WorldWideScience

Sample records for mri guided laser

  1. Improved operative efficiency using a real-time MRI-guided stereotactic platform for laser amygdalohippocampotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Allen L; Sussman, Eric S; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Le, Scheherazade; Mantovani, Alessandra; Keebaugh, Alaine C; Drover, David R; Grant, Gerald A; Wintermark, Max; Halpern, Casey H

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE MR-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive method for thermal destruction of benign or malignant tissue that has been used for selective amygdalohippocampal ablation for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy. The authors report their initial experience adopting a real-time MRI-guided stereotactic platform that allows for completion of the entire procedure in the MRI suite. METHODS Between October 2014 and May 2016, 17 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis were selected by a multidisciplinary epilepsy board to undergo a selective amygdalohippocampal ablation for temporal lobe epilepsy using MRgLITT. The first 9 patients underwent standard laser ablation in 2 phases (operating room [OR] and MRI suite), whereas the next 8 patients underwent laser ablation entirely in the MRI suite with the ClearPoint platform. A checklist specific to the real-time MRI-guided laser amydalohippocampal ablation was developed and used for each case. For both cohorts, clinical and operative information, including average case times and accuracy data, was collected and analyzed. RESULTS There was a learning curve associated with using this real-time MRI-guided system. However, operative times decreased in a linear fashion, as did total anesthesia time. In fact, the total mean patient procedure time was less in the MRI cohort (362.8 ± 86.6 minutes) than in the OR cohort (456.9 ± 80.7 minutes). The mean anesthesia time was significantly shorter in the MRI cohort (327.2 ± 79.9 minutes) than in the OR cohort (435.8 ± 78.4 minutes, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS The real-time MRI platform for MRgLITT can be adopted in an expedient manner. Completion of MRgLITT entirely in the MRI suite may lead to significant advantages in procedural times.

  2. MRI-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of liver metastases: clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Weinhold, N.; Mueller, P.; Mack, M.; Scholz, W.; Philipp, C.; Roggan, A.; Felix, R.

    1996-01-01

    The goal was to perform an evaluation of MRI-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of liver metastases as a clinical method. In a prospective study, 50 patients with liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma (35 patients), or other primary tumors (15 patients) were treated with LITT. For preparation and intermittent controls of therapy, standardized MRI examinations were made. Online monitoring during the the LITT was done with temperature-sensitive T1-weighted sequences (FLASH-2D, TurboFLASH). All in all, 83 metastases of a volume between 1 and 282 cubic centimeters (median = ± 10 cm 3 ) were treated.During performance of the LITT, a decrease of signal intensity in the thermosensitive sequences was measured for the application area, and was correlated with fluorine-optical temperature measurements. The MRI-guided LITT is a novel, potential modality for treatment of liver metastases, and poses only minimal clinical risks. (orig./VHE) [de

  3. MRI-guided prostate focal laser ablation therapy using a mechatronic needle guidance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepek, Jeremy; Lindner, Uri; Ghai, Sangeet; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Trachtenberg, John; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Focal therapy of localized prostate cancer is receiving increased attention due to its potential for providing effective cancer control in select patients with minimal treatment-related side effects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focal laser ablation (FLA) therapy is an attractive modality for such an approach. In FLA therapy, accurate placement of laser fibers is critical to ensuring that the full target volume is ablated. In practice, error in needle placement is invariably present due to pre- to intra-procedure image registration error, needle deflection, prostate motion, and variability in interventionalist skill. In addition, some of these sources of error are difficult to control, since the available workspace and patient positions are restricted within a clinical MRI bore. In an attempt to take full advantage of the utility of intraprocedure MRI, while minimizing error in needle placement, we developed an MRI-compatible mechatronic system for guiding needles to the prostate for FLA therapy. The system has been used to place interstitial catheters for MRI-guided FLA therapy in eight subjects in an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial. Data from these cases has provided quantification of the level of uncertainty in needle placement error. To relate needle placement error to clinical outcome, we developed a model for predicting the probability of achieving complete focal target ablation for a family of parameterized treatment plans. Results from this work have enabled the specification of evidence-based selection criteria for the maximum target size that can be confidently ablated using this technique, and quantify the benefit that may be gained with improvements in needle placement accuracy.

  4. MRI-guided stereotactic neurosurgical procedures in a diagnostic MRI suite: Background and safe practice recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul S; Willie, Jon T; Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Azmi-Ghadimi, Hooman; Nichols, Amy; Fauerbach, Loretta Litz; Johnson, Helen Boehm; Graham, Denise

    2017-07-01

    The development of navigation technology facilitating MRI-guided stereotactic neurosurgery has enabled neurosurgeons to perform a variety of procedures ranging from deep brain stimulation to laser ablation entirely within an intraoperative or diagnostic MRI suite while having real-time visualization of brain anatomy. Prior to this technology, some of these procedures required multisite workflow patterns that presented significant risk to the patient during transport. For those facilities with access to this technology, safe practice guidelines exist only for procedures performed within an intraoperative MRI. There are currently no safe practice guidelines or parameters available for facilities looking to integrate this technology into practice in conventional MRI suites. Performing neurosurgical procedures in a diagnostic MRI suite does require precautionary measures. The relative novelty of technology and workflows for direct MRI-guided procedures requires consideration of safe practice recommendations, including those pertaining to infection control and magnet safety issues. This article proposes a framework of safe practice recommendations designed for assessing readiness and optimization of MRI-guided neurosurgical interventions in the diagnostic MRI suite in an effort to mitigate patient risk. The framework is based on existing clinical evidence, recommendations, and guidelines related to infection control and prevention, health care-associated infections, and magnet safety, as well as the clinical and practical experience of neurosurgeons utilizing this technology. © 2017 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  5. Computer-guided laser for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivukangas, J; Louhisalmi, Y

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of over 40 neurosurgical laser operations, including CO2, Nd-YAG and simultaneous CO2/Nd-YAG laser procedures, a computer-guided system for spatial control of the laser beam has been developed. The pilot laser has several modes: it can direct the neurosurgeon along the central axis of the surgical microscope to stereotactically determined point-like targets or outline selected layers of underlying volume targets onto superficial surfaces such as scalp and cortex and onto the tissue at the appropriate depth. The active treatment laser can be guided by preoperative CT/MRI or intraoperative ultrasound image data for layer-by-layer resection of tumor. The laser system can be connected to the surgical field by rigid stereotactic means or by neuronavigator. In the present system, a special brain surgery adapter coordinates the imaging system and laser to the surgical field. Thus, the laser system can be used for image-guided surgical orientation, for demarcation of lesions and for actual layer-by-layer removal of tumor.

  6. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... assistance of a nurse and an MR imaging technologist. As with the ultrasound procedure, you may receive antibiotics, sedatives and pain medication before the biopsy. The MRI-guided procedure may use contrast ... A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter into a ...

  7. Wavefront Measurement for Laser-Guiding Diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, S.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-01-01

    The wavefront of a short laser pulse after interaction in a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) was measured to diagnose laser-guiding quality. Experiments were performed on a 100 TW class laser at the LOASIS facility of LBNL using a hydrogenfilled capillary discharge waveguide. Laser-guiding with a pre-formed plasma channel allows the laser pulse to propagate over many Rayleigh lengths at high intensity and is crucial to accelerate electrons to the highest possible energy. Efficient coupling of laser energy into the plasma is realized when the laser and the channel satisfy a matched guiding condition, in which the wavefront remains flat within the channel. Using a wavefront sensor, the laser-guiding quality was diagnosed based on the wavefront of the laser pulse exiting the plasma channel. This wavefront diagnostic will contribute to achieving controlled, matched guiding in future experiments.

  8. MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: comparison with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imschweiler, Thomas; Freiwald, Bianka; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A. [Kantonspital Baden AG, Institute for Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Haueisen, Harald [Kantonspital Aarau AG, Institute for Radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); Kampmann, Gert [Clinica Sant' Anna, Lugano, Sorengo (Switzerland); Rageth, Luzi [Adjumed Services AG, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Division of Biostatistics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Rageth, Christoph [Breast Centre, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    To analyse the development of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) in Switzerland and to compare the procedure with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB. We performed a retrospective analysis of VABs between 2009 and 2011. A total of 9,113 VABs were performed. Of these, 557 were MRI guided. MRI-guided VAB showed the highest growth rate (97 %) of all three procedures. The technical success rates for MRI-guided, stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB were 98.4 % (548/557), 99.1 % (5,904/5,960) and 99.6 % (2,585/2,596), respectively. There were no significant differences (P = 0.12) between the MRI-guided and the stereotactically guided procedures. The technical success rate for ultrasound-guided VAB was significantly higher than that for MRI-guided VAB (P < 0.001). There were no complications using MRI-guided VAB requiring open surgery. The malignancy diagnosis rate for MRI-guided VAB was similar to that for stereotactically guided VAB (P = 0.35). MRI-guided VAB is a safe and accurate procedure that provides insight into clinical breast findings. (orig.)

  9. Study on guided waves in semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudensi, M.A.A.

    1980-01-01

    In This work we studied the guided waves in semiconductor lasers. In the first part we carried on the experimental measurements on lasers with stripe nonorthogonal to the mirrors. In the second part we developed a matrix method for the study of propagation and reflection of guided waves in lasers. (author) [pt

  10. Development of a new apparatus for MRI guided stereotactic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yukiya; Amano, Keiichi; Kawamura, Hirotsune; Tanikawa, Tatsuya; Kawabatake, Hiroko; Iseki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Ono, Yuko

    1990-01-01

    Since Leksell et al. reported the application of NMR imaging to stereotactic surgery, MRI has been used for determination of the coordinates of target in the brain. The image of the MRI, however, is significantly distorted due to non-uniformity of the magnetic field. The authors have devised a new marker system (the imaginary inner marker system) and have also modified the Iseki CT guided stereotactic frame for utilizing MRI. In this system, the imaginary markers were set up inside the brain. The image of the grid phantom, obtained immediately before the operation, is superimposed on the image of a patient's brain. The nearest image of grid phantom is used for MRI localization as an imaginary inner marker. To prevent distortion and resolution degradation on MRI, the localizing system is composed of acrylic resin and titanium. The head ring can be fixed on both the MRI localizing system and the Iseki CT guided stereotactic frame which allows the transformation of target coordinates from the MRI localizing system to the CT guided frame. MRI guided stereotactic surgery, therefore, can be performed while monitoring with the CT scan. The system was tested using a phantom and taking T 1 -weighted images before clinical application. Coordinates of target points were determined accurately to a 2 mm cube. A 47-year-old, right-handed woman underwent a MRI guided biopsy of the right thalamic mass lesion that was more accurately detected by MRI than CT scan. The histological diagnosis was a malignant lymphoma. No complications have occurred. MRI stereotaxy, at the present time, is expected to be most useful in the biopsy of deep-seated brain lesions which are not easily detected by CT scan. In the near future, It will take the place of other imaging techniques during functional neurosurgery, with sufficient accuracy. (author)

  11. Fully automated MRI-guided robotics for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoianovici, D.; Vigaru, B.; Petrisor, D.; Muntener, M.; Patriciu, A.; Song, D.

    2008-01-01

    The uncertainties encountered in the deployment of brachytherapy seeds are related to the commonly used ultrasound imager and the basic instrumentation used for the implant. An alternative solution is under development in which a fully automated robot is used to place the seeds according to the dosimetry plan under direct MRI-guidance. Incorporation of MRI-guidance creates potential for physiological and molecular image-guided therapies. Moreover, MRI-guided brachytherapy is also enabling for re-estimating dosimetry during the procedure, because with the MRI the seeds already implanted can be localised. An MRI compatible robot (MrBot) was developed. The robot is designed for transperineal percutaneous prostate interventions, and customised for fully automated MRI-guided brachytherapy. With different end-effectors, the robot applies to other image-guided interventions of the prostate. The robot is constructed of non-magnetic and dielectric materials and is electricity free using pneumatic actuation and optic sensing. A new motor (PneuStep) was purposely developed to set this robot in motion. The robot fits alongside the patient in closed-bore MRI scanners. It is able to stay fully operational during MR imaging without deteriorating the quality of the scan. In vitro, cadaver, and animal tests showed millimetre needle targeting accuracy, and very precise seed placement. The robot tested without any interference up to 7T. The robot is the first fully automated robot to function in MRI scanners. Its first application is MRI-guided seed brachytherapy. It is capable of automated, highly accurate needle placement. Extensive testing is in progress prior to clinical trials. Preliminary results show that the robot may become a useful image-guided intervention instrument. (author)

  12. MR guided percutaneous laser lumbar disk hernia ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Takuo; Terao, Tohru; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Yuhki, Ichiro; Harada, Junta; Tashima, Michiko [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital; Abe, Toshiaki

    1998-03-01

    An MRI unit for interventional procedure is very useful for minimally invasive surgery of the brain and spine. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) utilizing X-ray fluoroscopy is a relatively new less invasive procedure for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. MR guided laser surgery is applied to patients with disc herniation at our department. Approaching the target of the disc protrusion was easily conducted and vaporizing the disc hernia directly using a laser was possible under MR fluoroscopy. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the usefulness of MR guided percutaneous laser disc hernia ablation (MR-guided PLDHA). As subjects, 36 patients with lumbar disc herniation, including 23 cases with L4/5 involvement and 13 cases with L5/S1 involvement were studied. Among these, 26 were males and 10 were females, age ranging from 24 to 62. We used an open type MR system (Hitachi, Airis 0.3T), a permanent, open configuration MR system. A YAG laser (LaserScope, USA) was used for PLDHA. An MR compatible 18G titanium needle 15 cm in length was used to puncture the herniated discs. The MR compatible needle was clearly visualized, and used to safely and accurately puncture the target herniated disc in each case with multidimensional guidance. Application of the laser was performed with MR guidance. The energy dose from the laser ranged from 800 to 2100 joules. In most cases, signs and symptoms improved in the patients immediately after disc vaporization. The overall success rate was 88.9%. The complication rate was 2.8%, including one case of discitis after PLDHA. MR fluoroscopy sequence permits near real time imaging and provides an easy approach to the therapeutic target of disc herniation. MR guided PLDHA is a minimally invasive procedure and is very useful for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusion. (author)

  13. MR guided percutaneous laser lumbar disk hernia ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Takuo; Terao, Tohru; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Yuhki, Ichiro; Harada, Junta; Tashima, Michiko; Abe, Toshiaki.

    1998-01-01

    An MRI unit for interventional procedure is very useful for minimally invasive surgery of the brain and spine. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) utilizing X-ray fluoroscopy is a relatively new less invasive procedure for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. MR guided laser surgery is applied to patients with disc herniation at our department. Approaching the target of the disc protrusion was easily conducted and vaporizing the disc hernia directly using a laser was possible under MR fluoroscopy. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the usefulness of MR guided percutaneous laser disc hernia ablation (MR-guided PLDHA). As subjects, 36 patients with lumbar disc herniation, including 23 cases with L4/5 involvement and 13 cases with L5/S1 involvement were studied. Among these, 26 were males and 10 were females, age ranging from 24 to 62. We used an open type MR system (Hitachi, Airis 0.3T), a permanent, open configuration MR system. A YAG laser (LaserScope, USA) was used for PLDHA. An MR compatible 18G titanium needle 15 cm in length was used to puncture the herniated discs. The MR compatible needle was clearly visualized, and used to safely and accurately puncture the target herniated disc in each case with multidimensional guidance. Application of the laser was performed with MR guidance. The energy dose from the laser ranged from 800 to 2100 joules. In most cases, signs and symptoms improved in the patients immediately after disc vaporization. The overall success rate was 88.9%. The complication rate was 2.8%, including one case of discitis after PLDHA. MR fluoroscopy sequence permits near real time imaging and provides an easy approach to the therapeutic target of disc herniation. MR guided PLDHA is a minimally invasive procedure and is very useful for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusion. (author)

  14. MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration therapy. A cost comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, M.H.; Froeling, V.; Roettgen, R.; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Streitparth, F. [Charite University Medicine Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Bretschneider, T. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Hartwig, T.; Disch, A.C. [Charite University Medicine Berlin (Germany). Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the costs of MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration for the minimally invasive treatment of radicular neck pain. Materials and Methods: Between September 2009 and April 2012, 22 patients (9 men, 13 women; mean age: 48.2 years) underwent MRI-guided (1.0 Tesla, Panorama HFO, Philips) single-site periradicular cervical nerve root infiltration with 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide. A further 64 patients (34 men, 30 women; mean age: 50.3 years) were treated under CT fluoroscopic guidance (Somatom Definition 64, Siemens). The mean overall costs were calculated as the sum of the prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, maintenance, and energy costs), personnel costs and expenditure for disposables that were identified for MRI- and CT-guided procedures. Additionally, the cost of ultrasound guidance was calculated. Results: The mean intervention time was 24.9 min. (range: 12-36 min.) for MRI-guided infiltration and 19.7 min. (range: 5-54 min.) for CT-guided infiltration. The average total costs per patient were EUR 240 for MRI-guided interventions and EUR 124 for CT-guided interventions. These were (MRI/CT guidance) EUR 150/60 for equipment use, EUR 46/40 for personnel, and EUR 44/25 for disposables. The mean overall cost of ultrasound guidance was EUR 76. Conclusion: Cervical nerve root infiltration using MRI guidance is still about twice as expensive as infiltration using CT guidance. However, since it does not involve radiation exposure for patients and personnel, MRI-guided nerve root infiltration may become a promising alternative to the CT-guided procedure, especially since a further price decrease is expected for MRI devices and MR-compatible disposables. In contrast, ultrasound remains the less expensive method for nerve root infiltration guidance. (orig.)

  15. MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration therapy. A cost comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, M.H.; Froeling, V.; Roettgen, R.; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Streitparth, F.; Bretschneider, T.; Hartwig, T.; Disch, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the costs of MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration for the minimally invasive treatment of radicular neck pain. Materials and Methods: Between September 2009 and April 2012, 22 patients (9 men, 13 women; mean age: 48.2 years) underwent MRI-guided (1.0 Tesla, Panorama HFO, Philips) single-site periradicular cervical nerve root infiltration with 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide. A further 64 patients (34 men, 30 women; mean age: 50.3 years) were treated under CT fluoroscopic guidance (Somatom Definition 64, Siemens). The mean overall costs were calculated as the sum of the prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, maintenance, and energy costs), personnel costs and expenditure for disposables that were identified for MRI- and CT-guided procedures. Additionally, the cost of ultrasound guidance was calculated. Results: The mean intervention time was 24.9 min. (range: 12-36 min.) for MRI-guided infiltration and 19.7 min. (range: 5-54 min.) for CT-guided infiltration. The average total costs per patient were EUR 240 for MRI-guided interventions and EUR 124 for CT-guided interventions. These were (MRI/CT guidance) EUR 150/60 for equipment use, EUR 46/40 for personnel, and EUR 44/25 for disposables. The mean overall cost of ultrasound guidance was EUR 76. Conclusion: Cervical nerve root infiltration using MRI guidance is still about twice as expensive as infiltration using CT guidance. However, since it does not involve radiation exposure for patients and personnel, MRI-guided nerve root infiltration may become a promising alternative to the CT-guided procedure, especially since a further price decrease is expected for MRI devices and MR-compatible disposables. In contrast, ultrasound remains the less expensive method for nerve root infiltration guidance. (orig.)

  16. A Guide to Laser Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, W M

    1998-09-01

    In one of the few volumes dedicated to laser safety to appear since the 'bible' of Sliney and Wolbarsht, Roy Henderson sets out to provide the reader with a practical account of both the philosophy and practice across contemporary application of lasers. The book is split into three sections. The first section is essentially a non-mathematical review of lasers, optical hazards and laser safety. It is intended as an easily digestible introduction to the subject, conveying the primary concepts of laser safety without the camouflage of equations. This piece of text is manifestly readable by all who have interest in the topic. The second section introduces more meat onto the bones introduced in the first section and some of the practical mathematics necessary to determine optical irradiance in simple laser beams. The book is not intended as a scientific treatise and rigorous treatment of laser physics is left (for the better) to other texts. Laser hazard assessment and safety management are covered in sufficient detail to allow the reader to understand what precautions are necessary to mitigate the risks of laser use. The final section takes a brief look at laser safety in a number of specific industrial applications. These include industrial processing, medicine, telecommunications and entertainment. These should be taken in the context of the second section and are not stand-alone text. With few typographical errors, and packed with practical hints, this book serves as an excellent text for any educational course on laser safety and provides a quick and easy reference for laser safety officers. (book review: A Roy Henderson - ISBN: 0 412 72940 7)

  17. MR-Guided Laser-Induced Thermotherapy of the Infratemporal Fossa and Orbit in Malignant Chondrosarcoma via a Modified Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Mack, Martin G.; Straub, Ralf; Eichler, Katrin; Zangos, Stephan

    2001-01-01

    A 76-year-old patient presented with a recurrent mass of a malignant chondrosarcoma in the right infratemporal fossa and in the left maxillary sinus with orbital invasion. The patient was treated with a palliative intention with MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy using a modified applicator technique. Following treatment clinical symptoms improved and MRI revealed complete laser-induced tumor necrosis

  18. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  19. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma: use of MRI to guide needle biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Mann, B.S.; Mahroof, S.; Pringle, J.A.S.; Briggs, T.W.R.; Cannon, S.R

    2004-03-01

    AIM: To describe the use of MRI to identify and biopsy areas of dedifferentiation in patients with a suspected diagnosis of dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Low-grade chondrosarcoma is characterized at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as having a lobulate, hyperintense appearance on T2-weighted spin-echo sequences. T2-weighted MR images were assessed in 15 patients with a final pathological diagnosis of dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma for regions of atypical reduced signal intensity. Information regarding the site of ultrasound or computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy was available in 10 cases. RESULTS: Nine patients were male and six female with a mean age of 60 years (range 25-77 years). The sites involved were the distal femur (n=4), pelvis (n=3), proximal femur (n=4), femoral diaphysis (n=1), proximal humerus (n=2) and proximal tibia (n=1). The dedifferentiated component consisted of osteosarcoma (n=5), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n=6), spindle cell sarcoma (n=1), leiomyosarcoma (n=1) and pleomorphic sarcoma (n=1). In 14 of the 15 cases, areas of lower signal intensity lacking in lobulation were identified. In nine of the 10 cases, biopsy site included such areas and yielded high-grade sarcoma. CONCLUSIONS: Dedifferentiation within chondrosarcoma may be identified on T2-weighted MRI as areas of reduced signal intensity. These areas should be the preferred site of biopsy.

  20. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabi, H.; Koutsouvelis, N.; Rouzaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial t......-CT images from conventional Dixon MRI sequences with improved bone extraction accuracy. The approach is promising for potential use in PET AC and MRI-only or hybrid PET/MRI-guided RT treatment planning. © 2016 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial...... the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas...

  1. Performance evaluation of laser guided leveler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Hoque

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted at Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI farm on clay loam soil during Rabi season of 2010-2011. The treatments consisted of laser land leveling (T1 and control (non-leveled (T2. A preliminary field survey was done using staff gage. Initially a base station was established to dispense laser ray uniformly. The laser ray erected from base station guided the sensor of the stuff gage and the leveler. Elevation data was collected from the different points of the field and made an average. The maximum gage reading were 247.0 cm and the minimum gage reading was 219.2 cm. Average gage readings of the laser leveled plot was 235.66 cm that was settled for auto adjustment. Therefore, huge amount of soils (16.46 cm high was cut from the highest point and subsequently had to fill to the low points. Finally, an equal gage reading of 235.66 cm was observed after leveling the plot. The laser leveler (Leica MLS700 was used hitching with a TAFE tractor. The field was leveled with manual control initially and finally it was operated with auto adjustment. Two operators, 25 litter diesels and total 6 hours time were required during this leveling. Wheat was cultivated in leveled land (T1 and non-leveled land (T2. Laser leveling was insured for improvement in nutrient use efficiencies, option for precision farming, reduces weed problems, and improves uniformity of crop maturity. There was better distribution of water in leveled plot, which helped to reduce irrigation application time 1 hour. Due to uniformity of moisture content improved germination and crop establishment was found which reflected in higher plant population (239 m-2. Maximum yield (3.41 t ha-1 was obtained in T1 due to longer panicle (10.89 cm, more grain per plant (27.47 and 1000 grain weight (47.38 g compared to yield of T2 (2.62 t ha-1.

  2. Interaction between laser-produced plasma and guiding magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Transportation properties of laser-produced plasma through a guiding magnetic field were examined. A drifting dense plasma produced by a KrF laser was injected into an axisymmetric magnetic field induced by permanent ring magnets. The plasma ion flux in the guiding magnetic field was measured by a Faraday cup at various distances from the laser target. Numerical analyses based on a collective focusing model were performed to simulate plasma particle trajectories and then compared with the experimental results. (author)

  3. Towards MRI-guided linear accelerator control: gating on an MRI accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crijns, S P M; Kok, J G M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2011-08-07

    , we will realize more intricate MRI-guided linear accelerator control in the near future.

  4. Targeted MRI-guided prostate biopsy: are two biopsy cores per MRI-lesion required?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmoeller, L.; Quentin, M.; Blondin, D.; Dietzel, F.; Schleich, C.; Thomas, C.; Antoch, G. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Hiester, A.; Rabenalt, R.; Albers, P.; Arsov, C. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Urology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Gabbert, H.E. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Pathology, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    This study evaluates the feasibility of performing less than two core biopsies per MRI-lesion when performing targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. Retrospectively evaluated were 1545 biopsy cores of 774 intraprostatic lesions (two cores per lesion) in 290 patients (66 ± 7.8 years; median PSA 8.2 ng/ml) regarding prostate cancer (PCa) detection, Gleason score, and tumor infiltration of the first (FBC) compared to the second biopsy core (SBC). Biopsies were acquired under in-bore MR-guidance. For the biopsy cores, 491 were PCa positive, 239 of 774 (31 %) were FBC and 252 of 771 (33 %) were SBC (p = 0.4). Patient PCa detection rate based on the FBC vs. SBC were 46 % vs. 48 % (p = 0.6). For clinically significant PCa (Gleason score ≥4 + 3 = 7) the detection rate was 18 % for both, FBC and SBC (p = 0.9). Six hundred and eighty-seven SBC (89 %) showed no histologic difference. On the lesion level, 40 SBC detected PCa with negative FBC (7.5 %). Twenty SBC showed a Gleason upgrade from 3 + 3 = 6 to ≥3 + 4 = 7 (2.6 %) and 4 to ≥4 + 3 = 7 (0.5 %). The benefit of a second targeted biopsy core per suspicious MRI-lesion is likely minor, especially regarding PCa detection rate and significant Gleason upgrading. Therefore, a further reduction of biopsy cores is reasonable when performing a targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. (orig.)

  5. Targeted MRI-guided prostate biopsy: are two biopsy cores per MRI-lesion required?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmoeller, L.; Quentin, M.; Blondin, D.; Dietzel, F.; Schleich, C.; Thomas, C.; Antoch, G.; Hiester, A.; Rabenalt, R.; Albers, P.; Arsov, C.; Gabbert, H.E.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of performing less than two core biopsies per MRI-lesion when performing targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. Retrospectively evaluated were 1545 biopsy cores of 774 intraprostatic lesions (two cores per lesion) in 290 patients (66 ± 7.8 years; median PSA 8.2 ng/ml) regarding prostate cancer (PCa) detection, Gleason score, and tumor infiltration of the first (FBC) compared to the second biopsy core (SBC). Biopsies were acquired under in-bore MR-guidance. For the biopsy cores, 491 were PCa positive, 239 of 774 (31 %) were FBC and 252 of 771 (33 %) were SBC (p = 0.4). Patient PCa detection rate based on the FBC vs. SBC were 46 % vs. 48 % (p = 0.6). For clinically significant PCa (Gleason score ≥4 + 3 = 7) the detection rate was 18 % for both, FBC and SBC (p = 0.9). Six hundred and eighty-seven SBC (89 %) showed no histologic difference. On the lesion level, 40 SBC detected PCa with negative FBC (7.5 %). Twenty SBC showed a Gleason upgrade from 3 + 3 = 6 to ≥3 + 4 = 7 (2.6 %) and 4 to ≥4 + 3 = 7 (0.5 %). The benefit of a second targeted biopsy core per suspicious MRI-lesion is likely minor, especially regarding PCa detection rate and significant Gleason upgrading. Therefore, a further reduction of biopsy cores is reasonable when performing a targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. (orig.)

  6. MRI-guided tumor tracking in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervino, Laura I; Jiang, Steve B [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technology and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, 3960 Health Sciences Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0865 (United States); Du, Jiang, E-mail: lcervino@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, 200 West Arbor Dr., San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Precise tracking of lung tumor motion during treatment delivery still represents a challenge in radiation therapy. Prototypes of MRI-linac hybrid systems are being created which have the potential of ionization-free real-time imaging of the tumor. This study evaluates the performance of lung tumor tracking algorithms in cine-MRI sagittal images from five healthy volunteers. Visible vascular structures were used as targets. Volunteers performed several series of regular and irregular breathing. Two tracking algorithms were implemented and evaluated: a template matching (TM) algorithm in combination with surrogate tracking using the diaphragm (surrogate was used when the maximum correlation between the template and the image in the search window was less than specified), and an artificial neural network (ANN) model based on the principal components of a region of interest that encompasses the target motion. The mean tracking error e and the error at 95% confidence level e{sub 95} were evaluated for each model. The ANN model led to e = 1.5 mm and e{sub 95} = 4.2 mm, while TM led to e = 0.6 mm and e{sub 95} = 1.0 mm. An extra series was considered separately to evaluate the benefit of using surrogate tracking in combination with TM when target out-of-plane motion occurs. For this series, the mean error was 7.2 mm using only TM and 1.7 mm when the surrogate was used in combination with TM. Results show that, as opposed to tracking with other imaging modalities, ANN does not perform well in MR-guided tracking. TM, however, leads to highly accurate tracking. Out-of-plane motion could be addressed by surrogate tracking using the diaphragm, which can be easily identified in the images.

  7. Clinical outcome following a low-suspicion multiparametric prostate MRI or benign MRI-guided biopsy to detect prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    follow-up [132/156 (85%)] had decreasing levels of prostate-specific-antigen and could be monitored in primary care. CONCLUSION: A low-suspicion MRI in men with prior negative systematic biopsies has a high negative predictive value in ruling out longer term significant cancer. Therefore, immediate...... repeated biopsies are of limited clinical value and could be avoided even if prostate-specific-antigen levels are persistently elevated.......PURPOSE: To assess the future risk of detecting significant prostate cancer following either a low-suspicion MRI or suspicious MRI with benign MRI-guided biopsies in men with prior negative systematic biopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 289 prospectively enrolled men underwent MRI followed by repeated...

  8. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brase, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  9. Biopsy guided by real-time sonography fused with MRI: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, C.; Grossjohann, Hanne Sønder; Nielsen, Kristina Rue

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to test the accuracy of sonographically guided biopsies in a phantom of structures not visible on sonography but shown on MRI by using commercially available sonography systems with image fusion software. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A previously recorded MRI...

  10. Guiding of laser pulses in plasma waveguides created by linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Lemos, N.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Albert, F.; Dias, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that plasma waveguides produced with ultra-short laser pulses (sub-picosecond) in gas jets are capable of guiding high intensity laser pulses. This scheme has the unique ability of guiding a high-intensity laser pulse in a plasma waveguide created by the same laser system in the very simple and stable experimental setup. A hot plasma column was created by a femtosecond class laser that expands into an on-axis parabolic low density profile suitable to act as a wav...

  11. Multiparametric MRI fusion-guided biopsy for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesch, Claudia; Schütz, Viktoria; Dieffenbacher, Svenja; Bonekamp, David; Hadaschik, Boris Alexander; Hohenfellner, Markus; Radtke, Jan P

    2018-03-01

    To discuss the timing, benefits, limitations and current controversies of multiparametric magnet resonance imaging (mpMRI) combined with fusion-guided biopsy and consider how additional incorporation of multivariable risk stratification might further improve prostate cancer diagnosis. MpMRI has been proven advantageous over standard practice for biopsy-naïve men and men with previous biopsy in large prospective studies providing level 1b evidence. Upfront multivariable risk stratification followed by or combined with mpMRI further improves diagnostic accuracy. Regarding active surveillance, mpMRI in combination with fusion biopsy can support initial candidate selection and may help to monitor disease progression. mpMRI and fusion biopsy, however, do not spare failure and conflicting data exists to what extend (systematic) biopsies can be omitted. Integration of mpMRI into the diagnostic pathway for prostate cancer is beneficial; yet more prospective and randomized data is needed to establish reliable procedure standards after mpMRI acquisition.

  12. Laser guiding of cold atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasishin, A V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Shuvaev, V A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using photonic crystals with a lattice defect for the laser guiding of cold atoms is analysed. We have found a configuration of a photonic-crystal lattice and a defect ensuring the distribution of a potential in the defect mode of the photonic crystal allowing the guiding of cold atoms along the defect due to the dipole force acting on atoms. Based on quantitative estimates, we have demonstrated that photonic crystals with a lattice defect permit the guiding of atoms with much higher transverse temperatures and a much higher transverse localisation degree than in the case of hollow-core fibres. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. MRI-guided biopsies and minimally invasive therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet Ghai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI have led to a paradigm shift in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (PCa. Its sensitivity in detecting clinically significant cancer and the ability to localize the tumor within the prostate gland has opened up discussion on targeted diagnosis and therapy in PCa. Use of mp-MRI in conjunction with prostate-specific antigen followed by targeted biopsy allows for a better diagnostic pathway than transrectal ultrasound (TRUS biopsy and improves the diagnosis of PCa. Improved detection of PCa by mp-MRI has also opened up opportunities for focal therapy within the organ while reducing the incidence of side-effects associated with the radical treatment methods for PCa. This review discusses the evidence and techniques for in-bore MRI-guided prostate biopsy and provides an update on the status of MRI-guided targeted focal therapy in PCa.

  14. WE-EF-BRD-01: Past, Present and Future: MRI-Guided Radiotherapy From 2005 to 2025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagendijk, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  15. MRI-guided robot for needle interventions in the prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is applied to non-invasively visualize patient’s anatomy and tumour suspicious regions with superior soft tissue contrast. Amongst others, online MRI is valuable in the diagnostic and treatment techniques for prostate cancer. Clinical MR scanners are suitable to

  16. Fiber Optic Force Sensors for MRI-Guided Interventions and Rehabilitation: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordachita, Iulian I.; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Liu, Xuan; Seifabadi, Reza; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides both anatomical imaging with excellent soft tissue contrast and functional MRI imaging (fMRI) of physiological parameters. The last two decades have witnessed the manifestation of increased interest in MRI-guided minimally invasive intervention procedures and fMRI for rehabilitation and neuroscience research. Accompanying the aspiration to utilize MRI to provide imaging feedback during interventions and brain activity for neuroscience study, there is an accumulated effort to utilize force sensors compatible with the MRI environment to meet the growing demand of these procedures, with the goal of enhanced interventional safety and accuracy, improved efficacy and rehabilitation outcome. This paper summarizes the fundamental principles, the state of the art development and challenges of fiber optic force sensors for MRI-guided interventions and rehabilitation. It provides an overview of MRI-compatible fiber optic force sensors based on different sensing principles, including light intensity modulation, wavelength modulation, and phase modulation. Extensive design prototypes are reviewed to illustrate the detailed implementation of these principles. Advantages and disadvantages of the sensor designs are compared and analyzed. A perspective on the future development of fiber optic sensors is also presented which may have additional broad clinical applications. Future surgical interventions or rehabilitation will rely on intelligent force sensors to provide situational awareness to augment or complement human perception in these procedures. PMID:28652857

  17. Fiber Optic Force Sensors for MRI-Guided Interventions and Rehabilitation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao; Iordachita, Iulian I; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Liu, Xuan; Seifabadi, Reza; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford; Fischer, Gregory S

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides both anatomical imaging with excellent soft tissue contrast and functional MRI imaging (fMRI) of physiological parameters. The last two decades have witnessed the manifestation of increased interest in MRI-guided minimally invasive intervention procedures and fMRI for rehabilitation and neuroscience research. Accompanying the aspiration to utilize MRI to provide imaging feedback during interventions and brain activity for neuroscience study, there is an accumulated effort to utilize force sensors compatible with the MRI environment to meet the growing demand of these procedures, with the goal of enhanced interventional safety and accuracy, improved efficacy and rehabilitation outcome. This paper summarizes the fundamental principles, the state of the art development and challenges of fiber optic force sensors for MRI-guided interventions and rehabilitation. It provides an overview of MRI-compatible fiber optic force sensors based on different sensing principles, including light intensity modulation, wavelength modulation, and phase modulation. Extensive design prototypes are reviewed to illustrate the detailed implementation of these principles. Advantages and disadvantages of the sensor designs are compared and analyzed. A perspective on the future development of fiber optic sensors is also presented which may have additional broad clinical applications. Future surgical interventions or rehabilitation will rely on intelligent force sensors to provide situational awareness to augment or complement human perception in these procedures.

