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Sample records for mri rarely occur

  1. A Rare Case of Cockayne Syndrome-MRI Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundaganur, Praveen

    2012-11-01

    The Cockayne Syndrome is a rare syndrome of congenital originwhich is charcterized by growth retardation, facial dysmorphism, facial naevi,retinopathy and mental retardation, which are associated with the changes in the brain parenchyma. The findings of MRI of the brain support the clinical diagnosis of the Cockayne Syndrome. We would like to highlight the MRI findings of this rare syndrome.

  2. A Rare Case of Cockayne Syndrome-MRI Features

    OpenAIRE

    Mundaganur, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    The Cockayne Syndrome is a rare syndrome of congenital originwhich is charcterized by growth retardation, facial dysmorphism, facial naevi,retinopathy and mental retardation, which are associated with the changes in the brain parenchyma. The findings of MRI of the brain support the clinical diagnosis of the Cockayne Syndrome. We would like to highlight the MRI findings of this rare syndrome.

  3. A Rare Occurance with Epidermolysis Bullosa Disease: Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Derya Cimen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a congenital and herediter vesiculobullous disease. Dystrophic form of this disease is characterized by severe malnutrition, failure to thrive, adhesions at fingers, joint contractures related with the formation of scar tissues, carcinoma of the skin, anemia, hipoalbuminemia, wound enfections and sepsis. Rarely, mortal dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in patients. In this report we present a 13 year-old pediatric patient with dilated cardiomyopathy, clinically diagnosed with Epidermolysis bullosa as well as a review of recent related literature.

  4. Fibrous dysplasia: rapid malignant transformation into osteogenic sarcoma - A rare occurance

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    S Gon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant transformation of fibrous dysplasia is rare, occurring in less than 1% of cases with a mean lag period of 13.5 years. We report a case of Osteogenic Sarcoma with chondroid differentiation in a pre-existing Fibrous Dysplasia occurring within one year of surgical resection and without any history of exposure to radiation. To the best of our knowledge and extensive search of literature, malignant transformation of Fibrous Dysplasia in such a short period of time, and without history of radiation exposure has never been reported from India.Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2012 Vol. 2, 335-337DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i4.6891

  5. MRI of a very rare hereditary ectodermal dysplasia: PIBI(D)S

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    Peserico, A.; Bertoli, P. (Ist. di Clinica Dermosifilopatica, Padua Univ. (Italy)); Battistella, P.A. (Dipt. di Pediatria, Padua Univ. (Italy))

    1992-08-01

    PIBI(D)S is a acronym for a very rare autosomal recessive syndrome consisting of photosensitivity, mild non-congenital ichthyosis, brittle cystine-deficient hair, impaired intelligence, occasionally decreased fertility and short stature. We report a 12-year-old female patient affected by PIBI(D)S with previously unreported MRI findings of central nervous system dysmyelination. (orig.).

  6. Cobb′s collar occurring in two brothers in a family: A rare entity revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most urethral strictures arise from iatrogenic, traumatic, or inflammatory causes. We report the familial occurrence of a congenital bulbar urethral stricture in two brothers. Retrograde and voiding cystourethrography was performed. A Cobb′s collar was diagnosed after radiological and endoscopic evaluation in both cases and was successfully managed with urethroplasty. Cobb′s collar is a rarely recognized cause of a membranous stricture of bulbar urethra that can lead to several urinary problems. In cases of adolescent and young adults presenting with symptoms of progressive urinary obstruction and enuresis with or without urinary tract infection, Cobb′s collar can be seen as a minor constriction in the bulbar urethra, but is not frequently symptomatic, and the familial occurrence of such a stricture is even rarer.

  7. Cobb's collar occurring in two brothers in a family: A rare entity revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Partha; Ray, Sayantan; Talukdar, Arunansu; Sonthalia, Nikhil; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2014-01-01

    Most urethral strictures arise from iatrogenic, traumatic, or inflammatory causes. We report the familial occurrence of a congenital bulbar urethral stricture in two brothers. Retrograde and voiding cystourethrography was performed. A Cobb's collar was diagnosed after radiological and endoscopic evaluation in both cases and was successfully managed with urethroplasty. Cobb's collar is a rarely recognized cause of a membranous stricture of bulbar urethra that can lead to several urinary problems. In cases of adolescent and young adults presenting with symptoms of progressive urinary obstruction and enuresis with or without urinary tract infection, Cobb's collar can be seen as a minor constriction in the bulbar urethra, but is not frequently symptomatic, and the familial occurrence of such a stricture is even rarer. PMID:24851013

  8. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension occurred after spinal surgery: report of two rare cases and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhengkuan; Li, Hao; Chen, Gang; Li, Fangcai; Qian, Shenjun; Chen, Qixin

    2017-05-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a relatively rare syndrome of increased intracranial pressure of unknown etiology. It is characterized by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure more than 250 mmH2O, with normal cranial imaging and CSF content. IIH occurred after spinal surgery is extremely rare. We present two IIH cases occurred after spinal surgery and conduct a systematic review of articles reporting IIH occurred after spinal surgery. The first patient underwent a posterior decompression and fixation for cervical fractures. IIH symptoms appeared 3 days postoperatively and gradually resolved with appropriate medication. The second patient underwent posterior spinal fusion with segmental instrumentation for congenital scoliosis. IIH symptoms appeared 5 days postoperatively and the patient died due to the irreversible intracranial hypertension although underwent intensive care and treatment. The literature review revealed that there were only five cases of IIH occurred after spinal surgery reported till date. IIH occurred after spinal surgery is relatively rare; the diagnosis is based upon exclusion of other diseases. IIH should be kept in mind in patients underwent spinal surgery as it could develop into irreversible intracranial hypertension.

  9. Gene flow among populations of two rare co-occurring fern species differing in ploidy level.

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    Anna Bucharová

    Full Text Available Differences in ploidy levels among different fern species have a vast influence on their mating system, their colonization ability and on the gene flow among populations. Differences in the colonization abilities of species with different ploidy levels are well known: tetraploids, in contrast to diploids, are able to undergo intra-gametophytic selfing. Because fertilization is a post-dispersal process in ferns, selfing results in better colonization abilities in tetraploids because of single spore colonization. Considerably less is known about the gene flow among populations of different ploidy levels. The present study examines two rare fern species that differ in ploidy. While it has already been confirmed that tetraploid species are better at colonizing, the present study focuses on the gene flow among existing populations. We analyzed the genetic structure of a set of populations in a 10×10 km study region using isoenzymes. Genetic variation in tetraploid species is distributed mainly among populations; the genetic distance between populations is correlated with the geographical distance, and larger populations host more genetic diversity than smaller populations. In the diploid species, most variability is partitioned within populations; the genetic distance is not related to geographic distance, and the genetic diversity of populations is not related to the population size. This suggests that in tetraploid species, which undergo selfing, gene flow is limited. In contrast, in the diploid species, which experience outcrossing, gene flow is extensive and the whole system behaves as one large population. Our results suggest that in ferns, the ability to colonize new habitats and the gene flow among existing populations are affected by the mating system.

  10. Gene flow among populations of two rare co-occurring fern species differing in ploidy level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharová, Anna; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Differences in ploidy levels among different fern species have a vast influence on their mating system, their colonization ability and on the gene flow among populations. Differences in the colonization abilities of species with different ploidy levels are well known: tetraploids, in contrast to diploids, are able to undergo intra-gametophytic selfing. Because fertilization is a post-dispersal process in ferns, selfing results in better colonization abilities in tetraploids because of single spore colonization. Considerably less is known about the gene flow among populations of different ploidy levels. The present study examines two rare fern species that differ in ploidy. While it has already been confirmed that tetraploid species are better at colonizing, the present study focuses on the gene flow among existing populations. We analyzed the genetic structure of a set of populations in a 10×10 km study region using isoenzymes. Genetic variation in tetraploid species is distributed mainly among populations; the genetic distance between populations is correlated with the geographical distance, and larger populations host more genetic diversity than smaller populations. In the diploid species, most variability is partitioned within populations; the genetic distance is not related to geographic distance, and the genetic diversity of populations is not related to the population size. This suggests that in tetraploid species, which undergo selfing, gene flow is limited. In contrast, in the diploid species, which experience outcrossing, gene flow is extensive and the whole system behaves as one large population. Our results suggest that in ferns, the ability to colonize new habitats and the gene flow among existing populations are affected by the mating system.

  11. INTRACRANIAL AND INTRASPINAL TUMOURS: REVIEW OF MRI FINDINGS IN A RARE NF - 2 CASE

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    Sahoo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome, characterized by multiple intracranial and intraspinal tumours associated with ocular abnormalities. The most common tumor associated with the disease is the vestibule cochlear schwannoma, and as many as 10% of patients with this tumor have neurofibromatosis type 2. Based on clinical and imaging findings the diagnostic of neurofibromatosis type 2 can be made. In this report we aim to report a 24 - year - old male who was evaluated for progressive h earing loss, vertigo, ataxic gait and right lower limb weakness. During the workup, cranial CT, Brain and whole s pine MRI was done which showed all the findings in one patient including bilateral vestibulocochlear schwannoma, multiple meningiomas, and intr amedullary and extramedullary tumours in spinal cord.

  12. Incidence and MRI characterization of the spectrum of posterolateral corner injuries occurring in association with ACL rupture

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    Frois Temponi, Eduardo [Hospital Madre Teresa, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Honorio de Carvalho, Lucio Jr. [Hospital Madre Teresa, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Saithna, Adnan [Southport and Ormskirk Hospitals, Southport (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Department of Clinical Engineering, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Thaunat, Mathieu; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand [Centre Orthopedic Santy, FIFA Medical Center of Excellence, Ramsay-Generale de Sante, Hopital Prive Jean Mermoz, Lyon (France)

    2017-08-15

    To determine the incidence and MRI characteristics of the spectrum of posterolateral corner (PLC) injuries occurring in association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. We carried out a level IV, retrospective case series study. All patients clinically diagnosed with an ACL rupture between July 2015 and June 2016 who underwent MRI of the knee were included in the study. In addition to standard MRI knee reporting, emphasis was placed on identifying injury to the PLC and a description of involvement of these structures by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Association with PLC involvement was sought with concomitant injuries using correlation analysis and logistic regression. One hundred sixty-two patients with MRI following ACL rupture were evaluated. Thirty-two patients (19.7%) had an injury to at least one structure of the PLC, including the inferior popliteomeniscal fascicle (n = 28), arcuate ligament (n = 20), popliteus tendon (n = 20), superior popliteomeniscal fascicle (n = 18), lateral collateral ligament (n = 8), popliteofibular ligament (n = 7), biceps tendon (n = 4), iliotibial band (n = 3), and fabellofibular ligament (n = 1). Seventy-five percent of all patients with combined ACL and PLC injuries had bone contusions involving the lateral compartment of the knee. The presence of these contusions strongly correlated with superior popliteomeniscal fascicle lesions (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between injuries to other structures of the PLC and other intra-articular lesions. Missed injuries of the PLC lead to considerable morbidity. The relevance of this study is to highlight that these injuries occur more frequently than previously described and that an appropriate index of suspicion, clinical examination, and MRI are all required to reduce the risk of missed diagnoses. The results of this study support previous suggestions that the rate of concomitant PLC injury in the ACL-deficient knee is under-reported. The rate of combined injuries in

  13. Calcifying fibrous tumor of the pleura: A rare case with an unusual presentation on CT and MRI

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    Lee, Da Hee; Haam, A. Seok Jin; Choi, Seong Eun; Park, Chul Hwan; Kim, Tae Hoon [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Calcifying fibrous tumors (CFTs) are rare benign mesenchymal tumors consisting of hyalinized collagenous fibrotic tissue with a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate and dystrophic calcifications. Radiographic features have seldom been described, and there are no reports describing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Here, we report a pleural CFT in a 47-year-old woman. The tumor mimicked an intrapulmonary lesion on initial computed tomography scans but migrated inferiorly and presented as an extra-pulmonary lesion on MRI. The tumor showed iso-signal intensity on T1-weighted images (WIs), low signal intensity on T2WIs, and slight rim enhancement on enhanced T1WIs.

  14. Oral cysticercosis: A rare case presentation with ultrasound and MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revath Vyas Devulapalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taenia solium , the larvae of pork tapeworm, can cause the parasitic infection known as cysticercosis. It is commonly seen in developing countries. The World Health Organization estimates that over 50,000 deaths per year are caused by neurocysticercosis worldwide. It can occur anywhere in the body. Cysticerci in the muscles generally do not cause symptoms; they present as nodules and can be felt as lumps under the skin or they can present as muscular pseudohypertrophy. The condition rarely involves musculature of the orofacial region and presents a difficulty in clinical diagnosis. Here, we present a case report of a healthy middle-aged female patient who had a painless swelling below the lower lip. The ultrasound examination revealed an intramuscular cysticercosal cyst. The diagnosis was confirmed using magnetic resonance imaging and by histopathology. The case was managed by conservative enucleation of the cyst.

  15. Rare case of primary spinal ependymomatosis occurring in a 26-year-old man: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2009-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of primary spinal ependymomatosis in a young adult man. Multiple primary ependymomatous lesions were seen on magnetic resonance imaging and no anaplasia was identified on the surgical-pathological analysis. The aetio-pathological mechanism and surgical significance of this rare occurrence is discussed.

  16. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...

  17. How rare is too rare to harvest? Management challenges posed by timber species occurring at low densities in the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Schulze; James Grogan; R. Matthew Landis; Edson. Vidal

    2008-01-01

    Tropical forests are characterized by diverse assemblages of plant and animal species compared to temperate forests. Corollary to this general rule is that most tree species, whether valued for timber or not, occur at low densities (

  18. Rare case of primary spinal ependymomatosis occurring in a 26-year-old man: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliaperumal Chandrasekaran

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The authors report a rare case of primary spinal ependymomatosis in a young adult man. Multiple primary ependymomatous lesions were seen on magnetic resonance imaging and no anaplasia was identified on the surgical-pathological analysis. The aetio-pathological mechanism and surgical significance of this rare occurrence is discussed. Case presentation A 26-year-old man of Polish origin presented with a ten-day history of pain in the left leg and lower back. This was followed by difficulty in urinating and a decrease in sensation in both legs. Examination revealed pyramidal signs and mild weakness in both lower limbs. He had early sphincter involvement requiring catheterization. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was normal. However, that of the spinal cord revealed multiple intradural spinal lesions, both intra- and extramedullary, extending from the cervical cord down to the cauda equina roots. T12-L1 laminectomy was performed. Multiple intradural, extra- and intra-medullary tumors were seen. After the operation, the patient deteriorated with a sensory level at T4. Post-operative cranio-spinal radiotherapy was administered but there was no clinical improvement in the lower limbs. Conclusion Primary spinal ependymomatosis is a rare phenomenon involving multiple spinal segments in the absence of a primary intracranial tumor. Radical excision is unrealistic in this condition. Biopsy followed by radiotherapy is the preferred method of treatment.

  19. MRI of the tibioastragalus anticus of Gruber muscle: a rare accessory muscle and normal anatomical variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, Yaron; Amiras, Dimitri [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); St Mary' s Hospital, Imaging Department, QEQM, London (United Kingdom); Mushtaq, Nadeem [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    We present the case of a 31-year-old man who sustained a hyperplantar flexion injury of his right ankle, and was evaluated using computed tomography and MRI to assess for osseous and ligamentous injury. The MRI and CT studies demonstrated a tibioastragalus anticus of Gruber (TAAG) muscle in the lower limb's anterior compartment. To our knowledge, the imaging of this muscle has not been previously described. The TAAG muscle arises from the lower third of the anterolateral tibia and the interosseous membrane. Its tendon passes laterally, deep to the tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis longus tendons, and inserts onto the anterior superolateral neck of the talus in a fan-like manner. Knowledge and recognition of this tendon are important for both diagnostic accuracy and surgical planning, and could potentially be used as a tendon transfer or graft in the appropriate clinical setting. The presence of this accessory muscle should not be confused with a pathological condition. (orig.)

  20. MRI appearances of the anterior fibulocalcaneus muscle: a rare anterior compartment muscle

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    Upadhyay, Bhavin [Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Imaging Department, Essex (United Kingdom); Amiras, Dimitri [Imperial College Health Care NHS Trust, Imaging Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    MRI of a 62-year-old female presenting with ankle pain demonstrated an accessory muscle within the anterior compartment of the lower leg. The muscle originated from the fibula and anterior crural septum. The tendon passed anterior to the lateral malleolus and inserted at the critical angle of Gissane on the calcaneus. This muscle was initially described in the anatomic literature by Lambert and Atsas in 2010. To our knowledge, this is the first time the MRI appearances of this muscle has been described in the radiological literature. Awareness of the fibulocalcaneal muscle is important as it may represent a cause of ankle pain. In addition, the tendon could potentially be harvested for use in reconstructive procedures. (orig.)

  1. Mutations of the Spliceosome Complex Genes Occur In Adult Patients but Are Very Rare In Children with Myeloid Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Moetter, Jessica; Yoshida, Kenichi

    patient was diagnosed at age of 17 years with systemic mastocytosis positive for c-kit D816V mutation, and with associated clonal hematological non-mast cell lineage disease: refractory cytopenia with normal cytogenetics. SCT was also performed with success on this patient. To ensure that the low rate...... in methylation and chromatin regulation (TET2, DNMT3A, ASXL1). Although mutations of these genes are present at high frequency in adult cohorts, they are very rare events in children with myeloid disease. Based on the results from a large-scale whole exome sequencing study of adult patients with myeloid....... In summary, re-sequencing of 3 spliceosome gene hotspots revealed the presence of heterozygous mutations in 2/339 children and 4/19 adults with myeloid disease. The analysis of another gene-hotspot implicated in the MDS whole exome study, SF3B1 K700 is ongoing, but all pediatric cases analyzed to date were...

  2. Evaluation of occurring complications after flow diverter treatment of elastase-induced aneurysm in rabbits using micro-CT and MRI at 9.4 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simgen, Andreas; Ley, Desiree; Muehl-Benninghaus, Ruben; Koerner, Heiko; Reith, Wolfgang; Yilmaz, Umut [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Roth, Christian [Clinic Bremen-Mitte, Department of Neuroradiology, Bremen (Germany); Cattaneo, Giorgio Franco Maria [Acandis GmbH, Pforzheim (Germany); Mueller, Andreas [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Experimental Surgery, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Kim, Yoo-Jin [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Scheller, Bruno [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Homburg, Saar (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Flow diverters are increasingly being used to treat intracranial aneurysms. This study evaluates occurring complications of flow-diverting devices in the treatment of experimental aneurysms, involving the use of micro-CT and small animal MRI at 9.4 T, in correlation to angiographic and histological findings. We previously published two preclinical studies, in which we assessed two different flow diverters in the treatment of elastase-induced aneurysms. Devices have been implanted across the aneurysm neck as well as in the abdominal aorta. From these studies, a total of 65 devices (prototype FD (n = 30) and Derivo embolization device (n = 35)) additionally underwent micro-CT and MRI after angiographic follow-up and before being histologically examined. The different architectures of both devices were precisely comparable due to high-resolution micro-CT imaging. Micro-CT revealed wire fractures in nine cases (30 %) only with the prototype FD. In three cases (10 %), severe wire fractures correlated with an in-stent stenosis due to intimal hyperplasia. Other complications, like distal stent occlusions and post-stent stenosis, were seen in both groups and verified with both imaging techniques. Osseous metaplasia were correlated to calcifications seen with micro-CT. MRI enabled visualization of the position of the implanted devices relative to the aneurysm and revealed incomplete aneurysm neck coverage with the prototype FD in two cases (6.7 %). Micro-CT and 9.4-T MRI are valid to discover and understand occurring complications of flow diverters in the preclinical phase and can serve as evaluation tools to minimize complication rates of endovascular devices in the future. (orig.)

  3. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and radio waves to create pictures of the body. It does not use radiation (x-rays). Single MRI images are called slices. The images can be stored on a computer or printed on film. One exam produces dozens or sometimes hundreds of ...

  4. Are bilateral cavernous hemangiomas of the orbit rare entities? The role of MRI in a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paonessa, Amalia [Department of Neuroradiology, S.Salvatore Hospital, University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy)], E-mail: apaonessa7@hotmail.com; Limbucci, Nicola; Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Neuroradiology, S.Salvatore Hospital, University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Cavernous hemangioma is a benign orbital extraocular vascular lesion consisting of large dilated venous channels with fibrous, well-delineated capsule and hemosiderin deposition. Cavernous hemangioma is considered to be almost always unilateral and bilateral cases have been rarely described. The aim of our study is to evaluate imaging characteristics of cavernous hemangioma and evaluate the prevalence of bilateral cases. We studied 14 patients with cavernous hemangioma of the orbit with surgical confirmation. MRI was performed on a 1.5-T unit before and after contrast agent administration. Each MR examination had been retrospectively evaluated in order to define signal patterns, dimensions, location and other main imaging characteristics. In 3 out of the 14 cases studied (21.4%) bilateral cavernous hemangiomas were found. Thirteen masses appeared isointense on T1, two were hypointense, and two heterogeneous. On T2, 12 were hyperintense, 3 were heterogeneous, 1 isointense, and 1 hypointense. Contrast enhancement was inhomogeneous in 5, homogeneous and intense in 12 cases. The size ranged from 3 mm up to 21 mm (average 14.57). In four patients also CT scan without contrast administration of the orbits was performed. Bilateral cavernous hemangioma appears to be more frequent than as predicted by the literature. In our opinion the main reason of this incongruence is related to technological advances. Our results could also be related to carelessness of radiologists to inspect the other orbit for possible concomitant lesions, and thus invites to major attention in exploring both orbits for eventual bilateral lesions.

  5. [MRI features of neurosyphilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, M; Chadenat, M L; Cordoliani, Y; Kamga-Tallom, R; D'Anglejean, J; Pico, F

    2011-04-01

    Neurosyphilis is rare today. It arises on average 20 years after poorly treated or untreated primary syphilis. Considering the decline in the incidence of syphilitic meningo encephalitis and the little known MRI aspects, we report the case of a patient affected by neurosyphilis occurring after primary syphilis untreated for 25 years. A 65-year-old man presented typical clinical features including general paresis with psychiatric disorders, maniac access, and frontal syndrome as well as tabes dorsalis and Argyll-Robertson pupil. Brain MRI showed bilateral high intensity signals on the T2 weighted sequence located in mesiotemporal, insular, frontal regions. Very few cases of neurosyphilis with detailed brain MRI aspects have been reported. The interest of this case report is first to recall the importance of syphilitic serology in patients with subacute psychiatric disorders and secondly to present rarely reported aspects of the brain MRI. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. MRI findings in children with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction occurring during the 2014 enterovirus D68 outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, J A; Mirsky, D M; Messacar, K; Dominguez, S R; Schreiner, T; Stence, N V

    2015-02-01

    Enterovirus D68 was responsible for widespread outbreaks of respiratory illness throughout the United States in August and September 2014. During this time, several patients presented to our institution with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction. The purpose of this report is to describe the unique imaging findings of this neurologic syndrome occurring during an enterovirus D68 outbreak. Patients meeting a specific case definition of acute flaccid paralysis and/or cranial nerve dysfunction and presenting to our institution during the study period were included. All patients underwent routine MR imaging of the brain and/or spinal cord, including multiplanar T1, T2, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. Eleven patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent MR imaging of the brain and/or spinal cord. Nine patients presented with brain stem lesions, most commonly involving the pontine tegmentum, with bilateral facial nerve enhancement in 1 patient. Ten patients had longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions; those imaged acutely demonstrated involvement of the entire central gray matter, and those imaged subacutely showed lesions restricted to the anterior horn cells. Ventral cauda equina nerve roots enhanced in 4 patients, and ventral cervical nerve roots enhanced in 3, both only in the subacute setting. Patients presenting with acute flaccid paralysis and/or cranial nerve dysfunction during the recent enterovirus D68 outbreak demonstrate unique imaging findings characterized by brain stem and gray matter spinal cord lesions, similar to the neuroimaging findings described in previous outbreaks of viral myelitis such as enterovirus 71 and poliomyelitis. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  7. An alternative to IVU. MRI RARE urography. Une alternative a l'UIV. L'urographie ''RARE'' par IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinee, P.; Stoever, B.; Sigmund, G.; Hauenstein, K.H.; Weyrich, G.; Frankenschmidt, A.; Hennig, J. (Klinikum der Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg (Germany))

    1994-02-01

    The authors describe the RARE sequence technique (Hennig, 1986) and its hydrographic applications including RARE urography. Heavily T2-weighted non-tomographic images of the urinary tract are obtained in less than 30 seconds, without contrast medium or ionizing radiation. The whole urinary tract is visualized on one image with a spatial resolution superior to that of sonography. The semiology of RARE urography is similar to that of the intravenous pyelogram. Silent kidneys are also visualized. (authors).

  8. Two pairs of rare naturally occurring 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2,5-heptanedione derivatives from the red alga Chondria crassicaulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Ai-Hong; Yao, Li-Gong; Guo, Yue-Wei; Mao, Shui-Chun; Wang, Bin

    2017-06-01

    Two pairs of rare naturally occurring racemic lipids, (±)-4,7-dihydroxy-4-methyl-2,5-heptanedione (1), and (±)-7-butoxy-4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2,5-heptanedione (2) were isolated from the red alga Chondria crassicaulis Harv. The structures of the racemic mixtures of 1 and 2 were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic techniques, including 1D and 2D NMR (1H and 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HSQC, and HMBC) as well as mass spectrometry and optical rotation experiments, and by comparison with data for related known analogs. This is the first report of naturally occurring 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2,5-heptanedione derivatives. Antifungal, PTP1B inhibitory, and receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitory activities of these two compounds were investigated. The results showed that compounds 1 and 2 exhibited good selective inhibition against RET tyrosine kinase activity with IC50 values of 9.56 and 8.93 μM, respectively. Compound 1 also displayed moderate antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans (32609), showing a MIC80 value of 32 μg/ml.

