WorldWideScience

Sample records for mri scan quality

  1. A quality improvement project to reduce hypothermia in infants undergoing MRI scanning

    Dalal, Priti G.; Parekh, Uma; Dhar, Padmani; McQuillan, Patrick M.; Porath, Janelle; Mujsce, Dennis; Wang, Ming; Hulse, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia prevention strategies during MRI scanning under general anesthesia in infants may pose a challenge due to the MRI scanner's technical constraints. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results related to increase or decrease in post-scan temperatures in children. We noted occurrences of post-scan hypothermia in anesthetized infants despite the use of routine passive warming techniques. The aims of our quality improvement project were (a) to identify variables associated with post-scan hypothermia in infants and (b) to develop and implement processes to reduce occurrence of hypothermia in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants undergoing MRI. One hundred sixty-four infants undergoing MRI scanning were prospectively audited for post-scan body temperatures. A multidisciplinary team identified potential variables associated with post-scan hypothermia and designed preventative strategies: protocol development, risk factor identification, vigilance and use of a vacuum immobilizer. Another audit was performed, specifically focusing on NICU infants. In the initial phase, we found that younger age (P = 0.002), lower weight (P = 0.005), lower pre-scan temperature (P < 0.01), primary anesthetic technique with propofol (P < 0.01), advanced airway devices (P = 0.02) and being in the NICU (P < 0.01) were associated with higher odds for developing post-scan decrease in body temperature. Quality improvement processes decreased the occurrence of hypothermia in NICU infants undergoing MRI scanning from 65% to 18% (95% confidence interval for the difference, 26-70%, P < 0.001). Several variables, including being in the NICU, are associated with a decrease in post-scan temperature in infants undergoing MRI scanning under sedation/general anesthesia. Implementation of strategies to prevent hypothermia in infants may be challenging in the high-risk MRI environment. We were able to minimize this problem in clinical practice by applying quality improvement

  2. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  3. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    Lee, D; Keall, P; Kim, T; Greer, P B; Arm, J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  4. Arm MRI scan

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  5. Sinus MRI scan

    ... CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  6. Leg MRI scan

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  7. Knee MRI scan

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  8. Propofol Drip Infusion Anesthesia for MRI Scanning: Two Case Reports

    Sasao-Takano, Mami; Misumi, Kan; Suzuki, Masayuki; Kamiya, Yoko; Noguchi, Izumi; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) room is a special environment. The required intense magnetic fields create unique problems with the use of standard anesthesia machines, syringe pumps, and physiologic monitors. We have recently experienced 2 oral maxillofacial surgery cases requiring MRI: a 15-year-old boy with developmental disability and a healthy 5-year-old boy. The patients required complete immobilization during the scanning for obtaining high-quality images for the best diagnosis. A...

  9. Propofol drip infusion anesthesia for MRI scanning: two case reports.

    Sasao-Takano, Mami; Misumi, Kan; Suzuki, Masayuki; Kamiya, Yoko; Noguchi, Izumi; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) room is a special environment. The required intense magnetic fields create unique problems with the use of standard anesthesia machines, syringe pumps, and physiologic monitors. We have recently experienced 2 oral maxillofacial surgery cases requiring MRI: a 15-year-old boy with developmental disability and a healthy 5-year-old boy. The patients required complete immobilization during the scanning for obtaining high-quality images for the best diagnosis. Anesthesia was started in the MRI scanning room. An endotracheal intubation was performed after induction with intravenous administration of muscle relaxant. Total intravenous anesthesia via propofol drip infusion (4-7 mg/kg/h) was used during the scanning. Standard physiologic monitors were used during scan pauses, but special monitors were used during scanning. In MRI scanning for oral maxillofacial surgery, general anesthesia, with the added advantage of having a secured airway, is recommended as a safe alternative to sedation especially in cases of patients with disability and precooperative chidren.

  10. Non-Cartesian MRI scan time reduction through sparse sampling

    Wajer, F.T.A.W.

    2001-01-01

    Non-Cartesian MRI Scan-Time Reduction through Sparse Sampling Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals are measured in the Fourier domain, also called k-space. Samples of the MRI signal can not be taken at will, but lie along k-space trajectories determined by the magnetic field gradients. MRI

  11. Factors influencing bone scan quality

    Adams, F.G.; Shirley, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    A reliable subjective method of assessing bone scan quality is described. A large number of variables which theoretically could influence scan quality were submitted to regression and factor analysis. Obesity, age, sex and abnormality of scan were found to be significant but weak variables. (orig.)

  12. Willingness among Obese Pregnant Women to Accept MRI Scan

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Thomsen, Henrik Segelcke; Astrup, Arne

    2015-01-01

    therefore undertook a study of the willingness of obese women to undergo MRI during pregnancy. Method: Obese pregnant women, body mass index (BMI) 30-45 kg/m2, participating in a weight management intervention study, were offered three MRI scans to be performed during pregnancy. One hundred and one women......Background/Aim: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered safe to perform during pregnancy. In spite of this many women are reluctant to undergo the examination. Weight gain is to be expected during pregnancy, but little is known about changes in the compartmentalization of abdominal fat. We...... were offered MRI scanning in gestational week (GW) 15, 64 in GW 32, and 45 in GW 40. Results: Of 106 women offered MRI scans 102 completed (96%) at least one scan. In total 177 out of 210 possible scans were completed. The proportion of women who completed first, second and third MRI scans were 96%, 83...

  13. No effects of MRI scan on male reproduction hormones.

    Møllerløkken, Ole J; Moen, Bente E; Baste, Valborg; Magerøy, Nils; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Neto, Emanuel; Ersland, Lars; Bjørge, Line; Torjesen, Peter A; Mild, Kjell Hansson

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasing around the world and the possible adverse effects on reproductive health of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in MRI are not previously studied. A prospective randomized balanced cross-over study using a head scan in real MRI with whole-body transmitting coil and sham MRI among 24 healthy male volunteers was conducted. Serum-blood samples of inhibin B, testosterone, prolactine, thyreotropine, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, sex-hormone binding globuline and estradiol were taken before and after the different scans. Neither immediately after, nor after 11 days were there seen any differences in the hormone levels comparing real and sham MRI. The lack of effects of EMF on male reproductive hormones should be reassuring to the public and especially for men examined in MRI. Adverse effects on other endpoints than male reproduction or possible chronic effect of multiple MRI scans have not been investigated in this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Willingness among obese pregnant women to accept MRI scan

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Thomsen, H; Astrup, Arne

    2016-01-01

    therefore undertook a study of the willingness of obese women to undergo MRI during pregnancy. Method: Obese pregnant women, body mass index (BMI) 30-45 kg/m2, participating in a weight management intervention study, were offered three MRI scans to be performed during pregnancy. One hundred and one women......Background/Aim: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered safe to perform during pregnancy. In spite of this many women are reluctant to undergo the examination. Weight gain is to be expected during pregnancy, but little is known about changes in the compartmentalization of abdominal fat. We...... were offered MRI scanning in gestational week (GW) 15, 64 in GW 32, and 45 in GW 40. Results: Of 106 women offered MRI scans 102 completed (96%) at least one scan. In total 177 out of 210 possible scans were completed. The proportion of women who completed first, second and third MRI scans were 96%, 83% and 61...

  15. [Microinjection Monitoring System Design Applied to MRI Scanning].

    Xu, Yongfeng

    2017-09-30

    A microinjection monitoring system applied to the MRI scanning was introduced. The micro camera probe was used to stretch into the main magnet for real-time video injection monitoring of injection tube terminal. The programming based on LabVIEW was created to analysis and process the real-time video information. The feedback signal was used for intelligent controlling of the modified injection pump. The real-time monitoring system can make the best use of injection under the condition that the injection device was away from the sample which inside the magnetic room and unvisible. 9.4 T MRI scanning experiment showed that the system in ultra-high field can work stability and doesn't affect the MRI scans.

  16. An MRI Scan of the nucleus

    Hoffman, Calem

    2017-09-01

    In the pursuit of a global description of nuclei, extensive experimental studies on short-lived isotopes have provided a wealth of new empirical information. Such data has been used to test theoretical concepts and in the development of innovative ideas. More directly, a novel device at Argonne National Laboratory, the HELIcal Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS), was focused on providing detailed single-particle information on the malleability of the nuclear magic numbers. Once thought as immovable pillars in nuclear structure, the shell-gaps in nuclei defining magic numbers of nucleons are now well-known to evolve as proton-to-neutron ratios change. And, determination of the underlying components of the nuclear force driving the evolution is at the forefront of nuclear structure research. Additionally, the HELIOS device mentioned above also carries its own aura being that it is formed by a decommissioned MRI solenoid magnet. In this talk recent highlights and advancements in our description of nuclear shell evolution will be the focus along with a few sidestepping comments on the life-cycle and interplay between basic research and the applications of nuclear physics. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  17. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.)

  18. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology); Baleriaux, D.; Christophe, C. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology))

    1992-02-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.).

  19. Prospective analysis of in vivo landmark point-based MRI geometric distortion in head and neck cancer patients scanned in immobilized radiation treatment position: Results of a prospective quality assurance protocol

    Abdallah S.R. Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Uncertainties related to geometric distortion are a major obstacle for effectively utilizing MRI in radiation oncology. We aim to quantify the geometric distortion in patient images by comparing their in-treatment position MRIs with the corresponding planning CTs, using CT as the non-distorted gold standard. Methods: Twenty-one head and neck cancer patients were imaged with MRI as part of a prospective Institutional Review Board approved study. MR images were acquired with a T2 SE sequence (0.5 × 0.5 × 2.5 mm voxel size in the same immobilization position as in the CTs. MRI to CT rigid registration was then done and geometric distortion comparison was assessed by measuring the corresponding anatomical landmarks on both the MRI and the CT images. Several landmark measurements were obtained including; skin to skin (STS, bone to bone, and soft tissue to soft tissue at specific levels in horizontal and vertical planes of both scans. Inter-observer variability was assessed and interclass correlation (ICC was calculated. Results: A total of 430 landmark measurements were obtained. The median distortion for all landmarks in all scans was 1.06 mm (IQR 0.6–1.98. For each patient 48% of the measurements were done in the right-left direction and 52% were done in the anteroposterior direction. The measured geometric distortion was not statistically different in the right-left direction compared to the anteroposterior direction (1.5 ± 1.6 vs. 1.6 ± 1.7 mm, respectively, p = 0.4. The magnitude of distortion was higher in the STS peripheral landmarks compared to the more central landmarks (2.0 ± 1.9 vs. 1.2 ± 1.3 mm, p < 0.0001. The mean distortion measured by observer one was not significantly different compared to observer 2, 3, and 4 (1.05, 1.23, 1.06 and 1.05 mm, respectively, p = 0.4 with ICC = 0.84. Conclusion: MRI geometric distortions were

  20. Reducing task-based fMRI scanning time using simultaneous multislice echo planar imaging

    Kiss, Mate [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Brain Imaging Centre, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Janos Szentagothai PhD School, MR Research Centre, Budapest (Hungary); National Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Neuroradiology, Budapest (Hungary); Hermann, Petra; Vidnyanszky, Zoltan; Gal, Viktor [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Brain Imaging Centre, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2018-03-15

    To maintain alertness and to remain motionless during scanning represent a substantial challenge for patients/subjects involved in both clinical and research functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations. Therefore, availability and application of new data acquisition protocols allowing the shortening of scan time without compromising the data quality and statistical power are of major importance. Higher order category-selective visual cortical areas were identified individually, and rapid event-related fMRI design was used to compare three different sampling rates (TR = 2000, 1000, and 410 ms, using state-of-the-art simultaneous multislice imaging) and four different scanning lengths to match the statistical power of the traditional scanning methods to high sampling-rate design. The results revealed that ∝ 4 min of the scan time with 1 Hz (TR = 1000 ms) sampling rate and ∝ 2 min scanning at ∝ 2.5 Hz (TR = 410 ms) sampling rate provide similar localization sensitivity and selectivity to that obtained with 11-min session at conventional, 0.5 Hz (TR = 2000 ms) sampling rate. Our findings suggest that task-based fMRI examination of clinical population prone to distress such as presurgical mapping experiments might substantially benefit from the reduced (20-40%) scanning time that can be achieved by the application of simultaneous multislice sequences. (orig.)

  1. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems...... consistent data throughout the course of a study, and consistent stability across time and sites is needed to allow data from different time periods or acquisition sites to be optimally integrated....

  2. Automated SmartPrep tracker positioning in liver MRI scans

    Goto, Takao; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for automated SmartPrep tracker positioning in liver MRI scans. SmartPrep is used to monitor the contrast bolus signal in order to detect the arrival time of the bolus. Accurately placing the tracker in the aorta while viewing three planar scout images is a difficult task for the operator and is an important problem from the workflow standpoint. The development of an automated SmartPrep tracker would therefore help to improve workflow in liver MRI scans. In our proposed method, the aorta is detected using AdaBoost (which is a machine learning technique) by searching around the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal cord. Analysis of scout scan images showed that our detection method functioned properly for a variety of axial MR images without intensity correction. A total of 234 images reconstructed from the datasets of 64 volunteers were analyzed, and the results showed that the detection error for the aorta was approximately 3 mm. (author)

  3. Interactive scan control for kinematic study in open MRI

    Goto, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kiyomi; Ito, Taeko; Nagao, Hisako; Takahashi, Tetsuhiko; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Hiai, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    A tool to support the subject is generally used for kinematic joint imaging with an open MRI apparatus because of difficulty setting the image plane correctly. However, use of a support tool requires a complicated procedure to position the subject, and setting the image plane when the joint angle changes is time consuming. Allowing the subject to move freely enables better diagnoses when kinematic joint imaging is performed. We therefore developed an interactive scan control (ISC) to facilitate the easy, quick, and accurate setting of the image plane even when a support tool is not used. We used a 0.4T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system open in the horizontal direction. The ISC determines the image plane interactively on the basis of fluoroscopy images displayed on a user interface. The imaging pulse is a balanced steady-state acquisition with rewound gradient echo (SARGE) sequence with update time less than 2 s. Without using a tool to support the knee, we positioned the knee of a healthy volunteer at 4 different joint angles and set the image plane through the patella and femur at each of the angles. Lumbar imaging is also demonstrated with ISC. Setting the image plane was easy and quick at all knee angles, and images obtained clearly showed the patella and femur. Total imaging time was less than 10 min, a fourth of the time needed when a support tool is used. We also used our ISC in kinematic imaging of the lumbar. The ISC shortens total time for kinematic joint imaging, and because a support tool is not needed, imaging can be done more freely in an open MR imaging apparatus. (author)

  4. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-02: Audiovisual Biofeedback Guided Respiratory-Gated MRI: An Investigation of Tumor Definition and Scan Time for Lung Cancer

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [Virginia Commonwealth University, Glen Allen, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Breathing consistency variations can cause respiratory-related motion blurring and artifacts and increase in MRI scan time due to inadequate respiratory-gating and discarding of breathing cycles. In a previous study the concept of audiovisual biofeedback (AV) guided respiratory-gated MRI was tested with healthy volunteers and it demonstrated image quality improvement on anatomical structures and scan time reduction. This study tests the applicability of AV-guided respiratorygated MRI for lung cancer in a prospective patient study. Methods: Image quality and scan time were investigated in thirteen lung cancer patients who underwent two 3T MRI sessions. In the first MRI session (pre-treatment), respiratory-gated MR images with free breathing (FB) and AV were acquired at inhalation and exhalation. An RF navigator placed on the liver dome was employed for the respiratory-gated MRI. This was repeated in the second MRI session (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were delineated on each dataset. FB and AV were compared in terms of (1) tumor definition assessed by lung tumor contours and (2) intra-patient scan time variation using the total image acquisition time of inhalation and exhalation datasets from the first and second MRI sessions across 13 lung cancer patients. Results: Compared to FB AV-guided respiratory-gated MRI improved image quality for contouring tumors with sharper boundaries and less blurring resulted in the improvement of tumor definition. Compared to FB the variation of intra-patient scan time with AV was reduced by 48% (p<0.001) from 54 s to 28 s. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that AV-guided respiratorygated MRI improved the quality of tumor images and fixed tumor definition for lung cancer. These results suggest that audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance has the potential to control breathing for adequate respiratory-gating for lung cancer imaging and radiotherapy.

  5. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-02: Audiovisual Biofeedback Guided Respiratory-Gated MRI: An Investigation of Tumor Definition and Scan Time for Lung Cancer

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing consistency variations can cause respiratory-related motion blurring and artifacts and increase in MRI scan time due to inadequate respiratory-gating and discarding of breathing cycles. In a previous study the concept of audiovisual biofeedback (AV) guided respiratory-gated MRI was tested with healthy volunteers and it demonstrated image quality improvement on anatomical structures and scan time reduction. This study tests the applicability of AV-guided respiratorygated MRI for lung cancer in a prospective patient study. Methods: Image quality and scan time were investigated in thirteen lung cancer patients who underwent two 3T MRI sessions. In the first MRI session (pre-treatment), respiratory-gated MR images with free breathing (FB) and AV were acquired at inhalation and exhalation. An RF navigator placed on the liver dome was employed for the respiratory-gated MRI. This was repeated in the second MRI session (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were delineated on each dataset. FB and AV were compared in terms of (1) tumor definition assessed by lung tumor contours and (2) intra-patient scan time variation using the total image acquisition time of inhalation and exhalation datasets from the first and second MRI sessions across 13 lung cancer patients. Results: Compared to FB AV-guided respiratory-gated MRI improved image quality for contouring tumors with sharper boundaries and less blurring resulted in the improvement of tumor definition. Compared to FB the variation of intra-patient scan time with AV was reduced by 48% (p<0.001) from 54 s to 28 s. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that AV-guided respiratorygated MRI improved the quality of tumor images and fixed tumor definition for lung cancer. These results suggest that audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance has the potential to control breathing for adequate respiratory-gating for lung cancer imaging and radiotherapy.

  6. Incidental findings on MRI scans of patients presenting with audiovestibular symptoms.

    Papanikolaou, Vasileios; Khan, Mohammad H; Keogh, Ivan J

    2010-06-07

    The evaluation of patients presenting with audiovestibular symptoms usually includes MRI of the internal auditory meatus, the cerebellopontine angle and the brain. A significant percentage of these scans will present unexpected, incidental findings, which could have important clinical significance. To determine the frequency and clinical significance of incidental findings on MRI scans of patients with audiovestibular symptoms. A retrospective analysis of 200 serial MRI scans. Gender distribution: equal. Age range: 17-82 years. One-hundred and four scans (52%) were normal and 1 scan (0.5%) demonstrated a unilateral vestibular schwannoma. Ninety-five scans (47.5%) demonstrated incidental findings. Sixty-six of these (33%) were considered of ishaemic origin and did not require further action. Five (2.5%) scans demonstrated significant findings which warranted appropriate referral; Two Gliomas (1%), 2 cases of extensive White Matter Lesions (1%), 1 lipoma (0.5%). The remaining scans demonstrated various other findings. Investigation of patients with audiovestibular symptoms with MRI scans revealed incidental findings in a significant percentage (47.5%). The majority of these findings were benign warranting no further action and only 2.5% required further referral. It is the responsibility of the referring Otolaryngologist to be aware of these findings, to be able to assess their significance, to inform the patient and if needed to refer for further evaluation.

  7. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  8. Guidelines for scanning twins and triplets with US and MRI

    Calvo-Garcia, Maria A. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Multiple-fetus gestations have an increased risk of discordant anomalies, aneuploidy and growth restriction compared to singleton pregnancies. In addition, twins sharing the same placenta are at risk for developing specific conditions that are potentially amenable to surgical management. In those scenarios, patients might need to be evaluated not only with US but with fetal MRI as well. This paper outlines basic guidelines to consider when imaging complicated multiple-fetus gestations during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters. (orig.)

  9. Temporal interpolation alters motion in fMRI scans: Magnitudes and consequences for artifact detection.

    Jonathan D Power

    Full Text Available Head motion can be estimated at any point of fMRI image processing. Processing steps involving temporal interpolation (e.g., slice time correction or outlier replacement often precede motion estimation in the literature. From first principles it can be anticipated that temporal interpolation will alter head motion in a scan. Here we demonstrate this effect and its consequences in five large fMRI datasets. Estimated head motion was reduced by 10-50% or more following temporal interpolation, and reductions were often visible to the naked eye. Such reductions make the data seem to be of improved quality. Such reductions also degrade the sensitivity of analyses aimed at detecting motion-related artifact and can cause a dataset with artifact to falsely appear artifact-free. These reduced motion estimates will be particularly problematic for studies needing estimates of motion in time, such as studies of dynamics. Based on these findings, it is sensible to obtain motion estimates prior to any image processing (regardless of subsequent processing steps and the actual timing of motion correction procedures, which need not be changed. We also find that outlier replacement procedures change signals almost entirely during times of motion and therefore have notable similarities to motion-targeting censoring strategies (which withhold or replace signals entirely during times of motion.

  10. An audit comparing the reporting of staging MRI scans for rectal cancer with the London Cancer Alliance (LCA) guidelines.

    Siddiqui, M R S; Shanmuganandan, A P; Rasheed, S; Tekkis, P; Brown, G; Abulafi, A M

    2017-11-01

    This article focuses on the audit and assessment of clinical practice before and after introduction of MRI reporting guidelines. Standardised proforma based reporting may improve quality of MRI reports. Uptake of the use may be facilitated by endorsement from regional and national cancer organisations. This audit was divided into 2 phases. MRI reports issued between April 2014 and June 2014 were included in the first part of our audit. Phase II included MRI reports issued between April 2015 and June 2015. 14 out of 15 hospitals that report MRI scans in the LCA responded to our audit proposal. The completion rate of key MRI metrics/metrics was better in proforma compared to prose reports both before (98% vs 73%; p < 0.05) and after introduction of the guidelines (98% vs 71%; p < 0.05). There was an approximate doubling of proforma reporting after the introduction of guidelines and workshop interventions (39% vs 65%; p < 0.05). Evaluation of locally advanced cancers (tumours extending to or beyond the circumferential resection margin) for beyond TME surgery was reported in 3% of prose reports vs. 42% in proformas. Incorporation of standardised reporting in official guidelines improved the uptake of proforma based reporting. Proforma based reporting captured more MRI reportable items compared to prose summaries, before and after the implementation of guidelines. MRI reporting of advanced cancers for beyond TME surgery falls short of acceptable standards but is more detailed in proforma based reports. Further work to improve completion especially in beyond TME reporting is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  11. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms.

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-12-21

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards.

  12. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards. (paper)

  13. In vivo estimation of normal amygdala volume from structural MRI scans with anatomical-based segmentation.

    Siozopoulos, Achilleas; Thomaidis, Vasilios; Prassopoulos, Panos; Fiska, Aliki

    2018-02-01

    Literature includes a number of studies using structural MRI (sMRI) to determine the volume of the amygdala, which is modified in various pathologic conditions. The reported values vary widely mainly because of different anatomical approaches to the complex. This study aims at estimating of the normal amygdala volume from sMRI scans using a recent anatomical definition described in a study based on post-mortem material. The amygdala volume has been calculated in 106 healthy subjects, using sMRI and anatomical-based segmentation. The resulting volumes have been analyzed for differences related to hemisphere, sex, and age. The mean amygdalar volume was estimated at 1.42 cm 3 . The mean right amygdala volume has been found larger than the left, but the difference for the raw values was within the limits of the method error. No intersexual differences or age-related alterations have been observed. The study provides a method for determining the boundaries of the amygdala in sMRI scans based on recent anatomical considerations and an estimation of the mean normal amygdala volume from a quite large number of scans for future use in comparative studies.

  14. Differences in MRI findings in cases showing ring-enhancement on a CT scan

    Tokiwa, Kaichi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Miyasaka, Yoshio; Yada, Kenzoh; Kan, Shinichi; Takagi, Hiroshi.

    1990-01-01

    It is sometimes difficult to differentiate between a brain abscess and a tumor, for both show ring-enhancement on a CT scan. The present authors have studied the benefit of MRI for the differential diagnosis of these two lesions. The subjects of this study were 6 cases of brain abscess and 10 cases of brain tumor, all of them showing ring-enhancement on a CT scan. The MRI findings were compared with those of the CT scan taken at almost the same time, especially focussing on the difference in the ring-enhancement. In 5 out of the 6 cases of brain abscess, T 2 -weighted MRI demonstrated a comparatively thin and homogeneous low-intensity, round rim. In the cases of brain tumor, however, none of the cases demonstrated this typical low-intensity, round rim; rather, in them the rim was thick and irregular. The authors can conclude that those MRI findings can serve as important differential diagnostic findings between brain abscess and tumor; also, MRI may be used as a landmark for terminating the administration of antibiotics in cases of brain abscess. (author)

  15. MRI isotropic resolution reconstruction from two orthogonal scans

    Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Totterman, Saara; Parker, Kevin J.

    2001-07-01

    An algorithm for the reconstructions of ISO-resolution volumetric MR data sets from two standard orthogonal MR scans having anisotropic resolution has been developed. The reconstruction algorithm starts by registering a pair of orthogonal volumetric MR data sets. The registration is done by maximizing the correlation between the gradient magnitude using a simple translation-rotation model in a multi-resolution approach. Then algorithm assumes that the individual voxels on the MR data are an average of the magnetic resonance properties of an elongated imaging volume. Then, the process is modeled as the projection of MR properties into a single sensor. This model allows the derivation of a set of linear equations that can be used to recover the MR properties of every single voxel in the SO-resolution volume given only two orthogonal MR scans. Projections on convex sets (POCS) was used to solve the set of linear equations. Experimental results show the advantage of having a ISO-resolution reconstructions for the visualization and analysis of small and thin muscular structures.

  16. Real-time motion analytics during brain MRI improve data quality and reduce costs.

    Dosenbach, Nico U F; Koller, Jonathan M; Earl, Eric A; Miranda-Dominguez, Oscar; Klein, Rachel L; Van, Andrew N; Snyder, Abraham Z; Nagel, Bonnie J; Nigg, Joel T; Nguyen, Annie L; Wesevich, Victoria; Greene, Deanna J; Fair, Damien A

    2017-11-01

    Head motion systematically distorts clinical and research MRI data. Motion artifacts have biased findings from many structural and functional brain MRI studies. An effective way to remove motion artifacts is to exclude MRI data frames affected by head motion. However, such post-hoc frame censoring can lead to data loss rates of 50% or more in our pediatric patient cohorts. Hence, many scanner operators collect additional 'buffer data', an expensive practice that, by itself, does not guarantee sufficient high-quality MRI data for a given participant. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-setup, easy-to-use Framewise Integrated Real-time MRI Monitoring (FIRMM) software suite that provides scanner operators with head motion analytics in real-time, allowing them to scan each subject until the desired amount of low-movement data has been collected. Our analyses show that using FIRMM to identify the ideal scan time for each person can reduce total brain MRI scan times and associated costs by 50% or more. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Generating finite element models of the knee: How accurately can we determine ligament attachment sites from MRI scans?

    Rachmat, H.H.; Janssen, D.; Zevenbergen, W.J.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Diercks, R.L.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the intra- and inter-observer variability when determining the insertion and origin sites of knee ligaments on MRI scan images. We collected data of five observers with different backgrounds, who determined the ligament attachment sites in an MRI scan of a right knee of a

  18. Serial CT scans and MRI scans of Tay-Sachs disease

    Shimoizumi, Hideo; Miyao, Masutomo; Ichihashi, Koh; Sawa, Rituko; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Osamu; Yanagisawa, Masayoshi; Kamoshita, Shigehiko.

    1986-01-01

    Serial X-ray CT and MRI were performed on 2 cases of Tay-Sachs disease. Case 1 : a 3-year-10-month-old girl. Her developmental milestones were normal until the age of 6 months. At the age of 10 months, hypotonia and unduly sensitiveness to sounds were noticed. She had cherry red spots in both fundi, and the serum hexosaminidase A activity was low. Significant clinical features during the next 3 years included regression of developmental milestones to the level of one month, and myoclonic and generalised seizures. After 3 years she showed megalencephaly, unstable body temperature, and respiratory disorders. Case 2 : a 2-year-6-month-old boy. His developmental milestones were normal until the age of 5 months. Then he manifested hyperreaction to noises and further developments ceased. He started to deteriorate from the age of 1 year and 2 months, and had no head control at the age of 1 year and 6 months. Cherry red spots were detected and the serum hexsosaminidase A activity was low, too. X-ray CT at the early stage of cases 1 and 2 showed mild cerebral atrophy and high density areas in bilateral thalami and basal ganglia. At the late stage of Case 1, high density areas appeared in occipital and frontal white matters. MRI in both patients were strikingly similar. In their grey matters, linear light areas were demonstrated on IR images. Their white matters showed extensive dark (long T 1 ) areas on IR images, and extensive light (long T 2 ) areas on SE images. Bilateral thalami and basal ganglia were light on IR images and dark on SE images. The findings of MRI in our patients seemed to correlate well with pathological and biochemical changes in their brains. (author)

  19. Contribution of brain imaging techniques: CT-scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Pasco-Papon, A.; Gourdier, A.L.; Papon, X.; Caron-Poitreau, C.

    1996-01-01

    In light of the current lack of consensus on the benefit of carotid artery surgery to treat asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis, the decision to operate on a patient depends on individual evaluation and characterization of risk factors on carotid artery stenosis greater than 70 %. The assessment of such risk factors is based especially on non-invasive brain imaging techniques.Computed tomography scanning (CT-scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enable two types of stenosis to be differentiated, i.e. stenoses which are symptomatic and those that are radiologically proven versus those which are clinically and radiologically silent. CT-scan investigation (with and without injection of iodinated contrast media) still continues to be a common routine test in 1996 whenever a surgical revascularization procedure is planned. The presence of deep lacunar infarcts ipsilateral to the carotid artery stenosis generally evidence the reality of stenosis and thus are useful to the surgeon in establishing whether surgery is indicated. In the absence a consensus on indications for surgical management, the surgeon could use the CT-scan and MRI as medicolegal records which could be compared to a subsequent postoperative CT-scan in case of ischemic complications associated with the surgical procedure. Furthermore, recent cerebral ischemia as evidenced by filling with contrast material, will call for postponing treatment by a few weeks. Although conventional MRI is more contributive than brain CT-scan in terms of sensibility and specificity, its indications are narrower because of its limited availability and cost constraints. But, development of angio-MRI and functional imaging promise that its future is assured and even perhaps as the sole diagnostic method if its indications are expanded to include preoperative angiographic evaluation of atheromatous lesions of supra-aortic trunks. (authors). 37 refs

  20. Specific MRI quality control: development and production of a multimodal test-object. Assessment of MRI sequences

    Dedieu, Veronique; Bard, Jean-Jacques; Bonnet, Jacques; Buchheit, Isabelle; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Certaines, Jacques de; Lacaze, Brigitte; Vincensini, Dominique; Joffre, Francis

    2007-02-01

    After a first part recalling the operation principle of a MRI imager and the modalities of acquisition of MRI images (base MNR experiment, image quality, technical issues, artefacts and main defects of MRI imagers), this document addresses the different types of quality control in MRI and regulatory issues. The third part presents the characteristics of a multimodal test-object which has been developed, the parameters of the specific quality control, and control procedures

  1. SU-F-I-27: Measurement of SAR and Temperature Elevation During MRI Scans

    Seo, Y [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The poor reliability and repeatability of the manufacturer-reported SAR values on clinical MRI systems have been acknowledged. The purpose of this study is to not only measure SAR values, but also RF-induced temperature elevation at 1.5 and 3T MRI systems. Methods: SAR measurement experiment was performed at 1.5 and 3T. Three MRI RF sequences (T1w TSE, T1w inversion recovery, and T2w TSE) with imaging parameters were selected. A hydroxyl-ethylcelluose (HEC) gelled saline phantom mimicking human body tissue was made. Human torso phantom were constructed, based on Korean adult standard anthropometric reference data (Fig.1). FDTD method was utilized to calculate the SAR distribution using Sim4Life software. Based on the results of the simulation, 4 electrical field (E-field) sensors were located inside the phantom. 55 Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensors (27 sensors in upper and lower cover lids, and one sensor located in the center as a reference) were located inside the phantom to measure temperature change during MRI scan (Fig.2). Results: Simulation shows that SAR value is 0.4 W/kg in the periphery and 0.001 W/kg in the center (Fig.2). One 1.5T and one of two 3T MRI systems represent that the measured SAR values were lower than MRI scanner-reported SAR values. However, the other 3T MRI scanner shows that the averaged SAR values measured by probe 2, 3, and 4 are 6.83, 7.59, and 6.01 W/kg, compared to MRI scanner-reported whole body SAR value (<1.5 W/kg) for T2w TSE (Table 1). The temperature elevation measured by FBG sensors is 5.2°C in the lateral shoulder, 5.1°C in the underarm, 4.7°C in the anterior axilla, 4.8°C in the posterior axilla, and 4.8°C in the lateral waist for T2w TSE (Fig.3). Conclusion: It is essential to assess the safety of MRI system for patient by measuring accurate SAR deposited in the body during clinical MRI.

  2. Experimental and clinical evaluation of acromioclavicular joint structures with new scan orientations in MRI

    Schaefer, Fritz K.; Schaefer, Philipp J.; Brossmann, Joachim; Hilgert, Ralf Erik; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate MRI for visualization of acromioclavicular (ac) joint structures in cadaveric shoulders, asymptomatic volunteers and symptomatic patients with trauma of the ac-joint. Three cadaveric shoulders were examined to find adequate planes and sequences for MRI. Afterwards, MR images were correlated to corresponding anatomical sections. Six asymptomatic volunteers and 13 patients were scanned in a 1.5 T Magnetom Vision with three sequences in the following planes: (1) parallel to the clavicle; (2) orthogonal to the ac joint, each time a fat-suppressed proton density-weighted + T2-sequence (TR/TE 4,000/15 ms) was performed; (3) parallel to the clavicle, T1-SE (TR/TE 817/20 ms). The parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, field-of-view 180 mm, matrix 210 x 256 pixels. Standard of reference in the patients was clinical examination and conventional X-rays. Classification was by Rockwood grades I-VI. MRI allowed excellent visualization and diagnoses of ac-joint structures in volunteers and patients (n=6 normal, n=1 Rockwood I, n=5 Rockwood II, n=3 Rockwood III, n=4 Rockwood V). On MRI, in one lesion type II and III each, a lower lesion type was suspected clinically and by X-ray. In one patient additional information by MRI led to surgery. MRI allows excellent anatomical display of ac-joint structures and can give clinically relevant information on type and extension of ac-joint trauma, which may influence therapy. (orig.)

  3. Experimental and clinical evaluation of acromioclavicular joint structures with new scan orientations in MRI

    Schaefer, Fritz K.; Schaefer, Philipp J.; Brossmann, Joachim; Hilgert, Ralf Erik; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kiel (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    The objective of the study was to evaluate MRI for visualization of acromioclavicular (ac) joint structures in cadaveric shoulders, asymptomatic volunteers and symptomatic patients with trauma of the ac-joint. Three cadaveric shoulders were examined to find adequate planes and sequences for MRI. Afterwards, MR images were correlated to corresponding anatomical sections. Six asymptomatic volunteers and 13 patients were scanned in a 1.5 T Magnetom Vision with three sequences in the following planes: (1) parallel to the clavicle; (2) orthogonal to the ac joint, each time a fat-suppressed proton density-weighted + T2-sequence (TR/TE 4,000/15 ms) was performed; (3) parallel to the clavicle, T1-SE (TR/TE 817/20 ms). The parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, field-of-view 180 mm, matrix 210 x 256 pixels. Standard of reference in the patients was clinical examination and conventional X-rays. Classification was by Rockwood grades I-VI. MRI allowed excellent visualization and diagnoses of ac-joint structures in volunteers and patients (n=6 normal, n=1 Rockwood I, n=5 Rockwood II, n=3 Rockwood III, n=4 Rockwood V). On MRI, in one lesion type II and III each, a lower lesion type was suspected clinically and by X-ray. In one patient additional information by MRI led to surgery. MRI allows excellent anatomical display of ac-joint structures and can give clinically relevant information on type and extension of ac-joint trauma, which may influence therapy. (orig.)

  4. High success rates of sedation-free brain MRI scanning in young children using simple subject preparation protocols with and without a commercial mock scanner–the Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet) experience

    Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Weinzimer, Stuart A.; Mauras, Nelly; Beck, Roy W.; Marzelli, Matt J.; Mazaika, Paul K.; Aye, Tandy; White, Neil H.; Tsalikian, Eva; Fox, Larry; Kollman, Craig; Cheng, Peiyao; Reiss, Allan L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to lie still in an MRI scanner is essential for obtaining usable image data. To reduce motion, young children are often sedated, adding significant cost and risk. Objective We assessed the feasibility of using a simple and affordable behavioral desensitization program to yield high-quality brain MRI scans in sedation-free children. Materials and methods 222 children (4–9.9 years), 147 with type 1 diabetes and 75 age-matched non-diabetic controls, participated in a multi-site study focused on effects of type 1 diabetes on the developing brain. T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI scans were performed. All children underwent behavioral training and practice MRI sessions using either a commercial MRI simulator or an inexpensive mock scanner consisting of a toy tunnel, vibrating mat, and video player to simulate the sounds and feel of the MRI scanner. Results 205 children (92.3%), mean age 7±1.7 years had high-quality T1-W scans and 174 (78.4%) had high-quality diffusion-weighted scans after the first scan session. With a second scan session, success rates were 100% and 92.5% for T1-and diffusion-weighted scans, respectively. Success rates did not differ between children with type 1 diabetes and children without diabetes, or between centers using a commercial MRI scan simulator and those using the inexpensive mock scanner. Conclusion Behavioral training can lead to a high success rate for obtaining high-quality T1-and diffusion-weighted brain images from a young population without sedation. PMID:24096802

  5. High success rates of sedation-free brain MRI scanning in young children using simple subject preparation protocols with and without a commercial mock scanner-the Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet) experience

    Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Marzelli, Matt J.; Mazaika, Paul K.; Weinzimer, Stuart A.; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Cheng, Peiyao; Mauras, Nelly; Fox, Larry; Aye, Tandy; White, Neil H.; Tsalikian, Eva; Reiss, Allan L.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to lie still in an MRI scanner is essential for obtaining usable image data. To reduce motion, young children are often sedated, adding significant cost and risk. We assessed the feasibility of using a simple and affordable behavioral desensitization program to yield high-quality brain MRI scans in sedation-free children. 222 children (4-9.9 years), 147 with type 1 diabetes and 75 age-matched non-diabetic controls, participated in a multi-site study focused on effects of type 1 diabetes on the developing brain. T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI scans were performed. All children underwent behavioral training and practice MRI sessions using either a commercial MRI simulator or an inexpensive mock scanner consisting of a toy tunnel, vibrating mat, and video player to simulate the sounds and feel of the MRI scanner. 205 children (92.3%), mean age 7 ± 1.7 years had high-quality T1-W scans and 174 (78.4%) had high-quality diffusion-weighted scans after the first scan session. With a second scan session, success rates were 100% and 92.5% for T1-and diffusion-weighted scans, respectively. Success rates did not differ between children with type 1 diabetes and children without diabetes, or between centers using a commercial MRI scan simulator and those using the inexpensive mock scanner. Behavioral training can lead to a high success rate for obtaining high-quality T1-and diffusion-weighted brain images from a young population without sedation. (orig.)

  6. High success rates of sedation-free brain MRI scanning in young children using simple subject preparation protocols with and without a commercial mock scanner-the Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet) experience

    Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Marzelli, Matt J.; Mazaika, Paul K. [Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Weinzimer, Stuart A. [Yale University, Pediatric Endocrinology, New Haven, CT (United States); Ruedy, Katrina J.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Cheng, Peiyao [Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, FL (United States); Mauras, Nelly; Fox, Larry [Nemours Children' s Clinic, Pediatric Endocrinology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Aye, Tandy [Stanford University, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford, CA (United States); White, Neil H. [Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis, MO (United States); Tsalikian, Eva [University of Iowa, Pediatric Endocrinology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Reiss, Allan L. [Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet), Stanford, CA (United States); Collaboration: on behalf of the Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet)

    2014-02-15

    The ability to lie still in an MRI scanner is essential for obtaining usable image data. To reduce motion, young children are often sedated, adding significant cost and risk. We assessed the feasibility of using a simple and affordable behavioral desensitization program to yield high-quality brain MRI scans in sedation-free children. 222 children (4-9.9 years), 147 with type 1 diabetes and 75 age-matched non-diabetic controls, participated in a multi-site study focused on effects of type 1 diabetes on the developing brain. T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI scans were performed. All children underwent behavioral training and practice MRI sessions using either a commercial MRI simulator or an inexpensive mock scanner consisting of a toy tunnel, vibrating mat, and video player to simulate the sounds and feel of the MRI scanner. 205 children (92.3%), mean age 7 ± 1.7 years had high-quality T1-W scans and 174 (78.4%) had high-quality diffusion-weighted scans after the first scan session. With a second scan session, success rates were 100% and 92.5% for T1-and diffusion-weighted scans, respectively. Success rates did not differ between children with type 1 diabetes and children without diabetes, or between centers using a commercial MRI scan simulator and those using the inexpensive mock scanner. Behavioral training can lead to a high success rate for obtaining high-quality T1-and diffusion-weighted brain images from a young population without sedation. (orig.)

  7. Automated image quality assessment for chest CT scans.

    Reeves, Anthony P; Xie, Yiting; Liu, Shuang

    2018-02-01

    Medical image quality needs to be maintained at standards sufficient for effective clinical reading. Automated computer analytic methods may be applied to medical images for quality assessment. For chest CT scans in a lung cancer screening context, an automated quality assessment method is presented that characterizes image noise and image intensity calibration. This is achieved by image measurements in three automatically segmented homogeneous regions of the scan: external air, trachea lumen air, and descending aorta blood. Profiles of CT scanner behavior are also computed. The method has been evaluated on both phantom and real low-dose chest CT scans and results show that repeatable noise and calibration measures may be realized by automated computer algorithms. Noise and calibration profiles show relevant differences between different scanners and protocols. Automated image quality assessment may be useful for quality control for lung cancer screening and may enable performance improvements to automated computer analysis methods. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. A comparative study of radionuclide bone scan, X-ray and MRI on early femoral head necrosis in adults

    Liu Jihua; Ji Qinglian; Xu Aide; Zuo Shuyao; Gao Zhenhua

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To summarize radionuclide bone scan signs in the early femoral head necrosis (FHN) in adults, to compare them with MRI and X-ray findings and to discuss the pathological basis of radionuclide bone scan findings from the view of MRI. Methods: Forty cases (63 hips) with early FHN in adult patients proved by follow-up studies or pathology were analyzed. All patients underwent radionuclide bone scan, MRI and X-ray examination within a period of less than 7 d separately. Results: 1) Radionuclide bone scan manifestations of the early FHN corresponding to different MRI signs included: focally decreased uptake of radioisotope, focally increased uptake, atypical or typical doughnut sign, mildly increased uptake in the superior part of femoral head with band-like region of obviously increased uptake in inferior part of femoral head or femoral neck, and diffused increase of uptake in the whole head. 2) In 40 cases (63 hips), there was statistical difference in diagnosis early FHN in adults not only between radionuclide bone scan and X-ray but also between MRI and X-ray in sensitivity (P 0.05). Conclusions: 1) The atypical or typical doughnut sign and mildly increased uptake in the superior part of femoral head with band-like region of obviously increased uptake in inferior part of femoral head or neck are specific signs for diagnosing early FHN. 2) For sensitivity, radionuclide bone scan and MRI are equally superior to X-ray. (authors)

  9. EEG, CT scan and MRI as diagnostic tools for ADHD in population between 6 and 19 years: a systematic review

    José Calleja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is generally diagnosed based on the criteria of DSM-IV. Because several diagnostic tests have appeared such as electroencephalography (EEG, CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, there is a particular interest in determining the usefulness and diagnostic accuracy of these tests for the diagnosis of ADHD. Purpose: To identify, synthesize and evaluate the best available evidence on the usefulness of EEG, CT and MRI as a diagnostic tool in ADHD in the 6-19 year-old population. Methods: A systematic review of studies on diagnostic tests that assessed the validity, reliability and effectiveness of the implementation of EEG, CT and MRI in the diagnosis of ADHD in the 6-19 year-old population was conducted. Searches were done in PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane, DARE and National Guideline Clearinghouse databases, until February 2012, in English and Spanish. The articles that met the inclusion criteria were independently assessed by two investigators for methodological quality using standard checklists for review articles and diagnostic test articles. Results: Of the 115 studies found, eight studies were included, among which two medium-quality systematic reviews and a good-quality primary article on diagnostic tests. Additionally, five evidence-based clinical guidelines that address this issue were also included. Conclusions: The available evidence on the validity, reliability and effectiveness of the electroencephalogram, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, does not recommend their use as diagnostic tools for ADHD. Clinical practice guidelines do not recommend their use either. These tests are recommended for the assessment of the individual patient with the disorder.

  10. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    Roland N Boubela

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to true neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TR< 0.5s scanning may help to identify and eliminate physiologic components, increasing tSNR and functional contrast. In addition, biological variability can be studied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.. From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  11. Microcomputer-based image processing system for CT/MRI scans II

    Kwok, J.C.K.; Yu, P.K.N.; Cheng, A.Y.S.; Ho, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that a microcomputer-based image processing system is used to digitize and process serial sections of CT/MRI scan and reconstruct three-dimensional images of brain structures and brain lesions. The images grabbed also serve as templates and different vital regions with different risk values are also traced out for 3D reconstruction. A knowledge-based system employing rule-based programming has been built to help identifying brain lesions and to help planning trajectory for operations. The volumes of the lesions are also automatically determined. Such system is very useful for medical skills archival, tumor size monitoring, survival and outcome forecasting, and consistent neurosurgical planning

  12. High-resolution MRI of the labyrinth. Optimization of scan parameters with 3D-FSE

    Sakata, Motomichi; Harada, Kuniaki; Shirase, Ryuji; Kumagai, Akiko; Ogasawara, Masashi

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to optimize the parameters of high-resolution MRI of the labyrinth with a 3D fast spin-echo (3D-FSE) sequence. We investigated repetition time (TR), echo time (TE), Matrix, field of view (FOV), and coil selection in terms of CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) and SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) by comparing axial images and/or three-dimensional images. The optimal 3D-FSE sequence parameters were as follows: 1.5 Tesla MR unit (Signa LX, GE Medical Systems), 3D-FSE sequence, dual 3-inch surface coil, acquisition time=12.08 min, TR=5000 msec, TE=300 msec, 3 number of excitations (NEX), FOV=12 cm, matrix=256 x 256, slice thickness=0.5 mm/0.0 sp, echo train=64, bandwidth=±31.5 kHz. High-resolution MRI of the labyrinth using the optimized 3D-FSE sequence parameters permits visualization of important anatomic details (such as scala tympani and scala vestibuli), making it possible to determine inner ear anomalies and the patency of cochlear turns. To obtain excellent heavily T2-weighted axial and three-dimensional images in the labyrinth, high CNR, SNR, and spatial resolution are significant factors at the present time. Furthermore, it is important not only to optimize the scan parameters of 3D-FSE but also to select an appropriate coil for high-resolution MRI of the labyrinth. (author)

  13. Correlation of intra-articular osseous measurements with posterior cruciate ligament length on MRI scans.

    Orakzai, S H

    2010-01-01

    Six patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) rupture, based on a positive posterior drawer test, had a normal appearance of the PCL on an MRI scan. It is postulated that the PCL had been ruptured but healed in a lengthened state. 12 volunteers with no history of knee trauma underwent an MRI scan of the knee. In this control group (n = 12), there was a close correlation between the lateral femoral condylar width in the sagittal plane and the PCL length, with a ratio of 2:1 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.817-2.095). In the clinically abnormal group (n = 6), the ratio was 1.49:1 (95% CI = 1.206-1.782) (p< 0.0005). In conclusion, the ratio of the lateral femoral condylar width in the sagittal plane to the PCL length is a useful index for diagnosing PCL attenuation and lengthening in the presence of a normal morphological MR appearance.

  14. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    Boubela, Roland N.; Kalcher, Klaudius; Nasel, Christian; Moser, Ewald

    2014-02-01

    Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to "true" neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TRstudied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.). From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  15. Usefulness of ACR MRI phantom for quality assurance of MRI instruments

    Lee, Jung Whee; Ahn, Kook Jin; Lee, Seung Koo; Na, Dong Gyu; Oh, Chang Hyun; Chang, Yong Min; Lim, Tae Hwan

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether the ACR phantom could be used in quality standards for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments in Korea. We conducted the phantom test using the ACR MRI phantom in 20 MRI instruments currently used in Korea. According to ACR criteria, we acquired the phantom images which were then assessed by the following seven tests: geometric accuracy, high spatial resolution, slice thickness accuracy, slice position accuracy, image intensity uniformity, percent signal ghosting, and low contrast object detectability. The phantom images were interpreted by three experienced radiologists according to ACR criteria. Then, we examined the failure rate of each test and evaluated the inter-observer variation in the measurements and test failure. The failure rate of each test could be broken into the following components: geometric accuracy (11-21%), high contrast spatial resolution (10-15%), slice thickness accuracy(6-22%), slice position accuracy (5-17%), image intensity uniformity (6%), percent signal ghosting (16%), and low contrast object detectability (8-10%). In this series, all the failure rates were less than 30%. In addition, no inter-observer variation was seen in the measurements and test failure. ACR MRI phantom promises to be established as the standard phantom for MRI instruments in Korea because of its objectivity in assessing the phantom images

  16. Comparison of MRI fast SPGR single slice scan and continuous dynamic scan in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Zhang Xinyu [Department of Radiology, Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, Qingdao 266003 (China)], E-mail: myginny2@sina.com; Yang Xue [Department of Radiology, Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, Qingdao 266003 (China)], E-mail: yangxueqyfy@126.com; Hua Hui [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao (China)], E-mail: huahuisky@163.com; Chen Jingjing [Department of Radiology, Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, Qingdao 266003 (China)], E-mail: chenjingjingsky@126.com

    2009-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate the application value of MRI fast SPGR single slice scan in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome when comparing the images between fast SPGR single slice scan and continuous dynamic scan. Methods: Eighteen patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome were examined by fast SPGR single slice scan and continuous dynamic scan in turn. Fast SPGR single slice scans were conducted when the phases of apnea, inspiration and expiration appeared on the respiratory wave of the subjects. Fast SPGR continuous dynamic scans were conducted when the patients were awake and apneic. The scan planes were median sagittal plane and axial planes (the slice of middle part of palate, the slice of inferior part of palate, the slice of middle part of lingual root and the slice of 0.5 cm beneath the free margin of epiglottis). The obstructed sites and the cross-sectional areas of upper airway were compared between the two scan methods. Results: Seven cases showed complete obstruction at the narrowest sites of upper airway when apnea appeared; eleven cases showed marked decrease in cross-sectional areas at the narrowest sites compared with the areas when the patients were awake; two cases manifested multiple narrowness. The obstructed sites showed by the two scan methods were same. The difference of the cross-sectional areas of upper airway between the two scan methods was insignificant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Fast SPGR single slice scan can accurately reflect the obstructed sites of upper airway when the breath breaks off and is the complementary method of continuous dynamic scan. Sometimes, single slice scan can replace continuous dynamic scan.

  17. An Automated and Intelligent Medical Decision Support System for Brain MRI Scans Classification.

    Muhammad Faisal Siddiqui

    Full Text Available A wide interest has been observed in the medical health care applications that interpret neuroimaging scans by machine learning systems. This research proposes an intelligent, automatic, accurate, and robust classification technique to classify the human brain magnetic resonance image (MRI as normal or abnormal, to cater down the human error during identifying the diseases in brain MRIs. In this study, fast discrete wavelet transform (DWT, principal component analysis (PCA, and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM are used as basic components. Firstly, fast DWT is employed to extract the salient features of brain MRI, followed by PCA, which reduces the dimensions of the features. These reduced feature vectors also shrink the memory storage consumption by 99.5%. At last, an advanced classification technique based on LS-SVM is applied to brain MR image classification using reduced features. For improving the efficiency, LS-SVM is used with non-linear radial basis function (RBF kernel. The proposed algorithm intelligently determines the optimized values of the hyper-parameters of the RBF kernel and also applied k-fold stratified cross validation to enhance the generalization of the system. The method was tested by 340 patients' benchmark datasets of T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed medical decision support system outperformed all other modern classifiers and achieves 100% accuracy rate (specificity/sensitivity 100%/100%. Furthermore, in terms of computation time, the proposed technique is significantly faster than the recent well-known methods, and it improves the efficiency by 71%, 3%, and 4% on feature extraction stage, feature reduction stage, and classification stage, respectively. These results indicate that the proposed well-trained machine learning system has the potential to make accurate predictions about brain abnormalities

  18. The role of latency period in quality management for free-breathing coronary wall MRI.

    Lin, Kai; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Liu, Ying; Bi, Xiaoming; Lu, Biao; Li, Debiao; Carr, James C

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of the latency period on the performance of free-breathing coronary wall MRI. With the approval of IRB, 70 participants were recruited for coronary wall magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and provided written informed consent. In 35 subjects, right coronary segments (RCA1-3) were imaged first; in the remaining subjects, the left coronary segments (LM and LAD1-3) were imaged first. The images were classified into groups; group 1 contained right coronary images from the subjects whose right coronary segments were imaged first and left coronary images from the subjects whose left coronary segments were imaged first. Group 2 contained the other coronary segments. The image scores (ranked1-3), latency periods, drift of the position of the navigator (NAV), scan efficiency were compared between image groups. Image group 1 has higher scores (1.66 ± 0.55 vs. 1.46 ± 0.51), shorter latency periods (32.04 ± 4.24 vs. 44.22 ± 5.57 min), lower drift in the location of the NAV (1.90 ± 1.27 mm vs. 2.61 ± 1.71 mm) and higher scan efficiency (32.7 ± 7.6 vs. 29.9 ± 7.9%) than group 2. Long latency periods have a significantly negative impact on the image quality of coronary wall MRI.

  19. Developing optimized CT scan protocols: Phantom measurements of image quality

    Zarb, Francis; Rainford, Louise; McEntee, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The increasing frequency of computerized tomography (CT) examinations is well documented, leading to concern about potential radiation risks for patients. However, the consequences of not performing the CT examination and missing injuries and disease are potentially serious, impacting upon correct patient management. The ALARA principle of dose optimization must be employed for all justified CT examinations. Dose indicators displayed on the CT console as either CT dose index (CTDI) and/or dose length product (DLP), are used to indicate dose and can quantify improvements achieved through optimization. Key scan parameters contributing to dose have been identified in previous literature and in previous work by our group. The aim of this study was to optimize the scan parameters of mA; kV and pitch, whilst maintaining image quality and reducing dose. This research was conducted using psychophysical image quality measurements on a CT quality assurance (QA) phantom establishing the impact of dose optimization on image quality parameters. Method: Current CT scan parameters for head (posterior fossa and cerebrum), abdomen and chest examinations were collected from 57% of CT suites available nationally in Malta (n = 4). Current scan protocols were used to image a Catphan 600 CT QA phantom whereby image quality was assessed. Each scan parameter: mA; kV and pitch were systematically reduced until the contrast resolution (CR), spatial resolution (SR) and noise were significantly lowered. The Catphan 600 images, produced by the range of protocols, were evaluated by 2 expert observers assessing CR, SR and noise. The protocol considered as the optimization threshold was just above the setting that resulted in a significant reduction in CR and noise but not affecting SR at the 95% confidence interval. Results: The limit of optimization threshold was determined for each CT suite. Employing optimized parameters, CTDI and DLP were both significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.001) by

  20. Device localization and dynamic scan plane selection using a wireless MRI detector array

    Riffe, Matthew J.; Yutzy, Stephen R.; Jiang, Yun; Twieg, Michael D.; Blumenthal, Colin J.; Hsu, Daniel P.; Pan, Li; Gilson, Wesley D.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Flask, Christopher A.; Duerk, Jeffrey L.; Nakamoto, Dean; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A prototype wireless guidance device using single sideband amplitude modulation (SSB) is presented for a 1.5T MRI system. Methods The device contained three fiducial markers each mounted to an independent receiver coil equipped with wireless SSB technology. Acquiring orthogonal projections of these markers determined the position and orientation of the device, which was used to define the scan plane for a subsequent image acquisition. Device localization and scan plane update required approximately 30 ms, so it could be interleaved with high temporal resolution imaging. Since the wireless device is used for localization and doesn’t require full imaging capability, the design of the SSB wireless system was simplified by allowing an asynchronous clock between the transmitter and receiver. Results When coupled to a high readout bandwidth, the error caused by the lack of a shared frequency reference was quantified to be less than one pixel (0.78 mm) in the projection acquisitions. Image-guidance with the prototype was demonstrated with a phantom where a needle was successfully guided to a target and contrast was delivered. Conclusion The feasibility of active tracking with a wireless detector array is demonstrated. Wireless arrays could be incorporated into devices to assist in image-guided procedures. PMID:23900921

  1. MRI evaluation of the anterolateral ligament of the knee: assessment in routine 1.5-T scans

    Partezani Helito, Camilo; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Kawamura Demange, Marco; Partezani Helito, Paulo Victor; Pereira Costa, Hugo; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of routine 1.5-T MRI scans to visualize the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and describe its path and anatomic relations with lateral knee structures. Thirty-nine 1.5-T MRI scans of the knee were evaluated. The scans included an MRI knee protocol with T1-weighted sequences, T2-weighted sequences with fat saturation, and proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. Two radiologists separately reviewed all MRI scans to evaluate interobserver reliability. The ALL was divided into three portions for analyses: femoral, meniscal, and tibial. The path of the ALL was evaluated with regard to known structural parameters previously studied in this region. At least a portion of the ALL was visualized in 38 (97.8 %) cases. The meniscal portion was most visualized (94.8 %), followed by the femoral (89.7 %) and the tibial (79.4 %) portions. The three portions of the ALL were visualized in 28 (71.7 %) patients. The ALL was characterized with greater clarity on the coronal plane and was visualized as a thin, linear structure. The T1-weighted sequences showed a statistically inferior ligament visibility frequency. With regard to the T2 and PD evaluations, although the visualization frequency in PD was higher for the three portions of the ligament, only the femoral portion showed significant values. The ALL can be visualized in routine 1.5-T MRI scans. Although some of the ligament could be depicted in nearly all of the scans (97.4 %), it could only be observed in its entirety in about 71.7 % of the tests. (orig.)