  18. Guiding of short, intense laser pulses through solid guides and preformed plasma channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghesi, M.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Gaillard, R.; Malka, G.; Vickers, C.; Willi, O.; Blanchot, N.; Miquel, J.L.; Canaud, B.; Davies, J.R.; Malka, G.; Offenberger, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    In a series of experiments carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (UK) and at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Limeil (France), various techniques of guiding ultra-intense laser pulses over distances exceeding the natural diffraction length were investigated. Efficient guiding was demonstrated both through density channels formed in an underdense plasma by an intense prepulse and through solid guides (hollow capillary tubes). Indication of collimated fast electron propagation though solid targets has also been obtained. (authors)

  19. MRI follow-up after concordant, histologically benign diagnosis of breast lesions sampled by MRI-guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Dershaw, D David; Lee, Carol H; Kaplan, Jennifer; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2009-09-01

    Follow-up MRI can be useful to confirm a benign diagnosis after MRI-guided breast biopsy. This retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate appropriate timing and imaging interpretation for the initial follow-up MRI when a benign, concordant histology is obtained using MRI-guided breast biopsy. Retrospective review was performed of 177 lesions visualized only by MRI in 172 women who underwent 9-gauge, vacuum-assisted core biopsy and marker placement with imaging-concordant benign histology. All underwent follow-up MRI within 12 months. Timing of the follow-up study, change in size, results of second biopsy if performed, and distance of localizing marker to the lesion on the follow-up study were recorded. At initial follow-up, 155 lesions were decreased or gone, 14 lesions were stable, and eight were enlarged. Seventeen (9.6%, 17/177) lesions underwent a second biopsy, including six enlarging, 10 stable, and one decreasing. Of these, four were malignant. Enlargement was seen in two carcinomas at 6 and 12 months. Two carcinomas, one stable at 2 months and another stable at 3 and 11 months, were rebiopsied because of suspicion of a missed lesion in the former and worrisome mammographic and sonographic changes in the latter. The distance of the marker from the lesion on follow-up did not correlate with biopsy accuracy. Follow-up MRI did not detect missed cancers because of lesion enlargement before 6 months after biopsy; two of four missed cancers were stable. The localizing marker can deploy away from the target despite successful sampling.

  20. Feasibility study on 3D image reconstruction from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI for MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Lee, Danny; Kipritidis, John; Whelan, Brendan; Greer, Peter B; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco; Keall, Paul

    2018-02-11

    In-room MRI is a promising image guidance strategy in external beam radiotherapy to acquire volumetric information for moving targets. However, limitations in spatio-temporal resolution led several authors to use 2D orthogonal images for guidance. The aim of this work is to present a method to concurrently compensate for non-rigid tumour motion and provide an approach for 3D reconstruction from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI slices for MRI-guided treatments. Free-breathing sagittal/coronal interleaved 2D cine-MRI were acquired in addition to a pre-treatment 3D volume in two patients. We performed deformable image registration (DIR) between cine-MRI slices and corresponding slices in the pre-treatment 3D volume. Based on an extrapolation of the interleaved 2D motion fields, the 3D motion field was estimated and used to warp the pre-treatment volume. Due to the lack of a ground truth for patients, the method was validated on a digital 4D lung phantom. On the phantom, the 3D reconstruction method was able to compensate for tumour motion and compared favourably to the results of previously adopted strategies. The difference in the 3D motion fields between the phantom and the extrapolated motion was 0.4 ± 0.3 mm for tumour and 0.8 ± 1.5 mm for whole anatomy, demonstrating feasibility of performing a 3D volumetric reconstruction directly from 2D orthogonal cine-MRI slices. Application of the method to patient data confirmed the feasibility of utilizing this method in real world scenarios. Preliminary results on phantom and patient cases confirm the feasibility of the proposed approach in an MRI-guided scenario, especially for non-rigid tumour motion compensation. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Laser and Particle Guiding Micro-Elements for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Plettner, Tomas; Spencer, James; Wisdom, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Laser driven particle accelerators based on the current generation of lasers will require sub-micron control of the laser field as well as precise beam guiding. Hence the fabrication techniques that allow integrating both elements into an accelerator-on-chip format become critical for the success of such particle accelerators. Micromachining technology for silicon has been shown to be one such feasible technology in PAC2003 but with a variety of complications on the laser side. Fortunately, in recent years the fabrication of transparent ceramics has become an interesting technology that could be applied for laser-particle accelerators in several ways. We discuss this area, its advantages such as the range of materials it provides and various ways to implement it followed by some different test examples that have been considered. One important goal of this approach is an integrated system that could avoid the necessity of having to inject either laser or particle pulses into these structures.

  2. Shoulder-Mounted Robot for MRI-guided arthrography: Accuracy and mounting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfaredi, R; Wilson, E; Sze, R; Sharma, K; Azizi, B; Iordachita, I; Cleary, K

    2015-08-01

    A new version of our compact and lightweight patient-mounted MRI-compatible 4 degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot for MRI-guided arthrography procedures is introduced. This robot could convert the traditional two-stage arthrography procedure (fluoroscopy-guided needle insertion followed by a diagnostic MRI scan) to a one-stage procedure, all in the MRI suite. The results of a recent accuracy study are reported. A new mounting technique is proposed and the mounting stability is investigated using optical and electromagnetic tracking on an anthropomorphic phantom. Five volunteer subjects including 2 radiologists were asked to conduct needle insertion in 4 different random positions and orientations within the robot's workspace and the displacement of the base of the robot was investigated during robot motion and needle insertion. Experimental results show that the proposed mounting method is stable and promising for clinical application.

  3. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Cole, Gregory; Li, Gang; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alexander; Tokuda, Junichi; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian...

  4. A Concentric Tube Continuum Robot with Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Closed-Loop Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Rucker, D. Caleb; Webster, Robert J.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling and experimental evaluation of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible concentric tube continuum robotic system. This system enables MRI-guided deployment of a precurved and steerable concentric tube continuum mechanism, and is suitable for clinical applications where a curved trajectory is needed. This compact 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) robotic system is piezoelectrically-actuated, and allows simultaneous robot motion and imaging with no visually...

  5. MRI-Guided Intervention for Breast Lesions Using the Freehand Technique in a 3.0-T Closed-Bore MRI Scanner: Feasibility and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Young [Department of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To report the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided intervention for diagnosing suspicious breast lesions detectable by MRI only, using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner. Five women with 5 consecutive MRI-only breast lesions underwent MRI-guided intervention: 3 underwent MRI-guided needle localization and 2, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy. The interventions were performed in a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI system using a dedicated phased-array breast coil with the patients in the prone position; the freehand technique was used. Technical success and histopathologic outcome were analyzed. MRI showed that four lesions were masses (mean size, 11.5 mm; range, 7-18 mm); and 1, a nonmass-like enhancement (maximum diameter, 21 mm). The locations of the lesions with respect to the breast with index cancer were as follows: different quadrant, same breast - 3 cases; same quadrant, same breast - 1 case; and contralateral breast - 1 case. Histopathologic evaluation of the lesions treated with needle localization disclosed perilobular hemangioma, fibrocystic change, and fibroadenomatous change. The lesions treated with vacuum-assisted biopsy demonstrated a radial scar and atypical apocrine hyperplasia. Follow-up MRI after 2-7 months (mean, 4.6 months) confirmed complete lesion removal in all cases. MRI-guided intervention for breast lesions using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner is feasible and accurate for diagnosing MRI-only lesions.

  6. MRI-Guided Intervention for Breast Lesions Using the Freehand Technique in a 3.0-T Closed-Bore MRI Scanner: Feasibility and Initial Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, So Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Ko, Eun Sook

    2013-01-01

    To report the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided intervention for diagnosing suspicious breast lesions detectable by MRI only, using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner. Five women with 5 consecutive MRI-only breast lesions underwent MRI-guided intervention: 3 underwent MRI-guided needle localization and 2, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy. The interventions were performed in a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI system using a dedicated phased-array breast coil with the patients in the prone position; the freehand technique was used. Technical success and histopathologic outcome were analyzed. MRI showed that four lesions were masses (mean size, 11.5 mm; range, 7-18 mm); and 1, a nonmass-like enhancement (maximum diameter, 21 mm). The locations of the lesions with respect to the breast with index cancer were as follows: different quadrant, same breast - 3 cases; same quadrant, same breast - 1 case; and contralateral breast - 1 case. Histopathologic evaluation of the lesions treated with needle localization disclosed perilobular hemangioma, fibrocystic change, and fibroadenomatous change. The lesions treated with vacuum-assisted biopsy demonstrated a radial scar and atypical apocrine hyperplasia. Follow-up MRI after 2-7 months (mean, 4.6 months) confirmed complete lesion removal in all cases. MRI-guided intervention for breast lesions using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner is feasible and accurate for diagnosing MRI-only lesions

  7. Edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) for MRI-CT image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Bigong; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the joint/simultaneous X-ray CT and MRI image reconstruction. In particular, a novel algorithm is proposed for MRI image reconstruction from highly under-sampled MRI data and CT images. It consists of two steps. First, a training dataset is generated from a series of well-registered MRI and CT images on the same patients. Then, an initial MRI image of a patient can be reconstructed via edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) based on the training dataset and a CT image of the patient. Second, an MRI image is reconstructed using the dictionary learning (DL) algorithm from highly under-sampled k-space data and the initial MRI image. Our algorithm can establish a one-to-one correspondence between the two imaging modalities, and obtain a good initial MRI estimation. Both noise-free and noisy simulation studies were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results with different under-sampling factors show that the proposed algorithm performed significantly better than those reconstructed using the DL algorithm from MRI data alone.

  8. Positioning device for MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damianou, Christakis [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus); MEDSONIC, LTD, Limassol (Cyprus); Ioannides, Kleanthis [Polikliniki Igia, Limassol (Cyprus); Milonas, Nicos [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus)

    2008-04-15

    A prototype magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- compatible positioning device was used to move an MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. The positioning device has three user-controlled degrees of freedom that allow access to various targeted lesions. The positioning device was designed and fabricated using construction materials selected for compatibility with high magnetic fields and fast switching magnetic field gradients encountered inside MRI scanners. The positioning device incorporates only MRI compatible materials such as piezoelectric motors, plastic sheets, brass screws, plastic pulleys and timing belts. The HIFU/MRI system includes the multiple subsystems (a) HIFU system, (b) MR imaging, (c) Positioning device (robot) and associate drivers, (d) temperature measurement, (e) cavitation detection, (f) MRI compatible camera, and (g) Soft ware. The MRI compatibility of the system was successfully demonstrated in a clinical high-field MRI scanner. The ability of the robot to accurately move the transducer thus creating discrete and overlapping lesions in biological tissue was tested successfully. A simple, cost effective, portable positioning device has been developed which can be used in virtually any clinical MRI scanner since it can be sited on the scanner's table. The propagation of HIFU can use either a lateral or superior-inferior approach. Discrete and large lesions were created successfully with reproducible results. (orig.)

  9. Post-clip placement MRI following second-look US-guided core biopsy for suspicious lesions identified on breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sung Eun; Cho, Nariya; Han, Wonshik

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate whether the post-clip placement MRI following second-look ultrasound (US)-guided core biopsy is useful to confirm the adequate sampling of suspicious lesions identified on breast MRI. Between 2014 and 2016, 31 consecutive women with 34 suspicious lesions that had not been identified on previous mammography or US were detected using MRI. Among them, 26 women with 29 lesions (mean size 1.5 cm, range 0.5-5.8 cm) found by second-look US underwent US-guided biopsy, subsequent clip insertion and post-clip placement MRI. Five women with five lesions that were not found by second-look US underwent MRI-guided biopsy. The technical success rate and lesion characteristics were described. The technical success rate was 96.6% (28/29). One failure case was a benign, 1.1-cm non-mass enhancement. Of the 28 success cases, 23 (82.1%) were masses and 5 (17.9%) were non-mass enhancements; 17 (60.7%) were benign, 4 (14.3%) were high-risk and 7 (25.0%) were malignant lesions. The technical success rate was 100% (28/28) for masses and 83.3% (5/6) for non-mass enhancements. Post-clip placement MRI following US-guided biopsy is useful in confirming the adequate sampling of lesions identified on MRI. This method could be an alternative to MRI-guided biopsy for lesions visible on US. • Post-clip MRI is useful for confirming adequate sampling of US-guided biopsy. • Post-clip MRI following US-guided biopsy revealed a 96.6 % technical success rate. • One technical failure case was a benign, 1.1-cm non-mass enhancement. • The technical success rate of US-guided biopsy for non-mass enhancements was 83.3 %.

  10. A tool for validating MRI-guided strategies: a digital breathing CT/MRI phantom of the abdominal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Summers, Paul; Gianoli, Chiara; Bellomi, Massimo; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as the elected image modality for organ motion quantification and management in image-guided radiotherapy. However, the lack of validation tools is an open issue for image guidance in the abdominal and thoracic organs affected by organ motion due to respiration. We therefore present an abdominal four-dimensional (4D) CT/MRI digital phantom, including the estimation of MR tissue parameters, simulation of dedicated abdominal MR sequences, modeling of radiofrequency coil response and noise, followed by k-space sampling and image reconstruction. The phantom allows the realistic simulation of images generated by MR pulse sequences with control of scan and tissue parameters, combined with co-registered CT images. In order to demonstrate the potential of the phantom in a clinical scenario, we describe the validation of a virtual T1-weighted 4D MRI strategy. Specifically, the motion extracted from a T2-weighted 4D MRI is used to warp a T1-weighted breath-hold acquisition, with the aim of overcoming trade-offs that limit T1-weighted acquisitions. Such an application shows the applicability of the digital CT/MRI phantom as a validation tool, which should be especially useful for cases unsuited to obtain real imaging data.

  11. Controlled Hyperthermia with MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, Steffen; Salomir, Rares; Pedersen, Michael

    Introduction: Hyperthermia is an appealing oncological treatment since the significant regions of hypoxia contained in most solid tumours are known to be sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of heat. However, due to the seemingly insurmountable technical difficulties associated with delivering thermal......-sensitive promoters and localized drug delivery using thermo-sensitive micro-carriers. Subjects Here we will present some of the recent advances in MRI-FUS, and their technical background. This will include: 1) Real-time MRI-thermometry. 2) FUS-technology. 3) Temporal and Spatial temperature control using MRI...... and penetration depth are governed by the wavelength. Hence for US it is possible to body non-invasively position sub-millimeter focal points in deep seated regions of the. Temperature Control: Most solid tumours cover volumes larger than that of the focal region. This problem may be reduced somewhat...

  12. A practical guide to handling laser diode beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Haiyin

    2015-01-01

    This book offers the reader a practical guide to the control and characterization of laser diode beams.  Laser diodes are the most widely used lasers, accounting for 50% of the global laser market.  Correct handling of laser diode beams is the key to the successful use of laser diodes, and this requires an in-depth understanding of their unique properties. Following a short introduction to the working principles of laser diodes, the book describes the basics of laser diode beams and beam propagation, including Zemax modeling of a Gaussian beam propagating through a lens.  The core of the book is concerned with laser diode beam manipulations: collimating and focusing, circularization and astigmatism correction, coupling into a single mode optical fiber, diffractive optics and beam shaping, and manipulation of multi transverse mode beams.  The final chapter of the book covers beam characterization methods, describing the measurement of spatial and spectral properties, including wavelength and linewidth meas...

  13. Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelet, Yohann; Houard, Aurélien; Arantchouk, Leonid; Forestier, Benjamin; Liu, Yi; Prade, Bernard; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2012-04-01

    A Tesla coil generator was designed to produce high voltage pulses oscillating at 100 kHz synchronisable with a nanosecond temporal jitter. Using this compact high voltage generator, we demonstrate reproducible meter long discharges in air at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Triggering and guiding of the discharges are performed in air by femtosecond laser filaments.

  14. MRI-guided brachytherapy for cancer of the oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, H.; Bachmann, G.; Lieven, H. von; Sens, M.

    1993-01-01

    A method of brachytherapy treatment planning using MRI is presented. In 13 patients with inoperable squamous cell cancer of the thoracic oesophagus an intraluminal afterloading boost with MRI assistance was performed. A new type of flexible catheter was filled with 1/100 diluted Gd-DTPA and introduced into the oesophagus before performing MRI in the sagittal, coronal and transverse planes. One sagittal or coronal picture which showed the catheter tip and the residual cancer was magnified to ''life size''. The position of the catheter was corrected if necessary and the treatment volume decided. The contrast medium was then aspirated out of the catheter and a thinner afterloading catheter pushed into the outer catheter. The patient was moved immediately to the afterloading room and received the first dose of boost irradiation. This method allows much more precise brachytherapy planning since it shows the cancer and the catheter together. It is superior to localising the cancer with a barium swallow or endoscopy because MRI visualises the whole extent of the residual cancer, which can then be covered with the necessary dose. (orig.)

  15. Creating 3D visualizations of MRI data: A brief guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is itself 3D, it is often difficult to adequately present the results papers and slides in 3D. As a result, findings of MRI studies are often presented in 2D instead. A solution is to create figures that include perspective and can convey 3D information; such figures can sometimes be produced by standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis packages and related specialty programs. However, many options cannot provide functionality such as visualizing activation clusters that are both cortical and subcortical (i.e., a 3D glass brain), the production of several statistical maps with an identical perspective in the 3D rendering, or animated renderings. Here I detail an approach for creating 3D visualizations of MRI data that satisfies all of these criteria. Though a 3D ‘glass brain’ rendering can sometimes be difficult to interpret, they are useful in showing a more overall representation of the results, whereas the traditional slices show a more local view. Combined, presenting both 2D and 3D representations of MR images can provide a more comprehensive view of the study’s findings. PMID:26594340

  16. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  17. Post-clip placement MRI following second-look US-guided core biopsy for suspicious lesions identified on breast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Eun; Cho, Nariya; Han, Wonshik

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate whether the post-clip placement MRI following second-look ultrasound (US)-guided core biopsy is useful to confirm the adequate sampling of suspicious lesions identified on breast MRI. Between 2014 and 2016, 31 consecutive women with 34 suspicious lesions that had not been identified on previous mammography or US were detected using MRI. Among them, 26 women with 29 lesions (mean size 1.5 cm, range 0.5-5.8 cm) found by second-look US underwent US-guided biopsy, subsequent clip insertion and post-clip placement MRI. Five women with five lesions that were not found by second-look US underwent MRI-guided biopsy. The technical success rate and lesion characteristics were described. The technical success rate was 96.6% (28/29). One failure case was a benign, 1.1-cm non-mass enhancement. Of the 28 success cases, 23 (82.1%) were masses and 5 (17.9%) were non-mass enhancements; 17 (60.7%) were benign, 4 (14.3%) were high-risk and 7 (25.0%) were malignant lesions. The technical success rate was 100% (28/28) for masses and 83.3% (5/6) for non-mass enhancements. Post-clip placement MRI following US-guided biopsy is useful in confirming the adequate sampling of lesions identified on MRI. This method could be an alternative to MRI-guided biopsy for lesions visible on US. (orig.)

  18. Post-clip placement MRI following second-look US-guided core biopsy for suspicious lesions identified on breast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sung Eun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Centre, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonshik [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate whether the post-clip placement MRI following second-look ultrasound (US)-guided core biopsy is useful to confirm the adequate sampling of suspicious lesions identified on breast MRI. Between 2014 and 2016, 31 consecutive women with 34 suspicious lesions that had not been identified on previous mammography or US were detected using MRI. Among them, 26 women with 29 lesions (mean size 1.5 cm, range 0.5-5.8 cm) found by second-look US underwent US-guided biopsy, subsequent clip insertion and post-clip placement MRI. Five women with five lesions that were not found by second-look US underwent MRI-guided biopsy. The technical success rate and lesion characteristics were described. The technical success rate was 96.6% (28/29). One failure case was a benign, 1.1-cm non-mass enhancement. Of the 28 success cases, 23 (82.1%) were masses and 5 (17.9%) were non-mass enhancements; 17 (60.7%) were benign, 4 (14.3%) were high-risk and 7 (25.0%) were malignant lesions. The technical success rate was 100% (28/28) for masses and 83.3% (5/6) for non-mass enhancements. Post-clip placement MRI following US-guided biopsy is useful in confirming the adequate sampling of lesions identified on MRI. This method could be an alternative to MRI-guided biopsy for lesions visible on US. (orig.)

  19. A novel approach of fMRI-guided tractography analysis within a group: construction of an fMRI-guided tractographic atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Maria Giulia; Makris, Nikos; Laganà, Maria Marcella; Papadimitriou, George; Baglio, Francesca; Griffanti, Ludovica; Nemni, Raffaello; Cecconi, Pietro; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) tractography and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) investigate two complementary aspects of brain networks: white matter (WM) anatomical connectivity and gray matter (GM) function. However, integration standards have yet to be defined; namely, individual fMRI-driven tractography is usually applied and only few studies address group analysis. This work proposes an efficient method of fMRI-driven tractography at group level through the creation of a tractographic atlas starting from the GM areas activated by a verbal fluency task in 11 healthy subjects. The individual tracts were registered to the MNI space. Selection ROIs derived by GM masking and dilation of group activated areas were applied to obtain the fMRI-driven subsets within tracts. An atlas of the tracts recruited among the population was obtained by selecting for each subject the fMRI-guided tracts passing through the high probability voxels (the voxels recruited by the 90% of the subjects) and merging them together. The reliability of this approach was assessed by comparing it with the probabilistic atlas previously introduced in literature. The introduced method allowed to successfully reconstruct activated tracts, which comprehended corpus callosum, left cingulum and arcuate, a small portion of the right arcuate, both cortico-spinal tracts and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi. Moreover, it proved to give results concordant with the previously introduced probabilistic approach, allowing in addition to reconstruct 3D trajectories of the activated fibers, which appear particularly helpful in the detection of WM connections.

  20. Fast MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Laura; Morris, Elizabeth A; Dershaw, D David; Thornton, Cynthia M; Van Zee, Kimberly J; Tan, Lee K

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new method for performing MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in a study of lesions that had subsequent surgical excision. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Twenty women scheduled for MRI-guided needle localization and surgical biopsy were prospectively entered in the study. MRI-guided biopsy was performed with a vacuum-assisted probe, followed by placement of a localizing clip, and then needle localization for surgical excision. Vacuum-assisted biopsy and surgical histology were correlated. Vacuum-assisted biopsy was successfully performed in 19 (95%) of the 20 women. The median size of 27 MRI-detected lesions that had biopsy was 1.0 cm (range, 0.4-6.4 cm). Cancer was present in eight (30%) of 27 lesions and in six (32%) of 19 women; among these eight cancers, five were infiltrating and three were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Among these 27 lesions, histology was benign at vacuum-assisted biopsy and at surgery in 19 (70%), cancer at vacuum-assisted biopsy in six (22%), atypical ductal hyperplasia at vacuum-assisted biopsy and DCIS at surgery in one (4%), and benign at vacuum-assisted biopsy with surgery showing microscopic DCIS that was occult at MRI in one (4%). The median time to perform vacuum-assisted biopsy of a single lesion was 35 min (mean, 35 min; range, 24-48 min). Placement of a localizing clip, attempted in 26 lesions, was successful in 25 (96%) of 26, and the clip was retrieved on specimen radiography in 22 (96%) of 23. One complication occurred: a hematoma that resolved with compression. MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy is a fast, safe, and accurate alternative to surgical biopsy for breast lesions detected on MRI.

  1. Longitudinal diffusion MRI for treatment response assessment: Preliminary experience using an MRI-guided tri-cobalt 60 radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingli; Cao, Minsong; Sheng, Ke; Gao, Yu; Chen, Allen; Kamrava, Mitch; Lee, Percy; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Lamb, James; Thomas, David; Low, Daniel; Hu, Peng

    2016-03-01

    To demonstrate the preliminary feasibility of a longitudinal diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) strategy for assessing patient response to radiotherapy at 0.35 T using an MRI-guided radiotherapy system (ViewRay). Six patients (three head and neck cancer, three sarcoma) who underwent fractionated radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. A 2D multislice spin echo single-shot echo planar imaging diffusion pulse sequence was implemented on the ViewRay system and tested in phantom studies. The same pulse sequence was used to acquire longitudinal diffusion data (every 2-5 fractions) on the six patients throughout the entire course of radiotherapy. The reproducibility of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements was assessed using reference regions and the temporal variations of the tumor ADC values were evaluated. In diffusion phantom studies, the ADC values measured on the ViewRay system matched well with reference ADC values with ViewRay MRI. Larger patient cohort studies are warranted to correlate the longitudinal diffusion measurements to patient outcomes. Such an approach may enable response-guided adaptive radiotherapy.

  2. A Concentric Tube Continuum Robot with Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Closed-Loop Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Rucker, D. Caleb; Webster, Robert J.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling and experimental evaluation of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible concentric tube continuum robotic system. This system enables MRI-guided deployment of a precurved and steerable concentric tube continuum mechanism, and is suitable for clinical applications where a curved trajectory is needed. This compact 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) robotic system is piezoelectrically-actuated, and allows simultaneous robot motion and imaging with no visually observable image artifact. The targeting accuracy is evaluated with optical tracking system and gelatin phantom under live MRI-guidance with Root Mean Square (RMS) errors of 1.94 and 2.17 mm respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the robot has kinematic redundancy to reach the same target through different paths. This was evaluated in both free space and MRI-guided gelatin phantom trails, with RMS errors of 0.48 and 0.59 mm respectively. As the first of its kind, MRI-guided targeted concentric tube needle placements with ex vivo porcine liver are demonstrated with 4.64 mm RMS error through closed-loop control of the piezoelectrically-actuated robot. PMID:26983842

  3. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Lænsø Madsen, Mads; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary–interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented...

  4. Outcomes of Interventional-MRI Versus Microelectrode Recording-Guided Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip S. Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In deep brain stimulation (DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN for Parkinson’s disease (PD, there is debate concerning the use of neuroimaging alone to confirm correct anatomic placement of the DBS lead into the STN, versus the use of microelectrode recording (MER to confirm functional placement. We performed a retrospective study of a contemporaneous cohort of 45 consecutive patients who underwent either interventional-MRI (iMRI or MER-guided DBS lead implantation. We compared radial lead error, motor and sensory side effect, and clinical benefit programming thresholds, and pre- and post-operative unified PD rating scale scores, and levodopa equivalent dosages. MER-guided surgery was associated with greater radial error compared to the intended target. In general, side effect thresholds during initial programming were slightly lower in the MER group, but clinical benefit thresholds were similar. No significant difference in the reduction of clinical symptoms or medication dosage was observed. In summary, iMRI lead implantation occurred with greater anatomic accuracy, in locations demonstrated to be the appropriate functional region of the STN, based on the observation of similar programming side effect and benefit thresholds obtained with MER. The production of equivalent clinical outcomes suggests that surgeon and patient preference can be used to guide the decision of whether to recommend iMRI or MER-guided DBS lead implantation to appropriate patients with PD.

  5. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deli, Martin; Fritz, Jan; Mateiescu, Serban; Busch, Martin; Carrino, John A.; Becker, Jan; Garmer, Marietta; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 ± 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 ± 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  6. Motion compensation for MRI-compatible patient-mounted needle guide device: estimation of targeting accuracy in MRI-guided kidney cryoablations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Chauvin, Laurent; Ninni, Brian; Kato, Takahisa; King, Franklin; Tuncali, Kemal; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Patient-mounted needle guide devices for percutaneous ablation are vulnerable to patient motion. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate a software system for an MRI-compatible patient-mounted needle guide device that can adaptively compensate for displacement of the device due to patient motion using a novel image-based automatic device-to-image registration technique. We have developed a software system for an MRI-compatible patient-mounted needle guide device for percutaneous ablation. It features fully-automated image-based device-to-image registration to track the device position, and a device controller to adjust the needle trajectory to compensate for the displacement of the device. We performed: (a) a phantom study using a clinical MR scanner to evaluate registration performance; (b) simulations using intraoperative time-series MR data acquired in 20 clinical cases of MRI-guided renal cryoablations to assess its impact on motion compensation; and (c) a pilot clinical study in three patients to test its feasibility during the clinical procedure. FRE, TRE, and success rate of device-to-image registration were mm, mm, and 98.3% for the phantom images. The simulation study showed that the motion compensation reduced the targeting error for needle placement from 8.2 mm to 5.4 mm (p  <  0.0005) in patients under general anesthesia (GA), and from 14.4 mm to 10.0 mm () in patients under monitored anesthesia care (MAC). The pilot study showed that the software registered the device successfully in a clinical setting. Our simulation study demonstrated that the software system could significantly improve targeting accuracy in patients treated under both MAC and GA. Intraprocedural image-based device-to-image registration was feasible.

  7. MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojala, Risto; Kerimaa, Pekka; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco-Sequeiros, Roberto [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oulu (Finland); Lakovaara, Martti [Oulu Deaconess Institute, Department of Surgery, Oulu (Finland); Hyvoenen, Pekka; Lehenkari, Petri [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Oulu (Finland)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method for osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) treatment. Ten OCD lesions of the knee unresponsive to conservative management were treated with MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling to reduce symptoms and promote ossification of the lesion. All lesions were located in distal femoral condyles. Only stable OCD lesions were included (preprocedural MRI grade I or II). Five lesions were of juvenile type and five lesions were of adult type OCD. All the patients had severe limitation of activity due to the OCD-related pain. By using a 0.23 T open MRI scanner and spinal anesthesia, percutaneous retrograde drilling of the OCD lesions was performed (3 mm cylindrical drill, one to three channels). Optical tracking and MRI imaging were used to guide instruments during the procedure. Mean postprocedural clinical follow-up time was 3 years. Eight patients had a post-procedural follow-up MRI within 1 year. All the OCD lesions were located and drilled using the 0.23 T open MRI scanner without procedural complications. All the patients had pain relief, mean visual analog score (VAS) declined from 6 to 2. Follow-up MRI showed ossification in all lesions. Eight patients could return to normal physical activity with no or minor effect on function (Hughston score 3-4). Treatment failed in two cases where the continuation of symptoms led to arthroscopy and transchondral fixation. MR-guided retrograde OCD lesion drilling is an accurate, feasible, and effective cartilage-sparing techique in OCD management. (orig.)

  8. MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojala, Risto; Kerimaa, Pekka; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco-Sequeiros, Roberto; Lakovaara, Martti; Hyvoenen, Pekka; Lehenkari, Petri

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method for osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) treatment. Ten OCD lesions of the knee unresponsive to conservative management were treated with MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling to reduce symptoms and promote ossification of the lesion. All lesions were located in distal femoral condyles. Only stable OCD lesions were included (preprocedural MRI grade I or II). Five lesions were of juvenile type and five lesions were of adult type OCD. All the patients had severe limitation of activity due to the OCD-related pain. By using a 0.23 T open MRI scanner and spinal anesthesia, percutaneous retrograde drilling of the OCD lesions was performed (3 mm cylindrical drill, one to three channels). Optical tracking and MRI imaging were used to guide instruments during the procedure. Mean postprocedural clinical follow-up time was 3 years. Eight patients had a post-procedural follow-up MRI within 1 year. All the OCD lesions were located and drilled using the 0.23 T open MRI scanner without procedural complications. All the patients had pain relief, mean visual analog score (VAS) declined from 6 to 2. Follow-up MRI showed ossification in all lesions. Eight patients could return to normal physical activity with no or minor effect on function (Hughston score 3-4). Treatment failed in two cases where the continuation of symptoms led to arthroscopy and transchondral fixation. MR-guided retrograde OCD lesion drilling is an accurate, feasible, and effective cartilage-sparing techique in OCD management. (orig.)

  9. Totally Accessible MRI A User's Guide to Principles, Technology, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lipton, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    This is a practical guide that offers a lucid introduction to the principles of MRI physics. The author, recognized in the imaging community for his exceptional teaching methods and lectures, has written an easy to understand text. Each chapter explains the "why" and "how" behind MRI physics. Readers will understand how altering MRI parameters will have many different consequences for image quality and the speed in which images are generated. Practical topics, selected for their value to clinical practice, include progressive changes in key MRI parameters, imaging time, and signal to noise ratio. A wealth of high quality illustrations, complemented by concise text, enables readers to gain a thorough understanding of the subject without requiring prior in-depth knowledge

  10. Future of medical physics: Real-time MRI-guided proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oborn, Bradley M; Dowdell, Stephen; Metcalfe, Peter E; Crozier, Stuart; Mohan, Radhe; Keall, Paul J

    2017-08-01

    With the recent clinical implementation of real-time MRI-guided x-ray beam therapy (MRXT), attention is turning to the concept of combining real-time MRI guidance with proton beam therapy; MRI-guided proton beam therapy (MRPT). MRI guidance for proton beam therapy is expected to offer a compelling improvement to the current treatment workflow which is warranted arguably more than for x-ray beam therapy. This argument is born out of the fact that proton therapy toxicity outcomes are similar to that of the most advanced IMRT treatments, despite being a fundamentally superior particle for cancer treatment. In this Future of Medical Physics article, we describe the various software and hardware aspects of potential MRPT systems and the corresponding treatment workflow. Significant software developments, particularly focused around adaptive MRI-based planning will be required. The magnetic interaction between the MRI and the proton beamline components will be a key area of focus. For example, the modeling and potential redesign of a magnetically compatible gantry to allow for beam delivery from multiple angles towards a patient located within the bore of an MRI scanner. Further to this, the accuracy of pencil beam scanning and beam monitoring in the presence of an MRI fringe field will require modeling, testing, and potential further development to ensure that the highly targeted radiotherapy is maintained. Looking forward we envisage a clear and accelerated path for hardware development, leveraging from lessons learnt from MRXT development. Within few years, simple prototype systems will likely exist, and in a decade, we could envisage coupled systems with integrated gantries. Such milestones will be key in the development of a more efficient, more accurate, and more successful form of proton beam therapy for many common cancer sites. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Atlas-based deformable image registration for MRI-guided prostate radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, J.; Fripp, J.; Salvado, O.; Lambert, J.; Denham, J.W.; Capp, A.; Grer, P.B.; Parker, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To develop atlas-based deformable image registration methods to automatically segment organs and map electron densities to pelvic MRI scans for MRI-guided radiation therapy. Methods An MRT pelvic atlas and corresponding CT atlas were developed based on whole pelvic T 2 MRI scans and CT scans for 39 patients. Expert manual segmentations on both MRI and CT scans were obtained. The atlas was deformably registered to the individual patient MRI scans for automatic prostate, rectum, bladder and bone segmentation. These were compared to the manual segmentations using the Dice overlap coefficient. The same deformation vectors were then applied to the CT-atlas to produce pseudo-CT scans that correspond to the patient MRI scan anatomy but are populated with Hounsfield units. The original patient plan was recalculated on the pseudo-CT and compared to the original CT plan and bulk density plans on the MRI scans. Results Dice coefficient results were high (>0.8) for bone and prostate but lower (<0.7) for bladder and rectum which exhibit greater changes in shape and volume. Doses calculated on pseudo-CT scans were within 3% of original patient plans. Two sources of discrepancy were found; MR anatomy differences from CT due to patient setup differences at the MR scanner. and Hounsfield unit differences for bone in the pseudo-CT from original CT. Patient setup will be adressed with a

  12. Percolation simulation of laser-guided electrical discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Akira; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Eiichi; Kato, Susumu; Fujii, Takashi; Kanazawa, Seiji

    2010-08-13

    A three-dimensional simulation of laser-guided discharges based on percolation is presented. The model includes both local growth of a streamer due to the enhanced electric field at the streamer's tip and propagation of a leader by remote ionization such as that caused by runaway electrons. The stochastic behavior of the discharge through a preformed plasma channel is reproduced by the calculation, which shows complex path with detouring and bifurcation. The probability of guiding is investigated with respect to the ionized, conductive fraction along the channel.

  13. Effects of laser beam propagation and saturation on the spatial shape of sodium laser guide stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Fabien; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2009-03-30

    The possibility to produce diffraction-limited images by large telescopes through Adaptive Optics is closely linked to the precision of measurement of the position of the guide star on the wavefront sensor. In the case of laser guide stars, many parameters can lead to a strong distortion on the shape of the LGS spot. Here we study the influence of both the saturation of the sodium layer excited by different types of lasers, the spatial quality of the laser mode at the ground and the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the upward propagation of the laser beam. Both shape and intensity of the LGS spot are found to depend strongly on these three effects with important consequences on the precision on the wavefront analysis.

  14. Guiding-center equations for electrons in ultraintense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    The guiding-center equations are derived for electrons in arbitrarily intense laser fields also subject to external fields and ponderomotive forces. Exhibiting the relativistic mass increase of the oscillating electrons, a simple frame-invariant equation is shown to govern the behavior of the electrons for sufficiently weak background fields and ponderomotive forces. The parameter regime for which such a formulation is valid is made precise, and some predictions of the equation are checked by numerical simulation

  15. Plasma wave amplitude measurement created by guided laser wakefield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojda, Franck

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of an intense laser pulse of short duration with a plasma produces a plasma wave with large amplitude in its wake, which is associated with a longitudinal electric field. It can be used to accelerate relativistic electrons injected into the wave to energies in the GeV range over distances of the order of a few centimeters, short compared to acceleration lengths in conventional accelerators. The control of the electron beam characteristics during the acceleration process is fundamental for achieving a usable laser-plasma acceleration stage. The main result of this thesis is the creation and characterization of a plasma wave in a weakly nonlinear regime over a length of several centimeters. Capillary tubes are used to guide the laser beam over these distances, while maintaining a large enough intensity (∼ 10 17 W/cm 2 ). The guided laser beam ionizes the gas in the tube and creates the plasma wave. A diagnostic based on the modification of the laser pulse spectrum was used to determine the amplitude of the plasma wave along the tube. The amplitude of the plasma wave was studied as a function of gas filling pressure, length of the capillary and laser energy. Experimental results are compared; they are in excellent agreement with analytical results and modeling. They show that the electric field associated with the plasma wave is between 1 and 10 GV/m over a length of up to 8 cm. This work has demonstrated the ability to create a controlled plasma wave in a weakly nonlinear regime. (author)

  16. Extracting Visual Evoked Potentials from EEG Data Recorded During fMRI-guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Boaz; Yovel, Galit

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an effective method for establishing a causal link between a cortical area and cognitive/neurophysiological effects. Specifically, by creating a transient interference with the normal activity of a target region and measuring changes in an electrophysiological signal, we can establish a causal link between the stimulated brain area or network and the electrophysiological signal that we record. If target brain areas are functionally defined with prior fMRI scan, TMS could be used to link the fMRI activations with evoked potentials recorded. However, conducting such experiments presents significant technical challenges given the high amplitude artifacts introduced into the EEG signal by the magnetic pulse, and the difficulty to successfully target areas that were functionally defined by fMRI. Here we describe a methodology for combining these three common tools: TMS, EEG, and fMRI. We explain how to guide the stimulator's coil to the desired target area using anatomical or functional MRI data, how to record EEG during concurrent TMS, how to design an ERP study suitable for EEG-TMS combination and how to extract reliable ERP from the recorded data. We will provide representative results from a previously published study, in which fMRI-guided TMS was used concurrently with EEG to show that the face-selective N1 and the body-selective N1 component of the ERP are associated with distinct neural networks in extrastriate cortex. This method allows us to combine the high spatial resolution of fMRI with the high temporal resolution of TMS and EEG and therefore obtain a comprehensive understanding of the neural basis of various cognitive processes. PMID:24893706

  17. Extracting visual evoked potentials from EEG data recorded during fMRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Boaz; Yovel, Galit

    2014-05-12

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an effective method for establishing a causal link between a cortical area and cognitive/neurophysiological effects. Specifically, by creating a transient interference with the normal activity of a target region and measuring changes in an electrophysiological signal, we can establish a causal link between the stimulated brain area or network and the electrophysiological signal that we record. If target brain areas are functionally defined with prior fMRI scan, TMS could be used to link the fMRI activations with evoked potentials recorded. However, conducting such experiments presents significant technical challenges given the high amplitude artifacts introduced into the EEG signal by the magnetic pulse, and the difficulty to successfully target areas that were functionally defined by fMRI. Here we describe a methodology for combining these three common tools: TMS, EEG, and fMRI. We explain how to guide the stimulator's coil to the desired target area using anatomical or functional MRI data, how to record EEG during concurrent TMS, how to design an ERP study suitable for EEG-TMS combination and how to extract reliable ERP from the recorded data. We will provide representative results from a previously published study, in which fMRI-guided TMS was used concurrently with EEG to show that the face-selective N1 and the body-selective N1 component of the ERP are associated with distinct neural networks in extrastriate cortex. This method allows us to combine the high spatial resolution of fMRI with the high temporal resolution of TMS and EEG and therefore obtain a comprehensive understanding of the neural basis of various cognitive processes.