  9. Infantile Refsum disease: serial evaluation with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakirer, Sinan; Savas, Mahmut R. [Sisli Etfal Hospital, Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-02-01

    Refsum disease is a rare metabolic disorder, which is characterized by the accumulation of phytanic acid in the blood and tissues, including the brain. A variant of this condition that occurs in young children is called infantile Refsum disease. The MRI findings of symmetrical signal change involving the corticospinal tracts, cerebellar dentate nuclei, and corpus callosum are characteristic. We report the serial MRI findings of a child with this rare metabolic disorder. (orig.)

  10. Disorder-specific characteristics of borderline personality disorder with co-occurring depression and its comparison with major depression: An fMRI study with emotional interference task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechko, Natalia; Kellermann, Thilo; Augustin, Marc; Zvyagintsev, Michael; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are both associated with abnormalities in the regulation of emotion, with BPD being highly comorbid with MDD. Disorder-specific dysfunctions in BPD, however, have hardly been addressed, hence the lack of knowledge pertaining to the specificity of emotion processing deficits and their commonality with MDD. 24 healthy comparison subjects, 21 patients with MDD, and 13 patients with comorbid BPD and MDD (BPD + MDD group) were studied using functional MRI. The subjects were required to perform an emotional interference task that entailed categorizing facial affect while ignoring words that labeled the emotional contents of the external stimuli. Collapsing across emotional face types, we observed that participants with BPD + MDD uniquely displayed a greater involvement of the visual areas and the cerebellum. During emotional conflict processing, on the other hand, the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) appeared to be affected in both patient groups. In comparison to the HC, the MDD group showed differences also in the posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) and the inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Thus, our data indicate dysfunctionality in the neural circuitry responsible for emotional conflict control in both disorders. The enhanced visual cortex activation in BPD + MDD suggests the visual system's hyperresponsiveness to faces at an early perceptual level. Not being associated with co-occurring depression, this effect in BPD + MDD appears to represent specific personality traits such as disturbed reactivity toward emotionally expressive facial stimuli.

  11. The occurence of rare and protected plant species on the peat bog near Lake Bikcze (Łęczyńsko-Włodawskie Lakeland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Pogorzelec

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a pilot field study, conducted in July 2007, designed to make floristic evaluation of the peat bog area adjacent to the western shore of Lake Bikcze (Łęczyńsko-Włodawskie Lakeland. The main aim of the study was to confirm the occurrence of populations of rare and legally protected plant species in this area and to identify, on a preliminary basis, habitat conditions in their stands. The occurrence of populations of the following strictly protected plant species: Betula humilis, Salix lapponum, Salix myrtilloides, Carex limosa, Drosera intermedia, Drosera rotundifolia, Dactylorhiza incarnata; and partially protected species: Menyanthes trifoliata, has been confirmed in the studied peat bog. Both an investigation of abiotic factors, conducted in situ, and an analysis of the species composition of the flora in terms of habitat preferences of particular groups of taxa have shown that the described rare plant species find suitable conditions for their growth and development in the studied peat bog.

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication of MRI believed to be caused by the ... injection minimizes the risk of this very rare complication. There is a very slight risk of an ...

  13. Inventory of Rare or Endangered Non-Vascular Plants and Ferns Occurring in the Floodplain of the Mississippi River between Cairo, Illinois, and St. Paul, Minnesota, and in the Floodplain of the Illinois River between Grafton, Illinois, and Chicago,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-03

    woods. On rotting wood. Occasional. Leptodictyum riparium (Hedw.) Warnst. Along rivers. On banks. Rare. Hygroamblystegium tenax (Hedw.) Jenn. Swamps...Dicranella varia - common Barbula unguiculata - occasional Desmetodon obtusifolius - rare Thelia lescuril - rare 0V 57 Leptodictyum riparium - rare

  14. Disorder-specific characteristics of borderline personality disorder with co-occurring depression and its comparison with major depression: An fMRI study with emotional interference task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Chechko

    2016-01-01

    Thus, our data indicate dysfunctionality in the neural circuitry responsible for emotional conflict control in both disorders. The enhanced visual cortex activation in BPD + MDD suggests the visual system's hyperresponsiveness to faces at an early perceptual level. Not being associated with co-occurring depression, this effect in BPD + MDD appears to represent specific personality traits such as disturbed reactivity toward emotionally expressive facial stimuli.

  15. MRI diagnosis of infantile Alexander disease in a 14 month old African boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlamini, Nondumiso; du Plessis, Vicci

    2016-10-01

    Alexander disease, also known as fibrinoid leukodystrophy, is a rare leukoencephalopathy which occurs due to a mutation in the glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) gene. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven to be highly sensitive in making the diagnosis. Typical MRI findings, in combination with positive genetic blood analysis, confirm the diagnosis.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  17. MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT in a rare case of early (precursor) B-lymphoblastic leukaemia with bone involvement as initial manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistaro, Angelina; La Delfa, Vincenzo; Di Rosa, Gianpaolo; Cogoni, Maurizio; Quartuccio, Natale

    2017-01-01

    A 4-year old girl presenting gait difficulty was referred for spine X-ray and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). MRI showed several diffuse hypointense signals in sacral and lumbar vertebrae. In order to exclude a possible lymphoproliferative disease a 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) was requested. The PET/CT scan confirmed the MRI findings and demonstrated additional findings in the sternum. Therefore, a bone marrow biopsy was performed and a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia - early B type was made.

  18. Whole-brain background-suppressed pCASL MRI with 1D-accelerated 3D RARE Stack-Of-Spirals readout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Vidorreta

    Full Text Available Arterial Spin Labeled (ASL perfusion MRI enables non-invasive, quantitative measurements of tissue perfusion, and has a broad range of applications including brain functional imaging. However, ASL suffers from low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, limiting image resolution. Acquisitions using 3D readouts are optimal for background-suppression of static signals, but can be SAR intensive and typically suffer from through-plane blurring. In this study, we investigated the use of accelerated 3D readouts to obtain whole-brain, high-SNR ASL perfusion maps and reduce SAR deposition. Parallel imaging was implemented along the partition-encoding direction in a pseudo-continuous ASL sequence with background-suppression and 3D RARE Stack-Of-Spirals readout, and its performance was evaluated in three small cohorts. First, both non-accelerated and two-fold accelerated single-shot versions of the sequence were evaluated in healthy volunteers during a motor-photic task, and the performance was compared in terms of temporal SNR, GM-WM contrast, and statistical significance of the detected activation. Secondly, single-shot 1D-accelerated imaging was compared to a two-shot accelerated version to assess benefits of SNR and spatial resolution for applications in which temporal resolution is not paramount. Third, the efficacy of this approach in clinical populations was assessed by applying the single-shot 1D-accelerated version to a larger cohort of elderly volunteers. Accelerated data demonstrated the ability to detect functional activation at the subject level, including cerebellar activity, without loss in the perfusion signal temporal stability and the statistical power of the activations. The use of acceleration also resulted in increased GM-WM contrast, likely due to reduced through-plane partial volume effects, that were further attenuated with the use of two-shot readouts. In a clinical cohort, image quality remained excellent, and expected effects of age and sex

  19. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication of MRI believed to be caused by the ... injection minimizes the risk of this very rare complication. There is a very slight risk of an ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... very rare occasions, a few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the eyes are particularly important because they may move during the scan, possibly causing blindness. Dyes used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is rare. ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is rare. ... who will share the results with you. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ...

  5. Cerebral fat embolism as a rare complication of postgastrectomy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihn, Yon Kwon; Baik, Jun Hyun [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-01

    Cerebral fat embolism syndrome is a rare complication of trauma, and it particularly involves fractures of the long bones. This syndrome may occur in a diverse series of conditions such as diabetes mellitus, acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis, acute fatty cirrhosis, prolonged corticosteroid therapy, lymphography and liposuction. The author reports the CT and MRI findings in a patient with cerebral fat embolism that occurred as a rare complication of postgastrectomy.

  6. Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma Occurring in the Third Ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyeon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA is a rare central nervous system tumor that has been included in the 2007 World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System. Due to its more aggressive behavior, PMA is classified as Grade II neoplasm by the World Health Organization. PMA predominantly affects the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region and occurs in children (mean age of occurrence = 10 months. We report a case of a 24-year-old man who presented with headache, nausea, and vomiting. Brain CT and MRI revealed a mass occupying only the third ventricle. We performed partial resection. Histological findings, including monophasic growth with a myxoid background, and absence of Rosenthal fibers or eosinophilic granular bodies, as well as the strong positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein were consistent with PMA.

  7. Inventory of Rare of Endangered Vascular Plants Occurring in the Floodplain of the Mississippi River between Cairo, Illinois, and St. Paul, Minnesota, and in the Floodplain of the Illinois River between Grafton, Illinois, and Chicago,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Family Convolvulaceae Status: Rare (Illinois, Wisconsin). This Dodder grows primarily over species of Ambrosia and Iva in low open woods, along the...adventive floodplain species is appended. P1 r 4 Sagittaria calycina Engelm. Arrowhead Family Alismataceae Status: Not rare nor endangered. This usually...spongia (Bosc) Steud. Frogbit Family Hydrocharitaceae Status: Rare (Illinois). This is a Coastal Plain species which ranges from Texas to Florida and

  8. Shoulder MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Shoulder Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder ... limitations of MRI of the shoulder? What is MRI of the shoulder? MRI of the shoulder provides ...

  9. Knee MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Knee Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee ... of a knee MRI? What is a Knee MRI? MRI of the knee provides detailed images of ...

  10. Desmoplastic fibroma of bone in a toe: Radiographic and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Kim, Seon Jeong; Kim Ji Yeon; Ryu, Ji Hwa [Inje University, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Hye Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Busan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University, Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Desmoplastic fibroma is a rare benign primary bone tumor that is histologically similar to the soft tissue desmoid tumor. It most often involves the mandible, large long bone or iliac bone. Desmoplastic fibroma in a toe has been extremely rarely reported. Authors report a rare case of desmoplastic fibroma of bone occurring in the distal phalanx of a foot, with descriptions of the radiographic and MRI findings, correlation of the radiologic and pathologic findings, and discussion on the differential diagnosis of the tumor.

  11. Evolution of MRI abnormalities in paediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yu Yi M; van Pelt, E Daniëlle; Ketelslegers, Immy A; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Neuteboom, Rinze F

    2017-03-01

    Acute disseminating encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease affecting the central nervous system and mainly occurs in young children. Children who initially presented with ADEM can be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in case new non-encephalopathic clinical symptoms occur with new lesions on MRI at least three months after onset of ADEM. We aim to study the timing of MRI abnormalities related to the evolution of clinical symptoms in our Dutch paediatric ADEM cohort. The Dutch database for acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) was screened for children under age eighteen fulfilling the international consensus diagnostic criteria for ADEM. Children were eligible when the first MRI was performed within the first three months after onset of clinical symptoms and at least one brain follow-up MRI was available for evaluation. Forty-two children with ADEM were included (median age four years two months). All available MRIs and medical records were assessed and categorised as 'improved', 'deteriorated' and 'unchanged'. We found that during clinical recovery, new lesions and enlargement of existing MRI lesions occurred in the first three months in about 50% of the performed MRIs. In contrast, this was rarely seen more than three months after first onset of ADEM. We recommend to perform a brain MRI as a reference scan three months after onset. Follow-up imaging should be compared with this scan in order to prevent an incorrect diagnosis of MS after ADEM. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour: CT and MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Sperandio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST is extremely rare malignancy in the general population, occurring more frequently in patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. In the literature five cases of MPNST arising from the parapharyngeal space (PPS in patients without neurofibromatosis have been reported. We report imaging techniques in a patient with MPNST in the PPS, who had neither a family history nor sign of NF1. Computed tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were performed for a correct therapeutic planning. CT and MRI findings were correlated with hystopathological diagnosis.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... very rare occasions, a few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the eyes are particularly important because they may move during the scan, possibly causing blindness. Dyes used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is rare. ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is rare. ... who will share the results with you. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ...

  17. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  18. MRI Findings In Dengue Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf V.V

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological manifestations are rare in dengue fever. Two cases with encephalopathy and systemic features of dengue fever with abnormal CSF and MR imaging are reported. Striking MRI finding was bilateral symmetrical thalamic lesions similar to those reported in Japanese encephalitis. This report highlights that MRI findings can be similar in dengue and Japanese encephalitis.

  19. The MRI findings of a de Garengeot hernia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2012-03-01

    The presence of the appendix within a femoral hernia is rare. It was first described by the French surgeon Jacques Croissant de Garengeot in 1731. This phenomenon accounts for 0.8-1% of all femoral hernias. Acute appendicitis occurring within a femoral hernia is even rarer and is difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. This type of hernia is termed a de Garengeot hernia. The ultrasonographic and CT imaging features of de Garengeot hernias have been described previously. We report a case of a 57-year-old female who presented with a painful right-sided groin mass. She underwent MRI of the inguinal region, which successfully diagnosed this rare hernia pre-operatively. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a de Garengeot hernia diagnosed using MRI.

  20. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  1. Rheumatoid nodule of the foot: MRI appearances mimicking an indeterminate soft tissue mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, T.G.; Linares, R. [Department of Radiology, David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center, Travis AFB, CA (United States); Su, A. [Department of Orthopedics, David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center, 101 Bodin Circle, Travis AFB, CA 94535 (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules occur commonly in advanced cases of rheumatoid arthritis, but only rarely appear in the feet. We present a case of a subcutaneous rheumatoid nodule arising in the heel pad of a 68-year-old man with a long history of rheumatoid arthritis, along with a review of the literature. The appearance of the mass on MRI is illustrated and correlated with the histologic findings. The MRI appearance of a subcutaneous rheumatoid nodule is that of a nonspecific ill-defined mass with long T1- and long T2-relaxation times. A differential diagnosis for similar appearing masses is offered. (orig.) With 2 figs., 14 refs.

  2. Rare Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    1998-04-01

    Fifty years after the discovery of the strange quark and the first search for lepton flavor violation in muon decay, extraordinary experimental progress continues to be made on measurements and searches for rare kaon and muon decays. Several important new rare kaon decay channels, including the second order weak flavor-changing-neutral-current process K^+arrowπ^+ν\\overlineν, have been reported recently, and further significant advances are anticipated. Although only null results have been found so far in the quest for lepton flavor violation, there are promising prospects for additional gains in sensitivity of orders of magnitude on such processes as μ→ e γ, nuclear μ → e conversion, K^0_Larrowμ e and Karrowπμ^+e^-. In this presentation, the status of experiments on selected rare decays of kaons and muons will be reviewed.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very rare cases, people whose kidneys don't work well can have problems after getting contrast solution. Getting Your Results You won't get MRI results right away. A radiologist (a doctor trained ...

  4. MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Rho, Eun Jin [Kangnam General Hospital Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare syndrom characterized by developmental delay, acrocyanosis, petechiae, chronic diarrhea, and ethylmalonic, lactic, and methylsuccinic aciduria. We report the MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy including previously unreported intracranial hematoma.

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  6. MRI of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Prostate Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate ... limitations of MRI of the Prostate? What is MRI of the Prostate? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  7. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Breast Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast ... limitations of MRI of the Breast? What is MRI of the Breast? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest ...

  9. Macrodystrophia lipomatosa: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil G. Kachewar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrodystrophia lipomatosa is a rare congenital nonhereditary mesenchymal hamartomatous malformation resulting in localized gigantism of parts of extremities that manifests clinically as macrodactyly or megalodactyly. Radiological and Pathological hallmark is the disproportionate fibroadipose tissue proliferation in subcutaneous tissue, nerve sheaths, and periosteum that leads to soft tissue and bony enlargement. As imaging is the key to early diagnosis, findings on various modalities like plain radiographs, CT scan and MRI are highlighted here.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not recommended for ... Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  11. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard....... MRI was done using a Philips Achieva 1.5 T system and CT was performed using a Siemens Somatom system. Axial and sagittal slices were acquired using standard T1w and T2w MRI sequences, and visualization was made using the Mistar software (Apollo Imaging Technology, Melbourne, Australia). Images were...

  12. Neurolipoma: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banyameen Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A lipoma is a common type of benign tumor and a neurolipoma is one of its variants. It is also referred to as neural fibrolipoma, fibrolipomatous hamartoma, intramural lipoma, and lipomatosis of nerve. The most common sites of presentation are the volar aspects of the hands, wrists, and forearms of young persons. The median nerve is most commonly involved. Lower-extremity cases are extremely rare. We report here a rare case involving the median nerve without any skeletal deformity occurring in a male patient. It usually presents with swelling associated with pain and tenderness.

  13. Rare carpometacarpal dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefere, M; Dallaudière, B; Omoumi, P; Cyteval, C; Larbi, A

    2016-10-01

    Posttraumatic carpal and carpometacarpal dislocations represent a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from high-energy wrist trauma. Perilunate injury is the most common and best-known manifestation of carpal dislocation, typically occurring after hyperextension trauma. Other forms are very rare and have different causative mechanisms. Carpometacarpal (CMC) dislocations are also uncommon and may affect isolated or multiple CMC joints. These lesions are prone to wrist instability if not treated promptly. The aim of this article is to provide a systematic radiologic approach to the evaluation of wrist injury and to present two acute cases of rare CMC dislocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Naturally occurring hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The study of naturally occurring hazardous materials (NOHMs) was conceived as a proactive response to assure that the Oregon : Department of Transportation (ODOT) maintenance and construction activities take the presence of NOHMs into account. The la...

  15. MRI findings of intraspinal extradural paragonimiasis granuloma in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yong; Cai, Jinhua

    2012-10-01

    Spinal paragonimiasis is a rare entity. We present a unique case of paragonimiasis involving the extradural space. MR imaging of the thoracic spine showed a bean-shaped extradural mass that extended through the left intervertebral foramen to paravertebral thickened pleura. This finding offers imaging evidence to support the theory that larvae of Paragonimus migrate through perivascular or perineural tissues into the extradural space. Another MRI finding was the hemorrhagic foci in the mass, which occurs frequently in the intracranial paragonimiasis and could also be a feature of the intraspinal paragonimiasis granuloma.

  16. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  17. Cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... interfere with the MRI machine or cause skin burns. Tattoos may cause a problem because older tattoo ...

  18. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... interfere with the MRI machine or cause skin burns. Tattoos may cause a problem because older tattoo ...

  19. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work ... test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause a piece ...

  20. Spindle Cell Liposarcoma – A Rare Tumour Occurring at a Rare Site?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuna Mallya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipomatous tumours are the most common type of soft tissue neoplasms with liposarcomas being the most common soft tissue sarcomas. Spindle cell liposarcoma is the most recent addition to this group and is characterized by a lipocytic and spindled component both showing atypia. Lipoblasts with their characteristic scalloped nuclei are found in the spindled areas. These tumours show CD34 positivity. Arising in the head and neck and soft tissues of the extremities, this tumour was described for the first time in 1994. Very few cases are reported in the literature. The present case emphasizes the fact that this tumour should be considered as a possible diagnosis in tissues histologically showing a good admixture of adipocytic and spindled cells.

  1. Quadrilateral space syndrome: incidence of imaging findings in a population referred for MRI of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, R Lee; Helms, Clyde

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of MRI findings suggesting quadrilateral space syndrome in a population referred for shoulder MRI. Focal teres minor atrophy or abnormal signal suggesting quadrilateral space syndrome is an uncommon, although not rare, finding on MRI of the shoulder in our referral population and is rarely an isolated abnormality.

  2. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  3. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  4. Breast MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... radiologist) see some areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  5. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  6. CASE REPORT Macrodystrophia lipomatosa – MR imaging of a rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adipose tissue on .... phalanges and affected limbs.2 Described as a rare congenital condition, it is classified with other phakomatoses, such as ... MRI can also well demonstrate fatty infiltration of muscles, bony overgrowth and cortical thickening.

  7. MRI of intramedullary cavernous haemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turjman, F. [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Neurologique, 69 Lyon (France); Joly, D. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bicetre, 94 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Monnet, O. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bicetre, 94 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Faure, C. [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Neurologique, 69 Lyon (France); Doyon, D. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bicetre, 94 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Froment, J.C. [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Neurologique, 69 Lyon (France)

    1995-05-01

    We reviewed 11 cases of intramedullary cavernous haemangiomas (IMCH) studied by MRI, to assess its diagnostic value in these lesions. Follow-up MRI was obtained in five patients 7 days-2 years following the initial study. In one case a postoperative examination was obtained. The diagnosis was pathologically proven in ten cases, and supported in the last by a family and personal history of cavernous haemangiomas. A reticulate appearance with areas of mixed signal intensity in both T1- and T2-weighted images was the most common finding. Homogeneous high, low or intermediate signal intensity was each found in one case. Two small lesions gave low signal. A rim of low signal was less common than in cerebral cavernous haemangiomas. In one case, the brain showed more than 20 lesions with the MRI appearances of cavernous haemangiomas. In two of five patients, serial preoperative MRI showed progressive disappearance of high-signal areas on both T1- and T2-weighted images. To find a haemorrhagic intramedullary lesion on MRI is not rare. Although the appearances are not pathognomonic, an IMCH can be suggested. We suggest that the following characteristics may help: (1) a personal and/or family history of cavernous haemangiomas; (2) typical MRI appearances of mixed acute, subacute and chronic haemorrhage; (3) a tendency for signal intensity to decrease on follow-up; (4) normal spinal angiography; and (5) associated brain lesions. (orig.)

  8. Atrial tumors in cardiac MRI; Vorhoftumoren in der kardialen MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Nils; Schoth, F.; Guenther, R.W.; Krombach, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany); Balzer, J.C.; Neizel, M.; Kuehl, H. [Klinik fuer Kardiologie, Pneumologie und Angiologie, Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for the diagnosis of cardiac masses. Various cardiac tumors are predisposed to occurring in atrial structures. The aim of this review article is the description of atrial tumors and their morphological features in MRI. In general, cardiac tumors are rare: approximately 0.001-0.03% in autopsy studies. About 75% of them are benign. The most common cardiac tumor is the myxoma. They are predisposed to occur in the atria and show a characteristically strong hyperintense signal on T2-wieghted images in MRI. In other sequences a heterogeneous pattern reflects its variable histological appearance. Lipomas exhibit a signal behavior identical to fatty tissue with a typical passive movement in cine imaging. Fibroelastomas are the most common tumors of the cardiac valves. Consisting of avascular fibrous tissue, they often present with hypointense signal intensities. Thrombi attached to their surface can cause severe emboli even in small tumors. Amongst primary cardiac malignancies, sarcomas are most common and favor the atria. Secondary malignancies of the heart are far more common than primary ones (20-40 times). In case of known malignancies, approximately 10% of patients develop cardiac metastasis at the end of their disease. Lymphogenic metastases favor the pericardium, while hematogenic spread prefers the myocardium. Since they are not real atrial tumors, thrombi and anatomical structures of the atria have to be differentiated from other pathologies. (orig.)

  9. Naturally occurring cardiac glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D J; Gillies, A D; Hinds, J A; Duffy, P

    1986-05-12

    Cardiac glycoside poisoning from the ingestion of plants, particularly of oleanders, occurs with reasonable frequency in tropical and subtropical areas. We have assessed a variety of plant specimens for their cardiac glycoside content by means of radioimmunoassays with antibodies that differ in their specificity for cardiac glycosides. Significant amounts of immunoreactive cardiac glycoside were found to be present in the ornamental shrubs: yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana); oleander (Nerium oleander); wintersweet (Carissa spectabilis); bushman's poison (Carissa acokanthera); sea-mango (Cerbera manghas); and frangipani (Plumeria rubra); and in the milkweeds: redheaded cotton-bush (Asclepias curassavica); balloon cotton (Asclepias fruiticosa); king's crown (Calotropis procera); and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandifolia). The venom gland of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) also contained large quantities of cardiac glycosides. The competitive immunoassay method permits the rapid screening of specimens that are suspected to contain cardiac glycosides. Awareness of the existence of these plant and animal toxins and their dangers allows them to be avoided and poisoning prevented. The method is also useful for the confirmation of the presence of cardiac glycosides in serum in cases of poisoning.

  10. MRI differentiates femoral condylar ossification evolution from osteochondritis dissecans. A new sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jans, Lennart B.O.; Huysse, Wouter C.; Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Jaremko, Jacob L.; Ditchfield, Michael [University of Melbourne Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Melbourne, Vic (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    To determine if MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the femoral condyles in children can differentiate variations in ossification from osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). MRI studies of the knee of 315 patients demonstrated ossification defects of the femoral condyles involving the subchondral bone plate. MRI features categorized the defects as ossification variability (N = 150) or OCD (N = 165). Both groups were compared for age, residual physeal cartilage, site, configuration, 'lesion angle' and associated findings. (a) Ossification variability did not occur in girls >10 year. and boys >13 year., OCD did not occur in children younger than 8 year. (b) Ossification variability was not seen in patients with 10% or less residual physeal cartilage, OCD was rare in patients with 30% or greater residual physeal cartilage. (c) Ossification variability was located in the posterior third of the femoral condyle, OCD occurred most commonly in the middle third. (d) Intracondylar extension was seen in OCD and not in ossification variability. (e) Perilesional oedema was very common with OCD and absent with ossification variability. (f) Lesion angle <105 was a feature of ossification variability. MRI may help differentiate variations in ossification of the femoral condyles from OCD. (orig.)

  11. MRI of vulvar Crohn disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Deepa; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Mahani, Maryam Ghadimi; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, F3503, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Adler, Jeremy [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Crohn disease is a chronic granulomatous inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects the gastrointestinal tract, particularly the distal small bowel and colon. While certain extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease are relatively common and well-known, others, such as metastatic cutaneous involvement, are quite rare and may be difficult to recognize, particularly in the pediatric population. This case report illustrates the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of vulvar region cutaneous Crohn disease in an 11-year-old girl. (orig.)

