrium garnet.

  2. Excited-state formation as H+ and He+ ions scatter from metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, W.E.; Zivitz, M.; Thomas, E.W.

    1975-01-01

    Impact of 10-to30KeV H + or He + ions on polycrystalline metal surfaces causes some projectiles to be backscattered in a neutral excited state. These projectiles subsequently radiatively decay, emitting Doppler-broadened spectral lines. By analysis of the spectral shape of these lines, we are able to determine the probability of radiationless deexcitation of the excited backscattered atoms. Quantitative measurements of spectral intensity indicate that less than 1% of all projectiles are backscattered in an excited state. The relative variation of total spectral line intensity with angle of projectile incidence and with projectile primary energy has been successfully predicted using a model which assumes that the probability for excited-state formation is independent of the scattered projectile's energy and direction. The variation in total spectral line intensity with target atomic number is predicted, and the sputtering and excitation of Al under He + impact is briefly examined

  3. Trapping time statistics and efficiency of transport of optical excitations in dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijs, Dirk-Jan; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    2004-09-01

    We theoretically study the trapping time distribution and the efficiency of the excitation energy transport in dendritic systems. Trapping of excitations, created at the periphery of the dendrimer, on a trap located at its core, is used as a probe of the efficiency of the energy transport across the dendrimer. The transport process is treated as incoherent hopping of excitations between nearest-neighbor dendrimer units and is described using a rate equation. We account for radiative and nonradiative decay of the excitations while diffusing across the dendrimer. We derive exact expressions for the Laplace transform of the trapping time distribution and the efficiency of trapping, and analyze those for various realizations of the energy bias, number of dendrimer generations, and relative rates for decay and hopping. We show that the essential parameter that governs the trapping efficiency is the product of the on-site excitation decay rate and the trapping time (mean first passage time) in the absence of decay.

  4. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to isotope separation employing isotopically selective vibrational excitation and vibration-translation reactions of the excited particles. Uranium enrichment, using uranium hexafluoride, is a particular embodiment. (U.K.)

  5. Spurious Excitations in Semiclassical Scattering Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, D. H. E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Shows how through proper handling of the nonuniform motion of semiclassical coordinates spurious excitation terms are eliminated. An application to the problem of nuclear Coulomb excitation is presented as an example. (HM)

  6. Backreaction of excitations on a vortex

    OpenAIRE

    Arodz, Henryk; Hadasz, Leszek

    1996-01-01

    Excitations of a vortex are usually considered in a linear approximation neglecting their backreaction on the vortex. In the present paper we investigate backreaction of Proca type excitations on a straightlinear vortex in the Abelian Higgs model. We propose exact Ansatz for fields of the excited vortex. From initial set of six nonlinear field equations we obtain (in a limit of weak excitations) two linear wave equations for the backreaction corrections. Their approximate solutions are found ...

  7. Excitation system testing in HPP 'Uvac'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojčić Nemanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The excitation system of hydro unit in HPP 'Uvac' and results of testings of excitation system performed for achieving of unit's mathematical model are presented in this paper. Description of excitation system equipment, parameters of regulators and results obtained after testings are presented. The presented results showed that the regulators are properly adjusted and that the excitation system is completely functional and reliable.

  8. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  9. Quantification of plasmon excitations in core-level photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yubero, F.; Tougaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    Calculation of photoelectron spectra (PES) based on our previous dielectric response model [A. C. Simonsen et al. Phys. Rev. B 56, 1612 (1997)] for electronic excitations in PES are compared with recently reported experimental data. It is found that the dielectric description of electron energy losses in photoemission reproduces quantitatively the angular dependence of the surface and bulk electron losses observed experimentally for the Al2s photoemission spectra of Al(111), excited with MgKα radiation. The model also allows to calculate the separate intrinsic and extrinsic effects in photoemission. Thus, the extrinsic losses account for more than 95% of the total surface excitations. Regarding the bulk excitations, both extrinsic and intrinsic contributions vary significantly with emission angle. The intrinsic contribution represents ∼35% of the intensity at the bulk plasmon position at normal emission while only 18% at 80 deg. glancing emission. The calculations presented here can easily be used to interpret PES spectra of other materials in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic effects, if their dielectric properties are known

  10. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  11. Production of excited charmed mesons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbaneo, D

    2000-01-01

    Studies od the production of orbitally excited charmed and charmed strange mesons in e+e- collisions, performed by the LEP collaborations are reviewed. Measurements of the production rates of orbitally excited charmed mesons in semileptonic b decays are presented. Searches for charmed meson radial excitations are also briefly discussed.

  12. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Balling, Peter; Frislev, Martin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report an approach to modeling the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and dielectric materials. The model includes the excitation of carriers by the laser through strongfield excitation, collisional excitation, and absorption in the plasma consisting of conduction-band electrons formed...

  13. Radiation and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfermann, H.H.; Solbach, C.

    1992-11-01

    The brochure explains the major types of radiation, the radiation sources, effects, uses, and risks, as well as the regulatory system adopted by the government in order to keep the risks as low as possible. (orig./DG) [de

  14. Radiation: behavioral implications in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogo, V.

    1988-01-01

    Since future space missions are likely to be beyond Earth's protective atmosphere, a potentially significant hazard is radiation. The following behavioural situations are addressed in this paper: (1) space radiations are more effective at disrupting behaviour; (2) task demands can aggravate the radiation-disruption; (3) efforts to mitigate disruption with drugs or shielding are not satisfactory and the drugs can be behaviourally toxic; and (4) space- and radiation-induced emesis combined may be synergistic. Thus future space travel will be a demanding, exciting time for behavioral toxicologists, and while the circumstances may seem insurmountable at first, creative application of scientific expertise should illicit solutions, similar to demanding situations confronted before. (author)

  15. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent

  16. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ/sub u/ + , v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 π/sub u'/, v = 1,2, b 1 π/sub u'/, v = 3-5, and c 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization. 23 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  17. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ + /sub u/, v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 1,2, b 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 3-5, and c 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization

  18. Radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, Sung Jin; Kim, Seung Guk; No, Gyeong Seok; Park, Myeong Hwan; Ann, Bong Seon

    1998-03-01

    This book explains technical terms about radiation measurement, which are radiation, radiation quantity and unit such as prefix of international unit, unit for defence purposes of radiation, coefficient of radiation and interaction, kinds and principles of radiation detector, ionization chamber, G-M counter, G-M tube, proportional counter, scintillation detector, semiconductor radiation detector, thermoluminescence dosimeter, PLD, others detector, radiation monitor, neutron detector, calibration of radiation detector, statistics of counting value, activation analysis and electronics circuit of radiation detector.

  19. Hadron excitation of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsch, H.-P.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given on giant resonance studies in heavy nuclei using scattering of different hadronic probes. Concerning isoscalar giant resonances compression modes are discussed with the possibility to obtain more detailed structure information. From detailed studies of α scattering the distribution of isoscalar strengths of multipolarity up to L=6 was obtained. Some recent aspects of heavy ion excitation of collective modes are mentioned. The possibility to study isovector giant resonances in hadron charge exchange reactions is discussed. Finally, a comparison is made between α and 200 MeV proton scattering from which isoscalar and spin-isospin continuum response are extracted. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic excitations in ferromagnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furdyna, J.K.; Liu, X.; Zhou, Y.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic excitations in a series of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor films were studied by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Using the FMR approach, multi-mode spin wave resonance spectra have been observed, whose analysis provides information on magnetic anisotropy (including surface anisotropy), distribution of magnetization precession within the GaMnAs film, dynamic surface spin pinning (derived from surface anisotropy), and the value of exchange stiffness constant D. These studies illustrate a combination of magnetism and semiconductor physics that is unique to magnetic semiconductors

  1. Laser amplification in excited dielectrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Thomas; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Sarpe, Cristian

    2018-01-01

    Wide-bandgap dielectrics such as glasses or water are transparent at visible and infrared wavelengths. This changes when they are exposed to ultrashort and highly intense laser pulses. Different interaction mechanisms lead to the appearance of various transient nonlinear optical phenomena. Using...... these, the optical properties of dielectrics can be controlled from the transparent to the metal-like state. Here we expand this range by a yet unexplored mechanism in excited dielectrics: amplification. In a two-colour pump-probe experiment, we show that a 400nm femtosecond laser pulse is coherently...

  2. Importance of being topologically excited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldi, D.G.

    1980-08-01

    A class of Euclidean configurations that appear to be dominant in the functional integral of the CP/sup N-1/ models is identified. These configurations are point-like topological excitations, and they may be viewed as constituents of instantons, although they are defined independently of instantons through a continuum duality transformation. Not only do these configurations survive as N → infinity, but in the plasma phase they are responsible for the effects encountered within the 1/N expansion - confinement, theta dependence, and dynamical mass generation

  3. Application of Monte Carlo method in determination of secondary characteristic X radiation in XFA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roubicek, P.

    1982-01-01

    Secondary characteristic radiation is excited by primary radiation from the X-ray tube and by secondary radiation of other elements so that excitations of several orders result. The Monte Carlo method was used to consider all these possibilities and the resulting flux of characteristic radiation was simulated for samples of silicate raw materials. A comparison of the results of these computations with experiments allows to determine the effect of sample preparation on the characteristic radiation flux. (M.D.)

  4. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an unus......Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  5. Studies on the substrate mediated vibrational excitation of CO/Si(100) by means of SFG spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Xu; Lass, Kristian; Balgar, Thorsten; Hasselbrink, Eckart [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Fachbereich Chemie, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Vibrational excitations of adsorbates play an important role in chemical reaction dynamics. In the past decade CO on solid surfaces was chosen as adequate model system for studying vibrational relaxation dynamics. Our work is focused on the energy dissipation of vibrationally excited CO adsorbed on a silicon surface by means of IR/Vis sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. Here we present studies on substrate mediated excitation of vibrational modes of CO on Si(100) induced by UV radiation. We suppose the observation of highly excited internal stretch vibrations of CO caused by hot electrons generated within the silicon substrate.

  6. Excitation of propagating surface plasmons with a scanning tunnelling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T; Boer-Duchemin, E; Zhang, Y; Comtet, G; Dujardin, G

    2011-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunnelling excitation of propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a thin gold film is demonstrated. This is done by combining a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) with an inverted optical microscope. Analysis of the leakage radiation in both the image and Fourier planes unambiguously shows that the majority (up to 99.5%) of the detected photons originate from propagating SPPs with propagation lengths of the order of 10 μm. The remaining photon emission is localized under the STM tip and is attributed to a tip-gold film coupled plasmon resonance as evidenced by the bimodal spectral distribution and enhanced emission intensity observed using a silver STM tip for excitation.

  7. Excitation of propagating surface plasmons with a scanning tunnelling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T; Boer-Duchemin, E; Zhang, Y; Comtet, G; Dujardin, G, E-mail: Elizabeth.Boer-Duchemin@u-psud.fr [Institut des Sciences Moleculaire d' Orsay (ISMO), CNRS Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-04-29

    Inelastic electron tunnelling excitation of propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a thin gold film is demonstrated. This is done by combining a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) with an inverted optical microscope. Analysis of the leakage radiation in both the image and Fourier planes unambiguously shows that the majority (up to 99.5%) of the detected photons originate from propagating SPPs with propagation lengths of the order of 10 {mu}m. The remaining photon emission is localized under the STM tip and is attributed to a tip-gold film coupled plasmon resonance as evidenced by the bimodal spectral distribution and enhanced emission intensity observed using a silver STM tip for excitation.

  8. Effective excitation of DBD lamp with a long feedline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schitz, D V; Nechoroshev, V O

    2016-01-01

    The proposed solution makes possible the transfer of high-voltage excitation pulses through the long coaxial cable with the minimum losses and the excilamp efficiency. Use of resonant topology of the pulse converter provides ZCS at switching-ON and ZVC at switching- OFF of the transistors. The values of efficiency of radiation of ∼ 9% at the feedline of 2.5 m in length obtained during the experiments are about twice as much as the efficiency at the XeCl- excilamp excitation by the quasi-square pulses power supply due to the decrease of losses at switching and the increase of electric efficiency of a resonant power supply with the long coaxial feedline. (paper)

  9. The giant quadrupole resonance in highly excited rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civitarese, O.; Furui, S.; Ploszajczak, M.; Faessler, A.

    1983-01-01

    The giant quadrupole resonance in highly excited, fast rotating nuclei is studied as a function of both the nuclear temperature and the nuclear angular momentum. The photo-absorption cross sections for quadrupole radiation in 156 Dy, 160 Er and 164 Er are evaluated within the linear response theory. The strength functions of the γ-ray spectrum obtained from the decay of highly excited nuclear states by deexcitation of the isoscalar quadrupole mode show a fine structure, which depends on the temperature T, the angular momentum I and the deformation of the nucleus β. The splitting of the modes associated with the signature-conserving and signature-changing components of the quadrupole field is discussed. (orig.)

  10. SCROLL, a superconfiguration collisional radiative model with external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Klapisch, M.

    2000-01-01

    A collisional radiative model for calculating non-local thermodynamical-equilibrium (non-LTE) spectra of heavy atoms in hot plasmas has been developed. It takes into account the numerous excited an autoionizing states by using superconfigurations. These are split systematically until the populations converge. The influence of an impinging radiation field has recently been added to the model. The effect can be very important. (author)

  11. Excitation functions of the 98Mo+d reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubin, P.P.; Padalko, V.Yu.; Khrisanfov, Yu.V.; Lebedev, P.P.; Podkopaev, Yu.N.

    The excitation functions of the 98 Mo+d reactions were studied. The energy dependence of (d,p),(d,n) and (d,α) reactions was investigated by the activation analysis. The energies of deuterons in the range (6-12) MeV were determined by means of the aluminium filters. 98 Mo foils with surface densities of 1.02, 0.23 and 0.14 mgxcm -2 with 98 Mo enrichment of 94.1% were used as targets. The gamma spectra were measured by a Ge(Li) detector. The 98 Mo(d,p) 99 Mo reaction excitation function was determined via detection of 739 and 181 keV γ-radiation of 99 Mo (Tsub(1/2)=66.47h); 140 keV γ-radiation of 99 Tc (Tsub(1/2)=6h) was detected for the 98 Mo(d,n) 99 Tc reaction excitation function determination and 460, 568, 1091, 1200 and 1492 keV γ-quanta of 96 Nb (Tsub(1/2)=23.35h) - for the 98 Mo(d,α) 96 Nb reaction. In the excitation function the wide extremum was observed at Esub(d) approximately 10 MeV. The ratio of cross sections σsup(m)(d,n)/σ(d,p) on the 98 Mo target was determined. The ratio σsup(m)(d,n)/σ(d,p) was found to be decreasing function of the deuteron energy. The relative cross sections were determined with an accuracy of +-5%, while for the absolute values of cross sections the accuracy was +-15%

  12. Process and device for the selective excitation and separation of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducas, T.W.