  18. MRI guided needle localization in a patient with recurrence pleomorphic sarcoma and post-operative scarring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ching-Di [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung (China); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Wei, Jesse; Wu, Jim S. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Goldsmith, Jeffrey D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Gebhardt, Mark C. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-07-15

    MRI-guided wire localization is commonly used for surgical localization of breast lesions. Here we introduce an alternative use of this technique to help with surgical resection of a recurrent pleomorphic sarcoma embedded in extensive post-treatment scar tissue. We describe a case of recurrent pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma in the thigh after treatment with neoadjuvant therapy, surgery, and radiation. Due to the distortion of the normal tissue architecture and formation of extensive scar tissue from prior treatment, wire localization under MRI was successfully used to assist the surgeon in identifying the recurrent tumor for removal. (orig.)

  19. 3D-Printed Patient-Specific ACL Femoral Tunnel Guide from MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Iain; Rehman, Haroon; Frame, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Traditional ACL reconstruction with non-anatomic techniques can demonstrate unsatisfactory long-term outcomes with regards instability and the degenerative knee changes observed with these results. Anatomic ACL reconstruction attempts to closely reproduce the patient's individual anatomic characteristics with the aim of restoring knee kinematics, in order to improve patient short and long-term outcomes. We designed an arthroscopic, patient-specific, ACL femoral tunnel guide to aid anatomical placement of the ACL graft within the femoral tunnel. The guide design was based on MRI scan of the subject's uninjured contralateral knee, identifying the femoral footprint and its anatomical position relative to the borders of the femoral articular cartilage. Image processing software was used to create a 3D computer aided design which was subsequently exported to a 3D-printing service. Transparent acrylic based photopolymer, PA220 plastic and 316L stainless steel patient-specific ACL femoral tunnel guides were created; the models produced were accurate with no statistical difference in size and positioning of the center of the ACL femoral footprint guide to MRI ( p =0.344, p =0.189, p =0.233 respectively). The guides aim to provide accurate marking of the starting point of the femoral tunnel in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. This study serves as a proof of concept for the accurate creation of 3D-printed patient-specific guides for the anatomical placement of the femoral tunnel during ACL reconstruction.

  20. Laser guiding at>1018 W/cm2 in plasma channels formed by the ignitor heater method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, C.; vanTilborg, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments explore guiding of intense laser pulses, optimization using channel formation beams and gas jet targets, and the interplay of channel guiding and relativistic self guiding. Impact on laser wakefield particle acceleration is being assessed

  1. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-07-01

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  2. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  3. Optical guiding and beam bending in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The electron beam in a free-electron laser (FEL) can act as an optical fiber, guiding or bending the optical beam. The refractive and gain effects of the bunched electron beam can compensate for diffraction, making possible wigglers that are many Rayleigh ranges (i.e., characteristic diffraction lengths) long. The origin of optical guiding can be understood by examining gain and refractive guiding in a fiber with a complex index of refraction, providing a mathematical description applicable also to the FEL, with some extensions. In the exponential gain regime of the FEL, the electron equations of motion must be included, but a self-consistent description of exponential gain with diffraction fully included becomes possible. The origin of the effective index of refraction of an FEL is illustrated with a simple example of bunched, radiating dipoles. Some of the properties of the index of refraction are described. The limited experimental evidence for optical beam bending is summarized. The evidence does not yet provide conclusive proof of the existence of optical guiding, but supports the idea. Finally, the importance of refractive guiding for the performance of a high-gain tapered-wiggler FEL amplifier is illustrated with numerical simulations

  4. Intraoperative MRI-guided resection of focal cortical dysplasia in pediatric patients: technique and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacino, Matthew F; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Murnick, Jonathan; Tsuchida, Tammy; Magge, Suresh N; Keating, Robert F; Gaillard, William D; Oluigbo, Chima O

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous meta-analysis has demonstrated that the most important factor in seizure freedom following surgery for focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is completeness of resection. However, intraoperative detection of epileptogenic dysplastic cortical tissue remains a challenge, potentially leading to a partial resection and the need for reoperation. The objective of this study was to determine the role of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) in the intraoperative detection and localization of FCD as well as its impact on surgical decision making, completeness of resection, and seizure control outcomes. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of pediatric patients who underwent iMRI-assisted resection of FCD at the Children's National Health System between January 2014 and April 2015. Data reviewed included demographics, length of surgery, details of iMRI acquisition, postoperative seizure freedom, and complications. Postsurgical seizure outcome was assessed utilizing the Engel Epilepsy Surgery Outcome Scale. RESULTS Twelve consecutive pediatric patients (8 females and 4 males) underwent iMRI-guided resection of FCD lesions. The mean age at the time of surgery was 8.8 years ± 1.6 years (range 0.7 to 18.8 years), and the mean duration of follow up was 3.5 months ± 1.0 month. The mean age at seizure onset was 2.8 years ± 1.0 year (range birth to 9.0 years). Two patients had Type 1 FCD, 5 patients had Type 2A FCD, 2 patients had Type 2B FCD, and 3 patients had FCD of undetermined classification. iMRI findings impacted intraoperative surgical decision making in 5 (42%) of the 12 patients, who then underwent further exploration of the resection cavity. At the time of the last postoperative follow-up, 11 (92%) of the 12 patients were seizure free (Engel Class I). No patients underwent reoperation following iMRI-guided surgery. CONCLUSIONS iMRI-guided resection of FCD in pediatric patients precluded the need for repeat surgery. Furthermore, it resulted

  5. Documenting the location of systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies: correlation with multi-parametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen; Locklin, Julia; Pang, Yuxi; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Baccala, Angelo; Rastinehad, Ardeshir; Benjamin, Compton; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2011-03-29

    During transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies, the actual location of the biopsy site is rarely documented. Here, we demonstrate the capability of TRUS-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image fusion to document the biopsy site and correlate biopsy results with multi-parametric MRI findings. Fifty consecutive patients (median age 61 years) with a median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 5.8 ng/ml underwent 12-core TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. Pre-procedural T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were fused to TRUS. A disposable needle guide with miniature tracking sensors was attached to the TRUS probe to enable fusion with MRI. Real-time TRUS images during biopsy and the corresponding tracking information were recorded. Each biopsy site was superimposed onto the MRI. Each biopsy site was classified as positive or negative for cancer based on the results of each MRI sequence. Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) values were calculated for multi-parametric MRI. Gleason scores for each multi-parametric MRI pattern were also evaluated. Six hundred and 5 systemic biopsy cores were analyzed in 50 patients, of whom 20 patients had 56 positive cores. MRI identified 34 of 56 positive cores. Overall, sensitivity, specificity, and ROC area values for multi-parametric MRI were 0.607, 0.727, 0.667, respectively. TRUS-MRI fusion after biopsy can be used to document the location of each biopsy site, which can then be correlated with MRI findings. Based on correlation with tracked biopsies, T2-weighted MRI and apparent diffusion coefficient maps derived from diffusion-weighted MRI are the most sensitive sequences, whereas the addition of delayed contrast enhancement MRI and three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated higher specificity consistent with results obtained using radical prostatectomy specimens.

  6. MRI guided stereotactic ventrointermediate thalamotomy for writer's cramp: two cases report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-shi NIU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the methods and curative effect of stereotactic surgery for treating writer's cramp (WC. Methods and Results Two patients with writer's cramp (tremor type underwent MRI guided stereotactic ventrointermediate (Vim thalamotomy on the left side. The symptoms of one patient disappeared immediately after operation, and the patient could write legibly. The tremor of right upper extremity in another patient was improved significantly. Two patients did not present obvious complications, and the previous symptoms were not found to recur during follow-up period respectively. Conclusions Stereotactic surgery for treatment of writer's cramp has definite therapeutic effect. MRI guided stereotactic technique can effectively avoid the complications of Vim thalamotomy. However, the indications of two methods in surgical treatment [thalamotomy and deep brain stimulation (DBS] and the respective merits still need further study. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.009

  7. Development of a Pneumatic Robot for MRI-guided Transperineal Prostate Biopsy and Brachytherapy: New Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan B.; Fischer, Gregory; Hata, Nobuhito; Tempany, Clare; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy has been introduced in order to enhance the cancer detection and treatment. For the accurate needle positioning, a number of robotic assistants have been developed. However, problems exist due to the strong magnetic field and limited workspace. Pneumatically actuated robots have shown the minimum distraction in the environment but the confined workspace limits optimal robot design and thus controllability is often poor. To overcome the problem, a simple external damping mechanism using timing belts was sought and a 1-DOF mechanism test result indicated sufficient positioning accuracy. Based on the damping mechanism and modular system design approach, a new workspace-optimized 4-DOF parallel robot was developed for the MRI-guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy. A preliminary evaluation of the robot was conducted using previously developed pneumatic controller and satisfying results were obtained. PMID:21399734

  8. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Cole, Gregory; Li, Gang; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alexander; Tokuda, Junichi; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian motion module. The needle driver provides needle cannula translation and rotation (2-DOF) and stylet translation (1-DOF). A custom robot controller consisting of multiple piezoelectric motor drivers provides precision closed-loop control of piezoelectric motors and enables simultaneous robot motion and MR imaging. The developed modular robot control interface software performs image-based registration, kinematics calculation, and exchanges robot commands and coordinates between the navigation software and the robot controller with a new implementation of the open network communication protocol OpenIGTLink. Comprehensive compatibility of the robot is evaluated inside a 3-Tesla MRI scanner using standard imaging sequences and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss is limited to 15%. The image deterioration due to the present and motion of robot demonstrates unobservable image interference. Twenty-five targeted needle placements inside gelatin phantoms utilizing an 18-gauge ceramic needle demonstrated 0.87 mm root mean square (RMS) error in 3D Euclidean distance based on MRI volume segmentation of the image-guided robotic needle placement procedure. PMID:26412962

  9. In-bore setup and software for 3T MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Song, Sang-Eun; Fedorov, Andriy; Oguro, Sota; Fennessy, Fiona M; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko; Iordachita, Iulian; Lasso, Andras

    2012-01-01

    MRI-guided prostate biopsy in conventional closed-bore scanners requires transferring the patient outside the bore during needle insertion due to the constrained in-bore space, causing a safety hazard and limiting image feedback. To address this issue, we present our custom-made in-bore setup and software to support MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3 T MRI scanner. The setup consists of a specially designed tabletop and a needle-guiding template with a Z-frame that gives a physician access to the perineum of the patient at the imaging position and allows the physician to perform MRI-guided transperineal biopsy without moving the patient out of the scanner. The software and Z-frame allow registration of the template, target planning and biopsy guidance. Initially, we performed phantom experiments to assess the accuracy of template registration and needle placement in a controlled environment. Subsequently, we embarked on our clinical trial (N = 10). The phantom experiments showed that the translational errors of the template registration along the right–left (RP) and anterior–posterior (AP) axes were 1.1 ± 0.8 and 1.4 ± 1.1 mm, respectively, while the rotational errors around the RL, AP and superior–inferior axes were (0.8 ± 1.0)°, (1.7 ± 1.6)° and (0.0 ± 0.0)°, respectively. The 2D root-mean-square (RMS) needle-placement error was 3 mm. The clinical biopsy procedures were safely carried out in all ten clinical cases with a needle-placement error of 5.4 mm (2D RMS). In conclusion, transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3T scanner is feasible using our custom-made tabletop setup and software, which supports manual needle placement without moving the patient out of the magnet. (paper)

  10. Development of a Pneumatic Robot for MRI-guided Transperineal Prostate Biopsy and Brachytherapy: New Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan B.; Fischer, Gregory; Hata, Nobuhito; Tempany, Clare; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy has been introduced in order to enhance the cancer detection and treatment. For the accurate needle positioning, a number of robotic assistants have been developed. However, problems exist due to the strong magnetic field and limited workspace. Pneumatically actuated robots have shown the minimum distraction in the environment but the confined workspace limits optimal robot design and thus controllability is often poor....

  11. EUS-Guided Needle-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhutani, Manoop S; Koduru, Pramoda; Joshi, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an excellent tool for imaging the gastrointestinal tract, as well as surrounding structures. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become the standard of care for the tissue sampling of a variety of masses and lymph nodes within and around...... the gut, providing further diagnostic and staging information. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is a novel endoscopic method that enables imaging at a subcellular level of resolution during endoscopy, allowing up to 1000-fold magnification of tissue and providing an optical biopsy. A new procedure...... that has been developed in the past few years is needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE), which involves a mini-CLE probe that can be passed through a 1 9-gauge needle during EUS-FNA. This enables the real-time visualization of tissue at a microscopic level, with the potential to further improve...

  12. Laser vibrometer measurement of guided wave modes in rail track

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available ) in the laboratory and on an operational rail track (with S-4 60-SAR profile) and example results are presented in this section. The measurements 5 were performed using a Polytec PSV-400-M2-20 high frequency scanning vibrometer 6 equipped with the VD-09 velocity...Hz on operational rail track and to identify the modes that are capable of 16 propagating large distances. 17 18 KEYWORDS: Semi-analytical finite element method; modes of guided wave 19 propagation; laser vibrometer measurement; rail track 20 PACs...

  13. Self-guiding of high-intensity laser pulses for laser wake field acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umstader, D.; Liu, X.

    1992-01-01

    A means of self-guiding an ultrashort and high-intensity laser pulse is demonstrated both experimentally and numerically. Its relevance to the laser wake field accelerator concept is discussed. Self-focusing and multiple foci formation are observed when a high peak power (P>100 GW), 1 μm, subpicosecond laser is focused onto various gases (air or hydrogen). It appears to result from the combined effects of self-focusing by the gas, and de-focusing both by diffraction and the plasma formed in the central high-intensity region. Quasi-stationary computer simulations show the same multiple foci behavior as the experiments. The results suggest much larger nonlinear electronic susceptibilities of a gas near or undergoing ionization in the high field of the laser pulse. Although self-guiding of a laser beam by this mechanism appears to significantly extend its high-intensity focal region, small-scale self-focusing due to beam non-uniformity is currently a limitation

  14. On the Potential Role of MRI Biomarkers of COPD to Guide Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Colin J; Capaldi, Dante P I; Di Cesare, Robert; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2018-02-01

    In patients with severe emphysema and poor quality of life, bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR) may be considered and guided based on lobar emphysema severity. In particular, x-ray computed tomography (CT) emphysema measurements are used to identify the most diseased and the second-most diseased lobes as BLVR targets. Inhaled gas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also provides chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) biomarkers of lobar emphysema and ventilation abnormalities. Our objective was to retrospectively evaluate CT and MRI biomarkers of lobar emphysema and ventilation in patients with COPD eligible for BLVR. We hypothesized that MRI would provide complementary biomarkers of emphysema and ventilation that help determine the most appropriate lung lobar targets for BLVR in patients with COPD. We retrospectively evaluated 22 BLVR-eligible patients from the Thoracic Imaging Network of Canada cohort (diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide = 37 ± 12% predicted , forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 34 ± 7% predicted , total lung capacity = 131 ± 17% predicted , and residual volume = 216 ± 36% predicted ). Lobar CT emphysema, measured using a relative area of concept retrospective analysis, quantitative MRI ventilation and CT emphysema measurements provided different BLVR targets in over 30% of the patients. The presence of large MRI ventilation defects in lobes next to CT-targeted lobes might also change the decision to proceed or to guide BLVR to a different lobar target. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MRI-Guided Percutaneous Biopsy of Mediastinal Masses Using a Large Bore Magnet: Technical Feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnon, J., E-mail: juliengarnon@gmail.com [Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Ramamurthy, N., E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Caudrelier J, J., E-mail: caudjean@yahoo.fr [Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Erceg, G., E-mail: erceggorislav@yahoo.com; Breton, E., E-mail: ebreton@unistra.fr [ICube, University of Strasbourg, CNRS (France); Tsoumakidou, G., E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com; Rao, P., E-mail: pramodrao@me.com; Gangi, A., E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2016-05-15

    ObjectiveTo evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided percutaneous biopsy of mediastinal masses performed using a wide-bore high-field scanner.Materials and MethodsThis is a retrospective study of 16 consecutive patients (8 male, 8 female; mean age 74 years) who underwent MRI-guided core needle biopsy of a mediastinal mass between February 2010 and January 2014. Size and location of lesion, approach taken, time for needle placement, overall duration of procedure, and post-procedural complications were evaluated. Technical success rates and correlation with surgical pathology (where available) were assessed.ResultsTarget lesions were located in the anterior (n = 13), middle (n = 2), and posterior mediastinum (n = 1), respectively. Mean size was 7.2 cm (range 3.6–11 cm). Average time for needle placement was 9.4 min (range 3–18 min); average duration of entire procedure was 42 min (range 27–62 min). 2–5 core samples were obtained from each lesion (mean 2.6). Technical success rate was 100 %, with specimens successfully obtained in all 16 patients. There were no immediate complications. Histopathology revealed malignancy in 12 cases (4 of which were surgically confirmed), benign lesions in 3 cases (1 of which was false negative following surgical resection), and one inconclusive specimen (treated as inaccurate since repeat CT-guided biopsy demonstrated thymic hyperplasia). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy in our study were 92.3, 100, 100, 66.7, and 87.5 %, respectively.ConclusionMRI-guided mediastinal biopsy is a safe procedure with high diagnostic accuracy, which may offer a non-ionizing alternative to CT guidance.

  16. MR-guided discography using an open 1 Tesla MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, Florian; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U.; Hartwig, T.; Strube, P.; Putzier, M.; Schnackenburg, B.; Chopra, S.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of MR-guided discography using an open 1 Tesla MRI system. 48 disc segments of 41 patients scheduled for intradiscal thermal treatment, total disc replacement or spondylodesis were examined. A 1.0-T open MRI was used for instrument guidance and imaging. After primary disc puncture under guidance of interactive PDw TSE imaging, 1-2 ml of gadolinium contrast saline mixture was injected into the disc. The occurrence of memory pain during injection was recorded. Axial and sagittal T1w TSE images with and without fat saturation were obtained. All MRI discograms were analysed by two readers, who were blinded to the clinical findings. Overall, the placement of the puncture needle in the targeted disc was accurate under real-time MR guidance. Injections were technically successful in all cases. No major complications occurred. The mean procedure time was 17 min (range 13-34 min). Image quality of contrast-enhanced MR discograms was excellent when using an optimized gadolinium contrast saline mixture of 1:600. Memory pain was detected in 16 out of 48 affected segments. MR-guided discography is accurate and safe. Multiplanar dynamic imaging facilitates the puncture of discs and provides high-quality MR discograms. (orig.)

  17. (HEL MRI) 3D Meta Optics for High Energy Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    optical communication link using orbital angular momentum multiplexing ." Optics express 24, no. 9 (2016): 9794-9805. 3. Li, Yuan, Wenzhe Li, J. Miller, and...Magnusson, R.; Binun, P.; McCormick, K., "Wavelength Selection and Polarization Multiplexing of Blue Laser Diodes," in Photonics Technology Letters, IEEE...spatial multiplexing can take advantage of a non-Gaussian beam profile. If the components are to be used as out-couplers in bulk lasers , the optics

  18. MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerimaa, Pekka; Ojala, Risto; Markkanen, Paula; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oulu (Finland); Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Korhonen, Jussi [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Oulu (Finland); Hyvoenen, Pekka [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Oulu (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI guidance for percutaneous retrograde drilling in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus (OCDT). Four patients, one juvenile and three adults, with one OCDT lesion each and persisting ankle pain after conservative treatment, were treated with MRI-guided retrograde drilling. All lesions were stable and located in the middle or posterior medial third of the talar dome. Pain relief and the ability to return to normal activities were assessed during clinical follow-up. MRI and plain film radiographs were used for imaging follow-up. Technical success was 100 % with no complications and with no damage to the overlying cartilage. All patients experienced some clinical benefit, although only one had complete resolution of pain and one had a relapse leading to surgical treatment. Changes in the pathological imaging findings were mostly very slight during the follow-up period. MRI guidance seems accurate, safe and technically feasible for retrograde drilling of OCDT. Larger series are needed to reliably assess its clinical value. (orig.)

  19. MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerimaa, Pekka; Ojala, Risto; Markkanen, Paula; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Korhonen, Jussi; Hyvoenen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI guidance for percutaneous retrograde drilling in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the talus (OCDT). Four patients, one juvenile and three adults, with one OCDT lesion each and persisting ankle pain after conservative treatment, were treated with MRI-guided retrograde drilling. All lesions were stable and located in the middle or posterior medial third of the talar dome. Pain relief and the ability to return to normal activities were assessed during clinical follow-up. MRI and plain film radiographs were used for imaging follow-up. Technical success was 100 % with no complications and with no damage to the overlying cartilage. All patients experienced some clinical benefit, although only one had complete resolution of pain and one had a relapse leading to surgical treatment. Changes in the pathological imaging findings were mostly very slight during the follow-up period. MRI guidance seems accurate, safe and technically feasible for retrograde drilling of OCDT. Larger series are needed to reliably assess its clinical value. (orig.)

  20. Towards Clinically Optimized MRI-guided Surgical Manipulator for Minimally Invasive Prostate Percutaneous Interventions: Constructive Design*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Sohrab; Fischer, Gregory S.; Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2013-01-01

    This paper undertakes the modular design and development of a minimally invasive surgical manipulator for MRI-guided transperineal prostate interventions. Severe constraints for the MRI-compatibility to hold the minimum artifact on the image quality and dimensions restraint of the bore scanner shadow the design procedure. Regarding the constructive design, the manipulator kinematics has been optimized and the effective analytical needle workspace is developed and followed by proposing the workflow for the manual needle insertion. A study of the finite element analysis is established and utilized to improve the mechanism weaknesses under some inevitable external forces to ensure the minimum structure deformation. The procedure for attaching a sterile plastic drape on the robot manipulator is discussed. The introduced robotic manipulator herein is aimed for the clinically prostate biopsy and brachytherapy applications. PMID:24683502

  1. Evaluation of a robotic technique for transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schouten, Martijn G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bomers, Joyce G.R.; Yakar, Derya; Huisman, Henkjan; Bosboom, Dennis; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rothgang, Eva [Pattern Recognition Lab, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research, Baltimore, MD (United States); Misra, Sarthak [University of Twente, MIRA-Institute of Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the accuracy and speed of a novel robotic technique as an aid to perform magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided prostate biopsies on patients with cancer suspicious regions. A pneumatic controlled MR-compatible manipulator with 5 degrees of freedom was developed in-house to guide biopsies under real-time imaging. From 13 consecutive biopsy procedures, the targeting error, biopsy error and target displacement were calculated to evaluate the accuracy. The time was recorded to evaluate manipulation and procedure time. The robotic and manual techniques demonstrated comparable results regarding mean targeting error (5.7 vs 5.8 mm, respectively) and mean target displacement (6.6 vs 6.0 mm, respectively). The mean biopsy error was larger (6.5 vs 4.4 mm) when using the robotic technique, although not significant. Mean procedure and manipulation time were 76 min and 6 min, respectively using the robotic technique and 61 and 8 min with the manual technique. Although comparable results regarding accuracy and speed were found, the extended technical effort of the robotic technique make the manual technique - currently - more suitable to perform MRI-guided biopsies. Furthermore, this study provided a better insight in displacement of the target during in vivo biopsy procedures. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of a robotic technique for transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schouten, Martijn G.; Bomers, Joyce G.R.; Yakar, Derya; Huisman, Henkjan; Bosboom, Dennis; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Fuetterer, Jurgen J.; Rothgang, Eva; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and speed of a novel robotic technique as an aid to perform magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided prostate biopsies on patients with cancer suspicious regions. A pneumatic controlled MR-compatible manipulator with 5 degrees of freedom was developed in-house to guide biopsies under real-time imaging. From 13 consecutive biopsy procedures, the targeting error, biopsy error and target displacement were calculated to evaluate the accuracy. The time was recorded to evaluate manipulation and procedure time. The robotic and manual techniques demonstrated comparable results regarding mean targeting error (5.7 vs 5.8 mm, respectively) and mean target displacement (6.6 vs 6.0 mm, respectively). The mean biopsy error was larger (6.5 vs 4.4 mm) when using the robotic technique, although not significant. Mean procedure and manipulation time were 76 min and 6 min, respectively using the robotic technique and 61 and 8 min with the manual technique. Although comparable results regarding accuracy and speed were found, the extended technical effort of the robotic technique make the manual technique - currently - more suitable to perform MRI-guided biopsies. Furthermore, this study provided a better insight in displacement of the target during in vivo biopsy procedures. (orig.)

  3. Navigated MRI-guided liver biopsies in a closed-bore scanner: experience in 52 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Michael; Heinig, Susann; Garnov, Nikita; Fuchs, Jochen; Petersen, Tim-Ole; Seider, Daniel; Brandmaier, Philipp; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate clinical effectiveness and diagnostic efficiency of a navigation device for MR-guided biopsies of focal liver lesions in a closed-bore scanner. In 52 patients, 55 biopsies were performed. An add-on MR navigation system with optical instrument tracking was used for image guidance and biopsy device insertion outside the bore. Fast control imaging allowed visualization of the true needle position at any time. The biopsy workflow and procedure duration were recorded. Histological analysis and clinical course/outcome were used to calculate sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy. Fifty-four of 55 liver biopsies were performed successfully with the system. No major and four minor complications occurred. Mean tumour size was 23 ± 14 mm and the skin-to-target length ranged from 22 to 177 mm. In 39 cases, access path was double oblique. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 88 %, 100 % and 92 %, respectively. The mean procedure time was 51 ± 12 min, whereas the puncture itself lasted 16 ± 6 min. On average, four control scans were taken. Using this navigation device, biopsies of poorly visible and difficult accessible liver lesions could be performed safely and reliably in a closed-bore MRI scanner. The system can be easily implemented in clinical routine workflow. • Targeted liver biopsies could be reliably performed in a closed-bore MRI. • The navigation system allows for image guidance outside of the scanner bore. • Assisted MRI-guided biopsies are helpful for focal lesions with a difficult access. • Successful integration of the method in clinical workflow was shown. • Subsequent system installation in an existing MRI environment is feasible.

  4. Large scale Tesla coil guided discharges initiated by femtosecond laser filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantchouk, L.; Point, G.; Brelet, Y.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; André, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2014-07-01

    The guiding of meter scale electric discharges produced in air by a Tesla coil is realized in laboratory using a focused terawatt laser pulse undergoing filamentation. The influence of the focus position, the laser arrival time, or the gap length is studied to determine the best conditions for efficient laser guiding. Discharge parameters such as delay, jitter, and resistance are characterized. An increase of the discharge length by a factor 5 has been achieved with the laser filaments, corresponding to a mean breakdown field of 2 kV/cm for a 1.8 m gap length. Consecutive guided discharges at a repetition rate of 10 Hz are also reported.

  5. A Fully Actuated Robotic Assistant for MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy and Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative medical imaging enables incorporation of human experience and intelligence in a controlled, closed-loop fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal modality for surgical guidance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with its ability to perform high resolution, real-time, high soft tissue contrast imaging without ionizing radiation. However, for most current image-guided approaches only static pre-operative images are accessible for guidance, which are unable to provide updated information during a surgical procedure. The high magnetic field, electrical interference, and limited access of closed-bore MRI render great challenges to developing robotic systems that can perform inside a diagnostic high-field MRI while obtaining interactively updated MR images. To overcome these limitations, we are developing a piezoelectrically actuated robotic assistant for actuated percutaneous prostate interventions under real-time MRI guidance. Utilizing a modular design, the system enables coherent and straight forward workflow for various percutaneous interventions, including prostate biopsy sampling and brachytherapy seed placement, using various needle driver configurations. The unified workflow compromises: 1) system hardware and software initialization, 2) fiducial frame registration, 3) target selection and motion planning, 4) moving to the target and performing the intervention (e.g. taking a biopsy sample) under live imaging, and 5) visualization and verification. Phantom experiments of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy were executed under MRI-guidance to evaluate the feasibility of the workflow. The robot successfully performed fully actuated biopsy sampling and delivery of simulated brachytherapy seeds under live MR imaging, as well as precise delivery of a prostate brachytherapy seed distribution with an RMS accuracy of 0.98mm. PMID:25076821

  6. Multimodal 18F-Fluciclovine PET/MRI and Ultrasound-Guided Neurosurgery of an Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlberg, Anna; Berntsen, Erik Magnus; Johansen, Håkon; Myrthue, Mariane; Skjulsvik, Anne Jarstein; Reinertsen, Ingerid; Esmaeili, Morteza; Dai, Hong Yan; Xiao, Yiming; Rivaz, Hassan; Borghammer, Per; Solheim, Ole; Eikenes, Live

    2017-12-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic tissue sampling are routinely performed as part of the diagnostic workup for patients with glioma. Because of the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, there is a risk of undergrading caused by histopathologic sampling errors. MRI has limitations in identifying tumor grade and type, detecting diffuse invasive growth, and separating recurrences from treatment induced changes. Positron emission tomography (PET) can provide quantitative information of cellular activity and metabolism, and may therefore complement MRI. In this report, we present the first patient with brain glioma examined with simultaneous PET/MRI using the amino acid tracer 18 F-fluciclovine ( 18 F-FACBC) for intraoperative image-guided surgery. A previously healthy 60-year old woman was admitted to the emergency care with speech difficulties and a mild left-sided hemiparesis. MRI revealed a tumor that was suggestive of glioma. Before surgery, the patient underwent a simultaneous PET/MRI examination. Fused PET/MRI, T1, FLAIR, and intraoperative three-dimensional ultrasound images were used to guide histopathologic tissue sampling and surgical resection. Navigated, image-guided histopathologic samples were compared with PET/MRI image data to assess the additional value of the PET acquisition. Histopathologic analysis showed anaplastic oligodendroglioma in the most malignant parts of the tumor, while several regions were World Health Organization (WHO) grade II. 18 F-Fluciclovine uptake was found in parts of the tumor where regional WHO grade, cell proliferation, and cell densities were highest. This finding suggests that PET/MRI with this tracer could be used to improve accuracy in histopathologic tissue sampling and grading, and possibly for guiding treatments targeting the most malignant part of extensive and eloquent gliomas. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Image-guided, Laser-based Fabrication of Vascular-derived Microfluidic Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Heintz, Keely A.; Mayerich, David; Slater, John H.

    2017-01-01

    This detailed protocol outlines the implementation of image-guided, laser-based hydrogel degradation for the fabrication of vascular-derived microfluidic networks embedded in PEGDA hydrogels. Here, we describe the creation of virtual masks that allow for image-guided laser control; the photopolymerization of a micromolded PEGDA hydrogel, suitable for microfluidic network fabrication and pressure head-driven flow; the setup and use of a commercially available laser scanning confocal microscope...

  8. Wavefront-Guided and Wavefront-Optimised Laser Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Aslı Utine

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical aberrations of the eye are the errors of the optical system that limit the resolution, contrast and amount of detail in the image formed on the retina. Wavefront technology allows us to measure these optical aberrations, calculate mathematically, and transfer this information into excimer laser system to perform customized treatment on the cornea. Two treatment algorithms developed to create low aberration-corneal profile are wavefront-optimised (WF-O and wavefront-guided (WF-G treatments. WF-O treatment, aims not to increase the existing spherical aberration while treatment is based on manifest refractive error as in conventional laser treatments. By increasing the number of laser spots applied peripherally in order to optimize the corneal asphericity, the preoperative central:peripheral keratometry ratio is preserved and optic zone shrinkage is prevented. On the other hand, WF-G treatment is based on aberrometry measurements and aims to correct the existing high-order aberrations in the eye. Thus, retinal image with high spatial details can be achieved. However, presence of postoperative defocus can abolish the successful results obtained with WF-G treatment. Clinical randomized controlled trials showed that in patients with preoperative RMS value of <0.3 μm, higher order aberration outcomes are similar after WF-G and WF-O treatments, but WF-G treatment yields better results when it is ≥0.4 μm. In normal eyes, very limited visual advantage can be achieved with WF-G treatment and preservation of asphericity value with WF-O treatment carries greater importance. On the other hand, in case of high astigmatism or higher order aberrations other than spherical aberration, decreasing aberrations with WF-G treatment becomes more important. In this study, we aimed to make a comparative analysis of characteristics and outcomes of the two treatment algorithms. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 474-8

  9. Designing an ultrafast laser virtual laboratory using MATLAB GUIDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambronero-López, F; Gómez-Varela, A I; Bao-Varela, C

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present a virtual simulator developed using the MATLAB GUIDE environment based on the numerical resolution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) and using the split step method for the study of the spatial–temporal propagation of nonlinear ultrashort laser pulses. This allows us to study the spatial–temporal propagation of ultrafast pulses as well as the influence of high-order spectral phases such as group delay dispersion and third-order dispersion on pulse compression in time. The NLS can describe several nonlinear effects, in particular in this paper we consider the Kerr effect, cross-polarized wave generation and cubic–quintic propagation in order to highlight the potential of this equation combined with the GUIDE environment. Graphical user interfaces are commonly used in science and engineering teaching due to their educational value, and have proven to be an effective way to engage and motivate students. Specifically, the interactive graphical interfaces presented provide the visualization of some of the most important nonlinear optics phenomena and allows users to vary the values of the main parameters involved. (paper)

  10. Designing an ultrafast laser virtual laboratory using MATLAB GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambronero-López, F.; Gómez-Varela, A. I.; Bao-Varela, C.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we present a virtual simulator developed using the MATLAB GUIDE environment based on the numerical resolution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) and using the split step method for the study of the spatial-temporal propagation of nonlinear ultrashort laser pulses. This allows us to study the spatial-temporal propagation of ultrafast pulses as well as the influence of high-order spectral phases such as group delay dispersion and third-order dispersion on pulse compression in time. The NLS can describe several nonlinear effects, in particular in this paper we consider the Kerr effect, cross-polarized wave generation and cubic-quintic propagation in order to highlight the potential of this equation combined with the GUIDE environment. Graphical user interfaces are commonly used in science and engineering teaching due to their educational value, and have proven to be an effective way to engage and motivate students. Specifically, the interactive graphical interfaces presented provide the visualization of some of the most important nonlinear optics phenomena and allows users to vary the values of the main parameters involved.