  12. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiriac, L.B.; Trandafir, D.L. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Turcu, R.V.F. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Todea, M. [Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Simon, S., E-mail: simons@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Dysprosium containing silica microparticles obtained by freeze and spray drying. • Higher structural units interconnection achieved in freeze vs. spray dried samples. • Dy occurance on the outermost layer of the microparticles evidenced by XPS. • Enhanced MRI contrast observed for freeze dried samples with 5% mol Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Abstract: The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T{sub 1} and RARE-T{sub 2} protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T{sub 2}-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  13. A Rare Syndrome: Balint Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülnur Tekgöl Uzuner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Balint’s syndrome is a rare disorder affecting the ability to perceive the visual field as a whole, most commonly following damage to the bilateral occipital and parietal regions. This syndrome has three components as simultanagnosia, optic ataxia, and oculomotor apraxia. Simultanagnosia play a key role in this syndrome. Sixty-two years old male patient who applied the blindness symptom has been evaluated in outpatient clinic. We observed that there are some deficits in perceive of visual field rather than blindness in neurologic examination of the patient. He had simultanagnosia, optic ataxia and oculomotor apraxia. There are multiple infarcts in bilaterally occipital and parietal regions in the patient’s cerebral MRI. In this case, we have present a rare disorder of the Balint’s syndrome.

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  15. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is performed ...

  1. MRI of the axial skeletal manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, D.S.; Forbat, S.M.; Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com

    2004-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable tool in the imaging and assessment of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. MRI can demonstrate the acute and chronic changes of sacroiliitis, osteitis, discovertebral lesions, disc calcifications and ossification and arthopathic lesions, which characterize the disease, as well as the complications, which include fracture and the rare cauda equina syndrome. This article reviews the range of MRI findings commonly seen within the axial skeleton in patients with this condition.

  2. Acute calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris associated with intraosseous involvement: a case report with serial CT and MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Kim, Jong Pil

    2013-11-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is a well-known condition, but it is rare in the rectus femoris origin. Mostly reported cases were occurred in the reflected head of the rectus femoris, and only few cases were in the direct head of the rectus femoris. Intraosseous marrow involvement of calcific tendinitis is a more rare condition; it often goes misdiagnosed as an infection or a neoplasm. We report a rare, unusual case of acute calcific tendinitis of the direct head of the rectus femoris associated with intraosseous marrow involvement of calcification in anterior inferior iliac spine with serial CT and MRI findings. Aggressive osseous change may occur in acute calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris as in this case which should be made an appropriate diagnosis to avoid unnecessary investigation and overtreatment like a surgery.

  3. MRI in non ketotic hyperglycaemia with hemichorea hemiballismus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Bhatia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hemichorea hemiballismus is a rare manifestation seen in diabetic patients. MRI in these patients shows characteristic findings with T1w hyperintensity in striatum. We present a case of 60 year old female showing classical clinical and MRI features.

  4. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: brain MRI and MR spectroscopy manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolli, Valentina; Soto Ares, Gustavo; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre [Roger Salengro Hospital, CHRU, Neuroradiology Department, Lille (France); Abou Chahla, Wadih [Jeanne de Flandre Hospital, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Department, Lille (France); Jissendi-Tchofo, Patrice [University Hospital Saint-Pierre, Radiology Department - Pediatric Neuroradiology Section, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-08-15

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, and neurological dysfunction. We present the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings obtained during the accelerated phase of the disorder in an 8-year-old. The brain MRI manifestations at recurrences 15 months and 24 months later are reported as well. (orig.)

  5. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  6. Acetabular stress fractures in military endurance athletes and recruits: incidence and MRI and scintigraphic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.R. [Portsmouth Naval Medical Center, Radiology Department, Charette Health Care Center, Portsmouth, VA (United States); Puckett, M.L.; Shin, A.Y.; Gorman, J.D. [Naval Medical Center San Diego, Radiology Department, San Diego, CA (United States); Denison, G. [US Naval Hospital Guam (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and the MRI and scintigraphic appearance of acetabular stress (fatigue) fractures in military endurance athletes and recruits. Design and patients: One hundred and seventy-eight active duty military endurance trainees with a history of activity-related hip pain were evaluated by both MRI and bone scan over a 2-year period. Patients in the study ranged in age from 17 to 45 years. They had hip pain related to activity and had plain radiographs of the hip and pelvis that were interpreted as normal or equivocal. The study was originally designed to evaluate the MRI and scintigraphic appearance of femoral neck stress fractures. Patients had scintigraphy and a limited MRI examination (coronal imaging only) within 48 h of the bone scan. Twelve patients demonstrated imaging findings compatible with acetabular stress fractures. Results: Stress fractures are common in endurance athletes and in military populations; however, stress fracture of the acetabulum is uncommon. Twelve of 178 patients (6.7%) in our study had imaging findings consistent with acetabular stress fractures. Two patterns were identified. Seven of the 12 (58%) patients had acetabular roof stress fractures. In this group, two cases of bilateral acetabular roof stress fractures were identified, one with a synchronous tensile sided femoral neck stress fracture. The remaining five of 12 (42%) patients had anterior column stress fractures, rarely occurring in isolation, and almost always occurring with inferior pubic ramus stress fracture (4 of 5, or 80%). One case of bilateral anterior column stress fractures was identified without additional sites of injury. Conclusions: Stress fractures are commonplace in military populations, especially endurance trainees. Acetabular stress fractures are rare and therefore unrecognized, but do occur and may be a cause for activity-related hip pain in a small percentage of military endurance athletes and recruits. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  9. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Musculoskeletal Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... the limitations of a Musculoskeletal MRI? What is MRI of the Musculoskeletal System? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine ... limitations of MRI of the Spine? What is MRI of the Spine? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  11. [Safety considerations to avoid current-induced skin burns in MRI procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, M V; Metzner, R; Brix, G; van Kaick, G

    1998-09-01

    The safety aspects of radiological methods continue to evolve. In this paper we report on two cases of skin burns in MRI caused by induced electrical current. A second- and a third-degree skin burn occurred during imaging in a 1.5 T system. The electromagnetic radiofrequency field inadvertently led to electrical currents caused by a conducting loop through the extremities and trunk. Skin burns induced by electrical current may occur in extremely rare cases even with standard MR imaging protocols operating within all current safety guidelines by inadvertently forming a closed conducting loop. By avoiding focal skin to skin contact of the extremities, this extremely rare adverse event can be avoided.

  12. Brucellosis of the pituitary region: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, E.; Erden, I.; Akyar, S. [Department of Radiology, University of Ankara (Turkey)

    1998-06-01

    We report a rare case of neurobrucellosis in a 25-year-old woman with visual impairment, bilateral hearing loss, hyperprolactinaemia and meningitis. MRI revealed a sellar and suprasellar mass with enlargement of the optic chiasm. (orig.) With 1 fig., 6 refs.

  13. A rare case of ovarian splenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheonea, Ioana Andreea; Săndulescu, Sarmis Marian; Firulescu, Sineta Cristina; Tudoraşcu, Diana Rodica; Ciobanu, Mircea Ovidiu; Badea, Oana; Gheonea, Dan IonuŢ; Săndulescu, Daniela Larisa

    2016-01-01

    Splenosis is a very rare entity that often appears following a traumatic rupture of the spleen or after splenectomy and represents heterotopic transplantation of splenic tissue. The ovary is reported as an atypical and rare localization. We report a case of a middle-aged woman, which presented with a left adnexal mass. Transvaginal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and high-field 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the left adnexal mass. Laparoscopy was performed, and histological and immunohistochemical examination revealed that resected mass was splenic tissue.

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful ... Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  15. Functional MRI and Outcome in Traumatic Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacino, Joseph T.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial-spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI and ASL and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  16. [Rare differential diagnosis on suspected liver tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkel, B; Walgenbach-Brünagel, G; Risse, J H; Pauleit, D O

    2009-05-01

    This case report describes a 77-year old woman with a leiomyosarcoma of subhepatic inferior caval vein. The presented symptom was unspecific abdominal pain. Ultrasound and CT suggested a primary liver tumor. MRI revealed retroperitoneal location of the neoplasm. The tumor was resected completely and ICV was replaced by a PTF-graft. Vascular leiomyosarcoma is a rare tumor entity, which often is diagnosed in advanced stage. Depending on location it can be mistaken for neoplasms of other organs.

  17. MRI Findings of Synovial Lipoma Arborescens of the Hip: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Chan Sub; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Jai Hyung; Yi, Sang Yeop [Myoungji Hospital, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Il [Shinchon Severance Hospital, Yonsei University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Lipoma arborescens is a rare intra-articular lesion consisting of villous lipomatous proliferation of the synovium that tends to occur in the knee joint, especially in the suprapatellar pouch. The lesion has been observed in other locations, including the glenohumeral joint, subdeltoid bursa, hip, and elbow. We report a case of a lipoma arborescens of a unilateral hip joint in a 34-year-old man. MRI and a whole body bone scan were performed. In addition, a surgical synovectomy was performed and microscopic examination of the tumor revealed multiple variable-sized villous masses composed of mature fat tissue and lined by synovial cells which confirmed the diagnosis of lipoma arborescens

  18. Correction For Pulse Height Variability Reduces Physiological Noise in Functional MRI When Studying Spontaneous Brain Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houdt, P.J.; Ossenblok, P.P.W.; Boon, P.A.J.M.; Leijten, F.S.S.; Velis, D.N.; Stam, C.J.; de Munck, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    EEG correlated functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) allows the delineation of the areas corresponding to spontaneous brain activity, such as epileptiform spikes or alpha rhythm. A major problem of fMRI analysis in general is that spurious correlations may occur because fMRI signals are not only correlated with

  19. Incidental MRI Findings of Acute Gadolinium Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Amene

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old girl with a remote history of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma developed acute onset flushing, tachycardia and shortness of breath immediately following administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine during routine brain MRI that subsided following intravenous diphenhydramine. A retrospective review of the MRI results revealed multiple areas of contrast enhancement of the face, consistent with observed urticaria. The patient received pretreatment medications prior to subsequent gadolinium injections without incident. Gadolinium allergy is extremely rare and has been reported in less than 0.1% of injections. However, in patients who undergo anesthesia for MRI studies, similar subtle extracranial MRI findings should alert the neuroradiologist to possible gadolinium allergy that may warrant premedication prior to future injections.

  20. Incidental MRI Findings of Acute Gadolinium Hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amene, C.; Yeh-Nayre, L.A.; Dory, C.E.; Crawford, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a remote history of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma developed acute onset flushing, tachycardia and shortness of breath immediately following administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine during routine brain MRI that subsided following intravenous diphenhydramine. A retrospective review of the MRI results revealed multiple areas of contrast enhancement of the face, consistent with observed urticaria. The patient received pretreatment medications prior to subsequent gadolinium injections without incident. Gadolinium allergy is extremely rare and has been reported in less than 0.1% of injections. However, in patients who undergo anesthesia for MRI studies, similar subtle extracranial MRI findings should alert the neuroradiologist to possible gadolinium allergy that may warrant premedication prior to future injections. PMID:22649344

  1. MRI of Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galluzzi, P.; Filosomi, G.; Vallone, I.M.; Venturi, C. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Policlinico ' ' Le Scotte' ' , Siena (Italy); Bardelli, A.M. [Dept. of Ophthalmological Sciences, Unit of Paediatric Ophthalmology, University of Siena (Italy)

    1999-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD) is a rare diffuse neurodegenerative disorder characterised by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and a wide variety of abnormalities of the central nervous system, urinary tract and endocrine glands. It may be familial or sporadic. Reported features on MRI of the brain are absence of the physiological high signal of the posterior lobe of the pituitary, shrinkage of optic nerves, chiasm and tracts, atrophy of the hypothalamic region, brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex. We report a 12-year-old girl with a 5-year history without brain stem, cerebellar or cerebral atrophy. MRI showed an unusual feature: a focus of high signal on PD- and T2-weighted images in the right substantia nigra. This is consistent with previously reported neuropathological post-mortem studies, but has never been reported in vivo. (orig.)

  2. MRI findings of spinal angiomyolipoma: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang A; Kim, Myung Soon; Jung, Soon Hee [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju Severance Christian Hospital, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Young Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Spinal angiomyolipoma (AML) is a rare disease. It is often reviewed with spinal angiolipoma. Both are composed of vascular and mature adipose elements. However, only AML contains broader array of mesenchymal component. They are accounting for 0.14% to 1.2% of spinal tumors. They appear as fat containing hypervascular tumor located at epidural space of thoracic spine. Spinal AML is more frequently infiltrative and often occurs more ventrally than angiolipoma. Previous studies have employed conventional radiograph, myelogram, and CT scan for spinal AML studies. Recently, MRI has been used for spinal AML in a few studies. Here, we describe a case of typical thoracic spinal AML with a review of its MRI findings and other differential diagnosis for epidural spinal mass with similar characteristics.

  3. Mucinous carcinoma occurring in the male breast

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Mitsuaki; UMEDA, TOMOKO; KAWAI, YUKI; MORI, Tsuyoshi; Kubota, Yoshihiro; ABE, Hajime; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Tani, Tohru; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Male breast carcinoma is an uncommon neoplasm, accounting for 0.6% of all breast carcinomas. Invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type is the most common type of male breast carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma occurring in the male breast is extremely rare. In the present study, we report a case of mucinous carcinoma of the male breast and discuss the clinicopathological features of this type of tumor. A 63-year-old Japanese male presented with a gradually enlarged nodule in the right breast...

  4. Infant with nasolacrimal sinonasal myxoma: Difusion MRI features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Gross Kelly, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the imaging features of a rare sinonasal myxoma situated over the right nasolacrimal duct in a 5-month-old male. We emphasize the importance of including sinonasal myxomas in the list of differential diagnostic possibilities when encountering a nasolacrimal gland mass in an infant, and describe the CT and MRI characteristics of this rare entity.

  5. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyesh Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS. As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  6. Acne Rosacea With Rare Eye Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R R

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available One 55 year old army officer had all 3 variants of acane rosacea occurring simultaneously for 9 years. Associated rare, serious complications as prominent rosacea keratitis, deterioration of vision, rhinophyma and lymphoedema were seen. We are reporting the present case as the above combination is rare.

  7. Queueing networks : Rare events and fast simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miretskiy, D.I.

    2009-01-01

    This monograph focuses on rare events. Even though they are extremely unlikely, they can still occur and then could have significant consequences. We mainly consider rare events in queueing networks. More precisely, we are interested in the probability of collecting some large number of jobs in the

  8. Synthetic MRI for visualization of quantitative MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging technique that is used in hospitals worldwide. The images are acquired through the use of an MRI scanner and the clinical information is provided through the image contrast, which is based on the magnetic properties in biological tissue. By altering the scanner settings, images with different contrast properties can be obtained. Conventional MRI is a qualitative imaging technique and no absolute measurements are performed. At Center for Medical I...

  9. A rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus endophthalmitis is a devastating inflammatory condition of the intraocular cavities that may result in irreparable loss of vision and rapid destruction of the eye. Almost all cases in the literature have shown an identified source causing aspergillus endophthalmitis as a result of direct extension of disease. We present a rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis. A 72-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus, congenital Hirschsprung disease, and recent culture-positive candida pyelonephritis with hydronephrosis status post-surgical stent placement presented with difficulty opening her eyes. She complained of decreased vision (20/200 with pain and redness in both eyes – right worse then left. Examination demonstrated multiple white fungal balls in both retinas consistent with bilateral fungal endophthalmitis. Bilateral vitreous taps for cultures and staining were performed. Patient was given intravitreal injections of amphotericin B, vancomycin, ceftazidime, and started on oral fluconazole. Patient was scheduled for vitrectomy to decrease organism burden and to remove loculated areas of infection that would not respond to systemic antifungal agents. Four weeks after initial presentation, the fungal cultures revealed mold growth consistent with aspergillus. Patient was subsequently started on voriconazole and fluconazole was discontinued due to poor efficacy against aspergillus. Further workup was conducted to evaluate for the source of infection and seeding. Transthoracic cardiogram was unremarkable for any vegetation or valvular abnormalities. MRI of the orbits and sinuses did not reveal any mass lesions or bony destruction. CT of the chest was unremarkable for infection. Aspergillus endophthalmitis may occur because of one of these several mechanisms: hematogenous dissemination, direct inoculation by trauma, and contamination during surgery. Our patient's cause of bilateral endophthalmitis was through an

  10. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemin, C. [Dept. of Radiology, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M. [Div. of Neuro-ophthalmology, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mullaney, P. [Division of Pediatrics, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2000-02-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  12. Abdominal MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... may not fit into the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your physician for ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a very small chance of irritation of your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items ... and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... eyes or other reactions. If you experience allergic symptoms, notify the technologist. A radiologist or other physician ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ... the technologist or nurse will monitor your vital signs to minimize this risk. Although the strong magnetic ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) before being safe for MRI ... devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... MRI. For more information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ...

  15. Safety of routine early MRI in preterm infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Dudink, Jeroen [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Raets, Marlou M.A.; Govaert, Paul [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Starre, Cynthia van der [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Intensive Care, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lequin, Maarten H. [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    Cerebral MRI performed on preterm infants at term-equivalent 30 weeks' gestational age (GA) is increasingly performed as part of standard clinical care. We evaluated safety of these early MRI procedures. We retrospectively collected data on patient safety of preterm infants who underwent early MRI scans. Data were collected at fixed times before and after the MRI scan. MRI procedures were carried out according to a comprehensive guideline. A total of 52 infants underwent an MRI scan at 30 weeks' GA. Although no serious adverse events occurred and vital parameters remained stable during the procedure, minor adverse events were encountered in 26 infants (50%). The MRI was terminated in three infants (5.8%) because of respiratory instability. Increased respiratory support within 24 h after the MRI was necessary for 12 infants (23.1%) and was significantly associated with GA, birth weight and the mode of respiratory support. Hypothermia (core temperature < 36 C) occurred in nine infants (17.3%). Temperature dropped significantly after the MRI scan. Minor adverse events after MRI procedures at 30 weeks GA were common and should not be underestimated. A dedicated and comprehensive guideline for MRI procedures in preterm infants is essential. (orig.)

  16. fMRI Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Christensen, Mark Schram; Madsen, Kristoffer M.

    2006-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) generates vast amounts of data. The handling, processing, and analysis of fMRI data would be inconceivable without computer-based methods. fMRI neuroinformatics is concerned with research, development, and operation of these methods. Reconstruction...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or CT. A special form of MRI called magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is helpful to assess the vessels of ... child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images ...

  18. MRI of Cerebellar Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Cocker, Laurens J L; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing brain infarction. Because of few or atypical clinical symptoms and a relatively low sensitivity of CT scans, many cerebellar infarctions may be detected only with MRI. With adequate recognition of cerebellar infarction on MRI and

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia ( ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  1. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tumors. MRI can help physicians evaluate both the structure of an organ and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to ...

  3. Seeing the sound after visual loss: functional MRI in acquired auditory-visual synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Zixin; Hsieh, Po-Jang; Milea, Dan

    2017-02-01

    Acquired auditory-visual synesthesia (AVS) is a rare neurological sign, in which specific auditory stimulation triggers visual experience. In this study, we used event-related fMRI to explore the brain regions correlated with acquired monocular sound-induced phosphenes, which occurred 2 months after unilateral visual loss due to an ischemic optic neuropathy. During the fMRI session, 1-s pure tones at various pitches were presented to the patient, who was asked to report occurrence of sound-induced phosphenes by pressing one of the two buttons (yes/no). The brain activation during phosphene-experienced trials was contrasted with non-phosphene trials and compared to results obtained in one healthy control subject who underwent the same fMRI protocol. Our results suggest, for the first time, that acquired AVS occurring after visual impairment is associated with bilateral activation of primary and secondary visual cortex, possibly due to cross-wiring between auditory and visual sensory modalities.

  4. Synovial sarcoma of primary bone origin: a rare case in a rare site with atypical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Seung Chai [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Choi, Jung-Ah; Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Chung, Jin-Haeng [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Pathology, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Oh, Joo Han [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea)

    2007-01-15

    Synovial sarcoma of bone origin is extremely rare and difficult to diagnose. We present a case in which the lesion arose in the cortex of the distal tibia. It showed heterogeneous intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and heterogeneous intermediate to low signal intensity on T2-weighted images with heterogeneous contrast enhancement on MRI. The lesion was confirmed as synovial sarcoma using a combination of histological and molecular genetic studies. (orig.)

  5. MRI diagnosis of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy from a remote childhood malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainani, Nisha I.; Lawande, Malini A.; Pungavkar, Sona A.; Patkar, Deepak P.; Sase, Kirti S. [Dr. Balabhai Nanavati Hospital and Research Centre, Department of MRI, Mammography and BMD, Mumbai (India); Parikh, Vipul P. [Dr. Balabhai Nanavati Hospital and Research Centre, Department of CT and USG, Mumbai (India)

    2007-06-15

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by digital clubbing, periosteal proliferation, bone pain, synovitis and arthralgia, all of these being commonly symmetrical. It is occasionally associated with nasopharyngeal lymphoepitheliomas and may develop before or after development of lung metastases in these patients. We report a case of a healthy 22-year-old female who presented to our institution with pain and swelling in the thighs and legs. She had a history of childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma. Radiographs of the knees were negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed features suggestive of bilateral periostitis. Because of the propensity of the rare childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma to present with HOA, this entity was included in the differential diagnosis. A subsequent chest radiograph and CT demonstrated a lung and mediastinal mass that were histologically confirmed to be metastatic. To the best of our knowledge, HOA and metastases from nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma occurring after such a long time interval have not been previously reported. Early demonstration and consideration of HOA on the basis of MRI, lead to expeditious and appropriate subsequent investigation. (orig.)

  6. MRI features of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Biao [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, XinHua Hospital (Chongming Branch), Shanghai (China); Feng, Xiao Yuan [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2013-08-15

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RTs) are rare, highly malignant tumors of the central nervous system, usually occurring in young children. To investigate the MRI features of AT/RT, with special emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS). MRI findings of 11 children with AT/RT were reviewed retrospectively, including DWI in 9 AT/RT children and MRS in 6 children. The neoplasms were infratentorial in 4 children and supratentorial in 5 children, both infra- and supratentorial in 1 child and multifocal in 1 child. AT/RT produced heterogeneous signal intensity from peripheral cysts in 7/11 (63%) and hemorrhage in 7/11 (63%). All lesions showed contrast enhancement of varying degrees. Seven (63%) had peritumoral edema. Nine (82%) were hyperintense on DWI with a mean {+-} SD ADC of 0.60 {+-} 0.13 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. Six lesions (55%) exhibited elevated levels of choline and decreased NAA, and three had lipid peaks. A childhood intracranial tumor with off-midline location, peripheral cystic components, hemorrhage, low ADC, and lipid peaks on MRS suggests AT/RT to be considered a differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Segmental Schwannomatosis of the Spine: Report of a Rare Case and Brief Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Ranjit Kumar; Bora, Suresh; Haque, Russel

    2016-01-01

    To report a case of segmental schwannomatosis involving the dorsal and lumbar spine and describe its excision as well as review of literature on schwannomatosis involving the spine. Schwannomas are nerve sheath tumours which usually occur as solitary lesions. Presence of multiple schwannomas suggests a genetic predisposition to tumorogenesis and possible association with neurofibromatosis. However, in very rare cases multiple schwannomas exist without typical features of neurofibromatosis and constitute a clinically and genetically distinct rare syndrome termed schwannomatosis. A 31-year-old female presented with low back pain with left lower limb radiculopathy and sensory deficit over the L4-L5 dermatome. Auditory and ophthalmologic examinations were normal. MRI showed two discrete intradural masses at D12-L2 and L3-L5. MRI of the brain was negative for any vestibular schwannoma. The tumours were excised discretely through a single midline incision to improve the symptoms. HPE of both the tumours revealed them to be schwannomas. Karyotyping from lymphocyte DNA revealed no abnormality. This is the 3rd case of schwannomatosis involving the dorsal and lumbar spine, in which excision of the tumours led to resolution of symptoms.

  8. Central Variant of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome - A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, K G; Balasubramanian, Padhmini; Mayilvaganan, K R; Kannan, Usha Nandhini; Bilal, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological condition associated with headache, altered mental status, dizziness and white matter vasogenic oedema in parieto-occipital region. It is often associated with hypertension but can also occur in diverse clinical settings like immunosuppression, eclampsia, etc. It is due to failure of autoregulatory mechanism of posterior circulation in response to change in blood pressure. We hereby report a rare case of central variant of PRES secondary to severe hypertension diagnosed with 3T MRI. Objective of reporting this case was to describe the imaging findings of typical and rare atypical patterns of PRES. A 71-year-old male hypertensive patient was referred for brain imaging with history of short period of loss of consciousness, headache and dizziness. MRI brain showed central variant pattern of PRES with preferential involvement of brainstem, thalami and periventricular white matter with sparing of frontal, parietal and occipital lobes. The patient was treated with anti-hypertensive after which patient's symptoms subsided. The patient was followed up conservatively. Atypical variants of PRES should be borne in mind when pontine hyperintensity is encountered in hypertensive patient.

  9. Does dietary learning occur outside awareness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M

    2004-09-01

    Several forms of dietary learning have been identified in humans. These include flavor-flavor learning, flavor-postingestive learning (including flavor-caffeine learning), and learned satiety. Generally, learning is thought to occur in the absence of contingency (CS-US) or demand awareness. However, a review of the literature suggests that this conclusion may be premature because measures of awareness lack the rigor that is found in studies of other kinds of human learning. If associations do configure outside awareness then this should be regarded as a rare instance of automatic learning. Conversely, if awareness is important, then successful learning may be governed by an individual's beliefs and predilection to attend to stimulus relationships. For researchers of dietary learning this could be critical because it might explain why learning paradigms have a reputation for being unreliable. Since most food preferences are learned, asking questions about awareness can also tell us something fundamental about everyday dietary control.