  2. MRI evaluation of the anterolateral ligament of the knee: assessment in routine 1.5-T scans

    Partezani Helito, Camilo; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Kawamura Demange, Marco [University of Sao Paulo, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Knee Surgery Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Partezani Helito, Paulo Victor; Pereira Costa, Hugo; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo [University of Sao Paulo, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    This study evaluated the ability of routine 1.5-T MRI scans to visualize the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and describe its path and anatomic relations with lateral knee structures. Thirty-nine 1.5-T MRI scans of the knee were evaluated. The scans included an MRI knee protocol with T1-weighted sequences, T2-weighted sequences with fat saturation, and proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. Two radiologists separately reviewed all MRI scans to evaluate interobserver reliability. The ALL was divided into three portions for analyses: femoral, meniscal, and tibial. The path of the ALL was evaluated with regard to known structural parameters previously studied in this region. At least a portion of the ALL was visualized in 38 (97.8 %) cases. The meniscal portion was most visualized (94.8 %), followed by the femoral (89.7 %) and the tibial (79.4 %) portions. The three portions of the ALL were visualized in 28 (71.7 %) patients. The ALL was characterized with greater clarity on the coronal plane and was visualized as a thin, linear structure. The T1-weighted sequences showed a statistically inferior ligament visibility frequency. With regard to the T2 and PD evaluations, although the visualization frequency in PD was higher for the three portions of the ligament, only the femoral portion showed significant values. The ALL can be visualized in routine 1.5-T MRI scans. Although some of the ligament could be depicted in nearly all of the scans (97.4 %), it could only be observed in its entirety in about 71.7 % of the tests. (orig.)

  3. Combined Use of Tc-99m MIBI Scan and MRI for Evaluation of Active Lesions in Multiple Myeloma

    Mititelu, R.; Marinescu, G.; Iriciuc, M.; Rimbu, A.; Ghita, S.; Mazilu, C.; Murgoci, P.; Codorean, I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Multiple Myeloma is a malignancy of plasma cells, in which neoplastic bone involvement is one of the leading symptoms. Many researchers have been trying to develop new imaging modalities and new methods for detecting the bone involvement, mainly because apart from the fact that bone marrow infiltration is one of the diagnostic criteria, typical radiographic findings can be found only in 60 70% of pts with first diagnosis of MM, and 10% of pts can present only osteoporosis-like changes. Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of 99mTc-MIBI whole-body scan in diagnosis of Multiple Myeloma, in correlation with other imaging modalities, and mainly with MRI. Material and Method: We performed a retrospective review of 29 cases of Multiple Myeloma Patients, all of them in active stage of the disease. All of them underwent 99mTc-MIBI whole body scan, MRI examination of the spine and a bone scan. Diagnosis and staging of the disease was made by using standard criteria. MRI was performed mainly for imaging spinal cord compression and for morphological characterization of lesions. We obtained saggital and transverse images which included T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and STIR sequences. We performed whole body MIBI scan in anterior and posterior views, 10 - 20 min after IV injection of 500-550 MBq of 99mTc-MIBI, using a dual head gamma-camera Philips- Axis. Results: We obtained pathologic changes in 25/29 pts that underwent whole-body MIBI scan(86.75%), and in 27/29(89.65%) for the MRI. Bone scan shown pathologic uptake of radiotracer in 18/29 pts(62.06%). In 4 pts that demonstrated pathologic increased uptake of MIBI we found photopenic lesions on the bone scan which were missed at the first interpretation of the bone scan; these lesions were reported only after comparative evaluation of bone scan and MIBI scan.We found three different patterns of pathologic MIBI uptake: focal increased uptake of MIBI in different sites (9 pts), diffuse increased

  4. MRI quality assurance using the ACR phantom in a multi-unit imaging center

    Ihalainen, Toni M.; Kuusela, Linda J.; Savolainen, Sauli E.; Loennroth, Nadja T.; Peltonen, Juha I.; Uusi-Simola, Jouni K.; Timonen, Marjut H.; Sipilae, Outi E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instrumentation is vulnerable to technical and image quality problems, and quality assurance is essential. In the studied regional imaging center the long-term quality assurance has been based on MagNET phantom measurements. American College of Radiology (ACR) has an accreditation program including a standardized image quality measurement protocol and phantom. The ACR protocol includes recommended acceptance criteria for clinical sequences and thus provides possibility to assess the clinical relevance of quality assurance. The purpose of this study was to test the ACR MRI phantom in quality assurance of a multi-unit imaging center. Material and methods. The imaging center operates 11 MRI systems of three major manufacturers with field strengths of 3.0 T, 1.5 T and 1.0 T. Images of the ACR phantom were acquired using a head coil following the ACR scanning instructions. Both ACR T1- and T2-weighted sequences as well as T1- and T2-weighted brain sequences in clinical use at each site were acquired. Measurements were performed twice. The images were analyzed and the results were compared with the ACR acceptance levels. Results. The acquisition procedure with the ACR phantom was faster than with the MagNET phantoms. On the first and second measurement rounds 91% and 73% of the systems passed the ACR test. Measured slice thickness accuracies were not within the acceptance limits in site T2 sequences. Differences in the high contrast spatial resolution between the ACR and the site sequences were observed. In 3.0 T systems the image intensity uniformity was slightly lower than the ACR acceptance limit. Conclusion. The ACR method was feasible in quality assurance of a multi-unit imaging center and the ACR protocol could replace the MagNET phantom tests. An automatic analysis of the images will further improve cost-effectiveness and objectiveness of the ACR protocol

  5. Automatic Segmentation of Abdominal Fat in MRI-Scans, Using Graph-Cuts and Image Derived Energies

    Christensen, Anders Nymark; Larsen, Christian Thode; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria

    2017-01-01

    For many clinical studies changes in the abdominal distribution of fat is an important measure. However, the segmentation of abdominal fat in MRI scans is both difficult and time consuming using manual methods. We present here an automatic and flexible software package, that performs both bias fi...

  6. MRI quality control tools for procedures and analyses

    Di Nallo, A.M.; Ortenzia, O.; Benassi, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Coniglio, D.

    2006-01-01

    Quality control in MRI includes acceptance tests on the installation of a new scanner and tests representative of the system's performance during clinical practice.The first tests are time consuming and carried out to evaluate the agreement of the system with the prescribed procurement specifications. The second tests identify the equipment malfunction requiring maintenance are not time consuming and are suited to a busy clinical scanner. The paper evaluates the feasibility of the AAPM protocols and proposes procedures and practical tools to achieve this purpose.The MRI images, captured from the scanner and transferred in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format by a local network, are analyzed by computerized worksheets and commercial software

  7. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI.

    Rogier Alexander Feis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data acquisition and analysis, as fMRI data is particularly sensitive to structured noise resulting from hardware, software and environmental differences. Here, we investigated whether a novel clean up tool for structured noise was capable of reducing center-related R-fMRI differences between healthy subjects.We analyzed 3 Tesla R-fMRI data from 72 subjects, half of whom were scanned with eyes closed in a Philips Achieva system in The Netherlands, and half of whom were scanned with eyes open in a Siemens Trio system in the UK. After pre-statistical processing and individual Independent Component Analysis (ICA, FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX was used to remove noise components from the data. GICA and dual regression were run and non-parametric statistics were used to compare spatial maps between groups before and after applying FIX.Large significant differences were found in all resting-state networks between study sites before using FIX, most of which were reduced to non-significant after applying FIX. The between-center difference in the medial/primary visual network, presumably reflecting a between-center difference in protocol, remained statistically different.FIX helps facilitate multi-center R-fMRI research by diminishing structured noise from R-fMRI data. In doing so, it improves combination of existing data from different centers in new settings and comparison of rare diseases and risk genes for which adequate sample size remains a challenge.

  8. Clinical Evaluation of PET Image Quality as a Function of Acquisition Time in a New TOF-PET/MRI Compared to TOF-PET/CT--Initial Results.

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos G; Barbosa, Felipe; Hüllner, Martin; ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare only the performance of the PET component between a TOF-PET/CT (henceforth noted as PET/CT) scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MRI (henceforth noted as PET/MRI) scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of standardized uptake value (SUV) as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). The CT and MR image quality were not assessed, and that is beyond the scope of this study. Five brain and five whole-body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MRI acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of the emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts, and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in the white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed strong correlation between PET/CT and PET/MRI brain SUVs. Liver correlation was good, however, with lower uptake estimation in PET/MRI, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MRI offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artifacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole-body scans while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The TOF-PET/MRI showed higher image quality compared to TOF-PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, this result accounts mainly for body imaging, while no significant differences were found in brain imaging.

  9. High prevalence of brain pathology in violent prisoners: a qualitative CT and MRI scan study.

    Schiltz, Kolja; Witzel, Joachim G; Bausch-Hölterhoff, Josef; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and extent of brain anomalies in a large sample of incarcerated violent offenders not previously considered neuropsychiatrically ill, in comparison with non-violent offenders and non-offending controls. MRI and CT brain scans from 287 male prison inmates (162 violent and 125 non-violent) not diagnosed as mentally ill before that were obtained due to headache, vertigo or psychological complaints during imprisonment were assessed and compared to 52 non-criminal controls. Brain scans were rated qualitatively with respect to evidence of structural brain damage. Each case received a semiquantitative rating of "normal" (=0), "questionably abnormal" (=1) or "definitely abnormal" (=2) for the lateral ventricles, frontal/parietal cortex and medial temporal structures bilaterally as well as third ventricle. Overall, offenders displayed a significantly higher rate of morphological abnormality, with the violent offenders scoring significantly higher than non-violent offenders and controls. This difference was statistically detectable for frontal/parietal cortex, medial temporal structures, third ventricle and the left but not the right lateral ventricle. The remarkable prevalence of brain pathology in convicted violent prisoners detectable by neuroradiological routine assessment not only highlights the importance of frontal and temporal structures in the control of social, and specifically of violent behaviour, but also raises questions on the legal culpability of violent offenders with brain abnormalities. The high proportion of undetected presence of structural brain damage emphasizes the need that in violent criminals, the comprehensive routine neuropsychiatric assessment usually performed in routine forensic psychiatric expertises should be complemented with brain imaging.

  10. Accurate measurement of brain changes in longitudinal MRI scans using tensor-based morphometry.

    Hua, Xue; Gutman, Boris; Boyle, Christina P; Rajagopalan, Priya; Leow, Alex D; Yanovsky, Igor; Kumar, Anand R; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene E; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2011-07-01

    This paper responds to Thompson and Holland (2011), who challenged our tensor-based morphometry (TBM) method for estimating rates of brain changes in serial MRI from 431 subjects scanned every 6 months, for 2 years. Thompson and Holland noted an unexplained jump in our atrophy rate estimates: an offset between 0 and 6 months that may bias clinical trial power calculations. We identified why this jump occurs and propose a solution. By enforcing inverse-consistency in our TBM method, the offset dropped from 1.4% to 0.28%, giving plausible anatomical trajectories. Transitivity error accounted for the minimal remaining offset. Drug trial sample size estimates with the revised TBM-derived metrics are highly competitive with other methods, though higher than previously reported sample size estimates by a factor of 1.6 to 2.4. Importantly, estimates are far below those given in the critique. To demonstrate a 25% slowing of atrophic rates with 80% power, 62 AD and 129 MCI subjects would be required for a 2-year trial, and 91 AD and 192 MCI subjects for a 1-year trial. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An environmental scan of quality indicators in critical care.

    Valiani, Sabira; Rigal, Romain; Stelfox, Henry T; Muscedere, John; Martin, Claudio M; Dodek, Peter; Lamontagne, François; Fowler, Robert; Gheshmy, Afshan; Cook, Deborah J; Forster, Alan J; Hébert, Paul C

    2017-06-21

    We performed a directed environmental scan to identify and categorize quality indicators unique to critical care that are reported by key stakeholder organizations. We convened a panel of experts ( n = 9) to identify key organizations that are focused on quality improvement or critical care, and reviewed their online publications and website content for quality indicators. We identified quality indicators specific to the care of critically ill adult patients and then categorized them according to the Donabedian and the Institute of Medicine frameworks. We also noted the organizations' rationale for selecting these indicators and their reported evidence base. From 28 targeted organizations, we identified 222 quality indicators, 127 of which were unique. Of the 127 indicators, 63 (32.5%) were safety indicators and 61 (31.4%) were effectiveness indicators. The rationale for selecting quality indicators was supported by consensus for 58 (26.1%) of the 222 indicators and by published research evidence for 45 (20.3%); for 119 indicators (53.6%), the rationale was not reported or the reader was referred to other organizations' reports. Of the 127 unique quality indicators, 27 (21.2%) were accompanied by a formal grading of evidence, whereas for 52 (40.9%), no reference to evidence was provided. There are many quality indicators related to critical care that are available in the public domain. However, owing to a paucity of rationale for selection, supporting evidence and results of implementation, it is not clear which indicators should be adopted for use. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  12. Quality Assurance By Laser Scanning And Imaging Techniques

    SchmalfuB, Harald J.; Schinner, Karl Ludwig

    1989-03-01

    Laser scanning systems are well established in the world of fast industrial in-process quality inspection systems. The materials inspected by laser scanning systems are e.g. "endless" sheets of steel, paper, textile, film or foils. The web width varies from 50 mm up to 5000 mm or more. The web speed depends strongly on the production process and can reach several hundred meters per minute. The continuous data flow in one of different channels of the optical receiving system exceeds ten Megapixels/sec. Therefore it is clear that the electronic evaluation system has to process these data streams in real time and no image storage is possible. But sometimes (e.g. first installation of the system, change of the defect classification) it would be very helpful to have the possibility for a visual look on the original, i.e. not processed sensor data. At first we show the principle set up of a standard laser scanning system. Then we will introduce a large image memory especially designed for the needs of high-speed inspection sensors. This image memory co-operates with the standard on-line evaluation electronics and provides therefore an easy comparison between processed and non-processed data. We will discuss the basic system structure and we will show the first industrial results.

  13. Application of IQWorks for quality assurance in MRI

    Fazakerley, J.; Moores, B.; Brunt, J.; Reilly, A.; Brunt, J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments have made available free software tools that would expedite local quality assurance (QA) in MR imaging, incorporating nationally established methodology. Several free software packages for DICOM image analysis have been reviewed, specifically considering the availability of the analysis tools that are required to analyse MRI QA images, based on methodology described in the UK national guidance provided by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). IQWorks emerged as the most suitable software. Key advantages are provided by its analysis tree functionality which facilitates user-implementation (without the need for further programming) of automated or partially automated analysis schemes incorporating the IPEM methodology. Aspects of the analysis tree include automated ROI positioning relative to the position of a detected edge, and production of results as PDF reports. Results are presented here specifically for the analysis of SNR although the techniques employed are applicable to more general image quality parameters. Results were produced using images from actual scanners (various models), and compared with those obtained from other sources including propriety manufacturer software and other image analysis software. The use of analysis trees in IQWorks was found to provide faster image analysis which is automated without relying on manual placement. The conclusion was made that software tools which have recently become freely available, expedite development of local MRI QA incorporating nationally established methodology. (authors)

  14. MRI of the prostate. Recommendations on patient preparation and scanning protocol

    Franiel, Tobias; Quentin, Michael; Schimmoeller, Lars; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich Gerd; Asbach, Patrick; Roedel, Stefan; Willinek, Winfried; Hueper, Katja; Beyersdorff, Dirk; Roethke, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The Working Group Uroradiology and Urogenital Diagnosis of the German Roentgen Society has developed uniform recommendations for the preparation and implementation of prostate MRI. In the first part detailed recommendations are given in tabular form regarding 1. anamnestic data before prostate MRI, 2. termination of examinations and preparation of examinations, 3. examination protocol and 4. MRI-guided in-bore biopsy. In the second part, the recommendations are discussed in detail and relevant background information is provided.

  15. Combined bilateral idiopathic necrosis of the humerus and femur heads: Bone scan, X-ray, CT, and MRI findings

    Piepenburg, R.; Hahn, K.; Doll, G.; Grimm, J.

    1992-01-01

    Untreated aseptic bone necroses close to a joint commonly leads to severe secondary arthrosis and destruction of the joint within a short time. Therefore, only a diagnosis in an early stage of the disease offers the chance of a successful joint- preserving therapy. In cases of clinically suspected aseptic bone necrosis but still negative or doubtful X-ray findings, bone scans or MRI are reliable methods of verifying the diagnosis. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Visual Assessment of Brain Perfusion MRI Scans in Dementia: A Pilot Study.

    Fällmar, David; Lilja, Johan; Velickaite, Vilma; Danfors, Torsten; Lubberink, Mark; Ahlgren, André; van Osch, Matthias J P; Kilander, Lena; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2016-05-01

    Functional imaging is becoming increasingly important for the detection of neurodegenerative disorders. Perfusion MRI with arterial spin labeling (ASL) has been reported to provide promising diagnostic possibilities but is not yet widely used in routine clinical work. The aim of this study was to compare, in a clinical setting, the visual assessment of subtracted ASL CBF maps with and without additional smoothing, to FDG-PET data. Ten patients with a clinical diagnosis of dementia and 11 age-matched cognitively healthy controls were examined with pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Three diagnostic physicians visually assessed the pCASL maps after subtraction only, and after postprocessing using Gaussian smoothing and GLM-based beta estimate functions. The assessment scores were compared to FDG PET values. Furthermore, the ability to discriminate patients from healthy elderly controls was assessed. Smoothing improved the correlation between visually assessed regional ASL perfusion scores and the FDG PET SUV-r values from the corresponding regions. However, subtracted pCASL maps discriminated patients from healthy controls better than smoothed maps. Smoothing increased the number of false-positive patient identifications. Application of beta estimate functions had only a marginal effect. Spatial smoothing of ASL images increased false positive results in the discrimination of hypoperfusion conditions from healthy elderly. It also decreased interreader agreement. However, regional characterization and subjective perception of image quality was improved. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  17. Feasibility of geometric-intensity-based semi-automated delineation of the tentorium cerebelli from MRI scans.

    Penumetcha, Neeraja; Kabadi, Suraj; Jedynak, Bruno; Walcutt, Charles; Gado, Mokhtar H; Wang, Lei; Ratnanather, J Tilak

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes a feasibility study of a method for delineating the tentorium cerebelli in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans. The tentorium cerebelli is a thin sheet of dura matter covering the cerebellum and separating it from the posterior part of the temporal lobe and the occipital lobe of the cerebral hemispheres. Cortical structures such as the parahippocampal gyrus can be indistinguishable from tentorium in magnetized prepared rapid gradient echo and T1-weighted MRI scans. Similar intensities in these neighboring regions make it difficult to perform accurate cortical analysis in neuroimaging studies of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. A semi-automated, geometric, intensity-based procedure for delineating the tentorium from a whole-brain scan is described. Initial and final curves are traced within the tentorium. A cost function, based on intensity and Euclidean distance, is computed between the two curves using the Fast Marching method. The initial curve is then evolved to the final curve based on the gradient of the computed costs, generating a series of intermediate curves. These curves are then used to generate a triangulated surface of the tentorium. For 3 scans, surfaces were found to be within 2 voxels from hand segmentations. Copyright © 2009 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  18. The value of MRI, CAT-SCAN in evaluation of knee disorders

    Jerosch, J.; Castro, W.H.M.; Assheuer, J.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study is presented containing 107 examined knees. All patients subsequently underwent arthroscopy. The findings of arthroscopy were compared with those of CT and MRI. (author). 13 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  19. 'Peripheric' pancreatic cysts: performance of CT scan, MRI and endoscopy according to final pathological examination.

    Duconseil, P; Turrini, O; Ewald, J; Soussan, J; Sarran, A; Gasmi, M; Moutardier, V; Delpero, J R

    2015-06-01

    To assess the accuracy of pre-operative staging in patients with peripheral pancreatic cystic neoplasms (pPCNs). From 2005 to 2011, 148 patients underwent a pancreatectomy for pPCNs. The pre-operative examination methods of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) were compared for their ability to predict the suggested diagnosis accurately, and the definitive diagnosis was affirmed by pathological examination. A mural nodule was detected in 34 patients (23%): only 1 patient (3%) had an invasive pPCN at the final histological examination. A biopsy was performed in 79 patients (53%) during EUS: in 55 patients (70%), the biopsy could not conclude a diagnosis; the biopsy provided the correct and wrong diagnosis in 19 patients (24%) and 5 patients (6%), respectively. A correct diagnosis was affirmed by CT, EUS and pancreatic MRI in 60 (41%), 103 (74%) and 80 (86%) patients (when comparing EUS and MRI; P = 0.03), respectively. The positive predictive values (PPVs) of CT, EUS and MRI were 70%, 75% and 87%, respectively. Pancreatic MRI appears to be the most appropriate examination to diagnose pPCNs accurately. EUS alone had a poor PPV. Mural nodules in a PCN should not be considered an indisputable sign of pPCN invasiveness. © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  20. Case of herpes simplex encephalitis without neurologic symptoms. A comparison between CT scan and MRI

    Kawabata, N.; Tanaka, T.; Hiramoto, N.; Takazuka, K.; Komatsu, T.

    1987-03-01

    The lack of neurologic symptoms is rare in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). A 42-year-old woman presented with psychiatric features alone, such as Korsakoff syndrome and abortive type Kluver-Bucy syndrome. The diagnosis of HSE was confirmed by serologically elevated antibody titer. The patient underwent both X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray computed tomography showed transient contrast enhancement and low density area confined to the lateral lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse areas with a high MRI signal intensity. Considering that the lack of neurologic features, as seen in the present HSE patient, may sometimes rule out the possibility of parenchymal disease, imaging modalities, especially MRI, may be of value in the detection of lesions for HSE.

  1. Commissioning and quality control of a dedicated wide bore 3T MRI simulator for radiotherapy planning

    Aitang Xing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a practical approach to commissioning and quality assurance (QA of a dedicated wide-bore 3 Tesla (3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner for radiotherapy planning.Methods: A comprehensive commissioning protocol focusing on radiotherapy (RT specific requirements was developed and performed. RT specific tests included: uniformity characteristics of radio-frequency (RF coil, couch top attenuation, geometric distortion, laser and couch movement and an end-to-end radiotherapy treatment planning test. General tests for overall system performance and safety measurements were also performed.Results: The use of pre-scan based intensity correction increased the uniformity from 61.7% to 97% (body flexible coil, from 50% to 90% (large flexible coil and from 51% to 98% (small flexible coil. RT flat top couch decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by an average of 42%. The mean and maximum geometric distortion was found to be 1.25 mm and 4.08 mm for three dimensional (3D corrected image acquisition, 2.07 mm and 7.88 mm for two dimensional (2D corrected image acquisition over 500 mm × 375 mm × 252 mm field of view (FOV. The accuracy of the laser and couch movement was less than ±1 mm. The standard deviation of registration parameters for the end-to-end test was less than 0.41 mm. An on-going QA program was developed to monitor the system’s performance.Conclusion: A number of RT specific tests have been described for commissioning and subsequent performance monitoring of a dedicated MRI simulator (MRI-Sim. These tests have been important in establishing and maintaining its operation for RT planning.

  2. Application of 3D documentation and geometric reconstruction methods in traffic accident analysis: with high resolution surface scanning, radiological MSCT/MRI scanning and real data based animation.

    Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Braun, Marcel; Bolliger, Stephan; Friederich, Hans; Jackowski, Christian; Aghayev, Emin; Christe, Andreas; Vock, Peter; Dirnhofer, Richard; Thali, Michael J

    2007-07-20

    The examination of traffic accidents is daily routine in forensic medicine. An important question in the analysis of the victims of traffic accidents, for example in collisions between motor vehicles and pedestrians or cyclists, is the situation of the impact. Apart from forensic medical examinations (external examination and autopsy), three-dimensional technologies and methods are gaining importance in forensic investigations. Besides the post-mortem multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the documentation and analysis of internal findings, highly precise 3D surface scanning is employed for the documentation of the external body findings and of injury-inflicting instruments. The correlation of injuries of the body to the injury-inflicting object and the accident mechanism are of great importance. The applied methods include documentation of the external and internal body and the involved vehicles and inflicting tools as well as the analysis of the acquired data. The body surface and the accident vehicles with their damages were digitized by 3D surface scanning. For the internal findings of the body, post-mortem MSCT and MRI were used. The analysis included the processing of the obtained data to 3D models, determination of the driving direction of the vehicle, correlation of injuries to the vehicle damages, geometric determination of the impact situation and evaluation of further findings of the accident. In the following article, the benefits of the 3D documentation and computer-assisted, drawn-to-scale 3D comparisons of the relevant injuries with the damages to the vehicle in the analysis of the course of accidents, especially with regard to the impact situation, are shown on two examined cases.

  3. Movement correction of the kidney in dynamic MRI scans using FFT phase difference movement detection

    Giele, ELW; de Priester, JA; Blom, JA; den Boer, JA; van Engelshoven, JMA; Hasman, A; Geerlings, M

    2001-01-01

    To measure cortical and medullary MR renograms, regions of interest (ROIs) are placed on the kidney in images acquired using dynamic MRI. Since native kidneys move with breathing, and breath-holding techniques are not feasible, movement correction is necessary. In this contribution we compare three

  4. Development of a New Fractal Algorithm to Predict Quality Traits of MRI Loins

    Caballero, Daniel; Caro, Andrés; Amigo, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, the quality traits of meat products have been estimated by means of physico-chemical methods. Computer vision algorithms on MRI have also been presented as an alternative to these destructive methods since MRI is non-destructive, non-ionizing and innocuous. The use of fractals...

  5. MRI

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  6. Automated lesion detection on MRI scans using combined unsupervised and supervised methods

    Guo, Dazhou; Fridriksson, Julius; Fillmore, Paul; Rorden, Christopher; Yu, Hongkai; Zheng, Kang; Wang, Song

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and precise detection of brain lesions on MR images (MRI) is paramount for accurately relating lesion location to impaired behavior. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically detect brain lesions from a T1-weighted 3D MRI. The proposed method combines the advantages of both unsupervised and supervised methods. First, unsupervised methods perform a unified segmentation normalization to warp images from the native space into a standard space and to generate probability maps for different tissue types, e.g., gray matter, white matter and fluid. This allows us to construct an initial lesion probability map by comparing the normalized MRI to healthy control subjects. Then, we perform non-rigid and reversible atlas-based registration to refine the probability maps of gray matter, white matter, external CSF, ventricle, and lesions. These probability maps are combined with the normalized MRI to construct three types of features, with which we use supervised methods to train three support vector machine (SVM) classifiers for a combined classifier. Finally, the combined classifier is used to accomplish lesion detection. We tested this method using T1-weighted MRIs from 60 in-house stroke patients. Using leave-one-out cross validation, the proposed method can achieve an average Dice coefficient of 73.1 % when compared to lesion maps hand-delineated by trained neurologists. Furthermore, we tested the proposed method on the T1-weighted MRIs in the MICCAI BRATS 2012 dataset. The proposed method can achieve an average Dice coefficient of 66.5 % in comparison to the expert annotated tumor maps provided in MICCAI BRATS 2012 dataset. In addition, on these two test datasets, the proposed method shows competitive performance to three state-of-the-art methods, including Stamatakis et al., Seghier et al., and Sanjuan et al. In this paper, we introduced a novel automated procedure for lesion detection from T1-weighted MRIs by combining both an unsupervised and a

  7. MRI

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  8. Optimization of scan time in MRI for total hip prostheses. SEMAC tailoring for prosthetic implants containing different types of metals

    Deligianni, X. [University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland). Div. of Radiological Physics; Merian Iselin Klinik, Basel (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiology; Bieri, O. [University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland). Div. of Radiological Physics; Elke, R. [Orthomerian, Basel (Switzerland); Wischer, T.; Egelhof, T. [Merian Iselin Klinik, Basel (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiology

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of soft tissues after total hip arthroplasty is of clinical interest for the diagnosis of various pathologies that are usually invisible with other imaging modalities. As a result, considerable effort has been put into the development of metal artifact reduction MRI strategies, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC). Generally, the degree of metal artifact reduction with SEMAC directly relates to the overall time spent for acquisition, but there is no specific consensus about the most efficient sequence setup depending on the implant material. The aim of this article is to suggest material-tailored SEMAC protocol settings. Five of the most common total hip prostheses (1. Revision prosthesis (S-Rom), 2. Titanium alloy, 3. Mueller type (CoNiCRMo alloy), 4. Old Charnley prosthesis (Exeter/Stryker), 5. MS-30 stem (stainless-steel)) were scanned on a 1.5 T MRI clinical scanner with a SEMAC sequence with a range of artifact-resolving slice encoding steps (SES: 2 - 23) along the slice direction (yielding a total variable scan time ranging from 1 to 10 min). The reduction of the artifact volume in comparison with maximal artifact suppression was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively in order to establish a recommended number of steps for each case. The number of SES that reduced the artifact volume below approximately 300 mm{sup 3} ranged from 3 to 13, depending on the material. Our results showed that although 3 SES steps can be sufficient for artifact reduction for titanium prostheses, at least 11 SES should be used for prostheses made of materials such as certain alloys of stainless steel. Tailoring SES to the implant material and to the desired degree of metal artifact reduction represents a simple tool for workflow optimization of SEMAC imaging near total hip arthroplasty in a clinical setting.

  9. Optimization of scan time in MRI for total hip prostheses. SEMAC tailoring for prosthetic implants containing different types of metals

    Deligianni, X.; Wischer, T.; Egelhof, T.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of soft tissues after total hip arthroplasty is of clinical interest for the diagnosis of various pathologies that are usually invisible with other imaging modalities. As a result, considerable effort has been put into the development of metal artifact reduction MRI strategies, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC). Generally, the degree of metal artifact reduction with SEMAC directly relates to the overall time spent for acquisition, but there is no specific consensus about the most efficient sequence setup depending on the implant material. The aim of this article is to suggest material-tailored SEMAC protocol settings. Five of the most common total hip prostheses (1. Revision prosthesis (S-Rom), 2. Titanium alloy, 3. Mueller type (CoNiCRMo alloy), 4. Old Charnley prosthesis (Exeter/Stryker), 5. MS-30 stem (stainless-steel)) were scanned on a 1.5 T MRI clinical scanner with a SEMAC sequence with a range of artifact-resolving slice encoding steps (SES: 2 - 23) along the slice direction (yielding a total variable scan time ranging from 1 to 10 min). The reduction of the artifact volume in comparison with maximal artifact suppression was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively in order to establish a recommended number of steps for each case. The number of SES that reduced the artifact volume below approximately 300 mm 3 ranged from 3 to 13, depending on the material. Our results showed that although 3 SES steps can be sufficient for artifact reduction for titanium prostheses, at least 11 SES should be used for prostheses made of materials such as certain alloys of stainless steel. Tailoring SES to the implant material and to the desired degree of metal artifact reduction represents a simple tool for workflow optimization of SEMAC imaging near total hip arthroplasty in a clinical setting.

  10. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%–90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  11. MRI quality control: six imagers studied using eleven unified image quality parameters

    Ihalainen, T.; Sipilae, O.; Savolainen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Quality control of the magnetic resonance imagers of different vendors in the clinical environment is non-harmonised, and comparing the performance is difficult. The purpose of this study was to develop and apply a harmonised long-term quality control protocol for the six imagers in our organisation in order to assure that they fulfil the same basic image quality requirements. The same Eurospin phantom set and identical imaging parameters were used with each imager. Values of 11 comparable parameters describing the image quality were measured. Automatic image analysis software was developed to objectively analyse the images. The results proved that the imagers were operating at a performance level adequate for clinical imaging. Some deficiencies were detected in image uniformity and geometry. The automated analysis of the Eurospin phantom images was successful. The measurements were successfully repeated after 2 weeks on one imager and after half a year on all imagers. As an objective way of examining the image quality, this kind of comparable and objective quality control of different imagers is considered as an essential step towards harmonisation of the clinical MRI studies through a large hospital organisation. (orig.)

  12. Inflammatory pseudotumours of the liver--role of dynamic MRI scan and surgical exploration.

    Hasan, W

    2011-02-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumours of the liver are extremely rare benign lesions. They were first described by Pack and Baker in 1953. They usually present with raised inflammatory markers and nonspecific abdominal symptoms. Most of these lesions are picked up incidentally on ultrasound scans. Diagnosis of these lesions poses a dilemma and a challenge due to their radiological similarities to other liver lesions such as hepatocellular carcinoma HCC. In this article we describe our experience in its diagnosis and management.

  13. Image quality transfer and applications in diffusion MRI

    Alexander, Daniel C.; Zikic, Darko; Ghosh, Aurobrata

    2017-01-01

    and the uniquely rich diffusion MRI data set from the human connectome project (HCP). Results highlight potential benefits of IQT in both brain connectivity mapping and microstructure imaging. In brain connectivity mapping, IQT reveals, from standard data sets, thin connection pathways that tractography normally...

  14. Prediction of pork quality parameters by applying fractals and data mining on MRI

    Caballero, Daniel; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad; Caro, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    This work firstly investigates the use of MRI, fractal algorithms and data mining techniques to determine pork quality parameters non-destructively. The main objective was to evaluate the capability of fractal algorithms (Classical Fractal algorithm, CFA; Fractal Texture Algorithm, FTA and One...... Point Fractal Texture Algorithm, OPFTA) to analyse MRI in order to predict quality parameters of loin. In addition, the effect of the sequence acquisition of MRI (Gradient echo, GE; Spin echo, SE and Turbo 3D, T3D) and the predictive technique of data mining (Isotonic regression, IR and Multiple linear...... regression, MLR) were analysed. Both fractal algorithm, FTA and OPFTA are appropriate to analyse MRI of loins. The sequence acquisition, the fractal algorithm and the data mining technique seems to influence on the prediction results. For most physico-chemical parameters, prediction equations with moderate...

  15. The experience of patients participating in a small randomised control trial that explored two different interventions to reduce anxiety prior to an MRI scan.

    Tugwell-Allsup, J; Pritchard, A W

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports qualitative findings from within a larger randomised control trial where a video clip or telephone conversation with a radiographer was compared to routine appointment letter and information sheet to help alleviate anxiety prior to their MRI scan. Questionnaires consisting of three free-text response questions were administered to all of the 74 patients recruited to the MRI anxiety clinical trial. The questionnaire was designed to establish patients' experiences of the intervention they had received. These questionnaires were administered post-scan. Two participants from each trial arm were also interviewed. A thematic approach was utilised for identifying recurrent categories emerging from the qualitative data which are supported by direct quotations. Participants in the interventional groups commented positively about the provision of pre-MRI scan information they received and this was contrastable with the relatively indifferent responses observed among those who received the standard information letter. Many important themes were identified including the patients needs for clear and simplified information, the experience of anticipation when waiting for the scan, and also the informally acquired information about having an MRI scan i.e. the shared experiences of friends and family. All themes highlighted the need for an inclusive and individually tailored approach to pre-scan information provision. Qualitative data collected throughout the trial is supportive of the statistical findings, where it is asserted that the use of a short video clip or a radiographer having a short conversation with patients before their scan reduces pre-scan anxiety. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High-definition, single-scan 2D MRI in inhomogeneous fields using spatial encoding methods.

    Ben-Eliezer, Noam; Shrot, Yoav; Frydman, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    An approach has been recently introduced for acquiring two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance images in a single scan, based on the spatial encoding of the spin interactions. This article explores the potential of integrating this spatial encoding together with conventional temporal encoding principles, to produce 2D single-shot images with moderate field of views. The resulting "hybrid" imaging scheme is shown to be superior to traditional schemes in non-homogeneous magnetic field environments. An enhancement of previously discussed pulse sequences is also proposed, whereby distortions affecting the image along the spatially encoded axis are eliminated. This new variant is also characterized by a refocusing of T(2)(*) effects, leading to a restoration of high-definition images for regions which would otherwise be highly dephased and thus not visible. These single-scan 2D images are characterized by improved signal-to-noise ratios and a genuine T(2) contrast, albeit not free from inhomogeneity distortions. Simple postprocessing algorithms relying on inhomogeneity phase maps of the imaged object can successfully remove most of these residual distortions. Initial results suggest that this acquisition scheme has the potential to overcome strong field inhomogeneities acting over extended acquisition durations, exceeding 100 ms for a single-shot image.

  17. Effect of blood glucose levels on image quality in 18F fluorodeoxyglucose scanning - a case report

    Szeto, E.; Keane, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In December last year, a 71-year-old gentleman presented to the Nuclear Medicine Department at St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney for an FDG coincidence detection positron emission scan. The patient had cancer of the lung with a large lesion in the left upper lobe and a small lesion in the right middle lobe. On initial investigation, this patient had a blood sugar level of 17mmol/L which was eventually reduced to 6.7mmol/L just prior to scanning. The patient was then asked to return to be rescanned without his blood sugar levels being adjusted. Just prior to his second scan, his blood sugar level was 15.4mmollL. The aim of the initial scan being repeated was to see just how important a role blood sugar levels play in the quality of a Co Pet scan. The first scan showed excellent image quality while the repeated scan showed markedly inferior image quality due to unwanted soft tissue FDG uptake. In conclusion, blood sugar levels play a significant role in output image quality in FDG coincidence detection positron emission scanning. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  18. Quality assurance of lower limb venous duplex scans performed by vascular surgeons.

    Kordowicz, A; Ferguson, G; Salaman, R; Onwudike, M

    2015-02-01

    Duplex scanning is the gold standard for investigating venous reflux; increasingly surgeons perform these scans themselves. There has been no data published analysing the accuracy of Duplex scans performed by vascular surgeons. We aimed to evaluate an objective method of comparing the results of lower limb Duplex scans performed by one consultant vascular surgeon with those performed by a vascular technologist. We assessed 100 legs with symptomatic varicose veins. Each patient underwent two lower limb venous Duplex scans; one performed by a consultant vascular surgeon and one by a vascular technologist. Scan results were randomised and sent to two consultant vascular surgeons blinded to the identity and experience of the sonographer. They were asked to recommend treatment. A k score was calculated in each case to assess the level of agreement between the scans performed by the consultant and the technologist. Eighty-one patients were studied (53 females). The kappa score for assessor 1 was 0.60 (95%CI:0.44-0.75) and for assessor 2 was 0.62 (95%CI:0.48-0.75). k scores >0.60 represent a substantial strength of agreement. Duplex scans performed by this surgeon were comparable to those performed by a vascular technologist. It is possible to quality-assure duplex performed by vascular surgeons without directly observing the scanning process or reviewing digitally recorded images. We propose standardisation of training, assessment and quality assurance for vascular surgeons wishing to perform ultrasound scans.

  19. Stationary Wavelet Transform and AdaBoost with SVM Based Pathological Brain Detection in MRI Scanning.

    Nayak, Deepak Ranjan; Dash, Ratnakar; Majhi, Banshidhar

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic classification system for segregating pathological brain from normal brains in magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The proposed system employs contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization scheme to enhance the diseased region in brain MR images. Two-dimensional stationary wavelet transform is harnessed to extract features from the preprocessed images. The feature vector is constructed using the energy and entropy values, computed from the level- 2 SWT coefficients. Then, the relevant and uncorrelated features are selected using symmetric uncertainty ranking filter. Subsequently, the selected features are given input to the proposed AdaBoost with support vector machine classifier, where SVM is used as the base classifier of AdaBoost algorithm. To validate the proposed system, three standard MR image datasets, Dataset-66, Dataset-160, and Dataset- 255 have been utilized. The 5 runs of k-fold stratified cross validation results indicate the suggested scheme offers better performance than other existing schemes in terms of accuracy and number of features. The proposed system earns ideal classification over Dataset-66 and Dataset-160; whereas, for Dataset- 255, an accuracy of 99.45% is achieved. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Brain tissue- and region-specific abnormalities on volumetric MRI scans in 21 patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS

    Johnston Jennifer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS is a heterogeneous human disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and characterized by the primary findings of obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, and learning and behavioural problems. BBS mouse models have a neuroanatomical phenotype consisting of third and lateral ventriculomegaly, thinning of the cerebral cortex, and reduction in the size of the corpus striatum and hippocampus. These abnormalities raise the question of whether humans with BBS have a characteristic morphologic brain phenotype. Further, although behavioral, developmental, neurological and motor defects have been noted in patients with BBS, to date, there are limited reports of brain findings in BBS. The present study represents the largest systematic evaluation for the presence of structural brain malformations and/or progressive changes, which may contribute to these functional problems. Methods A case-control study of 21 patients, most aged 13-35 years, except for 2 patients aged 4 and 8 years, who were diagnosed with BBS by clinical criteria and genetic analysis of known BBS genes, and were evaluated by qualitative and volumetric brain MRI scans. Healthy controls were matched 3:1 by age, sex and race. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS language with SAS STAT procedures. Results All 21 patients with BBS were found to have statistically significant region- and tissue-specific patterns of brain abnormalities. There was 1 normal intracranial volume; 2 reduced white matter in all regions of the brain, but most in the occipital region; 3 preserved gray matter volume, with increased cerebral cortex volume in only the occipital lobe; 4 reduced gray matter in the subcortical regions of the brain, including the caudate, putamen and thalamus, but not in the cerebellum; and 5 increased cerebrospinal fluid volume. Conclusions There are distinct and characteristic abnormalities in tissue- and region- specific volumes

  1. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI

    R.A. Feis (Rogier A.); S.M. Smith (Stephen); N. Filippini (Nicola); G. Douaud (Gwenaëlle); E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); V. Heise (Verena); A.J. Trachtenberg (Aaron J.); J.C. van Swieten (John); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); S.A.R.B. Rombouts (Serge); C.E. Mackay (Clare E.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractResting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data

  2. Wavelet entropy and directed acyclic graph support vector machine for detection of patients with unilateral hearing loss in MRI scanning

    Shuihua Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available (Aim Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is correlated to many neurodegenerative disease. Now more and more computer vision based methods are using to detect it in an automatic way. (Materials We have in total 49 subjects, scanned by 3.0T MRI (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany. The subjects contain 14 patients with right-sided hearing loss (RHL, 15 patients with left-sided hearing loss (LHL, and 20 healthy controls (HC. (Method We treat this as a three-class classification problem: RHL, LHL, and HC. Wavelet entropy (WE was selected from the magnetic resonance images of each subjects, and then submitted to a directed acyclic graph support vector machine (DAG-SVM. (Results The 10 repetition results of 10-fold cross validation shows 3-level decomposition will yield an overall accuracy of 95.10% for this three-class classification problem, higher than feedforward neural network, decision tree, and naive Bayesian classifier. (Conclusions This computer-aided diagnosis system is promising. We hope this study can attract more computer vision method for detecting hearing loss.

  3. Correlation between image quality of CT scan and amount of intravenous contrast media

    Yoon, Dae Young; Choi, Dae Seob; Kim, Seung Hyup; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Im, Jung Gi; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Jong Hyo; Han, Man Chung

    1993-01-01

    A blind, comparative clinical study was performed prospectively to examine the correlation between image quality of CT scan in terms of contrast enhancement effect and amount of intravenous contrast media. A total of 357 patients were randomized into two groups. Ionic high-osmolality contrast media (68% meglumine ioglicate) was administered intravenously as 100 ml bolus in one group and as 50 ml bolus in the other group. Statistically significant differences of image quality were found in CT scans of the brain, head and neck, chest and abdomen (p 0.05). We suggest that amount of contrast media may be reduced in pelvis CT without significant degradation of image quality

  4. Prospective Comparison of F-18 Choline PET/CT Scan Versus Axial MRI for Detecting Bone Metastasis in Biochemically Relapsed Prostate Cancer Patients

    Wouter Huysse

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared fluor-18 choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT and axial skeleton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI prospectively obtained for the detection of bone metastases in non-castrated patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer following primary treatment. PET/CT was performed 45 min post-injection of 3–4 MBq/kg F-18 methyl choline. MRI included T1- and fluid sensitive T2-weighted images of the spine and pelvis. Readers were initially blinded from other results and all scans underwent independent double reading. The best valuable comparator (BVC defined the metastatic status. On the basis of the BVC, 15 out of 64 patients presented with 24 bone metastases. On a patient level, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and PET were not significantly different. On a lesion level, the sensitivity of MRI was significantly better compared to PET, and the specificity did not differ significantly. In conclusion, axial MRI is an interesting screening tool for the detection of bone metastases because of its low probability of false negative results. However, F-18 choline PET is a valuable addition as it can overrule false positive MRI results and detect non-axial metastases.

  5. Image quality transfer and applications in diffusion MRI

    Alexander, Daniel C.; Zikic, Darko; Ghosh, Aurobrata

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a new computational imaging technique called image quality transfer (IQT). IQT uses machine learning to transfer the rich information available from one-off experimental medical imaging devices to the abundant but lower-quality data from routine acquisitions. The procedure u...

  6. Citrus Quality Control: An NMR/MRI Problem-Based Experiment

    Erhart, Sarah E.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.; Yezierski, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    An experiment seated in an industrial context can provide an engaging framework and unique learning opportunity for an upper-division physical chemistry laboratory. An experiment that teaches NMR/MRI through a problem-based quality control of citrus products was developed. In this experiment, using a problem-based learning (PBL) approach, students…

  7. Analysis on the value of the multi-slice spiral CT and MRI scanning for applying to the identifying diagnosis of the new and old vertebral compresion fracture

    Huo Zhiyi; Gao Shuming; Li Dasheng; Pei Lijun; Qu Hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze and explore the value of the mutislice spiral CT (MSCT) scanning, its reconstructive technology and MRI scanning for applying to the identifying diagnosis of new and old vertebral compresion fracture. Methods: One hundred and sixty-seven cases with the new and old vertebral compresion fracture who have 189 vertebrae in total were examined using the MSCT scanning, their imaging information were postprocessed with 2D and 3D reconstruction at the work station. Thirty-four patients with overall 43 vertebrae were carried out by MRI scanning and their images were compared with those of MSCT. Results: They had the highest proportion of vertebrae in L1 with accounting for 27.68% (31/112) and 35.06% (27/77) among the patients with new and old vertebral compresion fracture, respectively. The next was T12, L2 and T11. There were statistically significant differences between new and old cases in such appearance as fracture line clear and sharp (102 and 21), contusion and hemorrhage of spinal cord (15 and 0), parenchyma shadow beside vertebrae(103 and 11), appendant fracture(26 and 5), organ's lacerated wound around vertebral body (30 and 0), discus intervertebrales vacuum (10 and 36), derangement and hardening of vertebral bone trabecularism (29 and 51) (P 1 WI signal, 27 vertebrae with the T 2 WI fat-suppresion irregular high signal were demonstrated in MRI scanning among 27 vertebrae of 21 cases with new vertebral compresion fracture. While 16 vertebrae with the T 1 WI and T 2 WI signals were the same as those of the normal vertebrae, 16 vertebrae were the T 2 WI fat-suppresion low signal among 13 cases with old vertebral compresion fracture. Conclusions: The MSCT plays an important role in identifying diagnosis for the most of the patients with the new and old vertebral compresion fracture, while MRI scanning may reflect the pathophysiological characteristics in diagnosis of the spinal cord and the ligament lesion. Therefore, the MSCT and MRI scanning

  8. SU-E-J-220: Assessment of MRI Geometric Distortion in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Scanned in Immobilized Radiation Treatment Position

    Hansen, C; Mohamed, A; Weygand, J; Ding, Y; Fuller, C; Frank, S; Wang, J [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Uncertainties about geometric distortion have somewhat hindered MRI simulation in radiation therapy. Most of the geometric distortion studies were performed with phantom measurements but another major aspect of MR distortion is patient related. We studied the geometric distortion in patient images by comparing their MRI scans with the corresponding CT, using CT as the non-distorted gold standard. Methods: Ten H&N cancer patients were imaged with MRI as part of a prospective IRB approved study. All patients had their treatment planning CT done on the same day or within one week of the MRI. MR Images were acquired with a T2 SE sequence (1×1×2.5mm voxel size) in the same immobilization position as in the CT scans. MRI to CT rigid registration was then done and geometric distortion comparison was done by measuring the corresponding anatomical landmarks on both the MRI and the CT images by two observers. Several skin to skin (9 landmarks), bone to bone (8 landmarks), and soft tissue (3 landmarks) were measured at specific levels in horizontal and vertical planes of both scans. Results: The mean distortion for all landmark measurements in all scans was 1.8±1.9mm. For each patient 11 measurements were done in the horizontal plane while 9 were done in the vertical plane. The measured geometric distortion were significantly lower in the horizontal axis compared to the vertical axis (1.3±0.16 mm vs 2.2±0.19 mm, respectively, P=0.003*). The magnitude of distortion was lower in the bone to bone landmarks compared to the combined soft tissue and skin to skin landmarks (1.2±0.19 mm vs 2.3±0.17 mm, P=0.0006*). The mean distortion measured by observer one was not significantly different compared toobserver 2 (2.3 vs 2.4 mm, P=0.4). Conclusion: MRI geometric distortions were quantified in H&N patients with mean error of less than 2 mm. JW received a corporate sponsored research grant from Elekta.

  9. MRI of the prostate. Recommendations on patient preparation and scanning protocol; MRT der Prostata. Empfehlungen zur Vorbereitung und Durchfuehrung

    Franiel, Tobias [University Hospital Jena (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Quentin, Michael; Schimmoeller, Lars [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich Gerd [Munich Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Asbach, Patrick [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Roedel, Stefan [Staedtisches Klinikum Dresden Friedrichstadt (Germany). Radiology; Willinek, Winfried [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiology; Hueper, Katja [Hannover Medical School (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Beyersdorff, Dirk [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Roethke, Matthias [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiology

    2017-01-15

    The Working Group Uroradiology and Urogenital Diagnosis of the German Roentgen Society has developed uniform recommendations for the preparation and implementation of prostate MRI. In the first part detailed recommendations are given in tabular form regarding 1. anamnestic data before prostate MRI, 2. termination of examinations and preparation of examinations, 3. examination protocol and 4. MRI-guided in-bore biopsy. In the second part, the recommendations are discussed in detail and relevant background information is provided.

  10. Cervical MRI scan

    ... the bones and cartilage in the neck ( cervical spondylosis ) Abnormal results may also be due to: Bone ... Park AL. Degenerative disorders of the thoracic and lumbar spine. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, Canale ST, ...

  11. Breast MRI scan

    ... or breast ultrasound Evaluate for possible rupture of breast implants Find any cancer that remains after surgery or chemotherapy Show blood ... Mean Abnormal results may be due to: Breast cancer Cysts Leaking or ruptured breast implants Abnormal breast tissue that is not cancer Scar ...

  12. Pelvis MRI scan

    ... be used to help stage cervical, uterine, bladder, rectal, prostate and testicular cancers. Normal Results A normal ... Copyright 1997-2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing ...

  13. Shoulder MRI scan

    ... exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder replacement - discharge Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your shoulder after replacement surgery References Hanypsiak B, DeLong JM, Lowe WR. Scapulothoracic ...

  14. Dental-CT: image quality and absorbed radiation dose of different scan protocols

    Schorn, C.; Alamo, L.; Funke, M.; Grabbe, E.; Visser, H.; Hermann, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a scan protocol for dental-CT which guarantees good image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose. Methods: In an experimental investigation Dental-CT (HSA, GE, Milwaukee, USA) of the mandible of two human skeletons positioned in a water tank were performed in order to define the most advantageous scan protocol. Tube currents ranged from 40 to 200 mA and the scan technique was modified (axial mode or helical mode with pitches of 1 to 3 and corresponding increments of 0.4 to 1.0 mm). 39 patients underwent a dental-CT with decreased current (80 mA) in the helical scan mode (pitch 2, slice thickness 1 mm). Dose measurements were performed for two different scan protocols (A: axial, 130 mAs, B: helical, 80 mA, pitch 2). Results: The preliminary investigations of image quality showed only a minor effect of the applied current. For the helical scan mode, pitches of more than 2 impaired image quality. A low increment had no advantages. There were no disadvantages in clinical practice using protocol B with decreased tube current. Absorbed radiation dose of dental CT performed with protocol B was decreased to one third in comparison to protocol A. Conclusions: A scan protocol with a low tube current (e.g., 80 mA, for a rotation time of 1 s) and a helical scan mode (e.g., for a slice thickness of 1 mm with a pitch of 2 and an increment of 1 mm) is recommended for performing dental-CT. (orig.) [de

  15. Gastric visualization and image quality in radionuclide bone scanning: concise communication

    Wilson, M.A.; Pollack, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    In a 12-mo study period, there were 14 days identified when the stomach was visualized in routine bone imaging. On these days, 44% of the 110 patients imaged demonstrated this effect. Only the quality control, binding efficiency, and scan quality differed (p less than 0.005) when the study population was compared with a reference population of 162 patients. However, on the days when this effect was noted, there was a significant (p less than 0.001) linear correlation between the presence and degree of gastric visualization and the radiopharmaceutical incubation and quality control parameters. The study suggests a sporadic phenomenon that appears to result from partial oxidation of the agent during incubation, producing (a) different species of labeled diphosphonate that display altered affinity for bone (scan quality) and (b) free pertechnetate

  16. Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis using a slot scanning technique: Fixed-focus reconstruction and the resulting image quality

    Shibata, Koichi; Notohara, Daisuke; Sakai, Takihito

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis (PS-TS) is a novel technique that fuses the slot scanning technique and the conventional tomosynthesis (TS) technique. This approach allows one to obtain long-view tomosynthesis images in addition to normally sized tomosynthesis images, even when using a system that has no linear tomographic scanning function. The reconstruction technique and an evaluation of the resulting image quality for PS-TS are described in this paper. Methods: The PS-TS image-reconstruction technique consists of several steps (1) the projection images are divided into strips, (2) the strips are stitched together to construct images corresponding to the reconstruction plane, (3) the stitched images are filtered, and (4) the filtered stitched images are back-projected. In the case of PS-TS using the fixed-focus reconstruction method (PS-TS-F), one set of stitched images is used for the reconstruction planes at all heights, thus avoiding the necessity of repeating steps (1)–(3). A physical evaluation of the image quality of PS-TS-F compared with that of the conventional linear TS was performed using a R/F table (Sonialvision safire, Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto, Japan). The tomographic plane with the best theoretical spatial resolution (the in-focus plane, IFP) was set at a height of 100 mm from the table top by adjusting the reconstruction program. First, the spatial frequency response was evaluated at heights of −100, −50, 0, 50, 100, and 150 mm from the IFP using the edge of a 0.3-mm-thick copper plate. Second, the spatial resolution at each height was visually evaluated using an x-ray test pattern (Model No. 38, PTW Freiburg, Germany). Third, the slice sensitivity at each height was evaluated via the wire method using a 0.1-mm-diameter tungsten wire. Phantom studies using a knee phantom and a whole-body phantom were also performed. Results: The spatial frequency response of PS-TS-F yielded the best results at the IFP and degraded slightly as the

  17. Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis using a slot scanning technique: fixed-focus reconstruction and the resulting image quality.