  11. Feasibility of MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment for adenomyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Tien-Ying [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhang, Lian; Chen, Wenzhi [Clinical Center of Tumor Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010 (China); Liu, Yinjiang; He, Min; Huang, Xiu [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Orsi, Franco [Interventional Radiology Unit, European Institute of Oncology, 435 Via Ripamonti, 20141 Milan (Italy); Wang, Zhibiao, E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Clinical Center of Tumor Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400010 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the feasibility of MRIgHIFU ablation for adenomyosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patients were treated with MRIgHIFU under conscious sedation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patient symptoms were assessed using SSS and UFS-QOL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean SSS and UFS-QOL showed significant improvements at follow up. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No serious complications were observed 62.5 {+-} 21.6. -- Abstract: Purpose: To test the feasibility of MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation for adenomyosis. Materials and methods: Patients with symptomatic adenomyosis were treated with MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRIgHIFU). Under conscious sedation, MRIgHIFU was performed by a clinical MRI-compatible focused ultrasound tumour therapeutic system (JM15100, Haifu{sup Registered-Sign} Technology Co. Ltd., Chongqing, China) which is combined with a 1.5 T MRI system (Magnetom Symphony, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). MRI was used to calculate the volume of the uterus and lesion. Non-perfused volume of the targeted lesions was evaluated immediately after MRIgHIFU. Patient symptoms were assessed using symptom severity score (SSS) and uterine fibroids symptoms and quality of life questionnaire (UFS-QOL). Results: Ten patients with mean age of 40.3 {+-} 4 years with an average lesion size of 56.9 {+-} 12.7 mm in diameter were treated. Non-perfused volume and the percentage of non-perfused volume obtained from contrast-enhanced T1 Magnetic resonance images immediately post-treatment were 66.6 {+-} 49.4 cm{sup 3} and 62.5 {+-} 21.6%, respectively. The mean SSS and UFS-QOL showed significant improvements of 25%, 16% and 25% at 3, 6 and 12 months follow up, respectively, to pre-treatment scores. No serious complications were observed. Conclusion: Based on the results from this study, MRIgHIFU treatment appears to be a safe and feasible modality to ablate adenomyosis lesion and

  12. Integrated navigation and control software system for MRI-guided robotic prostate interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Fischer, Gregory S; DiMaio, Simon P; Gobbi, David G; Csoma, Csaba; Mewes, Philip W; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2010-01-01

    A software system to provide intuitive navigation for MRI-guided robotic transperineal prostate therapy is presented. In the system, the robot control unit, the MRI scanner, and the open-source navigation software are connected together via Ethernet to exchange commands, coordinates, and images using an open network communication protocol, OpenIGTLink. The system has six states called "workphases" that provide the necessary synchronization of all components during each stage of the clinical workflow, and the user interface guides the operator linearly through these workphases. On top of this framework, the software provides the following features for needle guidance: interactive target planning; 3D image visualization with current needle position; treatment monitoring through real-time MR images of needle trajectories in the prostate. These features are supported by calibration of robot and image coordinates by fiducial-based registration. Performance tests show that the registration error of the system was 2.6mm within the prostate volume. Registered real-time 2D images were displayed 1.97 s after the image location is specified. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Integrated navigation and control software system for MRI-guided robotic prostate interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Fischer, Gregory S.; DiMaio, Simon P.; Gobbi, David G.; Csoma, Csaba; Mewes, Philip W.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2010-01-01

    A software system to provide intuitive navigation for MRI-guided robotic transperineal prostate therapy is presented. In the system, the robot control unit, the MRI scanner, and the open-source navigation software are connected together via Ethernet to exchange commands, coordinates, and images using an open network communication protocol, OpenIGTLink. The system has six states called “workphases” that provide the necessary synchronization of all components during each stage of the clinical workflow, and the user interface guides the operator linearly through these workphases. On top of this framework, the software provides the following features for needle guidance: interactive target planning; 3D image visualization with current needle position; treatment monitoring through real-time MR images of needle trajectories in the prostate. These features are supported by calibration of robot and image coordinates by fiducial-based registration. Performance tests show that the registration error of the system was 2.6 mm within the prostate volume. Registered real-time 2D images were displayed 1.97 s after the image location is specified. PMID:19699057

  14. Image to physical space registration of supine breast MRI for image guided breast surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Rebekah H.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a desirable option for many women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and involves a lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy. However, approximately 50% of eligible women will elect for mastectomy over BCT despite equal survival benefit (provided margins of excised tissue are cancer free) due to uncertainty in outcome with regards to complete excision of cancerous cells, risk of local recurrence, and cosmesis. Determining surgical margins intraoperatively is difficult and achieving negative margins is not as robust as it needs to be, resulting in high re-operation rates and often mastectomy. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) can provide detailed information about tumor margin extents, however diagnostic images are acquired in a fundamentally different patient presentation than that used in surgery. Therefore, the high quality diagnostic MRIs taken in the prone position with pendant breast are not optimal for use in surgical planning/guidance due to the drastic shape change between preoperative images and the common supine surgical position. This work proposes to investigate the value of supine MRI in an effort to localize tumors intraoperatively using image-guidance. Mock intraoperative setups (realistic patient positioning in non-sterile environment) and preoperative imaging data were collected from a patient scheduled for a lumpectomy. The mock intraoperative data included a tracked laser range scan of the patient's breast surface, tracked center points of MR visible fiducials on the patient's breast, and tracked B-mode ultrasound and strain images. The preoperative data included a supine MRI with visible fiducial markers. Fiducial markers localized in the MRI were rigidly registered to their mock intraoperative counterparts using an optically tracked stylus. The root mean square (RMS) fiducial registration error using the tracked markers was 3.4mm. Following registration, the average closest point distance between the MR

  15. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  16. Respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK): Initial clinical experience on an MRI-guided radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Du, Dongsu; Gao, Yu; Rashid, Shams; Cao, Minsong; Shaverdian, Narek; Hegde, John V; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy; Raldow, Ann; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2018-06-01

    To optimize and evaluate the respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK-4D-MRI) method in a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRgRT) system. The study included seven patients with abdominal tumors treated on the MRgRT system. ROCK-4D-MRI and 2D-CINE, was performed immediately after one of the treatment fractions. Motion quantification based on 4D-MRI was compared with those based on 2D-CINE. The image quality of 4D-MRI was evaluated against 4D-CT. The gross tumor volumes (GTV) were defined based on individual respiratory phases of both 4D-MRI and 4D-CT and compared for their variability over the respiratory cycle. The motion measurements based on 4D-MRI matched well with 2D-CINE, with differences of 1.04 ± 0.52 mm in the superior-inferior and 0.54 ± 0.21 mm in the anterior-posterior directions. The image quality scores of 4D-MRI were significantly higher than 4D-CT, with better tumor contrast (3.29 ± 0.76 vs. 1.86 ± 0.90) and less motion artifacts (3.57 ± 0.53 vs. 2.29 ± 0.95). The GTVs were more consistent in 4D-MRI than in 4D-CT, with significantly smaller GTV variability (9.31 ± 4.58% vs. 34.27 ± 23.33%). Our study demonstrated the clinical feasibility of using the ROCK-4D-MRI to acquire high quality, respiratory motion-resolved 4D-MRI in a low-field MRgRT system. The 4D-MRI image could provide accurate dynamic information for radiotherapy treatment planning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Real-time virtual sonography (RVS)-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy for lesions initially detected with breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi

    2013-12-01

    To report on our initial experiences with a new method of real-time virtual sonography (RVS)-guided 11-gauge vacuum-assisted breast biopsy for lesions that were initially detected with breast MRI. RVS-guided 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy is performed when a lesion with suspicious characteristics is initially detected with breast MRI and is occult on mammography, sonography, and physical examination. Live sonographic images were co-registered to the previously loaded second-look spine contrast-enhanced breast MRI volume data to correlate the sonography and MR images. Six lesions were examined in six consecutive patients scheduled to undergo RVS-guided 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy. One patient was removed from the study because of non-visualization of the lesion in the second-look spine contrast-enhanced breast MRI. Five patients with non-mass enhancement lesions were biopsied. The lesions ranged in size from 9 to 13 mm (mean 11 mm). The average procedural time, including the sonography and MR image co-registration time, was 25 min. All biopsies resulted in tissue retrieval. One was fibroadenomatous nodules, and those of four were fibrocystic changes. There were no complications during or after the procedures. RVS-guided 11-gauge vacuum-assisted breast biopsies provide a safe and effective method for the examination of suspicious lesions initially detected with MRI.

  18. MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy in low-field (0.23-T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Ojala, Risto O.; Klemola, Rauli; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Vaara, Teuvo J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy. Sixty-seven nerve root infiltrations under MRI guidance were done for 61 patients suffering from lumbosacral radicular pain. Informed consent was acquired from all patients. A 0.23-T open-MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Philips Medical Systems, MR Technologies, Finland) was used. A surface coil was used in all cases. Nerve root infiltration was performed with MRI-compatible 20-G needle (Chiba type MReye, Cook, Bloomington, Ind.; or Manan type, MD Tech, Florida). The evaluation of clinical outcome was achieved with 6 months of clinical follow-up and questionnaire. The effect of nerve root infiltration to the radicular pain was graded: 1=good to excellent, i.e., no pain or not disturbing pain allowing normal physical activity at 3 months from the procedure; 2=temporary, i.e., temporary relief of pain; 3=no relief of pain; and 4=worsening of pain. As an adjunct to MRI-guided positioning of the needle the correct needle localization by the nerve root was confirmed with saline injection to nerve root channel and single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) imaging. The MRI guidance allowed adequate needle positioning in all but 1 case (98.5%). This failure was caused by degeneration-induced changes in anatomy. Of patients, 51.5% had good to excellent effect with regard to radicular pain from the procedure, 22.7% had temporary relief, 21.2% had no effect, and in 4.5% the pain worsened. Our results show that MRI guidance is accurate and safe in performing nerve root infiltration at lumbosacral area. The results of radicular pain relief from nerve root infiltration are comparable to CT or fluoroscopy studies on the subject. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI-guided Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shangang, E-mail: 1198685580@qq.com [University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, School of Medicine and Life Sciences (China); Li, Chengli, E-mail: chenglilichina@yeah.net [Shandong University, Department of Interventional MRI, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute (China); Yu, Xuejuan, E-mail: yuxuejuan2011@126.com [University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, School of Medicine and Life Sciences (China); Liu, Ming, E-mail: mingliuyxs@163.com [Shandong University, Department of Interventional MRI, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute (China); Fan, Tingyong, E-mail: FTY681105@sohu.com; Chen, Dong, E-mail: 857984870@qq.com; Zhang, Pinliang, E-mail: zhangpinliang@163.com; Ren, Ruimei, E-mail: liusg708@qq.com [University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, School of Medicine and Life Sciences (China)

    2015-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MRI-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs).MethodsRetrospective review of 69 patients who underwent MR-guided PTNB of SPNs was performed. Each case was reviewed for complications. The final diagnosis was established by surgical pathology of the nodule or clinical and imaging follow-up. Pneumothorax rate and diagnostic accuracy were compared between two groups according to nodule diameter (≤2 vs. >2 cm) using χ{sup 2} chest and Fisher’s exact test, respectively.ResultsThe success rate of single puncture was 95.6 %. Twelve (17.4 %) patients had pneumothorax, with 1 (1.4 %) requiring chest tube insertion. Mild hemoptysis occurred in 7 (7.2 %) patients. All of the sample material was sufficient for histological diagnostic evaluation. Pathological analysis of biopsy specimens showed 46 malignant, 22 benign, and 1 nondiagnostic nodule. The final diagnoses were 49 malignant nodules and 20 benign nodules basing on postoperative histopathology and clinical follow-up data. One nondiagnostic sample was excluded from calculating diagnostic performance. A sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value in diagnosing SPNs were 95.8, 100, 97.0, 100, and 90.9 %, respectively. Pneumothorax rate, diagnostic sensitivity, and accuracy were not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05).ConclusionsMRI-guided PTNB is safe, feasible, and high accurate diagnostic technique for pathologic diagnosis of pulmonary nodules.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused laser interstitial thermal therapy for subinsular metastatic adenocarcinoma: technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Ray, Wilson Z; Murphy, Rory K J; Dacey, Ralph G; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2012-06-01

    To describe the novel use of the AutoLITT System (Monteris Medical, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) for focused laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and stereotactic image guidance for the treatment of metastatic adenocarcinoma in the left insula. The patient was a 61-year-old right-handed man with a history of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon. He had previously undergone resection of multiple lesions, Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and whole-brain radiation. Despite treatment of a left insular tumor, serial imaging revealed that the lesion continued to enlarge. Given the refractory nature of this tumor to radiation and the deep-seated location, the patient elected to undergo LITT treatment. The center of the lesion and entry point on the scalp were identified with STEALTH (Medtronic, Memphis, Tennessee) image-guided navigation. The AXiiiS Stereotactic Miniframe (Monteris Medical) for the LITT system was secured onto the skull, and a trajectory was defined to achieve access to the centroid of the tumor. After a burr hole was made, a gadolinium template probe was inserted into the AXiiiS base. The trajectory was confirmed via an intraoperative MRI, and the LITT probe driver was attached to the base and CO2-cooled, side-firing laser LITT probe. The laser was activated and thermometry images were obtained. Two trajectories, posteromedial and anterolateral, produced satisfactory tumor ablation. LITT with intraoperative MRI and stereotactic image guidance is a newly available, minimally invasive, and therapeutically viable technique for the treatment of deep seated brain tumors.

  1. First patients treated with a 1.5 T MRI-Linac: clinical proof of concept of a high-precision, high-field MRI guided radiotherapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaymakers, B. W.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Bol, G. H.; Glitzner, M.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; van Asselen, B.; de Boer, J. C. J.; Bluemink, J. J.; Hackett, S. L.; Moerland, M. A.; Woodings, S. J.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; van Zijp, H. M.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Tijssen, R.; Kok, J. G. M.; de Groot-van Breugel, E. N.; Kiekebosch, I.; Meijers, L. T. C.; Nomden, C. N.; Sikkes, G. G.; Doornaert, P. A. H.; Eppinga, W. S. C.; Kasperts, N.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Tersteeg, J. H. A.; Brown, K. J.; Pais, B.; Woodhead, P.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2017-12-01

    The integration of 1.5 T MRI functionality with a radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac) has been pursued since 1999 by the UMC Utrecht in close collaboration with Elekta and Philips. The idea behind this integrated device is to offer unrivalled, online and real-time, soft-tissue visualization of the tumour and the surroundings for more precise radiation delivery. The proof of concept of this device was given in 2009 by demonstrating simultaneous irradiation and MR imaging on phantoms, since then the device has been further developed and commercialized by Elekta. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of online, high-precision, high-field MRI guidance of radiotherapy using the first clinical prototype MRI-Linac. Four patients with lumbar spine bone metastases were treated with a 3 or 5 beam step-and-shoot IMRT plan. The IMRT plan was created while the patient was on the treatment table and based on the online 1.5 T MR images; pre-treatment CT was deformably registered to the online MRI to obtain Hounsfield values. Bone metastases were chosen as the first site as these tumors can be clearly visualized on MRI and the surrounding spine bone can be detected on the integrated portal imager. This way the portal images served as an independent verification of the MRI based guidance to quantify the geometric precision of radiation delivery. Dosimetric accuracy was assessed post-treatment from phantom measurements with an ionization chamber and film. Absolute doses were found to be highly accurate, with deviations ranging from 0.0% to 1.7% in the isocenter. The geometrical, MRI based targeting as confirmed using portal images was better than 0.5 mm, ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm. In conclusion, high precision, high-field, 1.5 T MRI guided radiotherapy is clinically feasible.

  2. Prospective comparison of T2w-MRI and dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI, 3D-MR spectroscopic imaging or diffusion-weighted MRI in repeat TRUS-guided biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portalez, Daniel [Clinique Pasteur, 45, Department of Radiology, Toulouse (France); Rollin, Gautier; Mouly, Patrick; Jonca, Frederic; Malavaud, Bernard [Hopital de Rangueil, Department of Urology, Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Leandri, Pierre [Clinique Saint Jean, 20, Department of Urology, Toulouse (France); Elman, Benjamin [Clinique Pasteur, 45, Department of Urology, Toulouse (France)

    2010-12-15

    To compare T2-weighted MRI and functional MRI techniques in guiding repeat prostate biopsies. Sixty-eight patients with a history of negative biopsies, negative digital rectal examination and elevated PSA were imaged before repeat biopsies. Dichotomous criteria were used with visual validation of T2-weighted MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and literature-derived cut-offs for 3D-spectroscopy MRI (choline-creatine-to-citrate ratio >0.86) and diffusion-weighted imaging (ADC x 10{sup 3} mm{sup 2}/s < 1.24). For each segment and MRI technique, results were rendered as being suspicious/non-suspicious for malignancy. Sextant biopsies, transition zone biopsies and at least two additional biopsies of suspicious areas were taken. In the peripheral zones, 105/408 segments and in the transition zones 19/136 segments were suspicious according to at least one MRI technique. A total of 28/68 (41.2%) patients were found to have cancer. Diffusion-weighted imaging exhibited the highest positive predictive value (0.52) compared with T2-weighted MRI (0.29), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (0.33) and 3D-spectroscopy MRI (0.25). Logistic regression showed the probability of cancer in a segment increasing 12-fold when T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging MRI were both suspicious (63.4%) compared with both being non-suspicious (5.2%). The proposed system of analysis and reporting could prove clinically relevant in the decision whether to repeat targeted biopsies. (orig.)

  3. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  4. Vertical integration of dual wavelength index guided lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karouta, F.; Tan, H.H.; Jagadish, C.; Roy, van B.H.

    1999-01-01

    The vertical integration of two GaAs-based lasers operating at different wavelengths has been achieved with the use of re-growth technology. A V-channel substrate inner stripe structure was used for the bottom laser and a ridge waveguide for the top laser. Both lasers shared a common electrode and

  5. Development of Z-pinch optical guiding for laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokai, Tomonao; Kando, Masaki; Dewa, Hideki; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kondo, Shuji; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2000-01-01

    We have proposed optical guiding of intense laser pulse by fast Z-pinch for channel guided laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). It has been developed based on capillary discharge-pumped X-ray laser technique. The discharge driven by current of 4.8 kA with a rise time of 15 ns through preionized helium gas could produce an uniform guiding channel with good reproducibility. With this new guiding method an intense Ti-Sapphire laser pulse (λ=790 nm, 2.2 TW, 90 fs, 1 x 10 17 W/cm 2 ) was transported through the channel over a distance of 2 cm corresponding to 12.5 times the Rayleigh length. (author)

  6. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI-guided surgery in the evaluation of patients with early stage breast cancer for breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Jacqueline E.; Orel, Susan G.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Mammography is the primary imaging modality for the detection of breast cancer and the evaluation of patients with early stage breast cancer for breast conserving therapy (BCT). MRI may be more sensitive than mammography for detecting breast cancer and may have an adjunctive role in assessing patients with early stage disease for BCT. Our experience with 83 patients undergoing breast MRI during consideration for breast conserving therapy is analyzed. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 83 consecutive cases of patients undergoing breast MRI during standard work-up and evaluation for BCT from 1993 to 1996. Analysis of cases was limited to women who were AJCC clinical Stage 0, I, or II and who received definitive therapy at our institution. All patients signed informed consent. MRI of the breast was performed at 1.5 Tesla. Sagittal T1 and T2 and 3-D gradient pre- and post-contrast images were obtained. All MRI studies were reviewed by two radiologists. All patients were evaluated by one radiation oncologist. The records of these 83 patients were reviewed for patient age, tumor size, AJCC stage, histology, physical examination findings, mammographic findings, ultrasound findings, MRI findings, timing of first MRI study with respect to excisional surgery, findings from MRI-guided surgery (when done), and whether the patient underwent BCT. Results: The median age at the time of presentation was 51.5 years (range 26-77 years). Of the 83 patients, 16% were AJCC clinical stage 0, 65% were stage I, and 19% were stage II. No patient presented with synchronous bilateral carcinoma. Two patients had a history of prior contralateral breast carcinoma; both received BCT for their initial disease. Sixteen percent of patients had intraductal carcinoma, 39% had intraductal and infiltrating carcinoma, 28% had infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 7% had infiltrating lobular carcinoma, 4% had tubular carcinoma, 2% had adenoid cystic carcinoma, 2% had medullary carcinoma, 1% had colloid

  7. Traveling wave model for laser-guided discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, Martin; Fernsler, Richard F.; Slinker, Steven P.; Gordon, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    We present an easily solvable 1D traveling wave model for laser-guided discharges. By assuming constant propagation speed u, the hydro/electrodynamic/chemistry equations are reduced to ordinary differential equations in retarded time τ. Negative discharges are shown to propagate only if u>μE b , where μ is electron mobility and E b is the breakdown field; positive discharges propagate only if the channel preconductance exceeds ∼6x10 -11 m/Ω. The axial electric field E is shown to spike up to several times E b and then relax to ∼E b for as long as the gas remains cold. In this streamer region, the channel conductance, current, and potential all increase linearly with τ. The transition to the leader stage, where E is much smaller, occurs in two steps: excitation of vibrational and low-lying electronic states, then gas heating. The propagation range decreases as a function of initial radius and (for given maximum voltage) of the voltage rise rate. Expansion of the hot channel is shown to increase the range.

  8. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  9. In vivo MR guided boiling histotripsy in a mouse tumor model evaluated by MRI and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan; den Brok, Martijn H; Veltien, Andor; Wassink, Melissa; Wesseling, Pieter; Dumont, Erik; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-06-01

    Boiling histotripsy (BH) is a new high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation technique to mechanically fragmentize soft tissue into submicrometer fragments. So far, ultrasound has been used for BH treatment guidance and evaluation. The in vivo histopathological effects of this treatment are largely unknown. Here, we report on an MR guided BH method to treat subcutaneous tumors in a mouse model. The treatment effects of BH were evaluated one hour and four days later with MRI and histopathology, and compared with the effects of thermal HIFU (T-HIFU). The lesions caused by BH were easily detected with T2 w imaging as a hyper-intense signal area with a hypo-intense rim. Histopathological evaluation showed that the targeted tissue was completely disintegrated and that a narrow transition zone (<200 µm) containing many apoptotic cells was present between disintegrated and vital tumor tissue. A high level of agreement was found between T2 w imaging and H&E stained sections, making T2 w imaging a suitable method for treatment evaluation during or directly after BH. After T-HIFU, contrast enhanced imaging was required for adequate detection of the ablation zone. On histopathology, an ablation zone with concentric layers was seen after T-HIFU. In line with histopathology, contrast enhanced MRI revealed that after BH or T-HIFU perfusion within the lesion was absent, while after BH in the transition zone some micro-hemorrhaging appeared. Four days after BH, the transition zone with apoptotic cells was histologically no longer detectable, corresponding to the absence of a hypo-intense rim around the lesion in T2 w images. This study demonstrates the first results of in vivo BH on mouse tumor using MRI for treatment guidance and evaluation and opens the way for more detailed investigation of the in vivo effects of BH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Optimal structure of particles-based superparamagnetic microrobots: application to MRI guided targeted drug therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellal, Lyès; Belharet, Karim; Folio, David; Ferreira, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal design strategy for therapeutic magnetic micro carriers (TMMC) guided in real time by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. As aggregates of TMMCs must be formed to carry the most amount of drug and magnetic actuation capability, different clustering agglomerations could be arranged. Nevertheless, its difficult to predict the hydrodynamic behavior of any arbitrary-shaped object due to the nonlinear hydrodynamic effects. Indeed, the drag effect is related not only to the properties of the bolus but also to its interaction with the fluid viscosity, the free-stream velocity and the container geometry. In this work, we propose a mathematical framework to optimize the TMMC aggregates to improve the steering efficiency in experimental endovascular conditions. The proposed analysis is carried out on various sizes and geometries of microcarrier: spherical, ellipsoid-like, and chain-like of microsphere structures. We analyze the magnetophoretic behavior of such designs to exhibit the optimal configuration. Based on the optimal design of the boluses, experimental investigations were carried out in mm-sized fluidic artery phantoms to demonstrate the steerability of the magnetic bolus using a proof-of-concept setup. The experiments demonstrate the steerability of the magnetic bolus under different velocity, shear-stress, and trajectory constraints with a laminar viscous fluidic environment. Preliminary experiments with a MRI system confirm the feasibility of the steering of these TMMCs in hepatic artery microchannel phantom

  11. Multi-Channel RF System for MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Thermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yak, Nicolas; Asselin, Matthew; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy is an approach to treating localized prostate cancer which targets precise deposition of thermal energy within a confined region of the gland. This treatment requires a system incorporating a heating applicator with multiple planar ultrasound transducers and associated RF electronics to control individual elements independently in order to achieve accurate 3D treatment. We report the design, construction, and characterization of a prototype multi-channel system capable of controlling 16 independent RF signals for a 16-element heating applicator. The main components are a control computer, microcontroller, and a 16-channel signal generator with 16 amplifiers, each incorporating a low-pass filter and transmitted/reflected power detection circuit. Each channel can deliver from 0.5 to 10 W of electrical power and good linearity from 3 to 12 MHz. Harmonic RF signals near the Larmor frequency of a 1.5 T MRI were measured to be below -30 dBm and heating experiments within the 1.5 T MR system showed no significant decrease in SNR of the temperature images. The frequency and power for all 16 channels could be changed in less than 250 ms, which was sufficiently rapid for proper performance of the control algorithms. A common backplane design was chosen which enabled an inexpensive, modular approach for each channel resulting in an overall system with minimal footprint.

  12. MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound as a New Method of Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thanou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery under the guidance of an imaging modality can improve drug disposition and achieve site-specific drug delivery. The term focal drug delivery has been introduced to describe the focal targeting of drugs in tissues with the help of imaging and focused ultrasound. Focal drug delivery aims to improve the therapeutic profile of drugs by improving their specificity and their permeation in defined areas. Focused-ultrasound- (FUS- mediated drug delivery has been applied with various molecules to improve their local distribution in tissues. FUS is applied with the aid of microbubbles to enhance the permeability of bioactive molecules across BBB and improve drug distribution in the brain. Recently, FUS has been utilised in combination with MRI-labelled liposomes that respond to temperature increase. This strategy aims to “activate” nanoparticles to release their cargo locally when triggered by hyperthermia induced by FUS. MRI-guided FUS drug delivery provides the opportunity to improve drug bioavailability locally and therefore improve the therapeutic profiles of drugs. This drug delivery strategy can be directly translated to clinic as MRg FUS is a promising clinically therapeutic approach. However, more basic research is required to understand the physiological mechanism of FUS-enhanced drug delivery.

  13. MRI-guided robotic system for transperineal prostate interventions: proof of principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bosch, Michiel R; Moman, Maaike R; Van Vulpen, Marco; Battermann, Jan J; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Moerland, Marinus A; Duiveman, Ed; Van Schelven, Leonard J; De Leeuw, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the proof of principle of the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) robot dedicated to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided interventions in patients. The UMCU robot consists of polymers and non-ferromagnetic materials. For transperineal prostate interventions, it can be placed between the patient's legs inside a closed bore 1.5T MR scanner. The robot can manually be translated and rotated resulting in five degrees of freedom. It contains a pneumatically driven tapping device to automatically insert a needle stepwise into the prostate using a controller unit outside the scanning room. To define the target positions and to verify the needle insertion point and the needle trajectory, a high-resolution 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) scan that provides a T2/T1-weighted contrast is acquired. During the needle insertion fast 2D bSSFP images are generated to track the needle on-line. When the target position is reached, the radiation oncologist manually places a fiducial gold marker (small seed) at this location. In total two needle trajectories are used to place all markers. Afterwards, a high-resolution 3D bSSFP scan is acquired to visualize the fiducial gold markers. Four fiducial gold markers were placed transperineally into the prostate of a patient with a clinical stage T3 prostate cancer. In the generated scans, it was possible to discriminate the patient's anatomy, the needle and the markers. All markers were delivered inside the prostate. The procedure time was 1.5 h. This study proves that MRI-guided needle placement and seed delivery in the prostate with the UMCU robot are feasible. (note)

  14. In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies: Are there risk factors for complications?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier-Schroers, Michael, E-mail: michael.meier@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Homsi, Rami, E-mail: rami.homsi@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Kukuk, Guido, E-mail: guido.kukuk@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Wolter, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.wolter@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Decker, Georges, E-mail: georges.decker@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Fischer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.fischer@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Marx, Christian, E-mail: christian.marx@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Schmeel, Frederic Carsten, E-mail: carsten.schmeel@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Block, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.block@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Sprinkart, Alois Martin, E-mail: sprinkart@uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Traeber, Frank, E-mail: frank.traeber@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Schild, Hans Heinz, E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Willinek, Winfried, E-mail: w.willinek@bk-trier.de [Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Sonography and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital of the Barmherzige Brüder Trier, Nordallee 1, 54292 Trier (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Purpose: To systematically analyze risk factors for complications of in-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies (MRGB). Materials and methods: 90 patients, who were scheduled for MRGB were included for this study. Exclusion criteria were coagulation disorders, therapy with anticoagulant drugs, and acute infections of the urinary and the lower gastrointestinal tract. Directly after, one week and one year after the biopsy, we assessed biopsy related complications (e.g. hemorrhages or signs of prostatitis). Differences between patients with and without complications were analyzed regarding possible risk factors: age, prostate volume, number of taken samples, biopsy duration, biopsy of more than one lesion, diabetes, arterial hypertension, hemorrhoids, benign prostate hyperplasia, carcinoma or prostatitis (according to histopathological analysis), and lesion localization. Complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: We observed 15 grade I complications in 90 biopsies (16.7%) with slight hematuria in 9 cases (10%), minor vasovagal reactions in 4 cases (4.4%), and urinary retention and positioning-related facial dysesthesia in 1 case each (1.1%). One patient showed acute prostatitis requiring antibiotics as the only grade II complication (1.1%). There were no adverse events that occurred later than one week. Complications grade III or higher such as pelvic abscesses, urosepsis or severe hemorrhages were not seen. There were no significant associations between the assessed risk factors and biopsy-related complications. Conclusion: In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies can be considered safe procedures in the diagnosis of prostate cancer with very low complication rates. There seem to be no risk factors for complications.

  15. MRI-guided robotic system for transperineal prostate interventions: proof of principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Bosch, Michiel R; Moman, Maaike R; Van Vulpen, Marco; Battermann, Jan J; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Moerland, Marinus A [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Duiveman, Ed; Van Schelven, Leonard J [Medical Technology and Clinical Physics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); De Leeuw, Hendrik [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.R.vandenBosch@umcutrecht.nl

    2010-03-07

    In this study, we demonstrate the proof of principle of the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) robot dedicated to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided interventions in patients. The UMCU robot consists of polymers and non-ferromagnetic materials. For transperineal prostate interventions, it can be placed between the patient's legs inside a closed bore 1.5T MR scanner. The robot can manually be translated and rotated resulting in five degrees of freedom. It contains a pneumatically driven tapping device to automatically insert a needle stepwise into the prostate using a controller unit outside the scanning room. To define the target positions and to verify the needle insertion point and the needle trajectory, a high-resolution 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) scan that provides a T2/T1-weighted contrast is acquired. During the needle insertion fast 2D bSSFP images are generated to track the needle on-line. When the target position is reached, the radiation oncologist manually places a fiducial gold marker (small seed) at this location. In total two needle trajectories are used to place all markers. Afterwards, a high-resolution 3D bSSFP scan is acquired to visualize the fiducial gold markers. Four fiducial gold markers were placed transperineally into the prostate of a patient with a clinical stage T3 prostate cancer. In the generated scans, it was possible to discriminate the patient's anatomy, the needle and the markers. All markers were delivered inside the prostate. The procedure time was 1.5 h. This study proves that MRI-guided needle placement and seed delivery in the prostate with the UMCU robot are feasible. (note)

  16. In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies: Are there risk factors for complications?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier-Schroers, Michael; Homsi, Rami; Kukuk, Guido; Wolter, Karsten; Decker, Georges; Fischer, Stefan; Marx, Christian; Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Block, Wolfgang; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Traeber, Frank; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically analyze risk factors for complications of in-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies (MRGB). Materials and methods: 90 patients, who were scheduled for MRGB were included for this study. Exclusion criteria were coagulation disorders, therapy with anticoagulant drugs, and acute infections of the urinary and the lower gastrointestinal tract. Directly after, one week and one year after the biopsy, we assessed biopsy related complications (e.g. hemorrhages or signs of prostatitis). Differences between patients with and without complications were analyzed regarding possible risk factors: age, prostate volume, number of taken samples, biopsy duration, biopsy of more than one lesion, diabetes, arterial hypertension, hemorrhoids, benign prostate hyperplasia, carcinoma or prostatitis (according to histopathological analysis), and lesion localization. Complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: We observed 15 grade I complications in 90 biopsies (16.7%) with slight hematuria in 9 cases (10%), minor vasovagal reactions in 4 cases (4.4%), and urinary retention and positioning-related facial dysesthesia in 1 case each (1.1%). One patient showed acute prostatitis requiring antibiotics as the only grade II complication (1.1%). There were no adverse events that occurred later than one week. Complications grade III or higher such as pelvic abscesses, urosepsis or severe hemorrhages were not seen. There were no significant associations between the assessed risk factors and biopsy-related complications. Conclusion: In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies can be considered safe procedures in the diagnosis of prostate cancer with very low complication rates. There seem to be no risk factors for complications.

  17. A neuroradiologist's guide to arterial spin labeling MRI in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grade, M.; Hernandez Tamames, J.A.; Pizzini, F.B.; Achten, E.; Golay, X.; Smits, M.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive MRI technique to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). This review provides a practical guide and overview of the clinical applications of ASL of the brain, as well its potential pitfalls. The technical and physiological background is also addressed. At present, main areas of interest are cerebrovascular disease, dementia and neuro-oncology. In cerebrovascular disease, ASL is of particular interest owing to its quantitative nature and its capability to determine cerebral arterial territories. In acute stroke, the source of the collateral blood supply in the penumbra may be visualised. In chronic cerebrovascular disease, the extent and severity of compromised cerebral perfusion can be visualised, which may be used to guide therapeutic or preventative intervention. ASL has potential for the detection and follow-up of arteriovenous malformations. In the workup of dementia patients, ASL is proposed as a diagnostic alternative to PET. It can easily be added to the routinely performed structural MRI examination. In patients with established Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, hypoperfusion patterns are seen that are similar to hypometabolism patterns seen with PET. Studies on ASL in brain tumour imaging indicate a high correlation between areas of increased CBF as measured with ASL and increased cerebral blood volume as measured with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. Major advantages of ASL for brain tumour imaging are the fact that CBF measurements are not influenced by breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, as well as its quantitative nature, facilitating multicentre and longitudinal studies. (orig.)

  18. SU-E-J-201: Investigation of MRI Guided Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, JS [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy has been employed for cancer treatment to improve the tumor localization accuracy. Radiation therapy with proton beams requires more on this accuracy because the proton beam has larger uncertainty and dramatic dose variation along the beam direction. Among all the image modalities, magnetic-resonance image (MRI) is the best for soft tissue delineation and real time motion monitoring. In this work, we investigated the behavior of the proton beam in magnetic field with Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: A proton Monte Carlo platform, TOPAS, was used for this investigation. Dose calculations were performed with this platform in a 30cmx30cmx30cm water phantom for both pencil and broad proton beams with different energies (120, 150 and 180MeV) in different magnetic fields (0.5T, 1T and 3T). The isodose distributions, dose profiles in lateral and beam direction were evaluated. The shifts of the Bragg peak in different magnetic fields for different proton energies were compared and the magnetic field effects on the characters of the dose distribution were analyzed. Results: Significant effects of magnetic field have been observed on the proton beam dose distributions, especially for magnetic field of 1T and up. The effects are more significant for higher energy proton beam because higher energy protons travel longer distance in the magnetic field. The Bragg peak shift in the lateral direction is about 38mm for 180MeV and 11mm for 120MeV proton beams in 3T magnetic field. The peak positions are retracted back for 6mm and 2mm, respectively. The effect on the beam penumbra and dose falloff at the distal edge of the Bragg peak is negligible. Conclusion: Though significant magnetic effects on dose distribution have been observed for proton beams, MRI guided proton therapy is feasible because the magnetic effects on dose is predictable and can be considered in patient dose calculation.

  19. A neuroradiologist's guide to arterial spin labeling MRI in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grade, M. [Queen Square, UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Hernandez Tamames, J.A. [Rey Juan Carlos University, Medical Image Analysis and Biometry Laboratory, Madrid (Spain); Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pizzini, F.B. [Queen Square, UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Verona University Hospital, Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostics and Pathology, Verona (Italy); Achten, E. [Ghent University Hospital, Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Golay, X. [Queen Square, UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Smits, M. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive MRI technique to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). This review provides a practical guide and overview of the clinical applications of ASL of the brain, as well its potential pitfalls. The technical and physiological background is also addressed. At present, main areas of interest are cerebrovascular disease, dementia and neuro-oncology. In cerebrovascular disease, ASL is of particular interest owing to its quantitative nature and its capability to determine cerebral arterial territories. In acute stroke, the source of the collateral blood supply in the penumbra may be visualised. In chronic cerebrovascular disease, the extent and severity of compromised cerebral perfusion can be visualised, which may be used to guide therapeutic or preventative intervention. ASL has potential for the detection and follow-up of arteriovenous malformations. In the workup of dementia patients, ASL is proposed as a diagnostic alternative to PET. It can easily be added to the routinely performed structural MRI examination. In patients with established Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, hypoperfusion patterns are seen that are similar to hypometabolism patterns seen with PET. Studies on ASL in brain tumour imaging indicate a high correlation between areas of increased CBF as measured with ASL and increased cerebral blood volume as measured with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. Major advantages of ASL for brain tumour imaging are the fact that CBF measurements are not influenced by breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, as well as its quantitative nature, facilitating multicentre and longitudinal studies. (orig.)

  20. Treatment of osteoid osteoma using CT-guided radiofrequency ablation versus MR-guided laser ablation: A cost comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, M.H.; Gebauer, B.; Wieners, G.; De Bucourt, M.; Renz, D.M.; Hamm, B.; Streitparth, F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the costs of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and MR-guided laser ablation (LA) for minimally invasive percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteoma. Materials and methods: Between November 2005 and October 2011, 20 patients (14 males, 6 females, mean age 20.3 ± 9.1 years) underwent CT-guided RFA and 24 patients (18 males, 6 females; mean age, 23.8 ± 13.8 years) MR-guided LA (open 1.0 Tesla, Panorama HFO, Philips, Best, Netherlands) for osteoid osteoma diagnosed on the basis of clinical presentation and imaging findings. Prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, and maintenance), staff costs, and expenditure for disposables were identified for CT-guided RFA and MR-guided LA procedures. Results: The average total costs per patient were EUR 1762 for CT-guided RFA and EUR 1417 for MR-guided LA. These were (RFA/LA) EUR 92/260 for equipment use, EUR 149/208 for staff, and EUR 870/300 for disposables. Conclusion: MR-guided LA is less expensive than CT-guided RFA for minimally invasive percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteoma. The higher costs of RFA are primarily due to the higher price of the disposable RFA probes.