    1976-01-01

    Description is given of a method for selectively populating high-lying excited states of atoms or molecules. It comprises: excitation of atoms or molecules with a first circularly polarized pulsed radiation, the coherent frequency components of first pulsed radiation have frequencies corresponding to the energy difference between a lower energy level and the frequency split levels of an intermediate energy level, the duration of pulse being less than 2π/Δω, where Δω is the frequency difference of the split levels; applying a second circularly polarized pulsed radiation to atoms or molecules for a time subsequent to the termination of first radiation, the coherent frequency components of second pulsed radiation have frequencies corresponding to the energy difference between the split levels of intermediate energy level and an upper energy level, the duration of second pulse being less than 2π/Δω. The first and second radiation have the same handedness of circular polarization, whereby upper energy level has a greater population than prior to excitation by first and second radiation pulses [fr

  13. Thermodynamical description of excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonche, P.

    1989-01-01

    In heavy ion collisions it has been possible to obtain composite systems at rather high excitation energies corresponding to temperatures of several MeV. The theoretical studies of these systems are based on concepts borrowed from thermodynamics or statistical physics, such as the temperature. In these lectures, we present the concepts of statistical physics which are involved in the physics of heavy ion as they are produced nowadays in the laboratory and also during the final stage of a supernova collapse. We do not attempt to describe the reaction mechanisms which yield such nuclear systems nor their decay by evaporation or fragmentation. We shall only study their static properties. The content of these lectures is organized in four main sections. The first one gives the basic features of statistical physics and thermodynamics necessary to understand quantum mechanics at finite temperature. In the second one, we present a study of the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear physics. A phenomenological approach of the stability of hot nuclei follows. The microscopic point of view is proposed in the third part. Starting from the basic concepts derived in the first part, it provides a description of excited or hot nuclei which confirms the qualitative results of the second part. Furthermore it gives a full description of most properties of these nuclei as a function of temperature. Finally in the last part, a microscopic derivation of the equation of state of nuclear matter is proposed to study the collapse of a supernova core

  14. Core excitation and de-excitation spectroscopies of free atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a review of the current status of core excitation and de-excitation spectroscopy studies of free atoms molecules using a high-resolution soft X-ray monochromator and a high-resolution electron energy analyzer, installed in the soft X-ray photochemistry beam line at SPring-8. Experimental results are discussed for 1s excitation of Ne, O 1s excitation of CO and H 2 O, and F 1s excitation of CF 4 . (author)

  15. Electron-impact excitation rate-coefficients and polarization of subsequent emission for Ar"+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dipti; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Electron impact excitation in Ar"+ ions has been studied by using fully relativistic distorted wave theory. Calculations are performed to obtain the excitation cross-sections and rate-coefficients for the transitions from the ground state 3p"5 (J=3/2) to fine-structure levels of excited states 3p"44s, 3p"44p, 3p"45s, 3p"45p, 3p"43d and 3p"44d. Polarization of the radiation following the excitation has been calculated using the obtained magnetic sub-level cross-sections. Comparison of the present rate-coefficients is also done with the previously reported theoretical results for some unresolved fine structure transitions. - Highlights: • Fully relativistic distorted wave theory has been used to study the excitation of fine-structure states of Ar"+. • We have calculated electron-impact excitation cross-sections for the wide range of incident electron energies. • Electron impact excitation rate-coefficients are calculated as a function of electron temperature. • Polarization of photons emitted following the decay of the excited fine-structure states are also reported.

  16. Resonant and nonresonant transfer and excitation in Si11+ + He collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    For many years now, dielectronic recombination (DR) has been discussed as a possible energy loss mechanism in high temperature plasmas (e.g. stars). The process is basically the inverse Auger process and involves the capture of a free electron by an ion and the simultaneous excitation of an inner shell electron of the ion producing a doubly excited state. The DR process also includes the radiative deexcitation of the ion and hence represents an energy loss from the plasma since the plasma is essentially transparent to the photons. If, instead of a free electron, an electron that is weakly bound to an atom is captured and an inner shell electron of the ion is excited, the same excited states are produced as in DR. Because the bound electrons have a momentum distribution (Compton profile), individual doubly excited states cannot, in general, be observed in this case. This new process has been called Resonant Transfer and Excitation (RTE). There is also a competing mechanism for RTE in which excitation occurs via the interaction between a projectile ion electron and a target nucleus and the capture occurs because of the interaction of the projectile nucleus and a target electron. This competing mechanism has been termed Nonresonant Transfer and Excitation (NTE) Measurements have been performed to measure RTE and NTE cross sections. A discussion of the theory, methods, and results is included

  17. Parametric Cherenkov radiation (development of idea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buts, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Some physical results of researches about charged particles radiation in mediums with a periodic heterogeneity and in periodic potential are reported. The development of ideas Parametric Cherenkov Radiation has shown, that in mediums, which have even a weak degree of a periodic heterogeneity of an permittivity or potential, the nonrelativistic oscillators can radiated as relativistic. They effectively radiate the high numbers of harmonics. In particular, in the carried out experiments the ultra-violet radiation was excited at action on a crystal of intensive ten-centimetric radiation. These results give the reasons to hope for making of nonrelativistic lasers on free electrons

  18. Stacked dipole line source excitation of active nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel

    This work investigates electromagnetic properties of cylindrical active coated nano-particles excited by a stac- ked electric dipole line source. The nano-particles consist of a silica nano-core, layered by silver, gold, or copper nano-shell. Attention is devoted to the influence of the source...... location and dipole orientation, the gain constant, and the nano-particle material composition on the electromagnetic field distributions and radiated powers. The results are contrasted to those for the magnetic line source illumination of the nano-particles....

  19. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  20. Microwave Excitation In ECRIS plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Consoli, F.; Gammino, S.; Maimone, F.; Barbarino, S.; Catalano, R. S.; Mascali, D.; Tumino, L.

    2007-01-01

    A number of phenomena related to the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) has been better understood recently by means of the improvement of comprehension of the coupling mechanism between microwave generators and ECR plasma. In particular, the two frequency heating and the frequency tuning effect, that permit a remarkable increase of the current for the highest charge states ions, can be explained in terms of modes excitation in the cylindrical cavity of the plasma chamber. Calculations based on this theoretical approach have been performed, and the major results will be presented. It will be shown that the electric field pattern completely changes for a few MHz frequency variations and the changes in ECRIS performances can be correlated to the efficiency of the power transfer between electromagnetic field and plasma

  1. Excited levels of Pa-233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vara Cuadrado, J. M.

    1969-01-01

    A study of Pa-233 excited levels from the alpha decay of Np-237 and from beta decay of Th-233 has been performed. The alpha decay spectrum was measured with a semiconductor spectrometer of 18 keV effective resolution (FWHM). Over 13 new lines were identified. The gamma ray spectra of Np-237 and Th-233 were obtained with a Ge-Li detector low and medium range energy lines, and with Si-Li detector for the low energy region. A continuous purification method of Np-237 from its comparatively short-lived daughter Pa-233 was applied. A high number of new lines were identified in both spectra. The gamma-gamma coincidence spectra were obtained with INa(T 1 ) detectors. (Author) 54 refs

  2. Quantized wobbling excitations with alignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Ikuko; Hagemann, Gudrun B.

    2003-01-01

    The wobbling excitations in the presence of an appreciable amount of alignment are expected to appear more easily at lower angular momenta of the yrast spectra, compared with those in the textbook example. The large B(E2;I→I-1) value for Δn=1 transitions where n expresses the number of wobbling phonons is shown to be a strongly increasing function of the triaxiality parameter γ, especially for γ > or approx. +20 deg., while it is relatively independent of moments of inertia. On the other hand, the relation of the wobbling phonon energy to the total angular momentum may be used to extract quantitative information on nuclear moments of inertia. It is concluded that the γ value of the triaxial, strongly deformed bands in 163 Lu is about equal to +20 deg. and may be slightly increasing as a function of I

  3. Resonantly enhanced production of excited fragments of gaseous molecules following core-level excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.M.; Lu, K.T.; Lee, J.M.; Ho, S.C.; Chang, H.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    2005-01-01

    State-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations have been investigated by resonant photoemission spectroscopy and dispersed UV/optical fluorescence spectroscopy. The main features in the gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 fluorescence spectrum are identified as the emission from excited Si*, Si + *, CH* and H*. The core-to-Rydberg excitations at both Si 2p and Cl 2p edges lead to a noteworthy production of not only the excited atomic fragments, neutral and ionic (Si*, Si + *) but also the excited diatomic fragments (CH*). In particular, the excited neutral atomic fragments Si* are significantly reinforced. The experimental results provide deeper insight into the state-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of molecules via core-level excitation

  4. Spatial distribution of FIR rotationally excited CH+ and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar PDR⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikka, A.; Habart, E.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Abergel, A.; Pilleri, P.; Dartois, E.; Joblin, C.; Gerin, M.; Godard, B.

    2016-01-01

    Context The methylidyne cation (CH+) and hydroxyl (OH) are key molecules in the warm interstellar chemistry, but their formation and excitation mechanisms are not well understood. Their abundance and excitation are predicted to be enhanced by the presence of vibrationally excited H2 or hot gas (~500–1000 K) in photodissociation regions with high incident FUV radiation field. The excitation may also originate in dense gas (> 105 cm−3) followed by nonreactive collisions with H2, H, and electrons. Previous observations of the Orion Bar suggest that the rotationally excited CH+ and OH correlate with the excited CO, a tracer of dense and warm gas, and formation pumping contributes to CH+ excitation. Aims Our goal is to examine the spatial distribution of the rotationally excited CH+ and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar in order to establish their physical origin and main formation and excitation mechanisms. Methods We present spatially sampled maps of the CH+ J=3-2 transition at 119.8 µm and the OH Λ-doublet at 84 µm in the Orion Bar over an area of 110″×110″ with Herschel (PACS). We compare the spatial distribution of these molecules with those of their chemical precursors, C+, O and H2, and tracers of warm and dense gas (high-J CO). We assess the spatial variation of CH+ J=2-1 velocity-resolved line profile at 1669 GHz with Herschel HIFI spectrometer observations. Results The OH and especially CH+ lines correlate well with the high-J CO emission and delineate the warm and dense molecular region at the edge of the Bar. While notably similar, the differences in the CH+ and OH morphologies indicate that CH+ formation and excitation are strongly related to the observed vibrationally excited H2. This, together with the observed broad CH+ line widths, indicates that formation pumping contributes to the excitation of this reactive molecular ion. Interestingly, the peak of the rotationally excited OH 84 µm emission coincides with a bright young object, proplyd

  5. Spatial distribution of FIR rotationally excited CH+ and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikka, A; Habart, E; Bernard-Salas, J; Goicoechea, J R; Abergel, A; Pilleri, P; Dartois, E; Joblin, C; Gerin, M; Godard, B

    2017-03-01

    The methylidyne cation (CH + ) and hydroxyl (OH) are key molecules in the warm interstellar chemistry, but their formation and excitation mechanisms are not well understood. Their abundance and excitation are predicted to be enhanced by the presence of vibrationally excited H 2 or hot gas (~500-1000 K) in photodissociation regions with high incident FUV radiation field. The excitation may also originate in dense gas (> 10 5 cm -3 ) followed by nonreactive collisions with H 2 , H, and electrons. Previous observations of the Orion Bar suggest that the rotationally excited CH + and OH correlate with the excited CO, a tracer of dense and warm gas, and formation pumping contributes to CH + excitation. Our goal is to examine the spatial distribution of the rotationally excited CH + and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar in order to establish their physical origin and main formation and excitation mechanisms. We present spatially sampled maps of the CH + J=3-2 transition at 119.8 µm and the OH Λ-doublet at 84 µm in the Orion Bar over an area of 110″×110″ with Herschel (PACS). We compare the spatial distribution of these molecules with those of their chemical precursors, C + , O and H 2 , and tracers of warm and dense gas (high-J CO). We assess the spatial variation of CH + J=2-1 velocity-resolved line profile at 1669 GHz with Herschel HIFI spectrometer observations. The OH and especially CH + lines correlate well with the high-J CO emission and delineate the warm and dense molecular region at the edge of the Bar. While notably similar, the differences in the CH + and OH morphologies indicate that CH + formation and excitation are strongly related to the observed vibrationally excited H 2 . This, together with the observed broad CH + line widths, indicates that formation pumping contributes to the excitation of this reactive molecular ion. Interestingly, the peak of the rotationally excited OH 84 µm emission coincides with a bright young object, proplyd 244

  6. Excitation of waves in plasma near the ion cyclotron frequency using surface-wave antennas with auxillary passive gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longinov, A.V.; Lukinov, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    It is proposed to use a system of auxiliary passive gaps to excite waves in a plasma traveling in one direction parallel to the magnetic field, in order to localize the radiating surface of a surface-wave antenna. Using excitation of ion Bernstein waves in the plasma as an example the main properties of such an antenna system have been studied. It is shown that the use of passive gaps permits high directionality to be achieved for the radiation and allows the size of the radiating surface of the antenna to be controlled. 10 refs., 6 figs

  7. Cancer-causing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Holland, J.M.; Storer, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation causes cancer. That simple fact was known by the early 1900s. Further, radiation can induce cancer in almost any tissue in animals and humans. But the cancer-causing dose may vary by 20-fold for different tissues in animals. Such variation is also seen in people who are exposed, typically, to low radiation doses. Hence, the minimum dose that causes human cancer is not known. Thus, the crucial question becomes what factors, including amount of exposure, trigger cancer. Radiation is divided into two types, ionizing and nonionizing. Of the two, ionizing radiation involves higher energies. Thus by ejecting electrons from molecules, charged particles called ion pairs are formed. They are short-lived, and often break down to form highly reactive free radicals, which are molecular fragments containing unpaired electrons. Nonionizing radiation, which involves ultraviolet light and micro- and radiowaves, causes molecular excitations such as vibrations and electron movement, but produces no ions. And though ultraviolet light causes skin cancer, ionizing radiation is, by far, the more potent carcinogen

  8. First picosecond in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednar, J.

    1983-01-01

    The early processes of absorption by matter of ionizing radiation are discussed on the level of collision processes of electrons of the degradation spectrum of radiation with molecules of the medium. A short survey of the processes of initial excitations, superexcitations and ionizations is given occurring during absorption and relaxation processes. Collisions of fast charged particles with atoms and molecules are discussed within the first Bethe-Born approximation. A short theoretical description is given of the basic radiation chemical quantities, such as primary radiation chemical yield g and total absorbed energy Q/sub tot/ due to energy absorption from the totality of fast and slow electrons of the degradation spectrum. A short survey of current chemical and physical models of the track of a fast electron in condensed media is given together with some comments on the effect of the chemical composition of the medium on its initial radiation chemical decomposition. The model of the molecule in a high Rydberg state is sketched briefly together with some implications for radiation chemistry of formation and decay of this kind of highly excited matter. In conclusion, a survey of the initial yields of products in gases and track entities in liquids is presented and a few remarks are made concerning the intrinsic problems of radiation sciences, i.e. radiation physics, chemistry, dosimetry and biology

  9. Multiple electromagnetic excitations of relativistic projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llope, W.J.; Braun-Munzinger, P.