    Shibata, Koichi; Notohara, Daisuke; Sakai, Takihito

    2014-11-01

    Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis (PS-TS) is a novel technique that fuses the slot scanning technique and the conventional tomosynthesis (TS) technique. This approach allows one to obtain long-view tomosynthesis images in addition to normally sized tomosynthesis images, even when using a system that has no linear tomographic scanning function. The reconstruction technique and an evaluation of the resulting image quality for PS-TS are described in this paper. The PS-TS image-reconstruction technique consists of several steps (1) the projection images are divided into strips, (2) the strips are stitched together to construct images corresponding to the reconstruction plane, (3) the stitched images are filtered, and (4) the filtered stitched images are back-projected. In the case of PS-TS using the fixed-focus reconstruction method (PS-TS-F), one set of stitched images is used for the reconstruction planes at all heights, thus avoiding the necessity of repeating steps (1)-(3). A physical evaluation of the image quality of PS-TS-F compared with that of the conventional linear TS was performed using a R/F table (Sonialvision safire, Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto, Japan). The tomographic plane with the best theoretical spatial resolution (the in-focus plane, IFP) was set at a height of 100 mm from the table top by adjusting the reconstruction program. First, the spatial frequency response was evaluated at heights of -100, -50, 0, 50, 100, and 150 mm from the IFP using the edge of a 0.3-mm-thick copper plate. Second, the spatial resolution at each height was visually evaluated using an x-ray test pattern (Model No. 38, PTW Freiburg, Germany). Third, the slice sensitivity at each height was evaluated via the wire method using a 0.1-mm-diameter tungsten wire. Phantom studies using a knee phantom and a whole-body phantom were also performed. The spatial frequency response of PS-TS-F yielded the best results at the IFP and degraded slightly as the distance from the IFP increased. A

  18. Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis using a slot scanning technique: Fixed-focus reconstruction and the resulting image quality

    Shibata, Koichi, E-mail: shibatak@suzuka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science 1001-1, Kishioka-cho, Suzuka 510-0293 (Japan); Notohara, Daisuke; Sakai, Takihito [R and D Department, Medical Systems Division, Shimadzu Corporation 1, Nishinokyo-Kuwabara-cho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis (PS-TS) is a novel technique that fuses the slot scanning technique and the conventional tomosynthesis (TS) technique. This approach allows one to obtain long-view tomosynthesis images in addition to normally sized tomosynthesis images, even when using a system that has no linear tomographic scanning function. The reconstruction technique and an evaluation of the resulting image quality for PS-TS are described in this paper. Methods: The PS-TS image-reconstruction technique consists of several steps (1) the projection images are divided into strips, (2) the strips are stitched together to construct images corresponding to the reconstruction plane, (3) the stitched images are filtered, and (4) the filtered stitched images are back-projected. In the case of PS-TS using the fixed-focus reconstruction method (PS-TS-F), one set of stitched images is used for the reconstruction planes at all heights, thus avoiding the necessity of repeating steps (1)–(3). A physical evaluation of the image quality of PS-TS-F compared with that of the conventional linear TS was performed using a R/F table (Sonialvision safire, Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto, Japan). The tomographic plane with the best theoretical spatial resolution (the in-focus plane, IFP) was set at a height of 100 mm from the table top by adjusting the reconstruction program. First, the spatial frequency response was evaluated at heights of −100, −50, 0, 50, 100, and 150 mm from the IFP using the edge of a 0.3-mm-thick copper plate. Second, the spatial resolution at each height was visually evaluated using an x-ray test pattern (Model No. 38, PTW Freiburg, Germany). Third, the slice sensitivity at each height was evaluated via the wire method using a 0.1-mm-diameter tungsten wire. Phantom studies using a knee phantom and a whole-body phantom were also performed. Results: The spatial frequency response of PS-TS-F yielded the best results at the IFP and degraded slightly as the

  19. Registration accuracy and image quality of time averaged mid-position CT scans for liver SBRT

    Kruis, Matthijs F.; van de Kamer, Jeroen B.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Jansen, Edwin P. M.; van Herk, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to validate the accuracy of motion models derived from deformable registration from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and breath-hold contrast enhanced computed tomography (BHCCT) scans for liver SBRT. Additionally, the image quality of the time averaged mid-position (MidP)

  20. Sensitivity and specificity of CT- and MRI-scanning in evaluation of occult fracture of the proximal femur

    Haubro, M; Stougaard, C; Torfing, T

    2015-01-01

    AND METHODS: 67 patients (27 males, 40 females, mean age 80.5) seen in the emergency room with hip pain after fall, inability to stand and a primary X-ray without fracture were evaluated with both CT and MRI. The images were analysed by a senior consulting musculoskeletal radiologist, a resident in radiology...... and a resident in orthopaedic surgery. Sensitivity and specificity were estimated with MRI as the golden standard. Kappa value was used to assess level of agreement in both MRI and CT finding. RESULTS: 15 fractures of the proximal femur were found (7 intertrochanteric-, 3 femoral neck and 5 fractures...

  1. VISARTTM superconducting MRI system

    Usui, Yoshiyuki; Goro, Takehiko; Yamagata, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed VISART TM , a 1.5 T high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system based on technology developed for both the FLEXART TM (0.5T) and MRT-200/GP (1.5T) systems as the first and second products, respectively, of a new series of MRI systems. VISART TM is a newly coined word combining VISion and state-of-the-ART. A higher power gradient system and new high-speed imaging techniques have been developed to meet the market demand for higher resolution images and shorter scan times. The product concepts of VISART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, flexible clinical application, and ease of use, all of which are essential features for an MRI system in the high-field MRI market segment. (author)

  2. Long-distance longitudinal prostate MRI quality assurance: from startup to 12 months.

    Curci, Nicole E; Gartland, Patrick; Shankar, Prasad R; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Miller, David C; George, Arvin K; Davenport, Matthew S

    2018-02-22

    To evaluate a 12-month long-distance prostate MRI quality assurance (QA) program. The need for IRB approval was waived for this prospective longitudinal QA effort. One academic institution experienced with prostate MRI [~ 1000 examinations/year (Site 2)] partnered with a private institution 240 miles away that was starting a new prostate MRI program (Site 1). Site 1 performed all examinations (N = 249). Four radiologists at Site 1 created finalized reports, then sent images and reports to Site 2 for review on a rolling basis. One radiologist at Site 2 reviewed findings and exam quality and discussed results by phone (~ 2-10 minutes/MRI). In months 1-6 all examinations were reviewed. In months 7-12 only PI-RADS ≤ 2 and 'difficult' cases were reviewed. Repeatability was assessed with intra-class correlation (ICC). 'Clinically significant cancer' was Gleason ≥ 7. Image quality significantly (p < 0.001) improved after the first three months. Inter-rater agreement also improved in months 3-4 [ICC: 0.849 (95% CI 0.744-0.913)] and 5-6 [ICC: 0.768 (95% CI 0.619-0.864)] compared to months 1-2 [ICC: 0.621 (95% CI 0.436-0.756)]. PI-RADS ≤ 2 examinations were reclassified PI-RADS ≥ 3 in 19% (30/162); of these, 23 had post-MRI histology and 57% (13/23) had clinically significant cancer (5.2% of 249). False-negative examinations [N = 18 (PI-RADS ≤ 2 and Gleason ≥ 7)] were more common at Site 1 during months 1-6 [9% (14/160) vs. 4% (4/89)]. Positive predictive values for PI-RADS ≥ 3 were similar. Remote quality assurance of prostate MRI is feasible and useful, enabling new programs to gain durable skills with minimal risk to patients.

  3. Structured reporting of MRI of the shoulder - improvement of report quality?

    Gassenmaier, Sebastian; Armbruster, Marco; Sommer, Wieland H.; Sommer, Nora N. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU), Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Haasters, Florian [Schoen Klinik Muenchen Harlaching, Department of Knee, Hip and Shoulder Surgery, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU), Department of General, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Munich (Germany); Helfen, Tobias [Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU), Department of General, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Munich (Germany); Henzler, Thomas [University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Alibek, Sedat [Ambulatory Health Care Center Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Fuerth (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Pfoerringer, Dominik [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Department of Trauma Surgery, Munich (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate the effect of structured reports (SRs) in comparison to non-structured narrative free text (NRs) shoulder MRI reports and potential effects of both types of reporting on completeness, readability, linguistic quality and referring surgeons' satisfaction. Thirty patients after trauma or with suspected degenerative changes of the shoulder were included in this study (2012-2015). All patients underwent shoulder MRI for further assessment and possible surgical planning. NRs were generated during clinical routine. Corresponding SRs were created using a dedicated template. All 60 reports were evaluated by two experienced orthopaedic shoulder surgeons using a questionnaire that included eight questions. Eighty per cent of the SRs were fully complete without any missing key features whereas only 45% of the NRs were fully complete (p < 0.001). The extraction of information was regarded to be easy in 92% of the SRs and 63% of the NRs. The overall quality of the SRs was rated better than that of the NRs (p < 0.001). Structured reporting of shoulder MRI improves the readability as well as the linguistic quality of radiological reports, and potentially leads to a higher satisfaction of referring physicians. (orig.)

  4. Structured reporting of MRI of the shoulder - improvement of report quality?

    Gassenmaier, Sebastian; Armbruster, Marco; Sommer, Wieland H.; Sommer, Nora N.; Haasters, Florian; Helfen, Tobias; Henzler, Thomas; Alibek, Sedat; Pfoerringer, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of structured reports (SRs) in comparison to non-structured narrative free text (NRs) shoulder MRI reports and potential effects of both types of reporting on completeness, readability, linguistic quality and referring surgeons' satisfaction. Thirty patients after trauma or with suspected degenerative changes of the shoulder were included in this study (2012-2015). All patients underwent shoulder MRI for further assessment and possible surgical planning. NRs were generated during clinical routine. Corresponding SRs were created using a dedicated template. All 60 reports were evaluated by two experienced orthopaedic shoulder surgeons using a questionnaire that included eight questions. Eighty per cent of the SRs were fully complete without any missing key features whereas only 45% of the NRs were fully complete (p < 0.001). The extraction of information was regarded to be easy in 92% of the SRs and 63% of the NRs. The overall quality of the SRs was rated better than that of the NRs (p < 0.001). Structured reporting of shoulder MRI improves the readability as well as the linguistic quality of radiological reports, and potentially leads to a higher satisfaction of referring physicians. (orig.)

  5. Automatic initialization and quality control of large-scale cardiac MRI segmentations.

    Albà, Xènia; Lekadir, Karim; Pereañez, Marco; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Young, Alistair A; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2018-01-01

    Continuous advances in imaging technologies enable ever more comprehensive phenotyping of human anatomy and physiology. Concomitant reduction of imaging costs has resulted in widespread use of imaging in large clinical trials and population imaging studies. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), in particular, offers one-stop-shop multidimensional biomarkers of cardiovascular physiology and pathology. A wide range of analysis methods offer sophisticated cardiac image assessment and quantification for clinical and research studies. However, most methods have only been evaluated on relatively small databases often not accessible for open and fair benchmarking. Consequently, published performance indices are not directly comparable across studies and their translation and scalability to large clinical trials or population imaging cohorts is uncertain. Most existing techniques still rely on considerable manual intervention for the initialization and quality control of the segmentation process, becoming prohibitive when dealing with thousands of images. The contributions of this paper are three-fold. First, we propose a fully automatic method for initializing cardiac MRI segmentation, by using image features and random forests regression to predict an initial position of the heart and key anatomical landmarks in an MRI volume. In processing a full imaging database, the technique predicts the optimal corrective displacements and positions in relation to the initial rough intersections of the long and short axis images. Second, we introduce for the first time a quality control measure capable of identifying incorrect cardiac segmentations with no visual assessment. The method uses statistical, pattern and fractal descriptors in a random forest classifier to detect failures to be corrected or removed from subsequent statistical analysis. Finally, we validate these new techniques within a full pipeline for cardiac segmentation applicable to large-scale cardiac MRI databases. The

  6. {sup 99m}Tc-HDP Pinhole Bone Scan Features of Undetached Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Condyle: Report of a Case with Radiography, CT, and MRI Correlation

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Sung Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Hee [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    OCD may be initiated by arrest of bone growth and subchondral osteosclerosis followed by either cartilage hypertrophy with calcification or enfolding with osteochondral bridging. Diagnosis can be made in most instances using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) or invasive arthroscopy. As to usefulness of conventional radiography (CR) opinions diverge as some held it to be of limited value while others valuable. The controversy seems to be due to semantic confusion of OCD from osteonecrosis (ON) which are different entities. This report will describe a case of undetached OCD occurred in the medial femoral condyle in a middle-aged female. It was free of symptom and incidentally discovered on {sup 99m}Tc-HDP pinhole scan performed for patellar injury. Pinhole scan findings of OCD are correlated to those of CR, CT, and MRI. An electronic search of literature failed to reveal earlier publication of bone scan features of undetached OCD. Pathologically, OCD differs from ON in that the fragment in the former condition comes off from a normal vascular bony bed while that in the latter separates from an avascular bony bed. Indeed, bone fragment in ON is devascularized but that in OCD maintains vascularity until weighted images, respectively and the halo showed low signal intensity on both T1 and T2 images.

  7. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty MRI: impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction MRI on image quality, findings and therapy decision

    Agten, Christoph A.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Sutter, Reto; Grande, Filippo del; Fucentese, Sandro F.; Blatter, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction (SEMAC) on image quality, findings, and therapy decision in patients with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Forty-five painful UKAs were examined at 1.5T-MRI (STIR, proton-density(PD)-weighted sequence, each with SEMAC and high-bandwidth). Artefact size, image quality, anatomic depiction, and clinically relevant findings were compared between SEMAC and high-bandwidth (2 readers). In 30 patients, therapy decision was retrospectively assessed by two orthopaedic surgeons without MRI, with high-bandwidth-MRI, and with SEMAC-MRI. SEMAC reduced mean artefact size for STIR (11.8 cm 2 vs. 37.7 cm 2 ) and PD (16.8 cm 2 vs. 18.9 cm 2 ), p < 0.0005 for both comparisons. SEMAC showed more blurring than high-bandwidth, p < 0.0005. STIR-SEMAC revealed more bone marrow oedema (29 vs. 18 patients, p = 0.001, 30 vs. 13 patients, p < 0.0005, for reader 1 and 2 respectively). PD-SEMAC was worse in detecting meniscal lesions (6 missed, p = 0.031, 9 missed, p = 0.004, by reader 1 and 2 respectively) than PD-high-bandwidth. Revision-surgery was chosen in 12 and 11 patients without MRI (surgeon 1 and 2), with high-bandwidth-MRI in 15 and 14 patients, and with SEMAC-MRI in 19 and 14 patients. STIR-SEMAC was useful in detecting bone marrow oedema and influenced the orthopaedic surgeons' decisions towards surgery, while PD-SEMAC showed no clinical benefit. (orig.)

  8. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty MRI: impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction MRI on image quality, findings and therapy decision

    Agten, Christoph A.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Sutter, Reto [Balgrist University Hospital, Radiology Department, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Grande, Filippo del [Regional Hospital, Radiology, Lugano (Switzerland); Fucentese, Sandro F.; Blatter, Samuel [University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Balgrist University Hospital, Orthopedics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction (SEMAC) on image quality, findings, and therapy decision in patients with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Forty-five painful UKAs were examined at 1.5T-MRI (STIR, proton-density(PD)-weighted sequence, each with SEMAC and high-bandwidth). Artefact size, image quality, anatomic depiction, and clinically relevant findings were compared between SEMAC and high-bandwidth (2 readers). In 30 patients, therapy decision was retrospectively assessed by two orthopaedic surgeons without MRI, with high-bandwidth-MRI, and with SEMAC-MRI. SEMAC reduced mean artefact size for STIR (11.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 37.7 cm{sup 2}) and PD (16.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 18.9 cm{sup 2}), p < 0.0005 for both comparisons. SEMAC showed more blurring than high-bandwidth, p < 0.0005. STIR-SEMAC revealed more bone marrow oedema (29 vs. 18 patients, p = 0.001, 30 vs. 13 patients, p < 0.0005, for reader 1 and 2 respectively). PD-SEMAC was worse in detecting meniscal lesions (6 missed, p = 0.031, 9 missed, p = 0.004, by reader 1 and 2 respectively) than PD-high-bandwidth. Revision-surgery was chosen in 12 and 11 patients without MRI (surgeon 1 and 2), with high-bandwidth-MRI in 15 and 14 patients, and with SEMAC-MRI in 19 and 14 patients. STIR-SEMAC was useful in detecting bone marrow oedema and influenced the orthopaedic surgeons' decisions towards surgery, while PD-SEMAC showed no clinical benefit. (orig.)

  9. Scan-rescan reproducibility of segmental aortic wall shear stress as assessed by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers.

    van der Palen, Roel L F; Roest, Arno A W; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; de Roos, Albert; Blom, Nico A; Westenberg, Jos J M

    2018-05-26

    The aim was to investigate scan-rescan reproducibility and observer variability of segmental aortic 3D systolic wall shear stress (WSS) by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers. Ten healthy volunteers (age 26.5 ± 2.6 years) underwent aortic 4D flow MRI twice. Maximum 3D systolic WSS (WSSmax) and mean 3D systolic WSS (WSSmean) for five thoracic aortic segments over five systolic cardiac phases by phase-specific segmentations were calculated. Scan-rescan analysis and observer reproducibility analysis were performed. Scan-rescan data showed overall good reproducibility for WSSmean (coefficient of variation, COV 10-15%) with moderate-to-strong intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 0.63-0.89). The variability in WSSmax was high (COV 16-31%) with moderate-to-good ICC (0.55-0.79) for different aortic segments. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was good-to-excellent for regional aortic WSSmax (ICC ≥ 0.78; COV ≤ 17%) and strong-to-excellent for WSSmean (ICC ≥ 0.86; COV ≤ 11%). In general, ascending aortic segments showed more WSSmax/WSSmean variability compared to aortic arch or descending aortic segments for scan-rescan, intraobserver and interobserver comparison. Scan-rescan reproducibility was good for WSSmean and moderate for WSSmax for all thoracic aortic segments over multiple systolic phases in healthy volunteers. Intra/interobserver reproducibility for segmental WSS assessment was good-to-excellent. Variability of WSSmax is higher and should be taken into account in case of individual follow-up or in comparative rest-stress studies to avoid misinterpretation.

  10. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A., E-mail: priscillainglid@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  11. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A.

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  12. Development and Validation of MRI Sacroiliac Joint Scoring Methods for the Semiaxial Scan Plane Corresponding to the Berlin and SPARCC MRI Scoring Methods, and of a New Global MRI Sacroiliac Joint Method

    Hededal, Pernille; Østergaard, Mikkel; Sørensen, Inge Juul

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop semiaxial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring methods for assessment of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) bone marrow edema (BME) in patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and to compare the reliability with equivalent semicoronal scoring methods. METHODS: Two semiaxial SIJ MRI sc...

  13. Improving image quality by accounting for changes in water temperature during a photoacoustic tomography scan.

    Dominique Van de Sompel

    Full Text Available The emerging field of photoacoustic tomography is rapidly evolving with many new system designs and reconstruction algorithms being published. Many systems use water as a coupling medium between the scanned object and the ultrasound transducers. Prior to a scan, the water is heated to body temperature to enable small animal imaging. During the scan, the water heating system of some systems is switched off to minimize the risk of bubble formation, which leads to a gradual decrease in water temperature and hence the speed of sound. In this work, we use a commercially available scanner that follows this procedure, and show that a failure to model intra-scan temperature decreases as small as 1.5°C leads to image artifacts that may be difficult to distinguish from true structures, particularly in complex scenes. We then improve image quality by continuously monitoring the water temperature during the scan and applying variable speed of sound corrections in the image reconstruction algorithm. While upgrading to an air bubble-free heating pump and keeping it running during the scan could also solve the changing temperature problem, we show that a software correction for the temperature changes provides a cost-effective alternative to a hardware upgrade. The efficacy of the software corrections was shown to be consistent across objects of widely varying appearances, namely physical phantoms, ex vivo tissue, and in vivo mouse imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the efficacy of modeling temporal variations in the speed of sound during photoacoustic scans, as opposed to spatial variations as focused on by previous studies. Since air bubbles pose a common problem in ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging systems, our results will be useful to future small animal imaging studies that use scanners with similarly limited heating units.

  14. Line-Scan Hyperspectral Imaging Techniques for Food Safety and Quality Applications

    Jianwei Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging technologies in the food and agricultural area have been evolving rapidly over the past 15 years owing to tremendous interest from both academic and industrial fields. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging is a major method that has been intensively researched and developed using different physical principles (e.g., reflectance, transmittance, fluorescence, Raman, and spatially resolved spectroscopy and wavelength regions (e.g., visible (VIS, near infrared (NIR, and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR. Line-scan hyperspectral imaging systems are mainly developed and used for surface inspection of food and agricultural products using area or line light sources. Some of these systems can also be configured to conduct spatially resolved spectroscopy measurements for internal or subsurface food inspection using point light sources. This paper reviews line-scan hyperspectral imaging techniques, with introduction, demonstration, and summarization of existing and emerging techniques for food and agricultural applications. The main topics include related spectroscopy techniques, line-scan measurement methods, hardware components and systems, system calibration methods, and spectral and image analysis techniques. Applications in food safety and quality are also presented to reveal current practices and future trends of line-scan hyperspectral imaging techniques.

  15. Gastric visualization and image quality in radionuclide bone scanning: concise communication

    Wilson, M.A.; Pollack, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    In a 12-mo study period, there were 14 days identified when the stomach was visualized in routine bone imaging. On these days, 44% of the 110 patients imaged demonstrated this effect. There was a significant linear correlation between the presence and degree of gastric visualization and the radiopharmaceutical incubation and quality control parameters. The study suggests a sporadic phenomenon that appears to result from partial oxidation of the agent during incubation, producing (a) different species of labeled diphosphonate that display altered affinity for bone (scan quality) and (b) free pertechnetate

  16. Scanning multiple mice in a small-animal PET scanner: Influence on image quality

    Siepel, Francoise J.; Lier, Monique G.J.T.B. van; Chen Mu; Disselhorst, Jonathan A.; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C.; Visser, Eric P.

    2010-01-01

    To achieve high throughput in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET), it may be advantageous to scan more than one animal in the scanner's field of view (FOV) at the same time. However, due to the additional activity and increase of Poisson noise, additional attenuating mass, extra photon scattering, and radial or axial displacement of the animals, a deterioration of image quality can be expected. In this study, the NEMA NU 4-2008 image quality (NU4IQ) phantom and up to three FDG-filled cylindrical 'mouse phantoms' were positioned in the FOV of the Siemens Inveon small-animal PET scanner to simulate scans with multiple mice. Five geometrical configurations were examined. In one configuration, the NU4IQ phantom was scanned separately and placed in the center of the FOV (1C). In two configurations, a mouse phantom was added with both phantoms displaced radially (2R) or axially (2A). In two other configurations, the NU4IQ phantom was scanned along with three mouse phantoms with all phantoms displaced radially (4R), or in a combination of radial and axial displacement (2R2A). Images were reconstructed using ordered subset expectation maximization in 2 dimensions (OSEM2D) and maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction. Image quality parameters were obtained according to the NEMA NU 4-2008 guidelines. Optimum image quality was obtained for the 1C geometry. Image noise increased by the addition of phantoms and was the largest for the 4R configuration. Spatial resolution, reflected in the recovery coefficients for the FDG-filled rods, deteriorated by radial displacement of the NU4IQ phantom (2R, 2R2A, and 4R), most strongly for OSEM2D, and to a smaller extent for MAP reconstructions. Photon scatter, as indicated by the spill-over ratios in the non-radioactive water- and air-filled compartments, increased by the addition of phantoms, most strongly for the 4R configuration. Application of scatter correction substantially lowered the spill-over ratios, but caused an

  17. Image registration/fusion software for PET and CT/MRI by using simultaneous emission and transmission scans

    Kitamura, Keishi; Amano, Masaharu; Sato, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takeshi; Konishi, Norihiro; Komatsu, Masahiko

    2003-01-01

    When PET (positron emission tomography) is used for oncology studies, it is important to register and over-lay PET images with the images of other anatomical modalities, such as those obtained by CT (computed tomography) or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), in order for the lesions to be anatomically located with high accuracy. The Shimadzu SET-2000W Series PET scanners provide simultaneous acquisition of emission and transmission data, which is capable of complete spatial alignment of both functional and attenuation images. This report describes our newly developed image registration/fusion software, which reformats PET emission images to the CT/MRI grid by using the transform matrix obtained by matching PET transmission images with CT/MRI images. Transmission images are registered and fused either automatically or manually, through 3-dimensional rotation and translation, with the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal fused images being monitored on the screen. This new method permits sufficiently accurate registration and efficient data processing with promoting effective use of CT/MRI images of the DICOM format, without using markers in data acquisition or any special equipment, such as a combined PET/CT scanner. (author)

  18. A scanning point source for quality control of FOV uniformity in GC-PET imaging

    Bergmann, H.; Minear, G.; Dobrozemsky, G.; Nowotny, R.; Koenig, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: PET imaging with coincidence cameras (GC-PET) requires additional quality control procedures to check the function of coincidence circuitry and detector zoning. In particular, the uniformity response over the field of view needs special attention since it is known that coincidence counting mode may suffer from non-uniformity effects not present in single photon mode. Materials and methods: An inexpensive linear scanner with a stepper motor and a digital interface to a PC with software allowing versatile scanning modes was developed. The scanner is used with a source holder containing a Sodium-22 point source. While moving the source along the axis of rotation of the GC-PET system, a tomographic acquisition takes place. The scan covers the full axial field of view of the 2-D or 3-D scatter frame. Depending on the acquisition software, point source scanning takes place continuously while only one projection is acquired or is done in step-and-shoot mode with the number of positions equal to the number of gantry steps. Special software was developed to analyse the resulting list mode acquisition files and to produce an image of the recorded coincidence events of each head. Results: Uniformity images of coincidence events were obtained after further correction for systematic sensitivity variations caused by acquisition geometry. The resulting images are analysed visually and by calculating NEMA uniformity indices as for a planar flood field. The method has been applied successfully to two different brands of GC-PET capable gamma cameras. Conclusion: Uniformity of GC-PET can be tested quickly and accurately with a routine QC procedure, using a Sodium-22 scanning point source and an inexpensive mechanical scanning device. The method can be used for both 2-D and 3-D acquisition modes and fills an important gap in the quality control system for GC-PET

  19. Gyral high density on CT scan after head injury; [sup 123]I-IMP SPECT and MRI findings in three children

    Abe, Takumi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Aruga, Tohru

    1994-02-01

    The authors treated three children who had 'gyral high density' on plain CT scans after head injury with acute subdural hematoma. [sup 123]I-IMP SPECT (IMP) and MRI in the chronic stage were performed. All were males, about one year of age, with acute subdural hematoma. CT scan 48 hours after injury showed diffuse low density in the ipsilateral parenchyma with minimum midline shift, and IMP showed decreased activity in the same area. Plain CT scan 1 to 3 weeks after injury showed remarkably high density along the gyri in part of the same area. This area was markedly enhanced on CT with contrast medium and showed decreased blood flow on IMP. This high density area disappeared within 2 months after injury and the area concerned showed brain atrophy. In the chronic stage (after 6 months), only the high density area along the gyri seen in the CT scan showed MRI evidence of ishemia, but there was no definite evidence of hemorrhage. All three children had hemiplegia at the time of discharge. The gyral high density suggests ischemic brain, but the pathophysiological process might be different from that of so-called hemorrhagic infarction. Presumably, it is due to incomplete autoregulation, the incomplete blood-brain barrier and the sensitivity to stimulation of cerebral blood vessels in the brains of infants. The intensity and range of the gyral high density are considered to be important in estimating the future amount of atrophic change in the insulted brain and the resulting sequelae. (author).

  20. Mechanisms of cognitive impairment in cerebral small vessel disease: multimodal MRI results from the St George's cognition and neuroimaging in stroke (SCANS study.

    Andrew J Lawrence

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is a common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. A number of disease features can be assessed on MRI including lacunar infarcts, T2 lesion volume, brain atrophy, and cerebral microbleeds. In addition, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is sensitive to disruption of white matter ultrastructure, and recently it has been suggested that additional information on the pattern of damage may be obtained from axial diffusivity, a proposed marker of axonal damage, and radial diffusivity, an indicator of demyelination. We determined the contribution of these whole brain MRI markers to cognitive impairment in SVD. Consecutive patients with lacunar stroke and confluent leukoaraiosis were recruited into the ongoing SCANS study of cognitive impairment in SVD (n = 115, and underwent neuropsychological assessment and multimodal MRI. SVD subjects displayed poor performance on tests of executive function and processing speed. In the SVD group brain volume was lower, white matter hyperintensity volume higher and all diffusion characteristics differed significantly from control subjects (n = 50. On multi-predictor analysis independent predictors of executive function in SVD were lacunar infarct count and diffusivity of normal appearing white matter on DTI. Independent predictors of processing speed were lacunar infarct count and brain atrophy. Radial diffusivity was a stronger DTI predictor than axial diffusivity, suggesting ischaemic demyelination, seen neuropathologically in SVD, may be an important predictor of cognitive impairment in SVD. Our study provides information on the mechanism of cognitive impairment in SVD.

  1. Does spinal stenosis correlate with MRI findings and pain, psychologic factor and quality of life?

    Lee, Mi Young; Jung, Sung Won; Lee, Su Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate and analyze MRI findings in relation to visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), psychological-factor, sleep-quality, and Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores among patients with central lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) for the purpose of elucidating a correlation. Methods From July 2013 to May 2014, 117 consecutive patients with central LSS were included in this study. All of the MRIs were evaluated by one of the authors, and the evaluated items were the dural sac cross-sectional area (DSCSA), the number of stenotic levels, and the presence and levels of spondylolisthesis. The ODI, VAS, 36-item SF-36, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaires were used to evaluate the participants. Results There are no correlations between the ODI, VAS, BDI, BAI, PSQI, and SF-36 scores and the minimum DSCSA; however, a significant correlation was found between the ODI scores and multilevel LSS. The BDI, BAI, and PSQI scores are higher for multilevel LSS compared with single-level LSS, but the difference of this mean value is not statistically significant. Conclusions A significant correlation was shown between those patients with multilevel LSS and the ODI scores; however, significant correlations were not found between the MRI findings and the psychological factors pertaining to sleep and life qualities. PMID:26495059

  2. Quantitative MRI and strength measurements in the assessment of muscle quality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Wokke, B H; van den Bergen, J C; Versluis, M J; Niks, E H; Milles, J; Webb, A G; van Zwet, E W; Aartsma-Rus, A; Verschuuren, J J; Kan, H E

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess leg muscle quality and give a detailed description of leg muscle involvement in a series of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients using quantitative MRI and strength measurements. Fatty infiltration, as well as total and contractile (not fatty infiltrated) cross sectional areas of various leg muscles were determined in 16 Duchenne patients and 11 controls (aged 8-15). To determine specific muscle strength, four leg muscle groups (quadriceps femoris, hamstrings, anterior tibialis and triceps surae) were measured and related to the amount of contractile tissue. In patients, the quadriceps femoris showed decreased total and contractile cross sectional area, attributable to muscle atrophy. The total, but not the contractile, cross sectional area of the triceps surae was increased in patients, corresponding to hypertrophy. Specific strength decreased in all four muscle groups of Duchenne patients, indicating reduced muscle quality. This suggests that muscle hypertrophy and fatty infiltration are two distinct pathological processes, differing between muscle groups. Additionally, the quality of remaining muscle fibers is severely reduced in the legs of Duchenne patients. The combination of quantitative MRI and quantitative muscle testing could be a valuable outcome parameter in longitudinal studies and in the follow-up of therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The cerebellar development in chinese children-a study by voxel-based volume measurement of reconstructed 3D MRI scan.

    Wu, Kuan-Hsun; Chen, Chia-Yuan; Shen, Ein-Yiao

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar disorder was frequently reported to have relation with structural brain volume alteration and/or morphology change. In dealing with such clinical situations, we need a convenient and noninvasive imaging tool to provide clinicians with a means of tracing developmental changes in the cerebellum. Herein, we present a new daily practice method for cerebellum imaging that uses a work station and a software program to process reconstructed 3D neuroimages after MRI scanning. In a 3-y period, 3D neuroimages reconstructed from MRI scans of 50 children aged 0.2-12.7 y were taken. The resulting images were then statistically analyzed against a growth curve. We observed a remarkable increase in the size of the cerebellum in the first 2 y of life. Furthermore, the unmyelinated cerebellum grew mainly between birth and 2 y of age in the postnatal stage. In contrast, the postnatal development of the brain mainly depended on the growth of myelinated cerebellum from birth through adolescence. This study presents basic data from a study of ethnic Chinese children's cerebellums using reconstructed 3D brain images. Based on the technique we introduce here, clinicians can evaluate the growth of the brain.

  4. Image quality of high-resolution CT with 16-channel multidetector-row CT. Comparison between helical scan and conventional step-shoot scan

    Sumikawa, Hiromitsu; Johkoh, Takeshi; Koyama, Mitsuhiro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of high-resolution CT (HRCT) reconstructed from volumetric data with 16-channel multidetector-row CT (MDCT). Eleven autopsy lungs that were diagnosed histopathologically were scanned by 16-channel MDCT with the step-and-shoot scan mode and three helical scan modes. Each helical mode had each size of focal spot, pitch, and time of gantry rotation. HRCT images were reconstructed from the volumetric data with each helical mode and axial sequence data. Two observers evaluated the image quality and noted the most appropriate diagnosis for each imaging. Visualization of abnormal structures with one helical mode was equal to those with axial mode, whereas those with the other two helical modes were inferior to those with axial mode (Wilcoxon signed rank test; p<0.0001). There was no significant difference in diagnostic efficacy between modes. The image quality of HRCT with appropriate helical mode is equal to that with axial mode and diagnostic efficacy is equal among all modes. These results may indicate that sufficient HRCT images can be obtained by only one helical scan without the addition of conventional axial scans. (author)

  5. Ultrasonic C-scan Technique for Nondestructive Evaluation of Spot Weld Quality

    Park, Ik Gun

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of ultrasonic C-scan technique for nondestructive evaluation of spot weld quality. Ultrasonic evaluation for spot weld quality was performed by immersion method with the mechanical and the electronic scanning of point-focussed ultrasonic beam(25 MHz). For the sake of the approach to the quantitative measurement of nugget diameter and the discrimination of the corona bond from nugget, preliminary infinitesimal gap experiment by newton ring is tried in order to set up the optimum ultrasonic test condition. Ultrasonic image data obtained were confirmed and compared by optical microscope and SAM(Scanning Acoustic Microscope) observation of the spot-weld cross section. The results show that the nugget diameter can be measured with the accuracy of 1.0mm, and voids included in nugget can be detected to 10μm extent with simplicity and accuracy. Finally, it was found that it is necessary to make a profound study of definite discrimination of corona bond from nugget and the approach of quantitative evaluation of nugget diameter by utilizing the various image processing techniques

  6. Derivation of the scan time requirement for maintaining a consistent PET image quality

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Seok-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: the image quality of PET for larger patients is relatively poor, even though the injection dose is optimized considering the NECR characteristics of the PET scanner. This poor image quality is due to the lower level of maximum NECR that can be achieved in these large patients. The aim of this study was to optimize the PET scan time to obtain a consistent PET image quality regardless of the body size, based on the relationship between the patient specific NECR (pNECR) and body weight. Methods: eighty patients (M/F=53/27, body weight: 059 ± 1 kg) underwent whole-body FDG PET scans using a Philips GEMINI GS PET/CT scanner after an injection of 0.14 mCi/kg FDG. The relationship between the scatter fraction (SF) and body weight was determined by repeated Monte Carlo simulations using a NEMA scatter phantom, the size of which varied according to the relationship between the abdominal circumference and body weight. Using this information, the pNECR was calculated from the prompt and delayed PET sinograms to obtain the prediction equation of NECR vs. body weight. The time scaling factor (F TS ) for the scan duration was finally derived to make PET images with equivalent SNR levels. Results: the SF and NECR had the following nonlinear relationships with the body weight: SF=0.15 ⋅ body weight 0.3 and NECR = 421.36 (body weight) −0.84 . The equation derived for F TS was 0.01⋅ body weight + 0.2, which means that, for example, a 120-kg person should be scanned 1.8 times longer than a 70 kg person, or the scan time for a 40-kg person can be reduced by 30%. Conclusion: the equation of the relative time demand derived in this study will be useful for maintaining consistent PET image quality in clinics

  7. 3D Scan-Based Wavelet Transform and Quality Control for Video Coding

    Parisot Christophe

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Wavelet coding has been shown to achieve better compression than DCT coding and moreover allows scalability. 2D DWT can be easily extended to 3D and thus applied to video coding. However, 3D subband coding of video suffers from two drawbacks. The first is the amount of memory required for coding large 3D blocks; the second is the lack of temporal quality due to the sequence temporal splitting. In fact, 3D block-based video coders produce jerks. They appear at blocks temporal borders during video playback. In this paper, we propose a new temporal scan-based wavelet transform method for video coding combining the advantages of wavelet coding (performance, scalability with acceptable reduced memory requirements, no additional CPU complexity, and avoiding jerks. We also propose an efficient quality allocation procedure to ensure a constant quality over time.

  8. Evaluation of Image Quality in Low Tube-Voltage Chest CT Scan

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Cho, Jae Hwan; Park, Cheol Soo

    2010-01-01

    The patients who visited this department for pulmonary disease and need CT scans for Follow-up to observe change of CT value, evaluation of image quality and decrease of radiation dose as change of kVp. Subjects were the patients of 20 persons visited this department for pulmonary disease and Somatom Sensation 16(Semens, Enlarge, Germany) was used. Measurement of CT value as change of kVp was done by setting up ROI diameter of 1cm at the height of thyroid, aortic arch, right pulmonary artery in arterial phase image using 100 kVp, measuring 3 times, and recorded the average. CT value of phantom was measured by scanning phantoms which means contrast media diluted by normal saline by various ratio with tube voltage of 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 120 kVp, 140 kVp and recorded the average of 3 CT values of center of phantom image. In analysing radiation dose, CTDIVOL values of the latest arterial phase image of 120 kVp and as this research set that of 100 kVp were analyzed comparatively. 2 observers graded quality of chest images by 5 degrees (Unacceptable, Suboptimal, Adequate, Good, Excellent). CT value of chest image increased at 100 kVp by 14.06%∼27.26% in each ROI than 120 kVp. CT value of phantom increased as tube voltage lowered at various concentration of contrast media. CTDIVOL decreased at 100 kVp(5.00 mGy) by 36% than 120 kVp(7.80 mGy) in radiation dose analysis. here were 0 Unacceptable, 1 Suboptimal, 3 Adequate, 10 Good, 6 Excellent in totally 20 persons. Chest CT scanning with low kilo-voltage for patients who need CT scan repeatedly can bring images valuable for diagnose, and decrease radiation dose against patients

  9. An MRI-Conditional External Cardiac Defibrillator for Resuscitation Within the MRI Scanner Bore

    Schmidt, Ehud J.; Watkins, Ronald D.; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Guttman, Michael A.; Wang, Wei; Halperin, Henry A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects undergoing cardiac arrest within an MRI scanner are currently removed from the bore and then from the MRI suite, prior to delivery of CPR and defibrillation, potentially increasing risk of mortality. This precludes many higher-risk (acute-ischemic, acute-stroke) patients from undergoing MRI imaging and MRI-guided intervention. An MRI-conditional cardiac defibrillator should enable scanning with defibrillation pads attached and the generator ON, enabling application of defibrillation within the MRI seconds after a cardiac event. An MRI-conditional external defibrillator may improve patient acceptance for MRI procedures. Methods and Results A commercial external defibrillator was rendered 1.5 Tesla MRI-conditional by addition of novel Radio-Frequency (RF) filters between the generator and commercial disposable surface-pads. The RF filters reduced emission into the MRI scanner, and prevented cable/surface-pad heating during imaging, while preserving all the defibrillator’s monitoring and delivery functions. Human volunteers were imaged using high Specific-Absorption-Rate sequences to validate MRI image quality (IQ) and lack of heating. Swine were electrically fibrillated (N=4) and thereafter defibrillated both outside and inside the MRI bore. MRI IQ was reduced by 0.8 or 1.6 dB, with the generator in monitoring mode and operating on battery or AC power, respectively. Commercial surface-pads did not create artifacts deeper than 6mm below the skin surface. RF heating was within FDA guidelines. Defibrillation was completely successful inside and outside the MRI bore. Conclusions A prototype MRI-conditional defibrillation system successfully defibrillated in the MRI without degrading image quality, or increasing the time needed for defibrillation. It can increase patient acceptance for MRI procedures. PMID:27729363

  10. Image quality characteristics of a novel colour scanning digital ophthalmoscope (SDO) compared with fundus photography.

    Strauss, Rupert W; Krieglstein, Tina R; Priglinger, Siegfried G; Reis, Werner; Ulbig, Michael W; Kampik, Anselm; Neubauer, Aljoscha S

    2007-11-01

    To establish a set of quality parameters for grading image quality and apply those to evaluate the fundus image quality obtained by a new scanning digital ophthalmoscope (SDO) compared with standard slide photography. On visual analogue scales a total of eight image characteristics were defined: overall quality, contrast, colour brilliance, focus (sharpness), resolution and details, noise, artefacts and validity of clinical assessment. Grading was repeated after 4 months to assess repeatability. Fundus images of 23 patients imaged digitally by SDO and by Zeiss 450FF fundus camera using Kodak film were graded side-by-side by three graders. Lens opacity was quantified with the Interzeag Lens Opacity Meter 701. For all of the eight scales of image quality, good repeatability within the graders (mean Kendall's W 0.69) was obtained after 4 months. Inter-grader agreement ranged between 0.31 and 0.66. Despite the SDO's limited nominal image resolution of 720 x 576 pixels, the Zeiss FF 450 camera performed better in only two of the subscales - noise (p = 0.001) and artefacts (p = 0.01). Lens opacities significantly influenced only the two subscales 'resolution' and 'details', which deteriorated with increasing media opacities for both imaging systems. Distinct scales to grade image characteristics of different origin were developed and validated. Overall SDO digital imaging was found to provide fundus pictures of a similarly high level of quality as expert photography on slides.

  11. Short-scan-time multi-slice diffusion MRI of the mouse cervical spinal cord using echo planar imaging.

    Callot, Virginie; Duhamel, Guillaume; Cozzone, Patrick J; Kober, Frank

    2008-10-01

    Mouse spinal cord (SC) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides important information on tissue morphology and structural changes that may occur during pathologies such as multiple sclerosis or SC injury. The acquisition scheme of the commonly used DWI techniques is based on conventional spin-echo encoding, which is time-consuming. The purpose of this work was to investigate whether the use of echo planar imaging (EPI) would provide good-quality diffusion MR images of mouse SC, as well as accurate measurements of diffusion-derived metrics, and thus enable diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and highly resolved DWI within reasonable scan times. A four-shot diffusion-weighted spin-echo EPI (SE-EPI) sequence was evaluated at 11.75 T on a group of healthy mice (n = 10). SE-EPI-derived apparent diffusion coefficients of gray and white matter were compared with those obtained using a conventional spin-echo sequence (c-SE) to validate the accuracy of the method. To take advantage of the reduction in acquisition time offered by the EPI sequence, multi-slice DTI acquisitions were performed covering the cervical segments (six slices, six diffusion-encoding directions, three b values) within 30 min (vs 2 h for c-SE). From these measurements, fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivities were calculated, and fiber tracking along the C1 to C6 cervical segments was performed. In addition, high-resolution images (74 x 94 microm(2)) were acquired within 5 min per direction. Clear delineation of gray and white matter and identical apparent diffusion coefficient values were obtained, with a threefold reduction in acquisition time compared with c-SE. While overcoming the difficulties associated with high spatially and temporally resolved DTI measurements, the present SE-EPI approach permitted identification of reliable quantitative parameters with a reproducibility compatible with the detection of pathologies. The SE-EPI method may be particularly valuable when multiple sets of images

  12. The quality of tumor size assessment by contrast-enhanced spectral mammography and the benefit of additional breast MRI.

    Lobbes, Marc B I; Lalji, Ulrich C; Nelemans, Patty J; Houben, Ivo; Smidt, Marjolein L; Heuts, Esther; de Vries, Bart; Wildberger, Joachim E; Beets-Tan, Regina G

    2015-01-01

    Background - Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a promising new breast imaging modality that is superior to conventional mammography for breast cancer detection. We aimed to evaluate correlation and agreement of tumor size measurements using CESM. As additional analysis, we evaluated whether measurements using an additional breast MRI exam would yield more accurate results. Methods - Between January 1(st) 2013 and April 1(st) 2014, 87 consecutive breast cancer cases that underwent CESM were collected and data on maximum tumor size measurements were gathered. In 57 cases, tumor size measurements were also available for breast MRI. Histopathological results of the surgical specimen served as gold standard in all cases. Results - The Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC) of CESM versus histopathology and breast MRI versus histopathology were all >0.9, p1 cm between the two imaging modalities and histopathological results, we did not observe any advantage of performing an additional breast MRI after CESM in any of the cases. Conclusion - Quality of tumor size measurement using CESM is good and matches the quality of these measurement assessed by breast MRI. Additional measurements using breast MRI did not improve the quality of tumor size measurements.

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  14. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars. Part II: Data Quality Control and Processing

    Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen L.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2014-03-01

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the HS-RHI SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  15. Improved image quality and radiation dose reduction in liver dynamic CT scan with the protocol change

    Cho, Yu Jin; Cho, Pyong Kon [Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The purpose is reducing radiation dose while maintaining of image quality in liver dynamic CT(LDCT) scan, by protocols generally used and the tube voltage set at a low level protocol compared to the radiation dose and image quality. The target is body mass index, 18.5-24 patients out of 40 patients who underwent the ACT(abdominal CT). Group A(tube voltage : 120 kVp, SAFIRE strength 1) of 20 people among 40 people, to apply the general abdominal CT scan protocol, group B(tube voltage : 100 kVp, apply SAFIRE strength 0-5) was 20 people, set a lower tube voltage. Image quality evaluation was setting a region of interest(ROI) in the liver parenchyma, aorta, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), celiac trunk, visceral fat of arterial phase. In the ROI were compared by measuring the noise, signal to noise ratio(SNR), contrast to noise ratio(CNR), CT number. In addition, qualitative assessments to evaluate two people in the rich professional experience in Radiology by 0-3 points. We compared the total radiation dose, dose length product(DLP) and effective dose, volume computed tomography dose index(CTDIvol). The higher SAFIRE in the tube voltage 100 kVp, noise is reduced, CT number was increased. Thus, SNR and CNR was increased higher the SAFIRE step. Compared with the tube voltage 120 kVp, noise, SNR, CNR was most similar in SAFIRE strength 2 and 3. Qualitative assessment SAFIRE strength 2 is the most common SAFIRE strength 2 the most common qualitative assessment, if the tube voltage of 100 kVp when the quality of the images better evaluated was SAFIRE strength 1. Dose was reduced from 21.69%, in 100 kVp than 120 kVp. In the case of a relatively high BMI is not LDCT scan, When it is shipped from the factory tube voltage is set higher, unnecessary radiation exposure when considering the reality that is concerned, when according to the results of this study, set a lower tube voltage and adjust the SAFIRE strength to 1 or 2, the radiation without compromising image quality

  16. Neuropsychological deficits and morphological MRI brain scan abnormalities in apparently health non-encephalopathic patients with cirrhosis; A controlled Study

    Moore, J.W.; De Lacey, G.; Dunk, A.A.; Sinclair, T.S.; Mowat, M.A.G.; Brunt, P.W. (Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Deans, H. (Aberdeen Univ. (UK). Dept. of Medical Physics (United Kingdom)); Crawford, J.R. (Aberdeen University Medical School (United Kingdom). Department of Psychology (United Kingdom)); Besson, J.A.O. (Aberdeen University Medical School (United Kingdom). Department of Mental Health (United Kingdom))

    1989-11-01

    By means of psychometric testing, we have determined the frequency of latent hepatic encephalopathy in a group of 19 cirrhotics with no clinical evidence of encephalopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in order to determine whether morphological cerebral abnormalities were associated with latent encephalopathy. Nineteen age and educationally matched patient with normal liver function acted as controls. Significant differences (P < 0.05) between cirrhotics and controls were found in tests of short-term visual memory and speed of reaction to light (cirrhotics 326 ( 132 ms vs. controls 225 ) 36 ms), sound (cirrhotics 361 ( 152 ms vs. controls 236 ) 52 ms) and choice (cirrhotics 651 ( 190 ms vs. controls 406 ) 101 ms) stimuli (all values mean S.D.). Reitan trail test performance, however, was similar in both groups. ( Trail A: cirrhotics 43 ( 19 s vs. controls 35 ) 13 s; Trail B: cirrhotics 105 ( 66 s vs. controls 93 ) 36 s.) In patients with cirrhosis, MRI revealed statistically significant increases in the maximum fissure width of right frontal sulci, light and left parietal sulci, inter-hemispheric fissure width and in bicaudafe index. These changes, indicating cerebral atrophy, were largely confined to alcoholics. There was poor correlation between measurements of cerebral morphology and neuropsychological performance, only 10% of associations achieving statistical significance. (author). 2 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs.

  17. Neuropsychological deficits and morphological MRI brain scan abnormalities in apparently health non-encephalopathic patients with cirrhosis

    Moore, J.W.; De Lacey, G.; Dunk, A.A.; Sinclair, T.S.; Mowat, M.A.G.; Brunt, P.W.; Deans, H.; Crawford, J.R.; Besson, J.A.O.

    1989-01-01

    By means of psychometric testing, we have determined the frequency of latent hepatic encephalopathy in a group of 19 cirrhotics with no clinical evidence of encephalopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in order to determine whether morphological cerebral abnormalities were associated with latent encephalopathy. Nineteen age and educationally matched patient with normal liver function acted as controls. Significant differences (P < 0.05) between cirrhotics and controls were found in tests of short-term visual memory and speed of reaction to light (cirrhotics 326 ] 132 ms vs. controls 225 ] 36 ms), sound (cirrhotics 361 ] 152 ms vs. controls 236 ] 52 ms) and choice (cirrhotics 651 ] 190 ms vs. controls 406 ] 101 ms) stimuli (all values mean ] S.D.). Reitan trail test performance, however, was similar in both groups. ( Trail A: cirrhotics 43 ] 19 s vs. controls 35 ] 13 s; Trail B: cirrhotics 105 ] 66 s vs. controls 93 ] 36 s.) In patients with cirrhosis, MRI revealed statistically significant increases in the maximum fissure width of right frontal sulci, light and left parietal sulci, inter-hemispheric fissure width and in bicaudafe index. These changes, indicating cerebral atrophy, were largely confined to alcoholics. There was poor correlation between measurements of cerebral morphology and neuropsychological performance, only 10% of associations achieving statistical significance. (author). 2 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs

  18. Study of CT head scans using different voltages: image quality evaluation

    Pacheco de Freitas C, I.; Prata M, A. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Alonso, T. C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santana, P., E-mail: iarapfcorrea@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem, Av. Prof. Alfredo Balena 190, 30130-100 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was introduced to medical practice in 1972. It generates images recognized by high diagnostic potential. CT allows investigation of structures in the human body inaccessible by conventional image methods, replacing invasive methods in many cases. Noise is a kind of variation of brightness observed on CT images, and it is inherent to this method. The magnitude of the noise is determined by the standard deviation of CT numbers of a region of interest in a homogeneous material. The aim of this study is to analyze the noise in head CT images generated by different acquisition protocols using four voltage values. Five different scans were performed using a female Alderson phantom and their images were analyzed with the RadiAnt software. With the average HU values and standard deviation of each scan, the values of noise were calculated in some region of interest. The obtained noise values were compared and it was observed that the 140 kV voltage promotes the in the lower noise in the image, resulting in better image quality. The results also show that the parameters, such as voltage and current, can be adjusted so that the noise can be decreased. Thus, acquisition protocols may be adapted to produce images with diagnostic quality and lower doses in patient. (Author)

  19. Projector-Based Augmented Reality for Quality Inspection of Scanned Objects

    Kern, J.; Weinmann, M.; Wursthorn, S.

    2017-09-01

    After scanning or reconstructing the geometry of objects, we need to inspect the result of our work. Are there any parts missing? Is every detail covered in the desired quality? We typically do this by looking at the resulting point clouds or meshes of our objects on-screen. What, if we could see the information directly visualized on the object itself? Augmented reality is the generic term for bringing virtual information into our real environment. In our paper, we show how we can project any 3D information like thematic visualizations or specific monitoring information with reference to our object onto the object's surface itself, thus augmenting it with additional information. For small objects that could for instance be scanned in a laboratory, we propose a low-cost method involving a projector-camera system to solve this task. The user only needs a calibration board with coded fiducial markers to calibrate the system and to estimate the projector's pose later on for projecting textures with information onto the object's surface. Changes within the projected 3D information or of the projector's pose will be applied in real-time. Our results clearly reveal that such a simple setup will deliver a good quality of the augmented information.

  20. Study of CT head scans using different voltages: image quality evaluation

    Pacheco de Freitas C, I.; Prata M, A.; Alonso, T. C.; Santana, P.

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was introduced to medical practice in 1972. It generates images recognized by high diagnostic potential. CT allows investigation of structures in the human body inaccessible by conventional image methods, replacing invasive methods in many cases. Noise is a kind of variation of brightness observed on CT images, and it is inherent to this method. The magnitude of the noise is determined by the standard deviation of CT numbers of a region of interest in a homogeneous material. The aim of this study is to analyze the noise in head CT images generated by different acquisition protocols using four voltage values. Five different scans were performed using a female Alderson phantom and their images were analyzed with the RadiAnt software. With the average HU values and standard deviation of each scan, the values of noise were calculated in some region of interest. The obtained noise values were compared and it was observed that the 140 kV voltage promotes the in the lower noise in the image, resulting in better image quality. The results also show that the parameters, such as voltage and current, can be adjusted so that the noise can be decreased. Thus, acquisition protocols may be adapted to produce images with diagnostic quality and lower doses in patient. (Author)

  1. The impact of the depth of field on cytogenetic image quality in scanning microscopy

    Qiu, Yuchen; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Yuhua; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R.; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of the depth of field (DOF) of microscopic systems on cytogenetic image qualities. Due to the narrow DOF of high magnification, large numerical aperture (N.A.) objective lenses, random vibrations of even high precision scanning stages may result in large amount of off focused images. In this study, the DOF of microscopic systems with various objective magnifications/numerical apertures (N.A.) is first measured using standard resolution targets. The impact of DOF on cytogenetic image qualities is then subjectively evaluated with clinical samples, by comparing the band shape and sharpness of analyzable chromosomes. For a specific digital microscopic system with 100× objective lens (N.A. = 1.25), the results of observational studies revealed that chromosomal bands are still recognizable when the images are obtained approximately +/- 1 μm from the focusing plane. The chromosomal bands become fuzzy and unrecognizable when the system is 1.5 μm away from the focusing position. The results of this preliminary experimental study may provide useful design trade-off parameters for developing optimal scanning microscopic systems for cytogenetic applications.

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  4. The quality of reconstructed 3D images in multidetector-row helical CT: experimental study involving scan parameters

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Lim, Tae Hwan; Kang, Weechang

    2002-01-01

    To determine which multidetector-row helical CT scanning technique provides the best-quality reconstructed 3D images, and to assess differences in image quality according to the levels of the scanning parameters used. Four objects with different surfaces and contours were scanned using multidetector-row helical CT at three detector-row collimations (1.25, 2.50, 5.00 mm), two pitches (3.0, 6.0), and three different degrees of overlap between the reconstructed slices (0%, 25%, 50%). Reconstructed 3D images of the resulting 72 sets of data were produced using volumetric rendering. The 72 images were graded on a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best) for each of four rating criteria, giving a mean score for each criterion and an overall mean score. Statistical analysis was used to assess differences in image quality according to scanning parameter levels. The mean score for each rating criterion, and the overall mean score, varied significantly according to the scanning parameter levels used. With regard to detector-row collimation and pitch, all levels of scanning parameters gave rise to significant differences, while in the degree of overlap of reconstructed slices, there were significant differences between overlap of 0% and of 50% in all levels of scanning parameters, and between overlap of 25% and of 50% in overall accuracy and overall mean score. Among the 18 scanning sequences, the highest score (4.94) was achieved with 1.25 mm detector-row collimation, 3.0 pitch, and 50% overlap between reconstructed slices. Comparison of the quality of reconstructed 3D images obtained using multidetector-row helical CT and various scanning techniques indicated that the 1.25 mm, 3.0, 50% scanning sequence was best. Quality improved as detector-row collimation decreased; as pitch was reduced from 6.0 to 3.0; and as overlap between reconstructed slices increased

  5. Tree-structured vector quantization of CT chest scans: Image quality and diagnostic accuracy

    Cosman, P.C.; Tseng, C.; Gray, R.M.; Olshen, R.A.; Moses, L.E.; Davidson, H.C.; Bergin, C.J.; Riskin, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The quality of lossy compressed images is often characterized by signal-to-noise ratios, informal tests of subjective quality, or receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves that include subjective appraisals of the value of an image for a particular application. The authors believe that for medical applications, lossy compressed images should be judged by a more natural and fundamental aspect of relative image quality: their use in making accurate diagnoses. They apply a lossy compression algorithm to medical images, and quantify the quality of the images by the diagnostic performance of radiologists, as well as by traditional signal-to-noise ratios and subjective ratings. The study is unlike previous studies of the effects of lossy compression in that they consider non-binary detection tasks, simulate actual diagnostic practice instead of using paired tests or confidence rankings, use statistical methods that are more appropriate for non-binary clinical data than are the popular ROC curves, and use low-complexity predictive tree-structured vector quantization for compression rather than DCT-based transform codes combined with entropy coding. Their diagnostic tasks are the identification of nodules (tumors) in the lungs and lymphadenopathy in the mediastinum from computerized tomography (CT) chest scans. For the image modality, compression algorithm, and diagnostic tasks they consider, the original 12 bit per pixel (bpp) CT image can be compressed to between 1 bpp and 2 bpp with no significant changes in diagnostic accuracy

  6. Image quality of multiplanar reconstruction of pulmonary CT scans using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Honda, O; Yanagawa, M; Inoue, A; Kikuyama, A; Yoshida, S; Sumikawa, H; Tobino, K; Koyama, M; Tomiyama, N

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the image quality of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Inflated and fixed lungs were scanned with a garnet detector CT in high-resolution mode (HR mode) or non-high-resolution (HR) mode, and MPR images were then reconstructed. Observers compared 15 MPR images of ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) with those of ASIR (0%), and assessed image quality using a visual five-point scale (1, definitely inferior; 5, definitely superior), with particular emphasis on normal pulmonary structures, artefacts, noise and overall image quality. The mean overall image quality scores in HR mode were 3.67 with ASIR (40%) and 4.97 with ASIR (80%). Those in non-HR mode were 3.27 with ASIR (40%) and 3.90 with ASIR (80%). The mean artefact scores in HR mode were 3.13 with ASIR (40%) and 3.63 with ASIR (80%), but those in non-HR mode were 2.87 with ASIR (40%) and 2.53 with ASIR (80%). The mean scores of the other parameters were greater than 3, whereas those in HR mode were higher than those in non-HR mode. There were significant differences between ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) in overall image quality (pASIR did not suppress the severe artefacts of contrast medium. In general, MPR image quality with ASIR (80%) was superior to that with ASIR (40%). However, there was an increased incidence of artefacts by ASIR when CT images were obtained in non-HR mode.