  1. Hybrid Approach for Biliary Interventions Employing MRI-Guided Bile Duct Puncture with Near-Real-Time Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wybranski, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Wybranski@uk-koeln.de [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pech, Maciej [Otto-von-Guericke University Medical School, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Lux, Anke [Otto-von-Guericke University Medical School, Institute of Biometry and Medical Informatics (Germany); Ricke, Jens; Fischbach, Frank; Fischbach, Katharina [Otto-von-Guericke University Medical School, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    ObjectiveTo assess the feasibility of a hybrid approach employing MRI-guided bile duct (BD) puncture for subsequent fluoroscopy-guided biliary interventions in patients with non-dilated (≤3 mm) or dilated BD (≥3 mm) but unfavorable conditions for ultrasonography (US)-guided BD puncture.MethodsA total of 23 hybrid interventions were performed in 21 patients. Visualization of BD and puncture needles (PN) in the interventional MR images was rated on a 5-point Likert scale by two radiologists. Technical success, planning time, BD puncture time and positioning adjustments of the PN as well as technical success of the biliary intervention and complication rate were recorded.ResultsVisualization even of third-order non-dilated BD and PN was rated excellent by both radiologists with good to excellent interrater agreement. MRI-guided BD puncture was successful in all cases. Planning and BD puncture times were 1:36 ± 2.13 (0:16–11:07) min. and 3:58 ± 2:35 (1:11–9:32) min. Positioning adjustments of the PN was necessary in two patients. Repeated capsular puncture was not necessary in any case. All biliary interventions were completed successfully without major complications.ConclusionA hybrid approach which employs MRI-guided BD puncture for subsequent fluoroscopy-guided biliary intervention is feasible in clinical routine and yields high technical success in patients with non-dilated BD and/or unfavorable conditions for US-guided puncture. Excellent visualization of BD and PN in near-real-time interventional MRI allows successful cannulation of the BD.

  2. TH-CD-202-09: Free-Breathing Proton MRI Functional Lung Avoidance Maps to Guide Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capaldi, D; Sheikh, K; Parraga, G; Hoover, D; Yaremko, B; Palma, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary functional MRI using inhaled gas contrast agents was previously investigated as a way to identify well-functioning lung in patients with NSCLC who are clinical candidates for radiotherapy. Hyperpolarized noble-gas ( 3 He and 129 Xe) MRI has also been optimized to measure functional lung information, but for a number of reasons, the clinical translation of this approach to guide radiotherapy planning has been limited. As an alternative, free-breathing pulmonary 1H MRI using clinically available MRI systems and pulse sequences provides a non-contrast-enhanced method to generate both ventilation and perfusion maps. Free-breathing 1 H MRI exploits non-rigid registration and Fourier decomposition of MRI signal intensity differences (Bauman et al., MRM, 2009) that may be generated during normal tidal breathing. Here, our objective was to generate free-breathing 1 H MRI ventilation and lung function avoidance maps in patients with NSCLC as a way to guide radiation therapy planning. Methods: Stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC patients (n=8, 68±9yr) provided written informed consent to a randomized controlled clinical trial ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02002052 ) that aimed to compare outcomes related to image-guided versus conventional radiation therapy planning. Hyperpolarized 3 He/ 129 Xe and dynamic free tidal-breathing 1 H MRI were acquired as previously described (Capaldi et al., Acad Radiol, 2015). Non-rigid registration was performed using the modality-independent-neighbourhood-descriptor (MIND) deformable approach (Heinrich et al., Med Image Anal, 2012). Ventilation-defect-percent ( 3 He:VDP He , 129 Xe:VDP Xe , Free-breathing- 1 H:VDP FB ) and the corresponding ventilation maps were compared using Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Results: VDP FB was significantly related to VDP He (r=.71; p=.04) and VDP Xe (r=.80; p=.01) and there were also strong spatial relationships (DSC He /DSC Xe =89±3%/77±11

  3. TH-CD-202-09: Free-Breathing Proton MRI Functional Lung Avoidance Maps to Guide Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capaldi, D; Sheikh, K; Parraga, G [Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, CA (United States); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, CA (United States); Hoover, D; Yaremko, B; Palma, D [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, CA (United States); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary functional MRI using inhaled gas contrast agents was previously investigated as a way to identify well-functioning lung in patients with NSCLC who are clinical candidates for radiotherapy. Hyperpolarized noble-gas ({sup 3}He and {sup 129}Xe) MRI has also been optimized to measure functional lung information, but for a number of reasons, the clinical translation of this approach to guide radiotherapy planning has been limited. As an alternative, free-breathing pulmonary 1H MRI using clinically available MRI systems and pulse sequences provides a non-contrast-enhanced method to generate both ventilation and perfusion maps. Free-breathing {sup 1}H MRI exploits non-rigid registration and Fourier decomposition of MRI signal intensity differences (Bauman et al., MRM, 2009) that may be generated during normal tidal breathing. Here, our objective was to generate free-breathing {sup 1}H MRI ventilation and lung function avoidance maps in patients with NSCLC as a way to guide radiation therapy planning. Methods: Stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC patients (n=8, 68±9yr) provided written informed consent to a randomized controlled clinical trial ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02002052 ) that aimed to compare outcomes related to image-guided versus conventional radiation therapy planning. Hyperpolarized {sup 3}He/{sup 129}Xe and dynamic free tidal-breathing {sup 1}H MRI were acquired as previously described (Capaldi et al., Acad Radiol, 2015). Non-rigid registration was performed using the modality-independent-neighbourhood-descriptor (MIND) deformable approach (Heinrich et al., Med Image Anal, 2012). Ventilation-defect-percent ({sup 3}He:VDP{sub He}, {sup 129}Xe:VDP{sub Xe}, Free-breathing-{sup 1}H:VDP{sub FB}) and the corresponding ventilation maps were compared using Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Results: VDP{sub FB} was significantly related to VDP{sub He} (r=.71; p=.04) and VDP{sub Xe} (r=.80; p=.01) and

  4. MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression in open MRI: an initial clinical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, Florian; Walter, Thula; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Freyhardt, Patrick; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M. [Charite, Humboldt-University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Hartwig, Tony; Putzier, Michael; Strube, Patrick [Charite, Humboldt-University, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Bretschneider, Tina [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of real-time MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Twenty-four discs in 22 patients with chronic low-back and radicular pain were treated by PLDD using open 1.0-T magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). A fluoroscopic proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE) sequence was used to position the laser fibre. Non-spoiled gradient-echo (GRE) sequences were employed for real-time thermal monitoring based on proton resonance frequency (PRF). Radicular pain was assessed over 6 months with a numerical rating scale (NRS). PLDD was technically successful in all cases, with adequate image quality for laser positioning. The PRF-based real-time temperature monitoring was found to be feasible in practice. After 6 months, 21 % reported complete remission of radicular pain, 63 % at least great pain relief and 74 % at least mild relief. We found a significant decrease in the NRS score between the pre-intervention and the 6-month follow-up assessment (P < 0.001). No major complications occurred; the single adverse event recorded, moderate motor impairment, resolved. Real-time MR guidance and PRF-based thermometry of PLDD in the lumbar spine under open 1.0-T MRI appears feasible, safe and effective and may pave the way to more precise operating procedures. (orig.)

  5. MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression in open MRI: an initial clinical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, Florian; Walter, Thula; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Freyhardt, Patrick; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M.; Hartwig, Tony; Putzier, Michael; Strube, Patrick; Bretschneider, Tina

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of real-time MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Twenty-four discs in 22 patients with chronic low-back and radicular pain were treated by PLDD using open 1.0-T magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). A fluoroscopic proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE) sequence was used to position the laser fibre. Non-spoiled gradient-echo (GRE) sequences were employed for real-time thermal monitoring based on proton resonance frequency (PRF). Radicular pain was assessed over 6 months with a numerical rating scale (NRS). PLDD was technically successful in all cases, with adequate image quality for laser positioning. The PRF-based real-time temperature monitoring was found to be feasible in practice. After 6 months, 21 % reported complete remission of radicular pain, 63 % at least great pain relief and 74 % at least mild relief. We found a significant decrease in the NRS score between the pre-intervention and the 6-month follow-up assessment (P < 0.001). No major complications occurred; the single adverse event recorded, moderate motor impairment, resolved. Real-time MR guidance and PRF-based thermometry of PLDD in the lumbar spine under open 1.0-T MRI appears feasible, safe and effective and may pave the way to more precise operating procedures. (orig.)

  6. Spatial Distortion in MRI-Guided Stereotactic Procedures: Evaluation in 1.5-, 3- and 7-Tesla MRI Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Giese, Henrik; Biller, Armin; Nagel, Armin M; Kiening, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is replacing computed tomography (CT) as the main imaging modality for stereotactic transformations. MRI is prone to spatial distortion artifacts, which can lead to inaccuracy in stereotactic procedures. Modern MRI systems provide distortion correction algorithms that may ameliorate this problem. This study investigates the different options of distortion correction using standard 1.5-, 3- and 7-tesla MRI scanners. A phantom was mounted on a stereotactic frame. One CT scan and three MRI scans were performed. At all three field strengths, two 3-dimensional sequences, volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo, were acquired, and automatic distortion correction was performed. Global stereotactic transformation of all 13 datasets was performed and two stereotactic planning workflows (MRI only vs. CT/MR image fusion) were subsequently analysed. Distortion correction on the 1.5- and 3-tesla scanners caused a considerable reduction in positional error. The effect was more pronounced when using the VIBE sequences. By using co-registration (CT/MR image fusion), even a lower positional error could be obtained. In ultra-high-field (7 T) MR imaging, distortion correction introduced even higher errors. However, the accuracy of non-corrected 7-tesla sequences was comparable to CT/MR image fusion 3-tesla imaging. MRI distortion correction algorithms can reduce positional errors by up to 60%. For stereotactic applications of utmost precision, we recommend a co-registration to an additional CT dataset. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Competency-Based Curriculum Guide for Laser Technology. September 1980-June 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioroni, John J.

    This document contains materials developed by a project to provide a competency-based curriculum guide for laser technology at the community college level. An abstract of the final report is included. Next, the 17 job competencies determined as necessary to meet the job description of laser technician are listed. A career ladder and qualifications…

  8. Evaluation of Artifacts and Distortions of Titanium Applicators on 3.0-Tesla MRI: Feasibility of Titanium Applicators in MRI-Guided Brachytherapy for Gynecological Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yusung; Muruganandham, Manickam; Modrick, Joseph M.; Bayouth, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the levels of artifacts and distortions of titanium applicators on 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Fletcher-Suit-Delclos-style tandem and ovoids (T and O) and tandem and ring applicator (T and R) were examined. The quality assurance (QA) phantoms for each applicator were designed and filled with copper sulphate solution (1.5 g/l). The artifacts were quantified with the registration of corresponding computed tomography (CT) images. A favorable MR sequence was searched in terms of artifacts. Using the sequence, the artifacts were determined. The geometric distortions induced by the applicators were quantified through each registration of CT and MRI without applicators. The artifacts of T and O were also evaluated on in vivo MRI datasets of 5 patients. Results: T1-weighted MRI with 1-mm slice thickness was found as a favorable MR sequence. Applying the sequence, the artifacts at the tandem tip of T and O and T and R were determined as 1.5 ± 0.5 mm in a superior direction in phantom studies. In the ovoids of T and O, we found artifacts less than 1.5 ± 0.5 mm. The artifacts of a T and O tandem in vivo were found as less than 2.6 ± 1.3 mm on T1-weighted MRI, whereas less than 6.9 ± 3.4 mm on T2-weighted MRI. No more than 1.2 ± 0.6 mm (3.0 ± 1.5 mm) of distortions, due to a titanium applicator, were measured on T1-weighted MRI (T2-). Conclusion: In 3.0-Tesla MRI, we found the artifact widths at the tip of tandem were less than 1.5 ± 0.5 mm for both T and O and T and R when using T1-weighted MRI in phantom studies. However, exclusive 3.0-Tesla MRI-guided brachytherapy planning with a titanium applicator should be cautiously implemented.

  9. Using surface markers for MRI guided breast conserving surgery: a feasibility survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mehran; Siegler, Peter; Modhafar, Amen; Holloway, Claire M. B.; Plewes, Donald B.; Martel, Anne L.

    2014-04-01

    Breast MRI is frequently performed prior to breast conserving surgery in order to assess the location and extent of the lesion. Ideally, the surgeon should also be able to use the image information during surgery to guide the excision and this requires that the MR image is co-registered to conform to the patient’s position on the operating table. Recent progress in MR imaging techniques has made it possible to obtain high quality images of the patient in the supine position which significantly reduces the complexity of the registration task. Surface markers placed on the breast during imaging can be located during surgery using an external tracking device and this information can be used to co-register the images to the patient. There remains the problem that in most clinical MR scanners the arm of the patient has to be placed parallel to the body whereas the arm is placed perpendicular to the patient during surgery. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of co-registration based on a surface marker approach and, in particular, to determine what effect the difference in a patient’s arm position makes on the accuracy of tumour localization. Obtaining a second MRI of the patient where the patient’s arm is perpendicular to body axes (operating room position) is not possible. Instead we obtain a secondary MRI scan where the patient’s arm is above the patient’s head to validate the registration. Five patients with enhancing lesions ranging from 1.5 to 80 cm3 in size were imaged using contrast enhanced MRI with their arms in two positions. A thin-plate spline registration scheme was used to match these two configurations. The registration algorithm uses the surface markers only and does not employ the image intensities. Tumour outlines were segmented and centre of mass (COM) displacement and Dice measures of lesion overlap were calculated. The relationship between the number of markers used and the COM-displacement was also studied. The lesion COM

  10. Using surface markers for MRI guided breast conserving surgery: a feasibility survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi, Mehran; Siegler, Peter; Modhafar, Amen; Martel, Anne L; Holloway, Claire M B; Plewes, Donald B

    2014-01-01

    Breast MRI is frequently performed prior to breast conserving surgery in order to assess the location and extent of the lesion. Ideally, the surgeon should also be able to use the image information during surgery to guide the excision and this requires that the MR image is co-registered to conform to the patient’s position on the operating table. Recent progress in MR imaging techniques has made it possible to obtain high quality images of the patient in the supine position which significantly reduces the complexity of the registration task. Surface markers placed on the breast during imaging can be located during surgery using an external tracking device and this information can be used to co-register the images to the patient. There remains the problem that in most clinical MR scanners the arm of the patient has to be placed parallel to the body whereas the arm is placed perpendicular to the patient during surgery. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of co-registration based on a surface marker approach and, in particular, to determine what effect the difference in a patient’s arm position makes on the accuracy of tumour localization. Obtaining a second MRI of the patient where the patient’s arm is perpendicular to body axes (operating room position) is not possible. Instead we obtain a secondary MRI scan where the patient’s arm is above the patient’s head to validate the registration. Five patients with enhancing lesions ranging from 1.5 to 80 cm 3 in size were imaged using contrast enhanced MRI with their arms in two positions. A thin-plate spline registration scheme was used to match these two configurations. The registration algorithm uses the surface markers only and does not employ the image intensities. Tumour outlines were segmented and centre of mass (COM) displacement and Dice measures of lesion overlap were calculated. The relationship between the number of markers used and the COM-displacement was also studied. The lesion

  11. Feasibility of MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound as Organ-Sparing Treatment for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staruch, Robert; Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    High cure rates for testicular cancer have prompted interest in organ-sparing surgery for patients with bilateral disease or single testis. Focused ultrasound (FUS) ablation could offer a noninvasive approach to organ-sparing surgery. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using MR thermometry to guide organ-sparing focused ultrasound surgery in the testis. The testes of anesthetized rabbits were sonicated in several discrete locations using a single-element focused transducer operating at 2.787MHz. Focal heating was visualized with MR thermometry, using a measured PRF thermal coefficient of -0.0089±0.0003 ppm/° C. Sonications at 3.5-14 acoustic watts applied for 30 seconds produced maximum temperature elevations of 10-80° C, with coagulation verified by histology. Coagulation of precise volumes in the testicle is feasible with MRI-guided focused ultrasound. Variability in peak temperature for given sonication parameters suggests the need for online temperature feedback control.

  12. Activation of Visuomotor Systems during Visually Guided Movements: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellermann, Jutta M.; Siegal, Joel D.; Strupp, John P.; Ebner, Timothy J.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-04-01

    The dorsal stream is a dominant visuomotor pathway that connects the striate and extrastriate cortices to posterior parietal areas. In turn, the posterior parietal areas send projections to the frontal primary motor and premotor areas. This cortical pathway is hypothesized to be involved in the transformation of a visual input into the appropriate motor output. In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the entire brain to determine the patterns of activation that occurred while subjects performed a visually guided motor task. In nine human subjects, fMRI data were acquired on a 4-T whole-body MR system equipped with a head gradient coil and a birdcage RF coil using aT*2-weighted EPI sequence. Functional activation was determined for three different tasks: (1) a visuomotor task consisting of moving a cursor on a screen with a joystick in relation to various targets, (2) a hand movement task consisting of moving the joystick without visual input, and (3) a eye movement task consisting of moving the eyes alone without visual input. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast-based activation maps of each subject were generated using period cross-correlation statistics. Subsequently, each subject's brain was normalized to Talairach coordinates, and the individual maps were compared on a pixel by pixel basis. Significantly activated pixels common to at least four out of six subjects were retained to construct the final functional image. The pattern of activation during visually guided movements was consistent with the flow of information from striate and extrastriate visual areas, to the posterior parietal complex, and then to frontal motor areas. The extensive activation of this network and the reproducibility among subjects is consistent with a role for the dorsal stream in transforming visual information into motor behavior. Also extensively activated were the medial and lateral cerebellar structures, implicating the cortico

  13. Self-focusing and guiding of short laser pulses in ionizing gases and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Krall, J.; Ting, A.

    1997-01-01

    The propagation of intense laser pulses in gases and plasmas is relevant to a wide range of applications, including laser-driven accelerators, laser-plasma channeling, harmonic generation, supercontinuum generation, X-ray lasers, and laser-fusion schemes. Here, several features of intense, short-pulse (≤1 ps) laser propagation in gases undergoing ionization and in plasmas are reviewed, discussed, and analyzed. The wave equations for laser pulse propagation in a gas undergoing ionization and in a plasma are derived. The source-dependent expansion method is discussed, which is a general method for solving the paraxial wave equation with nonlinear source terms. In gases, the propagation of high-power (near the critical power) laser pulses is considered including the effects of diffraction, nonlinear self-focusing, ionization, and plasma generation. Self-guided solutions and the stability of these solutions are discussed. In plasmas, optical guiding by relativistic effects, ponderomotive effects, and preformed density channels is considered. The self-consistent plasma response is discussed, including plasma wave effects and instabilities such as self-modulation. Recent experiments on the guiding of laser pulses in gases and in plasmas are briefly summarized

  14. MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of liver metastases. Prospective results of an optimized method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mueller, P.; Hirsch, H.; Philipp, C.; Hammerstingl, R.; Boettcher, H.; Riess, H.; Beuthan, J.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    In a prospective study MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of liver metastases was optimized and the clinical parameters evaluated. Seventeen patients (4 women, 13 men) with a total of 29 lesions underwent LITT in 25 sessions through 1 March 1994. Twelve of them suffered from colorectal carcinomas, 5 from other primary tumors. Under local anesthesia a maximum of 5 lesions per patient were treated. For MR-guided LITT a neodymium yttrium aluminum garnet laser (Nd-YAG 1064 nm) with energy varying from 3 to 7.5 W was used. Energy and application time were defined through a computer program; they varied, dependent on the lesion size, location and consistency. To monitor the progress of LITT two special thermosensitive MR sequences (Thermo-Turbo-FLASH and FLASH-2D sequences) were individually optimized, whereby the increase in temperature correlates with an increase in signal loss. All procedures were well tolerated without significant early or late side effects. In only one patient was minimal air documentated in the pleural cavity with spontaneous resorption. Patients were dismissed without complaints after 24-h hospitalization. The control parameters of the contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI documented at optimal response a hypointense signal around the tip of the laser applicator, in accordance with laser-induced necrosis. In lesions 20 mm or smaller, nearly 100% tumor necrosis was achieved and in lesions larger than 20 mm, only 50%. Follow-up evaluation 6 months after treaqtment shows a significantly better response in lesions with a diameter fo 20 mm or smaller, with a local tumor control rate of 66%. In lesions larger than 20 mm only a local tumor control rate of 35% could be achieved. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Laser guide stars for optical free-space communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Calvo, Ramon; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Barrios, Ricardo; Centrone, Mauro; Giggenbach, Dirk; Lombardi, Gianluca; Becker, Peter; Zayer, Igor

    2017-02-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) performed a measurement campaign together in April and July 2016 at Teide-Observatory (Tenerife), with the support of the European Space Agency (ESA), to investigate the use of laser guide stars (LGS) in ground to space optical communications. Atmospheric turbulence causes strong signal fluctuations in the uplink, due to scintillation and beam wander. In space communications, the use of the downlink channel as reference for pointing and for pre-distortion adaptive optics is limited by the size of the isokinetic and isoplanatic angle in relation to the required point-ahead angle. Pointing and phase errors due to the decorrelation between downward and upward beam due to the point-ahead angle may have a severe impact on the required transmit power and the stability of the communications link. LGSs provide a self-tailored reference to any optical ground-to-space link, independently of turbulence conditions and required point-ahead angle. In photon-starved links, typically in deep-space scenarios, LGSs allow dedicating all downlink received signal to communications purposes, increasing the available link margin. The scope of the joint DLR-ESO measurement campaign was, first, to measure the absolute value of the beam wander (uplink-tilt) using a LGS, taking a natural star as a reference, and, second, to characterize the decrease of correlation between uplink-tilt and downlink-tilt with respect to the angular separation between both sources. This paper describes the experiments performed during the measurement campaigns, providing an overview of the measured data and the first outcomes of the data post-processing.

  16. Laser guide stars for daytime thermal IR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Jacques M.

    2008-04-01

    In connection with the planning for Extremely Large Telescopes, I revisit a 2001 paper in which Cacciani and I describe the use of Sodium Laser Guide Stars (LGSs) for diffraction limited daytime astronomical observations. The enabling technology for seeing LGSs in broad daylight is the availability of very narrow band magneto-optical filters. Considering the dominance of the atmospheric scattering of sunlight at wavelengths below 3.5 μm, daytime use is only indicated for mid- and thermal IR observations. The launch of the 6.5 meter aperture James Web Space Telescope (JWST) appears to be assured and planned for 2013, preceding the most optimistic projections for the completion date of the first ELT. The projected thermal background of the JWST is very much less than that of ground-based telescopes so that any competing ground-based observations are limited to those parameters not covered by the JWST: angular resolution (requiring apertures > 6.5 meter) and spectral resolution (R>3000). I compare the benefits of daytime observations with Na-LGS equipped telescopes and interferometers at moderate latitudes and in the Antarctic (specifically Dome C). In both cases daytime observations extend the amount of observing time available for TIR observations. Antarctic observations have the advantage of having very good seeing during the daytime, significantly better than nighttime seeing. In contrast the seeing at moderate latitude sites significantly deteriorates during daytime resulting in lower quality observations than during nighttime. In addition Antarctic sites are less hostile to maintenance and operations during daytime (summer) observations as compared to nighttime (winter) observations.

  17. Neural Activations of Guided Imagery and Music in Negative Emotional Processing: A Functional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Eun; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2016-01-01

    The Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music uses music and imagery to access and explore personal emotions associated with episodic memories. Understanding the neural mechanism of guided imagery and music (GIM) as combined stimuli for emotional processing informs clinical application. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate neural mechanisms of GIM for negative emotional processing when personal episodic memory is recalled and re-experienced through GIM processes. Twenty-four healthy volunteers participated in the study, which used classical music and verbal instruction stimuli to evoke negative emotions. To analyze the neural mechanism, activated regions associated with negative emotional and episodic memory processing were extracted by conducting volume analyses for the contrast between GIM and guided imagery (GI) or music (M). The GIM stimuli showed increased activation over the M-only stimuli in five neural regions associated with negative emotional and episodic memory processing, including the left amygdala, left anterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, bilateral culmen, and left angular gyrus (AG). Compared with GI alone, GIM showed increased activation in three regions associated with episodic memory processing in the emotional context, including the right posterior cingulate gyrus, bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, and AG. No neural regions related to negative emotional and episodic memory processing showed more activation for M and GI than for GIM. As a combined multimodal stimulus, GIM may increase neural activations related to negative emotions and episodic memory processing. Findings suggest a neural basis for GIM with personal episodic memories affecting cortical and subcortical structures and functions. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Preliminary results of a new workflow for MRI/CT-based image-guided brachytherapy in cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Miho Watanabe; Iwai, Yuma; Togasaki, Gentaro; Kurokawa, Marie; Harada, Rintarou; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Uno, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We propose a method of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) that combines MRI-based target volume delineation for the first fraction with CT datasets of subsequent fractions, using an automatic, applicator-based co-registration, and report our preliminary experience. The MRI of the first fraction was used for the first brachytherapy planning. For each subsequent brachytherapy fraction, after the same applicator insertion, a new CT scan with the applicator in place was obtained. The MR image set was registered to the subsequent brachytherapy treatment planning CT using the applicator for rigid body registration. To demonstrate the registration quality, we used here the Dice index as a measurement of tandem delineation overlap between CT and MRI. The median Dice index was 0.879 (range 0.610-0.932), which indicated that the contours on CT and MRI fitted well. With this combination method, the median D90 of HR CTV and the calculated D2 cm 3 of the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid in each fraction were 7.2 (4.0-10.4), 5.9 (2.3-7.7), 4.0 (1.9-6.7), and 3.8 (0.6-7.2) Gy, respectively. Our described method of MRI-guided IGBT offers a practical option for the benefits of target delineation.

  19. A MR-conditional High-torque Pneumatic Stepper Motor for MRI-guided and Robot-assisted Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging allows for visualizing detailed pathological and morphological changes of soft tissue. This increasingly attracts attention on MRI-guided intervention; hence, MR-conditional actuations have been widely investigated for development of image-guided and robot-assisted surgical devices under the MRI. This paper presents a simple design of MR-conditional stepper motor which can provide precise and high-torque actuation without adversely affecting the MR image quality. This stepper motor consists of two MR-conditional pneumatic cylinders and the corresponding supporting structures. Alternating the pressurized air can drive the motor to rotate each step in 3.6° with the motor coupled to a planetary gearbox. Experimental studies were conducted to validate its dynamics performance. Maximum 800mNm output torque can be achieved. The motor accuracy independently varied by two factors: motor operating speed and step size, was also investigated. The motor was tested within a Siemens 3T MRI scanner. The image artifact and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were evaluated in order to study its MRI compliancy. The results show that the presented pneumatic stepper motor generated 2.35% SNR reduction in MR images and no observable artifact was presented besides the motor body itself. The proposed motor test also demonstrates a standard to evaluate the motor capability for later incorporation with motorized devices used in robot-assisted surgery under MRI. PMID:24957635

  20. Vision 20/20: Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction in PET/MRI: Challenges, solutions, and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Arabi, Hossein [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, University of Geneva, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Attenuation correction is an essential component of the long chain of data correction techniques required to achieve the full potential of quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems mandated the widespread interest in developing novel strategies for deriving accurate attenuation maps with the aim to improve the quantitative accuracy of these emerging hybrid imaging systems. The attenuation map in PET/MRI should ideally be derived from anatomical MR images; however, MRI intensities reflect proton density and relaxation time properties of biological tissues rather than their electron density and photon attenuation properties. Therefore, in contrast to PET/computed tomography, there is a lack of standardized global mapping between the intensities of MRI signal and linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. Moreover, in standard MRI sequences, bones and lung tissues do not produce measurable signals owing to their low proton density and short transverse relaxation times. MR images are also inevitably subject to artifacts that degrade their quality, thus compromising their applicability for the task of attenuation correction in PET/MRI. MRI-guided attenuation correction strategies can be classified in three broad categories: (i) segmentation-based approaches, (ii) atlas-registration and machine learning methods, and (iii) emission/transmission-based approaches. This paper summarizes past and current state-of-the-art developments and latest advances in PET/MRI attenuation correction. The advantages and drawbacks of each approach for addressing the challenges of MR-based attenuation correction are comprehensively described. The opportunities brought by both MRI and PET imaging modalities for deriving accurate attenuation maps and improving PET quantification will be elaborated. Future prospects and potential clinical applications of these techniques and their integration in commercial

  1. MRI-only lesions: application of diffusion-weighted imaging obviates unnecessary MR-guided breast biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spick, Claudio; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H.; Baltzer, Pascal A. [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), General Hospital Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Wien (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Clinical Institute of Pathology, Wien (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    To assess if the application of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) obviates unnecessary MR-guided biopsies in suspicious breast lesions visible only on contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI). This institutional review board (IRB)-approved, retrospective, single-centre study included 101 patients (mean age, 49.5; SD 13.9 years) who underwent additional DWI at 1.5 T prior to MRI-guided biopsy of 104 lesions classified as suspicious for malignancy and visible on CE-MRI only. An experienced radiologist, blinded to histopathologic and follow-up results, measured apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values obtained from DWI. Diagnostic accuracy was investigated using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Histopathology revealed 20 malignant and 84 benign lesions. Lesions were masses in 61 (15 malignant, 24.6 %) and non-masses in 43 cases (five malignant, 11.6 %). Mean ADC values were 1.53 ± 0.38 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in benign lesions and 1.06 ± 0.27 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in malignant lesions. ROC analysis revealed exclusively benign lesions if ADC values were greater than 1.58 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. As a consequence, 29 false-positive biopsies (34.5 %) could have been avoided without any false-negative findings. Both in mass and in non-mass lesions, rule-in and rule-out criteria were identified using flexible ADC thresholds based on ROC analysis. Additional application of DWI in breast lesions visible only on MRI can avoid false-positive, MR-guided biopsies. Thus, DWI should be an integral part of breast MRI protocols. (orig.)

  2. Guided-wave tomographic imaging of plate defects by laser-based ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil; Lim, Ju Young; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Contact-guided-wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and rough surfaces or complex geometric features. A non-contact setup with a laser-ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is quite attractive for guided-wave inspection. In the present work, we developed a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique using the laser-ultrasonic technique in a plate. A method for Lamb-wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulsed laser-ultrasonic transmitter and Michelson-interferometer receiver was developed. The defect shape and area in the images obtained using laser scanning, showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact online inspection and monitoring technique.

  3. A study on laser-based ultrasonic technique by the use of guided wave tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr; Lim, Juyoung, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr [Graduate school, School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Younho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Krishnaswamy, Sridhar [Center for Quality Engineering and Failure Prevention, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Guided wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and coarse surfaces or geometrically complicated features. A non-contact setup with a laser ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is the classic attractive for guided wave inspection. The present work was done to develop a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique by laser ultrasonic technique in a plate-like structure. A method for Lam wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulse laser ultrasonic transmitter and a Michelson interferometer receiver has been developed. In the images obtained by laser scanning, the defect shape and area showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact-based online inspection and monitoring technique.

  4. Guided-wave tomography imaging plate defects by laser-based ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Pil; Lim, Ju Young; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Contact-guided-wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and rough surfaces or complex geometric features. A non-contact setup with a laser-ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is quite attractive for guided-wave inspection. In the present work, we developed a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique using the laser-ultrasonic technique in a plate. A method for Lamb-wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulsed laser-ultrasonic transmitter and Michelson-interferometer receiver was developed. The defect shape and area in the images obtained using laser scanning, showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact online inspection and monitoring technique.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Imaging-Guided Prostate Biopsy Techniques: Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound, Direct In-Bore MRI, and Image Fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venderink, W.; Govers, T.M.; Rooij, M. de; Futterer, J.J.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Three commonly used prostate biopsy approaches are systematic transrectal ultrasound guided, direct in-bore MRI guided, and image fusion guided. The aim of this study was to calculate which strategy is most cost-effective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A decision tree and Markov model were

  6. MRI-guided Wire Localization Surgical Biopsy in an Adolescent Patient with a Difficult to Diagnose Case of Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Scott M.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Jondal, Danielle E.; Rech, Karen L.; Mardini, Samir; Woodrum, David A.

    2017-01-01

    A 17-year-old previously healthy female presented with a progressive soft tissue infiltrative process involving the neck and thorax. Extensive diagnostic evaluation including multiple imaging, laboratory, and biopsy studies was nondiagnostic. Due to an urgent need to establish a diagnosis and several previous nondiagnostic biopsies, she was referred to interventional radiology for MRI-guided wire localization immediately prior to open surgical biopsy. Under general anesthesia, wires were placed in the areas of increased T2 signal within the bilateral splenius capitis muscles using intermittent MRI-guidance followed by immediate surgical biopsy down to the wires. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  7. MRI-guided Wire Localization Surgical Biopsy in an Adolescent Patient with a Difficult to Diagnose Case of Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Scott M., E-mail: Thompson.scott@mayo.edu; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Jondal, Danielle E. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States); Rech, Karen L. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (United States); Mardini, Samir [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery (United States); Woodrum, David A. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-01-15

    A 17-year-old previously healthy female presented with a progressive soft tissue infiltrative process involving the neck and thorax. Extensive diagnostic evaluation including multiple imaging, laboratory, and biopsy studies was nondiagnostic. Due to an urgent need to establish a diagnosis and several previous nondiagnostic biopsies, she was referred to interventional radiology for MRI-guided wire localization immediately prior to open surgical biopsy. Under general anesthesia, wires were placed in the areas of increased T2 signal within the bilateral splenius capitis muscles using intermittent MRI-guidance followed by immediate surgical biopsy down to the wires. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  8. Experimental studies of laser guiding and wake excitation in plasma channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volfbeyn, P.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1998-06-01

    This thesis presents results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor-Heater scheme was proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It made use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort ( 17 W/cm 2 , 75fs laser pulse. The guiding properties and transmission and coupling efficiency were studied as a function of relative position of the channel and the injection pulse focus. Whereas entrance coupling efficiency into the channel was lower than expected, channel coupling to continuum losses were found to be in good agreement with analytical predictions. The authors speculate that increased coupling efficiency can be achieved through better mode matching into the channel. Analytic and numerical one dimensional (1-D), nonrelativistic theory of laser pulse propagation in underdense plasma was presented, in the context of laser wakefield acceleration. The relation between the laser pulse energy depletion, longitudinal laser pulse shape distortion, and changes in the group velocity and center wavelength was explored. 1-D theory was extended to treat the case of a laser exciting a wake in a hollow plasma channel, by making use of an energy conservation argument. Based on the results of this theory, a laser wakefield diagnostic was proposed where, by measuring the changes in phase or spectrum of the driving laser pulse, it is possible to infer the amplitude of the plasma wake

  9. MRI-Guided Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Ntziachristos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the clinical implementation of a novel hybrid system that combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and near-infrared (NIR optical measurements for the noninvasive study of breast cancer in vivo. Fourteen patients were studied with a MR-NIR prototype imager and spectrometer. A diffuse optical tomographic scheme employed the MR images as a priori information to implement an image-guided NIR localized spectroscopic scheme. All patients who entered the study also underwent gadolinium-enhanced MRI and biopsy so that the optical findings were crossvalidated with MR readings and histopathology. The technique quantified the oxy-and deoxyhemoglobin of five malignant and nine benign breast lesions in vivo. Breast cancers were found with decreased oxygen saturation and higher blood concentration than most benign lesions. The average hemoglobin concentration ([H] of cancers was 0.130±0.100 mM, and the average hemoglobin saturation (Y was 60±9% compared to [H]=0.018±0.005 mM and Y=69±6% of background tissue. Fibroadenomas exhibited high hemoglobin concentration [H]=0.060±0.010 mM and mild decrease in oxygen saturation Y=67±2%. Cysts and other normal lesions were easily differentiated based on intrinsic contrast information. This novel optical technology can be a significant add-on in MR examinations and can be used to characterize functional parameters of cancers with diagnostic and treatment prognosis potential. It is foreseen that the technique can play a major role in functional activation studies of brain and muscle as well.

  10. Stability analysis of a deterministic dose calculation for MRI-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelyak, O.; Fallone, B. G.; St-Aubin, J.