  10. Angiodysplasia Occurring in Jejunal Diverticulosis

    OpenAIRE

    Edward A Jones; Hugh Chaun; Phillip Switzer; David J Clow; Ronald J Hancock

    1990-01-01

    The first case of angiodysplasia occurring in acquired jejunal diverticulosis is reported. The patient presented with occult gastrointestinal bleeding and chronic anemia, and was created successfully by resection of a 25 cm long segment of jejunum. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms for both angiodysplasia and jejunal diverticulosis are discussed.

  11. Biliary cystadenoma with bile duct communication depicted on liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced MRI in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, Gianluca; Carollo, Vincenzo; Luca, Angelo [Mediterranean Institute of Transplantation and High Specialization Therapy (ISMETT), Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Palermo (Italy); Maggiore, Giuseppe [University Hospital S. Chiara, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Paediatrics, Pisa (Italy); Sonzogni, Aurelio [Riuniti Hospital, Pathology Department, Bergamo (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    Biliary cystadenoma is a benign, but potentially malignant, cystic neoplasm of the biliary ducts occurring most commonly in middle-aged females and very rarely in children. We present a 9-year-old boy with biliary cystadenoma, diagnosed by MRI using a new liver-specific contrast agent (gadoxetic acid) that is eliminated by the biliary system. The images clearly demonstrate the communication between the multiloculated cystic mass and the biliary tree, suggesting the possibility of biliary cystadenoma. Due to the malignant potential of a cystadenoma, the lesion was resected. The resection was complete and the postoperative course was uneventful. (orig.)

  12. Biliary cystadenoma with bile duct communication depicted on liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced MRI in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrone, Gianluca; Maggiore, Giuseppe; Carollo, Vincenzo; Sonzogni, Aurelio; Luca, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    Biliary cystadenoma is a benign, but potentially malignant, cystic neoplasm of the biliary ducts occurring most commonly in middle-aged females and very rarely in children. We present a 9-year-old boy with biliary cystadenoma, diagnosed by MRI using a new liver-specific contrast agent (gadoxetic acid) that is eliminated by the biliary system. The images clearly demonstrate the communication between the multiloculated cystic mass and the biliary tree, suggesting the possibility of biliary cystadenoma. Due to the malignant potential of a cystadenoma, the lesion was resected. The resection was complete and the postoperative course was uneventful.

  13. MRI in essential primary cutis verticis gyrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K.; Ishikawa, K.; Furusawa, T.; Sakai, K. [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ito, J.; Tokiguchi, S. [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    2001-10-01

    We report MRI findings in four patients with essential primary cutis verticis gyrata (CVG). The patients were all men, aged 49-81 years (mean 65 years). They had no symptoms related to this rare scalp condition, preceding scalp disease or associated systemic disease. Coronal images showed a characteristic corrugated appearance of the thickened scalp at the vertex, diagnostic of CVG. Neuroradiologists should be aware of this condition. (orig.)

  14. MRI of hemangiopericytoma in the sacrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian Yuwei [School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Taiwan); Yao Minszu; Hsieh Shuchiang; Lao, Wilson T. [Department of Radiology, Taipei Medical University-Municipal Wan Fang Hospital, 111, Hsing-Long Road, Section 3, 116, Taipei (Taiwan); Fang Chialiang [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Taiwan); Chan, Wing P. [School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Taiwan); Department of Radiology, Taipei Medical University-Municipal Wan Fang Hospital, 111, Hsing-Long Road, Section 3, 116, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2004-08-01

    Osseous hemangiopericytoma is rare. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman with low-back pain with radiation to the left buttock for 1 month. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a tumor mass with areas of serpentine signal void pattern in the sacrum suggestive of a vascular tumor. Neither calcifications nor layered blood serum were noted. Histological diagnosis was compatible with osseous hemangiopericytoma. (orig.)

  15. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: ultrasound and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Brook; Kraft, Jeannette K. [Leeds Children' s Hospital at The Leeds General Infirmary, Clarendon Wing Radiology Department, Leeds, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Amin, Tania; Leone, Valentina; Wood, Mark [Leeds Children' s Hospital at The Leeds General Infirmary, Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is a rare genetic disorder related to failures in prostaglandin metabolism. Patients present with joint pain, limb enlargement, skin thickening and finger clubbing. Radiographs show characteristic periosteal reaction and thickening along the long bones. We present MRI and US findings in a child with the condition. Ultrasound showed echogenic tissue surrounding the long bones, presumably reflecting oedema and inflammatory tissue. Doppler sonograms demonstrated increased vascularity on the surface of some superficial bony structures. (orig.)

  16. Balo`s concentric sclerosis: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.J. [Department of Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 199 Tung Hwa North Road, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Ro, L.S. [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Wang, L.J. [Department of Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 199 Tung Hwa North Road, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Wong, Y.C. [Department of Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 199 Tung Hwa North Road, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-05-01

    We report a case of Balo`s concentric sclerosis. In the past, the diagnosis was usually made post mortem. In this case, we found that CT demonstrated only low-density lesions, but not their concentric pattern. However, MRI showed a striking feature, reminiscent of histopathology of Balo`s concentric sclerosis, and played an important role in antemortem diagnosis of this rare demyelinating disease. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  17. A RARE CASE OF NEUROBRUCELLOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedevi T

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND One of the most common causes of fever with back pain in India is brucellosis along with tuberculosis infection of the spinal cord and vertebral column. Brucellosis is a multisystem infection with a broad-spectrum of clinical presentations. Its nervous system involvement is known as neurobrucellosis is complication of brucellosis occurring in 0 to 25% and can present as meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis-radiculoneuritis, brain abscess, peripheral neuropathy and psychosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this case study, we present a 54-year-old male patient a cattle worker with unexplained back pain. Appropriate blood investigations, CSF analysis and MRI scan were taken towards the cause of the diagnosis. RESULTS CSF analysis showed lymphocyte pleocytosis with agglutination in Rose Bengal test. MRI diagnostic of neurobrucellosis revealed anterosuperior osteophyte inflammations, namely Pedro Pons’ sign or Pom’s sign. CONCLUSION Through this case report, we would like to notify that neurobrucellosis should be considered as one of the differential diagnosis and not to be missed as it is treatable. In such conditions, patient has to be treated with two or more antimicrobials such as rifampicin, co-trimoxazole and doxycycline in order to achieve complete cure rate and to prevent relapse.

  18. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  19. Neonatal hemophilia: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Ferreira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding.

  20. Does reconsolidation occur in humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eSchiller

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for reconsolidation in non-human animals has accumulated rapidly in the last decade, providing compelling` demonstration for this phenomenon across species and memory paradigms. In vast contrast, scant evidence exists for human reconsolidation to date. A major reason for this discrepancy is the invasive nature of current techniques used to investigate reconsolidation, which are difficult to apply in humans. Pharmacological blockade of reconsolidation, for example, has been typically used in animals as a proof of concept. However, most compounds used in these studies are toxic for humans, and those compounds that are safe target related, but not direct mechanisms of reconsolidation.Thus, although human reconsolidation has been hypothesized, there is limited evidence it actually exists, with the best evidence emerging from non-invasive techniques that ‘update’ memory during reconsolidation rather than block it, a technique only rarely used in animal research. Here we discuss the current state of human reconsolidation and the challenges ahead. We review findings on reconsolidation of emotional associative, episodic and procedural memories, using invasive and non-invasive techniques. We discuss the possible interpretation of these results, attempt to reconcile some inconsistencies, and suggest a conceptual framework for future research.

  1. Rare cancers: Challenges & issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendran K Pillai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare cancers account for about 22 per cent of all cancers diagnosed worldwide, disproportionately affecting some demographic groups, with an occurrence of less than 6 per 100,000 individuals annually. Many rare cancers in adults, adolescents and children are not curable, and patients and care providers have little option to take therapeutic decisions. The epidemiology of rare cancers is a challenging area of study but is inadequately addressed. Despite efforts mainly in some European nations, a few improvements have been observed in the management of rare cancers. Reasons for this obvious stagnation are multifactorial and are mainly inherent to logistical difficulties in carrying out clinical trials in very small patient populations, hesitation of the pharmaceutical industry to spend in small markets and complexity in creating adequate information for the development of cost-effective drugs. Rare cancers also face specific challenges that include late and incorrect diagnosis, lack of clinical expertise and lack of research interest and development of new therapies. The utilization of nationally representative study findings for the patients' evaluation may possibly offer chances to find out pathogenesis and prevalence, and this will eventually lead to control and prevention. Currently, advancing targeted therapies offer a great opportunity for the better management of rare cancers. Conducting clinical trials with small patient population, innovative clinical trial approach, prevailing controlling obstacles for international cooperation and financial support for research are the present challenges for rare cancers. The International Rare Cancers Initiative functions as a main platform for achieving new international clinical trials in rare tumours. This review delineates the current challenges and issues in the interpretation, management and research scenarios of rare cancers.

  2. Rare cancers: Challenges & issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Raveendran K.; Jayasree, K.

    2017-01-01

    Rare cancers account for about 22 per cent of all cancers diagnosed worldwide, disproportionately affecting some demographic groups, with an occurrence of less than 6 per 100,000 individuals annually. Many rare cancers in adults, adolescents and children are not curable, and patients and care providers have little option to take therapeutic decisions. The epidemiology of rare cancers is a challenging area of study but is inadequately addressed. Despite efforts mainly in some European nations, a few improvements have been observed in the management of rare cancers. Reasons for this obvious stagnation are multifactorial and are mainly inherent to logistical difficulties in carrying out clinical trials in very small patient populations, hesitation of the pharmaceutical industry to spend in small markets and complexity in creating adequate information for the development of cost-effective drugs. Rare cancers also face specific challenges that include late and incorrect diagnosis, lack of clinical expertise and lack of research interest and development of new therapies. The utilization of nationally representative study findings for the patients’ evaluation may possibly offer chances to find out pathogenesis and prevalence, and this will eventually lead to control and prevention. Currently, advancing targeted therapies offer a great opportunity for the better management of rare cancers. Conducting clinical trials with small patient population, innovative clinical trial approach, prevailing controlling obstacles for international cooperation and financial support for research are the present challenges for rare cancers. The International Rare Cancers Initiative functions as a main platform for achieving new international clinical trials in rare tumours. This review delineates the current challenges and issues in the interpretation, management and research scenarios of rare cancers. PMID:28574010

  3. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  4. Right azygos lobe occurring with fissural and lobation anomalies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The azygos lobe is a rare anomaly of the lung that is separated from the rest of the upper lobe by an azygos fissure. The lobe is encountered mostly in the right lung but a few cases have also been described in the left lung. It occurs at a frequency of 0.25-1% and has surgical and radiological importance.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  6. Can we reduce anesthesia exposure? Neonatal brain MRI: Swaddling vs. sedation, a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Benjamin J; Yudkowitz, Francine S; Lipson, Scott

    2017-05-01

    Neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a diagnostic modality that requires minimal motion to acquire quality images. Sedation or even general anesthesia may be necessary to achieve acceptable scans. There is a growing body of literature, especially in animal studies, that links neurotoxicity with anesthetic exposure to the developing brain. There is no study outlining strategies used by neonatal intensive care units (NICU) to achieve quality MRI images with limited exposure to medications identified as possibly harmful to the developing brain. A 15-question survey was sent to all NICU programs in the United States (US) with fellowship programs. MRI suite. Neonates. None. The programs were queried regarding their preferred method for obtaining MRIs of the brain and how successful they were in obtaining quality images. Of the 96 programs surveyed, 58 responded (response rate of 60%). To obtain brain MRIs, 64%(n=37) used feed and swaddle; 32% (n=19) use sedation; and 3% (n=2) used general anesthesia (GA). Success rate of obtaining quality MRI images varied by technique. In the feed and swaddle group, 81% reported that a failure to obtain useful images occurred 75%. In the sedation and GA group, 100% reported failure to obtain useful images occurred rarely. The majority of NICUs in the US that responded to the survey utilized feed and swaddle as their primary technique for obtaining MRIs of the brain and reported a high success rate. Given the growing concern over the possible neurotoxic effects of anesthetic drugs on the developing brain, more centers should consider this technique as a first line method to obtain brain MRIs, with sedation and GA reserved for failed feed and swaddle attempts and special circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A rare opportunity beckons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschneidner, K

    2011-02-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty for the future of rare-earth production. Rare-earths are a collection of 17 chemical elements in the periodic table, which include scandium and yttrium as well as the 15 lanthanides, such as dysprosium and ytterbium. China has a stranglehold on today's rare-earth market, which was worth about $3bn in 2010, with the country accounting for about 95% of worldwide production. Yet China's future actions can only be guessed at best. In September it halted shipments of rare-earth elements to Japan over a diplomatic spat concerning the detention of a Chinese trawler captain. Although the ban was later lifted, the episode raised concerns around the world about China's rare-earth monopoly and its use in diplomacy. China has already warned that it will not export any rare-earth material in the coming years as it expects its own consumption of rare-earth metals to increase. The country has introduced export taxes as well as production and export quotas, and also refused to grant any new rare-earth mining licences. Furthermore, because its reserves are limited and China's internal markets are growing so rapidly, the country has suggested it will no longer export products that require rare-earth elements, especially those that need heavy rare-earth elements, such as terbium and dysprosium. China's actions have led to huge rises in the cost of rare-earth materials and products. Dysprosium oxide, for example, has shot up from $36 per kilogram in 2005 to a massive $305 per kilogram by late last year. This could have a huge impact on much of today's electronics industry, given that rare-earth elements are ubiquitous in electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) and mobile phones. Neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets, for example, are used as computer spindle drives. The question is: what can be done to ensure that China's dominance of the rare-earth industry does not affect the

  8. Tale of two rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Shukla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH phenotype is variable & various genes have been decribed in association with IHH.We describe association of IHH with mosaic trisomy 13. A 20 year old male presented with lack of development of secondary sexual characters, normal height, micropenis, small testes, gynaecomastia, absence of axillary and pubic hairs, hyposmia,synkinesis, bilateral horizontal nystagmus and high arched palate. Investigations showed low gonadotropin,low total testosterone, LH after stimulation with 100 mcg tryptorelin sc was 11.42 mU/mL at 40 min. MRI of hypothalamo-pituitary region showed normal olfactory bulb and tract but shallow olfactory sulcus . Karyotype showed homologous Robertsonian translocation of chromosome 13. This case fits classical IHH except for LH rise on stimulation.Features of Patau syndrome which is associated with trisomy 13 are absent in our case. Mosaic trisomy 13, which can otherwise be rare incidental finding , has not been described in association with IHH.Causal association of novel mutation on chromosome 13 leading to aforementioned phenotype cannot be rule out.

  9. Tale of two rare diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ravindra; Basu, Asish Kumar; Mandal, Biplab; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Maity, Animesh; Sinha, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) phenotype is variable &various genes have been decribed in association with IHH. We describe association of IHH with mosaic trisomy 13. A 20 year old male presented with lack of development of secondary sexual characters, normal height, micropenis, small testes, gynaecomastia, absence of axillary and pubic hairs, hyposmia, synkinesis, bilateral horizontal nystagmus and high arched palate. Investigations showed low gonadotropin, low total testosterone, LH after stimulation with 100 mcg tryptorelin sc was 11.42 mU/mL at 40 min. MRI of hypothalamo-pituitary region showed normal olfactory bulb and tract but shallow olfactory sulcus. Karyotype showed homologous Robertsonian translocation of chromosome 13. This case fits classical IHH except for LH rise on stimulation. Features of Patau syndrome which is associated with trisomy 13 are absent in our case. Mosaic trisomy 13, which can otherwise be rare incidental finding, has not been described in association with IHH. Causal association of novel mutation on chromosome 13 leading to aforementioned phenotype cannot be rule out. PMID:24251138

  10. Tale of two rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ravindra; Basu, Asish Kumar; Mandal, Biplab; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Maity, Animesh; Sinha, Anirban

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) phenotype is variable &various genes have been decribed in association with IHH. We describe association of IHH with mosaic trisomy 13. A 20 year old male presented with lack of development of secondary sexual characters, normal height, micropenis, small testes, gynaecomastia, absence of axillary and pubic hairs, hyposmia, synkinesis, bilateral horizontal nystagmus and high arched palate. Investigations showed low gonadotropin, low total testosterone, LH after stimulation with 100 mcg tryptorelin sc was 11.42 mU/mL at 40 min. MRI of hypothalamo-pituitary region showed normal olfactory bulb and tract but shallow olfactory sulcus. Karyotype showed homologous Robertsonian translocation of chromosome 13. This case fits classical IHH except for LH rise on stimulation. Features of Patau syndrome which is associated with trisomy 13 are absent in our case. Mosaic trisomy 13, which can otherwise be rare incidental finding, has not been described in association with IHH. Causal association of novel mutation on chromosome 13 leading to aforementioned phenotype cannot be rule out.

  11. Pulmonary actinomycosis with thoracic soft tissue mass: a rare onset form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarca-diaz de la Espina, Miguel A.; Lopez-Menendez, Carlos; Ruiz-Martinez, Rafael; Molino-Trinidad, Ceferino

    2001-03-01

    Actinomycosis is unusual, and rare especially when the lung and the thoracic wall are involved. It is more frequent in immunocompromised patient. US, CT, or MRI are imaging methods of diagnosis with high sensibility to recognise the disease and are able to the management. We point out a rare case in a normal teenager with thoracic abscess.

  12. CT and MRI 'ring sign' may be due to demyelination: diagnostic pitfall.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, M H

    2012-02-03

    We report a case of acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in which both CT and MRI showed multiple ring-enhancing lesions suggestive of abscesses or brain tumour. This is a relatively rare phenomenon.

  13. MRI features of toxoplasma encephalitis in the immunocompetent host: a report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vastava, P.B.; Kumar, S.; Gupta, R.K. [Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rae Bareli Road, Lucknow 226014, UP (India); Pradhan, S.; Jha, S. [Department of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rae Bareli Road, Lucknow 226014, UP (India); Prasad, K.N. [Department of Microbiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rae Bareli Road, Lucknow 226014, UP (India)

    2002-10-01

    Central nervous system involvement due to toxoplasmosis in an immunocompetent host is rare. We describe MRI features in two immunocompetent patients with of cerebral toxoplasmosis and compare these with those for the immunocompromised host. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  19. MRI of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chao-Shiang; Chen, Wei-Tsung; Chen, Ran-Chou; Tu, Hsing-Yang [Taipei Municipal Jen-Ai Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Chan, Wing P. [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Taipei Municipal Wan-Fang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang, Chih-Peng [Taipei Municipal Jen-Ai Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Taipei (Taiwan); Shih, Li-Sun [Taipei Municipal Jen-Ai Hospital, Department of Pathology, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2004-10-01

    Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma is a rare soft tissue tumor of low-grade malignancy. We present the case of a 32-year-old man who complained of soreness and numbness over his left arm and hand over the previous 2 months and of having a palpable mass over his left upper back for 4 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an intramuscular soft tissue mass in the left scapular region. The tumor mass was seen to have multiple cystic components with fluid-fluid levels. Histological examination showed multiple cystic spaces filled with blood lakes and hemosiderin deposits in the solid part of the tumor. After the initial surgery, the patient had local recurrences over 2.5 years. The immunohistochemical study at the second surgery showed that the recurrent tumor was strongly positive for the histiocytic marker CD68, and the myoid trait desmin. Histological diagnosis was compatible with angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma. (orig.)

  20. MRI EVALUATION OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sama Surya Sravani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Neuralgia is the set of symptoms associated with nerve dysfunction. The most common of these symptoms is pain, which can occur intermittently in one area of the body or can radiate along the length of a damaged nerve. The most common type of neuralgia is trigeminal neuralgia. This study focuses on the effectiveness of MRI in visualising the entire course of trigeminal nerve and to diagnose the exact location, aetiology responsible for trigeminal neuralgia and possible pretreatment evaluation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Clinical records and imaging studies of 30 patients between the ages of 18-60 years who presented to the Department of Radiodiagnosis, KIMS, for brain magnetic resonance imaging with (Philips 1.5T machine during June 2015 to December 2016 were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS  The entire course of trigeminal nerve is evaluated in these patients.  There are different causes of trigeminal neuralgia, but in our study, most frequent cause is mechanical irritation of nerve is due to neurovascular contact (24 cases. The other causes identified are cerebellopontine angle lesions, brainstem tumours, demyelinating disease involving brainstem.  The cisternal portion of the nerve is the most common site of involvement. CONCLUSION Trigeminal nerve is the largest cranial nerve. MRI is unique as it produces images of entire course of the nerve. Of the many causes of trigeminal neuralgia, neurovascular conflict is the most common cause. The exact location and degree of neurovascular compression is graded on MRI.

  1. Analysis of rare categories

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jingrui

    2012-01-01

    This book focuses on rare category analysis where the majority classes have smooth distributions and the minority classes exhibit the compactness property. It focuses on challenging cases where the support regions of the majority and minority classes overlap.

  2. Herlyn–Werner–Wunderlich syndrome: a rare cause of pelvic pain in adolescent girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveiro, Ana Cristina; Miranda, Victor; Cabral, António Jorge; Nunes, Sidónia; Paulo, Filomeno; Freitas, Conceição

    2011-01-01

    The Herlyn–Werner–Wunderlich syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterised by uterus didelphys with blind hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis. It usually presents after menarche with progressive pelvic pain during menses secondary to haematocolpos. Awareness is necessary in order to diagnose and treat this disorder properly before complications occur. MRI is the preferred modality for the delineation of uterine malformation. When renal anomalies are encountered, a screening should also be made for congenital abnormalities of the reproductive tract and vice versa. The authors report a case of a girl with this condition who had a prenatal diagnose of right renal agenesis and presented at 13 years old with pelvic pain caused by haematocolpos. PMID:22689557

  3. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome: a rare cause of pelvic pain in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveiro, Ana Cristina; Miranda, Victor; Cabral, António Jorge; Nunes, Sidónia; Paulo, Filomeno; Freitas, Conceição

    2011-07-15

    The Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterised by uterus didelphys with blind hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis. It usually presents after menarche with progressive pelvic pain during menses secondary to haematocolpos. Awareness is necessary in order to diagnose and treat this disorder properly before complications occur. MRI is the preferred modality for the delineation of uterine malformation. When renal anomalies are encountered, a screening should also be made for congenital abnormalities of the reproductive tract and vice versa. The authors report a case of a girl with this condition who had a prenatal diagnose of right renal agenesis and presented at 13 years old with pelvic pain caused by haematocolpos.

  4. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in a case of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia: a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajra, Adrija; Bandyopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti

    2016-06-07

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a demyelinating disease that may occur in a postvaccination condition or as a parainfectious encephalomyelitis. It is almost always monophasic. The underlying pathogenesis of ADEM may include perivascular inflammation, oedema and demyelination in the central nervous system. We present a case of a 15-year-old girl who was diagnosed as having ADEM, as well as detected to be a follow-up case of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia on steroid treatment. She presented with progressive weakness of the right lower limb for the past 4 days. MRI showed multiple subcortical lesions of varying size showing hyperintensities in T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). The patient responded well to steroid therapy. No residual lesion was found on follow-up. Very few cases have been found with this rare association in the literature. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Childhood moyamoya disease: hemodynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzika, A.A. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Robertson, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Barnes, P.D. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Vajapeyam, S. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Burrows, P.E. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Treves, S.T. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Scott, R.M. l [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Background. Childhood moyamoya disease is a rare progressive cerebrovascular disease. Objective. To evaluate cerebral hemodynamics using dynamic Gd-DTPA-enhanced imaging in children with moyamoya disease. Materials and methods. Eight children (2-11 years of age) with the clinical and angiographic findings typical of moyamoya disease, before and/or after surgical intervention (pial synangiosis), underwent conventional MR imaging (MRI) and hemodynamic MR imaging (HMRI). HMRI used a spoiled gradient-echo with low flip angle (10 deg) and long TE (TR/TE = 24/15 ms) to minimize T 1 effects and emphasize T 2{sup *} weighting. Raw and calculated hemodynamic images were reviewed. Three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (MRA) and perfusion brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were also performed. Results. Abnormal hemodynamic maps resulting from vascular stenosis or occlusion and basal collaterals were observed in six patient studies. HMRI depicted perfusion dynamics of affected cerebrovascular territories, detected cortical perfusion deficits, and complemented conventional MRI and MRA. HMRI findings were consistent with those of catheter angiography and perfusion SPECT. Conclusion. Our preliminary experience suggests that HMRI may be of value in the preoperative and postoperative evaluation of surgical interventions in moyamoya disease. (orig.). With 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa associated with cerebellar hemorrhage: report of rare disease with MRI findings Hematoma subdural crônico de fossa posterior associado a hemorragia cerebelar espontânea: relato de doença rara com achados de RNM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leodante B. Costa Jr

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa is an uncommon entity, and spontaneous lesions are very rarely described, occurring mostly during anticoagulation therapy. The association of the posterior fossa chronic subdural hematoma with spontaneous parenchymal hemorrhage without anticoagulation therapy was never related in the literature, to our knowledge. We describe a case of a 64 year-old woman who suffered a spontaneous cerebellar hemorrhage, treated conservatively, and presented 1 month later with a chronic subdural posterior fossa hematoma.Hematomas subdurais da fossa posterior são lesões raras, mais comumente relacionadas com traumas graves. A ocorrência de hematomas subdurais crônicos na fossa posterior é muito rara, sendo descritos 15 casos até o momento, boa parte relacionada ao uso de anticoagulantes. Em nossa revisão da literatura, não pudemos encontrar nenhum relato da associação entre hematoma subdural crônico da fossa posterior e hemorragia cerebelar espontânea. Relatamos o caso de paciente de 64 anos com hematoma intraparenquimatoso cerebelar tratado conservadoramente e hematoma subdural crônico, tratado cirurgicamente, cerca de 1 mês após o acidente vascular cerebelar.

  7. A short overview of MRI artefacts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Abstract. Many different artefacts can occur during magnetic resonance imaging. (MRI), some affecting the diagnostic quality, while others may be confused with pathology. An artefact is a fea- ture appearing in an image that is not present in the original object. Arte- facts can be classified as patient- related, signal ...