  7. Development of techniques and methods for evaluation of quality of scanned image in mammography

    Carmo Santana, P. do; Nogueira, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is the second cause of death in the Brazilian female population and breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm amongst women. Mammography is an essential tool for diagnosis and early detection of this disease. In order to be effective, the mammography must be of good quality. The Brazilian College of Radiology (CBR), the National Agency for Health Surveillance (ANVISA) and international bodies recommend standards of practice for mammography. Due to the risk of ionizing radiation, techniques that minimize dose and optimize image quality are essential to ensure that all women are submitted to mammography procedures of high quality for the detection of breast cancer. In this research were analyzed components of the image treatment via digital and developed methods and techniques of analysis aiming the detection of structures for medical diagnosis, decreasing variations due to subjectivity. It used free software Image J, to make the evaluations of the information contained in the scanned images. We use the scanned images of calibration of a simulated breast to calibrate the program Image J. Thus, it was able to correctly convert the values of the scale of shades of gray in optical density values of presenting the standard deviation for each measure held. Applying the test t-student noticed that the values obtained with the digital system to the level of contrast and spatial resolution are consistent with the results obtained so subjective, since there was no significant difference (p <0.05) for all comparisons evaluated. Since then, this methodology is recommended in routine evaluations of services of mammography. (author)

  8. Reduction of MRI acoustic noise achieved by manipulation of scan parameters – A study using veterinary MR sequences

    Baker, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Sound pressure levels were measured within an MR scan room for a range of sequences employed in veterinary brain scanning, using a test phantom in an extremity coil. Variation of TR and TE, and use of a quieter gradient mode (‘whisper’ mode) were evaluated to determine their effect on sound pressure levels (SPLs). Use of a human head coil and a human brain sequence was also evaluated. Significant differences in SPL were achieved for T2, T1, T2* gradient echo and VIBE sequences by varying TR or TE, or by selecting the ‘whisper’ gradient mode. An appreciable reduction was achieved for the FLAIR sequence. Noise levels were not affected when a head coil was used in place of an extremity coil. Due to sequence parameters employed, veterinary patients and anaesthetists may be exposed to higher sound levels than those experienced in human MR examinations. The techniques described are particularly valuable in small animal MR scanning where ear protection is not routinely provided for the patient.

  9. [Time consumption and quality of an automated fusion tool for SPECT and MRI images of the brain].

    Fiedler, E; Platsch, G; Schwarz, A; Schmiedehausen, K; Tomandl, B; Huk, W; Rupprecht, Th; Rahn, N; Kuwert, T

    2003-10-01

    Although the fusion of images from different modalities may improve diagnostic accuracy, it is rarely used in clinical routine work due to logistic problems. Therefore we evaluated performance and time needed for fusing MRI and SPECT images using a semiautomated dedicated software. PATIENTS, MATERIAL AND METHOD: In 32 patients regional cerebral blood flow was measured using (99m)Tc ethylcystein dimer (ECD) and the three-headed SPECT camera MultiSPECT 3. MRI scans of the brain were performed using either a 0,2 T Open or a 1,5 T Sonata. Twelve of the MRI data sets were acquired using a 3D-T1w MPRAGE sequence, 20 with a 2D acquisition technique and different echo sequences. Image fusion was performed on a Syngo workstation using an entropy minimizing algorithm by an experienced user of the software. The fusion results were classified. We measured the time needed for the automated fusion procedure and in case of need that for manual realignment after automated, but insufficient fusion. The mean time of the automated fusion procedure was 123 s. It was for the 2D significantly shorter than for the 3D MRI datasets. For four of the 2D data sets and two of the 3D data sets an optimal fit was reached using the automated approach. The remaining 26 data sets required manual correction. The sum of the time required for automated fusion and that needed for manual correction averaged 320 s (50-886 s). The fusion of 3D MRI data sets lasted significantly longer than that of the 2D MRI data. The automated fusion tool delivered in 20% an optimal fit, in 80% manual correction was necessary. Nevertheless, each of the 32 SPECT data sets could be merged in less than 15 min with the corresponding MRI data, which seems acceptable for clinical routine use.

  10. Time consumption and quality of an automated fusion tool for SPECT and MRI images of the brain

    Fiedler, E.; Platsch, G.; Schwarz, A.; Schmiedehausen, K.; Kuwert, T.; Tomandl, B.; Huk, W.; Rupprecht, Th.; Rahn, N.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Although the fusion of images from different modalities may improve diagnostic accuracy, it is rarely used in clinical routine work due to logistic problems. Therefore we evaluated performance and time needed for fusing MRI and SPECT images using a semiautomated dedicated software. Patients, material and method: In 32 patients regional cerebral blood flow was measured using 99m Tc ethylcystein dimer (ECD) and the three-headed SPECT camera MultiSPECT 3. MRI scans of the brain were performed using either a 0,2 T Open or a 1,5 T Sonata. Twelve of the MRI data sets were acquired using a 3 D-T1 w MPRAGE sequence, 20 with a 2D acquisition technique and different echo sequences. Image fusion was performed on a Syngo workstation using an entropy minimizing algorithm by an experienced user of the software. The fusion results were classified. We measured the time needed for the automated fusion procedure and in case of need that for manual realignment after automated, but insufficient fusion. Results: The mean time of the automated fusion procedure was 123 s. It was for the 2D significantly shorter than for the 3D MRI datasets. For four of the 2D data sets and two of the 3D data sets an optimal fit was reached using the automated approach. The remaining 26 data sets required manual correction. The sum of the time required for automated fusion and that needed for manual correction averaged 320 s (50-886 s). Conclusion: The fusion of 3D MRI data sets lasted significantly longer than that of the 2D MRI data. The automated fusion tool delivered in 20% an optimal fit, in 80% manual correction was necessary. Nevertheless, each of the 32 SPECT data sets could be merged in less than 15 min with the corresponding MRI data, which seems acceptable for clinical routine use. (orig.) [de

  11. Continuously moving table MRI with sliding multislice for rectal cancer staging: Image quality and lesion detection

    Baumann, Tobias; Ludwig, Ute; Pache, Gregor; Fautz, Hans-Peter; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Schaefer, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine image quality and lesion detection of sliding multislice (SMS), a recently developed moving table MRI technique, in patients with rectal cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven paired SMS (Avanto, Siemens Medical Solutions) and MDCT (Sensation 64, Siemens Medical Solutions) examinations of abdomen and pelvis were performed in patients with rectal cancer and compared for detection of liver, lymph node and bone metastases by two independent observers. A contrast-enhanced, fat saturated 2D gradient echo sequence (TE, 2.0 ms; TR, 102 ms; slice, 5 mm) was acquired with SMS and a standard contrast-enhanced protocol (100 ml 2.5 ml/s; slice, 5 mm) was used for abdominal MDCT. Standard of reference consisted of a consensus evaluation of SMS, MDCT, and all available follow-up examinations after a period of 6 months. Artifact burden and image quality of SMS was assessed in comparison to stationary gradient echo sequences obtained in an age-matched group of 27 patients. Results: Whereas SMS achieved a mean quality score of 3.65 (scale, 0-4) for the liver, representing very good diagnostic properties, strong breathing artifacts in the intestinal region were observed in 19 cases by both observers. The retroperitoneum still achieved a mean quality score of 3.52, although breathing artifacts were noted in 12 and 15 cases (observers 1 and 2, respectively). The sensitivities of SMS to detect hepatic metastases were 91.2% and 94.1% for both observers, respectively, compared to 98.5%/98.5% for MDCT. The sensitivities for lymph node metastases were 87.5%/81.3% for SMS compared to 78.1%/81.3% for MDCT. The sensitivities for bone metastases were 91.7%/100% for SMS compared to 8.3%/16.7% for MDCT. Conclusion: With slightly reduced image quality in the intestinal region, SMS exhibits equal detection of lymph node and liver metastases compared to MDCT. SMS MRI proved to be superior to MDCT in detection of bone metastases.

  12. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part II. Data Quality Control and Processing

    Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Jo, Ieng [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Borque, Paloma [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Tatarevic, Aleksandra [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Lamer, Katia [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Bharadwaj, Nitin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Widener, Kevin B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Karen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Clothiaux, Eugene E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2013-10-04

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the Hemispherical Sky – Range Height Indicator SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  13. Weld quality inspection using laser-EMAT ultrasonic system and C-scan method

    Yang, Lei; Ume, I. Charles

    2014-02-01

    Laser/EMAT ultrasonic technique has attracted more and more interests in weld quality inspection because of its non-destructive and non-contact characteristics. When ultrasonic techniques are used to detect welds joining relative thin plates, the dominant ultrasonic waves present in the plates are Lamb waves, which propagate all through the thickness. Traditional Time of Flight(ToF) method loses its power. The broadband nature of laser excited ultrasound plus dispersive and multi-modal characteristic of Lamb waves make the EMAT acquired signals very complicated in this situation. Challenge rises in interpreting the received signals and establishing relationship between signal feature and weld quality. In this paper, the laser/EMAT ultrasonic technique was applied in a C-scan manner to record full wave propagation field over an area close to the weld. Then the effect of weld defect on the propagation field of Lamb waves was studied visually by watching an movie resulted from the recorded signals. This method was proved to be effective to detect the presence of hidden defect in the weld. Discrete wavelet transform(DWT) was applied to characterize the acquired ultrasonic signals and ideal band-pass filter was used to isolate wave components most sensitive to the weld defect. Different interactions with the weld defect were observed for different wave components. Thus this C-Scan method, combined with DWT and ideal band-pass filter, proved to be an effective methodology to experimentally study interactions of various laser excited Lamb Wave components with weld defect. In this work, the method was demonstrated by inspecting a hidden local incomplete penetration in weld. In fact, this method can be applied to study Lamb Wave interactions with any type of structural inconsistency. This work also proposed a ideal filtered based method to effectively reduce the total experimental time.

  14. Precision scan-imaging for paperboard quality inspection utilizing X-ray fluorescence

    Norlin, B.; Reza, S.; Fröjdh, C.; Nordin, T.

    2018-01-01

    Paperboard is typically made up of a core of cellulose fibers [C6H10O5] and a coating layer of [CaCO3]. The uniformity of these layers is a critical parameter for the printing quality. Current quality control methods include chemistry based visual inspection methods as well as X-ray based methods to measure the coating thickness. In this work we combine the X-ray fluorescence signals from the Ca atoms (3.7 keV) in the coating and from a Cu target (8.0 keV) placed behind the paper to simultaneously measure both the coating and the fibers. Cu was selected as the target material since its fluorescence signal is well separated from the Ca signal while its fluorescence's still are absorbed sufficiently in the paper. A laboratory scale setup is built using stepper motors, a silicon drift detector based spectrometer and a collimated X-ray beam. The spectroscopic image is retrieved by scanning the paperboard surface and registering the fluorescence signals from Ca and Cu. The exposure time for this type of setups can be significantly improved by implementing spectroscopic imaging sensors. The material contents in the layers can then be retrieved from the absolute and relative intensities of these two signals.

  15. Practical MRI atlas of neonatal brain development

    Barkovich, A.J.; Truwit, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is an anatomical reference for cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in neonates and infants. It contains 122 clear, sharp MRI scans and drawings showing changes in the normal appearance of the brain and skull during development. Sections of the atlas depict the major processes of maturation: brain myelination, development of the corpus callosum, development of the cranial bone marrow, and iron deposition in the brain. High-quality scans illustrate how these changes appear on magnetic resonance images during various stages of development

  16. Grain quality of drought tolerant accessions within the MRI Zemun Polje maize germplasm collection

    Jelena Vančetović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize Research Institute Zemun Polje (MRI gene bank created an elite drought tolerant core collection of 40 accessions, based on field trials and general combining ability with inbred lines from the main heterotic groups (Lancaster, Iowa Stiff Stalk Synthetic - BSSS and Iodent. A total of seven genetic groups were identified. Seven accessions showed good combining abilities with three testers from chosen heterotic groups, thus forming a dinstinctive genetic group (Unknown. In the present research, accessions with drought tolerance were also analyzed for grain quality, as these two traits are becoming highly important due to global warming and population growth. Kernel macronutrients contents (oil, protein and starch were determined using Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIR. Oil, protein and starch contents were significantly higher in introduced populations than in landraces for 0.43%, 0.12% and 0.85%, respectively (p<0.01. The greatest progress from the selection based on the expected genetic gain (ΔG for 5% selection intensity would be obtained for oil (14.74% followed by protein (10.14%. Landraces showed the least potential for the grain quality improvement due to the lowest expected ΔG for the three macronutrients. The differences between macronutrient content among genetic groups defined them as potentially favourable sources for a specific trait. According to ΔG values, the greatest progress in breeding would be accomplished for increased oil content with accessions from the Unknown group. Identification of the accessions with several favorable traits is valuable for simultaneous breeding for drought tolerance and grain quality.

  17. Grain quality of drought tolerant accessions within the MRI Zemun Polje maize germplasm collection

    Vancetovic, J.; Ignjatovic-Micic, D.; Bozinovic, S.; Babbic, M.; Filipovic, M.; Grcic, N.; Andjelkovic, V.

    2014-06-01

    Maize Research Institute Zemun Polje (MRI) gene bank created an elite drought tolerant core collection of 40 accessions, based on field trials and general combining ability with inbred lines from the main heterotic groups (Lancaster, Iowa Stiff Stalk Synthetic . BSSS and Iodent). A total of seven genetic groups were identified. Seven accessions showed good combining abilities with three testers from chosen heterotic groups, thus forming a distinctive genetic group (Unknown). In the present research, accessions with drought tolerance were also analyzed for grain quality, as these two traits are becoming highly important due to global warming and population growth. Kernel macronutrients contents (oil, protein and starch) were determined using Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIR). Oil, protein and starch contents were significantly higher in introduced populations than in landraces for 0.43%, 0.12% and 0.85%, respectively (p < 0.01). The greatest progress from the selection based on the expected genetic gain ({Delta}G) for 5% selection intensity would be obtained for oil (14.74%) followed by protein (10.14%). Landraces showed the least potential for the grain quality improvement due to the lowest expected {Delta}G for the three macronutrients. The differences between macronutrient content among genetic groups defined them as potentially favourable sources for a specific trait. According to {Delta}G values, the greatest progress in breeding would be accomplished for increased oil content with accessions from the Unknown group. Identification of the accessions with several favorable traits is valuable for simultaneous breeding for drought tolerance and grain quality. (Author)

  18. Scan Quality and Entrance Skin Dose in Thoracic CT: A Comparison between Bismuth Breast Shield and Posteriorly Centered Partial CT Scans

    Tappouni, Rafel; Mathers, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of the bismuth breast shield and partial CT scan in reducing entrance skin dose and to evaluate the effect of the breast shield on image quality (IQ). Methods. Nanodots were placed on an adult anthropomorphic phantom. Standard chest CT, CT with shield, and partial CT were performed. Nanodot readings and effective doses were recorded. 50 patients with chest CTs obtained both with and without breast shields were reviewed. IQ was evaluated by two radiologists and by measuring Hounsfield units (HUs) and standard deviation (SD) of HU in anterior subcutaneous region. Results. Breast shield and the partial CT scans reduced radiation to the anterior chest by 38% and 16%, respectively. Partial CT increased dose to the posterior chest by 37% and effective dose by 8%. Change in IQ in shield CT was observed in the anterior chest wall. Significant change in IQ was observed in 5/50 cases. The shield caused an increase of 20 HU (P = 0.021) and a 1.86 reduction in SD of HU (P = 0.027) in the anterior compared to posterior subcutaneous regions. Summary. Bismuth breast shield is more effective than the partial CT in reducing entrance skin dose while maintaining image quality

  19. VIRTOPSY--scientific documentation, reconstruction and animation in forensic: individual and real 3D data based geo-metric approach including optical body/object surface and radiological CT/MRI scanning.

    Thali, Michael J; Braun, Marcel; Buck, Ursula; Aghayev, Emin; Jackowski, Christian; Vock, Peter; Sonnenschein, Martin; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2005-03-01

    Until today, most of the documentation of forensic relevant medical findings is limited to traditional 2D photography, 2D conventional radiographs, sketches and verbal description. There are still some limitations of the classic documentation in forensic science especially if a 3D documentation is necessary. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate new 3D real data based geo-metric technology approaches. This paper present approaches to a 3D geo-metric documentation of injuries on the body surface and internal injuries in the living and deceased cases. Using modern imaging methods such as photogrammetry, optical surface and radiological CT/MRI scanning in combination it could be demonstrated that a real, full 3D data based individual documentation of the body surface and internal structures is possible in a non-invasive and non-destructive manner. Using the data merging/fusing and animation possibilities, it is possible to answer reconstructive questions of the dynamic development of patterned injuries (morphologic imprints) and to evaluate the possibility, that they are matchable or linkable to suspected injury-causing instruments. For the first time, to our knowledge, the method of optical and radiological 3D scanning was used to document the forensic relevant injuries of human body in combination with vehicle damages. By this complementary documentation approach, individual forensic real data based analysis and animation were possible linking body injuries to vehicle deformations or damages. These data allow conclusions to be drawn for automobile accident research, optimization of vehicle safety (pedestrian and passenger) and for further development of crash dummies. Real 3D data based documentation opens a new horizon for scientific reconstruction and animation by bringing added value and a real quality improvement in forensic science.

  20. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation

    Snow, Aisling; Milliren, Carly E.; Graham, Dionne A.; Callahan, Michael J.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Robertson, Richard L.; Taylor, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children's hospital admission reports were rated higher

  1. Anatomo-clinical overlapping maps (AnaCOM): a new method to create anatomo-functional maps from neuropsychological tests and structural MRI scan of subjects with brain lesions

    Kinkingnehun, Serge R. J.; du Boisgueheneuc, Foucaud; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Zhang, Sandy X.; Levy, Richard; Dubois, Bruno

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a new technique to analyze correlations between brain anatomy and its neurological functions. The technique is based on the anatomic MRI of patients with brain lesions who are administered neuropsychological tests. Brain lesions of the MRI scans are first manually segmented. The MRI volumes are then normalized to a reference map, using the segmented area as a mask. After normalization, the brain lesions of the MRI are segmented again in order to redefine the border of the lesions in the context of the normalized brain. Once the MRI is segmented, the patient's score on the neuropsychological test is assigned to each voxel in the lesioned area, while the rest of the voxels of the image are set to 0. Subsequently, the individual patient's MRI images are superimposed, and each voxel is reassigned the average score of the patients who have a lesion at that voxel. A threshold is applied to remove regions having less than three overlaps. This process leads to an anatomo-functional map that links brain areas to functional loss. Other maps can be created to aid in analyzing the functional maps, such as one that indicates the 95% confidence interval of the averaged scores for each area. This anatomo-clinical overlapping map (AnaCOM) method was used to obtain functional maps from patients with lesions in the superior frontal gyrus. By finding particular subregions more responsible for a particular deficit, this method can generate new hypotheses to be tested by conventional group methods.

  2. MRI Primer

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  3. A fluorescent screen + CCD system for quality assurance of therapeutic scanned ion beams

    Takeshita, E., E-mail: eriuli@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Furukawa, T., E-mail: t_furu@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Inaniwa, T., E-mail: taku@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Sato, S., E-mail: shin_s@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Himukai, T., E-mail: himukai@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shirai, T., E-mail: t_shirai@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Noda, K., E-mail: noda_k@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    A fluorescent screen + a charge coupled device (CCD) system were developed to verify the performance of scanned ion beams at the HIMAC. The fluorescent light from the screen is observed by the CCD camera. Two-dimensional fields, produced by the scanning process, i.e., the position and the size of the beam for each scan, represent of the important issues in scanning irradiation. In the developed system, the two-dimensional relative fluence and the flatness of the irradiation field were measured in a straightforward technique from the luminance distribution on the screen. The position and the size of the beams were obtained from centroid computation results of the brightness. By the good sensitivity and spatial resolution of the fluorescent screen + CCD system, the scanned ion beams were verified as the measurements at the HIMAC prototype scanning system.

  4. A fluorescent screen + CCD system for quality assurance of therapeutic scanned ion beams

    Takeshita, E.; Furukawa, T.; Inaniwa, T.; Sato, S.; Himukai, T.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2011-12-01

    A fluorescent screen + a charge coupled device (CCD) system were developed to verify the performance of scanned ion beams at the HIMAC. The fluorescent light from the screen is observed by the CCD camera. Two-dimensional fields, produced by the scanning process, i.e., the position and the size of the beam for each scan, represent of the important issues in scanning irradiation. In the developed system, the two-dimensional relative fluence and the flatness of the irradiation field were measured in a straightforward technique from the luminance distribution on the screen. The position and the size of the beams were obtained from centroid computation results of the brightness. By the good sensitivity and spatial resolution of the fluorescent screen + CCD system, the scanned ion beams were verified as the measurements at the HIMAC prototype scanning system.

  5. Measuring the quality of infection control in Dutch nursing homes using a standardized method; the Infection prevention RIsk Scan (IRIS)

    Willemsen, I.; Nelson-Melching, J.; Hendriks, Y.; Mulders, A.; Verhoeff, S.; Kluytmans-Vandenbergh, M.; Kluytmans, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We developed a standardised method to assess the quality of infection control in Dutch Nursing Home (NH), based on a cross-sectional survey that visualises the results. The method was called the Infection control RIsk Infection Scan (IRIS). We tested the applicability of this new tool in

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  7. Impact of spot size on plan quality of spot scanning proton radiosurgery for peripheral brain lesions

    Wang, Dongxu, E-mail: dongxu-wang@uiowa.edu; Dirksen, Blake; Hyer, Daniel E.; Buatti, John M.; Sheybani, Arshin; Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; TenNapel, Mindi; Bayouth, John E.; Flynn, Ryan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the plan quality of proton spot scanning (SS) radiosurgery as a function of spot size (in-air sigma) in comparison to x-ray radiosurgery for treating peripheral brain lesions. Methods: Single-field optimized (SFO) proton SS plans with sigma ranging from 1 to 8 mm, cone-based x-ray radiosurgery (Cone), and x-ray volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were generated for 11 patients. Plans were evaluated using secondary cancer risk and brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: For all patients, secondary cancer is a negligible risk compared to brain necrosis NTCP. Secondary cancer risk was lower in proton SS plans than in photon plans regardless of spot size (p = 0.001). Brain necrosis NTCP increased monotonically from an average of 2.34/100 (range 0.42/100–4.49/100) to 6.05/100 (range 1.38/100–11.6/100) as sigma increased from 1 to 8 mm, compared to the average of 6.01/100 (range 0.82/100–11.5/100) for Cone and 5.22/100 (range 1.37/100–8.00/100) for VMAT. An in-air sigma less than 4.3 mm was required for proton SS plans to reduce NTCP over photon techniques for the cohort of patients studied with statistical significance (p = 0.0186). Proton SS plans with in-air sigma larger than 7.1 mm had significantly greater brain necrosis NTCP than photon techniques (p = 0.0322). Conclusions: For treating peripheral brain lesions—where proton therapy would be expected to have the greatest depth-dose advantage over photon therapy—the lateral penumbra strongly impacts the SS plan quality relative to photon techniques: proton beamlet sigma at patient surface must be small (<7.1 mm for three-beam single-field optimized SS plans) in order to achieve comparable or smaller brain necrosis NTCP relative to photon radiosurgery techniques. Achieving such small in-air sigma values at low energy (<70 MeV) is a major technological challenge in commercially available proton therapy systems.

  8. Impact of spot size on plan quality of spot scanning proton radiosurgery for peripheral brain lesions

    Wang, Dongxu; Dirksen, Blake; Hyer, Daniel E.; Buatti, John M.; Sheybani, Arshin; Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; TenNapel, Mindi; Bayouth, John E.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the plan quality of proton spot scanning (SS) radiosurgery as a function of spot size (in-air sigma) in comparison to x-ray radiosurgery for treating peripheral brain lesions. Methods: Single-field optimized (SFO) proton SS plans with sigma ranging from 1 to 8 mm, cone-based x-ray radiosurgery (Cone), and x-ray volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were generated for 11 patients. Plans were evaluated using secondary cancer risk and brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: For all patients, secondary cancer is a negligible risk compared to brain necrosis NTCP. Secondary cancer risk was lower in proton SS plans than in photon plans regardless of spot size (p = 0.001). Brain necrosis NTCP increased monotonically from an average of 2.34/100 (range 0.42/100–4.49/100) to 6.05/100 (range 1.38/100–11.6/100) as sigma increased from 1 to 8 mm, compared to the average of 6.01/100 (range 0.82/100–11.5/100) for Cone and 5.22/100 (range 1.37/100–8.00/100) for VMAT. An in-air sigma less than 4.3 mm was required for proton SS plans to reduce NTCP over photon techniques for the cohort of patients studied with statistical significance (p = 0.0186). Proton SS plans with in-air sigma larger than 7.1 mm had significantly greater brain necrosis NTCP than photon techniques (p = 0.0322). Conclusions: For treating peripheral brain lesions—where proton therapy would be expected to have the greatest depth-dose advantage over photon therapy—the lateral penumbra strongly impacts the SS plan quality relative to photon techniques: proton beamlet sigma at patient surface must be small (<7.1 mm for three-beam single-field optimized SS plans) in order to achieve comparable or smaller brain necrosis NTCP relative to photon radiosurgery techniques. Achieving such small in-air sigma values at low energy (<70 MeV) is a major technological challenge in commercially available proton therapy systems

  9. Feasibility of an intracranial EEG-fMRI protocol at 3T: risk assessment and image quality.

    Boucousis, Shannon M; Beers, Craig A; Cunningham, Cameron J B; Gaxiola-Valdez, Ismael; Pittman, Daniel J; Goodyear, Bradley G; Federico, Paolo

    2012-11-15

    Integrating intracranial EEG (iEEG) with functional MRI (iEEG-fMRI) may help elucidate mechanisms underlying the generation of seizures. However, the introduction of iEEG electrodes in the MR environment has inherent risk and data quality implications that require consideration prior to clinical use. Previous studies of subdural and depth electrodes have confirmed low risk under specific circumstances at 1.5T and 3T. However, no studies have assessed risk and image quality related to the feasibility of a full iEEG-fMRI protocol. To this end, commercially available platinum subdural grid/strip electrodes (4×5 grid or 1×8 strip) and 4 or 6-contact depth electrodes were secured to the surface of a custom-made phantom mimicking the conductivity of the human brain. Electrode displacement, temperature increase of electrodes and surrounding phantom material, and voltage fluctuations in electrode contacts were measured in a GE Discovery MR750 3T MR scanner during a variety of imaging sequences, typical of an iEEG-fMRI protocol. An electrode grid was also used to quantify the spatial extent of susceptibility artifact. The spatial extent of susceptibility artifact in the presence of an electrode was also assessed for typical imaging parameters that maximize BOLD sensitivity at 3T (TR=1500 ms; TE=30 ms; slice thickness=4mm; matrix=64×64; field-of-view=24 cm). Under standard conditions, all electrodes exhibited no measurable displacement and no clinically significant temperature increase (2.0°C) that in some cases exceeded 10°C. Induced voltages in the frequency range that could elicit neuronal stimulation (<10 kHz) were well below the threshold of 100 mV. fMRI signal intensity was significantly reduced within 20mm of the electrodes for the imaging parameters used in this study. Thus, for the conditions tested, a full iEEG-fMRI protocol poses a low risk at 3T; however, fMRI sensitivity may be reduced immediately adjacent to the electrodes. In addition, high SAR sequences

  10. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-05: Semi-Automated, Open Source MRI Quality Assurance and Quality Control Program for Multi-Unit Institution

    Yung, J; Stefan, W; Reeve, D; Stafford, RJ

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Phantom measurements allow for the performance of magnetic resonance (MR) systems to be evaluated. Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report No. 100 Acceptance Testing and Quality Assurance Procedures for MR Imaging Facilities, American College of Radiology (ACR) MR Accreditation Program MR phantom testing, and ACR MRI quality control (QC) program documents help to outline specific tests for establishing system performance baselines as well as system stability over time. Analyzing and processing tests from multiple systems can be time-consuming for medical physicists. Besides determining whether tests are within predetermined limits or criteria, monitoring longitudinal trends can also help prevent costly downtime of systems during clinical operation. In this work, a semi-automated QC program was developed to analyze and record measurements in a database that allowed for easy access to historical data. Methods: Image analysis was performed on 27 different MR systems of 1.5T and 3.0T field strengths from GE and Siemens manufacturers. Recommended measurements involved the ACR MRI Accreditation Phantom, spherical homogenous phantoms, and a phantom with an uniform hole pattern. Measurements assessed geometric accuracy and linearity, position accuracy, image uniformity, signal, noise, ghosting, transmit gain, center frequency, and magnetic field drift. The program was designed with open source tools, employing Linux, Apache, MySQL database and Python programming language for the front and backend. Results: Processing time for each image is <2 seconds. Figures are produced to show regions of interests (ROIs) for analysis. Historical data can be reviewed to compare previous year data and to inspect for trends. Conclusion: A MRI quality assurance and QC program is necessary for maintaining high quality, ACR MRI Accredited MR programs. A reviewable database of phantom measurements assists medical physicists with processing and monitoring of large datasets

  11. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-05: Semi-Automated, Open Source MRI Quality Assurance and Quality Control Program for Multi-Unit Institution

    Yung, J; Stefan, W; Reeve, D; Stafford, RJ [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Phantom measurements allow for the performance of magnetic resonance (MR) systems to be evaluated. Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report No. 100 Acceptance Testing and Quality Assurance Procedures for MR Imaging Facilities, American College of Radiology (ACR) MR Accreditation Program MR phantom testing, and ACR MRI quality control (QC) program documents help to outline specific tests for establishing system performance baselines as well as system stability over time. Analyzing and processing tests from multiple systems can be time-consuming for medical physicists. Besides determining whether tests are within predetermined limits or criteria, monitoring longitudinal trends can also help prevent costly downtime of systems during clinical operation. In this work, a semi-automated QC program was developed to analyze and record measurements in a database that allowed for easy access to historical data. Methods: Image analysis was performed on 27 different MR systems of 1.5T and 3.0T field strengths from GE and Siemens manufacturers. Recommended measurements involved the ACR MRI Accreditation Phantom, spherical homogenous phantoms, and a phantom with an uniform hole pattern. Measurements assessed geometric accuracy and linearity, position accuracy, image uniformity, signal, noise, ghosting, transmit gain, center frequency, and magnetic field drift. The program was designed with open source tools, employing Linux, Apache, MySQL database and Python programming language for the front and backend. Results: Processing time for each image is <2 seconds. Figures are produced to show regions of interests (ROIs) for analysis. Historical data can be reviewed to compare previous year data and to inspect for trends. Conclusion: A MRI quality assurance and QC program is necessary for maintaining high quality, ACR MRI Accredited MR programs. A reviewable database of phantom measurements assists medical physicists with processing and monitoring of large datasets

  12. Automated image quality evaluation of T2 -weighted liver MRI utilizing deep learning architecture.

    Esses, Steven J; Lu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Tiejun; Shanbhogue, Krishna; Dane, Bari; Bruno, Mary; Chandarana, Hersh

    2018-03-01

    To develop and test a deep learning approach named Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for automated screening of T 2 -weighted (T 2 WI) liver acquisitions for nondiagnostic images, and compare this automated approach to evaluation by two radiologists. We evaluated 522 liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams performed at 1.5T and 3T at our institution between November 2014 and May 2016 for CNN training and validation. The CNN consisted of an input layer, convolutional layer, fully connected layer, and output layer. 351 T 2 WI were anonymized for training. Each case was annotated with a label of being diagnostic or nondiagnostic for detecting lesions and assessing liver morphology. Another independently collected 171 cases were sequestered for a blind test. These 171 T 2 WI were assessed independently by two radiologists and annotated as being diagnostic or nondiagnostic. These 171 T 2 WI were presented to the CNN algorithm and image quality (IQ) output of the algorithm was compared to that of two radiologists. There was concordance in IQ label between Reader 1 and CNN in 79% of cases and between Reader 2 and CNN in 73%. The sensitivity and the specificity of the CNN algorithm in identifying nondiagnostic IQ was 67% and 81% with respect to Reader 1 and 47% and 80% with respect to Reader 2. The negative predictive value of the algorithm for identifying nondiagnostic IQ was 94% and 86% (relative to Readers 1 and 2). We demonstrate a CNN algorithm that yields a high negative predictive value when screening for nondiagnostic T 2 WI of the liver. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:723-728. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. SU-F-J-166: Volumetric Spatial Distortions Comparison for 1.5 Tesla Versus 3 Tesla MRI for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Scans Using Frame Marker Fusion and Co-Registration Modes

    Neyman, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare typical volumetric spatial distortions for 1.5 Tesla versus 3 Tesla MRI Gamma Knife radiosurgery scans in the frame marker fusion and co-registration frame-less modes. Methods: Quasar phantom by Modus Medical Devices Inc. with GRID image distortion software was used for measurements of volumetric distortions. 3D volumetric T1 weighted scans of the phantom were produced on 1.5 T Avanto and 3 T Skyra MRI Siemens scanners. The analysis was done two ways: for scans with localizer markers from the Leksell frame and relatively to the phantom only (simulated co-registration technique). The phantom grid contained a total of 2002 vertices or control points that were used in the assessment of volumetric geometric distortion for all scans. Results: Volumetric mean absolute spatial deviations relatively to the frame localizer markers for 1.5 and 3 Tesla machine were: 1.39 ± 0.15 and 1.63 ± 0.28 mm with max errors of 1.86 and 2.65 mm correspondingly. Mean 2D errors from the Gamma Plan were 0.3 and 1.0 mm. For simulated co-registration technique the volumetric mean absolute spatial deviations relatively to the phantom for 1.5 and 3 Tesla machine were: 0.36 ± 0.08 and 0.62 ± 0.13 mm with max errors of 0.57 and 1.22 mm correspondingly. Conclusion: Volumetric spatial distortions are lower for 1.5 Tesla versus 3 Tesla MRI machines localized with markers on frames and significantly lower for co-registration techniques with no frame localization. The results show the advantage of using co-registration technique for minimizing MRI volumetric spatial distortions which can be especially important for steep dose gradient fields typically used in Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Consultant for Elekta AB

  14. Combined bilateral idiopathic necrosis of the humerus and femur heads: Bone scan, X-ray, CT, and MRI findings. Kombinierte beidseitige idiopathische Nekrose der Humerus- und Femurkoepfe: Skelettszintigraphie, Roentgen-, CT- und MRT-Befunde

    Piepenburg, R.; Hahn, K. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin); Doll, G. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Roentgendiagnostik); Grimm, J. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Orthopaedische Klinik)

    1992-12-01

    Untreated aseptic bone necroses close to a joint commonly leads to severe secondary arthrosis and destruction of the joint within a short time. Therefore, only a diagnosis in an early stage of the disease offers the chance of a successful joint- preserving therapy. In cases of clinically suspected aseptic bone necrosis but still negative or doubtful X-ray findings, bone scans or MRI are reliable methods of verifying the diagnosis. (orig./MG).

  15. SU-F-J-166: Volumetric Spatial Distortions Comparison for 1.5 Tesla Versus 3 Tesla MRI for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Scans Using Frame Marker Fusion and Co-Registration Modes

    Neyman, G [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare typical volumetric spatial distortions for 1.5 Tesla versus 3 Tesla MRI Gamma Knife radiosurgery scans in the frame marker fusion and co-registration frame-less modes. Methods: Quasar phantom by Modus Medical Devices Inc. with GRID image distortion software was used for measurements of volumetric distortions. 3D volumetric T1 weighted scans of the phantom were produced on 1.5 T Avanto and 3 T Skyra MRI Siemens scanners. The analysis was done two ways: for scans with localizer markers from the Leksell frame and relatively to the phantom only (simulated co-registration technique). The phantom grid contained a total of 2002 vertices or control points that were used in the assessment of volumetric geometric distortion for all scans. Results: Volumetric mean absolute spatial deviations relatively to the frame localizer markers for 1.5 and 3 Tesla machine were: 1.39 ± 0.15 and 1.63 ± 0.28 mm with max errors of 1.86 and 2.65 mm correspondingly. Mean 2D errors from the Gamma Plan were 0.3 and 1.0 mm. For simulated co-registration technique the volumetric mean absolute spatial deviations relatively to the phantom for 1.5 and 3 Tesla machine were: 0.36 ± 0.08 and 0.62 ± 0.13 mm with max errors of 0.57 and 1.22 mm correspondingly. Conclusion: Volumetric spatial distortions are lower for 1.5 Tesla versus 3 Tesla MRI machines localized with markers on frames and significantly lower for co-registration techniques with no frame localization. The results show the advantage of using co-registration technique for minimizing MRI volumetric spatial distortions which can be especially important for steep dose gradient fields typically used in Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Consultant for Elekta AB.

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  17. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Full Text Available ... the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation ... high as with other imaging techniques, such as CT or MRI. However, nuclear medicine scans are more ...

  18. Impact of measurement approach on the quality of gamma scanning density profile in a tray type lab-scale column

    Shahabinejad, H.; Feghhi, S.A.H.; Khorsandi, M.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study for investigating impact of the measurement approach on the quality of gamma scanning density profile in tray type columns using experimental and computational evaluations. Experimental density profiles from the total and the photopeak count measurements, as two approaches in gamma ray column scanning technique, has been compared with the computational density profile from Monte Carlo simulation results. We used a laboratory distillation column of 51 cm diameter as an illustrative example for this investigation. 137 Cs was used as a gamma ray source with the activity of 296 MBq (8 mCi), with a NaI(Tl) detector. MCNP4C Monte Carlo code has been used for simulations. The quality of the density profile in the photopeak count approach is relatively within 155–204% better than that of the total count approach for experimental results. The same comparison for simulation results leads to a relative difference within 100–135% for the density profile. - Highlights: • The quality of density profile in gamma scanning technique has been studied. • Quality of density profile depends on the measurement approach. • A laboratory distillation column has been used as an illustrative example. • MCNP4C Monte Carlo code has been used for simulations

  19. SU-E-T-464: On the Equivalence of the Quality Correction Factor for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Sorriaux, J; Paganetti, H; Testa, M; Giantsoudi, D; Schuemann, J; Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J.; Lee, J; Palmans, H; Vynckier, S; Sterpin, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In current practice, most proton therapy centers apply IAEA TRS-398 reference dosimetry protocol. Quality correction factors (kQ) take into account in the dose determination process the differences in beam qualities used for calibration unit and for treatment unit. These quality correction factors are valid for specific reference conditions. TRS-398 reference conditions should be achievable in both scattered proton beams (i.e. DS) and scanned proton beams (i.e. PBS). However, it is not a priori clear if TRS-398 kQ data, which are based on Monte Carlo (MC) calculations in scattered beams, can be used for scanned beams. Using TOPAS-Geant4 MC simulations, the study aims to determine whether broad beam quality correction factors calculated in TRS-398 can be directly applied to PBS delivery modality. Methods: As reference conditions, we consider a 10×10×10 cm 3 homogeneous dose distribution delivered by PBS system in a water phantom (32/10 cm range/modulation) and an air cavity placed at the center of the spread-out-Bragg-peak. In order to isolate beam differences, a hypothetical broad beam is simulated. This hypothetical beam reproduces exactly the same range modulation, and uses the same energy layers than the PBS field. Ion chamber responses are computed for the PBS and hypothetical beams and then compared. Results: For an air cavity of 2×2×0.2 cm 3 , the ratio of ion chamber responses for the PBS and hypothetical beam qualities is 0.9991 ± 0.0016. Conclusion: Quality correction factors are insensitive to the delivery pattern of the beam (broad beam or PBS), as long as similar dose distributions are achieved. This investigation, for an air cavity, suggests that broad beam quality correction factors published in TRS-398 can be applied for scanned beams. J. Sorriaux is financially supported by a public-private partnership involving the company Ion Beam Applications (IBA)

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not ...

  2. Musculoskeletal MRI: dedicated systems

    Masciocchi, C.; Barile, A.; Satragno, L.

    2000-01-01

    The ''dedicated'' MRI units have characteristics of high diagnostic accuracy and lower installation and management costs as compared with whole-body systems. The dedicated MRI units are easy to install. The low weight allows their installation also under unfavorable circumstances. In a dedicated system cost-effectiveness and ease of installation must be accompanied by the capability of providing high-quality images. In our experience, the high number of examinations performed, the most part of which provided with the surgical controls, allowed an accurate evaluation of the diagnostic potentialities of the dedicated magnet. We were not able to perform the examinations in only 3 % of cases due to the physical shape of the patient and the clinical condition of the patient which may hinder the correct positioning of the limb. The overlapping of the diagnostic accuracy of the E-scan and Artoscan units in the study of the lower limbs, compared with whole-body units and surgery, prompted us to exploit the potentialities of the E-Scan in the study of the shoulder. We had a good correlation between E-Scan, whole-body units, and surgical findings, which confirmed the high diagnostic accuracy of the dedicated system. In conclusion, in our experience carried out in the musculoskeletal system, the dedicated magnets showed promising results. Their diagnostic reliability and utility was comparable to that obtained from conventional units operating at higher magnetic fields. (orig.)

  3. SU-F-BRD-15: Quality Correction Factors in Scanned Or Broad Proton Therapy Beams Are Indistinguishable

    Sorriaux, J; Lee, J [Molecular Imaging Radiotherapy & Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); ICTEAM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Testa, M; Paganetti, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, Massachusetts (United States); Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J [Ion Beam Applications, Louvain-la-neuve, Brabant Wallon (Belgium); Palmans, H [EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Vynckier, S [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Sterpin, E [Molecular Imaging Radiotherapy & Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The IAEA TRS-398 code of practice details the reference conditions for reference dosimetry of proton beams using ionization chambers and the required beam quality correction factors (kQ). Pencil beam scanning (PBS) requires multiple spots to reproduce the reference conditions. The objective is to demonstrate, using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, that kQ factors for broad beams can be used for scanned beams under the same reference conditions with no significant additional uncertainty. We consider hereafter the general Alfonso formalism (Alfonso et al, 2008) for non-standard beam. Methods: To approach the reference conditions and the associated dose distributions, PBS must combine many pencil beams with range modulation and shaping techniques different than those used in passive systems (broad beams). This might lead to a different energy spectrum at the measurement point. In order to evaluate the impact of these differences on kQ factors, ion chamber responses are computed with MC (Geant4 9.6) in a dedicated scanned pencil beam (Q-pcsr) producing a 10×10cm2 composite field with a flat dose distribution from 10 to 16 cm depth. Ion chamber responses are also computed by MC in a broad beam with quality Q-ds (double scattering). The dose distribution of Q -pcsr matches the dose distribution of Q-ds. k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) is computed for a 2×2×0.2cm{sup 3} idealized air cavity and a realistic plane-parallel ion chamber (IC). Results: Under reference conditions, quality correction factors for a scanned composite field versus a broad beam are the same for air cavity dose response, k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) =1.001±0.001 and for a Roos IC, k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) =0.999±0.005. Conclusion: Quality correction factors for ion chamber response in scanned and broad proton therapy beams are identical under reference conditions within the calculation uncertainties. The results indicate that quality correction factors published in IAEA TRS-398 can be used for scanned beams in the SOBP of a

  4. SU-F-BRD-15: Quality Correction Factors in Scanned Or Broad Proton Therapy Beams Are Indistinguishable

    Sorriaux, J; Lee, J; Testa, M; Paganetti, H; Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J; Palmans, H; Vynckier, S; Sterpin, E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The IAEA TRS-398 code of practice details the reference conditions for reference dosimetry of proton beams using ionization chambers and the required beam quality correction factors (kQ). Pencil beam scanning (PBS) requires multiple spots to reproduce the reference conditions. The objective is to demonstrate, using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, that kQ factors for broad beams can be used for scanned beams under the same reference conditions with no significant additional uncertainty. We consider hereafter the general Alfonso formalism (Alfonso et al, 2008) for non-standard beam. Methods: To approach the reference conditions and the associated dose distributions, PBS must combine many pencil beams with range modulation and shaping techniques different than those used in passive systems (broad beams). This might lead to a different energy spectrum at the measurement point. In order to evaluate the impact of these differences on kQ factors, ion chamber responses are computed with MC (Geant4 9.6) in a dedicated scanned pencil beam (Q-pcsr) producing a 10×10cm2 composite field with a flat dose distribution from 10 to 16 cm depth. Ion chamber responses are also computed by MC in a broad beam with quality Q-ds (double scattering). The dose distribution of Q -pcsr matches the dose distribution of Q-ds. k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) is computed for a 2×2×0.2cm 3 idealized air cavity and a realistic plane-parallel ion chamber (IC). Results: Under reference conditions, quality correction factors for a scanned composite field versus a broad beam are the same for air cavity dose response, k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) =1.001±0.001 and for a Roos IC, k-(Q-pcsr,Q-ds) =0.999±0.005. Conclusion: Quality correction factors for ion chamber response in scanned and broad proton therapy beams are identical under reference conditions within the calculation uncertainties. The results indicate that quality correction factors published in IAEA TRS-398 can be used for scanned beams in the SOBP of a high

  5. Obese patients in an open MRI at 1.0 Tesla: image quality, diagnostic impact and feasibility

    Bucourt, Maximilian de; Streitparth, Florian; Wonneberger, Uta; Rump, Jens; Teichgraeber, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the performance of an open MRI system at its conceptual limits by examining excessively obese patients who otherwise could not receive adequate imaging examinations. Twenty-six excessively obese patients (BMI ≥ 35, average age 46) where CT, standard MR or ultrasound examinations were not possible or not conclusive were referred to an open MRI system at 1.0 Tesla. Image quality was measured by SNR and CNR with the integrated body coil for obese patients and optimal body coils for a regular weight control group (average BMI 23, average age 30). MRI findings were evaluated by a diagnostic impact matrix. SNR and CNR were generally lower in obese patients when the integrated body coil was used compared to the normal weight group with ideal body coils e.g.: For cerebral imaging T2W TSE (<5% for white matter, ca. 30% for grey matter) and T1W SE (ca. 15% for white matter, <5% for grey matter), for spinal imaging T2W TSE (ca. 35% for disc and vertebral body) and T1W SE (about 2% for disc, ca. 10% for vertebral body). Relevant new diagnoses impacting patient's therapy were identified in 30% (8/26), the particular medical question of the referring physician could be ruled out as possible reason for the medical condition in 53% (14/26). In excessively obese patients where CT, standard MR or ultrasound examination is not possible or not conclusive open MRI system have great potential in diagnostic evaluation, offering lower but sufficient image quality to impact therapy. (orig.)

  6. [Predictive quality of the injury severity score in the systematic use of cranial MRI].

    Woischneck, D; Lerch, K; Kapapa, T; Skalej, M; Firsching, R

    2010-09-01

    The ABBREVIATED INJURY SCORE (AIS) for the head is mostly coded on the basis of cranial computed tomography (CT). It defines, to a large extent, the predictive potency of the INJURY SEVERITY SCORE (ISS). The present study investigates whether the predictive capacity of the ISS can be improved by the systematic use of data from cranial MRI. 167 patients, who had been in a coma for at least 24 hours following trauma, underwent an MRI examination within 8 days. All had been found to have an intracranial injury on initial CT. 49 % had also suffered extracranial injuries. The GLASGOW OUTCOME SCALE (GOS) was determined 6 months post trauma. AIS, ISS and GOS values were rated as ordinal measurements. A contingency table was used as the statistical method of analysis, with a significance assumed as p RISC) score was improved by use of adapted MRI data. If visible brain stem lesions on MRI were coded according to the AIS guidelines, there was a significant increase in the ISS which correlated significantly to the GOS. If the AIS coding was adjusted to the prognostic significance of individual brain stem lesions, there was a further improvement in the prognostic potency of the ISS. The study encourages the inclusion of data obtained from MRI diagnostics in the ISS calculation. There are alternative ways. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The visual air quality predicted by conventional and scanning teleradiometers and an integrating nephelometer

    Malm, W [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV; Pitchford, A; Tree, R; Walther, E; Pearson, M; Archer, S

    1981-12-01

    Many Class I areas have unique vistas which require an observer to look over complex terrain containing basins, valleys, and canyons. These topographic features tend to form pollution ''basins'' and ''corridors'' that trap and funnel air pollutants under certain meteorological conditions. For example, on numerous days, layers of haze in the San Juan River Basin obscure various vista elements including the Chuska Mountains as viewed from Mesa Verde National Park, CO. Measrements by an integrating nephelometer and conventional teleradiometer at one location in Mesa Verde do not quantify inhomogeneities. In this paper, data from these instruments are compated to data derived from scanning teleradiometer measurements of photographic slide images. The slides, surrogates of the real three-dimensional scene, were projected and scanned to determine relative sky and vista radiance at 40 points within a vertical slice of the vista. Comparison of the corresponding visual range data sets for each instrument for September and December 1979 demonstrates the utility of the scanning teleradiometer.

  8. MRI follow-up examinations in multiple sclerosis: guidelines for quality assurance

    Gass, A.; Radue, E.W.; Filippi, M.; Kappos, L.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly sensitive to pathological tissue changes in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. It demonstrates the frequently subclinical disease activity and follow-up examinations regularly show the accumulation of new lesions and the development of atrophy. The increasing importance of follow-up examinations in MS patients makes it necessary to provide comparable MRI data even over long observation periods. This review article focusses on critical variables in this regard and technical issues; practical guidelines for MRI protocols in MS patients are presented. The influence of field strenght, MR systems from different manufacturers, and new software releases is described. Guidelines concerning the graphic planning of the examination, sequence protocols, documentation and reporting of cranial MR studies in MS patients are presented. (orig.) [de

  9. TIPS bilateral noise reduction in 4D CT perfusion scans produces high-quality cerebral blood flow maps

    Mendrik, Adrienne M; Van Ginneken, Bram; Viergever, Max A [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Vonken, Evert-jan; De Jong, Hugo W; Riordan, Alan; Van Seeters, Tom; Smit, Ewoud J; Prokop, Mathias, E-mail: a.m.mendrik@gmail.com [Radiology Department, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-07-07

    Cerebral computed tomography perfusion (CTP) scans are acquired to detect areas of abnormal perfusion in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. These 4D CTP scans consist of multiple sequential 3D CT scans over time. Therefore, to reduce radiation exposure to the patient, the amount of x-ray radiation that can be used per sequential scan is limited, which results in a high level of noise. To detect areas of abnormal perfusion, perfusion parameters are derived from the CTP data, such as the cerebral blood flow (CBF). Algorithms to determine perfusion parameters, especially singular value decomposition, are very sensitive to noise. Therefore, noise reduction is an important preprocessing step for CTP analysis. In this paper, we propose a time-intensity profile similarity (TIPS) bilateral filter to reduce noise in 4D CTP scans, while preserving the time-intensity profiles (fourth dimension) that are essential for determining the perfusion parameters. The proposed TIPS bilateral filter is compared to standard Gaussian filtering, and 4D and 3D (applied separately to each sequential scan) bilateral filtering on both phantom and patient data. Results on the phantom data show that the TIPS bilateral filter is best able to approach the ground truth (noise-free phantom), compared to the other filtering methods (lowest root mean square error). An observer study is performed using CBF maps derived from fifteen CTP scans of acute stroke patients filtered with standard Gaussian, 3D, 4D and TIPS bilateral filtering. These CBF maps were blindly presented to two observers that indicated which map they preferred for (1) gray/white matter differentiation, (2) detectability of infarcted area and (3) overall image quality. Based on these results, the TIPS bilateral filter ranked best and its CBF maps were scored to have the best overall image quality in 100% of the cases by both observers. Furthermore, quantitative CBF and cerebral blood volume values in both the phantom and the

  10. Identification of quality improvement areas in pediatric MRI from analysis of patient safety reports

    Jaimes, Camilo; Murcia, Diana J.; Miguel, Karen; DeFuria, Cathryn; Sagar, Pallavi; Gee, Michael S.

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of safety reports has been utilized to guide practice improvement efforts in adult magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data specific to pediatric MRI could help target areas of improvement in this population. To estimate the incidence of safety reports in pediatric MRI and to determine associated risk factors. In a retrospective HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study, a single-institution Radiology Information System was queried to identify MRI studies performed in pediatric patients (0-18 years old) from 1/1/2010 to 12/31/2015. The safety report database was queried for events matching the same demographic and dates. Data on patient age, gender, location (inpatient, outpatient, emergency room [ER]), and the use of sedation/general anesthesia were recorded. Safety reports were grouped into categories based on the cause and their severity. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize continuous variables. Chi-square analyses were performed for univariate determination of statistical significance of variables associated with safety report rates. A multivariate logistic regression was used to control for possible confounding effects. A total of 16,749 pediatric MRI studies and 88 safety reports were analyzed, yielding a rate of 0.52%. There were significant differences in the rate of safety reports between patients younger than 6 years (0.89%) and those older (0.41%) (P<0.01), sedated (0.8%) and awake children (0.45%) (P<0.01), and inpatients (1.1%) and outpatients (0.4%) (P<0.01). The use of sedation/general anesthesia is an independent risk factor for a safety report (P=0.02). The most common causes for safety reports were service coordination (34%), drug reactions (19%), and diagnostic test and ordering errors (11%). The overall rate of safety reports in pediatric MRI is 0.52%. Interventions should focus on vulnerable populations, such as younger patients, those requiring sedation, and those in need of acute medical attention. (orig.)

  11. Identification of quality improvement areas in pediatric MRI from analysis of patient safety reports

    Jaimes, Camilo [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Murcia, Diana J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Miguel, Karen; DeFuria, Cathryn [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Quality and Safety Office, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Sagar, Pallavi; Gee, Michael S. [Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Division of Pediatric Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Analysis of safety reports has been utilized to guide practice improvement efforts in adult magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data specific to pediatric MRI could help target areas of improvement in this population. To estimate the incidence of safety reports in pediatric MRI and to determine associated risk factors. In a retrospective HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study, a single-institution Radiology Information System was queried to identify MRI studies performed in pediatric patients (0-18 years old) from 1/1/2010 to 12/31/2015. The safety report database was queried for events matching the same demographic and dates. Data on patient age, gender, location (inpatient, outpatient, emergency room [ER]), and the use of sedation/general anesthesia were recorded. Safety reports were grouped into categories based on the cause and their severity. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize continuous variables. Chi-square analyses were performed for univariate determination of statistical significance of variables associated with safety report rates. A multivariate logistic regression was used to control for possible confounding effects. A total of 16,749 pediatric MRI studies and 88 safety reports were analyzed, yielding a rate of 0.52%. There were significant differences in the rate of safety reports between patients younger than 6 years (0.89%) and those older (0.41%) (P<0.01), sedated (0.8%) and awake children (0.45%) (P<0.01), and inpatients (1.1%) and outpatients (0.4%) (P<0.01). The use of sedation/general anesthesia is an independent risk factor for a safety report (P=0.02). The most common causes for safety reports were service coordination (34%), drug reactions (19%), and diagnostic test and ordering errors (11%). The overall rate of safety reports in pediatric MRI is 0.52%. Interventions should focus on vulnerable populations, such as younger patients, those requiring sedation, and those in need of acute medical attention. (orig.)

  12. Heart MRI

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  13. Effect of mid-scan breathing changes on quality of 4DCT using a commercial phase-based sorting algorithm.

    Noel, Camille E; Parikh, Parag J

    2011-05-01

    Though it is known that irregular breathing can introduce artifacts in commercial 4DCT, this has not been systematically explored. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of variations in basic parameters of the breathing wave on 4DCT imaging quality. A four-dimensional motion platform holding an acrylic sphere was scanned while moving in a trajectory modeled from a lung cancer patient. A bellows device was used as a respiratory surrogate, and the images were sorted by a commercial phase-based sorting algorithm. Motion during the first half of the scan was produced at a baseline trajectory with a consistent frequency and amplitude of 15 breaths per minute and 1 cm, peak to peak. The two parameters were then varied mid-scan to new frequency and amplitude values, with frequencies ranging from 7.5 to 22 bpm and amplitudes ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 cm. Image sets representing four respiratory phases were contoured. Each set was analyzed to compare centroid displacement, density homogeneity, and volumetric and geometric distortions of the imaged sphere. Undercoverage of the target ITV and overcoverage of healthy tissue was also evaluated. Changes in amplitude of 25% or more, with or without changes in frequency, consistently caused measurable distortions in shape, position, and density of the imaged sphere. Frequency changes over 50% showed a similar trend. This study suggests that basic breathing statistics can be used to quickly assess the quality of a 4DCT scan prior to image reconstruction. Such information can help give indication of the proper course of action when irregular breathing patterns are observed during CT scanning.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance therapy in lumbar disc herniation with lumbar radicular syndrome: effects of the intervention on pain intensity, health-related quality of life, disease-related disability, consumption of pain medication, duration of sick leave and MRI analysis.