    1992-01-01

    Conditions optimum for the first experimental verification of the multiplication electromagnetic excitations of nuclei in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are described. The relative magnitudes of three important physical processes that might interfere with such a measurement are compared to the predicted strengths for the single and multiple electromagnetic excitations for various choices of the projectile mass and beam energy. Strategies are presented for making inferences concerning the presence of multiple excitation strength in experimental data

  10. Stimulated emission depletion following two photon excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, R. J.; Armoogum, D. A.; Bain, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The technique of stimulated emission depletion of fluorescence (STED) from a two photon excited molecular population is demonstrated in the S, excited state of fluorescein in ethylene glycol and methanol. Two photon excitation (pump) is achieved using the partial output of a regeneratively amplified Ti:Sapphire laser in conjunction with an optical parametric amplifier whose tuneable output provides a synchronous depletion (dump) pulse. Time resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy measu...

  11. Nuclear wobbling-phonon excitations with alignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, I.

    2003-01-01

    Wobbling-phonon excitations, which are recently observed in 71 163 Lu 92 , are studied. The presence of alignments in nuclei makes it easier for wobbling excitations to appear at lower angular momenta of the yrast spectra. A family of rotational bands with wobbling excitations, which have nearly the same nuclear intrinsic structure, have been pinned down by observing specific electromagnetic decay properties between them. The triaxiality parameter γ = +20 deg. is obtained for the nuclear shape from measured E2 transition probabilities

  12. Radiation damage in biomolecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fuss, Martina Christina

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays and radioactivity, ionizing radiations have been widely applied in medicine both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The risks associated with radiation exposure and handling led to the parallel development of the field of radiation protection. Pioneering experiments done by Sanche and co-workers in 2000 showed that low-energy secondary electrons, which are abundantly generated along radiation tracks, are primarily responsible for radiation damage through successive interactions with the molecular constituents of the medium. Apart from ionizing processes, which are usually related to radiation damage, below the ionization level low-energy electrons can induce molecular fragmentation via dissociative processes such as internal excitation and electron attachment. This prompted collaborative projects between different research groups from European countries together with other specialists from Canada,  the USA and Australia. This book summarizes the advances achieved by these...

  13. Planar UV excilamp excited by a surface barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guivan, N N [Department of Quantum Electronics, Uzhgorod National University, Pidgirna 46, Uzhgorod 88000 (Ukraine); Janca, J [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); Brablec, A [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); Stahel, P [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); SlavIcek, P [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); Shimon, L L [Department of Quantum Electronics, Uzhgorod National University, Pidgirna 46, Uzhgorod 88000 (Ukraine)

    2005-09-07

    In this paper, the typical characteristics of a planar excilamp based on KrCl* and XeCl* exciplex molecules are presented. The excitation of the working mixture Kr/Xe/Cl{sub 2} is realized by means of the surface barrier discharge at pressures of 0.1-1 bar. The following properties are measured and discussed: spectra emitted by the plasma in the UV/VIS/NIR spectral range, intensity of emitted light versus total pressure in the discharge, the composition of the working mixture and the power of emitted light. The radiation power versus input electric power, and space distribution of the emitted light including basic electrical parameters of the discharge were also measured. It was shown that the characteristic power of UV radiation emitted in the spectral range 200-400 nm is about 6 mW cm{sup -2} while the efficiency could be about 8%.

  14. New mode of magnetic excitation in praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, K.N.; McEwen, K.A.; Jensen, J.

    1994-01-01

    A novel propagating mode of magnetic excitation has been observed in Pr. It takes the form of low-energy satellites to the crystal-field excitations on both the hexagonal and cubic sites which are very broad at long wavelengths, rise in energy and rapidly narrow with increasing q, and disappear...... beyond the point at which the two excitations would cross. The broadening may be abruptly quenched by a magnetic field. The satellite excitations are believed to be associated with the dynamics of the conduction electrons....

  15. Stabilization of nonlinear excitations by disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Johansson, M.

    1998-01-01

    Using analytical and numerical techniques we analyze the static and dynamical properties of solitonlike excitations in the presence of parametric disorder in the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a homogeneous power nonlinearity. Both the continuum and the discrete problem...... are investigated. We find that otherwise unstable excitations can be stabilized by the presence of disorder in the continuum problem. For the very narrow excitations of the discrete problem we find that the disorder has no effect on the averaged behavior. Finally, we show that the disorder can be applied to induce...... a high degree of controllability of the spatial extent of the stable excitations in the continuum system....

  16. Numerical simulation of the cavitation's hydrodynamic excitement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassis, H.; Dueymes, E.; Lauro, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    First, we study the motion, the velocity, the phases plane and the acoustic sources associated to a spherical bubble in a compressible or incompressible medium. The bubble can be excited by periodic or random excitements. We study the parameters which influence their behaviour: periodicity or not of motion, implosion and explosion or oscillation of bubble. We take into account this behaviour in a model of cavitation: it is a numerical simulation using population of bubbles which are with positions (in the cavitation volume) and sizes are random. These bubbles are excited by a random excitement: a model of turbulent flow or implosion and explosion of bubble. (author)

  17. Excited-state density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbola, Manoj K; Hemanadhan, M; Shamim, Md; Samal, P

    2012-01-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to excited-state density functional theory, we present our method of constructing modified local density approximated (MLDA) energy functionals for the excited states. We show that these functionals give accurate results for kinetic energy and exchange energy compared to the ground state LDA functionals. Further, with the inclusion of GGA correction, highly accurate total energies for excited states are obtained. We conclude with a brief discussion on the further direction of research that include the construction of correlation energy functional and exchange potential for excited states.

  18. The mechanisms of Excited states in enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes.......Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes....

  19. The implications of non-linearity for excitation transfer in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, K.F.; Cundall, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Non-linear effects which arise from the coupling of anharmonic interactions can completely change excitation transport through molecular chains. The consequences of this for an understanding of the effect of ionising radiation on DNA are discussed. We consider that these effects should be taken into account in the interpretation of experimental data. (author)

  20. Harmonic pulsed excitation and motion detection of a vibrating reflective target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2008-01-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality. Methods involving acoustic radiation force excitation and pulse-echo ultrasound motion detection have been investigated to assess the mechanical response of tissue. In this work new methods for dynamic radiation force excitation and motion detection are presented. The theory and model for harmonic motion detection of a vibrating reflective target are presented. The model incorporates processing of radio frequency data acquired using pulse-echo ultrasound to measure harmonic motion with amplitudes ranging from 100 to 10,000 nm. A numerical study was performed to assess the effects of different parameters on the accuracy and precision of displacement amplitude and phase estimation and showed how estimation errors could be minimized. Harmonic pulsed excitation is introduced as a multifrequency radiation force excitation method that utilizes ultrasound tonebursts repeated at a rate f(r). The radiation force, consisting of frequency components at multiples of f(r), is generated using 3.0 MHz ultrasound, and motion detection is performed simultaneously with 9.0 MHz pulse-echo ultrasound. A parameterized experimental analysis showed that displacement can be measured with small errors for motion with amplitudes as low as 100 nm. The parameterized numerical and experimental analyses provide insight into how to optimize acquisition parameters to minimize measurement errors.

  1. Measurements of electron excitation and recombination for Ne-like Ba46+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Levine, M.A.; Knapp, D.A.; Henderson, J.R.

    1987-07-01

    A new facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used to obtain measurements for electron-impact excitation, dielectronic recombination and radiative recombination for the neon-like Ba 46+ ion. The experimental technique consists of trapping highly charged ions inside the space charge of an electron beam and measuring their x-ray emission spectra

  2. Nonclassical Effects of a Four-Level Excited-Doublet Atom Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiansong; Xu Jingbo

    2006-01-01

    We adopt a dynamical algebraic method to study a four-level excited-doublet atom model and obtain the explicit expressions of the time-evolution operator and the density operator for the system. The nonclassical effects of the system, such as collapses and revivals of the atomic inversion and squeezing of the radiation field, are also discussed.

  3. Oxygen auroral transition laser system excited by collisional and photolytic energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.R.; Powell, H.T.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1975-06-01

    The properties of laser media involving the auroral transition of atomic oxygen and analogous systems are examined. A discussion of the atomic properties, collisional mechanisms, excitation processes, and collisionally induced radiative phenomena is given. Crossing phenomena play a particularly important role in governing the dynamics of the medium

  4. Tunable submillimeter sources applied to the excited state rotational spectroscopy and kinetics of CH3F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, W.A.M.; Fetterman, H.R.; Peck, D.D.; Goldsmith, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Tunable submillimeter radiation, generated and detected using optically pumped lasers and Schottky diode mixers, has been used in an infrared-submillimeter double resonance investigation of CH 3 F. This technique permits the direct observation of the molecular rotational spectra and kinetics of excited vibrational states and is particularly important for those molecules which are candidates for optically pumped submillimeter lasers

  5. Electron spectroscopy studies of argon K-shell excitation and vacancy cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.H.; MacDonald, M.A.; LeBrun, T.; Azuma, Y.; Cooper, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used for studies of Ar K-shell excitation and vacancy decay processes. In addition, electrons and fluorescent X-rays have been recorded in coincidence to select subsets of the ejected electron spectra. Examples are presented for Ar 1s photoelectrons and KLL and LMM Auger spectra

  6. Resonant Electron capture for be-like ions with K- and L- shell excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafy, H.

    2005-01-01

    Resonant electron capture in electron-ion collisions is known as dielectronic recombination (DR). It was proved that, DR dominants usually over radiative recombination (RR) at high energy. Since 1980's, DR is considered a very important process in thermal plasma. The DR is an effective process in self-cooling and ionization balance as well as plasma modeling. Experimental works are still carried out to understand the trends of DR process. In the present work, DR cross sections are calculated for Be-like ions with K- and L- shell excitations. It is found that, DR cross sections increase as the effective charge (Zeff) increases for both types of excitations. DR rates coefficient in case of L-shell excitation is found to be five times larger than that of K-shell excitation

  7. The influence of autoionizing states on the excitation of helium by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ittersum, T. van

    1976-01-01

    The work described in this thesis deals with resonance effects in the scattering of electrons by helium at energies near the threshold of the autoionizing states (50-70 eV). The investigation is performed by studying light emission following the excitation of singly excited states. In some cases, the polarization of the radiation was also investigated. The purpose of the research was (i) to enlarge our knowledge of triply excited negative ion states, i.e. resonance states which are formed by temporary binding of the incident electron to a doubly excited (autoionizing) state of neutral helium, and (ii) to clear up the nature of some resonance structures which could not be explained in terms of negative ion resonances

  8. Studies of isovector excitations in nuclei by neutron-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, L.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper isovector excitations in nuclei, in particular the giant isovector quadrupole resonance in spherical nuclei, will be discussed. Several methods to investigate this excitation have been used, e.g. inelastic electron scattering and charge-exchange reactions. An alternative method to study isovector E2 resonances in nuclei, based on the radiative capture of fast neutrons, will be presented. Results from such experiments performed at the tandem accelerator laboratories in Los Alamos and Uppsala will be presented and discussed in terms of the direct-semidirect capture model. As a separate issue, the preparations being undertaken at Uppsala for studies of isovector excitations in nuclei by means of the (n,p) reaction will be described. A schematic lay-out of the experiment will be presented together with some relevant neutron beam parameters. Among isovector excitations to be studied by this method are the isovector monopole resonance and the Gamow-Teller resonance. 54 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  9. Submillimeter vibrationally excited water emission from the peculiar red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, K. M.; Philipp, S. D.; Güsten, R.; Alcolea, J.; Polehampton, E. T.; Brünken, S.

    2006-08-01

    Context: .Vibrationally excited emission from the SiO and H2O molecules probes the innermost circumstellar envelopes of oxygen-rich red giant and supergiant stars. VY CMa is the most prolific known emission source in these molecules. Aims: .Observations were made to search for rotational lines in the lowest vibrationally excited state of H2O. Methods: .The APEX telescope was used for observations of H2O lines at frequencies around 300 GHz. Results: .Two vibrationally excited H2O lines were detected, a third one could not be found. In one of the lines we find evidence for weak maser action, similar to known (sub)millimeter ν2 = 1 lines. We find that the other line's intensity is consistent with thermal excitation by the circumstellar infrared radiation field. Several SiO lines were detected together with the H2O lines.

  10. Single Production of Excited Neutrino at Clic based Electron Photon Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirca, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of excited quarks and leptons, as predicted by composite models, would supply convincing evidence for substructure of fermions. Electron-photon interactions at very high energies provide ideal conditions to look for excited states of first generations offermions. In particular, in magnetic- transition coupling the electron to a gauge bo son would allow for single production of excited neutrinos (ν * ) through t-channel W boson exchange. In this work, (ν * ) production followed by the electroweak radiative decays ν * →νγ, ν * →eW, ν * →νZ is presented. The production cross sections and P T distributions of excited neutrino are studied for CLlC

  11. Deviations from excitation equilibrium in optically thick mercury arc plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabourniotis, D.; Couris, S.; Damelincourt, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Up to date mercury arcs at pressure greater than 1 atm have been investigated as plasma systems in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state. These studies have been motivated by the applications of mercury arcs, e.g., in the lighting industry. The LTE-assumption simplifies the use of spectroscopic diagnostics and the performance of species-concentration calculations. A high pressure mercury arc of about 1 atm had been considered in two possibilities: excitation and gas temperatures are the same, the electron temperature is higher and excitation and electron temperatures are the same, the gas temperature is lower. Recent measurements in mercury arcs reveal the existence of severe departures from thermal equilibrium and suggest the absence of excitation equilibrium in the axis and in the periphery in such an arc. The deviation from equilibrium leads to complicated distributions, such that the system cannot be described correctly by any single temperature. This becomes quite complicated when plasma inhomogeneity and strong reabsorption of the radiation are present

  12. Electron Impact Excitation-Ionization of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Esam Abobakr A.

    In the last few decades, the study of atomic collisions by electron-impact has made significant advances. The most difficult case to study is electron impact ionization of molecules for which many approximations have to be made and the validity of these approximations can only be checked by comparing with experiment. In this thesis, I have examined the Molecular three-body distorted wave (M3DW) or Molecular four-body distorted wave (M4DW) approximations for electron-impact ionization. These models use a fully quantum mechanical approach where all particles are treated quantum mechanically and the post collision interaction (PCI) is treated to all orders of perturbation. These electron impact ionization collisions play central roles in the physics and chemistry of upper atmosphere, biofuel, the operation of discharges and lasers, radiation induced damage in biological material like damage to DNA by secondary electrons, and plasma etching processes. For the M3DW model, I will present results for electron impact single ionization of small molecules such as Water, Ethane, and Carbon Dioxide and the much larger molecules Tetrahydrofuran, phenol, furfural, 1-4 Benzoquinone. I will also present results for the four-body problem in which there are two target electrons involved in the collision. M4DW results will be presented for dissociative excitation-ionization of orientated D2. I will show that M4DW calculations using a variational wave function for the ground state that included s- and p- orbital states give better agreement to the experimental measurements than a ground state approximated as a product of two 1s-type Dyson orbitals.