  8. MRI of overuse injury in elite athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, E.S.; Lee, J.C. [Department of Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Healy, J.C. [Department of Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.healy@imperial.ac.uk

    2007-11-15

    Overuse injuries are a common finding in elite athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal method for the diagnosis of overuse injury in athletes of all levels. We present a review of common and important overuse injuries occurring in elite athletes. A systematic approach based on the functional anatomic units - tendons, bones and joints - may assist in diagnosis of these injuries.

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pediatric facilities have child life personnel who can work with younger children to help avoid the need for sedation or anesthesia. They prepare the children for MRI by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lesions seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ... perform than other imaging modalities. MRI of the chest takes more time than an x-ray or CT exam. Because of the length of ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... zippers and similar metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike ... (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses ...

  15. Cervical MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer in the spine Arthritis in the spine MRI works better than CT scan in diagnosing these problems ... test. The strong magnetic fields created during an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants to not work as well. It can also cause a piece ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. Moderate and conscious ... for MRI by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a ... resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have ... may take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. MRI of ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  20. [Cardiac fibroma: A rare cause of sudden child death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Sarah; Gibier, Jean-Baptiste; Recher, Morgan; Leteurtre, Stéphane; Leroy, Xavier; Devisme, Louise

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 3-year-old child who died from the consequences of a cardio-respiratory arrest despite reanimation procedures. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass of the free wall of the left ventricle. Autopsy confirmed the existence of a solitary myocardial tumor, well-circumscribed, firm, with a whitish and trabeculated cut surface. Histologically, the tumor consisted of bundles of spindle-shaped and regular cells mingling with collagen and elastic fibers, insinuating themselves between myocytes in periphery. Calcifications were present. After immunohistochemistry, the cells were highlighted by anti-actin smooth muscle antibody; but they were not highlighted by anti-desmin, anti-β catenin and anti-Ki67 antibodies. The diagnosis of cardiac fibroma was made. The primary cardiac tumors of child are rare and usually benign. They are essentially represented by rhabdomyoma and fibroma. Cardiac fibroma mostly occurs during the first year of life. It can be revealed by cardiac insufficiency, arrhythmia, chest pain or sudden death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Electroencephalography and Brain MRI Patterns in Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabulya, Angela; Lesser, Ronald P; Llinas, Rafael; Kaplan, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Using electroencephalography (EEG) and histology in patients with diffuse encephalopathy, Gloor et al reported that paroxysmal synchronous discharges (PSDs) on EEG required combined cortical gray (CG) and "subcortical" gray (SCG) matter pathology, while polymorphic delta activity (PDA) occurred in patients with white matter pathology. In patients with encephalopathy, we compared EEG findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine if MRI reflected similar pathological EEG correlations. Retrospective case control study of 52 cases with EEG evidence of encephalopathy and 50 controls without evidence of encephalopathy. Review of clinical, EEG and MRI data acquired within 4 days of each other. The most common EEG finding in encephalopathy was background slowing, in 96.1%. We found PSDs in 0% of cases with the combination of CG and SCG abnormalities. Although 13.5% (n=7) had PSDs on EEG; 3 of these had CG and 4 had SCG abnormalities. A total of 73.1% (38/52) had white matter abnormalities-of these 28.9% (11/38) had PDA. PSDs were found with either CG or "SCG" MRI abnormalities and did not require a combination of the two. In agreement with Gloor et al, PDA occurred with white matter MRI abnormalities in the absence of gray matter abnormalities. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2015.

  2. Bilateral Traumatic Anterior Dislocation of Shoulder – a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashavantha Kumar C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bilateral shoulder dislocation are most commonly posterior type. These are most commonly due to seizure disorder and electrocution. Anterior shoulder dislocations occurring bilaterally without any predisposing factors are very rare. These types of injuries are due to trauma with a unique mechanism of injury. To best of our knowledge there are only few cases of similar kind are reported in literature. We hereby report a interesting case of posttraumatic, bilateral anterior dislocation of shoulder without associated fracture in a 45 old women without any predisposing pathoanatomy.Case Report: A 45-year-old women presented to casualty with sudden onset of pain and restriction of movement in both shoulders fallowing trauma. Immediately post trauma she had severe pain and restriction of both shoulders. On examination arms were abducted and externally rotated. Bilateral shoulder movements were painful and restricted . There was loss of round contour of shoulder with increased vertical diameter of axilla anteriorly. Radiological examination revealed bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders without any associated fractures. Closed reduction done by Milch technique after intraraticular lignocaine injection. MRI of bilateral shoulder showed no pathological lesion. Both shoulders were immobilized with a shoulder immobilizer for three weeks.Conclusion: Most of the bilateral shoulder dislocations are posterior type seen in seizure disorders. Bilateral traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations are rare and are seen as a result of unique mechanism of injury. In our case patient had a fall on her elbows causing forced extension. If diagnosed and treated promptly completely normal function of the shoulders can be restored.

  3. Unilateral pure trigeminal motor nerve neuropathy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant K Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral pure trigeminal motor nerve neuropathy is an extremely rare and unique condition, characterized by atrophy of the muscles, innervated by the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve. We report such a case in a 25-year-old male patient. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiological examinations. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI proved to be the key for establishing the diagnosis, which showed atrophy and fatty infiltration over the affected side of the muscles of mastication. We were unable to establish the cause of the condition even after performing a brain MRI.

  4. Rare-earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Seal, Robert R.; Long, Keith R.; Gambogi, Joseph; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The rare-earth elements (REEs) are 15 elements that range in atomic number from 57 (lanthanum) to 71 (lutetium); they are commonly referred to as the “lanthanides.” Yttrium (atomic number 39) is also commonly regarded as an REE because it shares chemical and physical similarities and has affinities with the lanthanides. Although REEs are not rare in terms of average crustal abundance, the concentrated deposits of REEs are limited in number.Because of their unusual physical and chemical properties, the REEs have diverse defense, energy, industrial, and military technology applications. The glass industry is the leading consumer of REE raw materials, which are used for glass polishing and as additives that provide color and special optical properties to the glass. Lanthanum-based catalysts are used in petroleum refining, and cerium-based catalysts are used in automotive catalytic converters. The use of REEs in magnets is a rapidly increasing application. Neodymium-iron-boron magnets, which are the strongest known type of magnets, are used when space and weight are restrictions. Nickel-metal hydride batteries use anodes made of a lanthanum-based alloys.China, which has led the world production of REEs for decades, accounted for more than 90 percent of global production and supply, on average, during the past decade. Citing a need to retain its limited REE resources to meet domestic requirements as well as concerns about the environmental effects of mining, China began placing restrictions on the supply of REEs in 2010 through the imposition of quotas, licenses, and taxes. As a result, the global rare-earth industry has increased its stockpiling of REEs; explored for deposits outside of China; and promoted new efforts to conserve, recycle, and substitute for REEs. New mine production began at Mount Weld in Western Australia, and numerous other exploration and development projects noted in this chapter are ongoing throughout the world.The REE-bearing minerals are

  5. A rare mutation in MYH7 gene occurs with overlapping phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Lucia; Fiorillo, Chiara; Gibertini, Sara; De Stefano, Francesco; Manganelli, Fiore; Iodice, Rosa; Vitale, Floriana; Zanotti, Simona; Galderisi, Maurizio; Mora, Marina; Santoro, Lucio

    2015-02-13

    Mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) cause different muscle disorders. The specific molecular pathobiological processes that cause these different phenotypes remains unexplained. We describe three members of a family with an autosomal dominant mutation in the distal rod of MYH7 [c.5401G> A (p.Glu1801Lys)] displaying a complex phenotype characterized by Laing Distal Myopathy like phenotype, left ventricular non compaction cardiomyopathy and Fiber Type Disproportion picture at muscle biopsy. We suggest that this overlapping presentation confirm the phenotypic variability of MYH7 myopathy and may be helpful to improve the genotype phenotype correlation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A rare polyglycine type II-like helix motif in naturally occurring proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentin, Eberhard; Weidenweber, Sina; Schühle, Karola; Demmer, Ulrike; Heider, Johann; Ermler, Ulrich

    2017-11-01

    Common structural elements in proteins such as α-helices or β-sheets are characterized by uniformly repeating, energetically favorable main chain conformations which additionally exhibit a completely saturated hydrogen-bonding network of the main chain NH and CO groups. Although polyproline or polyglycine type II helices (PP II or PG II ) are frequently found in proteins, they are not considered as equivalent secondary structure elements because they do not form a similar self-contained hydrogen-bonding network of the main chain atoms. In this context our finding of an unusual motif of glycine-rich PG II -like helices in the structure of the acetophenone carboxylase core complex is of relevance. These PG II -like helices form hexagonal bundles which appear to fulfill the criterion of a (largely) saturated hydrogen-bonding network of the main-chain groups and therefore may be regarded in this sense as a new secondary structure element. It consists of a central PG II -like helix surrounded by six nearly parallel PG II -like helices in a hexagonal array, plus an additional PG II -like helix extending the array outwards. Very related structural elements have previously been found in synthetic polyglycine fibers. In both cases, all main chain NH and CO groups of the central PG II -helix are saturated by either intra- or intermolecular hydrogen-bonds, resulting in a self-contained hydrogen-bonding network. Similar, but incomplete PG II -helix patterns were also previously identified in a GTP-binding protein and an antifreeze protein. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ... MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ...

  8. MRI of the Body (Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body ... limitations of MRI of the Body? What is MRI of the Body? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  9. MRI/linac integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Overweg, Johan; Brown, Kevin J; Kerkhof, Ellen M; van der Put, Richard W; Hårdemark, Björn; van Vulpen, Marco; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2008-01-01

    In radiotherapy the healthy tissue involvement still poses serious dose limitations. This results in sub-optimal tumour dose and complications. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is the key development in radiation oncology to solve this problem. MRI yields superb soft-tissue visualization and provides several imaging modalities for identification of movements, function and physiology. Integrating MRI functionality with an accelerator can make these capacities available for high precision, real time IGRT. The system being built at the University Medical Center Utrecht is a 1.5T MRI scanner, with diagnostic imaging functionality and quality, integrated with a 6MV radiotherapy accelerator. The realization of a prototype of this hybrid system is a joint effort between the Radiotherapy Department of the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, Elekta, Crawley, U.K., and Philips Research, Hamburg, Germany. Basically, the design is a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MRI scanner with a Magnex closed bore magnet surrounded by a single energy (6 MV) Elekta accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the radiation beam properties of the hybrid system, dosimetry equipment and for the construction of patient specific dose deposition kernels in the presence of a magnetic field. The latter are used to evaluate the IMRT capability of the integrated MRI linac. A prototype hybrid MRI/linac for on-line MRI guidance of radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is under construction. The aim of the system is to deliver the radiation dose with mm precision based on diagnostic quality MR images.

  10. Glomus Tumor - A Rarity; M.R.I- A big help in early Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dharam; Garg, R S; Vikas; Garg, Yashika; Arora, Vijinder

    2016-01-01

    Glomus tumor is a rare benign tumor arising from neuroarterial plexus concentrated beneath the nailbed usually in women of age group 20-40 yrs. The plexus is an arteriovenous anastomosis functioning without intermediary capillary bed, we report a case of glomus tumor affecting the nailbed of left little finger with characteristic periodic, spontaneous excruciating pain and temperature related algesia for the last 6 months. MRI helped in clinching the diagnosis at an early stage. Patient was operated for excision of the tumor making her completely pain free after resection oftumor. A 40-year-old female patient came in Ortho. OPD with complaints of pain, cold algesia, and point tenderness on the radial side of base of the nailbed of left little finger for the last 6 months. Diagnosis was delayed despite the patient having sought the advice from different clinicians a number of times before coming to us. Pain used to occur on accidental touching of tender spot, cold water immersion; excruciating at times, making the patient faint. On physical examination clinical diagnosis of glomus tumor was made, which was confirmed on MRI as the plain X-ray was non-contributory. Most of the glomus tumors are benign, which are amenable to cure with complete surgical excision. Rarely, if the lesion exceeds 2 cm malignant transformation of the tumor must be suspected unless proven otherwise. Delay in clinical diagnosis due to dithering on the part of the clinician unnecessarily prolong the suffering in the patient which can be greatly helped by M.R.I in clinching the diagnosis early.

  11. Gastrocnemius muscle herniation as a rare differential diagnosis of ankle sprain: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergmann Greta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle herniation of the leg is a rare clinical entity. Yet, knowing this condition is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. In the extremities, muscle herniation most commonly occurs as a result of an acquired fascial defect, often due to trauma. Different treatment options for symptomatic extremity muscle herniation in the extremities, including conservative treatment, fasciotomy and mesh repair have been described. Case presentation We present the case of a patient who presented with prolonged symptoms after an ankle sprain. The clinical picture showed a fascial insufficiency with muscle bulging under tension. Ultrasound and MRI imaging confirmed the diagnosis of muscle hernia of the medial gastrocnemius on the right leg. Conservative treatment did not lead to success. Therefore, the fascial defect was treated surgically by repairing the muscle herniation using a synthetic vicryl propylene patch. Conclusions Muscle hernias should be taken into consideration as a rare differential diagnosis whenever patients present with persisting pain or soft tissue swelling after ankle sprain. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical aspect and physical examination, but can be confirmed by radiologic imaging techniques, including (dynamic ultrasound and MRI. If conservative treatment fails, we recommend the closure with mesh patches for large fascial defects.

  12. Rare (Earth Elements [score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Méndez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rare (Earth Elements is a cycle of works for solo piano. The cycle was inspired by James Dillon’s Book of Elements (Vol. I-V. The complete cycle will consist of 14 pieces; one for each selected rare (earth element. The chosen elements are Neodymium, Erbium, Tellurium, Hafnium, Tantalum, Technetium, Indium, Dysprosium, Lanthanium, Cerium, Europium, Terbium, Yttrium and Darmstadtium. These elements were selected due to their special atomic properties that in many cases make them extremely valuable for the development of new technologies, and also because of their scarcity. To date, only 4 works have been completed Yttrium, Technetium, Indium and Tellurium.

  13. CT and MRI find- ings in Lhermitte- Duclos disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    Abstract. Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD) is a rare cerebellar lesion of uncertain ori- gin. It is linked to an autosomal- dom- inant phakomatosis known as. Cowden's disease in 40% of patients. The MRI features of LDD are almost unique and can be considered diag- nostic. We report on a patient who presented with the ...

  14. MRI in primary intraspinal extradural hydatid disease: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Avicenna Medical Centre, Ankara (Turkey); Ciftci, E. [Camlik Sitesi, Ankara (Turkey); Erdogan, A. [Department of Radiology, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Avicenna Medical Centre, Ankara (Turkey)

    1998-06-01

    A rare case of pathologically proven primary intraspinal extradural hydatid disease of the thoracic region with spinal cord compression is reported. The diagnosis was established preoperatively on the basis of the MRI findings. The patient underwent surgery and recovered completely. (orig.) With 2 figs., 12 refs.

  15. MRI in sarcoglycanopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterise the pattern and spectrum of involvement on muscle MRI in a large cohort of patients with sarcoglycanopathies, which are limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2C-2F) caused by mutations in one of the four genes coding for muscle sarcoglycans. METHODS: Lower limb MRI scans......, while lower leg muscles were relatively spared even in advanced disease. A proximodistal gradient of involvement of vasti muscles was a consistent finding in these patients, including the most severe ones. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle involvement on MRI is consistent in patients with LGMD2C-F and can be helpful...

  16. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  18. A rare case of aplasia cutis congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmardehei, Mostafa

    2013-05-30

    Aplasia cutis congenita is a rare anomaly presenting with the absence of skin. No definite etiology is available. The most common site is the scalp. We present an instance with ACC occurring symmetrically in both sides of the body from chest to flank.

  19. A Rare Case of Aplasia Cutis Congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Dahmardehei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aplasia cutis congenita is a rare anomaly presenting with the absence of skin. No definite etiology is available. The most common site is the scalp. We present an instance with ACC occurring symmetrically in both sides of the body from chest to flank.

  20. Tracking rare orchids (Orchidaceae) in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald A. Coleman

    2001-01-01

    Twenty-six native orchid species occur in Arizona, and 14 are considered rare with fewer than 100 occurrences in the state. The author is conducting three studies covering four of the wild orchids: Stenorrhynchos michuacanum, Hexalectris revoluta, Malaxis porphyry, and M. tenuis. The studies are ongoing so only interim results are available. Interim results indicate...

  1. Rare Decays With LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Mancinelli, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    Rare decays involving leptons or photons in the final states are studied using 1.0 fb^{-1} of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s}=7TeV collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011. We present results of measurements of branching ratios, angular distributions, and isospin asymmetries obtained using this data sample.

  2. Afganistan and rare earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian M. Dobrescu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On our planet, over a quarter of new technologies for the economic production of industrial goods, are using rare earths, which are also called critical minerals and industries that rely on these precious items being worth of an estimated nearly five trillion dollars, or 5 percent of world gross domestic product. In the near future, competition will increase for the control of rare earth minerals embedded in high-tech products. Rare minerals are in the twenty-first century what oil accounted for in the twentieth century and coal in the nineteenth century: the engine of a new industrial revolution. Future energy will be produced increasingly by more sophisticated technological equipment based not just on steel and concrete, but incorporating significant quantities of metals and rare earths. Widespread application of these technologies will result in an exponential increase in demand for such minerals, and what is worrying is that minerals of this type are almost nowhere to be found in Europe and in other industrialized countries in the world, such as U.S. and Japan, but only in some Asian countries, like China and Afghanistan.

  3. Rare Kaon Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    2010-06-01

    The prospects for measuring the ultra-rare decays K^ + -> π ^ + ν /line ν and KL0 -> π 0 ν /line ν are discussed. Several new experiments are being constructed or have been proposed at existing facilities and ideas for reaching very high precision experiments at a future high intensity proton source like Project X ICD2 are under discussion.

  4. Surveillance of rare cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, Johannes Martinus

    2016-01-01

    The widespread incidence and effects of cancer have led to a growing development in cancer prevention in the form of screening and research programs and cancer registries. Because of the low number of patients with rare cancers this improvement is not applied to the same extent to all cancer

  5. Magnetic rare earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in molecular beam epitaxy deposition techniques have recently made it possible to grow, an atomic plane at a time, single crystalline superlattices composed of alternating layers of a magnetic rare earth, such as Gd, Dy, Ho, or Er, and metallic Y, which has an identical chemical structure...

  6. MRI Appearance of Prostatic Stromal Sarcoma in a Young Adult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Sone, Teruki; Miyaji, Yoshiyuki; Kozuka, Yuji; Ito, Katsuyoshi [Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Prostatic stromal sarcoma (PSS) is quite rare. Herein, we describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a PSS identified in a 26-year-old man with dysuria and hematuria. MRI clearly depicted the extent and multinodular appearance of the tumor, which was mainly located in the central zone of the prostate. The tumor appeared as a heterogeneously signal-hyperintense mass with a pseudocapsule on T2-weighted imaging. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI showed necrotic portions in the gradually enhanced solid mass, and diffusion-weighted imaging permitted the accurate assessment of the local extent of the tumor. Thus, the appearance on MRI was quite different from that of adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

  7. All that glitters is not BOLD: inconsistencies in functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvall, Ville; Nangini, Cathy; Hari, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal is a widely-accepted marker of brain activity. The acquisition parameters (APs) of fMRI aim at maximizing the signals related to neuronal activity while minimizing unrelated signal fluctuations. Currently, a diverse set of APs is used to acquire BOLD fMRI data. Here we demonstrate that some fMRI responses are alarmingly inconsistent across APs, ranging from positive to negative, or disappearing entirely, under identical stimulus conditions. These discrepancies, resulting from non-BOLD effects masquerading as BOLD signals, have remained largely unnoticed because studies rarely employ more than one set of APs. We identified and characterized non-BOLD responses in several brain areas, including posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, as well as AP-dependence of both the signal time courses and of seed-based functional networks, noticing that AP manipulation can inform about the origin of the measured signals.

  8. CT, MRI, and PET findings of gastric schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Minako; Amano, Yasuo; Machida, Tadashi; Kato, Shunji; Naito, Zenya; Kumita, Shinichiro

    2012-08-01

    Gastric schwannoma is a rare tumor that accounts for only 0.2 % of all gastric tumors. We report a case of gastric schwannoma that underwent computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), and its histological confirmation was acquired. Gastric schwannoma showed high intensity on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI and high maximum standardized uptake on [(18)F]-FDG-PET. Lymphadenopathy close to the tumor was also found. Although diffusion-weighted MRI, [(18)F]-FDG-PET, and the presence of lymphadenopathy could suggest malignant tumors, the detail interpretation of the other CT and MRI findings may give a clue for the diagnosis of gastric schwannoma.

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ... projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause you and/or others nearby harm. These items ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you should let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ... For more information on adverse reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents, please consult the ACR Manual on ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... be removed. MRI exams generally include multiple runs (sequences), some of which may last several minutes. The ... You may be able to relax between imaging sequences, but will be asked to maintain your position ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood ... procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after the contrast injection. If you do not ... the iodine-based contrast materials used for conventional x-rays and CT scanning. MRI of the chest is ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... period is necessary. You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On ... that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to detect and identify any metal objects. In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no ... units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not ...

  3. Constrained MRI Impedance Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plewes, Donald

    2002-01-01

    An approach for imaging electric tissue properties in vivo is proposed. The technique relies upon the integration of MRI data with electrical potential measurements made over the surface of the patient...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam ... soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x- ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... blood flow to the heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist , ... the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... for more information. top of page How should I prepare? You may be asked to wear a ... total exam time. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most MRI ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... maintain your position without movement as much as possible. You will usually be alone in the exam ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while others use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made ... Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI ... being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. The electric ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to ... MRI exam, a physician, nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter, also known as an ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... might hear during the MRI exam, answer any questions and explain the procedure to relieve their anxiety. ... in case the radiologist or technologist has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of ...

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

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    Full Text Available ... may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should always ... metal objects. In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... radiation. MR images of the heart and vascular structures are often clearer and more detailed than with ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of ... The images can then be studied from different angles by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of ...

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    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any questions and explain the procedure to relieve their anxiety. Some pediatric facilities also provide goggles or headsets ...

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    Full Text Available ... scanned and should not enter the MRI scanning area: cochlear (ear) implant some types of clips used ... but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the radiologist ...

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... there is any question of their presence, an x-ray may be taken to detect and identify ...

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    Full Text Available ... asked to wear a gown. If you have claustrophobia or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... vary between facilities. Unless you are told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at ... you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ... A physician or nurse specializing in sedation or anesthesia for children should be available during the exam ...

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    Full Text Available ... vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  17. Sinus MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissues surrounding the eye (orbital cellulitis) Nasal polyps Sinusitis -- acute Sinusitis -- chronic Talk to your provider if you have ... therefore is not typically used for suspected acute sinusitis. Alternative Names MRI of the sinuses; Magnetic resonance ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older ... believed to be caused by the injection of high doses of gadolinium-based contrast material in patients ...

  2. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you are told otherwise, ... doctor for a mild sedative prior to the exam. What is MRI of the Chest? What are ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any questions and explain the procedure to relieve their anxiety. Some pediatric facilities also provide goggles or headsets ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... by showing them a dummy scanner, play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI ... a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MR images of the heart ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam ... Foreign bodies near and especially lodged in the eyes are particularly important because they may move during ...

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist preparing patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... time an MRI takes to complete, many young children and infants require sedation to hold still for ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast materials used for ... There is a very slight risk of an allergic reaction if contrast material is injected. Such reactions are ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be ... Jewelry and other accessories should be left at home, if possible, or removed prior to the MRI ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be ... the metallic objects. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a ... traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as a ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices they may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit ... room from the scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, ... risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of another imaging procedure. ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you ... has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine-containing contrast ... information on adverse reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents, please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media . ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of ... for a mild sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while others use headphones to reduce the intensity ... magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can be damaged pins, ... devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... there is any question of their presence, an x-ray may be taken to detect and identify any ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist , ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... and may add approximately 15 minutes to the total exam time. top of page What will I ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures of structures within ...

  2. MRI of intracranial calcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jin Wha; Chang, Kee Hyun; Park, Jung Mi; Han, Moon Hee; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    Recently computed tomography(CT) has been rapidly replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosis of majority of intracranial diseases. But MRI still has some limitation, one of which is its inferiority in detecting calcification. MRI of intracranial calcification has been known to be variable in signal intensity. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI of 26 patients with intracranial calcified lesions in order to evaluate the MR intensity of calcification and to assess the capability of MRI in detecting calcification in various intracranial lesions. All the MRI were obtained using routine T1-and T2-weighted spin eco pulse sequences on 2.0T superconducting system. The 26 patients consisted of 13 brain tumors (4 oligodendrogliomas, 2 craniopharyngiomas, 2 astrocytomas, 1 gem cell tumor, 1 medulloblastoma, 1 ependympma, and pathologically unconfirmed 2 cases), 11 infectious diseases (1 paragonimiasis, 1 sparganosis, 2 cysticercosis, 3 tuberculosis, and 4 unknown cases), and 2 undetermined pathologies. Eighty-two percent (9/11) of infections disease, and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group showed signal diminution or signal void on both T1-and T2-weighted image (T1W1, T2W1). Twenty-four percent (3/13) of brain tumors showed signal diminution on both T1W1 and T2W1. In 46% (6/13) and 61% (8/13) of brain tumors the signal intensities were isointense on T1W1 and T1W1, respectively. Unexpectedly, 3 oligodendrogliomas showed high signal intensity on T1W1, two of which showed com plexed signal intensity mixed with high, iso, and low signal intensities on T2W1. In remained cases (18% (2/11) of infectious diseases and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group) the signal intensities were mixed. With simultaneous review of CT and MRI in each case, the calcification (at least one in cases showing multiple ones) was identifiable on MRI in 62% (8/13) of rumors, 82% (9/11) of infectious diseases, and 100% (2/2) in undetermined group. In 36% (4/11) of infectious diseases, fewer number of

  3. MRI in the diagnosis of diphallia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafoori, Mahyar; Varedi, Peyman [Hazrat Rasoul Akram Hospital, Radiology Department, Tehran (Iran); Hosseini, Seyed J. [Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran (Iran)

    2007-12-15

    Diphallia or duplication of the penis is an extremely rare but well-documented anomaly. According to the presence of one or two corpora cavernosa in each of the penises, diphallia is classified into two major groups of bifid phallus or true diphallia, respectively. We report a 5-year-old boy with duplication of the penis. Significant separation of the penises and their morphology made them appear as true complete phalluses, but MRI established the definitive diagnosis of bifid phallus by demonstrating the presence of one corpus cavernosum in each penis. MRI is a valuable method for achieving the accurate diagnosis of these anomalies and associated malformations. It also provides the appropriate knowledge regarding anatomical detail and assists the surgeon in decision making and preoperative planning for the optimal surgical approach. (orig.)