    2018-01-01

    Modern effort in radiotherapy to address the challenges of tumor localization and motion has led to the development of MRI guided radiotherapy technologies. Accurate dose calculations must properly account for the effects of the MRI magnetic fields. Previous work has investigated the accuracy of a deterministic linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) solver that includes magnetic field, but not the stability of the iterative solution method. In this work, we perform a stability analysis of this deterministic algorithm including an investigation of the convergence rate dependencies on the magnetic field, material density, energy, and anisotropy expansion. The iterative convergence rate of the continuous and discretized LBTE including magnetic fields is determined by analyzing the spectral radius using Fourier analysis for the stationary source iteration (SI) scheme. The spectral radius is calculated when the magnetic field is included (1) as a part of the iteration source, and (2) inside the streaming-collision operator. The non-stationary Krylov subspace solver GMRES is also investigated as a potential method to accelerate the iterative convergence, and an angular parallel computing methodology is investigated as a method to enhance the efficiency of the calculation. SI is found to be unstable when the magnetic field is part of the iteration source, but unconditionally stable when the magnetic field is included in the streaming-collision operator. The discretized LBTE with magnetic fields using a space-angle upwind stabilized discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) was also found to be unconditionally stable, but the spectral radius rapidly reaches unity for very low-density media and increasing magnetic field strengths indicating arbitrarily slow convergence rates. However, GMRES is shown to significantly accelerate the DFEM convergence rate showing only a weak dependence on the magnetic field. In addition, the use of an angular parallel computing strategy

  11. Corrigendum to "Stability analysis of a deterministic dose calculation for MRI-guided radiotherapy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelyak, Oleksandr; Fallone, B Gino; St-Aubin, Joel

    2018-03-12

    Modern effort in radiotherapy to address the challenges of tumor localization and motion has led to the development of MRI guided radiotherapy technologies. Accurate dose calculations must properly account for the effects of the MRI magnetic fields. Previous work has investigated the accuracy of a deterministic linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) solver that includes magnetic field, but not the stability of the iterative solution method. In this work, we perform a stability analysis of this deterministic algorithm including an investigation of the convergence rate dependencies on the magnetic field, material density, energy, and anisotropy expansion. The iterative convergence rate of the continuous and discretized LBTE including magnetic fields is determined by analyzing the spectral radius using Fourier analysis for the stationary source iteration (SI) scheme. The spectral radius is calculated when the magnetic field is included (1) as a part of the iteration source, and (2) inside the streaming-collision operator. The non-stationary Krylov subspace solver GMRES is also investigated as a potential method to accelerate the iterative convergence, and an angular parallel computing methodology is investigated as a method to enhance the efficiency of the calculation. SI is found to be unstable when the magnetic field is part of the iteration source, but unconditionally stable when the magnetic field is included in the streaming-collision operator. The discretized LBTE with magnetic fields using a space-angle upwind stabilized discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) was also found to be unconditionally stable, but the spectral radius rapidly reaches unity for very low density media and increasing magnetic field strengths indicating arbitrarily slow convergence rates. However, GMRES is shown to significantly accelerate the DFEM convergence rate showing only a weak dependence on the magnetic field. In addition, the use of an angular parallel computing strategy

  12. Stability analysis of a deterministic dose calculation for MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelyak, O; Fallone, B G; St-Aubin, J

    2017-12-14

    Modern effort in radiotherapy to address the challenges of tumor localization and motion has led to the development of MRI guided radiotherapy technologies. Accurate dose calculations must properly account for the effects of the MRI magnetic fields. Previous work has investigated the accuracy of a deterministic linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) solver that includes magnetic field, but not the stability of the iterative solution method. In this work, we perform a stability analysis of this deterministic algorithm including an investigation of the convergence rate dependencies on the magnetic field, material density, energy, and anisotropy expansion. The iterative convergence rate of the continuous and discretized LBTE including magnetic fields is determined by analyzing the spectral radius using Fourier analysis for the stationary source iteration (SI) scheme. The spectral radius is calculated when the magnetic field is included (1) as a part of the iteration source, and (2) inside the streaming-collision operator. The non-stationary Krylov subspace solver GMRES is also investigated as a potential method to accelerate the iterative convergence, and an angular parallel computing methodology is investigated as a method to enhance the efficiency of the calculation. SI is found to be unstable when the magnetic field is part of the iteration source, but unconditionally stable when the magnetic field is included in the streaming-collision operator. The discretized LBTE with magnetic fields using a space-angle upwind stabilized discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) was also found to be unconditionally stable, but the spectral radius rapidly reaches unity for very low-density media and increasing magnetic field strengths indicating arbitrarily slow convergence rates. However, GMRES is shown to significantly accelerate the DFEM convergence rate showing only a weak dependence on the magnetic field. In addition, the use of an angular parallel computing strategy

  13. Highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational control for MRI-guided prostatic thermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Anthony B [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Diederich, Chris J [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nau, William H [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gill, Harcharan [Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Bouley, Donna M [Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Daniel, Bruce [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Rieke, Viola [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Butts, R Kim [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sommer, Graham [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-01-21

    Transurethral ultrasound applicators with highly directional energy deposition and rotational control were investigated for precise treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP). Two types of catheter-based applicators were fabricated, using either sectored tubular (3.5 mm OD x 10 mm) or planar transducers (3.5 mm x 10 mm). They were constructed to be MRI compatible, minimally invasive and allow for manual rotation of the transducer array within a 10 mm cooling balloon. In vivo evaluations of the applicators were performed in canine prostates (n 3) using MRI guidance (0.5 T interventional magnet). MR temperature imaging (MRTI) utilizing the proton resonance frequency shift method was used to acquire multiple-slice temperature overlays in real time for monitoring and guiding the thermal treatments. Post-treatment T1-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride stained tissue sections were used to define regions of tissue coagulation. Single sonications with the tubular applicator ) produced coagulated zones covering a wedge of the prostate extending from 1-2 mm outside the urethra to the outer boundary of the gland (16 mm radial coagulation). Single sonications with the planar applicator (15-20 W, 10 min, {approx}8 MHz) generated thermal lesions of {approx}30 extending to the prostate boundary. Multiple sequential sonications (sweeping) of a planar applicator (12 W with eight rotations of 30 each) demonstrated controllable coagulation of a 270 contiguous section of the prostate extending to the capsule boundary. The feasibility of using highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational capabilities to selectively coagulate regions of the prostate while monitoring and controlling the treatments with MRTI was demonstrated in this study.

  14. Theranostic Gd(III)-lipid microbubbles for MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feshitan, Jameel A; Vlachos, Fotis; Sirsi, Shashank R; Konofagou, Elisa E; Borden, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    We have synthesized a biomaterial consisting of Gd(III) ions chelated to lipid-coated, size-selected microbubbles for utility in both magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging. The macrocyclic ligand DOTA-NHS was bound to PE headgroups on the lipid shell of pre-synthesized microbubbles. Gd(III) was then chelated to DOTA on the microbubble shell. The reaction temperature was optimized to increase the rate of Gd(III) chelation while maintaining microbubble stability. ICP-OES analysis of the microbubbles determined a surface density of 7.5 × 10(5) ± 3.0 × 10(5) Gd(III)/μm(2) after chelation at 50 °C. The Gd(III)-bound microbubbles were found to be echogenic in vivo during high-frequency ultrasound imaging of the mouse kidney. The Gd(III)-bound microbubbles also were characterized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 9.4 T by a spin-echo technique and, surprisingly, both the longitudinal and transverse proton relaxation rates were found to be roughly equal to that of no-Gd(III) control microbubbles and saline. However, the relaxation rates increased significantly, and in a dose-dependent manner, after sonication was used to fragment the Gd(III)-bound microbubbles into non-gas-containing lipid bilayer remnants. The longitudinal (r(1)) and transverse (r(2)) molar relaxivities were 4.0 ± 0.4 and 120 ± 18 mM(-1)s(-1), respectively, based on Gd(III) content. The Gd(III)-bound microbubbles may find application in the measurement of cavitation events during MRI-guided focused ultrasound therapy and to track the biodistribution of shell remnants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Real-time MRI-guided percutaneous sclerotherapy of low-flow head and neck lymphatic malformations in the pediatric population - a stepwise approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partovi, Sasan; Vidal, Lorenna; Lu, Ziang; Nakamoto, Dean A.; Buethe, Ji; Clampitt, Mark; Coffey, Michael; Patel, Indravadan J. [University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Department of Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Real-time MRI-guided percutaneous sclerotherapy is a novel and evolving treatment for congenital lymphatic malformations in the head and neck. We elaborate on the specific steps necessary to perform an MRI-guided percutaneous sclerotherapy of lymphatic malformations including pre-procedure patient work-up and preparation, stepwise intraprocedural interventional techniques and post-procedure management. Based on our institutional experience, MRI-guided sclerotherapy with a doxycycline-gadolinium-based mixture as a sclerosant for lymphatic malformations of the head and neck region in children is well tolerated and effective. (orig.)

  16. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gong

    Full Text Available The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model.

  17. Evaluation of motion measurement using cine MRI for image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy on a new phantom platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Wang, Ziheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy of motion tracking of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. A phantom platform was developed in this work to fulfill the goal. The motion phantom consisted of a platform, a solid thread, a motor and a control system that can simulate motion in various modes. To validate its reproducibility, the phantom platform was setup three times and imaged with fluoroscopy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the same motion profile. After the validation test, the phantom platform was evaluated using cine MRI at 2.5 frames/second on a 1.5T GE scanner using five different artificial profiles and five patient profiles. The above profiles were again measured with EPID fluoroscopy and used as references. Discrepancies between measured profiles from cine MRI and EPID were quantified using root-mean-square (RMS) and standard deviation (SD). Pearson’s product moment correlational analysis was used to test correlation. The standard deviation for the reproducibility test was 0.28 mm. The discrepancies (RMS) between all profiles measured by cine MRI and EPID fluoroscopy ranged from 0.30 to 0.49 mm for artificial profiles and ranged from 0.75 to 0.91 mm for five patient profiles. The cine MRI sequence could precisely track phantom motion and the proposed motion phantom was feasible to evaluate cine MRI accuracy. PMID:29296304

  18. MED101: a laser-plasma simulation code. User guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, P.A.; Rose, S.J.; Rogoyski, A.M.

    1989-12-01

    Complete details for running the 1-D laser-plasma simulation code MED101 are given including: an explanation of the input parameters, instructions for running on the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory IBM, Atlas Centre Cray X-MP and DEC VAX, and information on three new graphics packages. The code, based on the existing MEDUSA code, is capable of simulating a wide range of laser-produced plasma experiments including the calculation of X-ray laser gain. (author)

  19. Laser pulse guiding and electron acceleration in the ablative capillary discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameshima, T.; Kotaki, H.; Kando, M.; Daito, I.; Kawase, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Homma, T.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Chen, L. M.; Kondo, S.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2009-01-01

    The results of experiments are presented for the laser electron acceleration in the ablative capillary discharge plasma. The plasma channel is formed by the discharge inside the ablative capillary. The intense short laser pulse is guided over a 4 cm length. The generated relativistic electrons show both the quasimonoenergetic and quasi-Maxwellian energy spectra, depending on laser and plasma parameters. The analysis of the inner walls of the capillaries that underwent several tens of shots shows that the wall deformation and blistering resulted from the discharge and laser pulse effects.

  20. Self-Guiding of Ultrashort Relativistically Intense Laser Pulses to the Limit of Nonlinear Pump Depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralph, J. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Pak, A. E.; Lu, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Fang, F.; Joshi, C.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.

    2009-01-01

    A study of self-guiding of ultra short, relativistically intense laser pulses is presented. Here, the laser pulse length is on the order of the nonlinear plasma wavelength and the normalized vector potential is greater than one. Self-guiding of ultrashort laser pulses over tens of Rayliegh lengths is possible when driving a highly nonlinear wake. In this case, self-guiding is limited by nonlinear pump depletion. Erosion of the pulse due to diffraction at the head of the laser pulse is minimized for spot sizes close to the blow-out radius. This is due to the slowing of the group velocity of the photons at the head of the laser pulse. Using an approximately 10 TW Ti:Sapphire laser with a pulse length of approximately 50 fs, experimental results are presented showing self-guiding over lengths exceeding 30 Rayliegh lengths in various length Helium gas jets. Fully explicit 3D PIC simulations supporting the experimental results are also presented.

  1. TU-AB-BRA-07: Distortion-Free 3D Diffusion MRI On An MRI-Guided Radiotherapy System for Longitudinal Tumor Response Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Y; Yang, Y; Rangwala, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Hu, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a reliable, 3D distortion-free diffusion MRI technique for longitudinal tumor response assessment and MRI-guided adaptive radiotherapy(RT). Methods: A diffusion prepared 3D turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) sequence in a commercially available diffusion phantom, and one head-and-neck and one brain cancer patient on an MRI-guided RT system (ViewRay). In phantom study, the geometric fidelity was quantified as the ratio between the left-right (RL) and anterior-posterior (AP) dimension. Ten slices were measured on DP-TSE, DW-ssEPI and standard TSE images where the later was used as the geometric reference. ADC accuracy was verified at both 0°C (reference ADC available) and room temperature with a range of diffusivity between 0.35 and 2.0*10"−"3mm"2/s. The ADC reproducibility was assessed based on 8 room-temperature measurements on 6 different days. In the pilot single-slice in-vivo study, CT images were used as the geometric reference, and ADC maps from both diffusion sequences were compared. Results: Distortion and susceptive-related artifact were severe in DW-ssEPI, with significantly lower RL/AP ratio (0.9579±0.0163) than DP-TSE (0.9990±0.0031) and TSE (0.9995±0.0031). ADCs from the two diffusion sequences both matched well with the vendor-provided values at 0°C; however DW-ssEPI fails to provide accurate ADC for high diffusivity vials at room temperature due to high noise level (10 times higher than DP-TSE). The DP-TSE sequence had excellent ADC reproducibility with <4% ADC variation among 8 separate measurements. In patient study, DP-TSE exhibited substantially improved geometric reliability. ROI analysis in ADC maps generated from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI showed <5% difference where high b-value images were excluded from the latter approach due to excessive noise level. Conclusion: A diffusion MRI sequence with excellent

  2. TU-AB-BRA-07: Distortion-Free 3D Diffusion MRI On An MRI-Guided Radiotherapy System for Longitudinal Tumor Response Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y; Yang, Y; Rangwala, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Hu, P [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a reliable, 3D distortion-free diffusion MRI technique for longitudinal tumor response assessment and MRI-guided adaptive radiotherapy(RT). Methods: A diffusion prepared 3D turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) sequence in a commercially available diffusion phantom, and one head-and-neck and one brain cancer patient on an MRI-guided RT system (ViewRay). In phantom study, the geometric fidelity was quantified as the ratio between the left-right (RL) and anterior-posterior (AP) dimension. Ten slices were measured on DP-TSE, DW-ssEPI and standard TSE images where the later was used as the geometric reference. ADC accuracy was verified at both 0°C (reference ADC available) and room temperature with a range of diffusivity between 0.35 and 2.0*10{sup −3}mm{sup 2}/s. The ADC reproducibility was assessed based on 8 room-temperature measurements on 6 different days. In the pilot single-slice in-vivo study, CT images were used as the geometric reference, and ADC maps from both diffusion sequences were compared. Results: Distortion and susceptive-related artifact were severe in DW-ssEPI, with significantly lower RL/AP ratio (0.9579±0.0163) than DP-TSE (0.9990±0.0031) and TSE (0.9995±0.0031). ADCs from the two diffusion sequences both matched well with the vendor-provided values at 0°C; however DW-ssEPI fails to provide accurate ADC for high diffusivity vials at room temperature due to high noise level (10 times higher than DP-TSE). The DP-TSE sequence had excellent ADC reproducibility with <4% ADC variation among 8 separate measurements. In patient study, DP-TSE exhibited substantially improved geometric reliability. ROI analysis in ADC maps generated from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI showed <5% difference where high b-value images were excluded from the latter approach due to excessive noise level. Conclusion: A diffusion MRI sequence with

  3. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Petschow

    Full Text Available Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson's disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels.13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson's disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ and higher (E = 640 mJ target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale.No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson's disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson's disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex.Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson's disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.

  4. Towards real-time plan adaptation for MRI-guided radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kontaxis, Charis

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of hybrid MRI and linear accelerator (MRI-linac) machines enables the online volumetric imaging during radiation delivery with the superior soft tissue contrast of the diagnostic quality MRI. In this context, conventional radiotherapy workflow will gradually transfer from an offline

  5. MRI-guided focused ultrasound thalamotomy in non-ET tremor syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alfonso; Llinas, Maheleth; Munhoz, Renato P; Hlasny, Eugen; Kucharczyk, Walter; Lozano, Andres M

    2017-08-22

    To report the 6-month single-blinded results of unilateral thalamotomy with MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) in patients with tremors other than essential tremor. Three patients with tremor due to Parkinson disease, 2 with dystonic tremor in the context of cervicobrachial dystonia and writer's cramp, and 1 with dystonia gene-associated tremor underwent MRgFUS targeting the ventro-intermedius nucleus (Vim) of the dominant hemisphere. The primary endpoint was the reduction of lateralized items of the Tremor Rating Scale of contralateral hemibody assessed by a blinded rater. All patients achieved a statistically significant, immediate, and sustained improvement of the contralateral tremor score by 42.2%, 52.0%, 55.9%, and 52.9% at 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure, respectively. All patients experienced transient side effects and 2 patients experienced persistent side effects at the time of last evaluation: hemitongue numbness and hemiparesis with hemihypoesthesia. Vim MRgFUS is a promising, incision-free, but nevertheless invasive technique to effectively treat tremors other than essential tremor. Future studies on larger samples and longer follow-up will further define its effectiveness and safety. NCT02252380. This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with tremor not caused by essential tremor, MRgFUS of the Vim improves the tremor of the contralateral hemibody at 6 months. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. A TMS coil positioning/holding system for MR image-guided TMS interleaved with fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohning, Daryl E; Denslow, S; Bohning, P A; Walker, J A; George, M S

    2003-11-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be interleaved with fMRI to visualize regional brain activity in response to direct, non-invasive, cortical stimulation, making it a promising tool for studying brain function. A major practical difficulty is accurately positioning the TMS coil within the MRI scanner for stimulating a particular area of brain cortex. The objective of this work was to design and build a self-contained hardware/software system for MR-guided TMS coil positioning in interleaved TMS/fMRI studies. A compact, manually operated, articulated TMS coil positioner/holder with 6 calibrated degrees of freedom was developed for use inside a cylindrical RF head coil, along with a software package for transforming between MR image coordinates, MR scanner space coordinates, and positioner/holder settings. Phantom calibration studies gave an accuracy for positioning within setups of dx=+/-1.9 mm, dy=+/-1.4 mm, dz=+/-0.8 mm and a precision for multiple setups of dx=+/-0.8 mm, dy=+/-0.1 mm, dz=+/-0.1 mm. This self-contained, integrated MR-guided TMS system for interleaved TMS/fMRI studies provides fast, accurate location of motor cortex stimulation sites traditionally located functionally, and a means of consistent, anatomy-based TMS coil positioning for stimulation of brain areas without overt response.

  7. Signal-inducing bone cements for MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty: evaluation of contrast-agent-based polymethylmethacrylate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bail, Hermann Josef; Tsitsilonis, Serafim; Wichlas, Florian; Sattig, Christoph; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl Mart

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate two signal-inducing bone cements for MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty. The bone cements were made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, 5 ml monomeric, 12 g polymeric) and gadoterate meglumine as a contrast agent (CA, 0-40 μl) with either saline solution (NaCl, 2-4 ml) or hydroxyapatite bone substitute (HA, 2-4 ml). The cement's signal was assessed in an open 1-Tesla MR scanner, with T1W TSE and fast interventional T1W TSE pulse sequences, and the ideal amount of each component was determined. The compressive and bending strength for different amounts of NaCl and HA were evaluated. The cement's MRI signal depended on the concentration of CA, the amount of NaCl or HA, and the pulse sequence. The signal peaks were recorded between 1 and 10 μl CA per ml NaCl or HA, and were higher in fast T1W TSE than in T1W TSE images. The NaCl-PMMA-CA cements had a greater MRI signal intensity and compressive strength; the HA-PMMA-CA cements had a superior bending strength. Concerning the MR signal and biomechanical properties, these cements would permit MRI-guided cementoplasty. Due to its higher signal and greater compressive strength, the NaCl-PMMA-CA compound appears to be superior to the HA-PMMA-CA compound. (orig.)

  8. Robust remote-pumping sodium laser for advanced LIDAR and guide star applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstberger, Bernhard; Enderlein, Martin; Friedenauer, Axel; Schwerdt, Robin; Wei, Daoping; Karpov, Vladimir; Leisching, Patrick; Clements, Wallace R. L.; Kaenders, Wilhelm G.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of large ground-based optical telescopes is limited due to wavefront distortions induced by atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics systems using natural guide stars with sufficient brightness provide a practical way for correcting the wavefront errors by means of deformable mirrors. Unfortunately, the sky coverage of bright stars is poor and therefore the concept of laser guide stars was invented, creating an artificial star by exciting resonance fluorescence from the mesospheric sodium layer about 90 km above the earth's surface. Until now, mainly dye lasers or sumfrequency mixing of solid state lasers were used to generate laser guide stars. However, these kinds of lasers require a stationary laser clean room for operation and are extremely demanding in maintenance. Under a development contract with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO), TOPTICA Photonics AG and its partner MPB Communications have finalized the development of a next-generation sodium guide star laser system which is available now as a commercial off-the-shelf product. The laser is based on a narrow-band diode laser, Raman fiber amplifier (RFA) technology and resonant second-harmonic generation (SHG), thus highly reliable and simple to operate and maintain. It emits > 22 W of narrow-linewidth (≈ 5 MHz) continuous-wave radiation at sodium resonance and includes a re-pumping scheme for boosting sodium return flux. Due to the SHG resonator acting as spatial mode filter and polarizer, the output is diffraction-limited with RMS wavefront error concept of line-replaceable units (LRU). A comprehensive system software, as well as an intuitive service GUI, allow for remote control and error tracking down to at least the LRU level. In case of a failure, any LRU can be easily replaced. With these fiber-based guide star lasers, TOPTICA for the first time offers a fully engineered, off-the-shelf guide star laser system for groundbased optical telescopes

  9. Multicentre treatment planning study of MRI-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison between tandem-ovoid applicator users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomden, Christel N.; Leeuw, Astrid A.C. de; Van Limbergen, Erik; Brabandere, Marisol de; Nulens, An; Nout, Remi A.; Laman, Mirjam; Ketelaars, Martijn; Lutgens, Ludovicus; Reniers, Brigitte; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina Maria

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare MRI-guided treatment planning approaches between four centres that use tandem-ovoid applicators. Material and methods: Four centres generated three treatment plans for four patients: standard, optimised intracavitary, and optimised intracavitary/interstitial. Prescribed D90 High-Risk CTV (HR-CTV) was 85 Gy EQD2 (external-beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy), while the D 2cc OAR limit was 90 Gy EQD2 for bladder and 75 Gy EQD2 for rectum, sigmoid, and bowel, respectively. DVH-parameters, source loading patterns and spatial dose distributions of the three treatment plans were compared. Results: The standard plans of the different centres were comparable with respect to the D90 HR-CTV, but differed in OAR doses. MRI-guided intracavitary optimisation resulted in organ sparing and smaller variation in DVH parameters between the centres. Adding interstitial needles led to target dose escalation while respecting the OAR constraints. However, substantial differences in relative weights of the applicator parts resulted in an increased variation in DVH parameters and locations of high dose regions. Conclusions: MRI-guided brachytherapy treatment planning optimisation provides the possibility to increase the dose to the HR-CTV and spare the OARs. Depending on the degree of conformity the centres make different choices in relative weighting of applicator parts, leading to different dose distributions

  10. The Laser Guide Star System for Adaptive Optics at Subaru Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Y.; Saito, Y.; Ito, M.; Saito, N.; Akagawa, K.; Takazawa, A.; Ito, M.; Wada, S.; Takami, H.; Iye, M.

    We report on the current status of developing the new laser guide star (LGS) system for the Subaru adaptive optics (AO) system. We have three major subsystems: the laser unit, the relay optical fiber and the laser launching telescope. A 4W-class all-solid-state 589nm laser has been developed as a light source for sodium laser guide star. We use two mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers operated at the wavelength of 1064nm and 1319nm to generate sum-frequency conversion into 589nm. The side-LD pumped configuration is used for the mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers. We have carefully considered the thermal lens effect in the cavity to achieve a high beam quality with TEM00; M2 = 1.06. The mode-locked frequency is selected at 143 MHz. We obtained the output powers of 16.5 W and 5.0 W at 1064nm and 1319 nm. Sum frequency generated by mixing two synchronized Nd:YAG mode-locked pulsed beams is precisely tuned to the sodium D2 line by thermal control of the etalon in the 1064nm Nd:YAG laser by observing the maximum fluorescence intensity of heated sodium vapor cell. The maximum output power at 589.159 nm reaches to 4.6 W using a PPMgOSLT crystal as a nonlinear optical crystal. And the output power can be maintained within a stability of +/- 1.2% for more than 3 days without optical damage. We developed a single-mode photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to relay the laser beam from laser clean room, in which the laser unit is located on the Nasmyth platform, to the laser launching telescope mounted behind the secondary mirror of Subaru Telescope. The photonic crystal fiber has solid pure silica core with the mode field diameter of 14 micron, which is relatively larger than that of the conventional step-index type single mode fiber. The length of the PCF is 35m and transmission loss due to the pure silica is 10dB/km at 589nm, which means PCF transmits 92% of the laser beam. We have preliminary achieved 75% throughput in total. Small mode-locked pulse width in time allows us to transmit the high

  11. Daily Tracking of Glioblastoma Resection Cavity, Cerebral Edema, and Tumor Volume with MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shahil; Gajjar, Shefali R; Padgett, Kyle R; Asher, David; Stoyanova, Radka; Ford, John C; Mellon, Eric A

    2018-03-19

    Radiation therapy (RT) plays a critical role in the treatment of glioblastoma. Studies of brain imaging during RT for glioblastoma have demonstrated changes in the brain during RT. However, frequent or daily utilization of standalone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans during RT have limited feasibility. The recent release of the tri-cobalt-60 MRI-guided RT (MR-IGRT) device (ViewRay MRIdian, Cleveland, OH) allows for daily brain MRI for the RT setup. Daily MRI of three postoperative patients undergoing RT and temozolomide for glioblastoma over a six-week course allowed for the identification of changes to the cavity, edema, and visible tumor on a daily basis. The volumes and dimensions of the resection cavities, edema, and T2-hyperintense tumor were measured. A general trend of daily decreases in cavity measurements was observed in all patients. For the one patient with edema, a trend of daily increases followed by a trend of daily decreases were observed. These results suggest that daily MRI could be used for onboard resimulation and adaptive RT for future fluctuations in the sizes of brain tumors, cavities, or cystic components. This could improve tumor targeting and reduce RT of healthy brain tissue.

  12. A dual-mode hemispherical sparse array for 3D passive acoustic mapping and skull localization within a clinical MRI guided focused ultrasound device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Brinker, Spencer T.; Coviello, Christian M.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2018-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that passive acoustic imaging may be used alongside MRI for monitoring of focused ultrasound therapy. However, past implementations have generally made use of either linear arrays originally designed for diagnostic imaging or custom narrowband arrays specific to in-house therapeutic transducer designs, neither of which is fully compatible with clinical MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) devices. Here we have designed an array which is suitable for use within an FDA-approved MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound device, within the bore of a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The array is constructed from 5  ×  0.4 mm piezoceramic disc elements arranged in pseudorandom fashion on a low-profile laser-cut acrylic frame designed to fit between the therapeutic elements of a 230 kHz InSightec ExAblate 4000 transducer. By exploiting thickness and radial resonance modes of the piezo discs the array is capable of both B-mode imaging at 5 MHz for skull localization, as well as passive reception at the second harmonic of the therapy array for detection of cavitation and 3D passive acoustic imaging. In active mode, the array was able to perform B-mode imaging of a human skull, showing the outer skull surface with good qualitative agreement with MR imaging. Extension to 3D showed the array was able to locate the skull within  ±2 mm/2° of reference points derived from MRI, which could potentially allow registration of a patient to the therapy system without the expense of real-time MRI. In passive mode, the array was able to resolve a point source in 3D within a  ±10 mm region about each axis from the focus, detect cavitation (SNR ~ 12 dB) at burst lengths from 10 cycles to continuous wave, and produce 3D acoustic maps in a flow phantom. Finally, the array was used to detect and map cavitation associated with microbubble activity in the brain in nonhuman primates.

  13. Accuracy of applicator tip reconstruction in MRI-guided interstitial 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy of liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wybranski, Christian; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Fischbach, Katharina; Fischbach, Frank; Walke, Mathias; Hass, Peter; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Kosiek, Ortrud; Kaiser, Mandy; Pech, Maciej; Lüdemann, Lutz; Ricke, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the reconstruction accuracy of brachytherapy (BT) applicators tips in vitro and in vivo in MRI-guided 192 Ir-high-dose-rate (HDR)-BT of inoperable liver tumors. Materials and methods: Reconstruction accuracy of plastic BT applicators, visualized by nitinol inserts, was assessed in MRI phantom measurements and in MRI 192 Ir-HDR-BT treatment planning datasets of 45 patients employing CT co-registration and vector decomposition. Conspicuity, short-term dislocation, and reconstruction errors were assessed in the clinical data. The clinical effect of applicator reconstruction accuracy was determined in follow-up MRI data. Results: Applicator reconstruction accuracy was 1.6 ± 0.5 mm in the phantom measurements. In the clinical MRI datasets applicator conspicuity was rated good/optimal in ⩾72% of cases. 16/129 applicators showed not time dependent deviation in between MRI/CT acquisition (p > 0.1). Reconstruction accuracy was 5.5 ± 2.8 mm, and the average image co-registration error was 3.1 ± 0.9 mm. Vector decomposition revealed no preferred direction of reconstruction errors. In the follow-up data deviation of planned dose distribution and irradiation effect was 6.9 ± 3.3 mm matching the mean co-registration error (6.5 ± 2.5 mm; p > 0.1). Conclusion: Applicator reconstruction accuracy in vitro conforms to AAPM TG 56 standard. Nitinol-inserts are feasible for applicator visualization and yield good conspicuity in MRI treatment planning data. No preferred direction of reconstruction errors were found in vivo

  14. Fiber-Based 589 nm Laser for Sodium Guide Star

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nilsson, Lars J; Jeong, Yoonchan; Dupriez, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    ...: The work will entail the construction of the required sub-assemblies, their integration into the laser source, and the exploration and adjustment of parameters in order to obtain adequate performance...

  15. High power radiation guiding systems for laser driven accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutolo, A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the main problems encountered in the design of an optical system for transmitting high fluence radiation in a laser driven accelerator. Particular attention is devoted to the analysis of mirror and waveguide systems. (orig.)

  16. Application of a Complex Lead Compensator for a Laser Guided Missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhila, M. R.; Gopika, S.; Abraham, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of a lead compensator with complex pole and complex zero for a missile. It is compared with a lead compensator with real pole and real zero. A typical laser guided missile control system is considered for the performance comparison of both the compensators. Simulation studies carried out with MATLAB brings out the scope of using complex compensator in missile guided systems.

  17. Image-guided spinal injection procedures in open high-field MRI with vertical field orientation: feasibility and technical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, F.; Walter, T.; Wonneberger, U.; Wagner, M.; Hermann, K.G.; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U. [Charite, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Chopra, S. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Wichlas, F. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    We prospectively evaluated the feasibility and technical features of MR-guided lumbosacral injection procedures in open high-field MRI at 1.0 T. In a CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O phantom and five human cadaveric spines, fluoroscopy sequences (proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE), T1w TSE, T2w TSE; balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), T1w gradient echo (GE), T2w GE) were evaluated using two MRI-compatible 20-G Chiba-type needles. Artefacts were analysed by varying needle orientation to B{sub 0}, frequency-encoding direction and slice orientation. Image quality was described using the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Subsequently, a total of 183 MR-guided nerve root (107), facet (53) and sacroiliac joint (23) injections were performed in 53 patients. In vitro, PDw TSE sequence yielded the best needle-tissue contrasts (CNR = 45, 18, 15, 9, and 8 for needle vs. fat, muscle, root, bone and sclerosis, respectively) and optimal artefact sizes (width and tip shift less than 5 mm). In vivo, PDw TSE sequence was sufficient in all cases. The acquisition time of 2 s facilitated near-real-time MRI guidance. Drug delivery was technically successful in 100% (107/107), 87% (46/53) and 87% (20/23) of nerve root, facet and sacroiliac joint injections, respectively. No major complications occurred. The mean procedure time was 29 min (range 19-67 min). MR-guided spinal injections in open high-field MRI are feasible and accurate using fast TSE sequence designs. (orig.)

  18. Clinical utility of an endorectal MRI-guided prostate probe: preliminary examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tödter Julia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most common cancer diseases in men in the western countries [1]. Besides the palpation, and the amount of prostate-specific-antigen’s (PSA inside the blood, the current diagnostic imaging technologies are not appropriate. Early diagnosis defining the exact tumor location, spread and margins could make efficient targeted biopsies and image-guided surgery. A multimodal imaging technique containing a transmit-receive surface coil for anatomical MR imaging, a (SPET detector module, consisting of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM, for functional imaging and an ultrasound (US probe are placed as close as possible to the prostate designed as an endorectal tube to increase sensitivity and spatial resolution. All materials that are used are non-magnetic. Advantages of the SiPM are diversified, like non-sensitive to magnetic fields, higher gain (105–106 than standard avalanche photodiodes (APD, good timing properties and compactness. The PET detector should reach approximately 1mm3 spatial resolution together with 60ps FWHM Time-of-Flight resolution and a high efficiency to reduce scanning time and injected dose. A home-made transmit-receive coil surrounding the PET module improves signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR with respect to standard coils will be present. The system will be used as a MRI-insert and be able to visualize anatomic and metabolic information together. The US-probe is guiding examination for correct overlapping of the multimodal images. This procedure will save time, costs and the need of co-registration. By combining all advantages of each system, it will necessarily update the non-invasive treatment of PCa. The system is adapted and tested to a 3 Tesla MR scanner called Trio A Tim system and Allegra system from the company Siemens healthcare with a larmor frequency of 123.2 MHz and an input of 50 Ω free from artifacts. First results on homogeneity of the transmit-receive coil will be presented. Preliminary

  19. GeV electron beams from centimeter-scale channel guided laser wakefield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsalves, A.; Nakamura, K.; Panasenko, D.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder; Hooker, S.M.; Leemans, W.P.; Hooker, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented on the generation of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energy up to 1 GeV using a 40TW laser and a 3.3 cm-long hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. Electron beams were not observed without a plasma channel, indicating that self-focusing alone could not be relied upon for effective guiding of the laser pulse. Results are presented of the electron beam spectra, and the dependence of the reliability of producing electron beams as a function of laser and plasma parameters

  20. Magnetization curves of sintered heavy tungsten alloys for applications in MRI-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Bradley M.; Keall, Paul J.; Horvat, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current interest in MRI-guided radiotherapy, the magnetic properties of the materials commonly used in radiotherapy are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, measurement results for the magnetization (BH) curves of a range of sintered heavy tungsten alloys used in radiation shielding and collimation are presented. Methods: Sintered heavy tungsten alloys typically contain >90 % tungsten and 0 and the BH curve derived. Results: The iron content of the alloys was found to play a dominant role, directly influencing the magnetizationM and thus the nonlinearity of the BH curve. Generally, the saturation magnetization increased with increasing iron content of the alloy. Furthermore, no measurable magnetization was found for all alloys without iron content, despite containing up to 6% of nickel. For two samples from different manufacturers but with identical quoted nominal elemental composition (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe), a relative difference in the magnetization of 11%–16% was measured. Conclusions: The measured curves show that the magnetic properties of sintered heavy tungsten alloys strongly depend on the iron content, whereas the addition of nickel in the absence of iron led to no measurable effect. Since a difference in the BH curves for two samples with identical quoted nominal composition from different manufacturers was observed, measuring of the BH curve for each individual batch of heavy tungsten alloys is advisable whenever accurate knowledge of the magnetic properties is crucial. The obtained BH curves can be used in FEM simulations to predict the magnetic impact of sintered heavy tungsten alloys

  1. SU-F-J-110: MRI-Guided Single-Session Simulation, Online Adaptation, and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P; Geurts, M; Mittauer, K; Bayouth, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a combined simulation and treatment workflow for MRI-guided radiation therapy using the ViewRay treatment planning and delivery system. Methods: Several features of the ViewRay MRIdian planning and treatment workflows are used to simulate and treat patients that require emergent radiotherapy. A simple “pre-plan” is created on diagnostic imaging retrieved from radiology PACS, where conformal fields are created to target a volume defined by a physician based on review of the diagnostic images and chart notes. After initial consult in radiation oncology, the patient is brought to the treatment room, immobilized, and imaged in treatment position with a volumetric MR. While the patient rests on the table, the pre-plan is applied to the treatment planning MR and dose is calculated in the treatment geometry. After physician review, modification of the plan may include updating the target definition, redefining fields, or re-balancing beam weights. Once an acceptable treatment plan is finalized and approved, the patient is treated. Results: Careful preparation and judicious choices in the online planning process allow conformal treatment plans to be created and delivered in a single, thirty-minute session. Several advantages have been identified using this process as compared to conventional urgent CT simulation and delivery. Efficiency gains are notable, as physicians appreciate the predictable time commitment and patient waiting time for treatment is decreased. MR guidance in a treatment position offers both enhanced contrast for target delineation and reduction of setup uncertainties. The MRIdian system tools designed for adaptive radiotherapy are particularly useful, enabling plan changes to be made in minutes. Finally, the resulting plans, typically 6 conformal beams, are delivered as quickly as more conventional AP/PA beam arrangements with comparatively superior dose distributions. Conclusion: The ViewRay treatment planning software and

  2. MO-FG-BRA-07: Theranostic Gadolinium-Based AGuIX Nanoparticles for MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detappe, A; Rottmann, J; Kunjachan, S; Berbeco, R; Tillement, O

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: AGuIX are gadolinium-based nanoparticles, initially developed for MRI, that have a potential role in radiation therapy as a radiosensitizer. Our goal is to demonstrate that these nanoparticles can both be used as an MRI contrast agent, as well as to obtain local dose enhancement in a pancreatic tumor when delivered in combination with an external beam irradiation. Methods: We performed in vitro cell uptake and radiosensitization studies of a pancreatic cancer cell line in a low energy (220kVp) beam, a standard clinical 6MV beam (STD) and a flattening filter free clinical 6MV beam (FFF). After injection of 40mM of nanoparticles, a biodistribution study was performed in vivo on mice with subcutaneous xenograft pancreatic tumors. In vivo radiation therapy studies were performed at the time point of maximum tumor uptake. Results: The concentration of AGuIX nanoparticles in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells, determined in vitro by MRI and ICPMS, peaks after 30 minutes with 0.3% of the initial concentration (5mg/g). Clonogenic assays show a significant effect (p<0.05) when the AGuIX are coupled with MV photon irradiation (DEF20%=1.31). Similar AGuIX tumor uptake is found in vivo by both MRI and ICPMS 30 minutes after intravenous injection. For long term survival studies, the choice of the radiation dose is determined with 5 control groups (3mice/group) irradiated with 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20Gy. Afterwards, 4 groups (8mice/group) are used to evaluate the effect of the nanoparticles. A Logrank test is performed as a statistical test to evaluate the effect of the nanoparticles. Conclusion: The combination of the MRI contrast and radiosensitization properties of gadolinium nanoparticles reveals a strong potential for usage with MRI-guided radiation therapy

  3. Calibration method for a vision guiding-based laser-tracking measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Mingwei; Wei, Zhenzhong; Hu, Mengjie; Zhang, Guangjun

    2015-01-01

    Laser-tracking measurement systems (laser trackers) based on a vision-guiding device are widely used in industrial fields, and their calibration is important. As conventional methods typically have many disadvantages, such as difficult machining of the target and overdependence on the retroreflector, a novel calibration method is presented in this paper. The retroreflector, which is necessary in the normal calibration method, is unnecessary in our approach. As the laser beam is linear, points on the beam can be obtained with the help of a normal planar target. In this way, we can determine the function of a laser beam under the camera coordinate system, while its corresponding function under the laser-tracker coordinate system can be obtained from the encoder of the laser tracker. Clearly, when several groups of functions are confirmed, the rotation matrix can be solved from the direction vectors of the laser beams in different coordinate systems. As the intersection of the laser beams is the origin of the laser-tracker coordinate system, the translation matrix can also be determined. Our proposed method not only achieves the calibration of a single laser-tracking measurement system but also provides a reference for the calibration of a multistation system. Simulations to evaluate the effects of some critical factors were conducted. These simulations show the robustness and accuracy of our method. In real experiments, the root mean square error of the calibration result reached 1.46 mm within a range of 10 m, even though the vision-guiding device focuses on a point approximately 5 m away from the origin of its coordinate system, with a field of view of approximately 200 mm  ×  200 mm. (paper)

  4. The relationship between optical guiding and the relative phase in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, H.P.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between the relative phase and optical guiding in the free-electron laser is studied. The relative phase in this case is defined as the shift in the wavenumber from the vacuum value integrated over the interaction length. In terms of the optical guiding of the signal in free-electron lasers, the relative phase must be positive in order for refractive guiding of the signal to occur. The relative phase is studied from the standpoint of the linear stability analysis in both the high- and low-gain regimes, and the qualitative implications in each of these regimes of the relative phase on the refractive guiding of the signal are identical. Specifically, the relative phase is found to be negative at the low-frequency over this band until it turns positive at a frequency approximately 10% below the frequency of peak gain. Thus optical guiding is indicated over a large portion, but not all, of the gain band. A quantitative measure of the optical guiding of the signal is obtained by an analytic formulation of the guiding of the signal. This formulation is based upon a separable beam approximation in which the evolution of the signal is determined by a Green's function analysis. The specific example of interest involves the low-gain regime prior to saturation. In this case, it is shown that the analytic result is in substantial agreement with the calculation of the relative phase

  5. Workflow optimisation for multimodal imaging procedures: a case of combined X-ray and MRI-guided TACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Gutiérrez, Fabiola; Wolska-Krawczyk, Malgorzata; Buecker, Arno; Houston, J Graeme; Melzer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    This study presents a framework for workflow optimisation of multimodal image-guided procedures (MIGP) based on discrete event simulation (DES). A case of a combined X-Ray and magnetic resonance image-guided transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) is presented to illustrate the application of this method. We used a ranking and selection optimisation algorithm to measure the performance of a number of proposed alternatives to improve a current scenario. A DES model was implemented with detail data collected from 59 TACE procedures and durations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnostic procedures usually performed in a common MRI suite. Fourteen alternatives were proposed and assessed to minimise the waiting times and improve workflow. Data analysis observed an average of 20.68 (7.68) min of waiting between angiography and MRI for TACE patients in 71.19% of the cases. Following the optimisation analysis, an alternative was identified to reduce waiting times in angiography suite up to 48.74%. The model helped to understand and detect 'bottlenecks' during multimodal TACE procedures, identifying a better alternative to the current workflow and reducing waiting times. Simulation-based workflow analysis provides a cost-effective way to face some of the challenges of introducing MIGP in clinical radiology, highligthed in this study.