  13. 13th AINSE radiation chemistry conference, 12-14 November 1986, Lucas Heights - AINSE Theatre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts of papers are given which cover the fields of radiolysis in aqueous solutions, solids and gases, radiation polymerisation and degradation, excitation in solids and gases, and industrial applications of radiation chemistry

  14. Some properties of Cerenkov radiation due to the finite thickness of the radiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzev, A.P.; Frank, I.M.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of Cerenkov radiation are analyzed for a small radiator thickness. It is shown that the directionality of the radiation, its threshold properties, and also the dependence on the electron energy and radiator thickness differ substantially from the well known characteristics of Cerenkov radiation corresponding to the case of an unlimited particle trajectory in an extended medium. We have experimentally studied the directionality and energy characteristics of radiation excited by electrons in a mica target of thickness 12 400 A at wavelength 4000 A. The experimental results are in good agreement with the calculations

  15. LS1: exciting times ahead

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    As the first and last proton-lead run of 2013 draws to a close, the extensive upgrade and maintenance programme of the LHC's first long shutdown (LS1) is about to get under way.   The LHC has provided physicists with a huge quantity of data to analyse since the first physics run in 2009. Now it's time for the machine, along with CERN's other accelerators, to get a facelift. LS1 will start on 13 February 2013, but this doesn’t mean that life at the Laboratory will be any less rich and exciting. Although there will be no collisions for a period of almost two years, the whole CERN site will be a hive of activity, with large-scale work under way to modernise the infrastructure and prepare the LHC for operation at higher energy. "A whole series of renovation work will be carried out around the LHC during LS1,” explains Simon Baird, deputy head of the EN Department. "The key driver is of course the consolidation of the 10,170 high-curren...

  16. Transverse excitations of 19F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, A.J.H.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis aspects of the structure of the nucleus 19 F are discussed as a result of transverse electron-scattering experiments, with emphasis on the ground state. The magnetization distribution of this state has been obtained from the measurement of electrons scattered from 19 F at backward angles. An introduction to the electron-scattering formalism is presented briefly together with the interpretation of electron-scattering results in terms of the nuclear shell model. The experimental apparatus for the measurement of electron scattering through an angle of 180 0 is described. This instrumentation has been installed in the low-energy facility (LEF) at NIKHEF-K. Simultaneously with the study of the magnetic ground state distribution of 19 F, also excited states of this nucleus up to an energy of 4.4 MeV have been investigated, mainly from data obtained in the EMIN station. Also for these states, the shell-model calculations have been the guide to determine their structure. (Auth.)

  17. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallieros, S.; Levin, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    The main theme of this report is the study and interpretation of the sequence of events that occur during the collisions of nuclear particles. Some of the processes discussed in parts A and B involve short range interactions; others involve interactions of long range. In most of part A one of the particles in the initial or in the final state (or in both) is a photon, which serves as a probe of the second particle, which may be a nucleus, a proton, a pion or any other hadron. The complexity of the processes taking place during the collisions makes it necessary to simplify some aspects of the physical problem. This leads to the introduction of modals which are used to describe a limited number of features in as much detail as possible. The main interest is the understanding of the hadronic excitations which result from the absorption of a photon and the determination of the fundamental structure constants of the target particle. In part B, all the particles are hadrons. The purpose here is to develop and apply optimal quantal methods appropriate for describing the interacting systems. Of particular interest are three-particle collision systems in which the final state consists of three free particles. Part B also considers the process of nuclear fusion as catalyzed by bound muons

  18. Excited-state imaging of cold atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheludko, D.V.; Bell, S.C.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Scholten, R.E.; Deshmukh, P.C.; Chakraborty, P.; Williams, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated state-selective diffraction contrast imaging (DCI) of cold 85Rb atoms in the first excited (52P3/2) state. Excited-state DCI requires knowledge of the complex refractive index of the atom cloud, which was calculated numerically using a semi-classical model. The Autler-Townes

  19. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Phillip W.K.; Sauer, Stephan P.A.; Oddershede, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase...

  20. Excitations of Neodymium Ions in Praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, M.; Jensen, J.; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    The excitations of Nd ions dissolved in Pr have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. A crystal-field level at about 1.2 meV interferes strongly with the host excitations. In the antiferromagnetic phase, another level is observed about 0.5 meV above the ground-state, which is split...

  1. S-parameters for weakly excited slots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels Christian

    1999-01-01

    A simple approach to account for parasitic effects in weakly excited slots cut in the broad wall of a rectangular waveguide is proposed......A simple approach to account for parasitic effects in weakly excited slots cut in the broad wall of a rectangular waveguide is proposed...

  2. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  3. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  4. Total cross section of highly excited strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizzi, F.; Senda, I.

    1990-01-01

    The unpolarized total cross section for the joining of two highly excited strings is calculated. The calculation is performed by taking the average overall states in the given excitation levels of the initial strings. We find that the total cross section grows with the energy and momentum of the initial states. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  5. Using excitation patterns to predict auditory masking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der M.L.; Kohlrausch, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated how well auditory masking can be predicted from excitation patterns. For this purpose, a quantitative model proposed by Moore and Glasberg (1987) and Glasberg and Moore (1990) was used to calculate excitation patterns evoked by stationary sounds. We performed simulations of a number

  6. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  7. Selective Coherent Excitation of Charged Density Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsvetkov, A.A.; Sagar, D.M.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Marel, D. van der

    2003-01-01

    Real time femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study collective and single particle excitations in the charge density wave state of the quasi-1D metal, blue bronze. Along with the previously observed collective amplitudon excitation, the spectra show several additional coherent features.

  8. Production of Excited Neutrinos at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, A; Mehdiyev, R

    2005-01-01

    We study the potential of the CERN LHC in the search for the single production of excited neutrino through gauge interactions. Subsequent decays of excited neutrino via gauge interactions are examined. The mass range accessible with the ATLAS detector is obtained.

  9. A large electrically excited synchronous generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    This invention relates to a large electrically excited synchronous generator (100), comprising a stator (101), and a rotor or rotor coreback (102) comprising an excitation coil (103) generating a magnetic field during use, wherein the rotor or rotor coreback (102) further comprises a plurality...... adjacent neighbouring poles. In this way, a large electrically excited synchronous generator (EESG) is provided that readily enables a relatively large number of poles, compared to a traditional EESG, since the excitation coil in this design provides MMF for all the poles, whereas in a traditional EESG...... each pole needs its own excitation coil, which limits the number of poles as each coil will take up too much space between the poles....

  10. Excitation methods for energy dispersive analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaklevic, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The rapid development in recent years of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis has been based primarily on improvements in semiconductor detector x-ray spectrometers. However, the whole analysis system performance is critically dependent on the availability of optimum methods of excitation for the characteristic x rays in specimens. A number of analysis facilities based on various methods of excitation have been developed over the past few years. A discussion is given of the features of various excitation methods including charged particles, monochromatic photons, and broad-energy band photons. The effects of the excitation method on background and sensitivity are discussed from both theoretical and experimental viewpoints. Recent developments such as pulsed excitation and polarized photons are also discussed

  11. Molecular excited states from the SCAN functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, David J.; Peach, Michael J. G.

    2018-06-01

    The performance of the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalised gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional is investigated for the calculation of time-dependent density-functional theory molecular excitation energies of local, charge-transfer and Rydberg character, together with the excited ? potential energy curve in H2. The SCAN results frequently resemble those obtained using a global hybrid functional, with either a standard or increased fraction of exact orbital exchange. For local excitations, SCAN can exhibit significant triplet instability problems, resulting in imaginary triplet excitation energies for a number of cases. The Tamm-Dancoff approximation offers a simple approach to improve the situation, but the excitation energies are still significantly underestimated. Understanding the origin of these (near)-triplet instabilities may provide useful insight into future functional development.

  12. Ionizing radiation, radiation sources, radiation exposure, radiation effects. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, E.

    1985-01-01

    Part 2 deals with radiation exposure due to artificial radiation sources. The article describes X-ray diagnosis complete with an analysis of major methods, nuclear-medical diagnosis, percutaneous radiation therapy, isotope therapy, radiation from industrial generation of nucler energy and other sources of ionizing radiation. In conclusion, the authors attempt to asses total dose, genetically significant dose and various hazards of total radiation exposure by means of a summation of all radiation impacts. (orig./WU) [de

  13. Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics: On-the-fly limiting of essential excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Tammie [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Naumov, Artem [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow 143026 (Russian Federation); Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian [Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Pea 352, B1876BXD Bernal (Argentina); Tretiak, Sergei, E-mail: serg@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The simulation of nonadiabatic dynamics in extended molecular systems involving hundreds of atoms and large densities of states is particularly challenging. Nonadiabatic coupling terms (NACTs) represent a significant numerical bottleneck in surface hopping approaches. Rather than using unreliable NACT cutting schemes, here we develop “on-the-fly” state limiting methods to eliminate states that are no longer essential for the non-radiative relaxation dynamics as a trajectory proceeds. We propose a state number criteria and an energy-based state limit. The latter is more physically relevant by requiring a user-imposed energy threshold. For this purpose, we introduce a local kinetic energy gauge by summing contributions from atoms within the spatial localization of the electronic wavefunction to define the energy available for upward hops. The proposed state limiting schemes are implemented within the nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics framework to simulate photoinduced relaxation in poly-phenylene vinylene (PPV) and branched poly-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) oligomers for benchmark evaluation.

  14. Radiation and photochemistry section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The highlights of this past year in the Radiation and Photochemistry Section at Argonne include: (1) picosecond optical studies of radical cations and excited states produced in hydrocarbon radiolysis provided the first kinetic measurements of ion transformation and production of triplet and singlet excited states by ion recombination. (2) studies of radical cations of alkyl-substituted amines and sulfides provided insights into ion-molecule reactions of radical cations in the condensed phase. (3) studies of the behavior of strained alkane radical cations, such as cubane + ·, revealed new rearrangements and remarkable, medium-dependent differences in their structures. (4) H·atom reactions yielding e aq - provided the first reliable measurements of hydrated-electron enthalpy and entropy and forced the revision of some previous thinking about the driving force in aq - reactions

  15. Study of inner shell excitation effect on C-H dissociation in aromatic hydrocarbon solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoyama, I.; Nakagawa, K.; Matsui, F.; Yoem, H.W.; Ohta, T.; Tanaka, S.; Mase, K.

    2000-01-01

    Since Carson et al. have reported the 'Coulomb Explosion' model, an inner shell excitation effect on dissociation is intensively attractive because multiply ionized states induced by Auger decay enhance dissociation. This effect on chemical reaction has been investigated especially for surface reaction processes such as desorption induced electron transition (DIET). Recently, some studies on DIET using monochromatic soft X-rays have reported that desorption yield depends on not only the repulsion energy but also the character of excited molecular orbital (MO). This means that inner shell resonant excitations to different MO result in different desorption. This Inner Shell Resonant Excitation Effect' is very interesting because it enables us to control photochemical reactions with synchrotron radiation. Two important problems lie ahead of us for application of this effect. One problem is secondary effect. When one irradiates soft X-rays to materials, following reaction includes two kinds of mixed effects; fundamental effect (FE) and secondary effect (SE). FE originates from interactions between photons and materials, while SE originates from interactions between secondary electrons and materials. Since the inner shell resonant excitation effect essentially originates from FE, it is important to know the ratio of FE to SE in a photochemical reaction in order to estimate true magnitude of the inner shell resonant excitation effect. The other problem is the difference between surface reaction and bulk reaction. Weather the bulk reaction shows inner shell excitation effect as well as the surface reaction does? Some studies of the inner shell excitation effect on damage in bulk have been reported. To our knowledge, however, there is no study which reports the difference between bulk and surface reaction. In this paper, we present two kinds of works with aromatic hydrocarbon compounds. First, we present photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID) on condensed benzene to study

  16. Atoms, radiation, and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes basic atomic and nuclear structure, the physical processes that result in the emission of ionizing radiations, and external and internal radiation protection criteria, standards, and practices from the standpoint of their underlying physical and biological basis. The sources and properties of ionizing radiation-charged particles, photons, and neutrons-and their interactions with matter are discussed in detail. The underlying physical principles of radiation detection and systems for radiation dosimetry are presented. Topics considered include atomic physics and radiation; atomic structure and radiation; the nucleus and nuclear radiation; interaction of heavy charged particles with matter; interaction of beta particles with matter; phenomena associated with charged-particle tracks; interaction of photons with matter; neutrons, fission and criticality; methods of radiation detection; radiation dosimetry; chemical and biological effects of radiation; radiation protection criteria and standards; external radiation protection; and internal dosimetry and radiation protection

  17. Influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function in low-pressure microwave argon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Cotrino, J.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    In this work the influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function has been determined for an argon microwave discharge at low pressure. A collisional-radiative model of argon has been developed taking into account the most recent experimental and theoretical values of argon-electron-impact excitation cross sections. The model has been solved along with the electron Boltzmann equation in order to study the influence of the inelastic collisions from the argon excited states on the electron-energy distribution function. Results show that under certain conditions the excited states can play an important role in determining the shape of the distribution function and the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, deplecting the high-energy tail due to inelastic processes from the excited states, especially from the 4s excited configuration. It has been found that from the populations of the excited states an excitation temperature can be defined. This excitation temperature, which can be experimentally determined by optical emission spectroscopy, is lower than the electron kinetic temperature obtained from the electron-energy distribution function

  18. Harmonics radiation of graphene surface plasmon polaritons in terahertz regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D., E-mail: dazhi_li@hotmail.com [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Wang, Y. [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Nakajima, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hashida, M. [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Wei, Y. [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Miyamoto, S. [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2016-06-03

    This letter presents an approach to extract terahertz radiation from surface plasmon polaritons excited in the surface of a uniform graphene structure by an electron beam. A sidewall configuration is proposed to lift the surface plasmon mode to be close to the light line, so that some of its harmonics have chances to go above the light line and become radiative. The harmonics are considered to be excited by a train of periodic electron bunches. The physical mechanism in this scheme is analyzed with three-dimensional theory, and the harmonics excitation and radiation are demonstrated through numerical calculations. The results show that this technique could be an alternative to transform the surface plasmon polaritons into radiation. - Highlights: • An approach to extract terahertz radiation from graphene surface plasmon polaritons is presented. • A sidewall configuration is proposed to lift the surface plasmon mode. • Harmonics of surface plasmon polaritons are possible to radiate.