  4. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D L; Pichler, B J; Gückel, B

    2018-01-01

    The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants c...... of response to pharmacological interventions and therapies. As such, PET/MRI is a key to advancing medicine and patient care....

  5. MRI Physics Workshop:

    OpenAIRE

    Daryoush Saedi

    2009-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the basic principle of imaging physics helps better understanding of normal anatomy and pathological imaging findings of the diseases."n"n This is more necessary in advanced imaging techniques like MRI because of the complexity of the basic physics of the technique. In basic MRI physics workshop, we discuss about this technique from the primary concepts. The content is very simplified and is showed by slides, animation and easy pictures for better understanding...

  6. MRI of plantar fasciitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, B.; Grenier, P. [Service de Radiologie Polyvalente Diagnostique et Interventionelle, Hopital de la Pitie, 83, boulevard de l`Hopital, F-75651 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    1997-12-01

    At present, MRI is the only imaging method that can precisely visualize lesions of the superficial plantar aponeurosis, whether they be musculoaponeurositides, enthesopathies or tears, and whether they be acute or chronic, with or without complications. By its direct visualization of the lesion, MRI enables an accurate assessment of the injury to be made and thereby better orients the therapeutic strategy. (orig.) With 11 figs., 15 refs.

  7. Painful erections secondary to rare epithelioid hemangioma of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Evan; Domes, Trustin

    2014-09-01

    Epithelioid hemangioma is a rare benign vascular tumour that atypically involves the penis and usually presents as a painful nodule. A 35-year-old man presented with a 5-month history of painful erections without a clinically apparent lesion or deformity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with pharmacologically induced erection demonstrated a 1.3-cm nodular lesion deep to the skin at the base of his penis. Following local excision of the lesion, which was diagnosed as an epithelioid hemangioma, the patient was symptom free. This case demonstrates a rare etiology of painful erections with a unique presentation. To the authors' knowledge, it is also the first report of MRI with intracavernosal injection of trimix to assess for a specific cause of painful erections.

  8. MRI-guided brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of MRI-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the last two decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome with regard to local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate HDR and LDR brachytherapy has improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk (OAR) delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. PMID:24931089

  9. Rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia: Meckel's cave meningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobaid, Abdullah; Schaeffer, Todd; Virojanapa, Justin; Dehdashti, Amir R

    2015-07-01

    The most common etiology of classic trigeminal neuralgia is vascular compression. However, other causes must be excluded. It is very unlikely that a meningocele presents with symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia. We present a rare case of a patient presenting with left trigeminal neuralgia. Thin-slice CT and MRI showed a transclival Meckel's cave meningocele. The patient underwent endoscopic repair of the meningocele, which resulted in complete resolution of her symptoms. Meckel's cave meningocele or encephalocele should be considered among the differential diagnoses of trigeminal neuralgia. Meningocele repair should be suggested as the first treatment option in this rare situation.

  10. MRI of pathology-proven peripheral nerve amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Gavin A.; Broski, Stephen M.; Howe, Benjamin M.; Spinner, Robert J.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Ringler, Michael D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To highlight the MRI characteristics of pathologically proven amyloidosis involving the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and determine the utility of MRI in directing targeted biopsy for aiding diagnosis. A retrospective study was performed for patients with pathologically proven PNS amyloidosis who also underwent MRI of the biopsied or excised nerve. MRI signal characteristics, nerve morphology, associated muscular denervation changes, and the presence of multifocal involvement were detailed. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine subtypes of amyloid. Charts were reviewed to gather patient demographics, neurological symptoms and radiologist interpretation. Four men and three women with a mean age of 62 ± 11 years (range 46-76) were identified. All patients had abnormal findings on EMG with mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. All lesions demonstrated diffuse multifocal neural involvement with T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, and variable enhancement on MRI. One lesion exhibited superimposed T2 hypointensity. Six of seven patients demonstrated associated muscular denervation changes. Peripheral nerve amyloidosis is rare, and the diagnosis is difficult because of insidious symptom onset, mixed sensorimotor neurologic deficits, and the potential for a wide variety of nerves affected. On MRI, peripheral nerve involvement is most commonly characterized by T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, variable enhancement, maintenance of the fascicular architecture with fusiform enlargement, multifocal involvement and muscular denervation changes. While this appearance mimics other inflammatory neuropathies, MRI can readily detect neural changes and direct-targeted biopsy, thus facilitating early diagnosis and appropriate management. (orig.)

  11. Painful erections secondary to rare epithelioid hemangioma of the penis

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, Evan; Domes, Trustin

    2014-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioma is a rare benign vascular tumour that atypically involves the penis and usually presents as a painful nodule. A 35-year-old man presented with a 5-month history of painful erections without a clinically apparent lesion or deformity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with pharmacologically induced erection demonstrated a 1.3-cm nodular lesion deep to the skin at the base of his penis. Following local excision of the lesion, which was diagnosed as an epithelioid hemangioma...

  12. Splenic abscess: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bhatia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscess is a rare clinical entity with an incidence of 0.2-0.7% in autopsy-based studies. When untreated, splenic abscess is associated with nearly 100% mortality; in treated patients, the mortality rate is 16.6% during the first 90 days. It mostly occurs in patients with neoplasia, immunodeficiency, trauma, diabetes or splenic infarct. The incidence of splenic abscess is thought to be growing because of the increase in the number of immunocompromised patients who are particularly at risk for this disease and also because of the widespread use of diagnostic modalities. However, the optimal treatment for this remains unclear. We present a case of a 42-year-old man diagnosed with multiloculated splenic abscess and was subjected to splenectomy.

  13. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sam

    2014-04-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s)0 → μ+μ- which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ- decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ-, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s)0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160) resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ- decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ- with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  14. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Sam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s0 → μ+μ− which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ− decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ−, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160 resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ− decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ− with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  15. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhri, Asim F. [Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Siddiqui, Adeel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  16. Vaginal leiomyoma: MRI features with pathologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avantika Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of vaginal leiomyoma presenting as prolapsed vaginal mass in a 45 years old woman. The leiomyoma was found to arise from the right lateral vaginal fornix with a vascular stalk. MRI showed homogenous hypointense signals on T1W1 and iso to hyperintense signals on T2W1 images with moderate heterogenous enhancement on post contrast images. It was enucleated via vaginal route and the histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of vaginal leiomyoma.

  17. Cyclopia: A Rare Condition with Unusual Presentation - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan S.A. Salama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cyclopia (alobar holoprosencephaly (OMIM% 236100 is a rare and lethal complex human malformation, resulting from incomplete cleavage of prosencephalon into right and left hemispheres occurring between the 18th and the 28th day of gestation. Holoprosencephaly occurs in 1/16,000 live births, and 1/250 during embryogenesis. Approximately 1.05 in 100,000 births are identified as infants with cyclopia, including stillbirths. Cyclopia typically presents with a median single eye or a partially divided eye in a single orbit, absent nose, and a proboscis above the eye. Extracranial malformations described in stillbirths with cyclopia include polydactyl, renal dysplasia, and an omphalocele. The etiology of this rare syndrome, which is incompatible with life, is still largely unknown. Most cases are sporadic. Heterogeneous risk factors have been implicated as possible causes. Case Presentation A live full-term baby with birth weight of 2900 g, product of cesarean section because of severe fetal bradycardia, was born at Prince Hashem Military Hospital – Zarqa city/Jordan. This newborn was the first baby to a non-consanguineous family, and a healthy 18-year-old mother, with no history of drug ingestion or febrile illnesses during pregnancy. Antenatal history revealed severe hydrocephalus diagnosed early by intrauterine ultrasound but the pregnancy was not terminated because of the lack of medical legitimization in the country. On examination, the newborn was found to have a dysmorphic face, with a median single eye, absence of nose, micrognathia, and a proboscis above the eye, all of which made cyclopia the possible initial diagnosis. Multiple unusual abdominal defects were present that include a huge omphalocele containing whole liver and spleen, urinary bladder extrophy, and undefined abnormal external genitalia, which called for urgent confirmation. Brain MRI was done and revealed findings consistent with alobar holoprosencephaly (cyclopia

  18. Enterogenous cyst as a rare cause of hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ye; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-biao; Hou, Ying-yong; Xie, Tao

    2011-04-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is most frequently caused by vascular compression of the facial nerve at the root exit zone of the brain stem, but there are other rare causes. An enterogenous cyst (EC) is a rare congenital lesion which occurs rarely in the cerebellopontine angle. The authors report a patient with HFS from an EC and review unusual causes of HFS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bilateral Double Maxillary Paramolars: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Aydin; Dag, Hakan; Altug, Hasan Ayberk; Sencimen, Metin

    2017-08-01

    Paramolars are rare supernumerary molars occurring buccally or lingually/palatally near the molar row. They may cause complications such as caries, periodontal disease and delay or prevention eruption of permanent teeth. Reports of bilateral entity are rarely found in the dental literature. The present article reports a rare case of bilateral double paramolars in the maxillary molar region in 21-year-old male patient.

  20. A Rare Complication of Tuberculosis: Acute Paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Teoman; Taşpınar, Özgür; Keskin, Yasar; Kepekçi, Müge; Güneşer, Meryem; Çamlı, Adil; Seyithanoğlu, Hakan; Kızıltan, Huriye; Eriş, Ali Hikmet

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculous radiculomyelitis(TBRM) is one of the complications of neurological tuberculosis and includes cases of arachnoiditis, intradural spinal tuberculoma or granuloma, and spinal cord complications of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). Here, we report a case of TBRM which presented with acute paraplegia. Neurological examination on admission revealed flaccid paralysis, bilateral extensor plantar responses, and exaggerated deep tendon reflexes. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed xanthochromic fluid that contained 600 cells/mm3, 98% lymphocytes, protein 318 mg/dl and glucose 51 mg/dl (blood glucose 118 mg/dl). On thorax CT, calcified lymph nodes that were sequelae of primary tuberculosis infection was detected. Antituberculosis and intravenous corticosteroids treatment was started. Seven weeks from the onset, on-control spinal MRI myelomalacia was determined, and there was no leptomeningeal enhancement. After six weeks of rehabilitation, lower limb total motor score was increased from 0/50 to 15/50. Tuberculous radiculomyelitis is a complication of TBM. It is rarely seen.

  1. MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  2. MRI in Japanese encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Misra, U.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Kalita, J. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Salwani, V. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gupta, R.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gujral, R. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-03-01

    We document the MRI features in seven patients with Japanese encephalitis. MRI was carried out on a 1.5 T system within 10-60 days of onset. In all the patients MRI revealed bilateral thalamic lesions, haemorrhagic in five. Signal changes were present in the cerebrum in four patients, the midbrain and cerebellum in three each, the pons in two and the basal ganglia in one. The lesions were haemorrhagic in three of the four patients with lesions in the cortex, two of the three with lesions in the midbrain and cerebellum, but the pontine lesions were haemorrhagic in both patients. Spinal cord involvement was seen in one of the three patients who underwent MRI. In two patients MRI was repeated 3 years after the onset, showing marked reduction in abnormal signal; and all the lesions gave low signal on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Bilateral thalamic involvement, especially haemorrhagic, may be considered characteristic of Japanese encephalitis, especially in endemic areas. (orig.)

  3. A rare cause of symptomatic cluster headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Prasanna Eswaradass

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cluster headache (CH is characterized by recurrent attacks of short-lasting excruciating pain accompanied by signs of autonomic dysfunction. Although neuroimaging results are usually normal in primary headaches, rarely structural lesions may be associated with CH like presentation. Most symptomatic CH is due to pituitary tumors and less commonly due to arteriovenous malformations (AVM and aneurysms. Here we describe a case of 44-year-old male who presented to us with new onset episodic CH with headache features typical. Initially, headache responded to treatment, but later the headache became continuous, severe in intensity and refractory to treatment. Since magnetic resonance imaging was normal, he was subjected to digital substraction angiography (DSA to rule out aneurysm or AVM. DSA revealed indirect carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF. Once the fistula was obliterated with onyx embolization, headache subsided completely. MRI brain is often routinely performed in CH to rule out secondary causes. When MRI brain is normal, detailed vascular imaging with DSA must be performed in patients with CH with especially in those with atypical features. Like continuous pain refractory to treatment, sudden increase in severity in the first episode, minimal or absent autonomic features and abnormal physical findings like persistent ptosis in the headache-free period. Although many cases of symptomatic CH have been reported in literature we report the first case of CCF presenting as CH. Early identification is essential as it is completely curable with endovascular treatment.

  4. A Rare Neurological Involvement in Sjogrens Syndrome: Abducens Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Ugan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren%u2019s syndrome (SS is an autoimmune disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of exocrine organs. Although neurological involvement occurs in approximately one quarter of patients, involvement of cranial nerves is a relatively rare occurrence. Here a rare case of cranial neuropathy related to SS is reported.

  5. A rare presentation of prostate adenocarcinoma metastatic to the maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata S Prathi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumors of the orofacial region are uncommon and may occur in the oral soft tissues and jaw bones. The occurrence of prostate as the primary site for jaw metastasis is extremely rare. Mandible and palate are the common prostate metastatic sites. Here, we present a rare case of prostate adenocarcinoma metastatic to maxilla.

  6. A rare case of massive hepatosplenomegaly due to acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer in pregnancy is rare, occurring in about one in 1 000 preg nancies.[1] The most .... hypertension. The case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for uncommon causes of massive hepatosplenomegaly as well as rare ... veries in 73% of 160 pregnant patients treated with anthracycline.

  7. Cavernous Lymphangioma of the Lower Lip- A Rare Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lymphangioma are rare, benign, and hamartomatous tumors of the lymphatic vessels, that show a marked predilection for the head and neck region. Very few cases of Cavernous lymphangioma have been reported to occur in the lower lip. We report a rare case of Cavernous Lymphangioma of the lower lip in a 13 years old ...

  8. Lingual fibrolipoma – a rare clinicopathological entity | Mungul ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipoma is a relatively common benign tumour occurring at sites of the body which are rich in adipose tissue. Due to sparsity of adipose tissue within the oral cavity, lipoma rarely presents in this region. Fibrolipoma of the tongue is a rare lesion. There are only 14 cases reported in the literature. An 85-year-old patient ...

  9. Invasive Breast Cancer Preferably and Predominantly Occurs at the Interface Between Fibroglandular and Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenlian; Harvey, Susan; Macura, Katarzyna J; Euhus, David M; Artemov, Dmitri

    2017-02-01

    Increasing evidence suggests adipocyte involvement in malignant breast tumor invasive front or margin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the location of invasive breast tumors in relation to fibroglandular and adipose tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Pretreatment breast DCE-MRI images of 294 patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer from 2008 to 2014 were studied. Invasive breast tumors were visualized as enhanced lesions in the postcontrast subtraction images. Positive identification of biopsy-confirmed invasive breast tumors on DCE-MRI images was achieved by correlation of findings from breast MRI and pathology reports. Tumor location in relation to fibroglandular and adipose tissue was investigated using precontrast T1-weighted MRI images. Of 294 patients, 291 had DCE-MRI discernable invasive breast tumors located at the interface between fibroglandular and adipose tissues, regardless of the tumor size, type, receptor status, or breast composition. Invasive breast cancer preferably and predominantly occurs adjacent to breast adipose tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [MRI for myocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutberlet, M; Lücke, C; Krieghoff, C; Hildebrand, L; Lurz, P; Steiner, J; Adam, J; Eitel, I; Thiele, H; Grothoff, M; Grotthoff, M; Lehmkuhl, L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has become the primary tool for the non-invasive assessment in patients with suspected myocarditis, especially after exclusion of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for the differential diagnosis. Various MRI parameters are available which have different accuracies. Volumetric and functional ventricular assessment and the occurrence of pericardial effusion alone demonstrate only a poor sensitivity and specificity. The calculation of the T2-ratio (edema assessment), the early or global relative myocardial enhancement (gRE) and the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), which represents irreversibly injured myocardium, are more specific parameters. All MRI parameters demonstrate the best accuracy in infarct-like acute myocarditis, whereas in chronic myocarditis sensitivity and specificity are less accurate. Therefore, a multisequential (at least two out of three parameters are positive) approach is recommended. The assessment of the value of newer, more quantitative MRI sequences, such as T1 and T2-mapping is still under investigation.

  11. MRI Conditional Pacemakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, magnetic resonance [MR] imaging is an absolute contraindication for those with an implanted pacemaker.This represents a significant clinical problem as several studies have shown approximately 75% of patients with pacemakers will have an indication for an MRI scan. Patients over the age of 65 are twice as likely to require an MRI and 80% of pacemaker patients are over the age of 65. MR imaging is an important source of information for neurological disorders and several soft tissue abnormalities. Hence denying this important diagnostic modality for those with an implanted pacemaker and other cardiac implantable electronic devices [CIED] is a tremendous clinical problem both because of concerns about MRI signals interfering with the function of the pacemaker and the pacemaker in turn interfering with the MR images.

  12. MRI of oriental cholangiohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wani, N.A., E-mail: ahmad77chinar@gmail.co [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India); Robbani, I.; Kosar, T. [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India)

    2011-02-15

    Oriental cholangiohepatitis (OCH) also called recurrent pyogenic cholangitis is characterized by intrahepatic duct calculi, strictures, and recurrent infections. In turn cholangitis can result in multiple hepatic abscesses, further biliary strictures, and in severe cases, progressive hepatic parenchymal destruction, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and conventional T1-weighted (T1 W) and T2-weighted (T2 W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings have been described in patients with OCH. MRCP findings include duct dilation, strictures, and calculi. MRCP can help to localize the diseased ducts and determine the severity of involvement. T1 and T2 W sequences reveal the parenchymal changes of atrophy, abscess formation, and portal hypertension in addition to calculi. Post-treatment changes are also well depicted using MRI. Comprehensive, non-invasive assessment is achieved by using conventional MRI and MRCP in OCH providing a roadmap for endoscopic or surgical management.

  13. A Rarely Seen Multilevel Thoracic Vertebral Fracture after a Nocturnal Hypoglycemic Convulsion Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Atalar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 49-year-old male presented with acute midthoracic severe back pain following a witnessed nocturnal convulsion attack. There was no history of trauma and the patient had a 23-year history of Type I diabetes mellitus. MRI scans of the thoracic spine revealed compression fractures at T5, T6, T7, and T8 vertebrae. The patient was treated conservatively. At 17 months after the initial diagnosis, the complaints of back pain had been resolved and the patient was able to easily undertake daily living activities. Hypoglycaemia is a common problem in diabetic patients treated with insulin. Convulsions may occur as a consequence of insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Nontraumatic compression fractures of the thoracic spine following seizures are a rare injury. Contractions of strong paraspinal muscles can lead to compression fracture of the midthoracic spine. Unrecognized hypoglycaemia should be considered to be a possible cause of convulsions in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. The aim of this report is to point out a case of rarely seen multilevel consecutive vertebrae fractures in a diabetic patient after a nocturnal hypoglycaemic convulsion attack.

  14. An Erupted Dilated Odontoma: A Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dilated odontoma is an extremely rare developmental anomaly represented as a dilatation of the crown and root as a consequence of a deep, enamel-lined invagination and is considered a severe variant of dens invaginatus. An oval shape of the tooth lacking morphological characteristics of a crown or root implies that the invagination happened in the initial stages of morphodifferentiation. Spontaneous eruption of an odontoma is a rare occurrence and the occurrence of a dilated odontoma in a supernumerary tooth is even rarer with only a few case reports documented in the English literature. We present an extremely rare case of erupted dilated odontoma occurring in the supernumerary tooth in anterior maxillary region in an 18-year-old male, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever case reported in English literature.

  15. MRI in a case of muslin-induced granuloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brochert, A.; Reynolds, T. [Radiology Department, Memorial Health University Medical Center, 4700 Waters Avenue, Savannah, GA 31404 (United States); Baker, R. [Neurological Institute of Savannah, 4 Jackson Boulevard, Savannah, GA 31405 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    When intracranial aneurysms are deemed nonclippable, an accepted alternative neurosurgical treatment is to reinforce the aneurysm wall by wrapping or coating it with various materials, including muslin (cotton gauze). Granulomatous or ''foreign-body'' reactions, sometimes referred to as ''muslinomas'' or ''gauzomas,'' and adhesive arachnoiditis are known but rare complications. Experience with MRI in these cases is limited. We describe the clinical and MRI features of a muslinoma developing after treatment of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. (orig.)

  16. Membranous lipodystrophy: skeletal findings on CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nwawka, O.K.; Schneider, Robert; Mintz, Douglas N. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Bansal, Manjula [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Lane, Joseph [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Membranous lipodystrophy, also known as Nasu-Hakola disease, is a rare hereditary condition with manifestations in the nervous and skeletal systems. The radiographic appearance of skeletal lesions has been well described in the literature. However, CT and MRI findings of lesions in the bone have not been documented to date. This report describes the radiographic, CT, MRI, and histopathologic skeletal findings in a case of membranous lipodystrophy. With corroborative pathologic findings, a diagnosis of membranous lipodystrophy on imaging allows for appropriate clinical management of disease manifestations. (orig.)

  17. Membranous lipodystrophy: skeletal findings on CT and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwawka, O Kenechi; Schneider, Robert; Bansal, Manjula; Mintz, Douglas N; Lane, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Membranous lipodystrophy, also known as Nasu-Hakola disease, is a rare hereditary condition with manifestations in the nervous and skeletal systems. The radiographic appearance of skeletal lesions has been well described in the literature. However, CT and MRI findings of lesions in the bone have not been documented to date. This report describes the radiographic, CT, MRI, and histopathologic skeletal findings in a case of membranous lipodystrophy. With corroborative pathologic findings, a diagnosis of membranous lipodystrophy on imaging allows for appropriate clinical management of disease manifestations.

  18. Lipomatosis of the sciatic nerve: typical and atypical MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Bernadette Zhi Ying [Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); University College London, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Amrami, Kimberly K.; Wenger, Doris E. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Dyck, P. James B. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurology, Rochester, MN (United States); Scheithauer, Bernd W. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology, Rochester, MN (United States); Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Lipomatosis of nerve, also known as fibrolipomatous hamartoma, is a rare condition of nerve, usually affecting the median nerve. The MRI appearance is characteristic. We describe two cases of lipomatosis of nerve involving the sciatic nerve, an extremely unusual location for this lesion, in patients with sciatic neuropathy. These cases share the typical features previously described in the literature for other nerves, but also contain atypical features not previously highlighted, relating to the variability in distribution and extent of the fatty deposition. Recognition of the MRI appearance of this entity is important in order to avoid unnecessary attempts at surgical resection of this lesion. (orig.)

  19. Pediatric Burkitt lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis: MRI characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amodio, John; Brodsky, Jennie E. [SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare initial presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with few reported cases described in older adults and even fewer in children. MRI features of Burkitt lymphoma of the pancreas are sparse in the radiologic literature. We present a 6-year-old boy who presented with pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice, which was the result of Burkitt lymphoma of the pancreas. The imaging findings of pancreatic involvement of Burkitt lymphoma on MRI are discussed and the contributory role of the radiologist in guiding the appropriate clinical work-up of this disease is highlighted. (orig.)

  20. MRI Findings of Brucellar Spondylitis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Young Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Wonju Christian Hospital, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Brucellosis is a systemic infectious disease, and musculoskeletal involvement is a frequent complication. Particularly, spondylitis is a common involvement. However, early diagnosis of brucellar spondylitis is often difficult due to non-specific clinical symptoms and long latent period. Especially in Korea, where tuberculosis is an endemic disease, differentiation between tuberculous and brucellar spondylitis is clinically and radiologically more challenging. A 59-year-old male cattle farmer, who presented with non-specific back pain, had spondylitis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and serologic test finally confirmed brucellar spondylitis. Therefore, we report a case of a rather rare disease in Korea, brucellar spondylitis with a review of MRI findings.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

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  4. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems....... Minimizing image noise and maximizing system stability is critical in fMRI because the blood oxygenation level- dependent (BOLD) signal changes that are used for most fMRI studies represent only a small fraction of the total MR signal. In addition, multiple imaging volumes must be acquired over time to track...... cognitive processes. As a result, MRI scanners must have excellent time-series stability to accurately measure BOLD signal changes over the course of a long time series (typically on the order of 10 min per scan). fMRI studies are particularly demanding on the scanner hardware because they utilize fast...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... may not fit into the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... than 30 minutes from the onset of symptoms. Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  3. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight for Me? What Is an Intellectual Disability? Movie: Endocrine System Getting an MRI ... MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of the inside of the body. The test is painless. All you'll need ...

  4. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Weight for Me? What Is an Intellectual Disability? Movie: Endocrine System Getting an MRI ... MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of the inside of the body. The test is painless. All you'll need ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) before being safe for MRI ... devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. ... information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... MRI. For more information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ...