  6. Ultrasound imaging-guided intracardiac injection to develop a mouse model of breast cancer brain metastases followed by longitudinal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heling; Zhao, Dawen

    2014-03-06

    Breast cancer brain metastasis, occurring in 30% of breast cancer patients at stage IV, is associated with high mortality. The median survival is only 6 months. It is critical to have suitable animal models to mimic the hemodynamic spread of the metastatic cells in the clinical scenario. Here, we are introducing the use of small animal ultrasound imaging to guide an accurate injection of brain tropical breast cancer cells into the left ventricle of athymic nude mice. Longitudinal MRI is used to assessing intracranial initiation and growth of brain metastases. Ultrasound-guided intracardiac injection ensures not only an accurate injection and hereby a higher successful rate but also significantly decreased mortality rate, as compared to our previous manual procedure. In vivo high resolution MRI allows the visualization of hyperintense multifocal lesions, as small as 310 µm in diameter on T2-weighted images at 3 weeks post injection. Follow-up MRI reveals intracranial tumor growth and increased number of metastases that distribute throughout the whole brain.

  7. MRI-guided trephine biopsy and fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of bone lesions in low-field (0.23 T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Klemola, Rauli; Ojala, Risto; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo; Lappi-Blanco, Elisa; Soini, Ylermi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI-guided bone biopsy with optical instrument tracking and evaluate advantage of combined fine-needle aspiration (FNA) with trephine biopsy. Twenty trephine bone biopsies and 13 FNAs were performed under MRI and CT guidance in 14 patients. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The evaluation of diagnostic accuracy was achieved by comparing the histopathological and cytological diagnosis with current or final diagnosis made during 6-month clinical follow-up. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Marconi Medical Systems, Cleveland, Ohio) was used. A surface coil was used. For trephine biopsy MRI-compatible bone biopsy set (Daum medical, Schwerin, Germany) was used. The FNA was performed with MRI compatible 20-G needle (Cook, Bloomington, Ind.). The diagnostic accuracy of MRI-guided trephine biopsy was 95%. The FNA sample diagnosis concurred with the histological in 54%. Our results show that MRI guidance in bone biopsies is accurate and safe. It is comparable to CT-guided or open biopsy. The role of combined FNA with bone biopsies remains controversial. (orig.)

  8. Laser guided automated calibrating system for accurate bracket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is widely recognized that accurate bracket placement is of critical importance in the efficient application of biomechanics and in realizing the full potential of a preadjusted edgewise appliance. Aim: The purpose of ... placement. Keywords: Hough transforms, Indirect bonding technique, Laser, Orthodontic bracket placement ...

  9. Laser Guided Automated Calibrating System for Accurate Bracket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The basic premise of preadjusted bracket system is accurate bracket positioning. ... using MATLAB ver. 7 software (The MathWorks Inc.). These images are in the form of matrices of size 640 × 480. 650 nm (red light) type III diode laser is used as ... motion control and Pitch, Yaw, Roll degrees of freedom (DOF).

  10. Wavefront-guided versus standard laser in situ keratomileusis to correct low to moderate myopia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijts, R.M.; Nabar, V.A.; Hament, W.J.; Eggink, F.A.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the 6-month refractive outcomes of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) (Zyoptix, Bausch & Lomb) versus standard LASIK (PlanoScan, Bausch & Lomb).Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.In a prospective randomized study,

  11. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of the Laser Beam Waist on Cold Atom Guiding Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Hu, Di; Xu, Xiaobin; Li, Wei; Lu, Xiangxiang; Song, Yitong

    2018-02-28

    The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the vertical guiding laser beam waist on cold atom guiding efficiency. In this study, a double magneto-optical trap (MOT) apparatus is used. With an unbalanced force in the horizontal direction, a cold atomic beam is generated by the first MOT. The cold atoms enter the second chamber and are then re-trapped and cooled by the second MOT. By releasing a second atom cloud, the process of transferring the cold atoms from MOT to the dipole trap, which is formed by a red-detuned converged 1064-nm laser, is experimentally demonstrated. And after releasing for 20 ms, the atom cloud is guided to a distance of approximately 3 mm. As indicated by the results, the guiding efficiency depends strongly on the laser beam waist; the efficiency reaches a maximum when the waist radius ( w ₀) of the laser is in the range of 15 to 25 μm, while the initial atom cloud has a radius of 133 μm. Additionally, the properties of the atoms inside the dipole potential trap, such as the distribution profile and lifetime, are deduced from the fluorescence images.

  12. Wireless guided wave and impedance measurement using laser and piezoelectric transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun-Jun; Sohn, Hoon; Yun, Chung-Bang; Chung, Joseph; Lee, Michael M S

    2012-01-01

    Guided-wave- and impedance-based structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques have gained much attention due to their high sensitivity to small defects. One of the popular devices commonly used for guided wave and impedance measurements is a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer. This study proposes a new wireless scheme where the power and data required for PZT excitation and sensing are transmitted via laser. First, a modulated laser beam is wirelessly transmitted to the photodiode connected to a PZT on a structure. Then, the photodiode converts the laser light into an electric signal, and it is applied to the PZT for excitation. The corresponding responses, impedance at the same PZT or guided waves at another PZT, are measured, re-converted into laser light, and wirelessly transmitted back to the other photodiode located in the data interrogator for signal processing. The feasibility of the proposed wireless guided wave and impedance measurement schemes has been examined through circuit analyses and experimentally investigated in a laboratory setup. (paper)

  13. Implementing MRI-based target delineation for cervical cancer treatment within a rapid workflow environment for image-guided brachytherapy: A practical approach for centers without in-room MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Feuerlein, Sebastian; Kim, Taeho; Garda, Allison; Watkins, W Tyler; Erickson, Sarah; Ornan, Afshan; Showalter, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based intracavitary brachytherapy offers several advantages over computed tomography (CT)-based brachytherapy, but many centers are unable to offer it at the time of brachytherapy because of logistic and/or financial considerations. We have implemented a method of integrating MRI into a CT-guided, high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy workflow in clinics that do not have immediately available MRI capability. At our institution, patients receiving high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy as a component of the definitive treatment of cervical cancer have a Smit sleeve placed during the first brachytherapy fraction in a dedicated suite with in-room CT-on-rails. After the first fraction of brachytherapy, an MRI is obtained with the Smit sleeve, but no applicator, in place. For each subsequent fraction, CT scans are coregistered to the MRI scan by the Smit sleeve. The gross target volume is defined by MRI and overlaid on the CT images for each brachytherapy treatment for dose optimization. This MRI-integrated workflow adds workflow is a feasible compromise to preserve an efficient workflow while integrating MRI target delineation, and it provides many of the advantages of both MRI- and CT-based brachytherapy. The future collection and analysis of clinical data will serve to compare the proposed approach to non-MRI containing techniques. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Positive Outcome of MRI-Guided Vacuum Assisted Core Needle Breast Biopsies Is Not Influenced by a Prior Negative Targeted Second-Look Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Romuald; AlSharif, Shaza; Aldis, Ann; Mesurolle, Benoît

    2017-11-01

    The study sought to investigate the outcome of breast magnetic resonance-guided biopsies as a function of the indication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the MRI features of the lesions, and the performance or not of a targeted second-look ultrasound (SLUS) prior breast MRI-guided biopsy. We identified 158 women with MRI-detected breast lesions scheduled for MRI-guided biopsy (2007-2013). Patient demographics, performance of targeted SLUS, imaging characteristics, and subsequent pathology results were reviewed. Three biopsies were deferred, and 155 lesions were biopsied under MRI guidance (155 women; median age 55.14 years; range 27-80 years). Ninety-eight women underwent a SLUS prior to the MRI-guided biopsy (63%). Of the 155 biopsied lesions, 23 (15%) were malignant, 106 (68%) were benign, and 26 (17%) were high risk. Four of 15 surgically excised high-risk lesions were upgraded to malignancy (27%). Most of the biopsied lesions corresponded to non-mass-like enhancement (81%, 126 of 155) and most of the biopsies (52%, 81 of 155) were performed in a screening context. No demographic or MRI features were associated with malignancy. No differences were noted between the 2 subgroups (prior SLUS vs no prior SLUS) except for the presence of a synchronous carcinoma associated with a likelihood of targeted SLUS before MRI-guided biopsy (P = .001). A negative SLUS does not influence the pathology outcome of a suspicious lesion biopsied under MR guidance. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-02: Audiovisual Biofeedback Guided Respiratory-Gated MRI: An Investigation of Tumor Definition and Scan Time for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [Virginia Commonwealth University, Glen Allen, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Breathing consistency variations can cause respiratory-related motion blurring and artifacts and increase in MRI scan time due to inadequate respiratory-gating and discarding of breathing cycles. In a previous study the concept of audiovisual biofeedback (AV) guided respiratory-gated MRI was tested with healthy volunteers and it demonstrated image quality improvement on anatomical structures and scan time reduction. This study tests the applicability of AV-guided respiratorygated MRI for lung cancer in a prospective patient study. Methods: Image quality and scan time were investigated in thirteen lung cancer patients who underwent two 3T MRI sessions. In the first MRI session (pre-treatment), respiratory-gated MR images with free breathing (FB) and AV were acquired at inhalation and exhalation. An RF navigator placed on the liver dome was employed for the respiratory-gated MRI. This was repeated in the second MRI session (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were delineated on each dataset. FB and AV were compared in terms of (1) tumor definition assessed by lung tumor contours and (2) intra-patient scan time variation using the total image acquisition time of inhalation and exhalation datasets from the first and second MRI sessions across 13 lung cancer patients. Results: Compared to FB AV-guided respiratory-gated MRI improved image quality for contouring tumors with sharper boundaries and less blurring resulted in the improvement of tumor definition. Compared to FB the variation of intra-patient scan time with AV was reduced by 48% (p<0.001) from 54 s to 28 s. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that AV-guided respiratorygated MRI improved the quality of tumor images and fixed tumor definition for lung cancer. These results suggest that audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance has the potential to control breathing for adequate respiratory-gating for lung cancer imaging and radiotherapy.

  16. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-02: Audiovisual Biofeedback Guided Respiratory-Gated MRI: An Investigation of Tumor Definition and Scan Time for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing consistency variations can cause respiratory-related motion blurring and artifacts and increase in MRI scan time due to inadequate respiratory-gating and discarding of breathing cycles. In a previous study the concept of audiovisual biofeedback (AV) guided respiratory-gated MRI was tested with healthy volunteers and it demonstrated image quality improvement on anatomical structures and scan time reduction. This study tests the applicability of AV-guided respiratorygated MRI for lung cancer in a prospective patient study. Methods: Image quality and scan time were investigated in thirteen lung cancer patients who underwent two 3T MRI sessions. In the first MRI session (pre-treatment), respiratory-gated MR images with free breathing (FB) and AV were acquired at inhalation and exhalation. An RF navigator placed on the liver dome was employed for the respiratory-gated MRI. This was repeated in the second MRI session (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were delineated on each dataset. FB and AV were compared in terms of (1) tumor definition assessed by lung tumor contours and (2) intra-patient scan time variation using the total image acquisition time of inhalation and exhalation datasets from the first and second MRI sessions across 13 lung cancer patients. Results: Compared to FB AV-guided respiratory-gated MRI improved image quality for contouring tumors with sharper boundaries and less blurring resulted in the improvement of tumor definition. Compared to FB the variation of intra-patient scan time with AV was reduced by 48% (p<0.001) from 54 s to 28 s. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that AV-guided respiratorygated MRI improved the quality of tumor images and fixed tumor definition for lung cancer. These results suggest that audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance has the potential to control breathing for adequate respiratory-gating for lung cancer imaging and radiotherapy.

  17. High-risk lesions diagnosed at MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: can underestimation be predicted?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crystal, Pavel [Mount Sinai Hospital, University Health Network, Division of Breast Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sadaf, Arifa; Bukhanov, Karina; Helbich, Thomas H. [Mount Sinai Hospital, University Health Network, Division of Breast Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); McCready, David [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Surgical Oncology, Toronto, ON (Canada); O' Malley, Frances [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology, Laboratory Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    To evaluate the frequency of diagnosis of high-risk lesions at MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (MRgVABB) and to determine whether underestimation may be predicted. Retrospective review of the medical records of 161 patients who underwent MRgVABB was performed. The underestimation rate was defined as an upgrade of a high-risk lesion at MRgVABB to malignancy at surgery. Clinical data, MRI features of the biopsied lesions, and histological diagnosis of cases with and those without underestimation were compared. Of 161 MRgVABB, histology revealed 31 (19%) high-risk lesions. Of 26 excised high-risk lesions, 13 (50%) were upgraded to malignancy. The underestimation rates of lobular neoplasia, atypical apocrine metaplasia, atypical ductal hyperplasia, and flat epithelial atypia were 50% (4/8), 100% (5/5), 50% (3/6) and 50% (1/2) respectively. There was no underestimation in the cases of benign papilloma without atypia (0/3), and radial scar (0/2). No statistically significant differences (p > 0.1) between the cases with and those without underestimation were seen in patient age, indications for breast MRI, size of lesion on MRI, morphological and kinetic features of biopsied lesions. Imaging and clinical features cannot be used reliably to predict underestimation at MRgVABB. All high-risk lesions diagnosed at MRgVABB require surgical excision. (orig.)

  18. Quantifying Post- Laser Ablation Prostate Therapy Changes on MRI via a Domain-Specific Biomechanical Model: Preliminary Findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Toth

    Full Text Available Focal laser ablation destroys cancerous cells via thermal destruction of tissue by a laser. Heat is absorbed, causing thermal necrosis of the target region. It combines the aggressive benefits of radiation treatment (destroying cancer cells without the harmful side effects (due to its precise localization. MRI is typically used pre-treatment to determine the targeted area, and post-treatment to determine efficacy by detecting necrotic tissue, or tumor recurrence. However, no system exists to quantitatively evaluate the post-treatment effects on the morphology and structure via MRI. To quantify these changes, the pre- and post-treatment MR images must first be spatially aligned. The goal is to quantify (a laser-induced shape-based changes, and (b changes in MRI parameters post-treatment. The shape-based changes may be correlated with treatment efficacy, and the quantitative effects of laser treatment over time is currently poorly understood. This work attempts to model changes in gland morphology following laser treatment due to (1 patient alignment, (2 changes due to surrounding organs such as the bladder and rectum, and (3 changes due to the treatment itself. To isolate the treatment-induced shape-based changes, the changes from (1 and (2 are first modeled and removed using a finite element model (FEM. A FEM models the physical properties of tissue. The use of a physical biomechanical model is important since a stated goal of this work is to determine the physical shape-based changes to the prostate from the treatment, and therefore only physical real deformations are to be allowed. A second FEM is then used to isolate the physical, shape-based, treatment-induced changes. We applied and evaluated our model in capturing the laser induced changes to the prostate morphology on eight patients with 3.0 Tesla, T2-weighted MRI, acquired approximately six months following treatment. Our results suggest the laser treatment causes a decrease in prostate

  19. Scanning laser vibrometer measurement of guided waves in rails

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave based inspection and monitoring systems for railway tracks operate at frequencies where as many as 40 modes of propagation may exist. During the development of such systems it is advantageous to be able to measure the amplitude...

  20. Sky coverage modeling for the whole sky for laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianqi; Andersen, David; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2012-06-01

    The scientific productivity of laser guide star adaptive optics systems strongly depends on the sky coverage, which describes the probability of finding natural guide stars for the tip/tilt wavefront sensor(s) to achieve a certain performance. Knowledge of the sky coverage is also important for astronomers planning their observations. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute the sky coverage for the laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics system, the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), being designed for the Thirty Meter Telescope project. We show that NFIRAOS can achieve more than 70% sky coverage over most of the accessible sky with the requirement of 191 nm total rms wavefront.

  1. Full automatic fiducial marker detection on coil arrays for accurate instrumentation placement during MRI guided breast interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippatos, Konstantinos; Boehler, Tobias; Geisler, Benjamin; Zachmann, Harald; Twellmann, Thorsten

    2010-02-01

    With its high sensitivity, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) of the breast is today one of the first-line tools for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, particularly in the dense breast of young women. However, many relevant findings are very small or occult on targeted ultrasound images or mammography, so that MRI guided biopsy is the only option for a precise histological work-up [1]. State-of-the-art software tools for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer in DCE-MRI data offer also means for image-based planning of biopsy interventions. One step in the MRI guided biopsy workflow is the alignment of the patient position with the preoperative MR images. In these images, the location and orientation of the coil localization unit can be inferred from a number of fiducial markers, which for this purpose have to be manually or semi-automatically detected by the user. In this study, we propose a method for precise, full-automatic localization of fiducial markers, on which basis a virtual localization unit can be subsequently placed in the image volume for the purpose of determining the parameters for needle navigation. The method is based on adaptive thresholding for separating breast tissue from background followed by rigid registration of marker templates. In an evaluation of 25 clinical cases comprising 4 different commercial coil array models and 3 different MR imaging protocols, the method yielded a sensitivity of 0.96 at a false positive rate of 0.44 markers per case. The mean distance deviation between detected fiducial centers and ground truth information that was appointed from a radiologist was 0.94mm.

  2. Distortion-free diffusion MRI using an MRI-guided Tri-Cobalt 60 radiotherapy system: Sequence verification and preliminary clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Cao, Minsong; Kaprealian, Tania; Kamrava, Mitchell; Wang, Chenyang; Neylon, John; Low, Daniel A; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2017-10-01

    Monitoring tumor response during the course of treatment and adaptively modifying treatment plan based on tumor biological feedback may represent a new paradigm for radiotherapy. Diffusion MRI has shown great promises in assessing and predicting tumor response to radiotherapy. However, the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) technique suffers from limited resolution, severe distortion, and possibly inaccurate ADC at low field strength. The purpose of this work was to develop a reliable, accurate and distortion-free diffusion MRI technique that is practicable for longitudinal tumor response evaluation and adaptive radiotherapy on a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system. A diffusion-prepared turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging sequence on a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system (ViewRay). A spatial integrity phantom was used to quantitate and compare the geometric accuracy of the two diffusion sequences for three orthogonal orientations. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) accuracy was evaluated on a diffusion phantom under both 0 °C and room temperature to cover a diffusivity range between 0.40 × 10 -3 and 2.10 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Ten room temperature measurements repeated on five different days were conducted to assess the ADC reproducibility of DP-TSE. Two glioblastoma (GBM) and six sarcoma patients were included to examine the in vivo feasibility. The target registration error (TRE) was calculated to quantitate the geometric accuracy where structural CT or MR images were co-registered to the diffusion images as references. ADC maps from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI were calculated and compared. A tube phantom was placed next to patients not treated on ViewRay, and ADCs of this reference tube were also compared. The proposed DP-TSE passed the spatial integrity test (< 1 mm within 100 mm radius and < 2 mm within 175 mm radius

  3. Extended Remediation of Sleep Deprived-Induced Working Memory Deficits Using fMRI-guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luber, Bruce; Steffener, Jason; Tucker, Adrienne; Habeck, Christian; Peterchev, Angel V.; Deng, Zhi-De; Basner, Robert C.; Stern, Yaakov; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: We attempted to prevent the development of working memory (WM) impairments caused by sleep deprivation using fMRI-guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Novel aspects of our fMRI-guided rTMS paradigm included the use of sophisticated covariance methods to identify functional networks in imaging data, and the use of fMRI-targeted rTMS concurrent with task performance to modulate plasticity effects over a longer term. Design: Between-groups mixed model. Setting: TMS, MRI, and sleep laboratory study. Participants: 27 subjects (13 receiving Active rTMS, and 14 Sham) completed the sleep deprivation protocol, with another 21 (10 Active, 11 Sham) non-sleep deprived subjects run in a second experiment. Interventions: Our previous covariance analysis had identified a network, including occipital cortex, which demonstrated individual differences in resilience to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on WM performance. Five Hz rTMS was applied to left lateral occipital cortex while subjects performed a WM task during 4 sessions over the course of 2 days of total sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: At the end of the sleep deprivation period, Sham sleep deprived subjects exhibited degraded performance in the WM task. In contrast, those receiving Active rTMS did not show the slowing and lapsing typical in sleep deprivation, and instead performed similarly to non- sleep deprived subjects. Importantly, the Active sleep deprivation group showed rTMS-induced facilitation of WM performance a full 18 hours after the last rTMS session. Conclusions: Over the course of sleep deprivation, these results indicate that rTMS applied concurrently with WM task performance affected neural circuitry involved in WM to prevent its full impact. Citation: Luber B; Steffener J; Tucker A; Habeck C; Peterchev AV; Deng ZD; Basner RC; Stern Y; Lisanby SH. Extended remediation of sleep deprived-induced working memory deficits using fMRI-guided

  4. MRI-guided percutaneous cryoablation of renal tumors: Use of external manual displacement of adjacent bowel loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncali, Kemal; Morrison, Paul R.; Tatli, Servet; Silverman, Stuart G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to investigate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of using external hand compression to displace adjacent bowel loops during MRI-guided percutaneous cryoablation of renal tumors. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients (six women, eight men; mean age: 72 years) with 15 renal tumors (mean diameter: 2.4 cm; range: 1.4-4.6 cm) adjacent to bowel were treated with MRI-guided percutaneous cryoablation during which bowel was displaced manually. Bowel loop of concern was ascending colon (n 5), descending colon (n = 8), descending colon and small bowel (n = 1), ascending colon and small bowel (n = 1). To analyze effectiveness of the maneuver, mean distance between tumor margin and bowel before and after the maneuver were compared and analyzed using paired Student's t-test. Minimum distance between iceball edge and adjacent bowel with external manual displacement during freezing was also measured. Safety was assessed by analyzing post-procedural MR imaging for adjacent bowel wall thickening and focal fluid collections as well as patients' clinical and imaging follow-up. Results: Mean distance between tumor margin and closest adjacent bowel increased from 0.8 cm (range: 0-2 cm) before external manual compression to 2.6 cm (range: 1.6-4.1 cm) with manual displacement (p < 0.01). Mean minimum distance between iceball edge and closest adjacent bowel during the procedures was 1.6 cm (range: 0.5-3.5 cm). No evidence of bowel injury was encountered. Twelve of 15 tumors had follow-up (mean: 10 months) that showed no tumor recurrence. Conclusion: MRI-guided percutaneous cryoablation of renal tumors adjacent to bowel can be done safely and effectively using external hand compression to displace bowel loops

  5. Thoughts turned into high-level commands: Proof-of-concept study of a vision-guided robot arm driven by functional MRI (fMRI) signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico; Nigri, Anna; Rosazza, Cristina; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the possibility of using functional MRI to control a robot arm through a brain-machine interface by directly coupling haemodynamic activity in the sensory-motor cortex to the position of two axes. Here, we extend this work by implementing interaction at a more abstract level, whereby imagined actions deliver structured commands to a robot arm guided by a machine vision system. Rather than extracting signals from a small number of pre-selected regions, the proposed system adaptively determines at individual level how to map representative brain areas to the input nodes of a classifier network. In this initial study, a median action recognition accuracy of 90% was attained on five volunteers performing a game consisting of collecting randomly positioned coloured pawns and placing them into cups. The "pawn" and "cup" instructions were imparted through four mental imaginery tasks, linked to robot arm actions by a state machine. With the current implementation in MatLab language the median action recognition time was 24.3s and the robot execution time was 17.7s. We demonstrate the notion of combining haemodynamic brain-machine interfacing with computer vision to implement interaction at the level of high-level commands rather than individual movements, which may find application in future fMRI approaches relevant to brain-lesioned patients, and provide source code supporting further work on larger command sets and real-time processing. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Can MRI Localise the Cause of Chronic Low Backache in Lumbar Spondylosis and Help Guide Specific Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joish Upendra Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: MRI is a primary imaging modality in assessing chronic low backache. Many of the findings identified on MRI may not be symptomatic. Nerve root compressions, compression of cauda equina, posterior annular tear, facetal arthropathy are more likely to be symptomatic. Management of each of these pathologies vary. It is essential to identify the pathologies that can cause pain and symptoms in lumbar spondylosis. Aim: To identify the specific finding/pathology on MRI that corresponds to the clinical presentation of the patient with lumbar spondylosis. Materials and Methods: The study was done between May and December 2016 and included 100 patients who were referred for MRI of lumbosacral spine with history of debilitating backache for more than 2 weeks. After ruling out other causes, clinical evaluation of patients was done to localize leve; and type of pain. T1, T2 weighted and STIR imaging of lumbo-sacral spine was done. The images were studied to localize the pathology which most likely caused the pattern of pain the patient experienced. Results: The study included 55 ladies and 45 men. 42 people had radiculopathy. In 86% of cases, MRI helped in localizing the exact pathology responsible for the pattern of pain the patients experienced. Nerve compressions were seen in 86% of patients with radiculopathy. Among the people without radiculopathy, the cause for pain could be localized in 86%. The most common cause of pain identified was horizontal posterior annular fissure (40%. Conclusion: In a significant number of patients with chronic low backache, we can identify the specific pathology that corroborates with the clinical symptomatology of the patient. This aids in guiding specific management to provide symptomatic relief.

  7. MRI screening-detected breast lesions in high-risk young women: the value of targeted second-look ultrasound and imaging-guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, P; Dhillon, R; Bose, S; Bourke, A

    2016-10-01

    To analyse the value of targeted second-look ultrasound and imaging-guided biopsy in high-risk young women eligible for screening magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a tertiary referral centre in Perth, Western Australia. A retrospective analysis of eligible high-risk young women who underwent screening breast MRI and targeted second-look ultrasound between June 2012 and June 2014 was performed with review of data. Over a 2-year period, 139 women underwent high-risk screening MRI. Of these, 30 women (with a total of 45 lesions) were recalled for targeted second-look ultrasound. Thirty-four MRI-detected lesions were identified on targeted ultrasound with 19 of them proceeding to ultrasound-guided biopsy, while the remaining 15 lesions were considered benign on ultrasound, were not biopsied, and were stable on follow-up imaging 12 months later. One lesion proceeded to an MRI-guided biopsy to confirm a benign result. Of the 11 lesions not seen on ultrasound, nine underwent MRI biopsy, one proceeded directly to hook wire localisation and excision, and one did not return for biopsy and was lost to follow-up. The overall biopsy rate was 14.4%. The cancer detection rate was 1.4%. The results of this study indicate that targeted second-look ultrasound and ultrasound-guided biopsy is a cost-effective and time-efficient approach for MRI-detected lesions in young women at high risk of developing breast cancer. MRI-guided biopsy should be considered for ultrasonographically occult suspicious lesions as there is a low, but definite, risk of cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Electromagnetically induced guiding and superradiant amplification of counter-propagating lasers in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, G.; Fisch, N.J.; Pukhov, A.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of counter-propagating laser pulses in a plasma is considered. When the frequencies of the two lasers are close, nonlinear modification of the refraction index results in the mutual focusing of the two beams. A short (of order the plasma period) laser pulse can be nonlinearly focused by a long counter-propagating beam which extends over the entire guiding length. It is also demonstrated that a short ( p ) laser pulse can be superradiantly amplified by a counter-propagating long low-intensity pump while remaining ultra-short. Particle-in-Cell simulations indicate that pump depletion can be as high as 40%. This implies that the long pump is efficiently compressed in time without frequency chirping and pulse stretching, making the superradiant amplification an interesting alternative to the conventional method of producing ultra-intense pulses by the chirped-pulse amplification. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  9. Brain changes following four weeks of unimanual motor training: Evidence from fMRI-guided diffusion MRI tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lee B; Sale, Martin V; Cunnington, Ross; Mattingley, Jason B; Rose, Stephen E

    2017-09-01

    We have reported reliable changes in behavior, brain structure, and function in 24 healthy right-handed adults who practiced a finger-thumb opposition sequence task with their left hand for 10 min daily, over 4 weeks. Here, we extend these findings by using diffusion MRI to investigate white-matter changes in the corticospinal tract, basal-ganglia, and connections of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Twenty-three participant datasets were available with pre-training and post-training scans. Task performance improved in all participants (mean: 52.8%, SD: 20.0%; group P right caudate nucleus (4.9%; P left nucleus accumbens (-1.3%; P right corticospinal tract (mean 3.28%; P left corticospinal tract did not show any changes. FA also increased in white matter connections between the right middle frontal gyrus and both right caudate nucleus (17/22 participants; P right supplementary motor area (18/22 participants; P left (non-trained) hemisphere. In combination with our functional and structural findings, this study provides detailed, multifocal evidence for widespread neuroplastic changes in the human brain resulting from motor training. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4302-4312, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Design and construction of wave guide CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ali, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes the design, construction and operation of a countinous wave (CW) CO2 waveguide laser with axial gas flow in which the multi-electrode technique was used to achieve uniform volume of ionized gas using two and four pairs of electrodes. Resonators of lengths ( 26 - 47.5 ) cm with inside diameter ( 3 - 4 ) mm were used with discharge taking place between four pairs of electordes 8.25 cm long each, in axial direction of the tube. The avearge flow at the tube outlet was ( 5 - 6.5 ) L/min at different gas pressures. ( 4 tabs., 74 figs., 58 refs. )

  11. Image-guided macular laser therapy: design considerations and progress toward implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jeffrey W.; Shin, David S.

    1999-06-01

    Laser therapy is currently the only treatment of proven benefit for exudative age related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. To guide treatment for macular diseases, investigations were initiated to permit overlay of previously-stored angiographic images and image sequences superimposed onto the real-time biomicroscopic fundus image. Prior to treatment, a set of partially overlapping fundus images is acquired and montaged in order to provide a map for subsequent tracking operations. A binocular slit-lamp biomicroscope interfaced to a CCD camera, framegrabber board, and PC permits acquisition and rendering of retinal images. Computer-vision algorithms facilitate robust tracking, registration, and near-video-rate image overlay of previously-stored retinal photographic and angiographic images onto the real-time fundus image. Laser treatment is guided in this augmented reality environment where the borders of the treatment target--for example, the boundaries of a choroidal neovascularization complex--are easily identified through overlay of angiographic information superimposed on, and registered with, the real-time fundus image. During periods of misregistration as judged by the amplitude of the tracking similarity metric, laser function is disabled, affording additional safety. Image-guided macular laser therapy should facilitate accurate targeting of treatable lesions and less unintentional retinal injury when compared with standard techniques.

  12. Analysis of histological findings obtained combining US/mp-MRI fusion-guided biopsies with systematic US biopsies: mp-MRI role in prostate cancer detection and false negative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiella, Eliodoro; Santucci, Domiziana; Greco, Federico; Frauenfelder, Giulia; Giacobbe, Viola; Muto, Giovanni; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Grasso, Rosario Francesco

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of mp-MRI correlating US/mp-MRI fusion-guided biopsy with systematic random US-guided biopsy in prostate cancer diagnosis. 137 suspected prostatic abnormalities were identified on mp-MRI (1.5T) in 96 patients and classified according to PI-RADS score v2. All target lesions underwent US/mp-MRI fusion biopsy and prostatic sampling was completed by US-guided systematic random 12-core biopsies. Histological analysis and Gleason score were established for all the samples, both target lesions defined by mp-MRI, and random biopsies. PI-RADS score was correlated with the histological results, divided in three groups (benign tissue, atypia and carcinoma) and with Gleason groups, divided in four categories considering the new Grading system of the ISUP 2014, using t test. Multivariate analysis was used to correlate PI-RADS and Gleason categories to PSA level and abnormalities axial diameter. When the random core biopsies showed carcinoma (mp-MRI false-negatives), PSA value and lesions Gleason median value were compared with those of carcinomas identified by mp-MRI (true-positives), using t test. There was statistically significant difference between PI-RADS score in carcinoma, atypia and benign lesions groups (4.41, 3.61 and 3.24, respectively) and between PI-RADS score in Gleason  7 group (4.14 and 4.79, respectively). mp-MRI performance was more accurate for lesions > 15 mm and in patients with PSA > 6 ng/ml. In systematic sampling, 130 (11.25%) mp-MRI false-negative were identified. There was no statistic difference in Gleason median value (7.0 vs 7.06) between this group and the mp-MRI true-positives, but a significant lower PSA median value was demonstrated (7.08 vs 7.53 ng/ml). mp-MRI remains the imaging modality of choice to identify PCa lesions. Integrating US-guided random sampling with US/mp-MRI fusion target lesions sampling, 3.49% of false-negative were identified.