  19. Natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feliciano, Vanusa Maria Delage

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic radiation, as well as cosmogenic radiation, terrestrial radiation, radon and thorium are introduced in this chapter 3. The distribution of natural radiation sources is treated, where the percentage distribution of the contribution relative to exposure to radiation from natural and artificial sources is also included

  20. Radiation physics for nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is expanding rapidly, with the development of exciting new diagnostic methods and treatments. This growth is closely associated with significant advances in radiation physics. In this book, acknowledged experts explain the basic principles of radiation physics in relation to nuclear medicine and examine important novel approaches in the field. The first section is devoted to what might be termed the "building blocks" of nuclear medicine, including the mechanisms of interaction between radiation and matter and Monte Carlo codes. In subsequent sections, radiation sources for medical applications, radiopharmaceutical development and production, and radiation detectors are discussed in detail. New frontiers are then explored, including improved algorithms for image reconstruction, biokinetic models, and voxel phantoms for internal dosimetry. Both trainees and experienced practitioners and researchers will find this book to be an invaluable source of up-to-date information.

  1. Excited-State Dynamics of Melamine and Its Lysine Derivative Investigated by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyuan Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melamine may have been an important prebiotic information carrier, but its excited-state dynamics, which determine its stability under UV radiation, have never been characterized. The ability of melamine to withstand the strong UV radiation present on the surface of the early Earth is likely to have affected its abundance in the primordial soup. Here, we studied the excited-state dynamics of melamine (a proto-nucleobase and its lysine derivative (a proto-nucleoside using the transient absorption technique with a UV pump, and UV and infrared probe pulses. For melamine, the excited-state population decays by internal conversion with a lifetime of 13 ps without coupling significantly to any photochemical channels. The excited-state lifetime of the lysine derivative is slightly longer (18 ps, but the dominant deactivation pathway is otherwise the same as for melamine. In both cases, the vast majority of excited molecules return to the electronic ground state on the aforementioned time scales, but a minor population is trapped in a long-lived triplet state.

  2. Inner-shell excitation and site specific fragmentation of poly(methylmethacrylate) thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinone, Marcia C. K.; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Maruyama, Junya; Ueno, Nobuo; Imamura, Motoyasu; Matsubayashi, Nobuyuki

    1994-04-01

    Soft x-ray excitations in the 250-600 eV photon energy range on poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) result in ionic fragmentation of the original polymer with the most intense ions corresponding to CH+3, H+, CH+2, CH+, CHO+, and COOCH+3. The photon energy dependence of ion desorption from thin films of PMMA was measured to investigate the primary steps in radiation induced decomposition following carbon and oxygen 1s electron excitations using monochromatic pulsed-synchrotron radiation. It was clearly found that the decomposition depends on the nature of the electronic states created in the excited species. The fragmentation pattern changes depending on the transitions of the 1s electron to a Rydberg orbital, an unoccupied molecular orbital or the ionization continuum. Moreover, the fragmentation occurs specifically around the site of the atom where the optical excitation takes place. Excitations from carbon and oxygen 1s to σ* states seem to be specially efficient for ion production as observed in the case of CH+3, CH+2, and CH+ at 288.7 and 535.6 eV, and in the case of CHO+ at 539.3 eV.

  3. Excitation of hydrogen atom by ultrashort laser pulses in optically dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calisti, A. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, Marseille (France); Astapenko, V.A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudnyi (Russian Federation); Lisitsa, V.S. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudnyi (Russian Federation); Russian Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-15

    The features of excitation of a hydrogen atom by ultrashort laser pulses (USP) with a Gaussian envelope in optically dense plasma at a Lyman-beta transition are studied theoretically. The problem is of interest for diagnostics of optically dense media. USP have two doubtless advantages over conventional laser excitation: (a) the USP carrier frequency is shifted to the region of short wavelengths allowing exciting atoms from the ground state and (b) the wide spectrum of USP allows them to penetrate into optically dense media to much longer distances as compared with monochromatic radiation. As actual realistic cases, two examples are considered: hot rarefied plasma (the coronal limit) and dense cold plasma (the Boltzmann equilibrium). Universal expressions for the total probability of excitation of the transition under consideration are obtained in view of absorption of radiation in a medium. As initial data for the spectral form of a line, the results of calculations by methods of molecular dynamics are used. The probability of excitation of an atom is analysed for different values of problem parameters: the pulse duration, the optical thickness of a medium, and the detuning of the pulse carrier frequency from the eigenfrequency of an electron transition. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Search for excited leptons at 130-140 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jacobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    A search for the radiative decay of excited charged leptons, ℓ ∗, and for radiative and weak decays of excited electron neutrinos, ν e∗, is performed, using the 5.8 pb -1 of data collected by ALEPH at 130-140 GeV. No evidence for a signal is found in single or pair production. Excluded mass limits from pair production are close to 65 GeV/ c2 for all excited lepton species. Limits on the couplings, {λ}/{m ℓ ∗}, of excited leptons are derived from single production. For an excited lepton mass of 130 GeV/ c2, these limits are 0.04 GeV -1 for μ ∗ and τ ∗, and 0.0007 GeV -1 for e ∗. For ν e∗, the limit is at the level of 0.03 GeV -1 for a mass of 120 GeV/ c2, independent of the decay branching ratios.

  5. Lifetimes of some 4p levels of Ne I obtained by two-step (electron-photon) excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.; Garcia, G.; Blanco, F.; Campos, J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes of some levels belonging to 2p 5 4p configuration of Ne I have been determined using electron excitation followed by selective laser excitation. The experimental results of this work are 123.8±3.6 ns, 120.3±2.8 ns and 135.9±4.5 ns for the 4p'(3/2) 1 , 4p'(1/2) 1 and 4p(5/2) 2 levels respectively. (orig.)

  6. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  7. Controlling flexible rotor vibrations using parametric excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atepor, L, E-mail: katepor@yahoo.co [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents both theoretical and experimental studies of an active vibration controller for vibration in a flexible rotor system. The paper shows that the vibration amplitude can be modified by introducing an axial parametric excitation. The perturbation method of multiple scales is used to solve the equations of motion. The steady-state responses, with and without the parametric excitation terms, is investigated. An experimental test machine uses a piezoelectric exciter mounted on the end of the shaft. The results show a reduction in the rotor response amplitude under principal parametric resonance, and some good correlation between theory and experiment.

  8. Excited-state molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    This review presents a survey of work using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and double-resonance techniques to study excited-state photoionization dynamics in molecules. These techniques routinely provide detail and precision that are difficult to achieve in single-photon ionization from the ground state. The review not only emphasizes new aspects of photoionization revealed in the excited-state experiments but also shows how the excited-state techniques can provide textbook illustrations of some fundamental mechanisms in molecular photoionization dynamics. Most of the examples are confined to diatomic molecules. (author)

  9. Surface and bulk excitations in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    In this lecture collective and single-particle electron excitations of solids will be discussed with emphasis on the properties of metallic and semiconducting materials. However, some of the general properties of long-wavelength collective modes to be discussed are valid for insulators as well, and some considerations apply to nuclear excitations such as optical or acoustical phonons, dipolar plasmons, etc. The concept of elementary excitations in solids, pioneered by Bohm and Pines almost 4 decades ago, has proved to be extremely useful in understanding the properties of systems of many particles, especially in respect to the response to the action of external probes. 32 refs., 12 figs

  10. Recent experiments involving highly excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    Very large and fragile atoms may be produced by exciting normal atoms with light or by collisions with other atomic particles. Atoms as large as 10 -6 m are now routinely produced in the laboratory and their properties studied. In this review some of the simpler experimental methods available for the production and detection of such atoms are described including tunable dye laser-excitation and field ionization. A few recent experiments which illustrate the collision properties and the effects of electric and and magnetic fields are also described. The relevance of highly excited atoms in other areas of research including radioastronomy and isotope separation are discussed. (author)

  11. Geophysical excitation of the chandler wobble revisited

    OpenAIRE

    A. Brzezinski; Henryk Dobslaw; Robert Dill; Maik Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The 14-month Chandler wobble is a free motion of the pole excited by geophysical processes. Several recent studies demonstrated that the combination of atmospheric and oceanic excitations contains enough power at the Chandler frequency and is significantly coherent with the observed free wobble. This paper is an extension of earlier studies by Brzeziński and Nastula (Adv Space Res 30:195–200, 2002), Brzeziński et al. (Oceanic excitation of the Chandler wobble using a 50-year time series of oc...

  12. Symmetry characterization of electrons and lattice excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schober H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Symmetry concerns all aspects of a physical system from the electronic orbitals to structural and magnetic excitations. In this article we will try to elaborate the fundamental connection between symmetry and excitations. As excitations are manyfold in physical systems it is impossible to treat them exhaustively. We thus concentrate on the two topics of Bloch electrons and phonons. These two examples are complementary in the sense that Bloch electrons describe single particles in an external periodic potential while phonons exemplify a decoupled system of interacting particles. The way we develop the argument gives as by-product a short account of molecular orbitals and molecular vibrations.

  13. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankan, P.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D.C.; Doebele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has a bandwith of 0.15 cm -1 . The wavelength of the laser radiation is calibrated by simultaneous recording of the two-photon laser induced fluorescence spectrum of nitric oxide. The excited hydrogen populations are calibrated on the basis of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements. A population distribution is measured in the shock region of a pure hydrogen plasma expansion. The higher rotational levels (J>5) show overpopulation compared to a Boltzmann distribution determined from the lower rotational levels (J≤5)

  14. Electromagnetic Radiation of Electrons in Periodic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich

    2011-01-01

    Periodic magnetic structures (undulators) are widely used in accelerators to generate monochromatic undulator radiation (UR) in the range from far infrared to the hard X-ray region. Another periodic crystalline structure is used to produce quasimonochromatic polarized photon beams via the coherent bremsstrahlung mechanism (CBS). Due to such characteristics as monochromaticity, polarization and adjustability, these types of radiation is of large interest for applied and basic research of accelerator-emitted radiation. The book provides a detailed overview of the fundamental principles behind electromagnetic radiation emitted from accelerated charged particles (e.g. UR, CBS, radiation of fast electrons in Laser flash fields) as well as a unified description of relatively new radiation mechanisms which attracted great interest in recent years. This are the so-called polarization radiation excited by the Coulomb field of incident particles in periodic structures, parametric X-rays, resonant transition radiation a...

  15. Radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochsner, S.F.; Head, L.H.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive review of radiation enteritis is presented. Experience in clinical radiation therapy has indicated that the small bowel is the segment of the alimentary tract that is most susceptible to radiation damage. (U.S.)

  16. Radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, C.T.; Green, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    A system for indicating radiation from a radioactive fluid such as a gas wherein simultaneous indications of the activity concentration of radioactivity of the gas, the radiation dose rate and average energy of the radiation are provided

  17. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ures Pantazi, M.

    1994-01-01

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  18. Radiation sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exposure to ionizing radiation. There are two main types of radiation: nonionizing and ionizing. Nonionizing radiation comes in the form of light, radio waves, microwaves and radar. These forms usually don't cause tissue damage. ...

  19. Storage of optical excitations in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In the present theis it is described, how colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals can be used under influence of an electric field to store optical excitation energy at room temperature, to alter, and to supply controlledly. For this the photoluminescence emission of an ensemble of heterogeneous nanocrystals was manipulated and spectroscopically studied. The applied od-shaped particles consist of a spherical core of CdSe, on which an elongated shell of CdS is monocrystallinely be grown. The electron is in such an asymmetric geometry delocalized over the hole nanorod, whereas the hole because of the high potential barrier remains bound in the CdSe core. The wave-function overlap of the charge carriers can therefore be influenced both by the length of the nanorod and by an external electric field. In the regime of prompt fluorescence the manipulation of the charge-carrier separation by an electric field led to a suppression of the radiative recombination. As consequence a fluorescence suppression of about 40% could be observed. After the removal of the electric field the separation was reduced and the stored energy is in an fluorescence increasement directedly liberated again. The strength of the storage efficiency lies with the strength of the electric field in a linear connection. Furthermore in this time range a quantum-confined Stark effect of upt o 14 meV could be detected at room temperature, although the effect is complicated by the different orientations and sizes of the nanorods in the ensemble. Hereby it is of advance to can adress with the applied detection technique a subensemble of nanocrystals. Furthermore a significant storage of the ensmble emission by up to 100 μs conditioned by the electric electric fieldcould be demonstrated, which exceeds the fluorescence lifetime of these particles by the 10 5 fold. As also could be shown by experiments on CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals surface states play a relevent role for the emission dynamics of nanocrystals. The

  20. Study of atomic excitations in sputtering with the use of N, O, F, Ne, Na, Cl, and Ar projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, H.K.; Veje, E.

    1985-01-01

    Solid magnesium has been bombarded with 80 keV ions of N, O, F, Ne, Na, Cl, and Ar, and excitation of sputtered magnesium atoms and ions has been studied. Relative level excitation probabilities depend strongly on the projectile, the dependences for Mg I levels being different from those for Mg II levels. With all projectiles, the resonance level in Mg II is excited stronger than the resonance level in Mg I. Very little radiation is observed from the projectiles except for sodium. The results are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation results in biological damage that differs from other hazardous substances and is highly dangerous to man. Ionizing radiation cannot be perceived by man's sense organs and the biological damage cannot be detected immediately afterwards (except in very high doses). Every human being is exposed to low doses of radiation. The structure of the atom; sources of ionizing radiation; radiation units; biological effects; norms for radiation protection; and the national control in South Africa are discussed. 1 fig., 5 refs

  2. Parametric conversion and maximally entangled photon pair via collective excitations in a cycle atomic ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Yu, R.; Yang, X.