  12. A rare sight

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso and The LHCb Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Today, at the Hadron Collider Physics Symposium in Kyoto, the LHCb collaboration has presented the evidence of a very rare B decay, the rarest ever seen. The result further shrinks the region in which scientists can still look for supersymmetry.   The graph showing evidence of the Bs0 → μ+ μ- decay. The result was presented Monday 12 November at the HCP Conference in Kyoto (photo courtesy of the LHCb Collaboration). Particle decays tell us about the inner properties and functioning of Nature’s physics processes. By studying them and their occurrence, physicists infer the rules that control them. Often, it turns out that some rare decays, which are very difficult to observe, are those in which Nature could reveal the presence of new physics. This is the case of some decays of the Bs0 particle (a particle made of a bottom anti-quark bound to a strange quark), and in particular Bs0 → μ+ μ- whose...

  13. Rare B decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, P M

    2001-01-01

    The results of the LEP experiments for rare B decays will be reviewed, covering hadronic final states, radiative and other rare decays and results for the inclusive charmless branching ratio. (8 refs).

  14. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cliques Make Kids Feel Left Out Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI can help physicians evaluate the structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of the ...

  16. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Go to School? Breast Cancer Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed ...

  17. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor: Rare Manifestation in Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, William Phillip Pereira da; Zavarez, Larissa Balbo; Zanferrari, Fernando Luiz; Schussel, Juliana Lucena; Faverani, Leonardo Pérez; Jung, Juliana Elizabeth; Sassi, Laurindo Moacir

    2017-11-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor and plasma cell granuloma, is a tumor that occurs most often in the lungs, abdomen, skin, soft tissue, genital system, and mediastinal. Before surgery, the diagnosis is difficult to establish because of its diverse manifestations. In the head and neck, manifestation is rare and may occur in the upper respiratory tract, soft tissues, orbits, and skull base. This article aims to report a rare manifestation of the disease in the face, highlighting the importance of a correct diagnosis to determine the most appropriate form of treatment, in male patient, leucoderma, 22 years old, with complain of a painless unilateral growth in the left cheek, beginning 2 months before and with progressive growth.

  18. Incidental discovery of circle contact lens by MRI: you can't scan my poker face, circle contact lens as a potential MRI hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokue, Hiroyuki; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Tokue, Azusa; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2013-03-25

    Circle contact lenses, also known as color contact lenses and big eye contact lenses, are a type of cosmetic contact lens. It is not generally known that a circle contact lens usually contains iron oxide and other metals, which means their use during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a potential hazard. We present a rare case of incidental discovery of circle contact lenses by MRI and MRI images of circle lenses in vitro. Circle contact lenses usually contain iron oxide, which is a known source of susceptibility artifact on MRI. Not only radiologists and radiographers but also referring physicians should be familiar with the imaging findings and potential risk of scanning circle contact lenses by MRI.

  19. Incidental discovery of circle contact lens by MRI: you can’t scan my poker face, circle contact lens as a potential MRI hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Circle contact lenses, also known as color contact lenses and big eye contact lenses, are a type of cosmetic contact lens. It is not generally known that a circle contact lens usually contains iron oxide and other metals, which means their use during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a potential hazard. Case presentation We present a rare case of incidental discovery of circle contact lenses by MRI and MRI images of circle lenses in vitro. Conclusions Circle contact lenses usually contain iron oxide, which is a known source of susceptibility artifact on MRI. Not only radiologists and radiographers but also referring physicians should be familiar with the imaging findings and potential risk of scanning circle contact lenses by MRI. PMID:23530981

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have allergies of any kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam contains a ... patients with iodine contrast allergy. It is far less common for a patient ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  2. MRI in suspected appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, M.M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift richt zich op de optimalisatie van beeldvormende diagnostiek bij patiënten met een klinische verdenking op appendicitis, waarbij het gebruik van ‘magnetic resonance imaging’ (MRI) wordt verkend. Het proefschrift omvat de resultaten van de OPTIMAP-studie (OPTimisation of IMaging

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning ... and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... into the scanning room also need to remove metal objects and notify the technologist of any medical or electronic devices they may have. top of page What ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exam time. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most MRI exams ... areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo. ...

  6. MRI in decompression illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hierholzer, J.; Stroszczynski, C.; Hosten, N.; Felix, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany); Tempka, A. [Dept. of Traumatology, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany); Amodio, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Federico II di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Haas, J. [Dept. of Neurology, Juedisches Krankenhaus Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    We report a case of decompression illness in which the patient developed paraparesis during scuba diving after rapid ascent. MRI of the spine revealed a focal intramedullary lesion consistent with the symptoms. The pathophysiological and radiological aspects of spinal decompression illness are discussed. (orig.)

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sedation or anesthesia. Alternatively, certain pediatric facilities have child life personnel who can work with younger children to help avoid the need for sedation or anesthesia. They prepare the children ... play the noises that the child might hear during the MRI exam, answer any ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it difficult to lie still during imaging. A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant or other metallic object sometimes makes it difficult to obtain clear images due to ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients with iodine contrast allergy. It is far less common for a patient to have an allergy to ... The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast materials used for ...

  12. MRI and Anesthesia & Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Esen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1945 Broch & Purcell described as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. It wasused for chemical and biochemical analyses for long years. It was widelyused in medical applications after Lauterbur et al. ‘s study in 1973 (1.The primary screening method for breast cancer is mammography asknown. It is the only method that positively affects survival. But itssensitivity and specificity is not 100% and it can be an inadequate methodat some ages. Studies showed that: MRI imaging added mammographyincreased success rates but increased false positivity rates can cause someunnecessary invasive procedures. Although these breast MRI is widely usedfor screening, diagnosis and staging (2.More than 80 million MRI is worldwide applied yearly. Claustrophobia ratesare between 1-15% and more than 2 million breast MRI application isinterrupted for the necessitation of sedation (3. Melendez et al. noticedthat rate around 30%. Also 3-5% of these cases were interrupted due tothe sedation necessitation. Anxiety and claustrophobia can cause sequencerepeating, procedure cancellation and important time and labor loss.

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. ... should be available during the exam for your child's safety. You will be given special instructions for ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Sponsored ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are ... including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  17. Anthropogenic rare earth elements and their spatial distributions in the Han River, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyeongseok; Shin, Woo-Jin; Ryu, Jong-Sik; Shin, Hyung Seon; Chung, Heesun; Lee, Kwang-Sik

    2017-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) consist of lanthanides (from La to Lu), together with yttrium and scandium, in which anthropogenic REE, such as gadolinium (Gd), lanthanum (La), and samarium (Sm), has emerged as micro-contaminants in natural waters in highly developed countries. Here, we collected water samples in the Han River (HR) and its tributaries flowing through Seoul Capital Area, the world's second largest metropolitan area in order to examine how and to what extent anthropogenic REE anomalies may occur. Water samples show higher light REE concentrations than heavy REE concentrations, while wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) samples display much higher heavy REE concentrations due to high Gd concentration. The PAAS-normalized REE patterns indicate that WWTP samples display the pronounced positive Gd anomalies, in which anthropogenic Gd from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnostic system occurs as a form of Gd complexation with either Cl- or SO42-. Due to the WWTP, both the HR and tributaries show also positive Gd anomalies and the anthropogenic Gd concentrations increase as a function of the distance from the Paldang dam. This result indicates a positive correlation between populaton, number of MRI instruments, and positive Gd anomaly. Similarly, positive La and Sm anomalies exist in the HR, indicating that the HR is also affected by their point sources. Based on the discharge rate and anthropogenic REE concentrations, their fluxes are estimated to be 952 ± 319 kg/yr, suggesting that this amount of fluxes could disturb REE distribution in the Yellow Sea, and pose harmful effects on aquatic ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MRI of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Imaging features and recommended MRI protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.A.; Sellar, R.J.; Zeidler, M.; Colchester, A.C.F.; Knight, R.; Will, R.G

    2001-09-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a rare, progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific histopathological features. Of the four subtypes of CJD described, the commonest is sporadic CJD (sCJD). More recently, a new clinically distinct form of the disease affecting younger patients, known as variant CJD (vCJD), has been identified, and this has been causally linked to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in cattle. Characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been identified in several forms of CJD; sCJD may be associated with high signal changes in the putamen and caudate head and vCJD is usually associated with hyperintensity of the pulvinar (posterior nuclei) of the thalamus. These appearances and other imaging features are described in this article. Using appropriate clinical and radiological criteria and tailored imaging protocols, MRI plays an important part in the in vivodiagnosis of this disease. Collie, D.A. et al. (2001)

  19. Experience of brain checkup by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, Youichi [Self Defence Force Sasebo Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan); Hirata, Fumihiko; Gotoh, Masayuki; Fujita, Kazuyuki; Makiyama, Takao; Ishikawa, Junichiro

    1996-09-01

    We performed head MRI and MR angiography (MRA) to find asymptomatic central nervous system (CNS) diseases and to prevent their development as a group health care. We performed 583 head MRI and MRAs since on March 1991 for the staff lived in Self Defence Force (SDF) Maizuru guard area whose age was 40 years, who reached the retirement age and had the risk factor of the cerebral vascular disease. We found 119 subcortical lesions, 26 asymptomatic cerebral infarctions, 6 unruptured cerebral aneurysm, 2 pituitary adenomas, 4 venous angiomas. For 5 cases of asymptomatic cerebral infarction, we prescribed anti-platelet agglutination drugs, there was no people whose disease became symptomatic. For unruptured cerebral aneurysms and pituitary adenomas, we did operation, everyone attained social rehabilitation. Before equipment of the MRI in SDF Maizuru hospital, 2 ruptured cerebral aneurysms occurs. There were no subarachnoid hemorrhage patient since our challenge started in SDF Maizuru guard area. It is useful to clarify the etiology of CNS disease and for group health care, using head MRI as medical checkup. (author)

  20. FIBULAR HEMIMELIA: A RARE CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisay, Samuel; Admassie, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Fibular hemimelia is a rare congenital absence of the fibula that may occur as an isolated anomaly or as a part of a malformation syndrome. Shortening of the extremity is obvious at birth with leg-length discrepancy. On plain radiograph of the leg and foot, significant deficiency or absence of the fibula can be seen. In this case report, a 6 year old boy with fibular hemimelia is presented. Radiological diagnosis and differential diagnosis are discussed.

  1. Childhood sarcoidosis: A rare but fascinating disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gedalia Abraham; Shetty Avinash K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Childhood sarcoidosis is a rare multisystemic granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology. In the pediatric series reported from the southeastern United States, sarcoidosis had a higher incidence among African Americans. Most reported childhood cases have occurred in patients aged 13–15 years. Macrophages bearing an increased expression of major histocompatibility class (MHC) II molecules most likely initiate the inflammatory response of sarcoidosis by presenting an unidentified antig...

  2. [A rare endolaryngeal tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Carine; Albert, Sébastien; Barry, Beatrix; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Couvelard, Anne; Hourseau, Muriel

    2017-10-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with a dysphonia. ENT tomography and laryngoscopy showed an endolaryngeal tumoral lesion extended to the right supraglottis. Biopsy of the lesion revealed dense lymphoid infiltrate in the lamina propria, without necrosis or ulceration of the mucosa. The infiltrate showed many CD3+, CD5+, CD4+, CD8+ lymphocytes and plasmocytes. Larger lymphoid cells with cytologic atypia expressed CD56 and cytotoxicity markers such as TIA1 and granzyme B. In situ hybridization for EBV revealed numerous positive cells. The diagnosis of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma was proposed. The primary laryngeal localization of this disease is exceptionally rare. Heavy admixture of inflammatory cells may mimic inflammatory process and delay the diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. MRI of the cardiomyopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it

    2001-06-01

    We examined the potentialities of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the main cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive and arrhythmogenic right ventricular. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is generally adequately investigated by echocardiography, that well defines the myocardial thickening and the obstruction of the left ventricular output. However, by echocardiography we still have difficulties in the evaluation of the apex of the left ventricle and the right ventricle involvement. MRI provides a complete evaluation of the heart with a clear evidence also of the echocardiographic dark zones by means of a clear evidence of the apex of the right ventricle. The dilated form is also well investigated by MRI that provides a clear evaluation of the volumes, mass and ejection fraction by means of the 3D analysis including conditions of the ventricular remodelling. Moreover, this technique helps in the differential diagnosis of acute myocarditis. In the acute phase of myocarditis (first 2 weeks), in fact, the myocardium produces high signal intensity on the T2 weighted sequences due to the presence of oedema. The third form of cardiomyopathy is the restrictive one, characterised by reduced diastolic filling and diastolic volume, normality of the systolic function and parietal thickness, interstitial fibrosis and enlargement of both atria. The mean potentiality of MRI is related to the differential diagnosis with constrictive pericarditis. Only in the former, the pericardium appears irregularly thickened with areas exceeding 4 mm of pericardial thickness. Finally, the right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy represents the main indication to MRI evaluation. With this imaging modality we are can obtain a clear morpho-functional evaluation of the right ventricle and distinguish the intramyocardial adipose substitution characterised by areas of high signal in the myocardium.

  4. Rare cancers are not so rare: The rare cancer burden in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatta, Gemma; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Casali, Paolo G.; Siesling, Sabine; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Kunkler, Ian; Otter, Renee; Licitra, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Epidemiologic information on rare cancers is scarce. The project Surveillance of Rare Cancers in Europe (RARECARE) provides estimates of the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare cancers in Europe based on a new and comprehensive list of these diseases. Materials and methods: RARECARE

  5. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Frederick J A; Goraj, Bozena

    2014-06-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to exclude other pathology. Possibly, brain MRI at higher magnetic field strengths could provide new diagnostic markers. In recent years, new imaging techniques such as susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), diffusion (tensor) MRI, magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), and functional MRI (f-MRI) have been applied to patient cohorts with PD to improve understanding of pathophysiologic changes, including functional connectivity. These advanced MRI techniques hold promise to provide additional diagnostic markers for early stage PD, as demonstrated by diffusional changes in the orbital-frontal region in the pre-motor phase of PD. Whether these advanced MRI techniques provide new diagnostic markers for early stage PD, remains a debate. Standardization of scanning protocols and post-processing methods, and validation of diagnostic criteria is crucial for these advanced MRI techniques. For this, well designed prospective clinical cohort studies are needed.

  6. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI in patients suffering from lymphoma: how much MRI information is really needed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, Julian; Heusch, Philipp; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Deuschl, Cornelius; Grueneisen, Johannes; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of different reading protocols, entailing non-enhanced/contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging for lesion detection and determination of the tumor stage in lymphoma patients. A total of 101 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI datasets including a (1) transverse T2-w HASTE and {sup 18}F-FDG PET (PET/MRI{sub 1}), (2) with an additional contrast enhanced VIBE (PET/MRI{sub 2}), and (3) with additional diffusion-weighted imaging (PET/MRI{sub 3}) were evaluated. Scans were performed for initial staging, restaging during treatment, or at the end of treatment and under surveillance with suspicion for tumor relapse. In all datasets lymphoma manifestations as well as tumor stage in analogy to the revised criteria of the Ann Arbor staging system were determined. Furthermore, potential changes in therapy compared to the reference standard were evaluated. Hitherto performed PET/CT and all available follow-up and prior examinations as well as histopathology served as reference standard. PET/MRI{sub 1} correctly identified 53/55 patients with active lymphoma and 190/205 lesions. Respective values were 55/55, 202/205 for PET/MRI{sub 2} and 55/55, 205/205 for PET/MRI{sub 3}. PET/MRI{sub 1} determined correct tumor stage in 88 out of 101 examinations, and corresponding results for PET/MRI{sub 2} were 95 out of 101 and 96 out of 101 in PET/MRI{sub 3}. Relating to the reference standard changes in treatment would occur in 11% based on PET/MRI{sub 1}, in 6% based on PET/MRI{sub 2}, and in 3% based on PET/MRI{sub 3}. The additional application of contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted imaging to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI resulted in higher diagnostic competence, particularly for initial staging and correct classification of the disease extent with potential impact on patient and therapy management. (orig.)

  7. MRI of fibrous cortical defect and non-ossifying fibroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, Yoshiko; Aoki, Takatoshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Nakata, Hajime; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshitaka [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    Fibrous cortical defect and non-ossifying fibroma are the benign fibrous lesions of bone commonly involving children. Their diagnosis is usually done with radiography, and MR examinations are rarely performed. We evaluated MRI findings of 11 lesions in 10 cases of fibrous cortical defect and non-ossifying fibroma. Signal intensity of the lesions was varied and large lesions (2 cm<) tended to show heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images corresponding to a mixture of components including fibrous tissue, hemosiderin and foam cells. MRI helps to delineate the extent of the involved bone and to assess the various histological components of the lesions. However, their diagnosis is basically made on the radiographic findings and the role of MRI is limited. (author)

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a contrast injection minimizes the risk of this very rare complication. There is a ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the 1980s with no reports of any ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, ... very rare occasions, a few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) disease. characterize mediastinal or pleural lesions seen by other ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, a few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... very rare occasions, a few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and ...

  15. Rare kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances spanning several orders of magnitude in sensitivity are anticipated in the current round of experiments with rare kaon decays. Observations of allowed processes, like /Kappa//sup +/ /yields/ /pi//sup +/ /nu//nu/-bar and /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu//sup +//mu//sup -/, shed light on detailed aspects of the standard model. New sources of T or CP violation could be manifested by measurements of muon polarization in /Kappa/ /yields/ /delta//mu//nu//sub /mu// and /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu//sup +//mu//sup -/ decays and by studies of reactions like /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /pi//sup 0/e/sup +/e/sup -/. Evidence for new particlews and new interactions could appear in advanced efforts to observe /Kappa/ /yields/ /pi/chichi' and /Kappa/ /yields/ /pi/chi decays, where chi and chi' represent hypothethetical neutral particles, and in searches for lepton flavor violating processes /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu/e and /Kappa//sup +/ /yields/ /pi//sup +/ /mu/e. The experiments are reviewed and their theoretical context is discussed.

  16. A Rare Case of Clavicle Osteomyelitis in a Child and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisavet-Anna Chrysochoou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute clavicle osteomyelitis in children is rare representing <3% of osteomyelitis cases. We treated a 12-year-old boy who presented with acute pain in the right clavicle and high fever for 4 days. MRI showed abnormal signal in the right clavicle with periosteal reaction. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from blood was susceptible to methicillin, clindamycin, and macrolides. Clindamycin was given intravenously for 3 wks and orally for another 3 wks with no recurrence. We reviewed clavicle osteomyelitis cases in children searching PubMed English literature. From a total of 89 studies retrieved, only 6 fulfilled the criteria and were analyzed. Sixteen patients (56% female were included with a median age of 9 yrs (range 2 wks–16 yrs. Osteomyelitis was hematogenous in most cases, with S. aureus being the most frequent cause, isolated from either blood or tissue. Symptoms included fever, swelling, and localized bone tenderness. Antimicrobial therapy lasted for 4–12 weeks (median 7.5. Three patients required drainage or curettage. Recurrence occurred in 1/16 cases (6.2% and persistence of symptoms occurred to 2/16 cases (12.5% reported before 90s with unknown antimicrobial susceptibility of the pathogen. Acute clavicle osteomyelitis mainly affects older children and has generally good prognosis. Staphylococcus aureus is most commonly implicated and surgery may be needed.

  17. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  18. Transverse colon cancer occurring at a colostomy site 35 years after colostomy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Chiyo; Hidaka, Eiji; Shimada, Mari; Shimada, Shoji; Nakahara, Kenta; Takayanagi, Daisuke; Takehara, Yusuke; Mukai, Shumpei; Sawada, Naruhiko; Ishida, Fumio; Kudo, Shin-Ei

    2015-01-01

    Background Carcinomas occurring at colostomy sites are rare, and most of these are metachronous colorectal cancers. The median time between colostomy and development of a carcinoma at a colostomy site is 22 years, which exceeds the length of the recommended follow-up period. We report a rare case of a carcinoma of the transverse colon occurring at a colostomy site in a patient without a history of colorectal cancer. Case report An 89-year-old woman presented with a tumor occurring at a colost...

  19. Assessment of muscle function using hybrid PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddock, Bryan; Holm, Søren; Poulsen, Jákup M.

    2017-01-01

    in muscle T2 may be used as a surrogate marker for glucose uptake and lead to an improved insight into the metabolic changes that occur with muscle activation. Such knowledge may lead to improved treatment strategies in patients with neuromuscular pathologies such as stroke, spinal cord injuries......Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between relative glucose uptake and MRI T2 changes in skeletal muscles following resistance exercise using simultaneous PET/MRI scans. Methods: Ten young healthy recreationally active men (age 21 – 28 years) were injected with 18F......-FDG while activating the quadriceps of one leg with repeated knee extension exercises followed by hand-grip exercises for one arm. Immediately following the exercises, the subjects were scanned simultaneously with 18F-FDG PET/MRI and muscle groups were evaluated for increases in 18F-FDG uptake and MRI T2...

  20. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome revisited: longitudinal MRI findings in 10 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcia, Giulia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Carmona, Orietta; Barnerias, Christine; Chemaly, Nicole; Gitiaux, Cyril; Brunelle, Francis; Dulac, Olivier; Boddaert, Nathalie; Nabbout, Rima

    2013-12-01

    Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome (HHS) is a rare severe epilepsy of infancy consisting of unilateral convulsive status epilepticus immediately followed by transient or lasting ipsilateral hemiplegia. HHS may occur either in patients with previous brain pathology or without any identified cause, so-called 'idiopathic HHS'. We retrospectively analysed clinical and MRI longitudinal findings of a series of 10 patients (six females, four males) presenting with HHS. Age at the study inclusion ranged from 2 years 6 months to 15 years (mean of 5 y 10 mo, median 4 y 2 mo). After defining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features as 'typical', i.e. strictly unilateral involvement, and 'atypical', i.e. bilateral, we compared clinical data from both groups. Cognitive level was assessed using Brunet-Lézine or Wechsler scales. HHS occurred at a mean age of 20.5 months (range 8-48 mo). In all cases, status epilepticus lasted for more than 1 hour and was characterised by unilateral clonic seizures followed by ipsilateral hemiplegia (persistent in five patients). Two patients in this series died: the first from multi-organ failure 2 weeks after the status epilepticus and the other from a second episode of ipsilateral intractable febrile status epilepticus 3 years after the first episode. Early MRI (days 1-7 from status epilepticus) showed hemispheric cytotoxic oedema in all, extending to the contralateral side for one. T2 hyperintensity in the basal ganglia was disclosed in 70% of patients and in the hippocampus in 60%. After 1 month (in intermediate and chronic phases), all surviving patients but one showed hemispheric cortical atrophy corresponding to the regions involved during the early stage. Comparing clinical features of patients presenting with 'typical' features, to those with 'atypical' findings, the second group presented psychomotor delay before status epilepticus. This series underlines the major value of early MRI for the prompt diagnosis of HHS, and shows that

  1. Introduction to MRI Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gary V

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging technique derived from radiofrequency (RF) signals of proton that are magnetized by a strong magnetic field. These protons typically originate from water, fat, or metabolites. The application of RF pulses is used to excite the magnetization, whereas pulsed magnetic field gradients are used to provide spatial localization. This chapter describes the fundamental principles giving rise to MR images. Furthermore, the connection between relaxation and image contrast is discussed.

  2. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-12-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 refs.

  3. Cerebellar Lesions of Uremic Encephalopathy on MRI in Hemodialyzed Diabetic Patient: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Min Chul; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Chungbuk National Universty Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a well-known complication of uremia, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. It is widely reported that in UE, the bilateral basal ganglia (BG) shows hyperintensities on T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but cerebellar lesions are extremely rare, with to the best of our knowledge, only one case reported to date. We describe the findings from computed tomography and MRI for typical BG and cerebellar vermis lesions.

  4. Pelvic Hydatid Disease: CT and MRI Findings Causing Sciatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica (1, 2). We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings. PMID:18071287

  5. Proteus syndrome: MRI characteristics of plantar cerebriform hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Beuckeleer, L.H. de; Schepper, A.M. de [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Deprettere, A. [Dept. of Pediatrics, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Moor, A. de [Dept. of Dermatology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium)

    2000-02-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare congenital hamartomatous syndrome with a variety of abnormalities. It shares many features with other congenital hamartomatous disorders, but cerebriform hyperplasia of the soles and the palms is known as a quite distinctive characteristic in the dermatologic literature. The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the MRI features of plantar cerebriform hyperplasia in a 9-year-old boy with known Proteus syndrome. (orig.)

  6. Rare B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Rare decays are flavour changing neutral current processes that allow sensitive searches for phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SM). In the SM, rare decays are loop-suppressed and new particles in SM extensions can give significant contributions. The very rare decay $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in addition helicity suppressed and constitutes a powerful probe for new (pseudo) scalar particles. Of particular interest are furthermore tests of lepton universality in rare $b\\to s\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays. The LHCb experiment is designed for the study of b-hadron decays and ideally suited for the analysis of rare decays due to its high trigger efficiency, as well as excellent tracking and particle identification performance. Recent results from the LHCb experiment in the area of rare decays are presented, including tests of lepton universality and searches for lepton flavour violation.

  7. A Rare Case Report of Caesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepika; Gupta, Taru; Wahi, Sonika

    2017-08-01

    Caesarean scar ectopic is one of the rarest of all ectopic pregnancies. It is defined as when a blastocyst implants on a previous Caesarean scar. The incidence of Caesarean scar ectopic has increased due to increase in number of Caesarean deliveries. Early diagnosis of this can be done by using sonography. It is very important because a delay can lead to increased maternal morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis leads to prompt management and improves the outcome by allowing preservation of future fertility. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has important role when sonography is equivocal or inconclusive before therapy or intervention. We are reporting a rare case of G3P2l2 with previous two Caesarean deliveries, diagnosed as Caesarean scar ectopic pregnancy with the help of sonography and MRI. Patient underwent laparotomy and on histopathological examination Caesarean scar pregnancy was confirmed.