    Salfinger, H; Salomonowitz, G; Friedrich, K M; Hahne, J; Holzapfel, J; Friedrich, M

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to assess the effects of therapeutic nuclear magnetic resonance (tNMR) as a conservative treatment for lumbar radicular syndrome (LRS) in patients with lumbar disc herniation. The prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial included 94 patients, aged 20-60 years (44.79 ± 8.83), with LRS caused by lumbar disc herniation confirmed by MRI scans and with clinical signs of a radicular lesion without indication for surgical intervention. Treatment group (TG) and control group (CG) received standard non-surgical therapy. Additionally, the TG had seven sessions with the tNMR device with a magnetic flux density of 2.3 mT and a frequency of 85 kHz; the CG received 7 sham treatments. Outcome parameters were the treatment effect on pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale-VAS), health-related quality of life (36-item Short Form Health Survey-SF-36), disease-related disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMDQ), pain medication intake, duration of sick leave and morphological changes assessed by MRI scan analysis. VAS scores improved significantly in both groups (p Patients in the TG recorded significantly fewer days of sick leave in month 3 after treatment (p = 0.026). MRI scan summary scores improved significantly in both groups (L4/5 p treatment of lumbar disc herniation with LRS. The application of tNMR did not meet MCID criteria. It rendered few statistically significant differences between patient groups. The overall results of this trial make a clinical implementation of tNMR in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation with LRS appear premature. Further research is needed to better understand the mode of action of tNMR on compressed neural tissue and to elucidate the issue of the cost/benefit ratio.

  15. Automatic, accurate, and reproducible segmentation of the brain and cerebro-spinal fluid in T1-weighted volume MRI scans and its application to serial cerebral and intracranial volumetry

    Lemieux, Louis

    2001-07-01

    A new fully automatic algorithm for the segmentation of the brain and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) from T1-weighted volume MRI scans of the head was specifically developed in the context of serial intra-cranial volumetry. The method is an extension of a previously published brain extraction algorithm. The brain mask is used as a basis for CSF segmentation based on morphological operations, automatic histogram analysis and thresholding. Brain segmentation is then obtained by iterative tracking of the brain-CSF interface. Grey matter (GM), white matter (WM) and CSF volumes are calculated based on a model of intensity probability distribution that includes partial volume effects. Accuracy was assessed using a digital phantom scan. Reproducibility was assessed by segmenting pairs of scans from 20 normal subjects scanned 8 months apart and 11 patients with epilepsy scanned 3.5 years apart. Segmentation accuracy as measured by overlap was 98% for the brain and 96% for the intra-cranial tissues. The volume errors were: total brain (TBV): -1.0%, intra-cranial (ICV):0.1%, CSF: +4.8%. For repeated scans, matching resulted in improved reproducibility. In the controls, the coefficient of reliability (CR) was 1.5% for the TVB and 1.0% for the ICV. In the patients, the Cr for the ICV was 1.2%.

  16. Evaluation on the influence of electrocardiograph modulated milliampere on image quality and exposure dosage of volume CT heart scan

    Zhang Sen; Du Xiangke; Li Jianyin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To find out whether the use of ECG modulated current (mA) will influence image quality and to decide whether the electrocardiograph (ECG) modulated mA will effectively reduce the exposure dosage. Methods: The cardiac pulsating phantom was set at three speed levels, i.e. high, medium, and low speed so as to simulate different heart rates. The phantom was scanned with ECG modulated mA turned on and off, and the exposure dosage of each scan sequence was documented. The images were reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm that matched the different levels of heart rate. CT values and their corresponding standard deviations at uniform areas on the images and the variation of the CT values at different locations were measured. The results from the two groups with and without ECG modulated mA were analyzed. Results: Under the same level of heart rate, the exposure dosage was remarkably reduced when the ECG modulated mA was on than when it was off. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference (P>0.05) between the images from the two groups. Conclusion: When scanning the heart with volume CT (VCT), the application of ECG modulated mA can effectively reduce the exposure dosage without sacrificing the image quality. (authors)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  18. Improved image quality of cone beam CT scans for radiotherapy image guidance using fiber-interspaced antiscatter grid.

    Stankovic, Uros; van Herk, Marcel; Ploeger, Lennert S; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-06-01

    Medical linear accelerator mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner provides useful soft tissue contrast for purposes of image guidance in radiotherapy. The presence of extensive scattered radiation has a negative effect on soft tissue visibility and uniformity of CBCT scans. Antiscatter grids (ASG) are used in the field of diagnostic radiography to mitigate the scatter. They usually do increase the contrast of the scan, but simultaneously increase the noise. Therefore, and considering other scatter mitigation mechanisms present in a CBCT scanner, the applicability of ASGs with aluminum interspacing for a wide range of imaging conditions has been inconclusive in previous studies. In recent years, grids using fiber interspacers have appeared, providing grids with higher scatter rejection while maintaining reasonable transmission of primary radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of one such grid on CBCT image quality. The grid used (Philips Medical Systems) had ratio of 21:1, frequency 36 lp/cm, and nominal selectivity of 11.9. It was mounted on the kV flat panel detector of an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and tested in a phantom and a clinical study. Due to the flex of the linac and presence of gridline artifacts an angle dependent gain correction algorithm was devised to mitigate resulting artifacts. Scan reconstruction was performed using XVI4.5 augmented with inhouse developed image lag correction and Hounsfield unit calibration. To determine the necessary parameters for Hounsfield unit calibration and software scatter correction parameters, the Catphan 600 (The Phantom Laboratory) phantom was used. Image quality parameters were evaluated using CIRS CBCT Image Quality and Electron Density Phantom (CIRS) in two different geometries: one modeling head and neck and other pelvic region. Phantoms were acquired with and without the grid and reconstructed with and without software correction which was adapted for the different acquisition

  19. Improved image quality of cone beam CT scans for radiotherapy image guidance using fiber-interspaced antiscatter grid

    Stankovic, Uros; Herk, Marcel van; Ploeger, Lennert S.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Medical linear accelerator mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner provides useful soft tissue contrast for purposes of image guidance in radiotherapy. The presence of extensive scattered radiation has a negative effect on soft tissue visibility and uniformity of CBCT scans. Antiscatter grids (ASG) are used in the field of diagnostic radiography to mitigate the scatter. They usually do increase the contrast of the scan, but simultaneously increase the noise. Therefore, and considering other scatter mitigation mechanisms present in a CBCT scanner, the applicability of ASGs with aluminum interspacing for a wide range of imaging conditions has been inconclusive in previous studies. In recent years, grids using fiber interspacers have appeared, providing grids with higher scatter rejection while maintaining reasonable transmission of primary radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of one such grid on CBCT image quality. Methods: The grid used (Philips Medical Systems) had ratio of 21:1, frequency 36 lp/cm, and nominal selectivity of 11.9. It was mounted on the kV flat panel detector of an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and tested in a phantom and a clinical study. Due to the flex of the linac and presence of gridline artifacts an angle dependent gain correction algorithm was devised to mitigate resulting artifacts. Scan reconstruction was performed using XVI4.5 augmented with inhouse developed image lag correction and Hounsfield unit calibration. To determine the necessary parameters for Hounsfield unit calibration and software scatter correction parameters, the Catphan 600 (The Phantom Laboratory) phantom was used. Image quality parameters were evaluated using CIRS CBCT Image Quality and Electron Density Phantom (CIRS) in two different geometries: one modeling head and neck and other pelvic region. Phantoms were acquired with and without the grid and reconstructed with and without software correction which was adapted for the different

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ... thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... an MRI scan, but this is rare. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... injection. If you do not require sedation, no recovery period is necessary. You may resume your usual ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional ( ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast for an MRI. If you ... can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  10. Evaluation of the Effect of Light and Scanning Time Delay on The Image Quality of Intra Oral Photostimulable Phosphor Plates.

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Yousefi, Arman; Soheili, Setareh; Ghazikhanloo, Karim; Amini, Payam; Mohammadpoor, Haniyeh

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, digital radiography is widely used in dental practice. One of the most common types is Photo Stimulated Phosphor Plate (PSP). The aims of this experimental study were to evaluate the impacts of different combinations of storage conditions and varying delays in reading of digital images captured using PSPs. Standardized images of a step wedges were obtained using PSPs from the Digora digital systems. Plates were exposed and immediately scanned to produce the baseline gold standard. The plates were re-exposed and stored in four different storage conditions: white light, yellow light, natural light environment and dark room, then scanned after 10 and 30 minutes and 4 and 8 hours. Objective analysis was conducted by density measurements and the data were analyzed statistically using GEE test. Subjective analysis was performed by two oral and maxillofacial radiologists and the results were analyzed using McNemar's test. The results from GEE analysis show that in the natural light environment, the densities in 10 minutes did not differ from the baseline. The mean densities decreased significantly during the time in all environments. The mean densities in step 2 for the dark room environment decreased with a slighter slope in comparison to yellow environment significantly. PSP images showed significant decrease in the density in plates scanned for 10 minutes or longer after exposure which may not be detected clinically. The yellow light environment had a different impact on the quality of PSP images. The spatial resolution did not change significantly with time.

  11. Evaluation of diagnostic quality in musculoskeletal three-dimensional CT scans

    Vannier, M.W.; Hildebolt, C.F.; Gilula, L.A.; Sutherland, C.J.; Offutt, C.J.; Drebin, R.; Mantle, M.; Giordono, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A major application of three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) is in the imaging of the skeleton. Three-dimensional CT has an important role in determining the presence and extent of congenital and acquired orthopedic abnormalities. The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of three-dimensional CT, planar CT, and plain radiography in the detection and characterization of orthopedic abnormalities. Three-dimensional CT scan reconstructions were obtained by two methods, surface reconstruction and volumetric techniques. Seventy patients were imaged with CT, three-dimensional CT, and plain radiography. The consensus opinion of experts with access to all images plus clinical history, surgical findings, and follow-up findings were taken as truth. Expert radiologists read these cases in a blinded fashion. The results were compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The diagnostic value of each three-dimensional reconstruction method and the parameters used to perform the reconstructions were evaluated

  12. Improving quality of laser scanning data acquisition through calibrated amplitude and pulse deviation measurement

    Pfennigbauer, Martin; Ullrich, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    Newest developments in laser scanner technologies put surveyors in the position to comply with the ever increasing demand of high-speed, high-accuracy, and highly reliable data acquisition from terrestrial, mobile, and airborne platforms. Echo digitization in pulsed time-of-flight laser ranging has demonstrated its superior performance in the field of bathymetry and airborne laser scanning for more than a decade, however at the cost of somewhat time consuming off line post processing. State-of-the-art online waveform processing as implemented in RIEGL's V-Line not only saves users post-processing time to obtain true 3D point clouds, it also adds the assets of calibrated amplitude and reflectance measurement for data classification and pulse deviation determination for effective and reliable data validation. We present results from data acquisitions in different complex target situations.

  13. Evaluation of MIT-SCAN-T2 for Thickness Quality Control for PCC and HMA Pavements

    2018-02-01

    Thickness is currently a pay item for PCC pavements and a quality control item for both PCC and HMA pavements. A change in pavement thickness of 0.5 in. can result in a change of multiple years of service. Current thickness measurements are performed...

  14. The time window of MRI of murine atherosclerotic plaques after administration of CB2 receptor targeted micelles: inter-scan variability and relation between plaque signal intensity increase and gadolinium content of inversion recovery prepared versus non-prepared fast spin echo

    te Boekhorst, B. C. M.; Bovens, S. M.; van de Kolk, C. W. A.; Cramer, M. J. M.; Doevendans, P. A. F. M.; ten Hove, M.; van der Weerd, L.; Poelmann, R.; Strijkers, G. J.; Pasterkamp, G.; van Echteld, C. J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Single fast spin echo scans covering limited time frames are mostly used for contrast-enhanced MRI of atherosclerotic plaque biomarkers. Knowledge on inter-scan variability of the normalized enhancement ratio of plaque (NER(plaque)) and relation between NER(plaque) and gadolinium content for

  15. Fundamental Science and Improvement of the Quality of Life-Space Quantization to MRI

    Tannenbaum, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: (1) Science versus technology - a false dichotomy; (2) scientific discovery is vital for future progress; (3) An example: Space quantization to magnetic reosnance imaging (MRI) - A timeline from 1911-1977; (4) Modern basic research - what is inside the proton; and (5) The 21st century - beginning of the 3rd millennium. The 20th century started with the study of macroscopic matter which led to the discovery of a whole new submicroscopic world of physics which totally changed our view of nature and led to new quantum applications, both fundamental and practical.

  16. Quality control of structural MRI images applied using FreeSurfer - a hands-on workflow to rate motion artifacts

    Lea Luise Backhausen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In structural magnetic resonance imaging motion artifacts are common, especially when not scanning healthy young adults. It has been shown that motion affects the analysis with automated image-processing techniques (e.g. FreeSurfer. This can bias results. Several developmental and adult studies have found reduced volume and thickness of gray matter due to motion artifacts. Thus, quality control is necessary in order to ensure an acceptable level of quality and to define exclusion criteria of images (i.e. determine participants with most severe artifacts. However, information about the quality control workflow and image exclusion procedure is largely lacking in the current literature and the existing rating systems differ. Here we propose a stringent workflow of quality control steps during and after acquisition of T1-weighted images, which enables researchers dealing with populations that are typically affected by motion artifacts to enhance data quality and maximize sample sizes. As an underlying aim we established a thorough quality control rating system for T1-weighted images and applied it to the analysis of developmental clinical data using the automated processing pipeline FreeSurfer. This hands-on workflow and quality control rating system will aid researchers in minimizing motion artifacts in the final data set, and therefore enhance the quality of structural magnetic resonance imaging studies.

  17. Novel edge treatment method for improving the transmission reconstruction quality in Tomographic Gamma Scanning.

    Han, Miaomiao; Guo, Zhirong; Liu, Haifeng; Li, Qinghua

    2018-05-01

    Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) is a method used for the nondestructive assay of radioactive wastes. In TGS, the actual irregular edge voxels are regarded as regular cubic voxels in the traditional treatment method. In this study, in order to improve the performance of TGS, a novel edge treatment method is proposed that considers the actual shapes of these voxels. The two different edge voxel treatment methods were compared by computing the pixel-level relative errors and normalized mean square errors (NMSEs) between the reconstructed transmission images and the ideal images. Both methods were coupled with two different interative algorithms comprising Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) with a non-negativity constraint and Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM). The results demonstrated that the traditional method for edge voxel treatment can introduce significant error and that the real irregular edge voxel treatment method can improve the performance of TGS by obtaining better transmission reconstruction images. With the real irregular edge voxel treatment method, MLEM algorithm and ART algorithm can be comparable when assaying homogenous matrices, but MLEM algorithm is superior to ART algorithm when assaying heterogeneous matrices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dosimetric commissioning and quality assurance of scanned ion beams at the Italian National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy

    Mirandola, Alfredo, E-mail: mirandola@cnao.it; Molinelli, S.; Vilches Freixas, G.; Mairani, A.; Gallio, E.; Panizza, D.; Russo, S.; Ciocca, M. [Fondazione CNAO, strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Donetti, M. [INFN, Torino 10125, Italy and Fondazione CNAO, strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Magro, G. [INFN–Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia, Via U. Bassi 6, Pavia 27100, Italy and Fondazione CNAO, strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Giordanengo, S. [INFN, Torino 10125 (Italy); Orecchia, R. [Fondazione CNAO, strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100, Italy and Radiotherapy Division, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, Milano 20141 (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: To describe the dosimetric commissioning and quality assurance (QA) of the actively scanned proton and carbon ion beams at the Italian National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy. Methods: The laterally integrated depth-dose-distributions (IDDs) were acquired with the PTW Peakfinder, a variable depth water column, equipped with two Bragg peak ionization chambers. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to generate the energy libraries, the IDDs in water, and the fragment spectra for carbon beams. EBT3 films were used for spot size measurements, beam position over the scan field, and homogeneity in 2D-fields. Beam monitor calibration was performed in terms of number of particles per monitor unit using both a Farmer-type and an Advanced Markus ionization chamber. The beam position at the isocenter, beam monitor calibration curve, dose constancy in the center of the spread-out-Bragg-peak, dose homogeneity in 2D-fields, beam energy, spot size, and spot position over the scan field are all checked on a daily basis for both protons and carbon ions and on all beam lines. Results: The simulated IDDs showed an excellent agreement with the measured experimental curves. The measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the pencil beam in air at the isocenter was energy-dependent for both particle species: in particular, for protons, the spot size ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 cm. For carbon ions, two sets of spot size are available: FWHM ranged from 0.4 to 0.8 cm (for the smaller spot size) and from 0.8 to 1.1 cm (for the larger one). The spot position was accurate to within ±1 mm over the whole 20 × 20 cm{sup 2} scan field; homogeneity in a uniform squared field was within ±5% for both particle types at any energy. QA results exceeding tolerance levels were rarely found. In the reporting period, the machine downtime was around 6%, of which 4.5% was due to planned maintenance shutdowns. Conclusions: After successful dosimetric beam commissioning, quality assurance measurements

  19. Dosimetric commissioning and quality assurance of scanned ion beams at the Italian National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy

    Mirandola, Alfredo; Molinelli, S.; Vilches Freixas, G.; Mairani, A.; Gallio, E.; Panizza, D.; Russo, S.; Ciocca, M.; Donetti, M.; Magro, G.; Giordanengo, S.; Orecchia, R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the dosimetric commissioning and quality assurance (QA) of the actively scanned proton and carbon ion beams at the Italian National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy. Methods: The laterally integrated depth-dose-distributions (IDDs) were acquired with the PTW Peakfinder, a variable depth water column, equipped with two Bragg peak ionization chambers. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to generate the energy libraries, the IDDs in water, and the fragment spectra for carbon beams. EBT3 films were used for spot size measurements, beam position over the scan field, and homogeneity in 2D-fields. Beam monitor calibration was performed in terms of number of particles per monitor unit using both a Farmer-type and an Advanced Markus ionization chamber. The beam position at the isocenter, beam monitor calibration curve, dose constancy in the center of the spread-out-Bragg-peak, dose homogeneity in 2D-fields, beam energy, spot size, and spot position over the scan field are all checked on a daily basis for both protons and carbon ions and on all beam lines. Results: The simulated IDDs showed an excellent agreement with the measured experimental curves. The measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the pencil beam in air at the isocenter was energy-dependent for both particle species: in particular, for protons, the spot size ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 cm. For carbon ions, two sets of spot size are available: FWHM ranged from 0.4 to 0.8 cm (for the smaller spot size) and from 0.8 to 1.1 cm (for the larger one). The spot position was accurate to within ±1 mm over the whole 20 × 20 cm"2 scan field; homogeneity in a uniform squared field was within ±5% for both particle types at any energy. QA results exceeding tolerance levels were rarely found. In the reporting period, the machine downtime was around 6%, of which 4.5% was due to planned maintenance shutdowns. Conclusions: After successful dosimetric beam commissioning, quality assurance measurements

  20. Evaluation of Human Corneal Lenticule Quality After SMILE With Different Cap Thicknesses Using Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Weng, Shengbei; Liu, Manli; Yang, Xiaonan; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Yugui; Lin, Haiqin; Liu, Quan

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the surface characteristics of lenticules created by small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) with different cap thicknesses. This prospective study included 20 consecutive patients who underwent bilateral SMILE. Surface regularity of the extracted corneal lenticule was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with 2 methods: qualitative and quantitative regularity. Qualitative regularity of SEM images was graded by masked observers using an established scoring system. Quantitative regularity of SEM images was assessed by counting the total number and areas of tissue bridges using Image-Pro Plus software. Four different cap thickness of 120, 130, 140, and 150 μm were compared. Refractive outcomes of patients were measured at baseline and 1 month after surgery. As 10 specimens were not analyzable, only 30 eyes were included. Postoperatively, all eyes had postoperative uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/20 or better; 43% had an unchanged corrected distance visual acuity; 43% gained 1 line; 10% lost 1 line. Ultrastructurally, surface irregularity was primarily caused by tissue bridges. The average surface regularity score obtained was 10.87 ± 2.40 for 120 μm, 10.78 ± 2.60 for 130 μm, 8.76 ± 2.16 for 140 μm, and 8.70 ± 2.66 for 150 μm (P < 0.001). The total number and areas of tissue bridges of 120 to 130 μm were significantly less than 140 to 150 μm (P < 0.05). Surface regularity decreased as cap thickness increased (P < 0.05). There is smoother appearance of the lenticular surface as seen through SEM when a thin cap is created compared with a thick cap qualitatively and quantitatively.

  1. Inexperienced clinicians can extract pathoanatomic information from MRI narrative reports with high reproducability for use in research/quality assurance

    Kent, Peter; Briggs, Andrew M; Albert, Hanne Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Background Although reproducibility in reading MRI images amongst radiologists and clinicians has been studied previously, no studies have examined the reproducibility of inexperienced clinicians in extracting pathoanatomic information from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) narrative reports and t...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

  3. Simultaneous electroencephalography-functional MRI at 3 T: an analysis of safety risks imposed by performing anatomical reference scans with the EEG equipment in place.

    Nöth, Ulrike; Laufs, Helmut; Stoermer, Robert; Deichmann, Ralf

    2012-03-01

    To describe heating effects to be expected in simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when deviating from the EEG manufacturer's instructions; to test which anatomical MRI sequences have a sufficiently low specific absorption rate (SAR) to be performed with the EEG equipment in place; and to suggest precautions to reduce the risk of heating. Heating was determined in vivo below eight EEG electrodes, using both head and body coil transmission and sequences covering the whole range of SAR values. Head transmit coil: temperature increases were below 2.2°C for low SAR sequences, but reached 4.6°C (one subject, clavicle) for high SAR sequences; the equilibrium temperature T(eq) remained below 39°C. Body transmit coil: temperature increases were higher and more frequent over subjects and electrodes, with values below 2.6°C for low SAR sequences, reaching 6.9°C for high SAR sequences (T8 electrode) with T(eq) exceeding a critical level of 40°C. Anatomical imaging should be based on T1-weighted sequences (FLASH, MPRAGE, MDEFT) with an SAR below values for functional MRI sequences based on gradient echo planar imaging. Anatomical sequences with a high SAR can pose a significant risk, which is reduced by using head coil transmission. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Improved image quality and diagnostic potential using ultra-high-resolution computed tomography of the lung with small scan FOV: A prospective study.

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Lian; Wang, Yali; Hamal, Preeti; You, Xiaofang; Mao, Haixia; Li, Fei; Sun, Xiwen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether CT imaging using an ultra-high-resolution CT (UHRCT) scan with a small scan field of view (FOV) provides higher image quality and helps to reduce the follow-up period compared with a conventional high-resolution CT (CHRCT) scan. We identified patients with at least one pulmonary nodule at our hospital from July 2015 to November 2015. CHRCT and UHRCT scans were conducted in all enrolled patients. Three experienced radiologists evaluated the image quality using a 5-point score and made diagnoses. The paired images were displayed side by side in a random manner and annotations of scan information were removed. The following parameters including image quality, diagnostic confidence of radiologists, follow-up recommendations and diagnostic accuracy were assessed. A total of 52 patients (62 nodules) were included in this study. UHRCT scan provides a better image quality regarding the margin of nodules and solid internal component compared to that of CHRCT (P images than of CHRCT images (Pimages (P 0.05). These findings suggest that the UHRCT prototype scanner provides a better image quality of subsolid nodules compared to CHRCT and contributes significantly to reduce the patients' follow-up period.

  5. Improved image quality and diagnostic potential using ultra-high-resolution computed tomography of the lung with small scan FOV: A prospective study.

    Huiyuan Zhu

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess whether CT imaging using an ultra-high-resolution CT (UHRCT scan with a small scan field of view (FOV provides higher image quality and helps to reduce the follow-up period compared with a conventional high-resolution CT (CHRCT scan. We identified patients with at least one pulmonary nodule at our hospital from July 2015 to November 2015. CHRCT and UHRCT scans were conducted in all enrolled patients. Three experienced radiologists evaluated the image quality using a 5-point score and made diagnoses. The paired images were displayed side by side in a random manner and annotations of scan information were removed. The following parameters including image quality, diagnostic confidence of radiologists, follow-up recommendations and diagnostic accuracy were assessed. A total of 52 patients (62 nodules were included in this study. UHRCT scan provides a better image quality regarding the margin of nodules and solid internal component compared to that of CHRCT (P 0.05. These findings suggest that the UHRCT prototype scanner provides a better image quality of subsolid nodules compared to CHRCT and contributes significantly to reduce the patients' follow-up period.

  6. National quality indicators and policies from 15 countries leading in adult end-of-life care: a systematic environmental scan.

    Virdun, Claudia; Luckett, Tim; Lorenz, Karl A; Phillips, Jane

    2018-06-01

    The importance of measuring the quality of end-of-life care provision is undisputed, but determining how best to achieve this is yet to be confirmed. This study sought to identify and describe national end-of-life care quality indicators and supporting policies used by countries leading in their end-of-life care provision. A systematic environmental scan that included a web search to identify relevant national policies and indicators; hand searching for additional materials; information from experts listed for the top 10 (n=15) countries ranked in the 'quality of care' category of the 2015 Quality of Death Index study; and snowballing from Index experts. Ten countries (66%) have national policy support for end-of-life care measurement, five have national indicator sets, with two indicator sets suitable for all service providers. No countries mandate indicator use, and there is limited evidence of consumer engagement in development of indicators. Two thirds of the 128 identified indicators are outcomes measures (62%), and 38% are process measures. Most indicators pertain to symptom management (38%), social care (32%) or care delivery (27%). Measurement of end-of-life care quality varies globally and rarely covers all care domains or service providers. There is a need to reduce duplication of indicator development, involve consumers, consider all care providers and ensure measurable and relevant indicators to improve end-of-life care experiences for patients and families. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Impact of recombinant TSH on quality of life in thyroid carcinoma patients undergoing remnant ablation or diagnostic whole body scanning

    Schroeder, Pamela R.; Ladenson, Paul W.; for the Members of the Thyrogen Trials

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Thyroid remnant ablation with 131 I is often necessary in the initial treatment of thyroid carcinoma. A recent study demonstrated that use of recombinant TSH (rh TSH) was equivalently effective to withdrawal from levothyroxine (L-T 4 ) for postoperative remnant ablation. Quality of life was also shown to be negatively impacted in patients withdrawn from L-T 4 , but not those maintained euthyroid and treated after rh TSH. In this study, we compare the impact of rh TSH on quality of life in patients undergoing remnant ablation versus those undergoing diagnostic whole body scanning (WBS) in a previous trial. Health-related quality of life was measured using the SF-36 survey, which consists of 8 domains describing the physical and mental functioning of patients and 2 physical and mental summary domains, in both trials at baseline on L-T 4 , after rh TSH while on L-T 4 and after L-T 4 withdrawal. Mean SF-36 scores declined from the rh TSH treatment versus L-T 4 withdrawal in both trials to a similar extent in all 8 domains and the 2 summary domains, as evidenced by overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Further SF-6D scores, which summarize all 8 domains in a single zero-to-one metric, were used to characterize the overall quality of life among patients in the two trials. The SF-6D scores for patients after rh TSH administration in the diagnostic and ablation trials were 0.803 and 0.714, respectively. In contrast, SF-6D scores for patients undergoing L-T 4 withdrawal in the diagnostic and ablation trials were 0.637 and 0.548, respectively (p 4 withdrawal both experience a comparable decrease in quality of life, which can be prevented by use of rh TSH in the euthyroid state. (author)

  8. SU-F-T-169: A Periodic Quality Assurance Program for a Spot-Scanning Proton Treatment Facility

    Mundy, D; Tryggestad, E; Beltran, C; Furutani, K; Gilson, G; Ito, S; Johnson, J; Kruse, J; Remmes, N; Tasson, A; Whitaker, T; Herman, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop daily and monthly quality assurance (QA) programs in support of a new spot-scanning proton treatment facility using a combination of commercial and custom equipment and software. Emphasis was placed on efficiency and evaluation of key quality parameters. Methods: The daily QA program was developed to test output, spot size and position, proton beam energy, and image guidance using the Sun Nuclear Corporation rf-DQA™3 device and Atlas QA software. The program utilizes standard Atlas linear accelerator tests repurposed for proton measurements and a custom jig for indexing the device to the treatment couch. The monthly QA program was designed to test mechanical performance, image quality, radiation quality, isocenter coincidence, and safety features. Many of these tests are similar to linear accelerator QA counterparts, but many require customized test design and equipment. Coincidence of imaging, laser marker, mechanical, and radiation isocenters, for instance, is verified using a custom film-based device devised and manufactured at our facility. Proton spot size and position as a function of energy are verified using a custom spot pattern incident on film and analysis software developed in-house. More details concerning the equipment and software developed for monthly QA are included in the supporting document. Thresholds for daily and monthly tests were established via perturbation analysis, early experience, and/or proton system specifications and associated acceptance test results. Results: The periodic QA program described here has been in effect for approximately 9 months and has proven efficient and sensitive to sub-clinical variations in treatment delivery characteristics. Conclusion: Tools and professional guidelines for periodic proton system QA are not as well developed as their photon and electron counterparts. The program described here efficiently evaluates key quality parameters and, while specific to the needs of our facility

  9. SU-F-T-169: A Periodic Quality Assurance Program for a Spot-Scanning Proton Treatment Facility

    Mundy, D; Tryggestad, E; Beltran, C; Furutani, K; Gilson, G; Ito, S; Johnson, J; Kruse, J; Remmes, N; Tasson, A; Whitaker, T; Herman, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop daily and monthly quality assurance (QA) programs in support of a new spot-scanning proton treatment facility using a combination of commercial and custom equipment and software. Emphasis was placed on efficiency and evaluation of key quality parameters. Methods: The daily QA program was developed to test output, spot size and position, proton beam energy, and image guidance using the Sun Nuclear Corporation rf-DQA™3 device and Atlas QA software. The program utilizes standard Atlas linear accelerator tests repurposed for proton measurements and a custom jig for indexing the device to the treatment couch. The monthly QA program was designed to test mechanical performance, image quality, radiation quality, isocenter coincidence, and safety features. Many of these tests are similar to linear accelerator QA counterparts, but many require customized test design and equipment. Coincidence of imaging, laser marker, mechanical, and radiation isocenters, for instance, is verified using a custom film-based device devised and manufactured at our facility. Proton spot size and position as a function of energy are verified using a custom spot pattern incident on film and analysis software developed in-house. More details concerning the equipment and software developed for monthly QA are included in the supporting document. Thresholds for daily and monthly tests were established via perturbation analysis, early experience, and/or proton system specifications and associated acceptance test results. Results: The periodic QA program described here has been in effect for approximately 9 months and has proven efficient and sensitive to sub-clinical variations in treatment delivery characteristics. Conclusion: Tools and professional guidelines for periodic proton system QA are not as well developed as their photon and electron counterparts. The program described here efficiently evaluates key quality parameters and, while specific to the needs of our facility

  10. Safety and EEG data quality of concurrent high-density EEG and high-speed fMRI at 3 Tesla

    Foged, Mette Thrane; Lindberg, Ulrich; Vakamudi, Kishore

    2017-01-01

    ) related heating, the effect of EEG on cortical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in fMRI, and assess EEG data quality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study compared EPI, multi-echo EPI, multi-band EPI and multi-slab echo-volumar imaging pulse sequences, using clinical 3 Tesla MR scanners from two different vendors...

  11. Evaluation of image quality with different field of view in CT scan of the body in children

    Gao Dechun; Wu Tai; Mao Dingli; Weng Zhigao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between field of view (FOV) and quality of CT images. Methods: Scanning of the phantoms of spatial resolution and density resolution was performed with FOVs of 25 cm x 25 cm, 35 cm x 35 cm, and 42 cm x 42 cm, respectively, and the spatial resolution and density resolution of CT images with different FOVs were measured. 20 patients underwent CT scanning using 25 cm x 25 cm and 35 cm x 35 cm FOVs, respectively. The images were evaluated by 3 qualified CT doctors by using a double-blind reading. Results: As FOVs changed, the spatial resolution and density resolution were different. The best spatial resolution and density resolution were obtained on 25 cm x 25 cm FOV images. The best spatial resolution could distinguish four 0.6 mm-diameter eyelets, and the best density resolution could distinguish five 2.5 mm-diameter eyelets. The CT images with 25 cm x 25 cm FOV were obviously better than those with 35 cm x 35 cm FOV (P<0.05). Conclusion: On the range of conventional FOV of CT, the spatial resolution and density resolution of CT images are the best when 25 cm x 25 cm FOV is used. (authors)

  12. Data processing and quality evaluation of a boat-based mobile laser scanning system.

    Vaaja, Matti; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Kurkela, Matti; Kasvi, Elina; Flener, Claude; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Järvelä, Juha; Alho, Petteri

    2013-09-17

    Mobile mapping systems (MMSs) are used for mapping topographic and urban features which are difficult and time consuming to measure with other instruments. The benefits of MMSs include efficient data collection and versatile usability. This paper investigates the data processing steps and quality of a boat-based mobile mapping system (BoMMS) data for generating terrain and vegetation points in a river environment. Our aim in data processing was to filter noise points, detect shorelines as well as points below water surface and conduct ground point classification. Previous studies of BoMMS have investigated elevation accuracies and usability in detection of fluvial erosion and deposition areas. The new findings concerning BoMMS data are that the improved data processing approach allows for identification of multipath reflections and shoreline delineation. We demonstrate the possibility to measure bathymetry data in shallow (0-1 m) and clear water. Furthermore, we evaluate for the first time the accuracy of the BoMMS ground points classification compared to manually classified data. We also demonstrate the spatial variations of the ground point density and assess elevation and vertical accuracies of the BoMMS data.

  13. Data Processing and Quality Evaluation of a Boat-Based Mobile Laser Scanning System

    Petteri Alho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile mapping systems (MMSs are used for mapping topographic and urban features which are difficult and time consuming to measure with other instruments. The benefits of MMSs include efficient data collection and versatile usability. This paper investigates the data processing steps and quality of a boat-based mobile mapping system (BoMMS data for generating terrain and vegetation points in a river environment. Our aim in data processing was to filter noise points, detect shorelines as well as points below water surface and conduct ground point classification. Previous studies of BoMMS have investigated elevation accuracies and usability in detection of fluvial erosion and deposition areas. The new findings concerning BoMMS data are that the improved data processing approach allows for identification of multipath reflections and shoreline delineation. We demonstrate the possibility to measure bathymetry data in shallow (0–1 m and clear water. Furthermore, we evaluate for the first time the accuracy of the BoMMS ground points classification compared to manually classified data. We also demonstrate the spatial variations of the ground point density and assess elevation and vertical accuracies of the BoMMS data.

  14. Towards Effective and Efficient Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    X. Ronald. Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA program based on measurement alone can be very time consuming due to the highly modulated dose distributions of IMPT fields. Incorporating independent dose calculation and treatment log file analysis could reduce the time required for measurements. In this article, we summarize our effort to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program that consists of three components: measurements, independent dose calculation, and analysis of patient-specific treatment delivery log files. Measurements included two-dimensional (2D measurements using an ionization chamber array detector for each field delivered at the planned gantry angles with the electronic medical record (EMR system in the QA mode and the accelerator control system (ACS in the treatment mode, and additional measurements at depths for each field with the ACS in physics mode and without the EMR system. Dose distributions for each field in a water phantom were calculated independently using a recently developed in-house pencil beam algorithm and compared with those obtained using the treatment planning system (TPS. The treatment log file for each field was analyzed in terms of deviations in delivered spot positions from their planned positions using various statistical methods. Using this improved PSQA program, we were able to verify the integrity of the data transfer from the TPS to the EMR to the ACS, the dose calculation of the TPS, and the treatment delivery, including the dose delivered and spot positions. On the basis of this experience, we estimate that the in-room measurement time required for each complex IMPT case (e.g., a patient receiving bilateral IMPT for head and neck cancer is less than 1 h using the improved PSQA program. Our experience demonstrates that it is possible to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program for IMPT with the equipment and resources available in the clinic.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  17. Use of treatment log files in spot scanning proton therapy as part of patient-specific quality assurance

    Li Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Li Yupeng; Li Xiaoqiang; Zhang Xiaodong; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    the patient based on the plan and recorded data was within 2%. Conclusions: The authors have shown that the treatment log file in a spot scanning proton beam delivery system is precise enough to serve as a quality assurance tool to monitor variation in spot position and MU value, as well as the delivered dose uncertainty from the treatment delivery system. The analysis tool developed here could be useful for assessing spot position uncertainty and thus dose uncertainty for any patient receiving spot scanning proton beam therapy.

  18. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI: An update and initial experience at HC-FMUSP

    Marcelo A. Queiroz

    Full Text Available Summary The new technology of PET/MRI is a prototype of hybrid imaging, allowing for the combination of molecular data from PET scanning and morphofunctional information derived from MRI scanning. Recent advances regarding the technical aspects of this device, especially after the development of MRI-compatible silicon photomultipliers of PET, permitted an increase in the diagnostic performance of PET/MRI translated into dose reduction and higher imaging quality. Among several clinical applications, PET/MRI gains ground initially in oncology, where MRI per se plays an essential role in the assessment of primary tumors (which is limited in the case of PET/CT, including prostate, rectal and gynecological tumors. On the other hand, the evaluation of the lungs remains an enigma although new MRI sequences are being designed to overcome this. More clinical indications of PET/MRI are seen in the fields of neurology, cardiology and inflammatory processes, and the use of PET/MRI also opens perspectives for pediatric populations as it involves very low radiation exposure. Our review aimed to highlight the current indications of PET/MRI and discuss the challenges and perspectives of PET/MRI at HC-FMUSP.

  19. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials.

  20. Combined MRI and MRS in prostate cancer. Improvement of spectral quality by susceptibility matching

    Scheidler, J.; Heuck, A. [Radiologisches Zentrum Muenchen-Pasing (Germany). Radiologie; Vogel, M.; Gross, P. [GE Global Research (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Purpose: local magnetic field inhomogeneity caused by susceptibility artifacts due to air in the endorectal coil substantially degrades the quality of 3D MR spectroscopic imaging (3D-MRSI). Perflubron (PFB) has magnetic susceptibility similar to that of human tissue. We prospectively assessed the effect of susceptibility matching using PFB on in vivo prostate {sup 1}H-3D-MRSI. Materials and methods: ninety-one consecutive patients referred for 3D-MRSI were examined using air and PFB as the filling agent for endorectal coils at 1.5T with an identically placed PRESS box and sat bands. Solely auto-shim without additional manual shimming was used. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the water peak was statistically compared with a paired t-test. The spectral quality was visually evaluated for the definition of metabolite peaks and for the citrate peak split (duplet). The MR image quality was rated on a five-point scale. Results: FWHM was significantly less (p < 0.001) using PFB (mean 9.0 {+-} 3.3, range 3 - 20) than air (mean 14.9 {+-} 4.2, range 6 - 26) in 85/91 patients (93%). The spectral quality markedly improved using PFB and frequently the duplet of the citrate peak was able to be identified. Image quality ratings were similar (mean rating PFB 4.2, air 4.3 points). Omitting manual shimming led to a time savings of 4 min. per study. (orig.)

  1. Combined MRI and MRS in prostate cancer. Improvement of spectral quality by susceptibility matching

    Scheidler, J.; Heuck, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: local magnetic field inhomogeneity caused by susceptibility artifacts due to air in the endorectal coil substantially degrades the quality of 3D MR spectroscopic imaging (3D-MRSI). Perflubron (PFB) has magnetic susceptibility similar to that of human tissue. We prospectively assessed the effect of susceptibility matching using PFB on in vivo prostate 1 H-3D-MRSI. Materials and methods: ninety-one consecutive patients referred for 3D-MRSI were examined using air and PFB as the filling agent for endorectal coils at 1.5T with an identically placed PRESS box and sat bands. Solely auto-shim without additional manual shimming was used. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the water peak was statistically compared with a paired t-test. The spectral quality was visually evaluated for the definition of metabolite peaks and for the citrate peak split (duplet). The MR image quality was rated on a five-point scale. Results: FWHM was significantly less (p < 0.001) using PFB (mean 9.0 ± 3.3, range 3 - 20) than air (mean 14.9 ± 4.2, range 6 - 26) in 85/91 patients (93%). The spectral quality markedly improved using PFB and frequently the duplet of the citrate peak was able to be identified. Image quality ratings were similar (mean rating PFB 4.2, air 4.3 points). Omitting manual shimming led to a time savings of 4 min. per study. (orig.)

  2. Combined MRI and MRS in prostate cancer: improvement of spectral quality by susceptibility matching.

    Scheidler, J; Vogel, M; Gross, P; Heuck, A

    2009-06-01

    Local magnetic field inhomogeneity caused by susceptibility artifacts due to air in the endorectal coil substantially degrades the quality of 3D MR spectroscopic imaging (3D-MRSI). Perflubron (PFB) has magnetic susceptibility similar to that of human tissue. We prospectively assessed the effect of susceptibility matching using PFB on in vivo prostate (1)H-3D-MRSI. Ninety-one consecutive patients referred for 3D-MRSI were examined using air and PFB as the filling agent for endorectal coils at 1.5T with an identically placed PRESS box and sat bands. Solely auto-shim without additional manual shimming was used. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the water peak was statistically compared with a paired t-test. The spectral quality was visually evaluated for the definition of metabolite peaks and for the citrate peak split (duplet). The MR image quality was rated on a five-point scale. FWHM was significantly less (p PFB (mean 9.0 +/- 3.3, range 3 - 20) than air (mean 14.9 +/- 4.2, range 6 - 26) in 85/91 patients (93%). The spectral quality markedly improved using PFB and frequently the duplet of the citrate peak was able to be identified. Image quality ratings were similar (mean rating PFB 4.2, air 4.3 points). Omitting manual shimming led to a time savings of 4 min. per study. 3D-MRSI using PFB for susceptibility matching benefits from significantly better local field homogeneity, thus providing improved spectra quality. Combined with a substantial time savings in data acquisition, this may increase the clinical utilization of 3D-MRSI in patients with prostate cancer.

  3. Forecasting the quality of water-suppressed 1 H MR spectra based on a single-shot water scan.

    Kyathanahally, Sreenath P; Kreis, Roland

    2017-08-01

    To investigate whether an initial non-water-suppressed acquisition that provides information about the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and linewidth is enough to forecast the maximally achievable final spectral quality and thus inform the operator whether the foreseen number of averages and achieved field homogeneity is adequate. A large range of spectra with varying SNR and linewidth was simulated and fitted with popular fitting programs to determine the dependence of fitting errors on linewidth and SNR. A tool to forecast variance based on a single acquisition was developed and its performance evaluated on simulated and in vivo data obtained at 3 Tesla from various brain regions and acquisition settings. A strong correlation to real uncertainties in estimated metabolite contents was found for the forecast values and the Cramer-Rao lower bounds obtained from the water-suppressed spectra. It appears to be possible to forecast the best-case errors associated with specific metabolites to be found in model fits of water-suppressed spectra based on a single water scan. Thus, nonspecialist operators will be able to judge ahead of time whether the planned acquisition can possibly be of sufficient quality to answer the targeted clinical question or whether it needs more averages or improved shimming. Magn Reson Med 78:441-451, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Criteria for designing an MRI quality assurance program. A multicenter trial

    Mascaro, L.; Baldassarri, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    The authors report the preliminary results of a multicenter trial aimed at defining methods, reference values and frequency of measurements for a magnetic resonance quality assurance program. In particular, they stress the definition of two attention levels (investigation and intervention) for image uniformity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by means short-and long-term measurements [it

  5. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  6. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Melchert, U.H.; Schroeder, C.; Boer, R. de; Spielmann, R.P.; Heller, M.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  7. TIPS bilateral noise reduction in 4D CT perfusion scans produces high-quality cerebral blood flow maps

    A. Mendrik (Adrienne); E.J.P.A. Vonken; B.T.J. van Ginneken (Berbke); J.R. Riordan (John ); H.W.A.M. de Jong (Hugo); T. van Seeters (Tom); E.J. Smit (Ewoud); M.A. Viergever (Max); M. Prokop (Mathias)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebral computed tomography perfusion (CTP) scans are acquired to detect areas of abnormal perfusion in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. These 4D CTP scans consist of multiple sequential 3D CT scans over time. Therefore, to reduce radiation exposure to the patient, the amount of

  8. TU-FG-BRB-12: Real-Time Visualization of Discrete Spot Scanning Proton Therapy Beam for Quality Assurance

    Matsuzaki, Y; Jenkins, C; Yang, Y; Xing, L; Yoshimura, T; Fujii, Y; Umegaki, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: With the growing adoption of proton beam therapy there is an increasing need for effective and user-friendly tools for performing quality assurance (QA) measurements. The speed and versatility of spot-scanning proton beam (PB) therapy systems present unique challenges for traditional QA tools. To address these challenges a proof-of-concept system was developed to visualize, in real-time, the delivery of individual spots from a spot-scanning PB in order to perform QA measurements. Methods: The PB is directed toward a custom phantom with planar faces coated with a radioluminescent phosphor (Gd2O2s:Tb). As the proton beam passes through the phantom visible light is emitted from the coating and collected by a nearby CMOS camera. The images are processed to determine the locations at which the beam impinges on each face of the phantom. By so doing, the location of each beam can be determined relative to the phantom. The cameras are also used to capture images of the laser alignment system. The phantom contains x-ray fiducials so that it can be easily located with kV imagers. Using this data several quality assurance parameters can be evaluated. Results: The proof-of-concept system was able to visualize discrete PB spots with energies ranging from 70 MeV to 220 MeV. Images were obtained with integration times ranging from 20 to 0.019 milliseconds. If not limited by data transmission, this would correspond to a frame rate of 52,000 fps. Such frame rates enabled visualization of individual spots in real time. Spot locations were found to be highly correlated (R"2=0.99) with the nozzle-mounted spot position monitor indicating excellent spot positioning accuracy Conclusion: The system was shown to be capable of imaging individual spots for all clinical beam energies. Future development will focus on extending the image processing software to provide automated results for a variety of QA tests.

  9. TU-FG-BRB-12: Real-Time Visualization of Discrete Spot Scanning Proton Therapy Beam for Quality Assurance

    Matsuzaki, Y [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Jenkins, C; Yang, Y; Xing, L [Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Yoshimura, T; Fujii, Y [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Umegaki, K [Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: With the growing adoption of proton beam therapy there is an increasing need for effective and user-friendly tools for performing quality assurance (QA) measurements. The speed and versatility of spot-scanning proton beam (PB) therapy systems present unique challenges for traditional QA tools. To address these challenges a proof-of-concept system was developed to visualize, in real-time, the delivery of individual spots from a spot-scanning PB in order to perform QA measurements. Methods: The PB is directed toward a custom phantom with planar faces coated with a radioluminescent phosphor (Gd2O2s:Tb). As the proton beam passes through the phantom visible light is emitted from the coating and collected by a nearby CMOS camera. The images are processed to determine the locations at which the beam impinges on each face of the phantom. By so doing, the location of each beam can be determined relative to the phantom. The cameras are also used to capture images of the laser alignment system. The phantom contains x-ray fiducials so that it can be easily located with kV imagers. Using this data several quality assurance parameters can be evaluated. Results: The proof-of-concept system was able to visualize discrete PB spots with energies ranging from 70 MeV to 220 MeV. Images were obtained with integration times ranging from 20 to 0.019 milliseconds. If not limited by data transmission, this would correspond to a frame rate of 52,000 fps. Such frame rates enabled visualization of individual spots in real time. Spot locations were found to be highly correlated (R{sup 2}=0.99) with the nozzle-mounted spot position monitor indicating excellent spot positioning accuracy Conclusion: The system was shown to be capable of imaging individual spots for all clinical beam energies. Future development will focus on extending the image processing software to provide automated results for a variety of QA tests.

  10. FAST MRI breast screening revisited

    Jain, Manish; Jain, Arushi; Hyzy, Marek D.; Werth, Graziella

    2017-01-01

    Screening for breast cancer in high-risk women takes about 40 minutes to acquire an MRI scan and is time-intensive to report. There is recent interest in the performance of an abbreviated MRI protocol (FAST) in the screening setting. FAST scans have a reported negative predictive value of 99.8%. This study evaluates the false positive rates (FPR) and recall rates for FAST scans as compared to full diagnostic studies (FD). A database of all screening breast MRI scans performed at our institution between 30 June 2013 and 1 July 2014 (n = 591) was created by one of the researchers, who did not subsequently analyse the MRI scans. The T1W and first post-contrast and subtracted images from each of these scans (FAST protocol) were assessed by experienced breast MRI radiologists, blinded to the final diagnosis. The findings were then compared with the FD result. The recall rates were 6.6% for FAST scans and 5.8% for FD scans. FPR rates were 4.7% and 3.9% respectively. There is no statistically significant difference in the recall rates or FPR of FAST scans in comparison with full diagnostic studies. Given the absence of statistically significant difference in the FPR and recall rates in comparison with FD, FAST scans can replace FD for screening of breast cancer.

  11. Impact of Spot Size and Beam-Shaping Devices on the Treatment Plan Quality for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Moteabbed, Maryam, E-mail: mmoteabbed@partners.org; Yock, Torunn I.; Depauw, Nicolas; Madden, Thomas M.; Kooy, Hanne M.; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess the clinical impact of spot size and the addition of apertures and range compensators on the treatment quality of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and to define when PBS could improve on passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: The patient cohort included 14 pediatric patients treated with PSPT. Six PBS plans were created and optimized for each patient using 3 spot sizes (∼12-, 5.4-, and 2.5-mm median sigma at isocenter for 90- to 230-MeV range) and adding apertures and compensators to plans with the 2 larger spots. Conformity and homogeneity indices, dose-volume histogram parameters, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and integral dose were quantified and compared with the respective PSPT plans. Results: The results clearly indicated that PBS with the largest spots does not necessarily offer a dosimetric or clinical advantage over PSPT. With comparable target coverage, the mean dose (D{sub mean}) to healthy organs was on average 6.3% larger than PSPT when using this spot size. However, adding apertures to plans with large spots improved the treatment quality by decreasing the average D{sub mean} and EUD by up to 8.6% and 3.2% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Decreasing the spot size further improved all plans, lowering the average D{sub mean} and EUD by up to 11.6% and 10.9% compared with PSPT, respectively, and eliminated the need for beam-shaping devices. The NTCP decreased with spot size and addition of apertures, with maximum reduction of 5.4% relative to PSPT. Conclusions: The added benefit of using PBS strongly depends on the delivery configurations. Facilities limited to large spot sizes (>∼8 mm median sigma at isocenter) are recommended to use apertures to reduce treatment-related toxicities, at least for complex and/or small tumors.

  12. The impact of insonation angle on four-chamber view image quality: an observational study on 2866 routine scans.

    Jaudi, Suha; Fries, Nicolas; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Dommergues, Marc

    2015-04-01

    To determine insonation angles achieved in routine screening practice and their impact on image quality. Prospective cross-sectional observational survey of 2866 four-chamber views produced by 287 senor ultrasonographers, from unselected routine second-trimester screening scans. Images were scored from 0 to 5 according to whether two atria, two ventricles, the heart crux, the apex, and the descending aorta were seen. Images were considered adequate if two atria, two ventricles, and the heart crux were seen. The insonation angle was classified as apical, basal, or lateral according to the orientation of the fetal heart to the ultrasound beam. There were 1612 (56.3%) apical, 869 (30.3%) basal, and 385 (13.4%) lateral views. The mean score and the rate of adequate images were significantly greater in the apical group (4.56 and 81.8%) than in the basal group (4.19 and 71.1 %) and were significantly greater in the basal group than in the lateral one (3.6 and 30.9%), p John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Comparative investigation of the gel chromatography column scanning method for quality control of /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-methylenediphosphonate

    Darte, L

    1981-04-01

    Gel chromatography column scanning (GCS) is the method of choice for quality control of sup(99m)Tc-MDP preparations. Using this method all the labelled components are obtained rapidly in one simple test procedure. The influence of various parameters such as gel type, column size, prehistory of column, equilibration, eluent, elution volume and flow rate upon the results have been investigated. Test results for sup(99 m)Tc-MDP have been compared for several different GCS systems, a few TLC systems and column chromatography with fraction collection. The GCS technique, optimized for testing sup(99m)Tc-MDP preparations has been applied in a few experiments in which very good reproducibility is required: Labelling kinetics and stability when stored at room temperature or in a refrigerator and influence of the sup(99m)Te/(sup(99m)Tc + /sup 99/Tc) atomic ratio and of the amount of radioactivity on the sup(99m)Tc-MDP labelling yield, covering parameter ranges of clinical interest, have been studied.

  14. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  15. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    Paulson, Eric S., E-mail: epaulson@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 and Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  16. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    Frohwein, Lynn J., E-mail: frohwein@uni-muenster.de; Schäfers, Klaus P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany); Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital of Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  17. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    Frohwein, Lynn J.; Schäfers, Klaus P.; Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  18. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  19. An open source automatic quality assurance (OSAQA) tool for the ACR MRI phantom.

    Sun, Jidi; Barnes, Michael; Dowling, Jason; Menk, Fred; Stanwell, Peter; Greer, Peter B

    2015-03-01

    Routine quality assurance (QA) is necessary and essential to ensure MR scanner performance. This includes geometric distortion, slice positioning and thickness accuracy, high contrast spatial resolution, intensity uniformity, ghosting artefact and low contrast object detectability. However, this manual process can be very time consuming. This paper describes the development and validation of an open source tool to automate the MR QA process, which aims to increase physicist efficiency, and improve the consistency of QA results by reducing human error. The OSAQA software was developed in Matlab and the source code is available for download from http://jidisun.wix.com/osaqa-project/. During program execution QA results are logged for immediate review and are also exported to a spreadsheet for long-term machine performance reporting. For the automatic contrast QA test, a user specific contrast evaluation was designed to improve accuracy for individuals on different display monitors. American College of Radiology QA images were acquired over a period of 2 months to compare manual QA and the results from the proposed OSAQA software. OSAQA was found to significantly reduce the QA time from approximately 45 to 2 min. Both the manual and OSAQA results were found to agree with regard to the recommended criteria and the differences were insignificant compared to the criteria. The intensity homogeneity filter is necessary to obtain an image with acceptable quality and at the same time keeps the high contrast spatial resolution within the recommended criterion. The OSAQA tool has been validated on scanners with different field strengths and manufacturers. A number of suggestions have been made to improve both the phantom design and QA protocol in the future.

  20. A combined tract-based spatial statistics and voxel-based morphometry study of the first MRI scan after diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with subgroup analysis.

    Alruwaili, A R; Pannek, K; Coulthard, A; Henderson, R; Kurniawan, N D; McCombe, P

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to compare the cortical and subcortical deep gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of ALS subjects and controls and to compare ALS subjects with (ALScog) and without (ALSnon-cog) cognitive impairment. The study was performed in 30 ALS subjects, and 19 healthy controls. Structural T1- and diffusion-weighted MRI data were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). All DTI measures and GM volume differed significantly between ALS subjects and controls. Compared to controls, greater DTI changes were present in ALScog than ALSnon-cog subjects. GM results showed reduction in the caudate nucleus volume in ALScog subjects compared to ALSnon-cog. and comparing all ALS with controls, there were changes on the right side and in a small region in the left middle frontal gyrus. This combined DTI and VBM study showed changes in motor and extra-motor regions. The DTI changes were more extensive in ALScog than ALSnon-cog subjects. It is likely that the inclusion of ALS subjects with cognitive impairment in previous studies resulted in extra-motor WM abnormalities being reported in ALS subjects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation

    Snow, Aisling [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Milliren, Carly E.; Graham, Dionne A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Program for Patient Safety and Quality, Boston, MA (United States); Callahan, Michael J.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Robertson, Richard L.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children

  2. Cine MRI of dissecting aneurysm

    Takaki, Hajime

    1991-01-01

    Cine MRI was performed in 25 cases of aortic dissection and comparative study among cine MRI, spin-echo static MRI, contrast-enhanced CT and intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was made. Cine MRI accurately detected aortic dissection. It was most accurate among various diagnostic methods in demonstration of entry site of dissection. Take-off of renal artery and its relation to true and false channels was also accurately demonstrated by cine MRI. The above results suggest that cine MRI can be an important diagnostic modality with almost equal diagnostic quality to those of conventional angiography. However, further technical improvement to shorten the imaging time seems necessary to replace angiography. (author)

  3. Superconductive MRI system, FLEXARTTM

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Nishikawa, Mineki; Goro, Takehiko

    1994-01-01

    Since the establishment of TAMI (Toshiba America MRI Inc.) in 1989, it has been jointly working with Toshiba on developing a new infrastructure for computer and software technologies to be applied to new MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) systems. As a result of these efforts, the first product of a new series of MRI systems has been introduced on the market. Known as FLEXART TM (a newly created word combining FLEXible and ART), this MRI system incorporates a new 32-bit RISC computer and a new controller for pulse sequences and data acquisition. The product concepts of FLEXART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, and ease of use, all of which are necessary features for an MRI system in the premium mid-field MRI market segment. (author)

  4. Video x-ray progressive scanning: new technique for decreasing x-ray exposure without decreasing image quality during cardiac catheterization

    Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Bove, A.A.; Wondrow, M.A.; Gray, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    A newly developed video x-ray progressive scanning system improves image quality, decreases radiation exposure, and can be added to any pulsed fluoroscopic x-ray system using a video display without major system modifications. With use of progressive video scanning, the radiation entrance exposure rate measured with a vascular phantom was decreased by 32 to 53% in comparison with a conventional fluoroscopic x-ray system. In addition to this substantial decrease in radiation exposure, the quality of the image was improved because of less motion blur and artifact. Progressive video scanning has the potential for widespread application to all pulsed fluoroscopic x-ray systems. Use of this technique should make cardiac catheterization procedures and all other fluoroscopic procedures safer for the patient and the involved medical and paramedical staff

  5. Effect of imaging parameters of spiral CT scanning on image quality for the dental implants. Visual evaluation using a semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indou, Hiroko; Honda Eiichi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of parameters of spiral CT scanning on the image quality required for the planning of dental implants operations. A semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom which has artificial mandibular canals and teeth roots was used as a standard object for imaging. Spiral CT scans for the phantom settled in water phantom with diameters of 20 and 16 cm were performed. Visibility of the artificial mandibular canal made of a Teflon tube and gaps between tooth apex and canal in the mandibular phantom was evaluated for various combinations of the slice thickness, tables speeds, angles to the canal, and x-ray tube currents. Teeth roots were made of PVC (poly vinyl chloride). The artificial mandibular canal was clearly observed on the images of 1 mm slice thickness. At the same table speed of 2 mm /rotation, the images of thin slice (1 mm) were superior to that of thick slice (2 mm). The gap between teeth apex and canal was erroneously diagnosed on the images with table speeds of 3 mm/rotation. Horizontal scanning in parallel to the canal result in poor image quality for observation of mandibular canals because of the partial volume effect. A relatively high x-ray tube current (125 mA) at thin slice (1 mm) scanning was required for scanning the mandibular phantom in 20 cm water vessel. Spiral scanning with slice thickness of 1 mm and table speeds of 1 of 2 mm/rotation seemed to be suitable for dental implants. The result of this study suggested that diagnosis from two independent spiral scans with a different angle to the object was more accurate and more efficient than single spiral scanning. (author)

  6. Advanced approach for intraoperative MRI guidance and potential benefit for neurosurgical applications.

    Busse, Harald; Schmitgen, Arno; Trantakis, Christos; Schober, Ralf; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2006-07-01

    To present an advanced approach for intraoperative image guidance in an open 0.5 T MRI and to evaluate its effectiveness for neurosurgical interventions by comparison with a dynamic scan-guided localization technique. The built-in scan guidance mode relied on successive interactive MRI scans. The additional advanced mode provided real-time navigation based on reformatted high-quality, intraoperatively acquired MR reference data, allowed multimodal image fusion, and used the successive scans of the built-in mode for quick verification of the position only. Analysis involved tumor resections and biopsies in either scan guidance (N = 36) or advanced mode (N = 59) by the same three neurosurgeons. Technical, surgical, and workflow aspects were compared. The image quality and hand-eye coordination of the advanced approach were improved. While the average extent of resection, neurologic outcome after functional MRI (fMRI) integration, and diagnostic yield appeared to be slightly better under advanced guidance, particularly for the main surgeon, statistical analysis revealed no significant differences. Resection times were comparable, while biopsies took around 30 minutes longer. The presented approach is safe and provides more detailed images and higher navigation speed at the expense of actuality. The surgical outcome achieved with advanced guidance is (at least) as good as that obtained with dynamic scan guidance. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ... thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... an MRI scan, but this is rare. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... injection. If you do not require sedation, no recovery period is necessary. You may resume your usual ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... called MR angiography (MRA) provides detailed images of blood vessels in the brain—often without the need ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  13. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & ... RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of the inside of the body. The test is painless. All you'll need to do ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  15. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Full Text Available ... resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures ... educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- ...