    2008-01-01

    We study the propagation of two quantized optical fields via considering the collective effects of photonic emissions and excitations of a three-level cyclic-type system (such as atomic ensemble with symmetry broken, or the chiral molecular gases, or manual 'atomic' array with symmetry broken), where the quantum transitions is driven by two quantized fields and a classical one. The results show that the parametric conversion and maximally entangled photon pair generation can be achieved by means of the collective excitation of the two upper energy levels induced by the classic optical field. This investigation may be used for the generated coherent short-wavelength quantum radiation and quantum information processing

  3. Photoemission from excited states in rare gas solids by combining synchrotronradiation with a laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstorff, S.

    1984-09-01

    A new spectroscopic method has been developed to study excited states in rare gas solids: Excitons and conductionband-states are populated by synchrotron radiation (photon energy hw SR =5 - 30 eV). Subsequently electrons from these bound or conduction band-states are excited above the vacuum level of the solid by a pulsed dye laser (hw L =1.9 - 3.7 eV). This experimental technique was applied to solid Xe, Kr, Ar and Ne. (orig./GSCH)

  4. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering: From band mapping to inter-orbital excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luning, J.; Hague, C.F.

    2008-01-01

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (also known as resonant X-ray Raman spectroscopy when only valence and conduction states are involved in the final state excitation) has developed into a major tool for understanding the electronic properties of complex materials. Presently it provides access to electron excitations in the few hundred meV range with element and bulk selectivity. Recent progress in X-ray optics and synchrotron radiation engineering have opened up new perspectives for this powerful technique to improve resolving power and efficiency. We briefly present the basics of the method and illustrate its potential with examples chosen from the literature. (authors)

  5. The excitation of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the galactic center circumnuclear disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, E. A. C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O 1009, Lopezville Drive, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Güsten, R.; Requena-Torres, M. A. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf Dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Morris, M. R., E-mail: millsb@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We present new observations of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the circumnuclear disk (CND) of the Galaxy, which we obtained with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope. We mapped emission in rotational lines of HCN J = 3-2, 4-3, and 8-7, as well as of HCO{sup +} J = 3-2, 4-3, and 9-8. We also present spectra of H{sup 13}CN J = 3-2 and 4-3 as well as H{sup 13}CO{sup +} J = 3-2 and 4-3 toward four positions in the CND. Using the intensities of all of these lines, we present an excitation analysis for each molecule using the non-LTE radiative transfer code RADEX. The HCN line intensities toward the northern emission peak of the CND yield log densities (cm{sup –3}) of 5.6{sub −0.6}{sup +0.6}, consistent with those measured with HCO{sup +} as well as with densities recently reported for this region from an excitation analysis of highly excited lines of CO. These densities are too low for the gas to be tidally stable. The HCN line intensities toward the CND's southern emission peak yield log densities of 6.5{sub −0.7}{sup +0.5}, higher than densities determined for this part of the CND with CO (although the densities measured with HCO{sup +}, log [n] = 5.6{sub −0.2}{sup +0.2}, are more consistent with the CO-derived densities). We investigate whether the higher densities we infer from HCN are affected by midinfrared radiative excitation of this molecule through its 14 μm rovibrational transitions. We find that radiative excitation is important for at least one clump in the CND, where we additionally detect the J = 4-3, v {sub 2} = 1 vibrationally excited transition of HCN, which is excited by dust temperatures of ≳125-150 K. If this hot dust is present elsewhere in the CND, it could lower our inferred densities, potentially bringing the HCN-derived densities for the southern part of the CND into agreement with those measured using HCO{sup +} and CO. Additional sensitive, high-resolution submillimeter observations, as well as midinfrared observations, would be

  6. Use of a 3-MV proton accelerator for study of noble gases, including laser ionization of excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.; Judish, J.P.; Nayfeh, M.H.; Parks, J.E.; Payne, M.G.; Wagner, E.B.

    1974-01-01

    The use of a pulsed 3-MV accelerator to study energy pathways in the noble gases is described. The objectives of pathways research are to obtain (1) information on the spectrum of excited states produced by a charged particle in a noble gas, (2) the rate of decay of the various states through various channels as a function of gas pressure, and (3) the modification of the decay channels due to the introduction of foreign species. A new energy pathways model is presented for helium as a general illustration. A method for the study of excited states, using a laser ionization technique is reported. Use is made of a laser which is tuned to a resonance transition between the desired excited state and some higher excited state. Photons in the same pulse photoionize the higher excited state; thus the ionization current vs photon wavelength has a resonance structure. Absolute yields of selected excited states can be obtained whenever the photon fluence per pulse is large enough to saturate the ionization current. A general summary is given of experimental facilities which include a 3-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, electronics for measuring radiation lifetimes, vacuum ultraviolet spectrometers, and a pulsed laser facility for direct study of excited states. Finally, the relevance of pathways research to (1) the interaction of radiation with matter, (2) the development of gas lasers, and (3) methods of ultrasensitive elemental analysis is pointed out

  7. Interaction of ionizing radiation with mater; Oddzialywanie promieniowania jonizujacego z materia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogocki, D [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-10-01

    The early radiation effects (e.g. excitation, ionization) have been described and compared for different kind of radiation interacting with mater. The mechanism of energy deposition in connection with radiation dose and their spatial distribution has been shown.The commonly used definitions and units in radiation dosimetry have been also reviewed. 4 refs, 4 figs.

  8. Laser-excited photoluminescence of three-layer GaAs double-heterostructure laser material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, F.R.; Dixon, R.W.; Barnes, P.A.; Schumaker, N.E.

    1975-01-01

    The successful fabrication of high-quality DH GaAs lasers from a simplified three-layer structure is reported. A major asset of this structure is the transparency of its final layer to recombination radiation occurring in the active layer, thus permitting the use of nondestructive photoluminescent techniques for material evaluation prior to device fabrication. In the course of photoluminescence investigations on this material the additional important observation has been made that indirect excitation (in which photocarriers are generated in the top ternary layer) has significant advantages over direct excitation (in which photocarriers are generated directly in the active layer). These include (i) the direct measurement of Al concentrations in both upper layers, (ii) the measurements of the minority-carrier diffusion length in the upper layer, (iii) an easily obtained indication of taper in the thickness of the upper layer, and (iv) surprisingly effective excitation of the active layer. By combining direct and indirect excitation it is shown that a clearer understanding of the location and detrimental influences of defects in the GaAs laser structure may be obtained. For example, the width of the region of reduced luminescence associated with many defects is found to be very excitation dependent and is confirmed to arise fr []m reduced active region luminescence. The photoluminescent excitation techniques described should be useful in the study of other heterostructure devices and material systems

  9. Ultrafast molecular dynamics illuminated with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, John D.; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafast molecular dynamics probed with synchrotron radiation. • Core-excitation as probe of ultrafast dynamics through core-hole lifetime. • Review of experimental and theoretical methods in ultrafast dynamics using core-level excitation. - Abstract: Synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool for studying molecular dynamics in small molecules in spite of the absence of natural matching between the X-ray pulse duration and the time scale of nuclear motion. Promoting core level electrons to unoccupied molecular orbitals simultaneously initiates two ultrafast processes, nuclear dynamics on the potential energy surfaces of the highly excited neutral intermediate state of the molecule on the one hand and an ultrafast electronic decay of the intermediate excited state to a cationic final state, characterized by a core hole lifetime. The similar time scales of these processes enable core excited pump-probe-type experiments to be performed with long duration X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source. Recent results obtained at the PLIEADES beamline concerning ultrafast dissociation of core excited states and molecular potential energy curve mapping facilitated by changes in the geometry of the short-lived intermediate core excited state are reviewed. High brightness X-ray beams combined with state-of-the art electron and ion-electron coincidence spectrometers and highly sophisticated theoretical methods are required to conduct these experiments and to achieve a full understanding of the experimental results.

  10. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  11. Excitation of giant resonances through inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kailas, S.

    1981-01-01

    In the last few years, exciting developments have taken place in the study of giant resonances (GR). In addition to the already well known gjant dipole resonance (GDR), the presence of at least two more new GRs viz. giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) and giant monopole resonance (GMR) has been experimentally established. The systematics covering these GRs is found to be consistent with the theoretical expectation. Though the existence of higher multipoles has been predjcted by theory, so far only some of these have been found to be excited experimentally. Various probe particles - electrons, protons (polarized and unpolarized), light and heavy ions and pions - at different bombarding energies have been used to excite the GR region, primarily through the inelastic scattering process. Detailed experiments, looking at the decay modes of GR region, have also been performed. These studies have contributed significantly to a better understanding of the phenomenon of nuclear collective excitation. In this report, the current status of 'GR' research is reviewed. (author)

  12. Dark excitations in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deilmann, Thorsten; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) possess unique optoelectronic properties, including strongly bound excitons and trions. To date, most studies have focused on optically active excitations, but recent experiments have highlighted the existence of dark states, which are equally...

  13. Non-equilibrium entropy in excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betak, E.

    1991-06-01

    The time-dependent behaviour of entropy in excited nuclei is investigated. In distinction to recent claims, it is shown that no self-organization is involved in pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions. (author). 9 refs.; 4 figs

  14. Wideband MEMS Resonator Using Multifrequency Excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Jaber, Nizar; Ramini, Abdallah; Al Hennawi, Qais M.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the excitation of combination resonances of additive and subtractive types and their exploitations to realize a large bandwidth micro-machined resonator of large amplitude even at higher harmonic modes of vibrations. The investigation is conducted on a Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) clamped-clamped microbeam fabricated using polyimide as a structural layer coated with nickel from top and chromium and gold layers from bottom. The microbeam is excited by a two-source harmonic excitation, where the first frequency source is swept around the targeted resonance (first or third mode of vibration) while the second source frequency is kept fixed. We report for the first time a large bandwidth and large amplitude response near the higher order modes of vibration. Also, we show that by properly tuning the frequency and amplitude of the excitation force, the frequency bandwidth of the resonator is controlled.

  15. Regulation of fields excited by permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, I.S.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods of fast regulation of fields excited by permanent magnets in salient-pole electron-optical lenses are described: 1)the hybrid method realized using the additional electromagnet introduced to a magnetic chain sequentially its field being composed or substracted with magnetosolid exciter field; 2)the method with saturation of a part of a magnetic circuit, with saturation being achievable at the begining or in the end of a regulation cycle. In the second method it is proposed to direct orthogonally the main flux excited by permanent magnets and the flux in the saturated part of the magnetic circuit excited using an electromagnet. It is shown that the second method allows one to reduce the required ampere-coils by more than an order as compared to the first method at one and the same regulation range and other equal conditions. The frequency of field regulation in the experimental mock-up was 10 kHz. 3 refs.; 2 figs

  16. Dissociative Excitation of Thymine by Electron Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, William; Tiessen, Collin; Hein, Jeffrey; Trocchi, Joshuah; Kedzierski, Wladek

    2014-05-01

    A crossed electron-gas beam system coupled to a VUV spectrometer has been used to investigate the dissociation of thymine (C5H6N2O2) into excited atomic fragments in the electron-impact energy range from threshold to 375 eV. A special stainless steel oven is used to vaporize the thymine and form it into a beam where it is intersected by a magnetically collimated electron beam, typical current 50 μA. The main features in the spectrum are the H Lyman series lines. The probability of extracting excited C or N atoms from the ring is shown to be very small. In addition to spectral data, excitation probability curves as a function of electron energy will be presented for the main emission features. Possible dissociation channels and excitation mechanisms in the parent molecule will be discussed. The authors thank NSERC (Canada) for financial support.

  17. Optical studies of multiply excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannervik, S.

    1989-01-01

    Optical studies of multiply-excited states are reviewed with emphasis on emission spectroscopy. From optical measurements, properties such as excitation energies, lifetimes and autoionization widths can be determined with high accuracy, which constitutes a challenge for modern computational methods. This article mainly covers work on two-, three- and four-electron systems, but also sodium-like quartet systems. Furthermore, some comments are given on bound multiply-excited states in negative ions. Fine structure effects on transition wavelengths and lifetimes (autoionization) are discussed. In particular, the most recent experimental and theoretical studies of multiply-excited states are covered. Some remaining problems, which require further attention, are discussed in more detail. (orig.) With 228 refs

  18. Wideband MEMS Resonator Using Multifrequency Excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Jaber, Nizar

    2016-03-09

    We demonstrate the excitation of combination resonances of additive and subtractive types and their exploitations to realize a large bandwidth micro-machined resonator of large amplitude even at higher harmonic modes of vibrations. The investigation is conducted on a Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) clamped-clamped microbeam fabricated using polyimide as a structural layer coated with nickel from top and chromium and gold layers from bottom. The microbeam is excited by a two-source harmonic excitation, where the first frequency source is swept around the targeted resonance (first or third mode of vibration) while the second source frequency is kept fixed. We report for the first time a large bandwidth and large amplitude response near the higher order modes of vibration. Also, we show that by properly tuning the frequency and amplitude of the excitation force, the frequency bandwidth of the resonator is controlled.

  19. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  20. Language identification using excitation source features

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, K Sreenivasa

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses the contribution of excitation source information in discriminating language. The authors focus on the excitation source component of speech for enhancement of language identification (LID) performance. Language specific features are extracted using two different modes: (i) Implicit processing of linear prediction (LP) residual and (ii) Explicit parameterization of linear prediction residual. The book discusses how in implicit processing approach, excitation source features are derived from LP residual, Hilbert envelope (magnitude) of LP residual and Phase of LP residual; and in explicit parameterization approach, LP residual signal is processed in spectral domain to extract the relevant language specific features. The authors further extract source features from these modes, which are combined for enhancing the performance of LID systems. The proposed excitation source features are also investigated for LID in background noisy environments. Each chapter of this book provides the motivatio...

  1. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  2. Search for Excited Leptons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hakobyan, R.S.; Hansen, J.M.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2003-01-01

    A search for charged and neutral excited leptons is performed in 217 pb-1 of data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The pair- and single-production mechanisms are investigated and no signals are detected. Combining with L3 results from searches at lower centre-of-mass energies, gives improved limits on the masses and couplings of excited leptons.