  8. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Challies, Tracy [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  9. Brain MRI findings of neuropsychiatric lupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang-Wook; Kwon, Bae Ju; Lee, Seung-Ro; Hahm, Chang-Kok; Moon, Won Jin; Jeon, Eui Yong; Bae, Sang-Chul [Hanyang Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the brain MRI findings in patients with neuropsychiatric lupus. In 26 patients (M:F = 2:24 ; aged 9-48 years) in whom the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus was clinically or pathologically proven and in whom neuropsychiatric lupus was also clinically diagnosed, the findings of brain MRI were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were analyzed with regard to the distribution, location, size and number of lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction, the presence of cerebral atrophy, and the extent and degree of brain parenchymal and intravascular enhancement. The most common MRI findings were lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction occurring in 18 patients (69%), and located within deep periventricular white matter (n=10), subcortical white matter (n=8), the cerebral cortex (n=7), basal ganglia (n=7), or brain stem or cerebellum (n=2). The lesions were single (n=3) or multiple (n=15), and in 17 patients were less than 1cm in diameter in regions other than the cerebral cortex. In six of these patients, lesions of 1-4cm in diameter in this region were combined, and one occurred in the cerebral cortex only. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 16 patients (62%), in ten of whom there was no past history of treatment with steroids for more than six months. In 15 patients (58%), contrast-enhanced MR image revealed diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia or intravascular enhancement. In no case were MRI findings normal. The primary mainfestations of neuropsychiatric lupus are multifocal ischemia or infarctions in the cerebral cortex, and subcortical and deep white matter, and the cerebral atrophy. Contrast-enhanced MR images also demonstrated diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia and intravascular enhancement, both thought to be related to the congestion due to the stagnation of cerebral blood flow.

  10. Breast Carcinoma Occurring from Chronic Granulomatous Mastitis

    OpenAIRE

    Luqman, Mazlan; Shahrun Niza, Abdullah Suhaimi; Saladina Jaszle, Jasmin; Nani Harlina, Md Latar; Sellymiah, Adzman; Rohaizak, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous mastitis is known as a benign and relatively rare disorder that is often difficult to differentiate from breast carcinoma. We highlight the case of a 34-year-old woman who had recurrent episodes of right breast swelling and abscess for 8 years. These were proven to be chronic granulomatous mastitis by tissue biopsies on 3 different occasions. Her condition improved on similar courses of antibiotics and high-dose prednisolone. However, she subsequently developed progressi...

  11. MRI findings in spinal subdural and epidural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Petra [Department of Radiology, Hospital La Plana, Ctra. De Vila-real a Borriana km. 0.5, 12540 Vila-real (Castello) (Spain)], E-mail: PetraBraun@gmx.de; Kazmi, Khuram [Department of Radiology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Nogues-Melendez, Pablo; Mas-Estelles, Fernando; Aparici-Robles, Fernando [Department of Radiology, La Fe Hospital, Avenida Campanar, 21, 46009 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    Background: Spinal hematomas are rare entities that can be the cause of an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Therefore, an early diagnosis is of great importance. Patients and Methods: From 2001 to 2005 seven patients with intense back pain and/or acute progressive neurological deficit were studied via 1.5 T MRI (in axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences). Follow-up MRI was obtained in six patients. Results: Four patients showed the MRI features of a hyperacute spinal hematoma (two spinal subdural hematoma [SSH] and two spinal epidural hematoma [SEH]), isointense to the spinal cord on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. One patient had an early subacute SEH manifest as heterogeneous signal intensity with areas of high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. Another patient had a late subacute SSH with high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The final patient had a SEH in the late chronic phase being hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Discussion: MRI is valuable in diagnosing the presence, location and extent of spinal hematomas. Hyperacute spinal hematoma and the differentiation between SSH and SEH are particular diagnostic challenges. In addition, MRI is an important tool in the follow-up in patients with conservative treatment.

  12. High Spatiotemporal Resolution Prostate MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0341 TITLE: High Spatiotemporal Resolution Prostate MRI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen J. Riederer, Ph.D...Resolution Prostate MRI 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0341 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Stephen J. Riederer E-Mail...overall purpose of this project is to develop improved means using MRI for detecting prostate cancer with the potential for differentiating disease

  13. A rare case: Hallucination associated with pazopanib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebi Serkan Demirci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea, hyperglycemia, anemia, depigmentation of the hair, and rash are common side effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Neurological side effect like hallucination due to pazopanib is exceptionally rare in literature cases. Herein, we reported a case of hallucination related to pazopanib in a patient with renal cell carcinoma. A 47-year-old male patient with renal cell carcinoma developed repetitive hallucinations on the following days of pazopanib initiation. There was no other significant finding in the differential diagnosis of hallucination. Neurological symptoms disappeared after termination of pazopanib. We aimed to emphasize that neurological side effect like hallucination may rarely occur during the treatment of pazopanib and take note that physicians should be aware of this infrequent side effect in the patients treated with pazopanib.

  14. Primary Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Katsourakis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH of the small intestine is an extremely rare condition. It occurs most commonly in the extremities and the trunk. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman who admitted with fever, myalgia, and altered status. After thorough investigation, a tumor of the jejunum was found. The patient underwent complete surgical removal of the tumor. A diagnosis of MFN (undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma was made. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with Gemcitabine. Two years after the operation, the patient died due to recurrence of the disease. MFH of the small intestine is an extremely rare neoplasm with an aggressive biological behaviour. In this paper, pathogenesis, natural history, and treatment are reviewed.

  15. Oral lymphangioma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Bhayya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangiomas are benign hamartomatous tumors of the lymphatic channels which present as developmental malformations arising from sequestration of lymphatic tissue that do not communicate with the rest of the lymphatic channels. Lymphatic vessels are filled with a clear protein-rich fluid containing few lymph cells. It can also occur in association with hemangioma. The onset of lymphangiomas are either at birth (60% to 70% or up to two years of age (90% and rare in adults. Lymphangiomas have marked predilection for the head and neck region (50-70%. The most common location in the mouth is the dorsum of tongue, followed by lips, buccal mucosa, soft palate, and floor of the mouth. On tongue, they may present as a localized or a diffused growth which may enlarge to cause macroglossia, impaired speech and difficulty in mastication. Herewith, we present a rare case of lymphangioma of tongue leading to macroglossia in a 8-year-old boy.

  16. [Rare adverse events following immunization: coincidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alò, Gian Loreto; Terracciano, Elisa; Zorzoli, Ermanno; Capanna, Alessandra; Gervasi, Giuseppe; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    The high standards of safety and effectiveness of vaccines have allowed them to get a prominent role in disease prevention and health protection. However, like any other intervention, vaccination is not free from risks. Rare adverse events occur after immunization in less than one in a thousand individuals and can be linked to vaccination by causality or coincidence. These events are reported on the SmPC (Summary of Product Characteristics). We have first divided the rare adverse events in local and generalized, and then we have analyzed them according to the type of vaccine linked to the event. Communication of the benefits of vaccines, that are surely greater than their risks, must take place in a conscious and scientific way, in order to avoid vaccinations being perceived as an imposition, instead of the great opportunity for everyone that they are.

  17. MRI assessment program. Consensus statement on clinical efficacy of MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This consensus statement is largely based on the experience gained at the MRI units at the four hospitals which have operated scanners in the MRI program. It reflects the considered opinion of the radiologists responsible for the MRI services at those hospitals. Account has also been taken of relevant overseas data. This collection of opinion relates particularly to comparison with other imaging modalities. The specific comments will require further consideration as technical developments with MRI become available, additional experience is gained with gadolinium contrast material and additional data are obtained on the influence of MRI on patient management. MRI, at present, is used either to improve diagnostic accuracy when other tests are negative or equivocal, when there is strong clinical suspicion of disease, or to improve surgical or other management planning when the diagnosis known. In some situations (eg syringomyelia, congenital spinal disease, posterior fossa/cerebello-pontine angle tumours) it may entirely replace other tests (eg myelography, air contrast, CT) which are substantially less accurate and/or more invasive. In other situations (eg hemispheric brain tumours, lumbar disc protrusions) when other tests, such as CT, can be as accurate, MRI is not usually or initially indicated because it is currently more expensive and of limited availability. However, balanced against this is the fact that it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionising radiation. It is also stressed that MRI images depend on complex, widely variable and, as yet, incompletely understood parameters. There is concern that this may result in false positive diagnoses, especially where MRI is used alone as a screening test, or used as the initial test. For several reasons (availability, cost, medical and diagnostic efficacy), the specific comments on indications for MRI presented are based upon the assumption that MRI is a tertiary and complementary imaging examination

  18. Status of rare decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    Some results are given for rare muon decay experiments currently running. Also, plans are discussed for rare kaon decay experiments. Some of the events sought come from processes which violate lepton flavor conservation. Several apparatuses used in the search are described. 35 references. (LEW)

  19. [Rare localization of aneurysmal bone cyst in the sphenoid bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoulkader, Farida; Aammou, Kaoutar; Siwane, Abdellatif; Essodegui, Fatiha

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign tumor that can affect all bones in the body. It rarely affects the base of the skull. It is usually located at the level of the long bones. We report the clinical case of a 44-year old man treated for a mass in the basisphenoid wrongly diagnosed as invasive prolactin-producing macroadenoma for which he was put under dopamine agonists over a period of 9 months. We adjusted the diagnosis by suggesting aneurysmal bone cyst in the sphenoid bone on the basis of its almost pathognomonic radiological aspect on MRI.

  20. Rare pseudotumors of the urinary bladder in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, G; Ahlhelm, F; Altmeyer, K; Aliani, S; Remberger, K; Schoenhofen, H; Kramann, B; Uder, M

    2001-01-01

    We report two cases of inflammatory pseudotumors of the urinary bladder, one case of a chronic granulomatous pseudotumor (CGT) and one case of a pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic (fibromyxoid) tumor (PMT). Both tumors resembled malignancies such as rhabdomyosarcomas regarding clinical appearance and imaging findings and represent rare urinary bladder tumors. The imaging findings on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI as well as histological specimen are presented. Final diagnosis was made following elective surgery. Differential diagnosis of urinary bladder tumors as well as the imaging findings of these clinically comparable cases are discussed. Awareness of these benign lesions may prevent patients from inappropriate therapies such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

  1. Conjoined twins in a triplet pregnancy. A rare obstetrical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Huseyin C; Ugur, Mete G; Mustafa, Aynur; Kutlar, Irfan

    2017-03-01

    Conjoined twins are derived from division of a single fertilized ovum after the twelfth day of fertilization. Triplet conjoined twin is considered as a unique phenomenon that is accompanied with a wide variety of congenital abnormalities and also hazardous consequences for both fetuses and parents. We present an extremely rare case of conjoined twins in a triplet pregnancy with symmetric thoracoomphalopagus that was diagnosed in prenatal period by using ultrasound scanning and MRI. In triplet pregnancies, we should be aware about the possibility of conjoined twins. If there are severe congenital malformations, termination of pregnancy should be recommended immediately after the diagnosis regardless of gestational age, particularly in early gestational age.

  2. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-06-25

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Contribution of MRI to the diagnosis of cerebral lesions of adrenoleukodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasco, A.; Kalifa, G.; Sarrazin, J.L.; Adamsbaum, C. (Hopital Saint Vincent de Paul, 75 - Paris (France). Dept. of Radiology); Aubourg, P. (Hopital Saint Vincent de Paul, 75 - Paris (France). Dept. of Pediatric Endocrinology)

    1991-04-01

    33 cases of adrenoleukodystrophy in children have been studied. Brain MRI was performed in these patients in order to appreciate the benefits of this technic in patients presenting with the cerebral type of ALD. 12 neurologically asymptomatic patients with the same biochemical disorder were studied. In both groups, MRI is the best imaging modality. In symptomatic patients lesions were clearly demonstrated with excellent clinical correlations. In addition, MRI can depict brain lesions in asymptomatic patients before devastating brain damage occurs. MRI is the essential step before proposing specific treatment to these patients. (orig.).

  4. Why are metapopulations so rare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronhofer, Emanuel A; Kubisch, Alexander; Hilker, Frank M; Hovestadt, Thomas; Poethke, Hans Joachim

    2012-08-01

    Roughly 40 years after its introduction, the metapopulation concept is central to population ecology. The notion that local populations and their dynamics may be coupled by dispersal is without any doubt of great importance for our understanding of population-level processes. A metapopulation describes a set of subpopulations linked by (rare) dispersal events in a dynamic equilibrium of extinctions and recolonizations. In the large body of literature that has accumulated, the term "metapopulation" is often used in a very broad sense; most of the time it simply implies spatial heterogeneity. A number of reviews have recently addressed this problem and have pointed out that, despite the large and still growing popularity of the metapopulation concept, there are only very few empirical examples that conform with the strict classical metapopulation (CM) definition. In order to understand this discrepancy between theory and observation, we use an individual-based modeling approach that allows us to pinpoint the environmental conditions and the life-history attributes required for the emergence of a CM structure. We find that CM dynamics are restricted to a specific parameter range at the border between spatially structured but completely occupied and globally extinct populations. Considering general life-history attributes, our simulations suggest that CMs are more likely to occur in arthropod species than in (large) vertebrates. Since the specific type of spatial population structure determines conservation concepts, our findings have important implications for conservation biology. Our model suggests that most spatially structured populations are panmictic, patchy, or of mainland-island type, which makes efforts spent on increasing connectivity (e.g., corridors) questionable. If one does observe a true CM structure, this means that the focal metapopulation is on the brink of extinction and that drastic conservation measures are needed.

  5. A rare cause of osteonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Agostinis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the HFE gene, which increase intestinal iron absorption. The prevalence of C282Y homozygosity, which causes the disorder, is 0.5% in Caucasian populations. The clinical manifestations are related to excess iron in the tissues, especially the liver, heart, pancreas, pituitary, and skin. They include fatigue, loss of libido or impotence in males, liver disease, skin pigmentation, diabetes mellitus, cardiac enlargement—with or without heart failure, and conduction defects. The classic triad of cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, and skin pigmentation (“bronze diabetes” results from a combination of iron deposits and melanin. It occurs late in the disease, when the total body iron content is more than five times the normal value, about 20 grams. Left untreated, approximately half of all patients with HH eventually develop arthralgia or arthropathy. Chondrocalcinosis, chronic pseudo-osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis are the major rheumatic manifestations of HH. The cause of the arthropathy is still unknown. Iron deposits within joints may trigger a number of pathologic events, such as free radical generation and crystal deposition, which stimulate immune complex formation and inflammation.Materials and methodsWe describe the case of a 48-year-old male suffering from chronic bilateral ankle pain.ResultsThe work-up revealed osteonecrosis of ankle. The patient also presented high plasma ferritin levels and homozygosity for the C282Y mutation. Other than HH, which was confirmed by liver biopsy, the patient had no other risk factors for osteonecrosis.DiscussionHH represents a rare cause of osteonecrosis, and there are no prior reports of aseptic osteonecrosis of the ankle in a patient with this disease. The pathogenetic mechanism remains unknown.

  6. MRI induced second-degree burn in a patient with extremely large uterine leiomyomas: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Kang, Bo Kyeong; Song, Soon Young; Koh, Byung Hee; Choi, Joong Sub; Lee, Won Moo [Hanyang University Medical Center, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Burns and thermal injuries related with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are rare. Previous literature indicates that medical devices with cable, cosmetics or tattoo are known as risk factors for burns and thermal injuries. However, there is no report of MRI-related burns in Korea. Herein, we reported a case of deep second degree burn after MRI in a 38-year-old female patient with multiple uterine leiomyomas including some that were large and degenerated. The large uterine leiomyoma-induced protruded anterior abdominal wall in direct contact with the body coil during MRI was suspected as the cause of injury, by retrospective analysis. Therefore, awareness of MRI related thermal injury is necessary to prevent this hazard, together with extreme care during MRI.

  7. Multiple Primary Cancers: Simultaneously Occurring Prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-20

    May 20, 2016 ... occurring prostate cancer and other primary tumors-our experience and ... tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited ..... Seretis C, Seretis F, Liakos N. Multidisciplinary approach to.

  8. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Ursula [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nemec, Stefan F., E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Bettelheim, Dieter [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Horcher, Ernst [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L. [Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23-37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  9. Oral sores: a rare presentation of Herpes zoster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunder Nagakeerthana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster is one of the common dermatological diseases in elderly. It is clinically diagnosed by the presence of vesicles in a zosteriform pattern, appearing along one or two dermatomes. We report a rare presentation of herpes zoster occurring over hard palate. Early recognition of such rare presentations of Herpes zoster and treatment with antivirals at the appropriate time is the most essential step required to decrease the morbidity.

  10. Rare molariform supernumerary teeth: Why are they bilateral?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior supernumerary teeth in the permanent dentition may be supplemental or rudimentary. Rudimentary types are further classified as conical, tuberculate, and molariform. The molariform type has been only rarely reported. We report a rare variety of anterior supernumerary teeth - the molariform type, occurring bilaterally and in association with a midline supernumerary tooth. We also suggest a hypothesis for the bilateral occurrence of supernumerary teeth.

  11. Gd enhanced MRI in sensorineural hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Mika; Tono, Tetsuya; Toyama, Katsuhiro; Kano, Kiyo; Morimitsu, Tamotsu [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    The enhanced MRI hearing findings of the inner ear in 124 patients with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. MR images were obtained before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium (0.1 mmol/kg). In three out of seventy-nine patients with unilateral healing loss, cochlear and/or the vestibular enhancement was noted on the symptomatic side. The positive cases included those with Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, mumps and so-called sudden deafness. Forty-five patients with bilateral hearing loss showed no enhancement within the inner ear. Although positive gadolinium enhancement of the inner ear may detect inflammatory lesions due to a viral infection, its incidence in sensorineural hearing loss, including cases of sudden deafness. seems to be extremely rare. (author)

  12. Late onset ‘en coup de sabre’ following trauma: Rare presentation of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasleem Arif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En coup de sabre (linear scleroderma of face is a rare type of morphea (localized scleroderma involving frontoparietal area of the forehead and scalp. Many triggering factors have been implicated in the development of morphea like trauma, immobilization, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG vaccination, injections of vitamin K, mechanical compression from clothing, etc. Linear scleroderma primarily affects the pediatric population, with 67% of patients diagnosed before 18 years of age. In this article, we describe a case of 26 year old female who presented with a three months history of brownish indurated plaque of skin on the frontal and forehead regions of the head. The patient gave a history of trauma at the same site six years back. The diagnosis of morphea was made clinically supported by histopathological features of the skin biopsy. Her neurological examination was normal. ANA was negative. Brain MRI didn’t reveal any abnormality. She was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1% ointment. The late onset en coup de sabre is a rare presentation and hence reported.

  13. Cerebral lesions can impair fMRI-based language lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Jörg; Weber, Bernd; Urbach, Horst; Reul, Jürgen; Fernandez, Guillen; Elger, Christian E

    2009-10-01

    Several small patient studies and case reports raise concerns that the reliability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be impaired in the vicinity of cerebral lesions. This could affect the clinical validity of fMRI for presurgical language lateralization. The current study sets out to identify if a systematic effect of lesion type and localization on fMRI exists. We classify lesions typically occurring in epilepsy patients according to (1) their potential to disturb blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD)-effect generation or detection or to disturb spatial brain normalization, and (2) the proximity of lesions to protocol-specific volumes of interest (VOIs). The effect of lesions is evaluated through the examination of 238 epilepsy patients and a subgroup of 37 patients with suspected unilateral left-language dominance according to the Wada test. Patients with fMRI-critical lesions such as cavernomas, gliomas, and mass defects close to VOIs, or with severe atrophy, show lower lateralization indices (LIs) and more often discordant language lateralization with the Wada test than do patients without such lesions. This study points seriously toward fMRI-language lateralization being sensitive to cerebral lesions. Some lesion types and locations are more critical than others. Our results question the noncritical application of fMRI in patients with cerebral lesions.

  14. Cerebral Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Occurring after Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jang Ho; Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Hong Chul; Hwang, Min Su [Dept. of Radiology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of organ transplantation and immunosuppression. A 36-year-old woman with a history of renal transplantation visited the hospital complaining of headache and on pathology was diagnosed with cerebral PTLD manifesting as multiple rim enhanced masses in both hemispheres. We report here a case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the cerebrum occurring after renal transplantation, and describe the MRI findings for this patient

  15. Pediatric schwannomatosis, a rare but distinct form of neurofibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Anna K. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Egelhoff, John C.; Curran, John G. [Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Thomas, Bobby

    2016-03-15

    Schwannomatosis is the third major form of neurofibromatosis, distinct from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and type 1 (NF1). This condition is rare with a variable phenotypic presentation and complex molecular and genetic findings. In this case, a previously healthy teenager was found to have multiple spinal lesions and an enhancing right parotid mass on MRI. On extensive further work-up, this patient met the existing clinical criteria for schwannomatosis. This case report aims to review the clinical features and current diagnostic criteria for schwannomatosis and compare it to NF1 and NF2. Special emphasis will be placed on imaging features that should prompt the radiologist to suggest this rare diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Oral malignant melanoma: A rare case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangala Rakaraddi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary malignant melanoma is only rarely found in oral cavity (estimated between 0.2 and 8-0% of all melanomas and occurs approximately four times more frequently in oral mucosa of the upper jaw, usually on the palate, alveolar gingiva and melanoma of mandibular gingiva is extremely rare. The peak age of diagnosis of melanoma is between 55 and 65 years. A biopsy is required to confirm the diagnosis. Here, we present a rare case of malignant melanoma of mandibular gingiva in a 64-year-old female patient which is confirmed by histopathology.

  17. Acardiac Parabiotic Fetus: A Rare Complication of Twin Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sood S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Acardiac parabiotic fetus is sequelae of complication of monochorionic monoamniotic twin pregnancy also known as Twin Reversed Arterial Perfusion Sequence (TRAP. It is rare affecting 1 in 35,000 births and 1 % of monozygotic twins. Acardiac parabiotic twin commonly known as parasite occurs rarely and may lead to high output cardiac failure, hydrops or premature delivery in the pump fetus. In this report, we present a 23 years old primigravida with twin pregnancy, with twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence with one of the twins being acardiac anceps and the other normal pump fetus. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore rarely documented.

  18. MRI in intraspinal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Gupta, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Kumar, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Kohli, A. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Misra, U.K. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Gujral, R.B. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India))

    1994-01-01

    We studied 20 patients with intraspinal tuberculosis (TB), to characterise the MRI features of tuberculous meningitis and myelitis. MRI leptomeningitis and intramedullary involvement in 11 patients, intramedullary lesions alone in 5, leptomeningitis alone in 2, and isolated extradural disease in 2. TB leptomeningitis was characterised by loculation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerve root thickening and clumping (seen only in the lumbar region) or complete obliteration of the subarachnoid space on unenhanced images. Gd-DTPA-enhanced images proved useful in 6 cases, revealing linear enhancement of the surface of the spinal cord and nerve roots or plaque-like enhancement of the dura-arachnoid mater complex. Intramedullary lesions included tuberculomas (8), cord oedema (5) and cavitation (3). In seven cases of intramedullary tuberculoma multiple lesions with skip areas were seen, without significant cord swelling. One patient had an isolated lesion in the conus medullaris. The lesions were iso- or hypointense on T1-weighted images, iso-, hypo- or hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed rim or nodular enhancement with contrast medium. (orig.)

  19. Musculoskeletal MRI: dedicated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masciocchi, C.; Barile, A. [Dept. of Radiology, University of L' Aquila (Italy); Satragno, L. [MRI Research Div., Esaote SpA, Genoa (Italy)

    2000-02-01

    The ''dedicated'' MRI units have characteristics of high diagnostic accuracy and lower installation and management costs as compared with whole-body systems. The dedicated MRI units are easy to install. The low weight allows their installation also under unfavorable circumstances. In a dedicated system cost-effectiveness and ease of installation must be accompanied by the capability of providing high-quality images. In our experience, the high number of examinations performed, the most part of which provided with the surgical controls, allowed an accurate evaluation of the diagnostic potentialities of the dedicated magnet. We were not able to perform the examinations in only 3 % of cases due to the physical shape of the patient and the clinical condition of the patient which may hinder the correct positioning of the limb. The overlapping of the diagnostic accuracy of the E-scan and Artoscan units in the study of the lower limbs, compared with whole-body units and surgery, prompted us to exploit the potentialities of the E-Scan in the study of the shoulder. We had a good correlation between E-Scan, whole-body units, and surgical findings, which confirmed the high diagnostic accuracy of the dedicated system. In conclusion, in our experience carried out in the musculoskeletal system, the dedicated magnets showed promising results. Their diagnostic reliability and utility was comparable to that obtained from conventional units operating at higher magnetic fields. (orig.)

  20. Tailgut cysts: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aflalo-Hazan, V.; Rousset, P.; Lewin, M.; Azizi, L. [Hopital Saint Antoine, Department of Radiology, PARIS Cedex 12 (France); Mourra, N. [Hopital Saint Antoine, Department of Pathology, PARIS Cedex 12 (France); Hoeffel, C. [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Radiology, Reims Cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of 11 surgically resected pelvic tailgut cysts were analyzed with reference to histopathologic and clinical data. Homogeneity, size, location, signal intensity, appearance and presence of septa and/or nodules and/or peripheral rim and involvement of surrounding structures were studied. Histological examination demonstrated 11 tailgut cysts (TGC), including one infected TGC and one TGC with a component of adenocarcinoma. Lesions (3-8 cm in diameter) were exclusively or partly retrorectal in all cases but one, with an extension down the anal canal in five cases. Lesions were multicystic in all patients but one. On T1-weighted MR images, all cystic lesions contained at least one hyperintense cyst. The peripheral rim of the cystic lesion was regular and non or moderately enhancing in all cases but the two complicated TGC. Nodular peripheral rim and irregular septa were seen in the degenerated TGC. Marked enhancement of the peripheral structures was noted in the two complicated TGC. Pelvic MRI is a valuable tool in the preoperative evaluation of TGC. (orig.)