  16. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  17. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    Barber, Brendan R. [St George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Martin A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Bockenhauer, Detlef [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  18. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    Barber, Brendan R.; Weber, Martin A.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran

    2011-01-01

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  19. Impact of Spot Size and Beam-Shaping Devices on the Treatment Plan Quality for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Yock, Torunn I.; Depauw, Nicolas; Madden, Thomas M.; Kooy, Hanne M.; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess the clinical impact of spot size and the addition of apertures and range compensators on the treatment quality of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and to define when PBS could improve on passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: The patient cohort included 14 pediatric patients treated with PSPT. Six PBS plans were created and optimized for each patient using 3 spot sizes (∼12-, 5.4-, and 2.5-mm median sigma at isocenter for 90- to 230-MeV range) and adding apertures and compensators to plans with the 2 larger spots. Conformity and homogeneity indices, dose-volume histogram parameters, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and integral dose were quantified and compared with the respective PSPT plans. Results: The results clearly indicated that PBS with the largest spots does not necessarily offer a dosimetric or clinical advantage over PSPT. With comparable target coverage, the mean dose (D_m_e_a_n) to healthy organs was on average 6.3% larger than PSPT when using this spot size. However, adding apertures to plans with large spots improved the treatment quality by decreasing the average D_m_e_a_n and EUD by up to 8.6% and 3.2% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Decreasing the spot size further improved all plans, lowering the average D_m_e_a_n and EUD by up to 11.6% and 10.9% compared with PSPT, respectively, and eliminated the need for beam-shaping devices. The NTCP decreased with spot size and addition of apertures, with maximum reduction of 5.4% relative to PSPT. Conclusions: The added benefit of using PBS strongly depends on the delivery configurations. Facilities limited to large spot sizes (>∼8 mm median sigma at isocenter) are recommended to use apertures to reduce treatment-related toxicities, at least for complex and/or small tumors.

  20. Morphological covariance in anatomical MRI scans can identify discrete neural pathways in the brain and their disturbances in persons with neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun; Peterson, Bradley S

    2015-05-01

    We hypothesize that coordinated functional activity within discrete neural circuits induces morphological organization and plasticity within those circuits. Identifying regions of morphological covariation that are independent of morphological covariation in other regions therefore may therefore allow us to identify discrete neural systems within the brain. Comparing the magnitude of these variations in individuals who have psychiatric disorders with the magnitude of variations in healthy controls may allow us to identify aberrant neural pathways in psychiatric illnesses. We measured surface morphological features by applying nonlinear, high-dimensional warping algorithms to manually defined brain regions. We transferred those measures onto the surface of a unit sphere via conformal mapping and then used spherical wavelets and their scaling coefficients to simplify the data structure representing these surface morphological features of each brain region. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to calculate covariation in these morphological measures, as represented by their scaling coefficients, across several brain regions. We then assessed whether brain subregions that covaried in morphology, as identified by large eigenvalues in the PCA, identified specific neural pathways of the brain. To do so, we spatially registered the subnuclei for each eigenvector into the coordinate space of a Diffusion Tensor Imaging dataset; we used these subnuclei as seed regions to track and compare fiber pathways with known fiber pathways identified in neuroanatomical atlases. We applied these procedures to anatomical MRI data in a cohort of 82 healthy participants (42 children, 18 males, age 10.5 ± 2.43 years; 40 adults, 22 males, age 32.42 ± 10.7 years) and 107 participants with Tourette's Syndrome (TS) (71 children, 59 males, age 11.19 ± 2.2 years; 36 adults, 21 males, age 37.34 ± 10.9 years). We evaluated the construct validity of the identified covariation in morphology

  1. Dixon-based MRI for assessment of muscle-fat content in phantoms, healthy volunteers and patients with achillodynia: comparison to visual assessment of calf muscle quality

    Fischer, Michael A.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Buck, Florian M. [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Espinosa, Norman [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Raptis, Dimitri A. [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    To quantify the muscle fat-content (MFC) in phantoms, volunteers and patients with achillodynia using two-point Dixon-based magnetic resonance imaging (2pt-MRI{sub DIXON}) in comparison to MR spectroscopy (MRS) and visual assessment of MFC. Two-point Dixon-based MRI was used to measure the MFC of 15 phantoms containing 0-100 % fat-content and calf muscles in 30 patients (13 women; 57 ± 15 years) with achillodynia and in 20 volunteers (10 women; 30 ± 14 years) at 1.5 T. The accuracy of 2pt-MRI{sub DIXON} in quantification of MFC was assessed in vitro using phantoms and in vivo using MRS as the standard of reference. Fat-fractions derived from 2pt-MRI{sub DIXON} (FF{sub DIXON}) and MRS (FF{sub MRS}) were related to visual assessment of MFC (Goutallier grades 0-4) and Achilles-tendon quality (grade 0-4). Excellent linear correlation was demonstrated for FF{sub DIXON} with phantoms and with FF{sub MRS} in patients (p{sub c} = 0.997/0.995; p < 0.001). FF{sub DIXON} of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly higher (p = 0.002) in patients (7.0 % ± 4.7 %) compared with volunteers (3.6 % ± 0.7 %), whereas visual-grading showed no difference between both groups (p > 0.05). FF{sub MRS} and FF{sub DIXON} were significantly higher in subjects with (>grade 1) structural damage of the Achilles-tendon (p = 0.01). Two-point Dixon-based MRI allows for accurate quantification of MFC, outperforming visual assessment of calf muscle fat. Structural damage of the Achilles tendon is associated with a significantly higher MFC. (orig.)

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

  3. Technical Note: Validation of halo modeling for proton pencil beam spot scanning using a quality assurance test pattern

    Lin, Liyong, E-mail: linl@uphs.upenn.edu; Huang, Sheng; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D.; McDonough, James E.; Ainsley, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models that include the halo component (low-dose tails) of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape, position, and dose. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN #1 and UN #2). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distributions based on the weighted superposition of location-independent (UN #1) or location-dependent (UN #2) spot profiles, previously measured using a pair-magnification method and between two nozzles. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The two nozzles clearly have different characteristics, as a direct comparison of measured data shows a passing rate of 89.7% for the 115 MeV proton beam. At 225 MeV, the corresponding gamma comparisons agree better between measurement and calculation, and between measurements in the two nozzles. Conclusions: In addition to confirming the primary component of individual PBS spot profiles, a comprehensive test pattern is useful for the validation of the halo component at off-axis locations, especially for low energy protons.

  4. Nuclear Scans

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  5. Development of a 3D optical scanning-based automatic quality assurance system for proton range compensators

    Kim, MinKyu; Ju, Sang Gyu; Chung, Kwangzoo; Hong, Chae-Seon; Kim, Jinsung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih; Chung, Yoonsun; Cho, Sungkoo; Choi, Doo Ho; Kim, Jungkuk; Shin, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A new automatic quality assurance (AutoRCQA) system using a three-dimensional scanner (3DS) with system automation was developed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the quality assurance (QA) procedure for proton range compensators (RCs). The system performance was evaluated for clinical implementation. Methods: The AutoRCQA system consists of a three-dimensional measurement system (3DMS) based on 3DS and in-house developed verification software (3DVS). To verify the geometrical accuracy, the planned RC data (PRC), calculated with the treatment planning system (TPS), were reconstructed and coregistered with the measured RC data (MRC) based on the beam isocenter. The PRC and MRC inner surfaces were compared with composite analysis (CA) using 3DVS, using the CA pass rate for quantitative analysis. To evaluate the detection accuracy of the system, the authors designed a fake PRC by artificially adding small cubic islands with side lengths of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 mm on the inner surface of the PRC and performed CA with the depth difference and distance-to-agreement tolerances of [1 mm, 1 mm], [2 mm, 2 mm], and [3 mm, 3 mm]. In addition, the authors performed clinical tests using seven RCs [computerized milling machine (CMM)-RCs] manufactured by CMM, which were designed for treating various disease sites. The systematic offsets of the seven CMM-RCs were evaluated through the automatic registration function of AutoRCQA. For comparison with conventional technique, the authors measured the thickness at three points in each of the seven CMM-RCs using a manual depth measurement device and calculated thickness difference based on the TPS data (TPS-manual measurement). These results were compared with data obtained from 3DVS. The geometrical accuracy of each CMM-RC inner surface was investigated using the TPS data by performing CA with the same criteria. The authors also measured the net processing time, including the scan and analysis time. Results: The Auto

  6. Impact of the method of registering Terrestrial Laser Scanning data on the quality of documenting cultural heritage structures

    M. Kedzierski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available When documenting historical structures and objects, especially delicate artefacts such as pieces of sacred art, only techniques that allow remote, non-contact methods that enable the most precise measurements should be used to obtain data. TLS can be considered as such a technique however in order to obtain complete information for the entire structure, there is usually a need to acquire data from more than one measuring station. In this case, the most important and essential step of processing TLS data is the registration of scans. The paper contains a description of research and analyses concerning the registration of point clouds using three methods: manual, automatic and a combination of the two. The research was carried on measurement data from a historical synagogue. The structure was divided into three parts – three scans. The accuracy with which these scans were registered was assessed and a 3D model of the interior was created.

  7. Fully automated MRI-guided robotics for prostate brachytherapy

    Stoianovici, D.; Vigaru, B.; Petrisor, D.; Muntener, M.; Patriciu, A.; Song, D.

    2008-01-01

    The uncertainties encountered in the deployment of brachytherapy seeds are related to the commonly used ultrasound imager and the basic instrumentation used for the implant. An alternative solution is under development in which a fully automated robot is used to place the seeds according to the dosimetry plan under direct MRI-guidance. Incorporation of MRI-guidance creates potential for physiological and molecular image-guided therapies. Moreover, MRI-guided brachytherapy is also enabling for re-estimating dosimetry during the procedure, because with the MRI the seeds already implanted can be localised. An MRI compatible robot (MrBot) was developed. The robot is designed for transperineal percutaneous prostate interventions, and customised for fully automated MRI-guided brachytherapy. With different end-effectors, the robot applies to other image-guided interventions of the prostate. The robot is constructed of non-magnetic and dielectric materials and is electricity free using pneumatic actuation and optic sensing. A new motor (PneuStep) was purposely developed to set this robot in motion. The robot fits alongside the patient in closed-bore MRI scanners. It is able to stay fully operational during MR imaging without deteriorating the quality of the scan. In vitro, cadaver, and animal tests showed millimetre needle targeting accuracy, and very precise seed placement. The robot tested without any interference up to 7T. The robot is the first fully automated robot to function in MRI scanners. Its first application is MRI-guided seed brachytherapy. It is capable of automated, highly accurate needle placement. Extensive testing is in progress prior to clinical trials. Preliminary results show that the robot may become a useful image-guided intervention instrument. (author)

  8. Spatially Resolved MR-Compatible Doppler Ultrasound: Proof of Concept for Triggering of Diagnostic Quality Cardiovascular MRI for Function and Flow Quantification at 3T.

    Crowe, Lindsey Alexandra; Manasseh, Gibran; Chmielewski, Aneta; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Speicher, Daniel; Greiser, Andreas; Muller, Hajo; de Perrot, Thomas; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Salomir, Rares

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of a magnetic-resonance (MR)-compatible ultrasound (US) imaging probe using spatially resolved Doppler for diagnostic quality cardiovascular MR imaging (MRI) as an initial step toward hybrid US/MR fetal imaging. A newly developed technology for a dedicated MR-compatible phased array ultrasound-imaging probe acquired pulsed color Doppler carotid images, which were converted in near-real time to a trigger signal for cardiac cine and flow quantification MRI. Ultrasound and MR data acquired simultaneously were interference free. Conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) and the proposed spatially resolved Doppler triggering were compared in 10 healthy volunteers. A synthetic "false-triggered" image was retrospectively processed using metric optimized gating (MOG). Images were scored by expert readers, and sharpness, cardiac function and aortic flow were quantified. Four-dimensional (4-D) flow (two volunteers) showed feasibility of Doppler triggering over a long acquisition time. Imaging modalities were compatible. US probe positioning was stable and comfortable. Image quality scores and quantified sharpness were statistically equal for Doppler- and ECG-triggering (p ). ECG-, Doppler-triggered, and MOG ejection fractions were equivalent (p ), with false-triggered values significantly lower (p 0.05). 4-D flow quantification gave consistent results between ECG and Doppler triggering. We report interference-free pulsed color Doppler ultrasound during MR data acquisition. Cardiovascular MRI of diagnostic quality was successfully obtained with pulsed color Doppler triggering. The hardware platform could further enable advanced free-breathing cardiac imaging. Doppler ultrasound triggering is applicable where ECG is compromised due to pathology or interference at higher magnetic fields, and where direct ECG is impossible, i.e., fetal imaging.

  9. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    Choudhri, Asim F. [Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Siddiqui, Adeel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  10. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    Choudhri, Asim F.; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  11. Noncontrast chest computed tomography immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: Clinical benefits and effect of radiation reduction on image quality in low-dose scanning

    Choi, Joon-Il; Kim, Hyun Beom; Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jong Seok; Koh, Young Whan; An, Sang Bu; Ko, Heung-kyu; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical benefits of noncontrast chest computed tomography (CT) immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and to assess the effect of radiation reduction on image quality in low-dose scanning. Materials and methods: From June to October 2010, we performed standard-dose, noncontrast chest CTs immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in 160 patients and low-dose CTs in 88 patients. We reviewed the entire noncontrast chest CTs and follow-up CTs to reveal the clinical benefits of CT evaluation immediately after transarterial chemoembolization. Using two independent readers, we also retrospectively evaluated the radiation dose and image quality in terms of the image noise, contrast between the liver parenchyma and iodized oil and diagnostic acceptability for the evaluation of treatment response after transarterial chemoembolization. Results: In 5.2% of the patients, additional treatment was performed immediately after the interpretation of the noncontrast chest CT, and additional pulmonary lesions were found in 8.5% of the patients. The measured mean dose-length product for the low-dose scanning was 18.4% of that of the standard-dose scanning. The image noise was significantly higher with the low-dose scanning (p < 0.001). However, all of the low-dose CT scans were diagnostically acceptable, and the mean scores for the subjective assessments of the contrast and diagnostic acceptability showed no significant differences for either reader. Conclusion: A noncontrast chest CT immediately after transarterial chemoembolization has some clinical benefits for immediate decision making and detecting pulmonary lesions. Low-dose, noncontrast chest CTs immediately after transarterial chemoembolization consistently provide diagnostically acceptable images and information on treatment response in patients who have undergone transarterial chemoembolization.

  12. 128-slice Dual-source Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Image Quality and Radiation Dose of Prospectively Electrocardiogram-triggered Sequential Scan Compared with Retrospectively Electrocardiogram-gated Spiral Scan.

    Lin, Lu; Wang, Yi-Ning; Kong, Ling-Yan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Lu, Guang-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Qi; Cao, Jian; Li, Shuo; Song, Lan; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Kang; Wang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the image quality (IQ) and radiation dose of 128-slice dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography using prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered sequential scan mode compared with ECG-gated spiral scan mode in a population with atrial fibrillation. Methods Thirty-two patients with suspected coronary artery disease and permanent atrial fibrillation referred for a second-generation 128-slice DSCT coronary angiography were included in the prospective study. Of them, 17 patients (sequential group) were randomly selected to use a prospectively ECG-triggered sequential scan, while the other 15 patients (spiral group) used a retrospectively ECG-gated spiral scan. The IQ was assessed by two readers independently, using a four-point grading scale from excel-lent (grade 1) to non-assessable (grade 4), based on the American Heart Association 15-segment model. IQ of each segment and effective dose of each patient were compared between the two groups. Results The mean heart rate (HR) of the sequential group was 96±27 beats per minute (bpm) with a variation range of 73±25 bpm, while the mean HR of the spiral group was 86±22 bpm with a variationrange of 65±24 bpm. Both of the mean HR (t=1.91, P=0.243) and HR variation range (t=0.950, P=0.350) had no significant difference between the two groups. In per-segment analysis, IQ of the sequential group vs. spiral group was rated as excellent (grade 1) in 190/244 (78%) vs. 177/217 (82%) by reader1 and 197/245 (80%) vs. 174/214 (81%) by reader2, as non-assessable (grade 4) in 4/244 (2%) vs. 2/217 (1%) by reader1 and 6/245 (2%) vs. 4/214 (2%) by reader2. Overall averaged IQ per-patient in the sequential and spiral group showed equally good (1.27±0.19 vs. 1.25±0.22, Z=-0.834, P=0.404). The effective radiation dose of the sequential group reduced significantly compared with the spiral group (4.88±1.77 mSv vs. 10.20±3.64 mSv; t=-5.372, P=0.000). Conclusion Compared with retrospectively

  13. Can unenhanced multiparametric MRI substitute gadolinium-enhanced MRI in the characterization of vertebral marrow infiltrative lesions?

    Dalia Z. Zidan

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Unenhanced-multiparametric MRI is compatible with gadolinium-enhanced MRI in reliable characterization of marrow infiltrative lesions. The routine MRI protocol of cancer patients should be altered to accommodate the evolving MRI technology and cost effectively substitute the need for a gadolinium enhanced scan.

  14. Chest MRI

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  15. CONSENSUS STATEMENT BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY ON THE QUALITY OF DXA SCANS AND REPORTS.

    Licata, Angelo A; Binkley, Neil; Petak, Steven M; Camacho, Pauline M

    2018-02-01

    High-quality dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans are necessary for accurate diagnosis of osteoporosis and monitoring of therapy; however, DXA scan reports may contain errors that cause confusion about diagnosis and treatment. This American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology consensus statement was generated to draw attention to many common technical problems affecting DXA report conclusions and provide guidance on how to address them to ensure that patients receive appropriate osteoporosis care. The DXA Writing Committee developed a consensus based on discussion and evaluation of available literature related to osteoporosis and osteodensitometry. Technical errors may include errors in scan acquisition and/or analysis, leading to incorrect diagnosis and reporting of change over time. Although the International Society for Clinical Densitometry advocates training for technologists and medical interpreters to help eliminate these problems, many lack skill in this technology. Suspicion that reports are wrong arises when clinical history is not compatible with scan interpretation (e.g., dramatic increase/decrease in a short period of time; declines in previously stable bone density after years of treatment), when different scanners are used, or when inconsistent anatomic sites are used for monitoring the response to therapy. Understanding the concept of least significant change will minimize erroneous conclusions about changes in bone density. Clinicians must develop the skills to differentiate technical problems, which confound reports, from real biological changes. We recommend that clinicians review actual scan images and data, instead of relying solely on the impression of the report, to pinpoint errors and accurately interpret DXA scan images. AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; BMC = bone mineral content; BMD = bone mineral density; DXA = dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; ISCD = International

  16. Whole-body computed tomography in trauma patients: optimization of the patient scanning position significantly shortens examination time while maintaining diagnostic image quality

    Hickethier T

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tilman Hickethier,1,* Kamal Mammadov,1,* Bettina Baeßler,1 Thorsten Lichtenstein,1 Jochen Hinkelbein,2 Lucy Smith,3 Patrick Sven Plum,4 Seung-Hun Chon,4 David Maintz,1 De-Hua Chang1 1Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Canada; 4Department of General, Visceral and Cancer Surgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The study was conducted to compare examination time and artifact vulnerability of whole-body computed tomographies (wbCTs for trauma patients using conventional or optimized patient positioning. Patients and methods: Examination time was measured in 100 patients scanned with conventional protocol (Group A: arms positioned alongside the body for head and neck imaging and over the head for trunk imaging and 100 patients scanned with optimized protocol (Group B: arms flexed on a chest pillow without repositioning. Additionally, influence of two different scanning protocols on image quality in the most relevant body regions was assessed by two blinded readers. Results: Total wbCT duration was about 35% or 3:46 min shorter in B than in A. Artifacts in aorta (27 vs 6%, liver (40 vs 8% and spleen (27 vs 5% occurred significantly more often in B than in A. No incident of non-diagnostic image quality was reported, and no significant differences for lungs and spine were found. Conclusion: An optimized wbCT positioning protocol for trauma patients allows a significant reduction of examination time while still maintaining diagnostic image quality. Keywords: CT scan, polytrauma, acute care, time requirement, positioning

  17. DTIPrep: Quality Control of Diffusion-Weighted Images

    Ipek eOguz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, diffusion MRI (dMRI studies of the human and animal brain have been used to investigate a multitude of pathologies and drug-related effects in neuroscience research. Study after study identifies white matter (WM degeneration as a crucial biomarker for all these diseases. The tool of choice for studying WM is dMRI. However, dMRI has inherently low signal-to-noise ratio and its acquisition requires a relatively long scan time; in fact, the high loads required occasionally stress scanner hardware past the point of physical failure. As a result, many types of artifacts implicate the quality of diffusion imagery. Using these complex scans containing artifacts without quality control (QC can result in considerable error and bias in the subsequent analysis, negatively affecting the results of research studies using them. However, dMRI QC remains an under-recognized issue in the dMRI community as there are no user-friendly tools commonly available to comprehensively address the issue of dMRI QC. As a result, current dMRI studies often perform a poor job at dMRI QC.Thorough QC of diffusion MRI will reduce measurement noise and improve reproducibility, and sensitivity in neuroimaging studies; this will allow researchers to more fully exploit the power of the dMRI technique and will ultimately advance neuroscience. Therefore, in this manuscript, we present our open-source software, DTIPrep, as a unified, user friendly platform for thorough quality control of dMRI data. These include artifacts caused by eddy-currents, head motion, bed vibration and pulsation, venetian blind artifacts, as well as slice-wise and gradient-wise intensity inconsistencies. This paper summarizes a basic set of features of DTIPrep described earlier and focuses on newly added capabilities related to directional artifacts and bias analysis.

  18. SU-F-I-46: Optimizing Dose Reduction in Adult Head CT Protocols While Maintaining Image Quality in Postmortem Head Scans

    Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Quails, N; Correa, N; Rajderkar, D; Bennett, J; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize adult head CT protocol by reducing dose to an appropriate level while providing CT images of diagnostic quality. Methods: Five cadavers were scanned from the skull base to the vertex using a routine adult head CT protocol (120 kVp, 270 mA, 0.75 s rotation, 0.5 mm × 32 detectors, 70.8 mGy CTDIvol) followed by seven reduced-dose protocols with varying combinations of reduced tube current, reduced rotation time, and increased detectors with CTDIvol ranging from 38.2 to 65.6 mGy. Organ doses were directly measured with 21 OSL dosimeters placed on the surface and implanted in the head by a neurosurgeon. Two neuroradiologists assessed grey-white matter differentiation, fluid space, ventricular size, midline shift, brain mass, edema, ischemia, and skull fractures on a three point scale: (1) Unacceptable, (2) Borderline Acceptable, and (3) Acceptable. Results: For the standard scan, doses to the skin, lens of the eye, salivary glands, thyroid, and brain were 37.55 mGy, 49.65 mGy, 40.67 mGy, 4.63 mGy, and 27.33 mGy, respectively. Two cadavers had cerebral edema due to changing dynamics of postmortem effects, causing the grey-white matter differentiation to appear less distinct. Two cadavers with preserved grey-white matter received acceptable scores for all image quality features for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 57.3 mGy, allowing organ dose savings ranging from 34% to 45%. One cadaver allowed for greater dose reduction for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 42 mGy. Conclusion: Efforts to optimize scan protocol should consider both dose and clinical image quality. This is made possible with postmortem subjects, whose brains are similar to patients, allowing for an investigation of ideal scan parameters. Radiologists at our institution accepted scan protocols acquired with lower scan parameters, with CTDIvol values closer to the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) Achievable Dose level of 57 mGy.

  19. SU-F-I-46: Optimizing Dose Reduction in Adult Head CT Protocols While Maintaining Image Quality in Postmortem Head Scans

    Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Quails, N; Correa, N; Rajderkar, D; Bennett, J; Rill, L; Arreola, M [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize adult head CT protocol by reducing dose to an appropriate level while providing CT images of diagnostic quality. Methods: Five cadavers were scanned from the skull base to the vertex using a routine adult head CT protocol (120 kVp, 270 mA, 0.75 s rotation, 0.5 mm × 32 detectors, 70.8 mGy CTDIvol) followed by seven reduced-dose protocols with varying combinations of reduced tube current, reduced rotation time, and increased detectors with CTDIvol ranging from 38.2 to 65.6 mGy. Organ doses were directly measured with 21 OSL dosimeters placed on the surface and implanted in the head by a neurosurgeon. Two neuroradiologists assessed grey-white matter differentiation, fluid space, ventricular size, midline shift, brain mass, edema, ischemia, and skull fractures on a three point scale: (1) Unacceptable, (2) Borderline Acceptable, and (3) Acceptable. Results: For the standard scan, doses to the skin, lens of the eye, salivary glands, thyroid, and brain were 37.55 mGy, 49.65 mGy, 40.67 mGy, 4.63 mGy, and 27.33 mGy, respectively. Two cadavers had cerebral edema due to changing dynamics of postmortem effects, causing the grey-white matter differentiation to appear less distinct. Two cadavers with preserved grey-white matter received acceptable scores for all image quality features for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 57.3 mGy, allowing organ dose savings ranging from 34% to 45%. One cadaver allowed for greater dose reduction for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 42 mGy. Conclusion: Efforts to optimize scan protocol should consider both dose and clinical image quality. This is made possible with postmortem subjects, whose brains are similar to patients, allowing for an investigation of ideal scan parameters. Radiologists at our institution accepted scan protocols acquired with lower scan parameters, with CTDIvol values closer to the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) Achievable Dose level of 57 mGy.

  20. High-resolution whole-brain DCE-MRI using constrained reconstruction: Prospective clinical evaluation in brain tumor patients

    Guo, Yi; Zhu, Yinghua; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Nayak, Krishna; Lebel, R. Marc; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Law, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate a highly accelerated T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI technique that provides high spatial resolution and whole-brain coverage via undersampling and constrained reconstruction with multiple sparsity constraints. Methods: Conventional (rate-2 SENSE) and experimental DCE-MRI (rate-30) scans were performed 20 minutes apart in 15 brain tumor patients. The conventional clinical DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 1.3 × 7.0 mm 3 , FOV 22 × 22 × 4.2 cm 3 , and the experimental DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 0.9 × 1.9 mm 3 , and broader coverage 22 × 22 × 19 cm 3 . Temporal resolution was 5 s for both protocols. Time-resolved images and blood–brain barrier permeability maps were qualitatively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: The experimental DCE-MRI scans showed no loss of qualitative information in any of the cases, while achieving substantially higher spatial resolution and whole-brain spatial coverage. Average qualitative scores (from 0 to 3) were 2.1 for the experimental scans and 1.1 for the conventional clinical scans. Conclusions: The proposed DCE-MRI approach provides clinically superior image quality with higher spatial resolution and coverage than currently available approaches. These advantages may allow comprehensive permeability mapping in the brain, which is especially valuable in the setting of large lesions or multiple lesions spread throughout the brain.

  1. Augmented Quadruple-Phase Contrast Media Administration and Triphasic Scan Protocol Increases Image Quality at Reduced Radiation Dose During Computed Tomography Urography.

    Saade, Charbel; Mohamad, May; Kerek, Racha; Hamieh, Nadine; Alsheikh Deeb, Ibrahim; El-Achkar, Bassam; Tamim, Hani; Abdul Razzak, Farah; Haddad, Maurice; Abi-Ghanem, Alain S; El-Merhi, Fadi

    The aim of this article was to investigate the opacification of the renal vasculature and the urogenital system during computed tomography urography by using a quadruple-phase contrast media in a triphasic scan protocol. A total of 200 patients with possible urinary tract abnormalities were equally divided between 2 protocols. Protocol A used the conventional single bolus and quadruple-phase scan protocol (pre, arterial, venous, and delayed), retrospectively. Protocol B included a quadruple-phase contrast media injection with a triphasic scan protocol (pre, arterial and combined venous, and delayed), prospectively. Each protocol used 100 mL contrast and saline at a flow rate of 4.5 mL. Attenuation profiles and contrast-to-noise ratio of the renal arteries, veins, and urogenital tract were measured. Effective radiation dose calculation, data analysis by independent sample t test, receiver operating characteristic, and visual grading characteristic analyses were performed. In arterial circulation, only the inferior interlobular arteries in both protocols showed a statistical significance (P contrast-to-noise ratio than protocol A (protocol B: 22.68 ± 13.72; protocol A: 14.75 ± 5.76; P contrast media and triphasic scan protocol usage increases the image quality at a reduced radiation dose.

  2. Online public reactions to fMRI communication with patients with disorders of consciousness: Quality of life, end-of-life decision making, and concerns with misdiagnosis.

    Chandler, Jennifer A; Sun, Jeffrey A; Racine, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the news media have reported on the discovery of covert awareness and the establishment of limited communication using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neuroimaging technique with several brain-injured patients thought to have been in a vegetative state. This discovery has raised many ethical, legal, and social questions related to quality of life, end-of-life decision making, diagnostic and prognostic accuracy in disorders of consciousness, resource allocation, and other issues. This project inquires into the public responses to these discoveries. We conducted a thematic analysis of online comments (n = 779) posted in response to 15 news articles and blog posts regarding the case of a Canadian patient diagnosed for 12 years as in a vegetative state, but who was reported in 2012 as having been able to communicate via fMRI. The online comments were coded using an iteratively refined codebook structured around 14 main themes. Among the most frequent public reactions revealed in the online comments were discussions of the quality of life of patients with disorders of consciousness, whether life-sustaining treatment should be withdrawn (and whether the fMRI communication technique should be used to ask patients about this), and misgivings about the accuracy of diagnosis in disorders of consciousness and brain death. These public perspectives are relevant to the obligations of clinicians, lawyers, and public policymakers to patients, families, and the public. Future work should consider how best to alleviate families' concerns as this type of research shakes their faith in diagnostic accuracy, to clarify the legal rules relating to advance directives in this context, and to address the manner in which public messaging might help to alleviate any indirect impact on confidence in the organ donation system.

  3. A simple but precise method for quantitative measurement of the quality of the laser focus in a scanning optical microscope.

    Trägårdh, J; Macrae, K; Travis, C; Amor, R; Norris, G; Wilson, S H; Oppo, G-L; McConnell, G

    2015-07-01

    We report a method for characterizing the focussing laser beam exiting the objective in a laser scanning microscope. This method provides the size of the optical focus, the divergence of the beam, the ellipticity and the astigmatism. We use a microscopic-scale knife edge in the form of a simple transmission electron microscopy grid attached to a glass microscope slide, and a light-collecting optical fibre and photodiode underneath the specimen. By scanning the laser spot from a reflective to a transmitting part of the grid, a beam profile in the form of an error function can be obtained and by repeating this with the knife edge at different axial positions relative to the beam waist, the divergence and astigmatism of the postobjective laser beam can be obtained. The measured divergence can be used to quantify how much of the full numerical aperture of the lens is used in practice. We present data of the beam radius, beam divergence, ellipticity and astigmatism obtained with low (0.15, 0.7) and high (1.3) numerical aperture lenses and lasers commonly used in confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy. Our knife-edge method has several advantages over alternative knife-edge methods used in microscopy including that the knife edge is easy to prepare, that the beam can be characterized also directly under a cover slip, as necessary to reduce spherical aberrations for objectives designed to be used with a cover slip, and it is suitable for use with commercial laser scanning microscopes where access to the laser beam can be limited. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. 2D XD-GRASP provides better image quality than conventional 2D cardiac cine MRI for patients who cannot suspend respiration

    Piekarski, Eve; Chitiboi, Teodora; Ramb, Rebecca; Latson, Larry A; Bhatla, Puneet; Feng, Li; Axel, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Object Residual respiratory motion degrades image quality in conventional cardiac cine MRI (CCMR). We evaluated whether a free-breathing (FB) radial imaging CCMR sequence with compressed sensing reconstruction (eXtra-Dimension (e.g. cardiac and respiratory phases) Golden-angle RAdial Sparse Parallel, or XD-GRASP) could provide better image quality than a conventional Cartesian breath-held (BH) sequence, in an unselected population of patients undergoing clinical CCMR. Material and Methods 101 patients who underwent BH and FB imaging in a mid-ventricular short-axis plane at a matching location were included. Visual and quantitative image analysis was performed by two blinded experienced readers, using a 5-point qualitative scale to score overall image quality and visual signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) grade, with measures of noise and sharpness. End-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) left-ventricular areas were also measured and compared for both BH and FB images. Results Image quality was generally better with the BH cines (overall quality grade BH vs FB: 4 vs 2.9, pXD-GRASP CCMR was visually inferior to conventional BH cardiac cine in general, it provided improved image quality in the subgroup of patients presenting respiratory motion-induced artifacts on breath-held images. PMID:29067539

  5. Two-dimensional XD-GRASP provides better image quality than conventional 2D cardiac cine MRI for patients who cannot suspend respiration.

    Piekarski, Eve; Chitiboi, Teodora; Ramb, Rebecca; Latson, Larry A; Bhatla, Puneet; Feng, Li; Axel, Leon

    2018-02-01

    Residual respiratory motion degrades image quality in conventional cardiac cine MRI (CCMRI). We evaluated whether a free-breathing (FB) radial imaging CCMRI sequence with compressed sensing reconstruction [extradimensional (e.g. cardiac and respiratory phases) golden-angle radial sparse parallel, or XD-GRASP] could provide better image quality than a conventional Cartesian breath-held (BH) sequence in an unselected population of patients undergoing clinical CCMRI. One hundred one patients who underwent BH and FB imaging in a midventricular short-axis plane at a matching location were included. Visual and quantitative image analysis was performed by two blinded experienced readers, using a five-point qualitative scale to score overall image quality and visual signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) grade, with measures of noise and sharpness. End-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular areas were also measured and compared for both BH and FB images. Image quality was generally better with the BH cines (overall quality grade for BH vs FB images 4 vs 2.9, p XD-GRASP CCMRI was visually inferior to conventional BH CCMRI in general, it provided improved image quality in the subgroup of patients with respiratory-motion-induced artifacts on BH images.

  6. What does an MRI scan cost?

    Young, David W

    2015-11-01

    Historically, hospital departments have computed the costs of individual tests or procedures using the ratio of cost to charges (RCC) method, which can produce inaccurate results. To determine a more accurate cost of a test or procedure, the activity-based costing (ABC) method must be used. Accurate cost calculations will ensure reliable information about the profitability of a hospital's DRGs.

  7. Comparative study of image quality between axial T2-weighted BLADE and turbo spin-echo MRI of the upper abdomen on 3.0 T.

    Zhang, Lin; Tian, ChunMei; Wang, PeiYuan; Chen, Liang; Mao, XiJin; Wang, ShanShan; Wang, Xu; Dong, JingMin; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    To compare image quality of turbo spin-echo (TSE) with BLADE [which is also named periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER)] on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for upper abdomen. This study involved the retrospective evaluation of 103 patients (63 males, 40 females; age range 19-76 years; median age 53.8 years) who underwent 3.0 T MRI with both conventional TSE T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and BLADE TSE T2WI. Two radiologists assessed respiratory motion, gastrointestinal peristalsis, and vascular pulsation artifacts, as well as the sharpness of the liver and pancreas edges. Scores for all magnetic resonance (MR) images were recorded. Wilcoxon's rank test was used to compare hierarchical data. Cohen's kappa coefficient was adopted to analyze interobserver consistency. Compared to TSE T2WI, BLADE TSE T2WI reduced all of the examined motion artifacts and increased the sharpness of the liver and pancreas edges (all P image quality.

  8. Optimising EEG-fMRI for Localisation of Focal Epilepsy in Children.

    Maria Centeno

    Full Text Available Early surgical intervention in children with drug resistant epilepsy has benefits but requires using tolerable and minimally invasive tests. EEG-fMRI studies have demonstrated good sensitivity for the localization of epileptic focus but a poor yield although the reasons for this have not been systematically addressed. While adults EEG-fMRI studies are performed in the "resting state"; children are commonly sedated however, this has associated risks and potential confounds. In this study, we assessed the impact of the following factors on the tolerability and results of EEG-fMRI in children: viewing a movie inside the scanner; movement; occurrence of interictal epileptiform discharges (IED; scan duration and design efficiency. This work's motivation is to optimize EEG-fMRI parameters to make this test widely available to paediatric population.Forty-six children with focal epilepsy and 20 controls (6-18 underwent EEG-fMRI. For two 10 minutes sessions subjects were told to lie still with eyes closed, as it is classically performed in adult studies ("rest sessions", for another two sessions, subjects watched a child friendly stimulation i.e. movie ("movie sessions". IED were mapped with EEG-fMRI for each session and across sessions. The resulting maps were classified as concordant/discordant with the presumed epileptogenic focus for each subject.Movement increased with scan duration, but the movie reduced movement by ~40% when played within the first 20 minutes. There was no effect of movie on the occurrence of IED, nor in the concordance of the test. Ability of EEG-fMRI to map the epileptogenic region was similar for the 20 and 40 minute scan durations. Design efficiency was predictive of concordance.A child friendly natural stimulus improves the tolerability of EEG-fMRI and reduces in-scanner movement without having an effect on IED occurrence and quality of EEG-fMRI maps. This allowed us to scan children as young as 6 and obtain localising

  9. Renal scan

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003790.htm Renal scan To use the sharing features on this ... anaphylaxis . Alternative Names Renogram; Kidney scan Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Chernecky CC, ...

  10. CT Scan

    ... disease, lung nodules and liver masses Monitor the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as cancer treatment Detect ... scan done in a hospital or an outpatient facility. CT scans are painless and, with newer machines, ...

  11. Shimadzu superconductive MRI system, SMT-100

    Yamauchi, Mikio; Shimizu, Koji; Itoh, Masamichi; Fujio, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Yasushi

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system SMT-100 operating at 1.0 T (Tesla) developed lately is reported on this paper. SMT-100 is graded as higher class and more effective system in MR-imaging systems. Purpose of development are (1) supply of high quality imaging, (2) high patient throughput, and (3) low operating cost. Following developments are carried out in this system: (1) development of 1.0 T superconducting magnet without liquid nitrogen vessel, attached self-magnetic shield, (2) development of digital controller system for being able to correspond to future pulse sequences, (3) development of flexible coil and establishment of displacement scanning method by fitting the coil on examination position, (4) separate console system (viewing console and scanning console) for high patient throughput. The outline of SMT-100 and clinical data by the system are reported here. (author)

  12. SU-E-J-240: Development of a Novel 4D MRI Sequence for Real-Time Liver Tumor Tracking During Radiotherapy

    Zhuang, L; Burmeister, J [Department of Oncology, Wayne State Univ School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Ye, Y [Department of Radiology, Wayne State Univ School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a Novel 4D MRI Technique that is feasible for realtime liver tumor tracking during radiotherapy. Methods: A volunteer underwent an abdominal 2D fast EPI coronal scan on a 3.0T MRI scanner (Siemens Inc., Germany). An optimal set of parameters was determined based on image quality and scan time. A total of 23 slices were scanned to cover the whole liver in the test scan. For each scan position, the 2D images were retrospectively sorted into multiple phases based on breathing signal extracted from the images. Consequently the 2D slices with same phase numbers were stacked to form one 3D image. Multiple phases of 3D images formed the 4D MRI sequence representing one breathing cycle. Results: The optimal set of scan parameters were: TR= 57ms, TE= 19ms, FOV read= 320mm and flip angle= 30°, which resulted in a total scan time of 14s for 200 frames (FMs) per slice and image resolution of (2.5mm,2.5mm,5.0mm) in three directions. Ten phases of 3D images were generated, each of which had 23 slices. Based on our test scan, only 100FMs were necessary for the phase sorting process which may lower the scan time to 7s/100FMs/slice. For example, only 5 slices/35s are necessary for a 4D MRI scan to cover liver tumor size ≤ 2cm leading to the possibility of tumor trajectory tracking every 35s during treatment. Conclusion: The novel 4D MRI technique we developed can reconstruct a 4D liver MRI sequence representing one breathing cycle (7s/ slice) without an external monitor. This technique can potentially be used for real-time liver tumor tracking during radiotherapy.

  13. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations

  14. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M [Univ Florida, Jacksonville Beach, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations.

  15. Reconstructed image quality analysis of an industrial instant non-scanning tomography system with different types of collimators by the Monte Carlo simulation

    Velo, Alexandre F.; Carvalho, Diego V.; Alvarez, Alexandre G.; Hamada, Margarida M.; Mesquita, Carlos H., E-mail: afvelo@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The greatest impact of the tomography technology application currently occurs in medicine. The great success of medical tomography is due to the human body presents reasonably standardized dimensions with well established chemical composition. Generally, these favorable conditions are not found in large industrial objects. In the industry there is much interest in using the information of the tomograph in order to know the interior of: (1) manufactured industrial objects or (2) machines and their means of production. In these cases, the purpose of the tomograph is to: (a) control the quality of the final product and (b) optimize production, contributing to the pilot phase of the projects and analyzing the quality of the means of production. In different industrial processes, e. g. in chemical reactors and distillation columns, the phenomena related to multiphase processes are usually fast, requiring high temporal resolution of the computed tomography (CT) data acquisition. In this context, Instant non-scanning tomograph and fifth generation tomograph meets these requirements. An instant non scanning tomography system is being developed at the IPEN/CNEN. In this work, in order to optimize the system, this tomograph comprised different collimators was simulated, with Monte Carlo method using the MCNP4C. The image quality was evaluated with MATLAB® 2013b, by analysis of the following parameters: contrast to noise (CNR), root mean square ratio (RMSE), signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the spatial resolution by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF(f)), to analyze which collimator fits better to the instant non scanning tomography. It was simulated three situations; (1) with no collimator; (2) ?25 mm x 50 mm cylindrical collimator with a septum of ø5.0 mm x 50 mm; (3) ø25 mm x 50 mm cylindrical collimator with a slit septum of 24 mm x 5.0 mm x 50 mm. (author)

  16. Reconstructed image quality analysis of an industrial instant non-scanning tomography system with different types of collimators by the Monte Carlo simulation

    Velo, Alexandre F.; Carvalho, Diego V.; Alvarez, Alexandre G.; Hamada, Margarida M.; Mesquita, Carlos H.

    2017-01-01

    The greatest impact of the tomography technology application currently occurs in medicine. The great success of medical tomography is due to the human body presents reasonably standardized dimensions with well established chemical composition. Generally, these favorable conditions are not found in large industrial objects. In the industry there is much interest in using the information of the tomograph in order to know the interior of: (1) manufactured industrial objects or (2) machines and their means of production. In these cases, the purpose of the tomograph is to: (a) control the quality of the final product and (b) optimize production, contributing to the pilot phase of the projects and analyzing the quality of the means of production. In different industrial processes, e. g. in chemical reactors and distillation columns, the phenomena related to multiphase processes are usually fast, requiring high temporal resolution of the computed tomography (CT) data acquisition. In this context, Instant non-scanning tomograph and fifth generation tomograph meets these requirements. An instant non scanning tomography system is being developed at the IPEN/CNEN. In this work, in order to optimize the system, this tomograph comprised different collimators was simulated, with Monte Carlo method using the MCNP4C. The image quality was evaluated with MATLAB® 2013b, by analysis of the following parameters: contrast to noise (CNR), root mean square ratio (RMSE), signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the spatial resolution by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF(f)), to analyze which collimator fits better to the instant non scanning tomography. It was simulated three situations; (1) with no collimator; (2) ?25 mm x 50 mm cylindrical collimator with a septum of ø5.0 mm x 50 mm; (3) ø25 mm x 50 mm cylindrical collimator with a slit septum of 24 mm x 5.0 mm x 50 mm. (author)

  17. DTIPrep: quality control of diffusion-weighted images.

    Oguz, Ipek; Farzinfar, Mahshid; Matsui, Joy; Budin, Francois; Liu, Zhexing; Gerig, Guido; Johnson, Hans J; Styner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, diffusion MRI (dMRI) studies of the human and animal brain have been used to investigate a multitude of pathologies and drug-related effects in neuroscience research. Study after study identifies white matter (WM) degeneration as a crucial biomarker for all these diseases. The tool of choice for studying WM is dMRI. However, dMRI has inherently low signal-to-noise ratio and its acquisition requires a relatively long scan time; in fact, the high loads required occasionally stress scanner hardware past the point of physical failure. As a result, many types of artifacts implicate the quality of diffusion imagery. Using these complex scans containing artifacts without quality control (QC) can result in considerable error and bias in the subsequent analysis, negatively affecting the results of research studies using them. However, dMRI QC remains an under-recognized issue in the dMRI community as there are no user-friendly tools commonly available to comprehensively address the issue of dMRI QC. As a result, current dMRI studies often perform a poor job at dMRI QC. Thorough QC of dMRI will reduce measurement noise and improve reproducibility, and sensitivity in neuroimaging studies; this will allow researchers to more fully exploit the power of the dMRI technique and will ultimately advance neuroscience. Therefore, in this manuscript, we present our open-source software, DTIPrep, as a unified, user friendly platform for thorough QC of dMRI data. These include artifacts caused by eddy-currents, head motion, bed vibration and pulsation, venetian blind artifacts, as well as slice-wise and gradient-wise intensity inconsistencies. This paper summarizes a basic set of features of DTIPrep described earlier and focuses on newly added capabilities related to directional artifacts and bias analysis.

  18. Studies on the reliability of high-field intra-operative MRI in brain glioma resection

    Zhi-jun SONG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the reliability of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.Method One hundred and thirty-one cases of brain glioma(69 males and 62 females,aged from 7 to 79 years with mean of 39.6 years hospitalized from Nov.2009 to Aug.2010 were involved in present study.All the patients were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI before the operation.The tumors were resected under conventional navigation microscope,and the high-field iMRI was used for all the patients when the operators considered the tumor was satisfactorily resected,while the residual tumor was difficult to detect under the microscope,but resected after being revealed by high-field iMRI.Histopathological examination was performed.The patients without residual tumors recieved high-field MRI scan at day 4 or 5 after operation to evaluate the accuracy of high-field iMRI during operation.Results High quality intra-operative images were obtained by using high-field iMRI.Twenty-eight cases were excluded because their residual tumors were not resected due to their location too close to functional area.Combined with the results of intra-operative histopathological examination and post-operative MRI at the early recovery stage,the sensitivity of high-field iMRI in residual tumor diagnosis was 98.0%(49/50,the specificity was 94.3%(50/53,and the accuracy was 96.1%(99/103.Conclusion High-quality intra-operative imaging could be acquired by high-field iMRI,which maybe used as a safe and reliable method in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.

  19. Results of a 1-year quality-improvement process to reduce door-to-needle time in acute ischemic stroke with MRI screening.

    Sablot, D; Gaillard, N; Colas, C; Smadja, P; Gely, C; Dutray, A; Bonnec, J-M; Jurici, S; Farouil, G; Ferraro-Allou, A; Jantac, M; Allou, T; Pujol, C; Olivier, N; Laverdure, A; Fadat, B; Mas, J; Dumitrana, A; Garcia, Y; Touzani, H; Perucho, P; Moulin, T; Richard, C; Heroum, C; Bouly, S; Sagnes-Raffy, C; Heve, D

    To determine the effects of a 1-year quality-improvement (QI) process to reduce door-to-needle (DTN) time in a secondary general hospital in which multimodal MRI screening is used before tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The QI process was initiated in January 2015. Patients who received intravenous (iv) tPAprocess; the "2015 cohort") were identified (n=130), and their demographic and clinical characteristics and timing metrics compared with those of patients treated by iv tPA in 2014 (the "2014 cohort", n=135). Of the 130 patients in the 2015 cohort, 120 (92.3%) of them were screened by MRI. The median DTN time was significantly reduced by 30% (from 84min in 2014 to 59min; Pimprovement in DTN time was associated with better outcomes after discharge (patients with a 0-2 score on the modified rankin scale: 59% in the 2015 cohort vs 42.4% in the 2014 cohort; Pprocess, the median DTN time decreased by 15% (from 65min in the first trimester to 55min in the last trimester; P≤0.04) with a non-significant 1.5-fold increase in the proportion of treated patients with a DTN time≤60min (from 41% to 62%; P=0.09). It is feasible to deliver tPA to patients with AIS within 60min in a general hospital, using MRI as the routine screening modality, making this QI process to reduce DTN time widely applicable to other secondary general hospitals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The involvement of medical doctors in hospital governance and implications for quality management: a quick scan in 19 and an in depth study in 7 OECD countries.

    Rotar, A M; Botje, D; Klazinga, N S; Lombarts, K M; Groene, O; Sunol, R; Plochg, T

    2016-05-24

    Hospital governance is broadening its orientation from cost and production controls towards 'improving performance on clinical outcomes'. Given this new focus one might assume that doctors are drawn into hospital management across OECD countries. Hospital performance in terms of patient health, quality of care and efficiency outcomes is supposed to benefit from their involvement. However, international comparative evidence supporting this idea is limited. Just a few studies indicate that there may be a positive relationship between medical doctors being part of hospital boards, and overall hospital performance. More importantly, the assumed relationship between these so-called doctor managers and hospital performance has remained a 'black-box' thus far. However, there is an increasing literature on the implementation of quality management systems in hospitals and their relation with improved performance. It seems therefore fair to assume that the relation between the involvement of doctors in hospital management and improved hospital performance is partly mediated via quality management systems. The threefold aim of this paper is to 1) perform a quick scan of the current situation with regard to doctor managers in hospital management in 19 OECD countries, 2) explore the phenomenon of doctor managers in depth in 7 OECD countries, and 3) investigate whether doctor involvement in hospital management is associated with more advanced implementation of quality management systems. This study draws both on a quick scan amongst country coordinators in OECD's Health Care Quality Indicator program, and on the DUQuE project which focused on the implementation of quality management systems in European hospitals. This paper reports two main findings. First, medical doctors fulfil a broad scope of managerial roles at departmental and hospital level but only partly accompanied by formal decision making responsibilities. Second, doctor managers having more formal decision making

  1. MRI findings of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Nakahara, Ichiro; Yin, Dali; Fukami, Masahiro; Kondo, Seiji; Takeuchi, Juji; Kanemoto, Kousuke; Sengoku, Akira; Kawai, Itsuo

    1992-01-01

    MRI findings were analyzed retrospectively in 46 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy in which the side of epileptogenic focus had been confirmed by EEG studies. T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images were obtained by the use of a 1.0 or 1.5 T superconducting-type MRI machine with a coronal scan perpendicular to the axis of the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle. Additional axial and sagittal scans were performed in some cases. The area of the hippocampal body was measured quantitatively using a computerized image-analysis system in 26 cases in which the hippocampus had been visualized with enough contrast on T 1 -weighted coronal images. Abnormal findings were observed in 31/46 (67%) cases. Hippocampal (HC) and temporal lobe (TL) atrophy were observed in 18/46 (39%) and 23/46 (50%) cases respectively, and the side of the atrophy corresponded with the side of the epileptogenic focus, as confirmed by EEG studies, with specificities of 89% and 74% respectively. A quantitative measurement of the area of the hippocampal body showed unilateral hippocampal atrophy more than 10% in 18/25 (69%) cases (10-25%: 10 cases, 25-50%: 7 cases, 50% 2 abnormality was observed in only 4 cases. Structural lesions were observed in 4 cases including an arachnoid cyst, an astrocytoma in amygdala, the Dandy-Walker syndrome, and tuberous sclerosis, using the more efficient imaging qualities than the CT scan. From these observations, it is apparant that superconducting MRI is extremely useful in the diagnosis of the epileptogenic topography of temporal lobe epilepsy. Particularly, hippocampal atrophy was found to correspond with the side of the epileptogenic focus on EEG with a high specificity; its quantitative evaluation could be one of the most important standards in detecting the operative indications for temporal lobe epilepsy. (author)

  2. Comparison of bioimpedance analysis scan, hemoglobin and urea reduction ratio in hemodialysis patients following and not following monitoring program for improving quality of life

    Muzasti, R. A.; Lubis, H. R.

    2018-03-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) is the renal replacement therapy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), at least 2-3 times a week, impacting substantial changes in daily life. Therefore a monitoring program is needed to improve the quality of life (QoL) of HD patients. Indicators in monitoring QoL include phase angle (PhA), muscle and fat mass, and body fluid composition through Bio Scan impedance analysis (BIA) Scan, hemoglobin level, and urea reduction ratio (URR). An analytic study with the cross-sectional design was performed in 168 patients at Klinik Spesialis Ginjal Hipertensi (KSGH) Rasyida, Medan to compare BIA Scan profiles, hemoglobin levels, and URR in HD patients who follow and do not follow the monitoring program for improving QoL {Program Pemantauan Peningkatan Kualitas Hidup (P3KH)}. Each variable was analyzed by independent T-test, it is significant if p <0.05. This study showed that there were differences in BMI (p = 0.006), fat mass (p = 0.010), extracellular water / intracellular water (ECW / ICW) (p = 0.046), and haemoglobin p = 0.001). Although it was better in the program group, statistically there was no difference of PhA (p = 0.136), muscle mass (p = 0.842), and URR (p = 0.232).