  3. Microstructure ion Nuclear Spectra at High Excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, T.E.O.

    1969-01-01

    The statistical microstructure of highly excited systems is illustrated by the distribution and fluctuations of levels, widths and cross-sections of nuclei both for the case of sharp resonances and the continuum case. The coexistence of simple modes of excitation with statistical effects in terms of strength functions is illustrated by isobaric analogue states. The analogy is made with similar phenomena for coherent light, is solid-state physics and high-energy physics. (author)

  4. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 3 presents essays on the chemical generation of excited states; the cis-trans isomerization of olefins; and the photochemical rearrangements in trienes. The book also includes essays on the zimmerman rearrangements; the photochemical rearrangements of enones; the photochemical rearrangements of conjugated cyclic dienones; and the rearrangements of the benzene ring. Essays on the photo rearrangements via biradicals of simple carbonyl compounds; the photochemical rearrangements involving three-membered rings or five-membered ring heterocycles;

  5. Excitation mechanisms in singly ionized krypton laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    1982-01-01

    Lifetimes for the low lying 4p 4 4d and 4p 4 5s levels of singly ionized krypton laser are calculated, taking into account configuration interaction effects. The results show that some of these levels are metastable. They also suggest a two step excitation from the ground state of the ion (or the atom) to the upper 4p 4 5p laser levels involving some intermediate metastable states as a possible excitation mechanism. (author)

  6. Excited quark production at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    1987-06-01

    Composite models generally predict the existence of excited quark and lepton states. We consider the production and experimental signatures of excited quarks Q* of spin and isospin 1/2 at hadron colliders and estimate the background for those channels which are most promising for Q* identification. Multi-TeV pp-colliders will give access to such particles with masses up to several TeV

  7. Propagation and excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jeppesen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of graphene plasmon polaritons in graphene nanoribbon waveguides and experimentally observe the excitation of the graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer. We show that graphene nanoribbon bends do not induce any additional loss...... and nanofocusing occurs in a tapered graphene nanoriboon, and we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritonss in a continuous graphene monolayer assisted by a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating....

  8. High energy excitations in itinerant ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prange, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Itinerant magnets, those whose electrons move throughout the crystal, are described by band theory. Single particle excitations offer confirmation of band theory, but their description requires important corrections. The energetics of magnetism in iron and nickel is also described in band theory but requires complex bands. Magnetism above the critical temperature and the location of the critical temperature offer discriminants between the two major models of magnetism at high temperature and can be addressed by high energy excitations

  9. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    We have made measurements of state-to-state deactivation cross sections and radiative lifetimes for Xe*(6p,6p',7p) and Kr*(5p) states in xenon and krypton buffer gases. These results are relevant to kinetic models and both excimer lasers and the infrared xenon laser; and they are a significant improvement in the precision of the known radiative lifetimes. This type of experiment can now be compared with recent calculations of state-to-state collisional relaxation in rare-gases by Hickman, Huestis, and Saxon. We have also made significant progress in the study of the electronic spectra of small molecules of the rare gases. Spectra have been obtained for Xe 2 , Xe 3 , Xe 4 , and larger clusters. As guidance for the larger clusters of the rare gases we have obtained the first multiphoton spectra for excitons in condensed xenon. In collaboration with research on the multiphoton spectra of the rare gases, we have continued experiments using synchrotron radiation in collaboration with the University of Hamburg. In experiments there we have observed excitation and fluorescence spectra for single xenon atoms at the surface, within the second layer, and within the bulk of large argon clusters

  10. Excitation of giant resonances in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, W.

    1991-01-01

    Introduction: What are Giant Resonances? General Features of Giant Resonances, Macroscopic Description and Classification, Basic Excitation Mechanisms, Decay Modes, Giant Resonances Built on Excited States, Relativistic Coulomb Excitation of Giant Resonances, Experimental Situation. (orig.)

  11. Excitation mechanisms of 2s1/2-2p3/2 and 2p1/2-2p3/2 transitions in U82+ through U89+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decaux, V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A.

    1994-01-01

    A model based on detailed calculations of the electron-impact excitation of n = 2 electrons in the Li- to Ne-like uranium ions was developed to interpret and explain measurements on EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap). While only considering the direct excitation process provided a good model for the electric dipole (El) transitions, it was necessary for the magnetic dipole (Ml) spectrum to include various additional excitation processes in the model. In particular, the model was expanded to include electron-impact excitation of n = 3 levels followed by radiative cascades. Moreover, excitation by the ionization of 2s 1/2 , 2p 1/2 , and 2p 3/2 electrons and by radiative capture of beam electrons into excited levels was added. The new model demonstrates that the dipole-forbidden lines are almost exclusively produced by indirect excitation processes

  12. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The Cancergram deals with all aspects of radiation carcinogenesis. The term radiation here includes U-V radiation and the entire electromagnetic spectrum, electron and other charged particle beams, neutrons, and alpha and beta radiation from radioactive substances. Abstracts included concern relationships between radiation and carcinogenesis in humans, experimental induction of tumors in animals by irradiation, studies on the mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis at the cellular level, studies of RBE, dose response or dose threshold in relation to radiation carcinogenesis, and methods and policies for control of radiation exposure in the general population. In general, this Cancergram excludes abstracts on radio-therapy, radiologic diagnosis, radiation pathology, and radiation biology, where these articles have no bearing on radiation carcinogenesis

  13. Stick-Slip Analysis of a Drill String Subjected to Deterministic Excitation and Stochastic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyuan Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a finite element model, this paper investigates the torsional vibration of a drill string under combined deterministic excitation and random excitation. The random excitation is caused by the random friction coefficients between the drill bit and the bottom of the hole and assumed as white noise. Simulation shows that the responses under random excitation become random too, and the probabilistic distribution of the responses at each discretized time instant is obtained. The two points, entering and leaving the stick stage, are examined with special attention. The results indicate that the two points become random under random excitation, and the distributions are not normal even when the excitation is assumed as Gaussian white noise.

  14. OH radiation from the interstellar cloud medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Q-Rieu,; Winnberg, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn (F.R. Germany); Guibert, J [Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, 92 (France); Lepine, J R.D. [Universidade Mackenzie, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Radio-Astronomia et Astrofisica; Johansson, L E.B. [Rymdobservatoriet, Onsala (Sweden); Goss, W M [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Epping (Australia). Div. of Radiophysics

    1976-02-01

    We have detected OH in the direction of about 50% of the continuum sources investigated. The OH abundance is one order of magnitude less than usually found in dust clouds. Most of the OH features have HI counterparts. This suggests that the OH radiation arises from the HI interstellar cold clouds. Our observations allowed in some cases the determination of the excitation temperatures in all four lines. A pumping model involving far-infrared radiation and collisions with neutral and charged particles has been proposed. It explains the observed excitation temperatures.

  15. ALL-OPTICAL CONTROL OF THZ RADIATION IN PARALLEL PLATE WAVEGUIDES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to control of THz radiation in parallel plate waveguides (PPWG) by forming components in the waveguide by use of optical radiation pulses. Patterns of excited regions induced in the PPWG by an optical excitation pulses changes the electromagnetic properties of the waveguide...... medium in the THz regime, thereby forming transient passive and active components for controlling THz radiation signals. The excitation can be generation of free charge carriers in a semiconductor material in the PPWG, to create metallic regions that form mirrors, lenses or photonic crystal structures......-on-a-chip applications. The optical and THz radiation can be ultrashort pulses with picosecond or femtosecond pulse durations. L...

  16. Advances in radiation processing of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, K.; Sasak, T.; Vikis, A.C.; Singh, A.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper we review recent advances in industrial applications of electron-beam irradiation in the field of polymer processing at the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment (TRCRE) of JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), and the Whiteshell Laboratories of AECL Research, Canada. Irradiation of a substrate with ionizing radiation produces free radicals through ionization and excitation events. The subsequent chemistry of these radicals is used in radiation processing as a substitute for conventional processing techniques based on heating and/or the addition of chemicals. The advantages of radiation processing include the formation of novel products with desirable material properties, favourable overall process economics and, often, environmental benefits

  17. Sensitivity of nonlinear photoionization to resonance substructure in collective excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, T.; Karamatskou, A.; Ilchen, M.; Bakhtiarzadeh, S.; Rafipoor, A. J.; O'Keeffe, P.; Kelly, T. J.; Walsh, N.; Costello, J. T.; Meyer, M.; Santra, R.

    2015-01-01

    Collective behaviour is a characteristic feature in many-body systems, important for developments in fields such as magnetism, superconductivity, photonics and electronics. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the optically nonlinear response of collective excitations. Here we demonstrate how the nonlinear interaction of a many-body system with intense XUV radiation can be used as an effective probe for characterizing otherwise unresolved features of its collective response. Resonant photoionization of atomic xenon was chosen as a case study. The excellent agreement between experiment and theory strongly supports the prediction that two distinct poles underlie the giant dipole resonance. Our results pave the way towards a deeper understanding of collective behaviour in atoms, molecules and solid-state systems using nonlinear spectroscopic techniques enabled by modern short-wavelength light sources. PMID:25854939

  18. Laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing was applied to investigate the local fields and interactions of paramagnetic ions in oxide glasses. Studies included the site dependence of energy levels, radiative and nonradiative transition probabilities, homogeneous line broadening, and ion--ion energy transfer of rare earth ions. These results and the experimental techniques are reviewed briefly; the use of paramagnetic ions other than the rare earths is also considered. Recently, laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy was used to investigate modifications in the local structure of lithium borate glass caused by compositional changes and phase separation and the site dependence of nonradiative relaxation of paramagnetic ions by multiphonon processes. These results and their implications are discussed. 6 figures

  19. Diagnostics development for E-beam excited air channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrom, D. J.; Dickenson, J. S.

    1982-02-01

    As the tempo of development of particle beam weapons increases, more detailed diagnostics of the interaction of the particle beam with the atmosphere are being proposed and implemented. Some of these diagnostics involve probing of the excited air channel with visible wavelength laser radiation. Examples include the use of visible wavelength interferometry to measure electron density profiles in the nose of the beam Ri81 and Stark shift measurements to determine self-induced electric fields Hi81, DR81. In these diagnostics, the change in laser intensity due to the desired diagnostic effect can be quite small, leading to the possibility that other effects, such as gas phase absorption, could seriously interfere with the measurement.

  20. Coulomb excitation of radioactive 20, 21Na

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, M. A.; Cline, D.; Hackman, G.; Pearson, C.; Svensson, C. E.; Wu, C. Y.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Becker, J. A.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Buchmann, L.; Churchman, R.; Cifarelli, F.; Cooper, R. J.; Cross, D. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Demand, G. A.; Dimmock, M. R.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Gallant, A. T.; Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Grint, A. N.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harkness, L. J.; Hayes, A. B.; Kanungo, R.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Leach, K. G.; Lee, G.; Maharaj, R.; Martin, J.-P.; Moisan, F.; Morton, A. C.; Mythili, S.; Nelson, L.; Newman, O.; Nolan, P. J.; Orce, J. N.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Phillips, A. A.; Porter-Peden, M.; Ressler, J. J.; Roy, R.; Ruiz, C.; Sarazin, F.; Scraggs, D. P.; Waddington, J. C.; Wan, J. M.; Whitbeck, A.; Williams, S. J.; Wong, J.

    2009-12-01

    The low-energy structures of the radioactive nuclei 20, 21Na have been examined using Coulomb excitation at the TRIUMF-ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. Beams of ˜ 5×106 ions/s were accelerated to 1.7MeV/A and Coulomb excited in a 0.5mg/cm^2 natTi target. Two TIGRESS HPGe clover detectors perpendicular to the beam axis were used for γ -ray detection, while scattered nuclei were observed by the Si detector BAMBINO. For 21Na , Coulomb excitation from the 3/2+ ground state to the first excited 5/2+ state was observed, while for 20Na , Coulomb excitation was observed from the 2+ ground state to the first excited 3+ and 4+ states. For both beams, B ( λ L) values were determined using the 2+ rightarrow 0+ de-excitation in 48Ti as a reference. The resulting B( E2) ↓ value for 21Na is 137±9 e^2fm^4, while the resulting B( λ L) ↓ values for 20Na are 55±6 e^2fm^4 for the 3+ rightarrow 2+ , 35.7±5.7 e^2 fm^4 for the 4+ rightarrow 2+ , and 0.154±0.030 μ_ N^2 for the 4+ rightarrow 3+ transitions. This analysis significantly improves the measurement of the 21Na B( E2) value, and provides the first experimental determination of B( λ L) values for the proton dripline nucleus 20Na .-1

  1. The remarkably high excitation planetary nebula GC 6537.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, L H; Hung, S; Feibelman, W A

    1999-05-11

    NGC 6537 is an unusually high excitation point symmetric planetary nebula with a rich spectrum. Its kinematical structures are of special interest. We are here primarily concerned with the high resolution spectrum as revealed by the Hamilton echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory (resolution approximately 0.2 A) and supplemented by UV and near-UV data. These extensive data permit a determination of interstellar extinction, plasma diagnostics, and ionic concentrations. The photoionization models that have been used successfully for many planetary nebulae are not entirely satisfactory here. The plasma electron temperature of a photoionization model cannot much exceed 20,000 K, but plasma diagnostics show that regions emitting radiation of highly ionized atoms such as [NeIV] and [NeV] are much hotter, showing that shock excitation must be important, as suggested by the remarkable kinematics of this object. Hence, instead of employing a strict photoionization model, we are guided by the nebular diagnostics, which reveal how electron temperature varies with ionization potential and accommodates density effects. The predictions of the photoionization model may be useful in estimating ionization correction factor. In effect, we have estimated the chemical composition by using both photoionization and shock considerations.

  2. Exciting Message from a Dying Monster Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    SEST Discovers First Extra-galactic SiO Maser With the help of a new and more sensitive receiver, recently installed on the 15-metre Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) at the European Southern Observatory on the La Silla mountain in Chile, a team of European astronomers [1] has succeeded in discovering the first extra-galactic silicon-monoxide (SiO) maser . It is located in the atmosphere of the largest known star in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to the Milky Way. This observational feat now opens new, exciting possibilities for the study of individual stars in other galaxies in the Local Group. The continued search for extra-galactic SiO masers is a joint project of European and Australian astronomers, to be carried on with even more advanced instruments that will become available in the near future. What is a maser ? The fact that masers exist in the Universe is one of the most unexpected discoveries made by astronomers in this century. They function according to the same principles as the better known lasers . Lasers (Light Amplified Stimulated Emission Radiators) are becoming more and more common in our daily life, for instance to read discs in CD players and to cut steel plates. Inside a laser, molecules act as an enormously powerful amplifier for light of a specific wavelength (`colour') [2]. However, this only happens when we subject the molecules to special conditions, much unlike those they would normally experience in nature. Nevertheless, exotic places do exist in the Universe where conditions are similar to those in lasers. In the 1960s, astronomers discovered that some celestial objects emit abnormally strong radio waves at a particular wavelength. In the beginning, they thought that this emission was coming from an unknown molecule they called `Mysterium'. Later it turned out that it originated in already known, and rather ordinary, OH-molecules of oxygen and hydrogen. In some places in space, these molecules experience the

  3. Near-field excitation exchange between motionless point atoms located near the conductive surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraptsev, Aleksei S.; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2018-04-01

    On the basis of quantum microscopic approach we study the excitation dynamics of two motionless point atoms located near the perfectly conducting mirror. We have analyzed the spontaneous decay rate of individual atoms near the mirror as well as the strength of dipole-dipole interaction between different atoms. It is shown that the spontaneous decay rate of an excited atom significantly depends on the distance from this atom to the mirror. In the case when the interatomic separation is less or comparable with the wavelength of resonant radiation, the spontaneous decay dynamics of an excited atom is described by multi-exponential law. It depends both the interatomic separation and the spatial orientation of diatomic quasimolecule.