  3. Update on the MRI Core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Borowski, Bret J; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Fox, Nick C; Thompson, Paul M; Schuff, Norbert; Krueger, Gunnar; Killiany, Ronald J; DeCarli, Charles S; Dale, Anders M; Weiner, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Functions of the ADNI MRI core fall into three categories: (1) those of the central MRI core lab at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, needed to generate high quality MRI data in all subjects at each time point; (2) those of the funded ADNI MRI core imaging analysis groups responsible for analyzing the MRI data, and (3) the joint function of the entire MRI core in designing and problem solving MR image acquisition, pre-processing and analyses methods. The primary objective of ADNI was and continues to be improving methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer's disease. Our approach to the present (“ADNI-GO”) and future (“ADNI-2”, if funded) MRI protocol will be to maintain MRI methodological consistency in previously enrolled “ADNI-1” subjects who are followed longitudinally in ADNI-GO and ADNI-2. We will modernize and expand the MRI protocol for all newly enrolled ADNI-GO and ADNI-2 subjects. All newly enrolled subjects will be scanned at 3T with a core set of three sequence types: 3D T1-weighted volume, FLAIR, and a long TE gradient echo volumetric acquisition for micro hemorrhage detection. In addition to this core ADNI-GO and ADNI-2 protocol, we will perform vendor specific pilot sub-studies of arterial spin labeling perfusion, resting state functional connectivity and diffusion tensor imaging. One each of these sequences will be added to the core protocol on systems from each MRI vendor. These experimental sub-studies are designed to demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring useful data in a multi-center (but single vendor) setting for these three emerging MRI applications. PMID:20451869

  4. Cost-effectiveness of EOB-MRI for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Japan.

    Nishie, Akihiro; Goshima, Satoshi; Haradome, Hiroki; Hatano, Etsuro; Imai, Yasuharu; Kudo, Masatoshi; Matsuda, Masanori; Motosugi, Utaroh; Saitoh, Satoshi; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Crawford, Bruce; Kruger, Eliza; Ball, Graeme; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) in the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Japan compared with extracellular contrast media-enhanced MRI (ECCM-MRI) and contrast media-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) scanning. A 6-stage Markov model was developed to estimate lifetime direct costs and clinical outcomes associated with EOB-MRI. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, along with clinical data on HCC survival, recurrence, treatment patterns, costs, and health state utility values, were derived from predominantly Japanese publications. Parameters unavailable from publications were estimated in a Delphi panel of Japanese clinical experts who also confirmed the structure and overall approach of the model. Sensitivity analyses, including one-way, probabilistic, and scenario analyses, were conducted to account for uncertainty in the results. Over a lifetime horizon, EOB-MRI was associated with lower direct costs (¥2,174,869) and generated a greater number of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) (9.502) than either ECCM-MRI (¥2,365,421, 9.303 QALYs) or CE-CT (¥2,482,608, 9.215 QALYs). EOB-MRI was superior to the other diagnostic strategies considered, and this finding was robust over sensitivity and scenario analyses. A majority of the direct costs associated with HCC in Japan were found to be costs of treatment. The model results revealed the superior cost-effectiveness of the EOB-MRI diagnostic strategy compared with ECCM-MRI and CE-CT. EOB-MRI could be the first-choice imaging modality for medical care of HCC among patients with hepatitis or liver cirrhosis in Japan. Widespread implementation of EOB-MRI could reduce health care expenditures, particularly downstream treatment costs, associated with HCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Strategic planning of building stock. Annex 1, examples. Annex 2, quality scan. Annex 3, ranking of measures

    2007-06-01

    A working book has been published aiming at supporting the strategic supply management and the associated daily practice of housing management, from vision to implementation. These annexes provide background information for the working book. Strategic supply management is defined as offering living qualities that are in demand now and in the future. [mk] [nl

  6. Evaluation of MIT-SCAN-T2 for thickness quality control for PCC and HMA pavements : research project capsule.

    2013-04-01

    Thickness is currently a pay item for portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements : and a quality control item for both PCC and hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements. : A change in pavement thickness of 0.5 in. can result in a reduction of multiple : years of...

  7. Estimating achievable signal-to-noise ratios of MRI transmit-receive coils from radiofrequency power measurements: applications in quality control

    Redpath, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    The inverse relationship between the radiofrequency (RF) power needed to transmit a 90 deg. RF pulse, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) available from a transmit-receive RF coil is well known. The theory is restated and a formula given for the signal-to-noise ratio from water, achievable from a single-shot MRI experiment, in terms of the net forward RF power needed for a rectangular 90 deg. RF pulse of known shape and duration. The result is normalized to a signal bandwidth of 1 Hz and a sample mass of 1 g. The RF power information needed is available on most commercial scanners, as it is used to calculate specific absorption rates for RF tissue heating. The achievable SNR figure will normally be larger that that actually observed, mainly because of receiver noise, but also because of inaccuracies in setting RF pulse angles, and relaxation effects. Phantom experiments were performed on the transmit-receive RF head coil of a commercial MRI system at 0.95 T using a projection method. The measured SNR agreed with that expected from the formula for achievable SNR once a correction was made for the noise figure of the receiving chain. Comparisons of measured SNR figures with those calculated from RF power measurements are expected to be of value in acceptance testing and quality control. (author)

  8. Effect of multiple freeze-thaw cycles on the quality of instant sea cucumber: Emphatically on water status of by LF-NMR and MRI.

    Tan, Mingqian; Lin, Zhuyi; Zu, Yinxue; Zhu, Beiwei; Cheng, Shasha

    2018-07-01

    Instant sea cucumber has become one popular product due to its convenience to eat, favourable taste and minimal loss of nutrients and bioactive components. However, there was rare information about the water dynamic of instant sea cucumber subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles. In this study, low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) and magnetic resonance image (MRI) were employed to investigate the effect of freeze-thaw cycles on water status of instant sea cucumber. Four water populations corresponding to strongly bound water, weakly bound water, immobile water and free water were observed in instant sea cucumber. With the increase of freeze-thaw cycles, the transverse relaxation time of immobile and free water increased, while the peak area of free water decreased significantly. MRI enabled the visualization of water migration of instant sea cucumber during multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Multiple freeze-thaw cycles also led to significant changes of other quality properties including thawing loss, WHC, color parameters, texture and protein content, and enlarge the interspace between fiber network in microstructure. Good correlations between T 22 , A 22 , A 23 and thaw loss, WHC, L*, hardness and collagen content (0.873 ≤ r ≤ 0.958) revealed LF-NMR may be an effective real-time monitoring method of these physicochemical parameters as a non-destructive technique. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CT and MRI techniques for imaging around orthopedic hardware

    Do, Thuy Duong; Skornitzke, Stephan; Weber, Marc-Andre [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Sutter, Reto [Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland). Radiology

    2018-01-15

    Orthopedic hardware impairs image quality in cross-sectional imaging. With an increasing number of orthopedic implants in an aging population, the need to mitigate metal artifacts in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is becoming increasingly relevant. This review provides an overview of the major artifacts in CT and MRI and state-of-the-art solutions to improve image quality. All steps of image acquisition from device selection, scan preparations and parameters to image post-processing influence the magnitude of metal artifacts. Technological advances like dual-energy CT with the possibility of virtual monochromatic imaging (VMI) and new materials offer opportunities to further reduce artifacts in CT and MRI. Dedicated metal artifact reduction sequences contain algorithms to reduce artifacts and improve imaging of surrounding tissue and are essential tools in orthopedic imaging to detect postoperative complications in early stages.

  10. Prediction of compliance with MRI procedures among children of ages 3 years to 12 years

    Cahoon, Glenn D.; Davison, Tanya E.

    2014-01-01

    A number of children are unable to comply with an MRI procedure and require general anesthetic. However, we lack information about which factors are associated with MRI compliance in young children. To determine the strongest predictors of MRI compliance, focusing on variables that can be easily rated by patients' parents. A sample of 205 children ages 3-11 years (mean age 6.6 years) who were at risk of non-compliance were recruited from a children's hospital. Their parents completed a behavior assessment scale for children as well as a questionnaire that assessed their expectations of compliance and perception of their child's typical medical compliance. The children subsequently completed a mock MRI with an educational play therapist and a clinical MRI, with the quality of the scan scored by the MRI technologist. Overall, 88.3% of children complied with the clinical scan and achieved diagnostic images, with age unrelated to compliance in this well-prepared patient group. The strongest predictors of MRI compliance were parental expectations and ratings of how well the child typically copes with medical procedures. Non-compliance was related to child attention problems and to poor adaptability among children. A total of 64 preschool-age children (91.4%) and 110 school-age children (95.7%) were correctly classified as compliant or non-compliant based on these predictor variables. A child's temperament, medical experiences and parental expectations provide important information in predicting which children successfully comply with an MRI procedure and which require general anesthesia. Further study is needed to explore the utility of these variables in predicting compliance at sites that do not have access to an MRI simulator. (orig.)

  11. Prediction of compliance with MRI procedures among children of ages 3 years to 12 years

    Cahoon, Glenn D. [The Royal Children' s Hospital Melbourne, Medical Imaging Department, Parkville (Australia); Davison, Tanya E. [Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    A number of children are unable to comply with an MRI procedure and require general anesthetic. However, we lack information about which factors are associated with MRI compliance in young children. To determine the strongest predictors of MRI compliance, focusing on variables that can be easily rated by patients' parents. A sample of 205 children ages 3-11 years (mean age 6.6 years) who were at risk of non-compliance were recruited from a children's hospital. Their parents completed a behavior assessment scale for children as well as a questionnaire that assessed their expectations of compliance and perception of their child's typical medical compliance. The children subsequently completed a mock MRI with an educational play therapist and a clinical MRI, with the quality of the scan scored by the MRI technologist. Overall, 88.3% of children complied with the clinical scan and achieved diagnostic images, with age unrelated to compliance in this well-prepared patient group. The strongest predictors of MRI compliance were parental expectations and ratings of how well the child typically copes with medical procedures. Non-compliance was related to child attention problems and to poor adaptability among children. A total of 64 preschool-age children (91.4%) and 110 school-age children (95.7%) were correctly classified as compliant or non-compliant based on these predictor variables. A child's temperament, medical experiences and parental expectations provide important information in predicting which children successfully comply with an MRI procedure and which require general anesthesia. Further study is needed to explore the utility of these variables in predicting compliance at sites that do not have access to an MRI simulator. (orig.)

  12. Age determination of subdural hematomas with CT and MRI: A systematic review

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa, E-mail: t.sieswerda@amc.nl [Section of Forensic Pediatrics, Department of Forensic Medicine, Netherlands Forensic Institute, PO Box 24044, 2490 AA The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center/Emma Children' s Hospital, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Postema, Floor A.M., E-mail: f.a.postema@amc.nl [Faculty of Medicine, University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbaan, Dagmar, E-mail: d.verbaan@amc.nl [Department of Neurosurgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Majoie, Charles B., E-mail: c.b.majoie@amc.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center/Emma Children' s Hospital, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rijn, Rick R. van, E-mail: r.r.vanrijn@amc.nl [Section of Forensic Pediatrics, Department of Forensic Medicine, Netherlands Forensic Institute, PO Box 24044, 2490 AA The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center/Emma Children' s Hospital, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature on dating subdural hematomas (SDHs) on CT and MRI scans. Methods: We performed a systematic review in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane to search for articles that described the appearance of SDHs on CT or MRI in relation to time between trauma and scanning. Two researchers independently screened the articles, assessed methodological quality and performed data extraction. Medians with interquartile ranges were calculated. Differences were tested with a Mann–Whitney U or Kruskal–Wallis H test. Results: We included 22 studies describing 973 SDHs on CT and 4 studies describing 83 SDHs on MRI. Data from 17 studies (413 SDHs) could be pooled. There were significant differences between time intervals for the different densities on CT (p < 0.001). Time interval differed significantly between children and adults for iso- and hypodensity (p = 0.000) and hyperdensity (p = 0.046). Time interval did not differ significantly between abused and non-abused children. On MRI, time intervals for different signal intensities on T1 and T2 did not differ significantly (p = 0.108 and p = 0.194, respectively). Conclusions: Most time intervals of the different appearances of SDHs on CT and MRI are broad and overlapping. Therefore CT or MRI findings cannot be used to accurately date SDHs.

  13. Age determination of subdural hematomas with CT and MRI: A systematic review

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Postema, Floor A.M.; Verbaan, Dagmar; Majoie, Charles B.; Rijn, Rick R. van

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature on dating subdural hematomas (SDHs) on CT and MRI scans. Methods: We performed a systematic review in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane to search for articles that described the appearance of SDHs on CT or MRI in relation to time between trauma and scanning. Two researchers independently screened the articles, assessed methodological quality and performed data extraction. Medians with interquartile ranges were calculated. Differences were tested with a Mann–Whitney U or Kruskal–Wallis H test. Results: We included 22 studies describing 973 SDHs on CT and 4 studies describing 83 SDHs on MRI. Data from 17 studies (413 SDHs) could be pooled. There were significant differences between time intervals for the different densities on CT (p < 0.001). Time interval differed significantly between children and adults for iso- and hypodensity (p = 0.000) and hyperdensity (p = 0.046). Time interval did not differ significantly between abused and non-abused children. On MRI, time intervals for different signal intensities on T1 and T2 did not differ significantly (p = 0.108 and p = 0.194, respectively). Conclusions: Most time intervals of the different appearances of SDHs on CT and MRI are broad and overlapping. Therefore CT or MRI findings cannot be used to accurately date SDHs

  14. A proposal for PET/MRI attenuation correction with μ-values measured using a fixed-position radiation source and MRI segmentation

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Kershaw, Jeff; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Suga, Mikio; Ikoma, Yoko; Obata, Takayuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-01-01

    Several MRI-based attenuation correction methods have been reported for PET/MRI; these methods are expected to make efficient use of high-quality anatomical MRIs and reduce the radiation dose for PET/MRI scanning. The accuracy of the attenuation map (μ-map) from an MRI depends on the accuracy of tissue segmentation and the attenuation coefficients to be assigned (μ-values). In this study, we proposed an MRI-based μ-value estimation method with a non-rotational radiation source to construct a suitable μ-map for PET/MRI. The proposed method uses an accurately segmented tissue map, the partial path length of each tissue, and detected intensities of attenuated radiation from a fixed-position (rather than a rotating) radiation source to obtain the μ-map. We estimated the partial path length from a virtual blank scan of fixed-point radiation with the same scanner geometry using the known tissue map from MRI. The μ-values of every tissue were estimated by inverting a linear relationship involving the partial path lengths and measured radioactivity intensity. Validation of the proposed method was performed by calculating a fixed- point data set based upon real a real transmission scan. The root-mean-square error between the μ-values derived from a conventional transmission scan and those obtained with our proposed method were 2.4±1.4%, 17.4±9.1% and 6.6±4.3% for brain, bone and soft tissue other than brain, respectively. Although the error estimates for bone and soft tissue are not insignificant, the method we propose is able to estimate the brain μ-value accurately and it is this factor that most strongly affects the quantitative value of PET images because of the large volumetric ratio of the brain. -- Highlights: • An MRI-derived µ-map for the attenuation correction of PET images is proposed. • Method relies on segmentation of MRI and a fixed-point source transmission scan. • Tissue segmentation reduces the number of unknown µ-values. • Method

  15. A proposal for PET/MRI attenuation correction with μ-values measured using a fixed-position radiation source and MRI segmentation

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi, E-mail: kwgc@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Hirano, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yhirano@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kershaw, Jeff, E-mail: len@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takahiro, E-mail: tshira@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suga, Mikio, E-mail: mikio.suga@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering of Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ikoma, Yoko, E-mail: ikoma@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Obata, Takayuki, E-mail: t_obata@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi, E-mail: hito@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga, E-mail: taiga@nirs.go.jp [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-01-11

    Several MRI-based attenuation correction methods have been reported for PET/MRI; these methods are expected to make efficient use of high-quality anatomical MRIs and reduce the radiation dose for PET/MRI scanning. The accuracy of the attenuation map (μ-map) from an MRI depends on the accuracy of tissue segmentation and the attenuation coefficients to be assigned (μ-values). In this study, we proposed an MRI-based μ-value estimation method with a non-rotational radiation source to construct a suitable μ-map for PET/MRI. The proposed method uses an accurately segmented tissue map, the partial path length of each tissue, and detected intensities of attenuated radiation from a fixed-position (rather than a rotating) radiation source to obtain the μ-map. We estimated the partial path length from a virtual blank scan of fixed-point radiation with the same scanner geometry using the known tissue map from MRI. The μ-values of every tissue were estimated by inverting a linear relationship involving the partial path lengths and measured radioactivity intensity. Validation of the proposed method was performed by calculating a fixed- point data set based upon real a real transmission scan. The root-mean-square error between the μ-values derived from a conventional transmission scan and those obtained with our proposed method were 2.4±1.4%, 17.4±9.1% and 6.6±4.3% for brain, bone and soft tissue other than brain, respectively. Although the error estimates for bone and soft tissue are not insignificant, the method we propose is able to estimate the brain μ-value accurately and it is this factor that most strongly affects the quantitative value of PET images because of the large volumetric ratio of the brain. -- Highlights: • An MRI-derived µ-map for the attenuation correction of PET images is proposed. • Method relies on segmentation of MRI and a fixed-point source transmission scan. • Tissue segmentation reduces the number of unknown µ-values. • Method

  16. Scan-To Output Validation: Towards a Standardized Geometric Quality Assessment of Building Information Models Based on Point Clouds

    Bonduel, M.; Bassier, M.; Vergauwen, M.; Pauwels, P.; Klein, R.

    2017-11-01

    The use of Building Information Modeling (BIM) for existing buildings based on point clouds is increasing. Standardized geometric quality assessment of the BIMs is needed to make them more reliable and thus reusable for future users. First, available literature on the subject is studied. Next, an initial proposal for a standardized geometric quality assessment is presented. Finally, this method is tested and evaluated with a case study. The number of specifications on BIM relating to existing buildings is limited. The Levels of Accuracy (LOA) specification of the USIBD provides definitions and suggestions regarding geometric model accuracy, but lacks a standardized assessment method. A deviation analysis is found to be dependent on (1) the used mathematical model, (2) the density of the point clouds and (3) the order of comparison. Results of the analysis can be graphical and numerical. An analysis on macro (building) and micro (BIM object) scale is necessary. On macro scale, the complete model is compared to the original point cloud and vice versa to get an overview of the general model quality. The graphical results show occluded zones and non-modeled objects respectively. Colored point clouds are derived from this analysis and integrated in the BIM. On micro scale, the relevant surface parts are extracted per BIM object and compared to the complete point cloud. Occluded zones are extracted based on a maximum deviation. What remains is classified according to the LOA specification. The numerical results are integrated in the BIM with the use of object parameters.

  17. TrueFisp versus HASTE sequences in 3T cine MRI: Evaluation of image quality during phonation in patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency

    Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane; Czerny, Christian; Weber, Michael; Baumann, Arnulf; Sinko, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality of two fast dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences: True fast imaging with steady state precession (TrueFisp) was compared with half-Fourier acquired single turbo-spin-echo (HASTE) sequence for the characterization of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) in repaired cleft palate patients. Twenty-two patients (10 female and 12 male; mean age, 17.7 ± 10.6 years; range, 9-31) with suspected VPI underwent 3-T MRI using TrueFisp and HASTE sequences. Imaging was performed in the sagittal plane at rest and during phonation of ''ee'' and ''k'' to assess the velum, tongue, posterior pharyngeal wall and a potential VP closure. The results were analysed independently by one radiologist and one orthodontist. HASTE performed better than TrueFisp for all evaluated items, except the tongue evaluation by the orthodontist during phonation of ''k'' and ''ee''. A statistically significant difference in favour of HASTE was observed in assessing the velum at rest and during phonation of ''k'' and ''ee'', and also in assessing VP closure in both raters (p < 0.05). TrueFisp imaging was twice as fast as HASTE (0.36 vs. 0.75 s/image). Dynamic HASTE images were of superior quality to those obtained with TrueFisp, although TrueFisp imaging was twice as fast. (orig.)

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... or anesthesia. Alternatively, certain pediatric facilities have child life personnel who can work with younger children to help avoid the need ... MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... and may add approximately 15 minutes to the total exam time. top of page What will I ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  20. Imaging of abdominal tumours: CT or MRI?

    Olsen, Oeystein E.

    2009-01-01

    The scope of this review is to discuss a theoretical approach to imaging policy, particularly in the perspective of radiation risk reduction. Decisions are ideally driven by empirical evidence about efficacy and risk, e.g., in classical hierarchical efficacy model. As a result of the paucity of empirical evidence (inevitable because of rapid technological development), a pragmatic model is needed. This should avoid overemphasis of factors that currently seem to hamper change, namely personal preference, local expertise, infrastructure, availability. Extrapolation of current general knowledge about CT and MRI demonstrates how a pragmatic approach can be applied in the real world with intermediate goals such as (1) channeling patients from CT to MRI, and (2) reducing CT-delivered radiation. Increased utilisation of MRI in body imaging requires optimisation of scan protocols and equipment, and, being a very operator-dependent modality, the active involvement of the radiologist. In CT dose reduction the main challenge is to benchmark the minimum radiation-dose requirement, and therefore the minimum required image quality that is diagnostically acceptable. As this will ultimately depend on pre-test likelihoods in institutional populations, it is difficult to issue general guidance, and local assessment remains a cornerstone in this effort. (orig.)

  1. Cooperative scans

    M. Zukowski (Marcin); P.A. Boncz (Peter); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractData mining, information retrieval and other application areas exhibit a query load with multiple concurrent queries touching a large fraction of a relation. This leads to individual query plans based on a table scan or large index scan. The implementation of this access path in most

  2. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: cyang@tccn.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Tzu-Chi College of Technology, 970, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shu-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital, 970, Hualien, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Tzu-Chi College of Technology, 970, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S. P. [Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  3. Effect of water migration between arabinoxylans and gluten on baking quality of whole wheat bread detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Li, Juan; Kang, Ji; Wang, Li; Li, Zhen; Wang, Ren; Chen, Zheng Xing; Hou, Gary G

    2012-07-04

    A new method, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique characterized by T(2) relaxation time, was developed to study the water migration mechanism between arabinoxylan (AX) gels and gluten matrix in a whole wheat dough (WWD) system prepared from whole wheat flour (WWF) of different particle sizes. The water sequestration of AX gels in wheat bran was verified by the bran fortification test. The evaluations of baking quality of whole wheat bread (WWB) made from WWF with different particle sizes were performed by using SEM, FT-IR, and RP-HPLC techniques. Results showed that the WWB made from WWF of average particle size of 96.99 μm had better baking quality than those of the breads made from WWF of two other particle sizes, 50.21 and 235.40 μm. T(2) relaxation time testing indicated that the decreased particle size of WWF increased the water absorption of AX gels, which led to water migration from the gluten network to the AX gels and resulted in inferior baking quality of WWB.

  4. Evaluation of diagnostic performance of whole-body simultaneous PET/MRI in pediatric lymphoma

    Ponisio, Maria Rosana; Laforest, Richard; Khanna, Geetika; McConathy, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is the standard of care for lymphoma. Simultaneous PET/MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a promising new modality that combines the metabolic information of PET with superior soft-tissue resolution and functional imaging capabilities of MRI while decreasing radiation dose. There is limited information on the clinical performance of PET/MRI in the pediatric setting. This study evaluated the feasibility, dosimetry, and qualitative and quantitative diagnostic performance of simultaneous whole-body FDG-PET/MRI in children with lymphoma compared to PET/CT. Children with lymphoma undergoing standard of care FDG-PET/CT were prospectively recruited for PET/MRI performed immediately after the PET/CT. Images were evaluated for quality, lesion detection and anatomical localization of FDG uptake. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV max/mean ) of normal organs and SUV max of the most FDG-avid lesions were measured for PET/MRI and PET/CT. Estimation of radiation exposure was calculated using specific age-related factors. Nine PET/MRI scans were performed in eight patients (mean age: 15.3 years). The mean time interval between PET/CT and PET/MRI was 51 ± 10 min. Both the PET/CT and PET/MRI exams had good image quality and alignment with complete (9/9) concordance in response assessment. The SUVs from PET/MRI and PET/CT were highly correlated for normal organs (SUV mean r 2 : 0.88, P<0.0001) and very highly for FDG-avid lesions (SUV max r 2 : 0.94, P=0.0002). PET/MRI demonstrated an average percent radiation exposure reduction of 39% ± 13% compared with PET/CT. Simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI is clinically feasible in pediatric lymphoma. PET/MRI performance is comparable to PET/CT for lesion detection and SUV measurements. Replacement of PET/CT with PET/MRI can significantly decrease radiation dose from diagnostic imaging in children. (orig.)

  5. MRI: Imaging of stomach

    Lam, W. W. M; Lee, J. S. W.; Ho, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The study is to determine the optimal MRI bowel preparation regime for visualization of the stomach anatomy, Eight healthy volunteers were asked to take water, 75% barium and blueberry juice. The image quality and tolerance of different stomach distension regime were evaluated. Blueberry juice gave the best distension, but the signal intensity was not very homogeneous. Taking into account the image quality, tolerability and adverse effects, it is concluded that water is the most desirable oral contrast for MR stomach imaging

  6. Initial Experience With Simultaneous 18F-FDG PET/MRI in the Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis and Myocarditis.

    Hanneman, Kate; Kadoch, Michael; Guo, Henry H; Jamali, Mehran; Quon, Andrew; Iagaru, Andrei; Herfkens, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare combined PET/MRI with PET/CT and cardiac MRI in the evaluation of cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. Ten patients (4 men and 6 women; 56.1 ± 9.6 years old) were prospectively enrolled for evaluation of suspected cardiac sarcoidosis or myocarditis. Written informed consent was obtained. Following administration of 9.9 ± 0.9 mCi F-FDG, patients underwent standard cardiac PET/CT followed by combined PET/MRI using a simultaneous 3-T scanner. Cardiac MRI sequences included ECG-triggered cine SSFP, T2-weighted, and late gadolinium-enhanced imaging. Myocardial involvement was assessed with separate analysis of combined PET/MRI, PET/CT, and cardiac MRI data using dedicated postprocessing software. Estimates of radiation dose were derived from the applied doses of F-FDG and CT protocol parameters. Imaging was acquired with a delay from F-FDG injection of 90.2 ± 27.4 minutes for PET/CT and 207.7 ± 40.3 minutes for PET/MRI. Total scan time for PET/MRI was significantly longer than for PET/CT (81.4 ± 14.8 vs 12.0 minutes, P PET/MRI compared with PET/CT (6.9 ± 0.6 vs 8.2 ± 1.1 mSv, P = 0.007). There was no significant difference in the number of positive cases identified between combined PET/MRI (n = 10 [100%]), PET/CT (n = 6 [60%]), and cardiac MRI (n = 8 [80%]), P = 0.091. Simultaneous cardiac PET/MRI is feasible in the evaluation of cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis achieving diagnostic image quality.

  7. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Nemec, Ursula; Nemec, Stefan F.; Bettelheim, Dieter; Brugger, Peter C.; Horcher, Ernst; Schöpf, Veronika; Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L.; Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23–37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  8. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Nemec, Ursula [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nemec, Stefan F., E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Bettelheim, Dieter [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Horcher, Ernst [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L. [Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23-37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  9. Radionuclide scanning

    Shapiro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide scanning is the production of images of normal and diseased tissues and organs by means of the gamma-ray emissions from radiopharmaceutical agents having specific distributions in the body. The gamma rays are detected at the body surface by a variety of instruments that convert the invisible rays into visible patterns representing the distribution of the radionuclide in the body. The patterns, or images, obtained can be interpreted to provide or to aid diagnoses, to follow the course of disease, and to monitor the management of various illnesses. Scanning is a sensitive technique, but its specificity may be low when interpreted alone. To be used most successfully, radionuclide scanning must be interpreted in conjunction with other techniques, such as bone radiographs with bone scans, chest radiographs with lung scans, and ultrasonic studies with thyroid scans. Interpretation is also enhanced by providing pertinent clinical information because the distribution of radiopharmaceutical agents can be altered by drugs and by various procedures besides physiologic and pathologic conditions. Discussion of the patient with the radionuclide scanning specialist prior to the study and review of the results with that specialist after the study are beneficial

  10. Bone scan in pediatrics

    Gordon, I.; Peters, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, a survey carried out in 21 countries in Europe showed that bone scintigraphy comprised 16% of all paediatric radioisotope scans. Although the value of bone scans in paediatrics is potentially great, their quality varies greatly, and poor-quality images are giving this valuable technique a bad reputation. The handling of children requires a sensitive staff and the provision of a few simple inexpensive items of distraction. Attempting simply to scan a child between two adult patients in a busy general department is a recipe for an unhappy, uncooperative child with the probable result of poor images. The intravenous injection of isotope should be given adjacent to the gamma camera room, unless dynamic scans are required, so that the child does not associate the camera with the injection. This injection is best carried out by someone competent in paediatric venipunture; the entire procedure should be explained to the child and parent, who should remain with child throughout. It is naive to think that silence makes for a cooperative child. The sensitivity of bone-seeking radioisotope tracers and the marked improvement in gamma camera resolution has allowed the bone scanning to become an integrated technique in the assessment of children suspected of suffering from pathological bone conditions. The tracer most commonly used for routine bone scanning is 99m Tc diphosphonate (MDP); other isotopes used include 99m Tc colloid for bone marrow scans and 67 Ga citrate and 111 In white blood cells ( 111 In WBC) for investigation of inflammatory/infective lesions

  11. Heritability estimates on resting state fMRI data using ENIGMA analysis pipeline.

    Adhikari, Bhim M; Jahanshad, Neda; Shukla, Dinesh; Glahn, David C; Blangero, John; Reynolds, Richard C; Cox, Robert W; Fieremans, Els; Veraart, Jelle; Novikov, Dmitry S; Nichols, Thomas E; Hong, L Elliot; Thompson, Paul M; Kochunov, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Big data initiatives such as the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis consortium (ENIGMA), combine data collected by independent studies worldwide to achieve more generalizable estimates of effect sizes and more reliable and reproducible outcomes. Such efforts require harmonized image analyses protocols to extract phenotypes consistently. This harmonization is particularly challenging for resting state fMRI due to the wide variability of acquisition protocols and scanner platforms; this leads to site-to-site variance in quality, resolution and temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR). An effective harmonization should provide optimal measures for data of different qualities. We developed a multi-site rsfMRI analysis pipeline to allow research groups around the world to process rsfMRI scans in a harmonized way, to extract consistent and quantitative measurements of connectivity and to perform coordinated statistical tests. We used the single-modality ENIGMA rsfMRI preprocessing pipeline based on modelfree Marchenko-Pastur PCA based denoising to verify and replicate resting state network heritability estimates. We analyzed two independent cohorts, GOBS (Genetics of Brain Structure) and HCP (the Human Connectome Project), which collected data using conventional and connectomics oriented fMRI protocols, respectively. We used seed-based connectivity and dual-regression approaches to show that the rsfMRI signal is consistently heritable across twenty major functional network measures. Heritability values of 20-40% were observed across both cohorts.

  12. An Observational Study to Assess Brain MRI Change and Disease Progression in Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Practice-The MS-MRIUS Study.

    Zivadinov, Robert; Khan, Nasreen; Medin, Jennie; Christoffersen, Pia; Price, Jennifer; Korn, Jonathan R; Bonzani, Ian; Dwyer, Michael G; Bergsland, Niels; Carl, Ellen; Silva, Diego; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2017-05-01

    To describe methodology, interim baseline, and longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition parameter characteristics of the multiple sclerosis clinical outcome and MRI in the United States (MS-MRIUS). The MS-MRIUS is an ongoing longitudinal and retrospective study of MS patients on fingolimod. Clinical and brain MRI image scan data were collected from 600 patients across 33 MS centers in the United States. MRI brain outcomes included change in whole-brain volume, lateral ventricle volume, T2- and T1-lesion volumes, and new/enlarging T2 and gadolinium-enhancing lesions. Interim baseline and longitudinal MRI acquisition parameters results are presented for 252 patients. Mean age was 44 years and 81% were female. Forty percent of scans had 3-dimensional (3D) T1 sequence in the preindex period, increasing to 50% in the postindex period. Use of 2-dimensional (2D) T1 sequence decreased over time from 85% in the preindex period to 65% in the postindex. About 95% of the scans with FLAIR and 2D T1-WI were considered acceptable or good quality compared to 99-100% with 3D T1-WI. There were notable changes in MRI hardware, software, and coil (39.5% in preindex to index and 50% in index to postindex). MRI sequence parameters (orientation, thickness, or protocol) differed for 36%, 29%, and 20% of index/postindex scans for FLAIR, 2D T1-WI, and 3D T1-WI, respectively. The MS-MRIUS study linked the clinical and brain MRI outcomes into an integrated database to create a cohort of fingolimod patients in real-world practice. Variability was observed in MRI acquisition protocols overtime. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  13. High-resolution whole-brain diffusion MRI at 7T using radiofrequency parallel transmission.

    Wu, Xiaoping; Auerbach, Edward J; Vu, An T; Moeller, Steen; Lenglet, Christophe; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil

    2018-03-30

    Investigating the utility of RF parallel transmission (pTx) for Human Connectome Project (HCP)-style whole-brain diffusion MRI (dMRI) data at 7 Tesla (7T). Healthy subjects were scanned in pTx and single-transmit (1Tx) modes. Multiband (MB), single-spoke pTx pulses were designed to image sagittal slices. HCP-style dMRI data (i.e., 1.05-mm resolutions, MB2, b-values = 1000/2000 s/mm 2 , 286 images and 40-min scan) and data with higher accelerations (MB3 and MB4) were acquired with pTx. pTx significantly improved flip-angle detected signal uniformity across the brain, yielding ∼19% increase in temporal SNR (tSNR) averaged over the brain relative to 1Tx. This allowed significantly enhanced estimation of multiple fiber orientations (with ∼21% decrease in dispersion) in HCP-style 7T dMRI datasets. Additionally, pTx pulses achieved substantially lower power deposition, permitting higher accelerations, enabling collection of the same data in 2/3 and 1/2 the scan time or of more data in the same scan time. pTx provides a solution to two major limitations for slice-accelerated high-resolution whole-brain dMRI at 7T; it improves flip-angle uniformity, and enables higher slice acceleration relative to current state-of-the-art. As such, pTx provides significant advantages for rapid acquisition of high-quality, high-resolution truly whole-brain dMRI data. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. MRI to determine the chronological age of Ghanaian footballers

    of fusion of the distal radius on magentic resonance imaging (MRI) and comparing it with the Fédération Internationale de Football. Association (FIFA) MRI grading. Methods. MRI scans of the left wrists of 86 players aspiring to play for the national U17 football team were recruited for the study during a. 'justify your inclusion ...

  15. Evaluating the effect of a third-party implementation of resolution recovery on the quality of SPECT bone scan imaging using visual grading regression.

    Hay, Peter D; Smith, Julie; O'Connor, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits to SPECT bone scan image quality when applying resolution recovery (RR) during image reconstruction using software provided by a third-party supplier. Bone SPECT data from 90 clinical studies were reconstructed retrospectively using software supplied independent of the gamma camera manufacturer. The current clinical datasets contain 120×10 s projections and are reconstructed using an iterative method with a Butterworth postfilter. Five further reconstructions were created with the following characteristics: 10 s projections with a Butterworth postfilter (to assess intraobserver variation); 10 s projections with a Gaussian postfilter with and without RR; and 5 s projections with a Gaussian postfilter with and without RR. Two expert observers were asked to rate image quality on a five-point scale relative to our current clinical reconstruction. Datasets were anonymized and presented in random order. The benefits of RR on image scores were evaluated using ordinal logistic regression (visual grading regression). The application of RR during reconstruction increased the probability of both observers of scoring image quality as better than the current clinical reconstruction even where the dataset contained half the normal counts. Type of reconstruction and observer were both statistically significant variables in the ordinal logistic regression model. Visual grading regression was found to be a useful method for validating the local introduction of technological developments in nuclear medicine imaging. RR, as implemented by the independent software supplier, improved bone SPECT image quality when applied during image reconstruction. In the majority of clinical cases, acquisition times for bone SPECT intended for the purposes of localization can safely be halved (from 10 s projections to 5 s) when RR is applied.

  16. Implication of spot position error on plan quality and patient safety in pencil-beam-scanning proton therapy

    Yu, Juan; Beltran, Chris J., E-mail: beltran.chris@mayo.edu; Herman, Michael G. [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively and systematically assess dosimetric effects induced by spot positioning error as a function of spot spacing (SS) on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan quality and to facilitate evaluation of safety tolerance limits on spot position. Methods: Spot position errors (PE) ranging from 1 to 2 mm were simulated. Simple plans were created on a water phantom, and IMPT plans were calculated on two pediatric patients with a brain tumor of 28 and 3 cc, respectively, using a commercial planning system. For the phantom, a uniform dose was delivered to targets located at different depths from 10 to 20 cm with various field sizes from 2{sup 2} to 15{sup 2} cm{sup 2}. Two nominal spot sizes, 4.0 and 6.6 mm of 1 σ in water at isocenter, were used for treatment planning. The SS ranged from 0.5 σ to 1.5 σ, which is 2–6 mm for the small spot size and 3.3–9.9 mm for the large spot size. Various perturbation scenarios of a single spot error and systematic and random multiple spot errors were studied. To quantify the dosimetric effects, percent dose error (PDE) depth profiles and the value of percent dose error at the maximum dose difference (PDE [ΔDmax]) were used for evaluation. Results: A pair of hot and cold spots was created per spot shift. PDE[ΔDmax] is found to be a complex function of PE, SS, spot size, depth, and global spot distribution that can be well defined in simple models. For volumetric targets, the PDE [ΔDmax] is not noticeably affected by the change of field size or target volume within the studied ranges. In general, reducing SS decreased the dose error. For the facility studied, given a single spot error with a PE of 1.2 mm and for both spot sizes, a SS of 1σ resulted in a 2% maximum dose error; a SS larger than 1.25 σ substantially increased the dose error and its sensitivity to PE. A similar trend was observed in multiple spot errors (both systematic and random errors). Systematic PE can lead to noticeable hot

  17. Head MRI

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  18. Pediatric MRI

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  19. Statistical analysis of MRI-only based dose planning

    Korsholm, M. E.; Waring, L. W.; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2012-01-01

    . MRIonly based RT eliminates these errors and reduce the time and costs of a CT scan. The aim of this study is to investigate the dosimetric differences of a treatment plan when the dose calculation is based on MRI as compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Four diagnostic groups are investigated; 12...... as a clinically approved treatment plan. The treatment planning software is Eclipse v.10.0 (Varian Medical Systems). The dose calculation based on MRI data is evaluated in two different ways; a homogeneous density assigned MRI (MRI unit), where the entire body is assigned an HU equal to water and a heterogeneous...... density assigned MRI (MRI bulk) where in addition the CT segmented bone is transferred to the MRI and assigned an age dependent HU based on ICRU report 46. The CT based clinical treatment plan and structure set are registered to the corresponding MRI unit and MRI bulk. The body is outlined on both the MRI...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

  1. Impact of the use of an endorectal coil for 3 T prostate MRI on image quality and cancer detection rate.

    Gawlitza, Josephin; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Thörmer, Gregor; Schaudinn, Alexander; Linder, Nicolas; Garnov, Nikita; Horn, Lars-Christian; Minh, Do Hoang; Ganzer, Roman; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael; Busse, Harald

    2017-02-01

    This work aims to assess the impact of an additional endorectal coil on image quality and cancer detection rate within the same patients. At a single academic medical center, this transversal study included 41 men who underwent T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging at 3 T using surface coils only or in combination with an endorectal coil in the same session. Two blinded readers (A and B) randomly evaluated all image data in separate sessions. Image quality with respect to localization and staging was rated on a five-point scale. Lesions were classified according to their prostate imaging reporting and data system (PIRADS) score version 1. Standard of reference was provided by whole-mount step-section analysis. Mean image quality scores averaged over all localization-related items were significantly higher with additional endorectal coil for both readers (p < 0.001), corresponding staging-related items were only higher for reader B (p < 0.001). With an endorectal coil, the rate of correctly detecting cancer per patient was significantly higher for reader B (p < 0.001) but not for reader A (p = 0.219). The numbers of histologically confirmed tumor lesions were rather similar for both settings. The subjectively rated 3-T image quality was improved with an endorectal coil. In terms of diagnostic performance, the use of an additional endorectal coil was not superior.

  2. MRI for appendicitis in pregnancy: is seeing believing? clinical outcomes in cases of appendix nonvisualization.

    Al-Katib, Sayf; Sokhandon, Farnoosh; Farah, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the clinical outcomes in cases of appendix nonvisualization with MRI in pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis and the implications of appendix nonvisualization for excluding appendicitis. Fifty-eight pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis evaluated with MRI at three centers from a single institution were retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists with varying levels of abdominal imaging experience. All scans were performed on a 1.5-Tesla Siemens unit. Cases were evaluated for diagnostic quality, visualization of the appendix, presence of appendicitis, and alternate diagnoses. Clinical outcomes were gathered from the electronic medical record. Of the 58 patients who underwent MRI for suspected appendicitis, 50 cases were considered adequate diagnostic quality by all three radiologists. The rate of appendix visualization among the three radiologists ranged from 60 to 76% (p = 0.44). The appendix was nonvisualized by at least one of the three radiologists in 25 cases (50%). Of these, none had a final diagnosis of appendicitis including one patient who underwent appendectomy. MRI suggested an alternate diagnosis in 6 (24%) patients with appendix nonvisualization. For the three reviewers, the agreement level on whether or not the appendix was visualized on the MRI had a Light's kappa value of 0.526, indicating a "moderate" level of agreement (p value appendicitis confers a significant reduction in the risk of appendicitis compared to all comers as long as the study is adequate diagnostic quality and there are no secondary signs of appendicitis present.

  3. [Scanning electron microscopic investigations of cutting edge quality in lamellar keratotomy using the Wavelight femtosecond laser (FS-200) : What influence do spot distance and an additional tunnel have?

    Hammer, T; Höche, T; Heichel, J

    2018-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers (fs-lasers) are established cutting instruments for the creation of LASIK flaps. Previous studies often showed even rougher surfaces after application of fs-laser systems compared to lamellar keratotomy with mechanical microkeratomes. When cutting the cornea with fs-lasers, an intrastromal gas development occurs, which has a potentially negative influence on the cutting quality if the gas cannot be dissipated; therefore, manufacturers have chosen the way of gas assimilation in so-called pockets. The investigated system creates a tunnel which opens under the conjunctiva. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a tunnel as well as the influence of different spot distances on the quality of cut surfaces and edges. In this experimental study on freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 15), the following cuts were carried out with the FS-200 (Wavelight, Erlangen, Germany): 1. standard setting (spot and line separation 8 µm), 2. with tunnel for gas drainage, 3. without gas-conducting tunnel, 4. with increased spot spacing (spot and line separation 9 μm instead of 8 μm) and 5. with reduced spot spacing (spot and line separation 7 μm instead of 8 μm). Subsequently, scanning electron microscopy (FEI Quanta 650, Hillsboro, OR) of the cut edges and surfaces as well as the gas drain tunnel were performed. The evaluation was based on an established score. The current fs-laser system (200 Hz) is able to create smooth cutting surfaces and sharp edges. The changed density of laser pulses compared to the standard settings with a reduced or increased distance between the pulses, did not achieve any further improvement in the surface quality. The gas-conducting tunnel could be detected by scanning electron microscope. In the case of cutting without a tunnel, roughened surfaces and irregularities on the cutting edges were found. When the FS-200 fs-laser is used, LASIK cuts with very smooth cut surfaces and sharp cutting

  4. MRI-powered biomedical devices.

    Hovet, Sierra; Ren, Hongliang; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford; Tokuda, Junichi; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2017-11-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is beneficial for imaging-guided procedures because it provides higher resolution images and better soft tissue contrast than computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and X-ray. MRI can be used to streamline diagnostics and treatment because it does not require patients to be repositioned between scans of different areas of the body. It is even possible to use MRI to visualize, power, and control medical devices inside the human body to access remote locations and perform minimally invasive procedures. Therefore, MR conditional medical devices have the potential to improve a wide variety of medical procedures; this potential is explored in terms of practical considerations pertaining to clinical applications and the MRI environment. Recent advancements in this field are introduced with a review of clinically relevant research in the areas of interventional tools, endovascular microbots, and closed-loop controlled MRI robots. Challenges related to technology and clinical feasibility are discussed, including MRI based propulsion and control, navigation of medical devices through the human body, clinical adoptability, and regulatory issues. The development of MRI-powered medical devices is an emerging field, but the potential clinical impact of these devices is promising.

  5. A Novel Marker Based Method to Teeth Alignment in MRI

    Luukinen, Jean-Marc; Aalto, Daniel; Malinen, Jarmo; Niikuni, Naoko; Saunavaara, Jani; Jääsaari, Päivi; Ojalammi, Antti; Parkkola, Riitta; Soukka, Tero; Happonen, Risto-Pekka

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can precisely capture the anatomy of the vocal tract. However, the crowns of teeth are not visible in standard MRI scans. In this study, a marker-based teeth alignment method is presented and evaluated. Ten patients undergoing orthognathic surgery were enrolled. Supraglottal airways were imaged preoperatively using structural MRI. MRI visible markers were developed, and they were attached to maxillary teeth and corresponding locations on the dental casts. Repeated measurements of intermarker distances in MRI and in a replica model was compared using linear regression analysis. Dental cast MRI and corresponding caliper measurements did not differ significantly. In contrast, the marker locations in vivo differed somewhat from the dental cast measurements likely due to marker placement inaccuracies. The markers were clearly visible in MRI and allowed for dental models to be aligned to head and neck MRI scans.

  6. MRI Volume Fusion Based on 3D Shearlet Decompositions.

    Duan, Chang; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Xue Gang; Huang, Qi Hong

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays many MRI scans can give 3D volume data with different contrasts, but the observers may want to view various contrasts in the same 3D volume. The conventional 2D medical fusion methods can only fuse the 3D volume data layer by layer, which may lead to the loss of interframe correlative information. In this paper, a novel 3D medical volume fusion method based on 3D band limited shearlet transform (3D BLST) is proposed. And this method is evaluated upon MRI T2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping data of 4 human brains. Both the perspective impression and the quality indices indicate that the proposed method has a better performance than conventional 2D wavelet, DT CWT, and 3D wavelet, DT CWT based fusion methods.

  7. MRI Volume Fusion Based on 3D Shearlet Decompositions

    Chang Duan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays many MRI scans can give 3D volume data with different contrasts, but the observers may want to view various contrasts in the same 3D volume. The conventional 2D medical fusion methods can only fuse the 3D volume data layer by layer, which may lead to the loss of interframe correlative information. In this paper, a novel 3D medical volume fusion method based on 3D band limited shearlet transform (3D BLST is proposed. And this method is evaluated upon MRI T2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping data of 4 human brains. Both the perspective impression and the quality indices indicate that the proposed method has a better performance than conventional 2D wavelet, DT CWT, and 3D wavelet, DT CWT based fusion methods.

  8. Safety of routine early MRI in preterm infants

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Dudink, Jeroen; Raets, Marlou M.A.; Govaert, Paul; Starre, Cynthia van der; Lequin, Maarten H.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral MRI performed on preterm infants at term-equivalent 30 weeks' gestational age (GA) is increasingly performed as part of standard clinical care. We evaluated safety of these early MRI procedures. We retrospectively collected data on patient safety of preterm infants who underwent early MRI scans. Data were collected at fixed times before and after the MRI scan. MRI procedures were carried out according to a comprehensive guideline. A total of 52 infants underwent an MRI scan at 30 weeks' GA. Although no serious adverse events occurred and vital parameters remained stable during the procedure, minor adverse events were encountered in 26 infants (50%). The MRI was terminated in three infants (5.8%) because of respiratory instability. Increased respiratory support within 24 h after the MRI was necessary for 12 infants (23.1%) and was significantly associated with GA, birth weight and the mode of respiratory support. Hypothermia (core temperature < 36 C) occurred in nine infants (17.3%). Temperature dropped significantly after the MRI scan. Minor adverse events after MRI procedures at 30 weeks GA were common and should not be underestimated. A dedicated and comprehensive guideline for MRI procedures in preterm infants is essential. (orig.)

  9. Safety of routine early MRI in preterm infants

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Dudink, Jeroen [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Raets, Marlou M.A.; Govaert, Paul [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Starre, Cynthia van der [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Intensive Care, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lequin, Maarten H. [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    Cerebral MRI performed on preterm infants at term-equivalent 30 weeks' gestational age (GA) is increasingly performed as part of standard clinical care. We evaluated safety of these early MRI procedures. We retrospectively collected data on patient safety of preterm infants who underwent early MRI scans. Data were collected at fixed times before and after the MRI scan. MRI procedures were carried out according to a comprehensive guideline. A total of 52 infants underwent an MRI scan at 30 weeks' GA. Although no serious adverse events occurred and vital parameters remained stable during the procedure, minor adverse events were encountered in 26 infants (50%). The MRI was terminated in three infants (5.8%) because of respiratory instability. Increased respiratory support within 24 h after the MRI was necessary for 12 infants (23.1%) and was significantly associated with GA, birth weight and the mode of respiratory support. Hypothermia (core temperature < 36 C) occurred in nine infants (17.3%). Temperature dropped significantly after the MRI scan. Minor adverse events after MRI procedures at 30 weeks GA were common and should not be underestimated. A dedicated and comprehensive guideline for MRI procedures in preterm infants is essential. (orig.)

  10. Scanning table

    1960-01-01

    Before the invention of wire chambers, particles tracks were analysed on scanning tables like this one. Today, the process is electronic and much faster. Bubble chamber film - currently available - (links can be found below) was used for this analysis of the particle tracks.

  11. Scan Statistics

    Glaz, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for graduate students and researchers in applied probability and statistics, as well as for scientists in biology, computer science, pharmaceutical science and medicine, this title brings together a collection of chapters illustrating the depth and diversity of theory, methods and applications in the area of scan statistics.

  12. Bayesian segmentation of brainstem structures in MRI

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Bhatt, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    the brainstem structures in novel scans. Thanks to the generative nature of the scheme, the segmentation method is robust to changes in MRI contrast or acquisition hardware. Using cross validation, we show that the algorithm can segment the structures in previously unseen T1 and FLAIR scans with great accuracy...

  13. Portable MRI

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  14. Portable MRI

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  15. Fetal MRI

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  16. Interventional MRI

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  17. Fetal MRI

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  18. Diagnostic Quality of 3D T2-SPACE Compared with T2-FSE in the Evaluation of Cervical Spine MRI Anatomy.

    Chokshi, F H; Sadigh, G; Carpenter, W; Allen, J W

    2017-04-01

    Spinal anatomy has been variably investigated using 3D MRI. We aimed to compare the diagnostic quality of T2 sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using flip angle evolution (SPACE) with T2-FSE sequences for visualization of cervical spine anatomy. We predicted that T2-SPACE will be equivalent or superior to T2-FSE for visibility of anatomic structures. Adult patients undergoing cervical spine MR imaging with both T2-SPACE and T2-FSE sequences for radiculopathy or myelopathy between September 2014 and February 2015 were included. Two blinded subspecialty-trained radiologists independently assessed the visibility of 12 anatomic structures by using a 5-point scale and assessed CSF pulsation artifact by using a 4-point scale. Sagittal images and 6 axial levels from C2-T1 on T2-FSE were reviewed; 2 weeks later and after randomization, T2-SPACE was evaluated. Diagnostic quality for each structure and CSF pulsation artifact visibility on both sequences were compared by using a paired t test. Interobserver agreement was calculated (κ). Forty-five patients were included (mean age, 57 years; 40% male). The average visibility scores for intervertebral disc signal, neural foramina, ligamentum flavum, ventral rootlets, and dorsal rootlets were higher for T2-SPACE compared with T2-FSE for both reviewers ( P T2-SPACE showed less degree of CSF flow artifact ( P T2-SPACE and -0.02-0.30 for T2-FSE (slight to fair agreement). T2-SPACE may be equivalent or superior to T2-FSE for the evaluation of cervical spine anatomic structures, and T2-SPACE shows a lower degree of CSF pulsation artifact. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Calibration Transfer Between a Bench Scanning and a Submersible Diode Array Spectrophotometer for In Situ Wastewater Quality Monitoring in Sewer Systems.

    Brito, Rita S; Pinheiro, Helena M; Ferreira, Filipa; Matos, José S; Pinheiro, Alexandre; Lourenço, Nídia D

    2016-03-01

    Online monitoring programs based on spectroscopy have a high application potential for the detection of hazardous wastewater discharges in sewer systems. Wastewater hydraulics poses a challenge for in situ spectroscopy, especially when the system includes storm water connections leading to rapid changes in water depth, velocity, and in the water quality matrix. Thus, there is a need to optimize and fix the location of in situ instruments, limiting their availability for calibration. In this context, the development of calibration models on bench spectrophotometers to estimate wastewater quality parameters from spectra acquired with in situ instruments could be very useful. However, spectra contain information not only from the samples, but also from the spectrophotometer generally invalidating this approach. The use of calibration transfer methods is a promising solution to this problem. In this study, calibration models were developed using interval partial least squares (iPLS), for the estimation of total suspended solids (TSS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in sewage from Ultraviolet-visible spectra acquired in a bench scanning spectrophotometer. The feasibility of calibration transfer to a submersible, diode array equipment, to be subsequently operated in situ, was assessed using three procedures: slope and bias correction (SBC); single wavelength standardization (SWS) on mean spectra; and local centering (LC). The results showed that SBC was the most adequate for the available data, adding insignificant error to the base model estimates. Single wavelength standardization was a close second best, potentially more robust, and independent of the base iPLS model. Local centering was shown to be inadequate for the samples and instruments used. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Efficacy of pre-scan beta-blockade and impact of heart rate on image quality in patients undergoing coronary multidetector computed tomography angiography

    Shapiro, Michael D.; Pena, Antonio J.; Nichols, John H.; Worrell, Stewart; Bamberg, Fabian; Dannemann, Nina; Abbara, Suhny; Cury, Ricardo C.; Brady, Thomas J.; Hoffmann, Udo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: While beta-blockers are routinely administered to patients prior to coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), their effectiveness is unknown. We therefore assessed the efficacy of beta-blockade with regards to heart rate (HR) control and image quality in an unselected patient cohort. Methods: We studied 150 consecutive patients (104 men/46 female; mean age, 56 ± 13 years) referred for coronary CTA. Intravenous metoprolol (5-20 mg) was administered to patients with a HR >65 beats per minute (bpm). The goal HR was defined as an average HR <65 bpm without a single measurement above 68 bpm. Results: Overall, 45% (68/150) of patients met the HR criteria for beta-blocker administration of which 76% (52/68) received metoprolol (mean dose 12 ± 10 mg). Of the 52 patients who received beta-blocker versus the 98 who did not, 18 (35%) versus 62 (64%) patients achieved the goal HR, respectively. All patients who achieved the target HR had an evaluable CTA while five patients who did not achieve the target HR had at least one non-evaluable coronary artery due to motion artifact. There was also a significant reduction in any motion artifact among those who achieved the goal HR as compared to those who did not (p = 0.001). Logistic regression revealed an increase in the odds of stair step artifact of 11.6% (95% CI: 2.4% decrease, 27.5% increase) per 1 bpm increase in the standard deviation of scan HR. Conclusion: Overall, efficacy of beta-blocker administration to reach target HR is limited. Improvements in CT scanner temporal resolution are mandatory to achieve consistently high image quality independent of HR and beta-blocker administration

  1. Efficacy of pre-scan beta-blockade and impact of heart rate on image quality in patients undergoing coronary multidetector computed tomography angiography

    Shapiro, Michael D. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Pena, Antonio J.; Nichols, John H. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Worrell, Stewart [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Dannemann, Nina [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Abbara, Suhny; Cury, Ricardo C.; Brady, Thomas J. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States)], E-mail: uhoffmann@partners.org

    2008-04-15

    Objective: While beta-blockers are routinely administered to patients prior to coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), their effectiveness is unknown. We therefore assessed the efficacy of beta-blockade with regards to heart rate (HR) control and image quality in an unselected patient cohort. Methods: We studied 150 consecutive patients (104 men/46 female; mean age, 56 {+-} 13 years) referred for coronary CTA. Intravenous metoprolol (5-20 mg) was administered to patients with a HR >65 beats per minute (bpm). The goal HR was defined as an average HR <65 bpm without a single measurement above 68 bpm. Results: Overall, 45% (68/150) of patients met the HR criteria for beta-blocker administration of which 76% (52/68) received metoprolol (mean dose 12 {+-} 10 mg). Of the 52 patients who received beta-blocker versus the 98 who did not, 18 (35%) versus 62 (64%) patients achieved the goal HR, respectively. All patients who achieved the target HR had an evaluable CTA while five patients who did not achieve the target HR had at least one non-evaluable coronary artery due to motion artifact. There was also a significant reduction in any motion artifact among those who achieved the goal HR as compared to those who did not (p = 0.001). Logistic regression revealed an increase in the odds of stair step artifact of 11.6% (95% CI: 2.4% decrease, 27.5% increase) per 1 bpm increase in the standard deviation of scan HR. Conclusion: Overall, efficacy of beta-blocker administration to reach target HR is limited. Improvements in CT scanner temporal resolution are mandatory to achieve consistently high image quality independent of HR and beta-blocker administration.

  2. Improving fMRI reliability in presurgical mapping for brain tumours.

    Stevens, M Tynan R; Clarke, David B; Stroink, Gerhard; Beyea, Steven D; D'Arcy, Ryan Cn

    2016-03-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is becoming increasingly integrated into clinical practice for presurgical mapping. Current efforts are focused on validating data quality, with reliability being a major factor. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of a recently developed approach that uses receiver operating characteristic-reliability (ROC-r) to: (1) identify reliable versus unreliable data sets; (2) automatically select processing options to enhance data quality; and (3) automatically select individualised thresholds for activation maps. Presurgical fMRI was conducted in 16 patients undergoing surgical treatment for brain tumours. Within-session test-retest fMRI was conducted, and ROC-reliability of the patient group was compared to a previous healthy control cohort. Individually optimised preprocessing pipelines were determined to improve reliability. Spatial correspondence was assessed by comparing the fMRI results to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping, in terms of the distance to the nearest active fMRI voxel. The average ROC-r reliability for the patients was 0.58±0.03, as compared to 0.72±0.02 in healthy controls. For the patient group, this increased significantly to 0.65±0.02 by adopting optimised preprocessing pipelines. Co-localisation of the fMRI maps with cortical stimulation was significantly better for more reliable versus less reliable data sets (8.3±0.9 vs 29±3 mm, respectively). We demonstrated ROC-r analysis for identifying reliable fMRI data sets, choosing optimal postprocessing pipelines, and selecting patient-specific thresholds. Data sets with higher reliability also showed closer spatial correspondence to cortical stimulation. ROC-r can thus identify poor fMRI data at time of scanning, allowing for repeat scans when necessary. ROC-r analysis provides optimised and automated fMRI processing for improved presurgical mapping. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  3. Scanning holograms

    Natali, S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on the scanning of 1000 holograms taken in HOBC at CERN. Each hologram is triggered by an interaction in the chamber, the primary particles being pions at 340 GeV/c. The aim of the experiment is the study of charm production. The holograms, recorded on 50 mm film with the ''in line'' technique, can be analyzed by shining a parallel expanded laser beam through the film, obtaining immediately above it the real image of the chamber which can then be scanned and measured with a technique half way between emulsions and bubble chambers. The results indicate that holograms can be analyzed as quickly and reliably as in other visual techniques and that to them is open the same order of magnitude of large scale experiments

  4. Bone scans

    Hetherington, V.J.