  4. Cometary models - excitation of molecules at radio wavelengths and thermodynamics of the coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.

    1987-01-01

    Models for molecular excitation under physical conditions of cometary atmospheres are obviously a requisite for interpreting radio spectroscopic observations of comets. A review of such models is presented. The prevailing excitation mechanism for the rotational lines of parent molecules is pumping of the fundamental vibrational bands by the solar infrared radiation field, followed by spontaneous decay; the molecular rotational population is then at fluorescence equilibrium. Another competing mechanism in the inner coma is thermal excitation by collisions. Its evaluation needs the knowledge of the coma kinetic temperature law, which up to now can only be achieved by modeling the coma thermodynamics. A review of cometary thermodynamical models is also given here, and the relations between such models and cometary molecular observations are discussed. 50 references

  5. Vibrational excitation of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and third-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Hara, Hideaki; Hiraki, Takahiro; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2018-01-01

    We report the coherent excitation of the vibrational state of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and the resultant third-harmonic generation (THG). Parahydrogen molecules cooled by liquid nitrogen are irradiated by mid-infrared nanosecond pulses at 4.8 μm with a nearly Fourier-transform-limited linewidth. The first excited vibrational state of parahydrogen is populated by two-photon absorption of the mid-infrared photons. Because of the narrow linewidth of the mid-infrared pulses, coherence between the ground and excited states is sufficient to induce higher-order processes. Near-infrared photons from the THG are observed at 1.6 μm. The dependence of the intensity of the near-infrared radiation on mid-infrared pulse energy, target pressure, and cell length is determined. We used a simple formula for THG with consideration of realistic experimental conditions to explain the observed results.

  6. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. IV. Receiving antennas and reciprocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenzel, R. L., E-mail: stenzel@physics.ucla.edu; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Antenna radiation patterns are an important property of antennas. Reciprocity holds in free space and the radiation patterns for exciting and receiving antennas are the same. In anisotropic plasmas, radiation patterns are complicated by the fact that group and phase velocities differ and certain wave properties like helicity depend on the direction of wave propagation with respect to the background magnetic field B{sub 0}. Interference and wave focusing effects are different than in free space. Reciprocity does not necessarily hold in a magnetized plasma. The present work considers the properties of various magnetic antennas used for receiving whistler modes. It is based on experimental data from exciting low frequency whistler modes in a large uniform laboratory plasma. By superposition of linear waves from different antennas, the radiation patterns of antenna arrays are derived. Plane waves are generated and used to determine receiving radiation patterns of different receiving antennas. Antenna arrays have radiation patterns with narrow lobes, whose angular position can be varied by physical rotation or electronic phase shifting. Reciprocity applies to broadside antenna arrays but not to end fire arrays which can have asymmetric lobes with respect to B{sub 0}. The effect of a relative motion between an antenna and the plasma has been modeled by the propagation of a short wave packet moving along a linear antenna array. An antenna moving across B{sub 0} has a radiation pattern characterized by an oscillatory “whistler wing.” A receiving antenna in motion can detect any plane wave within the group velocity resonance cone. The radiation pattern also depends on loop size relative to the wavelength. Motional effects prevent reciprocity. The concept of the radiation pattern loses its significance for wave packets since the received signal does not only depend on the antenna but also on the properties of the wave packet. The present results are of fundamental

  7. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. IV. Receiving antennas and reciprocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Antenna radiation patterns are an important property of antennas. Reciprocity holds in free space and the radiation patterns for exciting and receiving antennas are the same. In anisotropic plasmas, radiation patterns are complicated by the fact that group and phase velocities differ and certain wave properties like helicity depend on the direction of wave propagation with respect to the background magnetic field B 0 . Interference and wave focusing effects are different than in free space. Reciprocity does not necessarily hold in a magnetized plasma. The present work considers the properties of various magnetic antennas used for receiving whistler modes. It is based on experimental data from exciting low frequency whistler modes in a large uniform laboratory plasma. By superposition of linear waves from different antennas, the radiation patterns of antenna arrays are derived. Plane waves are generated and used to determine receiving radiation patterns of different receiving antennas. Antenna arrays have radiation patterns with narrow lobes, whose angular position can be varied by physical rotation or electronic phase shifting. Reciprocity applies to broadside antenna arrays but not to end fire arrays which can have asymmetric lobes with respect to B 0 . The effect of a relative motion between an antenna and the plasma has been modeled by the propagation of a short wave packet moving along a linear antenna array. An antenna moving across B 0 has a radiation pattern characterized by an oscillatory “whistler wing.” A receiving antenna in motion can detect any plane wave within the group velocity resonance cone. The radiation pattern also depends on loop size relative to the wavelength. Motional effects prevent reciprocity. The concept of the radiation pattern loses its significance for wave packets since the received signal does not only depend on the antenna but also on the properties of the wave packet. The present results are of fundamental interest and of

  8. Electron capture into excited states of multi-charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkkamp, D.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis deals with charge exchange reactions in slow collisions of multi-charged ions with neutral atoms or molecules. These reactions proceed very efficiently via a curve crossing mechanism, which leads to preferential population of excited states of the ion. The subsequent decay of these states leads to the emission of characteristic radiation. From wavelength resolved measurements of the absolute intensity of this radiation, cross sections for selective population of the excited (n,l-) states of the ion were determined. In addition, for some systems the total capture cross section was measured directly by means of charge state analysis of the secondary projectile ions. The role of charge exchange processes in fusion plasmas and in astrophysical plasmas is indicated. An experimental set-up is described with emphasis on the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source that was used in the experiments. Results for collisions of C 6+ , N 6+ , O 6+ and Ne 6+ with He, H 2 and Ar are presented as well as for electron capture from Li atoms by C 4+ and He 2+ . The interaction of the iso-electronic sequence C 4+ , N 5+ , O 6+ with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen and helium is studied. First results for partial and total cross sections in collisions of fully stripped carbon, nitrogen and oxygen ions with atomic hydrogen are presented. These data are of particular importance for applications in fusion diagnostics. The data indicate that calculations of both molecular and atomic orbital type yield correct results, if an extended basis set is used. (Auth.)

  9. Radiation detectors based by polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherestes, Margareta; Cherestes, Codrut; Constantinescu, Livia

    2004-01-01

    Scintillation counters make use of the property of certain chemical compounds to emit short light pulses after excitation produced by the passage of charged particles or photons of high energy. These flashes of light are detected by a photomultiplier tube that converts the photons into a voltage pulse. The light emitted from the detector also can be collected, focussed and dispersed by a CCD detector. The study of the evolution of the light emission and of the radiation damage under irradiation is a primary topic in the development of radiation hard polymer based scintillator. Polymer scintillator thin films are used in monitoring radiation beam intensities and simultaneous counting of different radiations. Radiation detectors have characteristics which depend on: the type of radiation, the energy of radiation, and the material of the detector. Three types of polymer thin films were studied: a polyvinyltoluene based scintillator, fluorinated polyimide and PMMA. (authors)

  10. Cerenkov radiation from cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turver, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    It is almost 40 years since it was suggested that Cerenkov radiations may be produced in the atmosphere by the passage of the cosmic radiation and account for a small part of the night sky brightness. The first detection of this visible Cerenkov radiation followed within a few years and by the 1960s the atmospheric Cerenkov radiation technique was established as a tool in high energy astrophysics. An exciting new field of astronomy, high energy gamma ray astronomy, has developed which relies on the atmospheric Cerenkov light. We here review the mechanism for the production of Cerenkov light in the atmosphere and summarize the contributions to high energy astrophysics made using the technique. (author)

  11. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-01-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic X-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become incrasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of X-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved. (orig.)

  12. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved

  13. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-01

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of 235 U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10 -10 sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass

  14. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-15

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10{sup -10} sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass.

  15. Radiation practices and radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    The guide presents the principal requirements on accuracy of radiation measurements and on the approval, calibration and operating condition inspections of radiation meters, together with requirements for dosimetric services measuring the individual radiation doses of workers engaged in radiation work (approved dosimetric services). The Guide also sets out the definitions of quantities and units used in radiation measurements. The radiation protection quantities used for assessing the harmful effects of radiation and for expressing the maximum values for radiation exposure (equivalent dose and effective dose) are set out in Guide ST 7.2. This Guide concerns measurements of ionizing radiation involved in radiation practices, the results of which are used for determining the radiation exposure of workers engaged in radiation work and members of the public, and of patients subject to the use of radiation in health services, or upon the basis of which compliance with safety requirements of appliances currently in use and of their premises of use or of the workplaces of workers is ensured. The Guide also concerns measurements of the radon concentration of inhaled air in both workplaces and dwellings. The Guide does not apply to determining the radiation exposure of aircrews, determination of exposure caused by internal radiation, or measurements made to protect the public in the event of, or in preparation for abnormal radiation conditions

  16. Photoionization dynamics of excited molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; O'Halloran, M.A.; Tomkins, F.S.; Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of opportunities for exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. Here we will first give a brief overview of the large variety of experimental approaches to excited state phenomena made possible by REMPI. Then we will examine in more detail, recent studies of the three photon resonant, four photon (3 + 1) ionization of H 2 via the C 'PI/sup u/ state. Strong non-Franck-Condon behavior in the photoelectron spectra of this nominally simple Rydberg state has led to the examination of a variety of dynamical mechanisms. Of these, the role of doubly excited autoionizing states now seems decisive. Progress on photoelectron studies of autoionizing states in H 2 , excited in a (2 + 1) REMPI process via the E, F 1 Σ/sub g/ + will also be briefly discussed. 26 refs., 7 figs

  17. Exciplex formation accompanied with excitation quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Stanislav G; Burshtein, Anatoly I

    2010-04-08

    The competence of the reversible exciplex formation and parallel quenching of excitation (by electron or energy transfer) was considered using a non-Markovian pi-forms approach, identical to integral encounter theory (IET). General equations accounting for the reversible quenching and exciplex formation are derived in the contact approximation. Their general solution was obtained and adopted to the most common case when the ground state particles are in great excess. Particular cases of only photoionization or just exciplex formation separately studied earlier by means of IET are reproduced. In the case of the irreversible excitation quenching, the theory allows specifying the yields of the fluorescence and exciplex luminescence, as well as the long time kinetics of excitation and exciplex decays, in the absence of quenching. The theory distinguishes between the alternative regimes of (a) fast equilibration between excitations and exciplexes followed by their decay with a common average rate and (b) the fastest and deep excitation decay followed by the weaker and slower delayed fluorescence, backed by exciplex dissociation.

  18. Nuclear transitions induced by atomic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, P.; Bounds, J.A.; Haight, R.C.; Luk, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the two-step pumping scheme for a gamma-ray laser, an essential step is that of exciting the nucleus from a long-lived storage isomer to a nearby short- lived state that then decays to the upper lasing level. An experiment is in progress to induce this transfer by first exciting the atomic electrons with UV photons. The incident photons couple well to the electrons, which then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, excitation of the 235 U nucleus is being sought, using a high- brightness UV laser. The excited nuclear state, having a 26- minute half-life, decays by internal conversion, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic beam of 235 U which is then bombarded by the UV laser beam. Ions are collected, and conversion electrons are detected by a channel electron multiplier. In preliminary experiments, an upper limit of 7 x 10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting a 235 U atom in the UV beam for one picosecond at an intensity of about 10 15 W/cm 2 . Experiments with higher sensitivities and at higher UV beam intensities are underway

  19. Diffusion-driven and excitation-dependent recombination rate in blue InGaN/GaN quantum well structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksiejūnas, R.; Gelžinytė, K.; Nargelas, S.; Jarašiūnas, K.; Vengris, M.; Armour, E. A.; Byrnes, D. P.; Arif, R. A.; Lee, S. M.; Papasouliotis, G. D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on diffusion-driven and excitation-dependent carrier recombination rate in multiple InGaN/GaN quantum wells by using photoluminescence, light-induced absorption, and diffraction techniques. We demonstrate gradually increasing with excitation carrier diffusivity and its correlation with the recombination rate. At low carrier densities, an increase in radiative emission and carrier lifetime was observed due to partial saturation of non-radiative recombination centers. However, at carrier densities above ∼5 × 10 18  cm −3 , a typical value of photoluminescence efficiency droop, a further increase of diffusivity forces the delocalized carriers to face higher number of fast non-radiative recombination centers leading to an increase of non-radiative losses

  20. Diffusion-driven and excitation-dependent recombination rate in blue InGaN/GaN quantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksiejūnas, R.; Gelžinytė, K.; Nargelas, S., E-mail: saulius.nargelas@ff.vu.lt; Jarašiūnas, K. [Department of Semiconductor Optoelectronics, Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9–III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vengris, M. [Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 10, 10223 Vilnius (Lithuania); Armour, E. A.; Byrnes, D. P.; Arif, R. A.; Lee, S. M.; Papasouliotis, G. D. [Veeco Instruments, Turbodisc Operations, 394 Elizabeth Avenue, Somerset, New Jersey 08873 (United States)

    2014-01-13

    We report on diffusion-driven and excitation-dependent carrier recombination rate in multiple InGaN/GaN quantum wells by using photoluminescence, light-induced absorption, and diffraction techniques. We demonstrate gradually increasing with excitation carrier diffusivity and its correlation with the recombination rate. At low carrier densities, an increase in radiative emission and carrier lifetime was observed due to partial saturation of non-radiative recombination centers. However, at carrier densities above ∼5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}, a typical value of photoluminescence efficiency droop, a further increase of diffusivity forces the delocalized carriers to face higher number of fast non-radiative recombination centers leading to an increase of non-radiative losses.