    1989-01-01

    Oftentimes, in managing podiatric complaints, clinical and conventional radiographic techniques are insufficient in determining a patient's problem. This is especially true in the early stages of bone infection. Bone scanning or imaging can provide additional information in the diagnosis of the disorder. However, bone scans are not specific and must be correlated with clinical, radiographic, and laboratory evaluation. In other words, bone scanning does not provide the diagnosis but is an important bit of information aiding in the process of diagnosis. The more useful radionuclides in skeletal imaging are technetium phosphate complexes and gallium citrate. These compounds are administered intravenously and are detected at specific time intervals postinjection by a rectilinear scanner with minification is used and the entire skeleton can be imaged from head to toe. Minification allows visualization of the entire skeleton in a single image. A gamma camera can concentrate on an isolated area. However, it requires multiple views to complete the whole skeletal image. Recent advances have allowed computer augmentation of the data received from radionucleotide imaging. The purpose of this chapter is to present the current radionuclides clinically useful in podiatric patients

  5. Mechanical Validation of an MRI Compatible Stereotactic Neurosurgery Robot in Preparation for Pre-Clinical Trials

    Nycz, Christopher J; Gondokaryono, Radian; Carvalho, Paulo; Patel, Nirav; Wartenberg, Marek; Pilitsis, Julie G; Fischer, Gregory S

    2018-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for guiding robotic surgical devices has shown great potential for performing precisely targeted and controlled interventions. To fully realize these benefits, devices must work safely within the tight confines of the MRI bore without negatively impacting image quality. Here we expand on previous work exploring MRI guided robots for neural interventions by presenting the mechanical design and assessment of a device for positioning, orienting, and inserting an interstitial ultrasound-based ablation probe. From our previous work we have added a 2 degree of freedom (DOF) needle driver for use with the aforementioned probe, revised the mechanical design to improve strength and function, and performed an evaluation of the mechanism’s accuracy and effect on MR image quality. The result of this work is a 7-DOF MRI robot capable of positioning a needle tip and orienting it’s axis with accuracy of 1.37 ± 0.06mm and 0.79° ± 0.41°, inserting it along it’s axis with an accuracy of 0.06 ± 0.07mm, and rotating it about it’s axis to an accuracy of 0.77° ± 1.31°. This was accomplished with no significant reduction in SNR caused by the robot’s presence in the MRI bore, ≤ 10.3% reduction in SNR from running the robot’s motors during a scan, and no visible paramagnetic artifacts. PMID:29696097

  6. Delayed enhanced MRI in intraparenchymal tumors

    Eguchi, Takahiko; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Toshikazu

    1991-01-01

    Delayed enhanced MRI was performed on 20 intraparenchymal tumors, and these findings were compared with those of early enhanced MRI. Using the spin-echo technique (SE: 400-500/20 msec), early scans were obtained 5 minutes, and delayed scans were obtained 60 minutes, after the intravenous injection of 0.1 nmol of gadolinium-DTPA/Kg. We discussed the changes in the delayed scan with regard to the change in the pattern of enhancement and the boundary of enhancement. In these twenty intraparenchymal tumors, there were three low-grade astrocytomas, two anaplastic astrocytomas, seven glioblastomas, and eight metastatic tumors. The changes in the enhanced pattern showed three types as follows: Type I: heterogeneous enhancement in both early and delayed scans; Type II: heterogeneous enhancement in early scan and homogeneous enhancement in delayed scan; Type III: homogeneous enhancement in both early and delayed scans. Most malignant tumors, such as glioblastomas (6/8), anaplastic astrocytomas (2/2), and metastatic tumors (7/8), revealed Type I, although low-grade astrocytomas showed Type II (3/2) and Type III (1/3). The heterogeneous enhancement in delayed scan was found in malignant tumors and in low-grade astrocytoma; even if the early scan revealed heterogeneous enhancement, the delayed scan showed homogeneous enhancement. In the delayed scan, most enhanced boundaries spread out of the boundaries in the early scan. Glioblastomas spread markedly in the delayed scan, although none of the low-grade astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, or metastases revealed marked spreading. We called these marked increases in the delayed scan a 'spreading sign' and thought that this sign was specific to glioblastomas. Recently some authors have emphasized the usefulness of serial scans. Delayed enhanced MRI 60 minutes after the administration of a contrast medium was here found also to be useful for the accurate diagnosis for brain tumors. (author)

  7. MO-E-BRC-02: MRI-Guided Online Adaptive Radiotherapy: The UCLA Approach to Quality Management

    Lamb, J. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  8. MO-E-BRC-02: MRI-Guided Online Adaptive Radiotherapy: The UCLA Approach to Quality Management

    Lamb, J.

    2016-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  9. Choosing the polarity of the phase-encoding direction in diffusion MRI: Does it matter for group analysis?

    Kennis, M.; van Rooij, S.J.H.; Kahn, R.S.; Geuze, E.; Leemans, A.

    2016-01-01

    Notorious for degrading diffusion MRI data quality are so-called susceptibility-induced off-resonance fields, which cause non-linear geometric image deformations. While acquiring additional data to correct for these distortions alleviates the adverse effects of this artifact drastically – e.g., by reversing the polarity of the phase-encoding (PE) direction – this strategy is often not an option due to scan time constraints. Especially in a clinical context, where patient comfort and safety ar...

  10. SU-F-T-172: A Method for Log File QA On An IBA Proteus System for Patient Specific Spot Scanning Quality Assurance

    Tang, S; Ho, M; Chen, C; Mah, D [ProCure NJ, Somerset, NJ (United States); Rice, I; Doan, D; Mac Rae, B [IBA, Somerset, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The use of log files to perform patient specific quality assurance for both protons and IMRT has been established. Here, we extend that approach to a proprietary log file format and compare our results to measurements in phantom. Our goal was to generate a system that would permit gross errors to be found within 3 fractions until direct measurements. This approach could eventually replace direct measurements. Methods: Spot scanning protons pass through multi-wire ionization chambers which provide information about the charge, location, and size of each delivered spot. We have generated a program that calculates the dose in phantom from these log files and compares the measurements with the plan. The program has 3 different spot shape models: single Gaussian, double Gaussian and the ASTROID model. The program was benchmarked across different treatment sites for 23 patients and 74 fields. Results: The dose calculated from the log files were compared to those generate by the treatment planning system (Raystation). While the dual Gaussian model often gave better agreement, overall, the ASTROID model gave the most consistent results. Using a 5%–3 mm gamma with a 90% passing criteria and excluding doses below 20% of prescription all patient samples passed. However, the degree of agreement of the log file approach was slightly worse than that of the chamber array measurement approach. Operationally, this implies that if the beam passes the log file model, it should pass direct measurement. Conclusion: We have established and benchmarked a model for log file QA in an IBA proteus plus system. The choice of optimal spot model for a given class of patients may be affected by factors such as site, field size, and range shifter and will be investigated further.

  11. Respiratory challenge MRI: Practical aspects

    Fiona C. Moreton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory challenge MRI is the modification of arterial oxygen (PaO2 and/or carbon dioxide (PaCO2 concentration to induce a change in cerebral function or metabolism which is then measured by MRI. Alterations in arterial gas concentrations can lead to profound changes in cerebral haemodynamics which can be studied using a variety of MRI sequences. Whilst such experiments may provide a wealth of information, conducting them can be complex and challenging. In this paper we review the rationale for respiratory challenge MRI including the effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide on the cerebral circulation. We also discuss the planning, equipment, monitoring and techniques that have been used to undertake these experiments. We finally propose some recommendations in this evolving area for conducting these experiments to enhance data quality and comparison between techniques.

  12. MRI of neuronal migration disorders

    Engelbrecht, V.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-one MRI examinations of the brain were performed in 19 children with neuronal migration disorders. Multiplanar oriented spin-echo sequences were on a scanner with 1.5 T. In 8 children we performed an additional turbo-inversion recovery (TIR) sequence. Results of sonography or CT from five children were compared with MRI scans. Using the actual nomenclature, we found the following migration disorders: Lissencephaly (n=6), cobblestone lissencephaly with Walker-Warbung syndrome (WWS) (n=2), polymicrogyria and schizencephaly (n=2), focal heterotopia (n=5), diffuse heterotopie (n=2) and hemimegalencephaly (n=2). MRI was superior to CT and sonography in all children. Except for the two boys with WWS, the TIR sequence was the best to demonstrate the changes in migration disorder because of the high contrast between gray and white matter. We demonstrate the characteristic features of the different migration disorders and compare them with the existing literature. (orig.) [de

  13. MRI angiography

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  14. Reducing sedation for pediatric body MRI using accelerated and abbreviated imaging protocols

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Hu, Houchun Harry; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established diagnostic imaging tool for investigating pediatric disease. MRI allows assessment of structure, function, and morphology in cardiovascular imaging, as well as tissue characterization in body imaging, without the use of ionizing radiation. For MRI in children, sedation and general anesthesia (GA) are often utilized to suppress patient motion, which can otherwise compromise image quality and diagnostic efficacy. However, evidence is emerging that use of sedation and GA in children might have long-term neurocognitive side effects, in addition to the short-term procedure-related risks. These concerns make risk-benefit assessment of sedation and GA more challenging. Therefore, reducing or eliminating the need for sedation and GA is an important goal of imaging innovation and research in pediatric MRI. In this review, the authors focus on technical and clinical approaches to reducing and eliminating the use of sedation in the pediatric population based on image acquisition acceleration and imaging protocols abbreviation. This paper covers important physiological and technical considerations for pediatric body MR imaging and discusses MRI techniques that offer the potential of recovering diagnostic-quality images from accelerated scans. In this review, the authors also introduce the concept of reporting elements for important indications for pediatric body MRI and use this as a basis for abbreviating the MR protocols. By employing appropriate accelerated and abbreviated approaches based on an understanding of the imaging needs and reporting elements for a given clinical indication, it is possible to reduce sedation and GA for pediatric chest, cardiovascular and abdominal MRI. (orig.)

  15. Reducing sedation for pediatric body MRI using accelerated and abbreviated imaging protocols

    Ahmad, Rizwan [The Ohio State University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbus, OH (United States); Hu, Houchun Harry; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established diagnostic imaging tool for investigating pediatric disease. MRI allows assessment of structure, function, and morphology in cardiovascular imaging, as well as tissue characterization in body imaging, without the use of ionizing radiation. For MRI in children, sedation and general anesthesia (GA) are often utilized to suppress patient motion, which can otherwise compromise image quality and diagnostic efficacy. However, evidence is emerging that use of sedation and GA in children might have long-term neurocognitive side effects, in addition to the short-term procedure-related risks. These concerns make risk-benefit assessment of sedation and GA more challenging. Therefore, reducing or eliminating the need for sedation and GA is an important goal of imaging innovation and research in pediatric MRI. In this review, the authors focus on technical and clinical approaches to reducing and eliminating the use of sedation in the pediatric population based on image acquisition acceleration and imaging protocols abbreviation. This paper covers important physiological and technical considerations for pediatric body MR imaging and discusses MRI techniques that offer the potential of recovering diagnostic-quality images from accelerated scans. In this review, the authors also introduce the concept of reporting elements for important indications for pediatric body MRI and use this as a basis for abbreviating the MR protocols. By employing appropriate accelerated and abbreviated approaches based on an understanding of the imaging needs and reporting elements for a given clinical indication, it is possible to reduce sedation and GA for pediatric chest, cardiovascular and abdominal MRI. (orig.)

  16. MRI zoo

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  17. Positive findings on bone scan in multiple myeloma

    Lin Lin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of multiple myeloma in which the CT only shows osteolytic lesions and MRI only shows compressive fractrue, but the scan shows some interesting imaging that make us to think of multiple myeloma. (authors)

  18. The usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies

    Amano, Yasuo

    1994-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies was evaluated. Pelvic MRI was carried out on 29 cases suspected of abnormal pregnancy by ultrasonography and clinical examinations. The abnormal pregnancies were classified into three categories: (1) maternal abnormalities, (2) fetal abnormalities and (3) placental abnormalities. MRI was of great value for the diagnosis of maternal abnormalities, particularly in cases of coexistent pelvic tumor. MRI allowed diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and dermoid cyst through its excellent tissue characterization and broad range of vision. MRI was useful in making diagnoses of fetal central nervous anomalies and fetal death, since the lack of fetal movement and the lesions were clear enough to be detected by MRI. However, anomalies in the fetal trunk or extremities could only be demonstrated, but not diagnosed, by MRI owing to its inferior spatial and time resolution. MRI showed placenta accreta and placental hematoma. Although accurate diagnosis was difficult because of their rarity, MRI revealed the hemorrhagic component of the lesions, which was not shown by ultrasonography. The author believes MRI has potential usefulness in making diagnoses of placental abnormalities through its tissue characterization. MRI was superior to ultrasonography in the soft tissue characterization, field of view, while MRI was inferior in time and spatial resolution. In summary, MRI hould be used in case of abnormal pregnancies such as pelvic tumors, fetal nervous anomalies and placental hemorrhagic lesions. MRI will become useful for the diagnosis of other abnormalities as its spatial resolution and fast scan technology advances. (author)

  19. The usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies

    Amano, Yasuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies was evaluated. Pelvic MRI was carried out on 29 cases suspected of abnormal pregnancy by ultrasonography and clinical examinations. The abnormal pregnancies were classified into three categories: (1) maternal abnormalities, (2) fetal abnormalities and (3) placental abnormalities. MRI was of great value for the diagnosis of maternal abnormalities, particularly in cases of coexistent pelvic tumor. MRI allowed diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and dermoid cyst through its excellent tissue characterization and broad range of vision. MRI was useful in making diagnoses of fetal central nervous anomalies and fetal death, since the lack of fetal movement and the lesions were clear enough to be detected by MRI. However, anomalies in the fetal trunk or extremities could only be demonstrated, but not diagnosed, by MRI owing to its inferior spatial and time resolution. MRI showed placenta accreta and placental hematoma. Although accurate diagnosis was difficult because of their rarity, MRI revealed the hemorrhagic component of the lesions, which was not shown by ultrasonography. The author believes MRI has potential usefulness in making diagnoses of placental abnormalities through its tissue characterization. MRI was superior to ultrasonography in the soft tissue characterization, field of view, while MRI was inferior in time and spatial resolution. In summary, MRI hould be used in case of abnormal pregnancies such as pelvic tumors, fetal nervous anomalies and placental hemorrhagic lesions. MRI will become useful for the diagnosis of other abnormalities as its spatial resolution and fast scan technology advances. (author).

  20. Knee MRI

    ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  1. Shoulder MRI

    ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  2. Imaging features of colovesical fistulae on MRI.

    Tang, Y Z; Booth, T C; Swallow, D; Shahabuddin, K; Thomas, M; Hanbury, D; Chang, S; King, C

    2012-10-01

    MRI is routinely used in the investigation of colovesical fistulae at our institute. Several papers have alluded to its usefulness in achieving the diagnosis; however, there is a paucity of literature on its imaging findings. Our objective was to quantify the MRI characteristics of these fistulae. We selected all cases over a 4-year period with a final clinical diagnosis of colovesical fistula which had been investigated with MRI. The MRI scans were reviewed in a consensus fashion by two consultant uroradiologists. Their MRI features were quantified. There were 40 cases of colovesical fistulae. On MRI, the fistula morphology consistently fell into three patterns. The most common pattern (71%) demonstrated an intervening abscess between the bowel wall and bladder wall. The second pattern (15%) had a visible track between the affected bowel and bladder. The third pattern (13%) was a complete loss of fat plane between the affected bladder and bowel wall. MRI correctly determined the underlying aetiology in 63% of cases. MRI is a useful imaging modality in the diagnosis of colovesical fistulae. The fistulae appear to have three characteristic morphological patterns that may aid future diagnoses of colovesical fistulae. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first publication of the MRI findings in colovesical fistulae.

  3. Motion correction options in PET/MRI.

    Catana, Ciprian

    2015-05-01

    Subject motion is unavoidable in clinical and research imaging studies. Breathing is the most important source of motion in whole-body PET and MRI studies, affecting not only thoracic organs but also those in the upper and even lower abdomen. The motion related to the pumping action of the heart is obviously relevant in high-resolution cardiac studies. These two sources of motion are periodic and predictable, at least to a first approximation, which means certain techniques can be used to control the motion (eg, by acquiring the data when the organ of interest is relatively at rest). Additionally, nonperiodic and unpredictable motion can also occur during the scan. One obvious limitation of methods relying on external devices (eg, respiratory bellows or the electrocardiogram signal to monitor the respiratory or cardiac cycle, respectively) to trigger or gate the data acquisition is that the complex motion of internal organs cannot be fully characterized. However, detailed information can be obtained using either the PET or MRI data (or both) allowing the more complete characterization of the motion field so that a motion model can be built. Such a model and the information derived from simple external devices can be used to minimize the effects of motion on the collected data. In the ideal case, all the events recorded during the PET scan would be used to generate a motion-free or corrected PET image. The detailed motion field can be used for this purpose by applying it to the PET data before, during, or after the image reconstruction. Integrating all these methods for motion control, characterization, and correction into a workflow that can be used for routine clinical studies is challenging but could potentially be extremely valuable given the improvement in image quality and reduction of motion-related image artifacts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Organizing Knowing in Interdisciplinary MRI Practice

    Yoshinaka, Yutaka

    's CT-scan and X-ray machines, were to take on MRI scanning, on an albeit rotational basis. Opening up to a broader group of operators to the scanning practice was to allow for organizational flexibility and a broader basis for competence building among radiology staff, where different occupational......This paper addresses organizational knowledge practices pertaining to the interdisciplinary work of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at a hospital radiology department. The setting occasions an interesting venue for exploring domestication of MRI as it unfolds in distributed settings of collective......, facilitating, and yet, in tension with, efforts at organizational transformation – its occasioning(s), mediations and contingent effects. The case study is based on direct observation and interviews, exploring and drawing upon the idea of different units of analysis as a methodological means to address...

  5. Is There a Role for MRI in Plantar Heel Pain.

    Fazal, Muhammad Ali; Tsekes, Demetris; Baloch, Irshad

    2018-06-01

    There is an increasing trend to investigate plantar heel pain with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan though plantar fasciitis is the most common cause. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of MRI in patients presenting with plantar heel pain. Case notes and MRI scans of 141 patients with a clinical diagnosis of plantar fasciitis were reviewed retrospectively. There were 98 females and 43 males patients. Fourteen patients had bilateral symptoms. Average age for male patients was 51 years (range = 26-78 years), and for female patients the average age was 52 years (range = 29-76 years). A total of 121 feet had MRI features suggestive of plantar fasciitis. MRI was normal in 32 feet. There was one case of stress fracture of calcaneus and another of a heel fibroma diagnosed on MRI scan. In our study, MRI scan was normal in 20.7% of the cases; 1.3% had a diagnosis other than plantar fasciitis but no sinister pathology. We therefore conclude that MRI scan is not routinely indicated and key is careful clinical assessment. Therapeutic, Level IV: Retrospective, Case series.

  6. MRI and the diagnosis of glioblastomas

    Bowe, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is based on an oral presentation given at the Sydney conference in February 2000. Two cases will be presented to demonstrate the use of this imaging modality in the diagnosis of glioblastomas, MRI has superior soft tissue imaging abilities making it ideal for imaging the brain. Conventional MRI is good for evaluating oedema and haemorrhage and offers high resolution without associated bone artefacts. However, as with all imaging modalities there are some disadvantages. Patients with pacemakers, certain types of metallic clips, or claustrophobia may not be suitable for an MRI scan. Copyright (2002) Australian Institute of Radiography

  7. Automatic EEG-assisted retrospective motion correction for fMRI (aE-REMCOR).

    Wong, Chung-Ki; Zotev, Vadim; Misaki, Masaya; Phillips, Raquel; Luo, Qingfei; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    Head motions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) impair fMRI data quality and introduce systematic artifacts that can affect interpretation of fMRI results. Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings performed simultaneously with fMRI provide high-temporal-resolution information about ongoing brain activity as well as head movements. Recently, an EEG-assisted retrospective motion correction (E-REMCOR) method was introduced. E-REMCOR utilizes EEG motion artifacts to correct the effects of head movements in simultaneously acquired fMRI data on a slice-by-slice basis. While E-REMCOR is an efficient motion correction approach, it involves an independent component analysis (ICA) of the EEG data and identification of motion-related ICs. Here we report an automated implementation of E-REMCOR, referred to as aE-REMCOR, which we developed to facilitate the application of E-REMCOR in large-scale EEG-fMRI studies. The aE-REMCOR algorithm, implemented in MATLAB, enables an automated preprocessing of the EEG data, an ICA decomposition, and, importantly, an automatic identification of motion-related ICs. aE-REMCOR has been used to perform retrospective motion correction for 305 fMRI datasets from 16 subjects, who participated in EEG-fMRI experiments conducted on a 3T MRI scanner. Performance of aE-REMCOR has been evaluated based on improvement in temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR) of the fMRI data, as well as correction efficiency defined in terms of spike reduction in fMRI motion parameters. The results show that aE-REMCOR is capable of substantially reducing head motion artifacts in fMRI data. In particular, when there are significant rapid head movements during the scan, a large TSNR improvement and high correction efficiency can be achieved. Depending on a subject's motion, an average TSNR improvement over the brain upon the application of aE-REMCOR can be as high as 27%, with top ten percent of the TSNR improvement values exceeding 55%. The average

  8. Clinical and MRI evaluation of tuberculous meningitis

    Jiang Chunjing; Shu Jiner; Chen Jian; Sheng Sanlan; Lu Jinhua; Cai Xiaoxiao; Li Huimin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and to improve the understanding of TBM. Methods: The clinical and MRI findings in 42 patients with confirmed TBM were analyzed retrospectively. MRI examination was performed using a 1 Tesla system, including SE T 1 WI and T 2 WI. Intravenous contrast was injected in 29 patients, and follow-up scans were performed on 17 patients. Results: Of 24 patients with early TBM, MRI was abnormal in 5(21%) with slight Tl-hypointense meningeal (4) or ependymal thickening (1). MRI on 33/35 (94%) patients with late stage TBM was abnormal with T 1 hypointensity and T 2 hyperintensity including meningeal thickening (19), mild surrounding brain edema (10), nodules (11), tuberculoma (5) and abscess (2). There was significant plaque-like, nodular or rim enhancement with surrounding brain edema. Conclusion: Tuberculous meningitis has minimal clinical and MRI findings in the early phase and significant clinical and MRI findings in the late phase. The enhanced scan may help to detect the abnormality. (authors)

  9. Feasibility of test-bolus DCE-MRI using CAIPIRINHA-VIBE for the evaluation of pancreatic malignancies

    Huh, Jimi; Seo, Nieun; Kim, Bohyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoonseok; Woo, Dong-Cheol; Lee, Chang Kyung [Asan Medical Center, Bioimaging Center, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Seong [Siemens Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nickel, Dominik [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany); Kim, Kyung Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Asan Medical Center, Bioimaging Center, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of test-bolus dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI with CAIPIRINHA-VIBE for pancreatic malignancies. Thirty-two patients underwent DCE-MRI with CAIPIRINHA-VIBE after injection of 2 mL gadolinium. From the resulting time-intensity curve (TIC), we estimated the arterial (AP) and portal venous phase (PVP) scan timing for subsequent multiphasic MRI. DCE-MRI perfusion maps were generated, and perfusion parameters were calculated. The image quality was rated on a 5-point scale (1: poor, 5: excellent). Goodness-of-fit of the TIC was evaluated by Pearson's χ{sup 2} test. Test-bolus DCE-MRIs with high temporal (3 s) and spatial resolution (1 x 1 x 4 mm{sup 3}) were acquired with good-quality perfusion maps of Ktrans and iAUC (mean score 4.313 ± 0.535 and 4.125 ± 0.554, respectively). The mean χ{sup 2} values for fitted TICs were 0.115 ± 0.082 for the pancreatic parenchyma and 0.784 ± 0.074 for pancreatic malignancies, indicating an acceptable goodness-of-fit. Test-bolus DCE-MRI was highly accurate in estimating the proper timing of AP (90.6 %) and PVP (100 %) of subsequent multiphasic MRI. Between pancreatic adenocarcinomas and neuroendocrine tumours, there were significant differences in the Ktrans (0.073 ± 0.058 vs. 0.308 ± 0.062, respectively; p = 0.007) and iAUC (1.501 ± 0.828 vs. 3.378 ± 0.378, respectively; p = 0.045). Test-bolus DCE-MRI using CAIPIRINHA-VIBE is feasible for incorporating perfusion analysis of pancreatic tumours into routine multiphasic MRI. (orig.)

  10. A graphics processing unit accelerated motion correction algorithm and modular system for real-time fMRI.

    Scheinost, Dustin; Hampson, Michelle; Qiu, Maolin; Bhawnani, Jitendra; Constable, R Todd; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2013-07-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) has recently gained interest as a possible means to facilitate the learning of certain behaviors. However, rt-fMRI is limited by processing speed and available software, and continued development is needed for rt-fMRI to progress further and become feasible for clinical use. In this work, we present an open-source rt-fMRI system for biofeedback powered by a novel Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated motion correction strategy as part of the BioImage Suite project ( www.bioimagesuite.org ). Our system contributes to the development of rt-fMRI by presenting a motion correction algorithm that provides an estimate of motion with essentially no processing delay as well as a modular rt-fMRI system design. Using empirical data from rt-fMRI scans, we assessed the quality of motion correction in this new system. The present algorithm performed comparably to standard (non real-time) offline methods and outperformed other real-time methods based on zero order interpolation of motion parameters. The modular approach to the rt-fMRI system allows the system to be flexible to the experiment and feedback design, a valuable feature for many applications. We illustrate the flexibility of the system by describing several of our ongoing studies. Our hope is that continuing development of open-source rt-fMRI algorithms and software will make this new technology more accessible and adaptable, and will thereby accelerate its application in the clinical and cognitive neurosciences.

  11. Cardiac MRI in ischemic heart disease

    Ishida, Masaki; Kato, Shingo; Sakuma, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cine MRI is recognized as the most accurate method for evaluating ventricular function. Late gadolinium-enhanced MRI can clearly delineate subendocardial infarction, and the assessment of transmural extent of infarction on MRI is widely useful for predicting myocardial viability. Stress myocardial perfusion MRI allows for detection of subendocardial myocardial ischemia, and the diagnostic accuracy of stress perfusion MRI is superior to stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). In recent years, image quality, volume coverage, acquisition speed and arterial contrast of 3-dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have been substantially improved with use of steady-state free precession sequences and parallel imaging techniques, permitting the acquisition of high-quality, whole-heart coronary MRA within a reasonably short imaging time. It is now widely recognized that cardiac MRI has tremendous potential for the evaluation of ischemic heart disease. However, cardiac MRI is technically complicated and its use in clinical practice is relatively limited. With further improvements in education and training, as well as standardization of appropriate study protocols, cardiac MRI will play a central role in managing patients with CAD. (author)

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  13. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  17. Play the MRI Game

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  18. Development of a registration framework to validate MRI with histology for prostate focal therapy.

    Reynolds, H M; Williams, S; Zhang, A; Chakravorty, R; Rawlinson, D; Ong, C S; Esteva, M; Mitchell, C; Parameswaran, B; Finnegan, M; Liney, G; Haworth, A

    2015-12-01

    Focal therapy has been proposed as an alternative method to whole-gland treatment for prostate cancer when aiming to reduce treatment side effects. The authors recently validated a radiobiological model which takes into account tumor location and tumor characteristics including tumor cell density, Gleason score, and hypoxia in order to plan optimal dose distributions for focal therapy. The authors propose that this model can be informed using multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and in this study present a registration framework developed to map prostate mpMRI and histology data, where histology will provide the "ground truth" data regarding tumor location and biology. The authors aim to apply this framework to a growing database to develop a prostate biological atlas which will enable MRI based planning for prostate focal therapy treatment. Six patients scheduled for routine radical prostatectomy were used in this proof-of-concept study. Each patient underwent mpMRI scanning prior to surgery, after which the excised prostate specimen was formalin fixed and mounted in agarose gel in a custom designed sectioning box. T2-weighted MRI of the specimen in the sectioning box was acquired, after which 5 mm sections of the prostate were cut and histology sections were microtomed. A number of image processing and registration steps were used to register histology images with ex vivo MRI and deformable image registration (DIR) was applied to 3D T2w images to align the in vivo and ex vivo MRI data. Dice coefficient metrics and corresponding feature points from two independent annotators were selected in order to assess the DIR accuracy. Images from all six patients were registered, providing histology and in vivo MRI in the ex vivo MRI frame of reference for each patient. Results demonstrated that their DIR methodology to register in vivo and ex vivo 3D T2w MRI improved accuracy in comparison with an initial manual alignment for prostates containing features which were readily visible

  19. [18F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [18F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian; Weckesser, Matthias; Stegger, Lars; Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas; Schaefers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [ 18 F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [ 18 F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast agent is contraindicated. (orig.)

  20. Head CT scan

    ... scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... head size in children Changes in thinking or behavior Fainting Headache, when you have certain other signs ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able to ...

  3. Animal MRI Core

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  4. Data on the safety of repeated MRI in healthy children

    Scott K. Holland

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Examination of neurocognitive and biometric data from a decade-long, longitudinal fMRI study of normal language development in this small, longitudinal sample of healthy children in the age range of 5 to 18 years, who received up to 10 MRI scans, provides scientific evidence to support the belief that MRI poses minimal risk for use in research with healthy children.

  5. Evaluation of MRI sequences for quantitative T1 brain mapping

    Tsialios, P.; Thrippleton, M.; Glatz, A.; Pernet, C.

    2017-11-01

    T1 mapping constitutes a quantitative MRI technique finding significant application in brain imaging. It allows evaluation of contrast uptake, blood perfusion, volume, providing a more specific biomarker of disease progression compared to conventional T1-weighted images. While there are many techniques for T1-mapping there is a wide range of reported T1-values in tissues, raising the issue of protocols reproducibility and standardization. The gold standard for obtaining T1-maps is based on acquiring IR-SE sequence. Widely used alternative sequences are IR-SE-EPI, VFA (DESPOT), DESPOT-HIFI and MP2RAGE that speed up scanning and fitting procedures. A custom MRI phantom was used to assess the reproducibility and accuracy of the different methods. All scans were performed using a 3T Siemens Prisma scanner. The acquired data processed using two different codes. The main difference was observed for VFA (DESPOT) which grossly overestimated T1 relaxation time by 214 ms [126 270] compared to the IR-SE sequence. MP2RAGE and DESPOT-HIFI sequences gave slightly shorter time than IR-SE (~20 to 30ms) and can be considered as alternative and time-efficient methods for acquiring accurate T1 maps of the human brain, while IR-SE-EPI gave identical result, at a cost of a lower image quality.

  6. Placenta accreta: MRI antenatal diagnosis and surgical correlation.

    Ha, T P; Li, K C

    1998-01-01

    We describe a case of a placenta previa accreta that was diagnosed antenatally by MRI with subsequent surgical confirmation. We show the advantages of ultrafast MRI single shot (SS) fast spin echo (FSE) techniques for accurate diagnosis with minimal scan time and fetal motion artifacts.

  7. A Framework Based on Reference Data with Superordinate Accuracy for the Quality Analysis of Terrestrial Laser Scanning-Based Multi-Sensor-Systems.

    Stenz, Ulrich; Hartmann, Jens; Paffenholz, Jens-André; Neumann, Ingo

    2017-08-16

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is an efficient solution to collect large-scale data. The efficiency can be increased by combining TLS with additional sensors in a TLS-based multi-sensor-system (MSS). The uncertainty of scanned points is not homogenous and depends on many different influencing factors. These include the sensor properties, referencing, scan geometry (e.g., distance and angle of incidence), environmental conditions (e.g., atmospheric conditions) and the scanned object (e.g., material, color and reflectance, etc.). The paper presents methods, infrastructure and results for the validation of the suitability of TLS and TLS-based MSS. Main aspects are the backward modelling of the uncertainty on the basis of reference data (e.g., point clouds) with superordinate accuracy and the appropriation of a suitable environment/infrastructure (e.g., the calibration process of the targets for the registration of laser scanner and laser tracker data in a common coordinate system with high accuracy) In this context superordinate accuracy means that the accuracy of the acquired reference data is better by a factor of 10 than the data of the validated TLS and TLS-based MSS. These aspects play an important role in engineering geodesy, where the aimed accuracy lies in a range of a few mm or less.

  8. Radionuclide brain scanning

    Abdel-Dayem, H.

    1992-01-01

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ''allied advances'' with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  9. Radionuclide brain scanning

    Abdel-Dayem, H

    1993-12-31

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ``allied advances`` with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  10. Multiparametric prostate MRI: technical conduct, standardized report and clinical use.

    Manfredi, Matteo; Mele, Fabrizio; Garrou, Diletta; Walz, Jochen; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Russo, Filippo; Vassallo, Lorenzo; Villers, Arnauld; Emberton, Mark; Valerio, Massimo

    2018-02-01

    Multiparametric prostate MRI (mp-MRI) is an emerging imaging modality for diagnosis, characterization, staging, and treatment planning of prostate cancer (PCa). The technique, results reporting, and its role in clinical practice have been the subject of significant development over the last decade. Although mp-MRI is not yet routinely used in the diagnostic pathway, almost all urological guidelines have emphasized the potential role of mp-MRI in several aspects of PCa management. Moreover, new MRI sequences and scanning techniques are currently under evaluation to improve the diagnostic accuracy of mp-MRI. This review presents an overview of mp-MRI, summarizing the technical applications, the standardized reporting systems used, and their current roles in various stages of PCa management. Finally, this critical review also reports the main limitations and future perspectives of the technique.

  11. Establishment of atherosclerotic model and USPIO enhanced MRI techniques study in rabbits

    Li Yonggang; Zhu Mo; Dai Yinyu; Chen Jianhua; Guo Liang; Ni Jiankun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the methods of establishment of atherosclerotic model and USPIO enhanced MRI techniques in rabbits. Methods: Thirty New Zealand male rabbits were divided randomly into two groups: 20 animals in the experiment group, 10 animals in the control group. Animal model of atherosclerosis was induced with aortic balloon endothelial injury and high-fat diet feeding. There was no intervention with the rabbits in control group. MRI examination included plan scan, USPIO enhanced black-blood sequences and white-blood sequence. The features of the plaques was analyzed in the experimental group and the effection on the image quality of different coils, sequences and parameters and a statistical study was also analyzed. Results: Animal model of atherosclerosis was successfully made in 12 rabbits and most plaques located in the abdomen aorta. There were 86 plaques within the scanning scope among which 67 plaques were positive to the Prussian blue staining. The image quality of knee joint coil was better than that of other coils. Although there was no difference in the detection of numbers of AS plaques between USPIO enhanced black-blood sequences and white-blood sequence (P > 0.05), blackblood sequences was superior to white-blood sequence in the demonstration of the components of plaque. Conclusion: The method of aortic balloon endothelial injury and high-fat diet feeding can easily establish the AS model in rabbits with a shorter period and it may be used for controlling the location of the plaques. USPIO enhanced MRI sequences has high sensitivity in the detection of the AS plauqes and can reveal the component of AS plaques. The optimization of MRI techniques is very important in the improvement of the image quality and the detection of the plaques. (authors)

  12. Influence of diagnostic quality scanning technique with CR mammography; Influencia de la tecnica de exploracion en la calidad diagnostica de la mamografia ocn CR

    Rivas Ballarin, M. A.; Ruiz Manzano, P.; Ortega Pardina, P.; Laliena Bielsa, V.; Calvo Carrillo, S.; Garcia Romero, A.; Millan Cebrian, E.

    2013-07-01

    Image quality criteria laid down in the Spanish Protocol of Control of quality in Radiology (PECCR) to a team of mammography with CR imaging system are applied in this work and evaluated the dosimetry impact implied by the modification of the technique of exposure required for the fulfilment of those criteria. Is also analyzes the impact on the image quality of the new radiographic technique, evaluated by three radiologists. (Author)

  13. Complex Wavelet transform for MRI

    Junor, P.; Janney, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There is a perpetual compromise encountered in magnetic resonance (MRl) image reconstruction, between the traditional elements of image quality (noise, spatial resolution and contrast). Additional factors exacerbating this trade-off include various artifacts, computational (and hence time-dependent) overhead, and financial expense. This paper outlines a new approach to the problem of minimizing MRI image acquisition and reconstruction time without compromising resolution and noise reduction. The standard approaches for reconstructing magnetic resonance (MRI) images from raw data (which rely on relatively conventional signal processing) have matured but there are a number of challenges which limit their use. A major one is the 'intrinsic' signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image that depends on the strength of the main field. A typical clinical MRI almost invariably uses a super-cooled magnet in order to achieve a high field strength. The ongoing running cost of these super-cooled magnets prompts consideration of alternative magnet systems for use in MRIs for developing countries and in some remote regional installations. The decrease in image quality from using lower field strength magnets can be addressed by improvements in signal processing strategies. Conversely, improved signal processing will obviously benefit the current conventional field strength MRI machines. Moreover, the 'waiting time' experienced in many MR sequences (due to the relaxation time delays) can be exploited by more rigorous processing of the MR signals. Acquisition often needs to be repeated so that coherent averaging may partially redress the shortfall in SNR, at the expense of further delay. Wavelet transforms have been used in MRI as an alternative for encoding and denoising for over a decade. These have not supplanted the traditional Fourier transform methods that have long been the mainstay of MRI reconstruction, but have some inflexibility. The dual

  14. Whole-body MRI screening

    Puls, Ralf [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Hosten, Norbert (ed.) [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald (Germany). Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2014-07-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  15. Whole-body MRI screening

    Puls, Ralf; Hosten, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  16. Automatic delineation of brain regions on MRI and PET images from the pig

    Villadsen, Jonas; Hansen, Hanne D; Jørgensen, Louise M

    2018-01-01

    : Manual inter-modality spatial normalization to a MRI atlas is operator-dependent, time-consuming, and can be inaccurate with lack of cortical radiotracer binding or skull uptake. NEW METHOD: A parcellated PET template that allows for automatic spatial normalization to PET images of any radiotracer....... RESULTS: MRI and [11C]Cimbi-36 PET scans obtained in sixteen pigs made the basis for the atlas. The high resolution MRI scans allowed for creation of an accurately averaged MRI template. By aligning the within-subject PET scans to their MRI counterparts, an averaged PET template was created in the same...... the MRI template with individual MRI images and 0.92±0.26mm using the PET template with individual [11C]Cimbi-36 PET images. We tested the automatic procedure by assessing eleven PET radiotracers with different kinetics and spatial distributions by using perfusion-weighted images of early PET time frames...

  17. MRI findings of Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Park, Won Kyu; Lee, Hwa Jin; Byun, Woo Mok [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To evaluate MRI findings of Guillain-Barre syndrome. In six patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome diagnosed by clinical, cerebrospinal fluid and electrophysiologic findings, a retrospective review of MR findings was conducted. Follow-up MRI scans were carried out in two patients showing minimal clinical improvement. Marked or moderate enhancement of thickened nerve roots was seen in all cases on gadopentetate dimeglumine enhanced axial T1-weighted images. Two patterns were seen; one was even enhancement of both anterior and posterior nerve roots (n=1) and the other was enhancement of anterior nerve roots only (n=5). Enhancement and thickness of nerve roots was seen to have slightly decreased on MRI follow-up at 32 and 50 days; clinical and electrophysiologic examination showed minimal improvement. Although MRI findings of nerve root enhancement are nonspecific and can be seen in neoplastic and other inflammatory diseases, the enhancement of thickened anterior nerve roots within the cal sac suggests Guillain-Barre syndrome.

  18. MRI findings of Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Park, Won Kyu; Lee, Hwa Jin; Byun, Woo Mok

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate MRI findings of Guillain-Barre syndrome. In six patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome diagnosed by clinical, cerebrospinal fluid and electrophysiologic findings, a retrospective review of MR findings was conducted. Follow-up MRI scans were carried out in two patients showing minimal clinical improvement. Marked or moderate enhancement of thickened nerve roots was seen in all cases on gadopentetate dimeglumine enhanced axial T1-weighted images. Two patterns were seen; one was even enhancement of both anterior and posterior nerve roots (n=1) and the other was enhancement of anterior nerve roots only (n=5). Enhancement and thickness of nerve roots was seen to have slightly decreased on MRI follow-up at 32 and 50 days; clinical and electrophysiologic examination showed minimal improvement. Although MRI findings of nerve root enhancement are nonspecific and can be seen in neoplastic and other inflammatory diseases, the enhancement of thickened anterior nerve roots within the cal sac suggests Guillain-Barre syndrome

  19. MRI of the wrist and hand

    Reicher, M.A.; Kellerhouse, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the preferred technique for evaluating a wide range of wrist and hand disorders and has a crucial role in planning arthroscopic and nonarthroscopic wrist surgery. This book details the capabilities of MRI for detecting wrist, hand, and finger pathology; provides a complete understanding of examination techniques, imaging protocols, and anatomy; and contains nearly 400 clear, sharp scans and numerous line drawings showing examination techniques, anatomic structures, and pathologic findings. After an introductory review of MR physics, the book describes state- of-the-art MRI techniques and explains the rationale for selecting imaging protocols. A complete MRI examination of a normal wrist is presented, along with a multiplanar atlas of cross-sectional wrist anatomy

  20. Robust inverse-consistent affine CT-MR registration in MRI-assisted and MRI-alone prostate radiation therapy.

    Rivest-Hénault, David; Dowson, Nicholas; Greer, Peter B; Fripp, Jurgen; Dowling, Jason A

    2015-07-01

    CT-MR registration is a critical component of many radiation oncology protocols. In prostate external beam radiation therapy, it allows the propagation of MR-derived contours to reference CT images at the planning stage, and it enables dose mapping during dosimetry studies. The use of carefully registered CT-MR atlases allows the estimation of patient specific electron density maps from MRI scans, enabling MRI-alone radiation therapy planning and treatment adaptation. In all cases, the precision and accuracy achieved by registration influences the quality of the entire process. Most current registration algorithms do not robustly generalize and lack inverse-consistency, increasing the risk of human error and acting as a source of bias in studies where information is propagated in a particular direction, e.g. CT to MR or vice versa. In MRI-based treatment planning where both CT and MR scans serve as spatial references, inverse-consistency is critical, if under-acknowledged. A robust, inverse-consistent, rigid/affine registration algorithm that is well suited to CT-MR alignment in prostate radiation therapy is presented. The presented method is based on a robust block-matching optimization process that utilises a half-way space definition to maintain inverse-consistency. Inverse-consistency substantially reduces the influence of the order of input images, simplifying analysis, and increasing robustness. An open source implementation is available online at http://aehrc.github.io/Mirorr/. Experimental results on a challenging 35 CT-MR pelvis dataset demonstrate that the proposed method is more accurate than other popular registration packages and is at least as accurate as the state of the art, while being more robust and having an order of magnitude higher inverse-consistency than competing approaches. The presented results demonstrate that the proposed registration algorithm is readily applicable to prostate radiation therapy planning. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  1. Age determination of subdural hematomas with CT and MRI: a systematic review

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Postema, Floor A. M.; Verbaan, Dagmar; Majoie, Charles B.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review the literature on dating subdural hematomas (SDHs) on CT and MRI scans. We performed a systematic review in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane to search for articles that described the appearance of SDHs on CT or MRI in relation to time between trauma and scanning. Two researchers

  2. Actual imaging time in fetal MRI

    Brugger, Peter C.; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Safety issues in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important, especially in fetal MRI. However, since basic data with respect of the effective exposure time in fetal MRI are not available, this study aimed to determine the actual imaging time during a fetal MRI study. Methods: 100 fetal MRI studies of singleton pregnancies performed on a 1.5 T system were analysed with respect to study duration (from starting the survey scan until the end of study), the number of sequences acquired, and the actual imaging time, which was calculated by adding up scan time of each sequence. Furthermore, each sequence type was analysed regarding the number of acquisitions, specific absorption rates (SAR), and duration. Results: Mean study duration was 34.6 min (range: 14–58 min; standard deviation (SD): 9.7 min), the average number of sequences acquired was 26.6 (range: 11–44, SD: 6.6). Actual scan time averaged 11.4 min (range: 4–19 min, SD: 4.0 min). Ultrafast T2-weighted and steady-state free-precession sequences accounted for 62.3% of actual scan time, and were distributed over the whole duration of the study. Conclusion: Actual imaging time only accounts for 33% of total study time and is not continuous. The remaining time is consumed by the preparation phases of the scanner, and is spent with planning sequences and the eventual repositioning of the coil and/or pregnant woman. These data may help to more accurately estimate the exposure to radiofrequency deposition and noise during fetal MRI studies.

  3. Modeling of the bony pelvis from MRI using a multi-atlas AE-SDM for registration and tracking in image-guided robotic prostatectomy.

    Gao, Qinquan; Chang, Ping-Lin; Rueckert, Daniel; Ali, S Mohammed; Cohen, Daniel; Pratt, Philip; Mayer, Erik; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Edwards, Philip Eddie

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental challenge in the development of image-guided surgical systems is alignment of the preoperative model to the operative view of the patient. This is achieved by finding corresponding structures in the preoperative scans and on the live surgical scene. In robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), the most readily visible structure is the bone of the pelvic rim. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for prostate cancer detection and staging, but extraction of bone from MRI is difficult and very time consuming to achieve manually. We present a robust and fully automated multi-atlas pipeline for bony pelvis segmentation from MRI, using a MRI appearance embedding statistical deformation model (AE-SDM). The statistical deformation model is built using the node positions of deformations obtained from hierarchical registrations of full pelvis CT images. For datasets with corresponding CT and MRI images, we can transform the MRI into CT SDM space. MRI appearance can then be used to improve the combined MRI/CT atlas to MRI registration using SDM constraints. We can use this model to segment the bony pelvis in a new MRI image where there is no CT available. A multi-atlas segmentation algorithm is introduced which incorporates MRI AE-SDMs guidance. We evaluated the method on 19 subjects with corresponding MRI and manually segmented CT datasets by performing a leave-one-out study. Several metrics are used to quantify the overlap between the automatic and manual segmentations. Compared to the manual gold standard segmentations, our robust segmentation method produced an average surface distance 1.24±0.27mm, which outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for MRI bony pelvis segmentation. We also show that the resulting surface can be tracked in the endoscopic view in near real time using dense visual tracking methods. Results are presented on a simulation and a real clinical RALP case. Tracking is accurate to 0.13mm over 700 frames

  4. Brain PET scan

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  5. MRI with cardiac pacing devices – Safety in clinical practice

    Kaasalainen, Touko, E-mail: touko.kaasalainen@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Pakarinen, Sami, E-mail: sami.pakarinen@hus.fi [HUS Department of Cardiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Kivistö, Sari, E-mail: sari.kivisto@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Holmström, Miia, E-mail: miia.holmstrom@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Hänninen, Helena, E-mail: helena.hanninen@hus.fi [HUS Department of Cardiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Peltonen, Juha, E-mail: juha.peltonen@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, School of Science, Aalto University, Helsinki (Finland); Lauerma, Kirsi, E-mail: kirsi.lauerma@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Sipilä, Outi, E-mail: outi.sipila@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce a single centre “real life” experience of performing MRI examinations in clinical practice on patients with cardiac pacemaker systems. Additionally, we aimed to evaluate the safety of using a dedicated safety protocol for these patients. Materials and methods: We used a 1.5 T MRI scanner to conduct 68 MRI scans of different body regions in patients with pacing systems. Of the cardiac devices, 32% were MR-conditional, whereas the remaining 68% were MR-unsafe. We recorded the functional parameters of the devices prior, immediately after, and approximately one month after the MRI scanning, and compared the device parameters to the baseline values. Results: All MRI examinations were completed safely, and each device could be interrogated normally following the MRI. We observed no changes in the programmed parameters of the devices. For most of the participants, the distributions of the immediate and one-month changes in the device parameters were within 20% of the baseline values, although some changes approached clinically important thresholds. Furthermore, we observed no differences in the variable changes between MR-conditional and MR-unsafe pacing systems, or between scans of the thorax area and other scanned areas. Conclusion: MRI in patients with MR-conditional pacing systems and selected MR-unsafe systems could be performed safely under strict conditions in this study.

  6. Safety of a dedicated brain MRI protocol in patients with a vagus nerve stimulator.

    de Jonge, Jeroen C; Melis, Gerrit I; Gebbink, Tineke A; de Kort, Gérard A P; Leijten, Frans S S

    2014-11-01

    Although implanted metallic devices constitute a relative contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, the safety of brain imaging in a patient with a vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) is classified as "conditional," provided that specific manufacturer guidelines are followed when a transmit and receive head coil is used at 1.5 or 3.0 Tesla. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of performing brain MRI scans in patients with the VNS. From September 2009 until November 2011, 101 scans were requested in 73 patients with the VNS in The Netherlands. Patients were scanned according to the manufacturer's guidelines. No patient reported any side effect, discomfort, or pain during or after the MRI scan. In one patient, a lead break was detected based on device diagnostics after the MRI-scan. However, because no system diagnostics had been performed prior to MR scanning in this patient, it is unclear whether MR scanning was responsible for the lead break. The indication for most scans was epilepsy related. Twenty-six scans (26%) were part of a (new) presurgical evaluation and could probably better have been performed prior to VNS implantation. Performing brain MRI scans in patients with an implanted VNS is safe when a modified MRI protocol is followed. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. CT and MRI slice separation evaluation by LabView developed software.

    Acri, Giuseppe; Testagrossa, Barbara; Sestito, Angela; Bonanno, Lilla; Vermiglio, Giuseppe

    2018-02-01

    The efficient use of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) equipment necessitates establishing adequate quality-control (QC) procedures. In particular, the accuracy of slice separation, during multislices acquisition, requires scan exploration of phantoms containing test objects. To simplify such procedures, a novel phantom and a computerised LabView-based procedure have been devised, enabling determination the midpoint of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in real time while the distance from the profile midpoint of two progressive images is evaluated and measured. The results were compared with those obtained by processing the same phantom images with commercial software. To validate the proposed methodology the Fisher test was conducted on the resulting data sets. In all cases, there was no statistically significant variation between the commercial procedure and the LabView one, which can be used on any CT and MRI diagnostic devices. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Retrospective quality control review of FDG scans in the imaging sub-study of PALETTE EORTC 62072/VEG110727: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial

    Hristova, Ivalina [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boellaard, Ronald [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vogel, Wouter [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix [Maastricht University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marreaud, Sandrine; Collette, Sandra [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Schoeffski, Patrick [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of General Medical Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, Department of Oncology, KU Leuven (Belgium); Sanfilippo, Roberta [Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Dewji, Raz [GlaxoSmithKline, Oncology R and D, Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Graaf, Winette van der [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    {sup 18}F-Labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can detect early changes in tumour metabolism and may be a useful quantitative imaging biomarker (QIB) for prediction of disease stabilization, response and duration of progression-free survival (PFS). Standardization of imaging procedures is a prerequisite, especially in multicentre clinical trials. In this study we reviewed the quality of FDG scans and compliance with the imaging guideline (IG) in a phase III clinical trial. Forty-four cancer patients were enrolled in an imaging sub-study of a randomized international multicentre trial. FDG scan had to be performed at baseline and 10-14 days after treatment start. The image transmittal forms (ITFs) and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) [1] standard headers were analysed for compliance with the IG. Mean liver standardized uptake values (LSUV{sub mean}) were measured as recommended by positron emission tomography (PET) Response Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0 (PERCIST) [2]. Of 88 scans, 81 were received (44 patients); 36 were properly anonymized; 77/81 serum glucose values submitted, all but one within the IG. In 35/44 patients both scans were of sufficient visual quality. In 22/70 ITFs the reported UT differed by >1 min from the DICOM headers (max. difference 1 h 4 min). Based on the DICOM, UT compliance for both scans was 31.4 %. LSUV{sub mean} was fairly constant for the 11 patients with UT compliance: 2.30 ± 0.33 at baseline and 2.27 ± 0.48 at follow-up (FU). Variability substantially increased for the subjects with unacceptable UT (11 patients): 2.27 ± 1.04 at baseline and 2.18 ± 0.83 at FU. The high attrition number of patients due to low compliance with the IG compromised the quantitative assessment of the predictive value for early response monitoring. This emphasizes the need for better regulated procedures in imaging departments, which may be achieved by education of involved personnel or efforts towards regulations. LSUV{sub mean} could be

  9. The application of MRI in gluteal muscle contracture

    Zhao Tao; You Yuhua; Sun Jing; Cheng Kebin; Liu Wei; Qu Hui

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MRI findings and its diagnostic value in gluteal muscle contracture (GMC). Methods: Eleven clinic or operation confirmed GMC patients were examined by plain X-ray and MRI. Conventional T 1 WI and T 2 WI MR imaging were performed and FFE-T 2 WI (fast field echo-T 2 WI) was also scanned. CT scan was conducted in 5 cases. Results: 11 GMC patients were all diagnosed by MRI. Conventional T 1 WI and T 2 WI could only show the atrophy of gluteal muscles, while FFE-T 2 WI could directly show the fibrous band of gluteal muscle and its fascia, and the fibrous band appeared as low signal intensity on FFE-T 2 WI sequence. Conclusions: MRI is the efficient modality in imaging the fibrous band for GMC patients, and FFE-T 2 WI is the most valuable sequence. MRI is very helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of GMC

  10. Atlas-based deformable image registration for MRI-guided prostate radiation therapy

    Dowling, J.; Fripp, J.; Salvado, O.; Lambert, J.; Denham, J.W.; Capp, A.; Grer, P.B.; Parker, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To develop atlas-based deformable image registration methods to automatically segment organs and map electron densities to pelvic MRI scans for MRI-guided radiation therapy. Methods An MRT pelvic atlas and corresponding CT atlas were developed based on whole pelvic T 2 MRI scans and CT scans for 39 patients. Expert manual segmentations on both MRI and CT scans were obtained. The atlas was deformably registered to the individual patient MRI scans for automatic prostate, rectum, bladder and bone segmentation. These were compared to the manual segmentations using the Dice overlap coefficient. The same deformation vectors were then applied to the CT-atlas to produce pseudo-CT scans that correspond to the patient MRI scan anatomy but are populated with Hounsfield units. The original patient plan was recalculated on the pseudo-CT and compared to the original CT plan and bulk density plans on the MRI scans. Results Dice coefficient results were high (>0.8) for bone and prostate but lower (<0.7) for bladder and rectum which exhibit greater changes in shape and volume. Doses calculated on pseudo-CT scans were within 3% of original patient plans. Two sources of discrepancy were found; MR anatomy differences from CT due to patient setup differences at the MR scanner. and Hounsfield unit differences for bone in the pseudo-CT from original CT. Patient setup will be adressed with a

  11. MRI simulation: end-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms

    Sun, Jidi; Menk, Fred; Lambert, Jonathan; Martin, Jarad; Denham, James W; Greer, Peter B; Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David; Pichler, Peter; Parker, Joel; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah

    2015-01-01

    To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation.A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities.Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor’s 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was <1.5 and <1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs.The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT. (paper)

  12. Technical Note: Dosimetric effects of couch position variability on treatment plan quality with an MRI-guided Co-60 radiation therapy machine

    Chow, Phillip E., E-mail: pechow@mednet.ucla.edu; Thomas, David H.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel A.; Yang, Yingli; Steinberg, Michael L.; Lee, Percy; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance in radiation therapy brings real-time imaging and adaptive planning into the treatment vault where it can account for interfraction and intrafraction movement of soft tissue. The only commercially available MRI-guided radiation therapy device is a three-head {sup 60}Co and MRI system with an integrated treatment planning system (TPS). Couch attenuation of the beam of up to 20% is well modeled in the TPS. Variations in the patient’s day-to-day position introduce discrepancies in the actual couch attenuation as modeled in the treatment plan. For this reason, the authors’ institution avoids plans with beams that pass through or near the couch edges. This study investigates the effects of differential beam attenuation by the couch due to couch shifts in order to determine whether couch edge avoidance restrictions can be lifted. Couch shifts were simulated using a Monte Carlo treatment planning system and ion chamber measurements performed for validation. Methods: A total of 27 plans from 23 patients were investigated. Couch shifts of 1 and 2 cm were introduced in combinations of lateral and vertical directions to simulate patient position variations giving 16 shifted plans per reference plan. The 1 and 2 cm shifts were based on shifts recorded in 320 treatment fractions. Results: Following TG176 recommendations for measurement methods, couch attenuation measurements agreed with TPS modeled attenuation to within 2.1%. Planning target volume D95 changed less than 1% for 1 and 2 cm couch shifts in only the x-direction and less than 3% for all directions. Conclusions: Dosimetry of all plans tested was robust to couch shifts up to ±2 cm. In general, couch shifts resulted in clinically insignificant dosimetric deviations. It is conceivable that in certain cases with large systematic couch shifts and plans that are particularly sensitive to shifts, dosimetric changes might rise to a clinically significant level.

  13. MRI features of meningeal metastasis from lung cancer

    Luo Xuemao; Long Wansheng; Jin Zhifa; Hu Maoqing; Mai Xuyu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the pathway and MRI findings of meningeal metastasis original from lung cancer. Methods: 44 cases with cerebro-spinal meningeal metastasis original from lung cancer proven by clinical and pathology were retrospectively reviewed. All cases undergone plain MRI scan and Gd-DTPA enhanced