  13. WE-FG-202-08: Assessment of Treatment Response Via Longitudinal Diffusion MRI On A MRI-Guided System: Initial Experience of Quantitative Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X; Yang, Y; Yang, L; Low, D; Sheng, K [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To report our initial experience of systematic monitoring treatment response using longitudinal diffusion MR images on a Co-60 MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Methods: Four patients, including 2 head-and-necks, 1 sarcoma and 1 GBM treated on a 0.35 Tesla MRI-guided treatment system, were analyzed. For each patient, 3D TrueFISP MRIs were acquired during CT simulation and before each treatment for treatment planning and patient setup purposes respectively. Additionally, 2D diffusion-weighted MR images (DWI) were acquired weekly throughout the treatment course. The gross target volume (GTV) and brainstem (as a reference structure) were delineated on weekly 3D TrueFISP MRIs to monitor anatomy changes, the contours were then transferred onto the corresponding DWI images after fusing with the weekly TrueFISP images. The patient-specific temporal and spatial variations during the entire treatment course, such as anatomic changes, target apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) distribution were evaluated in a longitudinal pattern. Results: Routine MRI revealed progressive soft-tissue GTV volume changes (up to 53%) for the H&N cases during the treatment course of 5–7 weeks. Within the GTV, the mean ADC values varied from −44% (ADC decrease) to +26% (ADC increase) in a week. The gradual increase of ADC value was inversely associated with target volume variation for one H&N case. The maximal changes of mean ADC values within the brainstem were 5.3% for the H&N cases. For the large size sarcoma and GBM tumors, spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations were observed through longitudinal ADC analysis. Conclusion: In addition to the superior soft-tissue visualization, the 0.35T MR system on ViewRay showed the potential to quantitatively measure the ADC values for both tumor and normal tissues. For normal tissue that is minimally affected by radiation, its ADC values are reproducible. Tumor ADC values show temporal and spatial fluctuation that can be exploited for

  14. T1-weighted MRI as a substitute to CT for refocusing planning in MR-guided focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintermark, Max; Sumer, Suna; Lau, Benison; Cupino, Alan; Tustison, Nicholas J; Demartini, Nicholas; Elias, William J; Kassell, Neal; Patrie, James T; Xin, Wenjun; Eames, Matt; Snell, John; Hananel, Arik; Aubry, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Precise focusing is essential for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) to minimize collateral damage to non-diseased tissues and to achieve temperatures capable of inducing coagulative necrosis at acceptable power deposition levels. CT is usually used for this refocusing but requires a separate study (CT) ahead of the TcMRgFUS procedure. The goal of this study was to determine whether MRI using an appropriate sequence would be a viable alternative to CT for planning ultrasound refocusing in TcMRgFUS. We tested three MRI pulse sequences (3D T1 weighted 3D volume interpolated breath hold examination (VIBE), proton density weighted 3D sampling perfection with applications optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolution and 3D true fast imaging with steady state precision T2-weighted imaging) on patients who have already had a CT scan performed. We made detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the MRI data and compared those so-called ‘virtual CT’ to detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the CT data, used as a reference standard. We then loaded both standard and virtual CT in a TcMRgFUS device and compared the calculated phase correction values, as well as the temperature elevation in a phantom. A series of Bland–Altman measurement agreement analyses showed T1 3D VIBE as the optimal MRI sequence, with respect to minimizing the measurement discrepancy between the MRI derived total skull thickness measurement and the CT derived total skull thickness measurement (mean measurement discrepancy: 0.025; 95% CL (−0.22–0.27); p = 0.825). The T1-weighted sequence was also optimal in estimating skull CT density and skull layer thickness. The mean difference between the phase shifts calculated with the standard CT and the virtual CT reconstructed from the T1 dataset was 0.08 ± 1.2 rad on patients and 0.1 ± 0.9 rad on phantom. Compared to the real CT, the MR-based correction showed a 1 °C drop on the

  15. Identifying MRI markers to evaluate early treatment-related changes post-laser ablation for cancer pain management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Danish, Shabbar; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) has recently emerged as a new treatment modality for cancer pain management that targets the cingulum (pain center in the brain), and has shown promise over radio-frequency (RF) based ablation which is reported to provide temporary relief. One of the major advantages enjoyed by LITT is its compatibility with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), allowing for high resolution in vivo imaging to be used in LITT procedures. Since laser ablation for pain management is currently exploratory and is only performed at a few centers worldwide, its short-, and long-term effects on the cingulum are currently unknown. Traditionally treatment effects are evaluated by monitoring changes in volume of the ablation zone post-treatment. However, this is sub-optimal since it involves evaluating a single global parameter (volume) to detect changes pre-, and post-MRI. Additionally, the qualitative observations of LITT-related changes on multi-parametric MRI (MPMRI) do not specifically address differentiation between the appearance of treatment related changes (edema, necrosis) from recurrence of the disease (pain recurrence). In this work, we explore the utility of computer extracted texture descriptors on MP-MRI to capture early treatment related changes on a per-voxel basis by extracting quantitative relationships that may allow for an in-depth understanding of tissue response to LITT on MRI, subtle changes that may not be appreciable on original MR intensities. The second objective of this work is to investigate the efficacy of different MRI protocols in accurately capturing treatment related changes within and outside the ablation zone post-LITT. A retrospective cohort of studies comprising pre- and 24-hour post-LITT 3 Tesla T1-weighted (T1w), T2w, T2-GRE, and T2-FLAIR acquisitions was considered. Our scheme involved (1) inter-protocol as well as inter-acquisition affine registration of pre- and post-LITT MRI, (2) quantitation of MRI parameters

  16. Guiding flying-spot laser transepithelial phototherapeutic keratectomy with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yokogawa, Hideaki; Tang, Maolong; Chamberlain, Winston; Zhang, Xinbo; Huang, David

    2017-04-01

    To analyze transepithelial phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) results using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and develop a model to guide the laser dioptric and depth settings. Casey Eye Institute, Portland, Oregon, USA. Prospective nonrandomized case series. Patients with superficial corneal opacities and irregularities had transepithelial PTK with a flying-spot excimer laser by combining wide-zone myopic and hyperopic astigmatic ablations. Optical coherence tomography was used to calculate corneal epithelial lenticular masking effects, guide refractive laser settings, and measure opacity removal. The laser ablation efficiency and the refractive outcome were investigated using multivariate linear regression models. Twenty-six eyes of 20 patients received PTK to remove opacities and irregular astigmatism due to scar, dystrophy, radial keratotomy, or previous corneal surgeries. The uncorrected distance visual acuity and corrected distance visual acuity were significantly improved (P laser ablation depths were 31.3% (myopic ablation) and 63.0% (hyperopic ablation) deeper than the manufacturer's nomogram. The spherical equivalent of the corneal epithelial lenticular masking effect was 0.73 diopter ± 0.61 (SD). The refractive outcome highly correlated to the laser settings and epithelial lenticular masking effect (Pearson R = 0.96, P < .01). The ablation rate of granular dystrophy opacities appeared to be slower. Smoothing ablation under masking fluid was needed to prevent focal steep islands in these cases. The OCT-measured ablation depth efficiency could guide opacity removal. The corneal epithelial lenticular masking effect could refine the spherical refractive nomogram to achieve a better refractive outcome after transepithelial ablation. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image guided treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. D.; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Mujat, Mircea; Husain, Deeba

    2009-02-01

    Subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNM) are a deleterious complication of laser eye injury and retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroiditis, and myopic retinopathy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs are approved treatment methods. PDT acts by selective dye accumulation, activation by laser light, and disruption and clotting of the new leaky vessels. However, PDT surgery is currently not image-guided, nor does it proceed in an efficient or automated manner. This may contribute to the high rate of re-treatment. We have developed a multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) for automated diagnosis and image-guided treatment of SRNMs associated with AMD. The system combines line scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (LSLO), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), PDT laser delivery, and retinal tracking in a compact, efficient platform. This paper describes the system hardware and software design, performance characterization, and automated patient imaging and treatment session procedures and algorithms. Also, we present initial imaging and tracking measurements on normal subjects and automated lesion demarcation and sizing analysis of previously acquired angiograms. Future pre-clinical testing includes line scanning angiography and PDT treatment of AMD subjects. The automated acquisition procedure, enhanced and expedited data post-processing, and innovative image visualization and interpretation tools provided by the multimodal retinal imager may eventually aid in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of AMD and other retinal diseases.

  18. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  19. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-16

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  20. Wavefront-guided versus wavefront-optimized laser in situ keratomileusis: contralateral comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Prema; Mrochen, Michael; Basuthkar, Subam; Viswanathan, Deepa; Joseph, Roy

    2008-03-01

    To compare the outcomes of wavefront-guided and wavefront-optimized treatment in fellow eyes of patients having laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia. Medical and Vision Research Foundation, Tamil Nadu, India. This prospective comparative study comprised 27 patients who had wavefront-guided LASIK in 1 eye and wavefront-optimized LASIK in the fellow eye. The Hansatome (Bausch & Lomb) was used to create a superior-hinged flap and the Allegretto laser (WaveLight Laser Technologie AG), for photoablation. The Allegretto wave analyzer was used to measure ocular wavefront aberrations and the Functional Acuity Contrast Test chart, to measure contrast sensitivity before and 1 month after LASIK. The refractive and visual outcomes and the changes in aberrations and contrast sensitivity were compared between the 2 treatment modalities. One month postoperatively, 92% of eyes in the wavefront-guided group and 85% in the wavefront-optimized group had uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better; 93% and 89%, respectively, had a postoperative spherical equivalent refraction of +/-0.50 diopter. The differences between groups were not statistically significant. Wavefront-guided LASIK induced less change in 18 of 22 higher-order Zernike terms than wavefront-optimized LASIK, with the change in positive spherical aberration the only statistically significant one (P= .01). Contrast sensitivity improved at the low and middle spatial frequencies (not statistically significant) and worsened significantly at high spatial frequencies after wavefront-guided LASIK; there was a statistically significant worsening at all spatial frequencies after wavefront-optimized LASIK. Although both wavefront-guided and wavefront-optimized LASIK gave excellent refractive correction results, the former induced less higher-order aberrations and was associated with better contrast sensitivity.

  1. Thyroid tissue: US-guided percutaneous laser thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Spiezia, Stefano; Bianchini, Antonio; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Crescenzi, Anna; Pacella, Sara; Toscano, Vincenzo; Papini, Enrico

    2004-07-01

    To evaluate in vivo the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous laser thermal ablation (LTA) in the debulking of thyroid lesions. Twenty-five adult patients at poor surgical risk with cold nodules (n = 8), autonomously hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules (n = 16), or anaplastic carcinoma (n = 1) underwent LTA. One to four 21-gauge spinal needles were inserted with ultrasonographic (US) guidance into the thyroid lesions. A 300-microm-diameter quartz optical fiber was advanced through the sheath of the needle. Nd:YAG laser was used with output power of 3-5 W. Side effects, complications, and clinical and hormonal changes were evaluated at the end of LTA and during follow-up. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate the correlation between energy delivered and reduction in nodule volume. Volume of induced necrosis and reduction in nodule volume were assessed with US or computed tomography. LTA was performed without difficulties in 76 LTA sessions. After treatment with 5 W, two patients experienced mild dysphonia, which resolved after 48 hours and 2 months. Improvement of local compression symptoms was experienced by 12 of 14 (86%) patients. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was detectable in five of 16 (31%) patients with hyperfunctioning nodules at 6 months after LTA. Volume of induced necrosis ranged from 0.8 to 3.9 mL per session. Anaplastic carcinoma treated with four fibers yielded 32.0 mL of necrosis. Echo structure and baseline volume did not influence response. Energy load and reduction in nodule volume were significantly correlated (r(2) =.75, P nodule volume reduction at 6 months in hyperfunctioning nodules was 3.3 mL +/- 2.8 (62% +/- 21.4 [SD]) and in cold nodules was 7.7 mL +/- 7.5 (63% +/- 13.8). LTA may be a therapeutic tool for highly selected problems in the treatment of thyroid lesions. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  2. Ultrasound-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation of an autonomous thyroid nodule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2003-01-01

    effects and often necessitates multiple treatment sessions. We present a case of a 17-year-old female successfully treated with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) for an AFTN. Initially, she had a serum thyrotropin (TSH) of 0.01 mU/L and normal peripheral thyroid.......9 mL (40% reduction) without further alterations during an additional 9 months of follow-up. Side effects were transient thyrotoxicosis and local pain as seen with PEI. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of ILP used in a patient with a pretoxic thyroid nodule. US-guided thermic tissue...

  3. Use of the carbon dioxide laser in guided tissue regeneration wound healing in the beagle dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmann, Jeffrey A.; Parlar, Ates; Abdel-Ghaffar, Khaled A.; El-Khouli, Amr M.; Israel, Michael

    1996-04-01

    The concept of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) allowing cells from the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone to repopulate the treated root surface has shown the ability to obtain periodontal new attachment. Healing studies have also shown that conventional GTR therapy still does not exclude all the epithelium. This epithelial proliferation apically interferes with the establishment of the new connective tissue attachment to the root surface. The objective of this research study was to examine whether controlled de-epithelialization with the carbon dioxide laser during the healing phase after periodontal surgery, would retard the apical migration of the epithelium and thereby enhance the results obtained through guided tissue regeneration. Eight beagle dogs were used, the experimental side received de-epithelialization with the CO2 laser in conjunction with flap reflection and surgically created buccal osseous defects. Selected defects on each side were treated with ePTFE periodontal membranes. The laser de-epithelialization was repeated every 10 days until removal of the membranes. The control side received the same surgical treatment without laser application. This experimental design allowed histologic study of the new attachment obtained in defects treated with flap debridement with or without laser de-epithelialization and with or without ePTFE membranes. A statistical analysis was performed on the histometric data from 48 teeth in the 8 dogs after 4 months of healing. The results showed significant amounts of new attachment obtained from all four treatment modalities with no statistically significant differences for any one treatment. However, the trend towards enhanced regeneration with the combined treatment of laser and membrane vs. membrane alone or debridement alone was evident. The histologic analysis revealed a significant amount of newly formed `fat cementum' seen only on the laser treated teeth. This feature was the most remarkable finding of the

  4. Contrast agents for MRI based on iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, M.P. E-mail: puerto@icmm.csic.es; Bomati-Miguel, O.; Perez de Alejo, R.; Ruiz-Cabello, J.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; O' Grady, K

    2003-10-01

    Colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles with application as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging have been prepared by coating iron oxide nanoparticles with dextran. The particles were prepared by laser-induced pyrolysis of iron pentacarbonyl vapors. By adjusting the experimental conditions, the particle and crystal size of the iron oxide nanoparticles were varied in the range 2-7 nm with a very narrow size distribution. The suspensions consisted of dextran-coated nanoparticle aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of around 50 nm and unimodal size distributions. It was observed that an important enhancement of the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles and the suspensions (saturation magnetization and susceptibility values) takes place as the particle and the crystallite size increases. Consequently, the {sup 1}H NMR relaxation times of the suspensions, characterized by the longitudinal (R{sub 1}) and transversal (R{sub 2}) relaxation rates, also increase with the crystal order. This effect was more pronounced for the values of R{sub 2}. The mechanism of MRI enhancement appears to be related to water protons diffusing within the inhomogeneous magnetic field created by the magnetic clusters. The global structure of the cluster, the anisotropy and the magnetic field around it are important factors affecting the value of R{sub 2}.

  5. Contrast agents for MRI based on iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, M.P.; Bomati-Miguel, O.; Perez de Alejo, R.; Ruiz-Cabello, J.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; O'Grady, K.

    2003-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles with application as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging have been prepared by coating iron oxide nanoparticles with dextran. The particles were prepared by laser-induced pyrolysis of iron pentacarbonyl vapors. By adjusting the experimental conditions, the particle and crystal size of the iron oxide nanoparticles were varied in the range 2-7 nm with a very narrow size distribution. The suspensions consisted of dextran-coated nanoparticle aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of around 50 nm and unimodal size distributions. It was observed that an important enhancement of the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles and the suspensions (saturation magnetization and susceptibility values) takes place as the particle and the crystallite size increases. Consequently, the 1 H NMR relaxation times of the suspensions, characterized by the longitudinal (R 1 ) and transversal (R 2 ) relaxation rates, also increase with the crystal order. This effect was more pronounced for the values of R 2 . The mechanism of MRI enhancement appears to be related to water protons diffusing within the inhomogeneous magnetic field created by the magnetic clusters. The global structure of the cluster, the anisotropy and the magnetic field around it are important factors affecting the value of R 2

  6. Clinical Study Pathologic Findings in MRI-Guided Needle Core Biopsies of the Breast in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siziopikou, K.P.; Jokich, P.; Cobleigh, M.

    2011-01-01

    The role of MRI in the management of breast carcinoma is rapidly evolving from its initial use for specific indications only to a more widespread use on all women with newly diagnosed early stage breast cancer. However, there are many concerns that such widespread use is premature since detailed correlation of MRI findings with the underlying histopathology of the breast lesions is still evolving and clear evidence for improvements in management and overall prognosis of breast cancer patients evaluated by breast MRI after their initial cancer diagnosis is lacking. In this paper, we would like to bring attention to a benign lesion that is frequently present on MRI-guided breast biopsies performed on suspicious MRI findings in the affected breast of patients with a new diagnosis of breast carcinoma

  7. High quality electron beams from a plasma channel guided laser wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, Cs.; Tilborg, J. van; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Bruhwiler, D.; Nieter, C.; Cary, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    Laser driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave driven by an intense laser, have demonstrated accelerating electric fields of hundreds of GV/m. These fields are thousands of times those achievable in conventional radiofrequency (RF) accelerators, spurring interest in laser accelerators as compact next generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance results in low energy beams with 100% electron energy spread, limiting applications. Here we demonstrate that a relativistically intense laser can be guided by a preformed plasma density channel and that the longer propagation distance can result in electron beams of percent energy spread with low emittance and increased energy, containing >10 9 electrons above 80 MeV. The preformed plasma channel technique forms the basis of a new class of accelerators, combining beam quality comparable to RF accelerators with the high gradients of laser accelerators to produce compact tunable high brightness electron and radiation sources

  8. MR-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy of MRI-only lesions: a single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spick, Claudio; Schernthaner, Melanie; Pinker, Katja; Kapetas, Panagiotis; Bernathova, Maria; Polanec, Stephan H.; Bickel, Hubert; Wengert, Georg J.; Helbich, Thomas H.; Baltzer, Pascal A. [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Wien (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Clinical Institute of Pathology, Wien (Austria)

    2016-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare three different biopsy devices on false-negative and underestimation rates in MR-guided, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) of MRI-only lesions. This retrospective, single-center study was IRB-approved. Informed consent was waived. 467 consecutive patients underwent 487 MR-guided VABB using three different 8-10-gauge-VABB devices (Atec-9-gauge,A; Mammotome-8-gauge,M; Vacora-10-gauge,V). VABB data (lesion-type, size, biopsy device, histopathology) were compared to final diagnosis (surgery, n = 210 and follow-up, n = 277). Chi-square, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were applied. P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Final diagnosis was malignant in 104 (21.4 %), high risk in 64 (13.1 %) and benign in 319 (65.5 %) cases. Eleven of 328 (3.4 %) benign-rated lesions were false-negative (1/95, 1.1 %, A; 2/73, 2.7 %, M; 8/160 5.0 % V; P = 0.095). Eleven high-risk (11/77, 14.3 %) lesions proved to be malignant (3/26, 11.5 % A; 4/12, 33.3 % M; 4/39, 10.3 % V; P = 0.228). Five of 34 (14.7 %) DCIS were upgraded to invasive cancer (2/15, 13.3 %, A; 1/6, 16.6 % M; 2/13, 15.3 %, V; P = 0.977). Lesion size (P = 0.05) and type (mass vs. non-mass, P = 0.107) did not differ significantly. MR-guided VABB is an accurate method for diagnosis of MRI-only lesions. No significant differences on false-negative and underestimation rates were observed between three different biopsy devices. (orig.)

  9. Intelligent Image Analysis for Image-Guided Laser Hair Removal and Skin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brian; Lu, Thomas; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    We present the development of advanced automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms for the hair follicles identification in digital skin images to accurately direct the laser beam to remove the hair. The ATR system first performs a wavelet filtering to enhance the contrast of the hair features in the image. The system then extracts the unique features of the targets and sends the features to an Adaboost based classifier for training and recognition operations. The ATR system automatically classifies the hair, moles, or other skin lesion and provides the accurate coordinates of the intended hair follicle locations. The coordinates can be used to guide a scanning laser to focus energy only on the hair follicles. The intended benefit would be to protect the skin from unwanted laser exposure and to provide more effective skin therapy.

  10. Comparison between target magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-gantry and cognitively directed transperineal or transrectal-guided prostate biopsies for Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) 3-5 MRI lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaxley, Anna J; Yaxley, John W; Thangasamy, Isaac A; Ballard, Emma; Pokorny, Morgan R

    2017-11-01

    To compare the detection rates of prostate cancer (PCa) in men with Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) 3-5 abnormalities on 3-Tesla multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using in-bore MRI-guided biopsy compared with cognitively directed transperineal (cTP) biopsy and transrectal ultrasonography (cTRUS) biopsy. This was a retrospective single-centre study of consecutive men attending the private practice clinic of an experienced urologist performing MRI-guided biopsy and an experienced urologist performing cTP and cTRUS biopsy techniques for PI-RADS 3-5 lesions identified on 3-Tesla mpMRI. There were 595 target mpMRI lesions from 482 men with PI-RADS 3-5 regions of interest during 483 episodes of biopsy. The abnormal mpMRI target lesion was biopsied using the MRI-guided method for 298 biopsies, the cTP method for 248 biopsies and the cTRUS method for 49 biopsies. There were no significant differences in PCa detection among the three biopsy methods in PI-RADS 3 (48.9%, 40.0% and 44.4%, respectively), PI-RADS 4 (73.2%, 81.0% and 85.0%, respectively) or PI-RADS 5 (95.2, 92.0% and 95.0%, respectively) lesions, and there was no significant difference in detection of significant PCa among the biopsy methods in PI-RADS 3 (42.2%, 30.0% and 33.3%, respectively), PI-RADS 4 (66.8%, 66.0% and 80.0%, respectively) or PI-RADS 5 (90.5%, 89.8% and 90.0%, respectively) lesions. There were also no differences in PCa or significant PCa detection based on lesion location or size among the methods. We found no significant difference in the ability to detect PCa or significant PCa using targeted MRI-guided, cTP or cTRUS biopsy methods. Identification of an abnormal area on mpMRI appears to be more important in increasing the detection of PCa than the technique used to biopsy an MRI abnormality. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Narrow line width operation of a 980 nm gain guided tapered diode laser bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Barrientos-Barria, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate two different schemes for the spectral narrowing of a 12 emitter 980 nm gain guided tapered diode laser bar. In the first scheme, a reflective grating has been used in a Littman Metcalf configuration and the wavelength of the laser emission could be narrowed down from more than 5.......5 nm in the free running mode to 0.04 nm (FWHM) at an operating current of 30 A with an output power of 8 W. The spectrum was found to be tunable within a range of 16 nm. In the second scheme, a volume Bragg grating has been used to narrow the wavelength of the laser bar from over 5 nm to less than 0.......2 nm with an output of 5 W at 20 A. To our knowledge, this is the first time spectral narrowing has been performed on a gain guided tapered diode laser bar. In the Littman Metcalf configuration, the spectral brightness has been increased by 86 times and in the volume Bragg grating cavity the spectral...

  12. Guided Interventions for Prostate Cancer Using 3D-Transurethral Ultrasound and MRI Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    stitching of the images and 3D reconstruction for both the TUUS and MRI images was accomplished using a free DICOM medical imaging software called...References: i. David R. Holmes III, Brian J. Davis, Christopher C. Goulet, Torrence M. Wilson, Lance A. Mynderse, Keith M. Furutani, Jon J. Camp

  13. Investigating the Feasibility of Rapid MRI for Image-Guided Motion Management in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sawant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner. A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter, tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter, tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  14. Investigating the feasibility of rapid MRI for image-guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul; Pauly, Kim Butts; Alley, Marcus; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Loo, Billy W; Hinkle, Jacob; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-01-01

    Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner). A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP) sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D) images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter), tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter), tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  15. A tip / tilt mirror with large dynamic range for the ESO VLT Four Laser Guide Star Facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnveld, N.; Henselmans, R.; Nijland, B.A.H.

    2011-01-01

    One of the critical elements in the Four Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) for the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) is the Optical Tube Assembly (OTA), consisting of a stable 20x laser beam expander and an active tip/tilt mirror, the Field Selector Mechanism (FSM). This paper describes the design and

  16. Lobular neoplasia detected in MRI-guided core biopsy carries a high risk for upgrade: a study of 63 cases from four different institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Thaer; Kumar, Prasanna R; Li, Zaibo; Karabakhtsian, Rouzan G; Sanati, Souzan; Chen, Xiwei; Wang, Dan; Liu, Song; Reig, Beatriu

    2017-01-01

    There are certain criteria to recommend surgical excision for lobular neoplasia diagnosed in mammographically detected core biopsy. The aims of this study are to explore the rate of upgrade of lobular neoplasia detected in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided biopsy and to investigate the clinicopathological and radiological features that could predict upgrade. We reviewed 1655 MRI-guided core biopsies yielding 63 (4%) cases of lobular neoplasia. Key clinical features were recorded. MRI findings including mass vs non-mass enhancement and the reason for biopsy were also recorded. An upgrade was defined as the presence of invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ in subsequent surgical excision. The overall rate of lobular neoplasia in MRI-guided core biopsy ranged from 2 to 7%, with an average of 4%. A total of 15 (24%) cases had an upgrade, including 5 cases of invasive carcinoma and 10 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ. Pure lobular neoplasia was identified in 34 cases, 11 (32%) of which had upgrade. In this group, an ipsilateral concurrent or past history of breast cancer was found to be associated with a higher risk of upgrade (6/11, 55%) than contralateral breast cancer (1 of 12, 8%; P = 0.03). To our knowledge, this is the largest series of lobular neoplasia diagnosed in MRI-guided core biopsy. The incidence of lobular neoplasia is relatively low. Lobular neoplasia detected in MRI-guided biopsy carries a high risk for upgrade warranting surgical excision. However, more cases from different types of institutions are needed to verify our results. PMID:26564004

  17. TU-CD-BRB-12: Radiogenomics of MRI-Guided Prostate Cancer Biopsy Habitats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyanova, R; Lynne, C; Abraham, S; Patel, M; Jorda, M; Kryvenko, O; Ishkanian, A; Abramowitz, M; Pollack, A [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Tachar, M; Erho, N; Buerki, C; Lam, L; Davicioni, E [GenomeDx Biosciences Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diagnostic prostate biopsies are subject to sampling bias. We hypothesize that quantitative imaging with multiparametric (MP)-MRI can more accurately direct targeted biopsies to index lesions associated with highest risk clinical and genomic features. Methods: Regionally distinct prostate habitats were delineated on MP-MRI (T2-weighted, perfusion and diffusion imaging). Directed biopsies were performed on 17 habitats from 6 patients using MRI-ultrasound fusion. Biopsy location was characterized with 52 radiographic features. Transcriptome-wide analysis of 1.4 million RNA probes was performed on RNA from each habitat. Genomics features with insignificant expression values (<0.25) and interquartile range <0.5 were filtered, leaving total of 212 genes. Correlation between imaging features, genes and a 22 feature genomic classifier (GC), developed as a prognostic assay for metastasis after radical prostatectomy was investigated. Results: High quality genomic data was derived from 17 (100%) biopsies. Using the 212 ‘unbiased’ genes, the samples clustered by patient origin in unsupervised analysis. When only prostate cancer related genomic features were used, hierarchical clustering revealed samples clustered by needle-biopsy Gleason score (GS). Similarly, principal component analysis of the imaging features, found the primary source of variance segregated the samples into high (≥7) and low (6) GS. Pearson’s correlation analysis of genes with significant expression showed two main patterns of gene expression clustering prostate peripheral and transitional zone MRI features. Two-way hierarchical clustering of GC with radiomics features resulted in the expected groupings of high and low expressed genes in this metastasis signature. Conclusions: MP-MRI-targeted diagnostic biopsies can potentially improve risk stratification by directing pathological and genomic analysis to clinically significant index lesions. As determinant lesions are more reliably

  18. Dosimetric impact of interfraction catheter movement and organ motion on MRI/CT guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Felipe; Chang, Chang; Mesina, Carmen; Dixit, Nayha; Kevin Teo, Boon-Keng; Lin, Lilie L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric impact of catheter movement for MRI/CT image guided high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) for gynecologic cancers. Materials and methods: Ten patients were treated with HDR ISBT. The CTV and organs at risk were contoured using a postimplant MRI and CT. 5 fractions were delivered twice daily on 3 consecutive days. The first fraction was delivered on day 1 (d1), fraction 2–3 on d2 and fraction 4–5 on d3. MRI/CT was acquired prior to the second and fourth fractions. Four scenarios were modeled. (1) The d1 plan was applied to the d2 and d3 CT, using the updated catheter positions. (2) Replanning was performed for d2 and d3. (3) We applied the dwell positions/times from the d2 replan over the d3 CT and compared with a d3 CT replan. (4) Based on daily MRI, target volumes were recontoured and replanned. Dosimetry was analyzed for each plan and compared to the d1 dose distribution. Results: (1) When using the d1 plan on the d2 and d3 CT with the updated catheter positions, the mean CTV D90 was reduced from 93.4% on d1 to 89.3% (p = 0.08) on d2 and to 87.7% (p = 0.005) on d3. (2) Replanning on d2 and d3 compensated for catheter movement, mean CTV D90 of 95.4% on d2 and 94.6% (p = 0.36) on d3. (3) When compared to the replan of d2 applied on the d3 CT vs the d3 replan, there was no significant difference in coverage, mean CTV D90 of 90.9% (p = 0.09). (4) Reoptimization based on daily MRI, significantly improved the CTV coverage for each day. The mean D2 cc for the rectum was significantly higher with model 1 vs model 3 59.1 ± 4.7 vs 60.9 ± 4.8 (p = 0.04) Gy EQD2. There were no significant differences in D2 cc of bladder and sigmoid between models. Conclusions: Interfraction dosimetric changes significantly decreased the CTV coverage of the third day. Rather than replanning on each day, replanning on the day 2 CT before the second or third fraction would give an optimal solution that would compensate for

  19. A Helical Undulator Wave-guide Inverse Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.; Bodzin, N.; Frigola, P.; Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.; Travish, G.; Joshi, C.; Tochitsky, S.

    2004-01-01

    With recent success in high gradient, high-energy gain IFEL experiments at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory, future experiments are now being contemplated. The Neptune IFEL was designed to use a tightly focused, highly diffracting, near-TW peak power 10 micron laser. This choice of laser focusing, driven by power-handling limitations of the optics near the interaction region, led to design and use of a very complex undulator, and to sensitivity to both laser misalignment and focusing errors. As these effects limited the performance of the IFEL experiment, a next generation experiment at Neptune has been studied which avoids the use of a highly diffractive laser beam through use of a waveguide. We discuss here the choice of low-loss waveguide, guided mode characteristics and likely power limitations. We also examine a preferred undulator design, which is chosen to be helical in order to maximize the acceleration achieved for a given power. With the limitations of these laser and undulator choices in mind, we show the expected performance of the IFEL using 1D simulations. Three-dimensional effects are examined, in the context of use of a solenoid for focusing and acceleration enhancement

  20. Development of an MRI-Guided Intra-Prostatic Needle Placement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Downloaded on August 09,2010 at 01:03:56 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. Fig. 5. This mechanis provides for...Authorized licensed use limited to: Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Downloaded on August 09,2010 at 01:03:56 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply...A, Su H, Approaches to Creating and Controlling Motion in MRI, In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in

  1. Assessment of left ventricular function with single breath-hold highly accelerated cine MRI combined with guide-point modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmaier, Christina; Nassenstein, Kai; Nielles-Vallespin, Sonia; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Hunold, Peter; Barkhausen, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the performance of highly accelerated cine MRI in multi-orientations combined with a new guide-point modeling post-processing technique (GPM approach) for assessment of left ventricular (LV) function compared to the standard summation of slices method based on a stack of short axis views (SoS approach). Materials and methods: 33 consecutive patients were examined on a 1.5 T scanner with a standard steady state free precession (SSFP) sequence (TR, 3.0 ms; TE, 1.5 m; flip angle (FA), 60 o ; acceleration factor (AF), 2) analyzed with the SoS method and a highly accelerated, single breath-hold temporal parallel acquisition SSFP sequence (TR, 4.6 ms; TE, 1.1 ms; AF, 3) post-processed with the GPM method. LV function values were measured by two independent readers with different experience in cardiac MRI and compared by using the paired t-test and F-test. Inter- and intraobserver agreements were calculated using Bland-Altman-Plots. Results: Mean acquisition and post-processing time was significantly shorter with the GPM approach (15 s/3 min versus 360 s/6 min). For all LV function parameters interobserver agreement between the experienced and non-experienced reader was significantly improved when the GPM approach was used. However, end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were larger for the GPM technique when compared to the SoS method (P 0.121). In both readers and for all parameters variances did not differ significantly (P ≥ 0.409) and the two approaches showed an excellent linear correlation (r > 0.951). Conclusion: Due to its accurate, fast and reproducible assessment of LV function parameters highly accelerated MRI combined with the GPM technique may become the technique of first choice for assessment of LV function in clinical routine.

  2. MRI-guided gas bubble enhanced ultrasound heating in in vivo rabbit thigh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokka, S D; King, R; Hynynen, K

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we propose a focused ultrasound surgery protocol that induces and then uses gas bubbles at the focus to enhance the ultrasound absorption and ultimately create larger lesions in vivo. MRI and ultrasound visualization and monitoring methods for this heating method are also investigated. Larger lesions created with a carefully monitored single ultrasound exposure could greatly improve the speed of tumour coagulation with focused ultrasound. All experiments were performed under MRI (clinical, 1.5 T) guidance with one of two eight-sector, spherically curved piezoelectric transducers. The transducer, either a 1.1 or 1.7 MHz array, was driven by a multi-channel RF driving system. The transducer was mounted in an MRI-compatible manual positioning system and the rabbit was situated on top of the system. An ultrasound detector ring was fixed with the therapy transducer to monitor gas bubble activity during treatment. Focused ultrasound surgery exposures were delivered to the thighs of seven New Zealand white rabbits. The experimental, gas-bubble-enhanced heating exposures consisted of a high amplitude 300 acoustic watt, half second pulse followed by a 7 W, 14 W or 21 W continuous wave exposure for 19.5 s. The respective control sonications were 20 s exposures of 14 W, 21 W and 28 W. During the exposures, MR thermometry was obtained from the temperature dependency of the proton resonance frequency shift. MR T2-enhanced imaging was used to evaluate the resulting lesions. Specific metrics were used to evaluate the differences between the gas-bubble-enhanced exposures and their respective control sonications: temperatures with respect to time and space, lesion size and shape, and their agreement with thermal dose predictions. The bubble-enhanced exposures showed a faster temperature rise within the first 4 s and higher overall temperatures than the sonications without bubble formation. The spatial temperature maps and the thermal dose maps derived from the MRI

  3. MR-guided facet joint injection therapy using an open 1.0-T MRI system: an outcome study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyhardt, Patrick; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Streitparth, Florian; Hartwig, Tony; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy, safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided facet joint injection therapy using a 1.0-T open MRI. One hundred and sixty-six facet joint blocks in 45 patients with lower back pain were performed under MR fluoroscopic guidance using a proton-density-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence. An in-room monitor, wireless MR-mouse for operator-controlled multiplanar navigation, a flexible surface coil and MR-compatible 20-G needle were used. Clinical outcome was evaluated by questionnaire before intervention and after 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months using a numerical visual analogue scale (VAS). All facet joint blocks were considered technically successful with distribution of the injectant within and/or around the targeted facet joint. No major complications occurred. The final outcome analysis included 38 patients. An immediate effect was reported by 63 % of the patients. A positive mid-/long-term effect was seen in 13 patients (34 %) after 6 months and in 9 patients (24 %) after 12 months. Mean VAS was reduced from 7.1 ± 1.7 (baseline) to 3.5 ± 2.2, 4.1 ± 3.0, 3.8 ± 2.9 and 4.6 ± 2.9 at 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months (P < 0.01). MR-guided facet joint injection therapy of the lumbosacral spine is accurate, safe and efficient in the symptomatic treatment of lower back pain. (orig.)

  4. Guided Wave Sensing In a Carbon Steel Pipe Using a Laser Vibrometer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz Toledo, Abelardo; Salazar Soler, Jordi; Chávez Domínguez, Juan Antonio; García Hernández, Miguel Jesús; Turó Peroy, Antoni

    2010-05-01

    Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques have achieved a great development during the last decades as a valuable tool for material characterization, manufacturing control and structural integrity tests. Among these tools, the guided wave technology has been rapidly extended because it reduces inspection time and costs compared to the ordinary point by point testing in large structures, as well as because of the possibility of inspecting under insulation and coating conditions. This fast development has motivated the creation of several inspection and material characterization systems including different technologies which can be combined with this technique. Different measurements systems based on laser techniques have been presented in order to inspect pipes, plates and diverse structures. Many of them are experimental systems of high cost and complexity which combine the employment of a laser for generation of waves in the structure and an interferometer for detection. Some of them employ air-coupled ultrasound generation transducers, with high losses in air and which demand high energy for exciting waves in materials of high stiffness. The combined employment of a commercial vibrometer system for Lamb wave sensing in plates has been successfully shown in the literature. In this paper we present a measurement system based on the combined employment of a piezoelectric wedge transducer and a laser vibrometer to sense guided acoustic waves in carbon steel pipes. The measurement system here presented is mainly compounded of an angular wedge transducer, employed to generate the guided wave and a commercial laser vibrometer used in the detection process. The wedge transducer is excited by means of a signal function generator whose output signal has been amplified with a power signal amplifier. A high precision positioning system is employed to place the laser beam at different points through the pipe surface. The signal detected by the laser vibrometer system is

  5. TH-AB-BRA-02: Automated Triplet Beam Orientation Optimization for MRI-Guided Co-60 Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D; Thomas, D; Cao, M; O’Connor, D; Lamb, J; Sheng, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI guided Co-60 provides daily and intrafractional MRI soft tissue imaging for improved target tracking and adaptive radiotherapy. To remedy the low output limitation, the system uses three Co-60 sources at 120° apart, but using all three sources in planning is considerably unintuitive. We automate the beam orientation optimization using column generation, and then solve a novel fluence map optimization (FMO) problem while regularizing the number of MLC segments. Methods: Three patients—1 prostate (PRT), 1 lung (LNG), and 1 head-and-neck boost plan (H&NBoost)—were evaluated. The beamlet dose for 180 equally spaced coplanar beams under 0.35 T magnetic field was calculated using Monte Carlo. The 60 triplets were selected utilizing the column generation algorithm. The FMO problem was formulated using an L2-norm minimization with anisotropic total variation (TV) regularization term, which allows for control over the number of MLC segments. Our Fluence Regularized and Optimized Selection of Triplets (FROST) plans were compared against the clinical treatment plans (CLN) produced by an experienced dosimetrist. Results: The mean PTV D95, D98, and D99 differ by −0.02%, +0.12%, and +0.44% of the prescription dose between planning methods, showing same PTV dose coverage. The mean PTV homogeneity (D95/D5) was at 0.9360 (FROST) and 0.9356 (CLN). R50 decreased by 0.07 with FROST. On average, FROST reduced Dmax and Dmean of OARs by 6.56% and 5.86% of the prescription dose. The manual CLN planning required iterative trial and error runs which is very time consuming, while FROST required minimal human intervention. Conclusions: MRI guided Co-60 therapy needs the output of all sources yet suffers from unintuitive and laborious manual beam selection processes. Automated triplet orientation optimization is shown essential to overcome the difficulty and improves the dosimetry. A novel FMO with regularization provides additional controls over the number of MLC segments

  6. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI-guided

  7. TH-AB-BRA-02: Automated Triplet Beam Orientation Optimization for MRI-Guided Co-60 Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D; Thomas, D; Cao, M; O’Connor, D; Lamb, J; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided Co-60 provides daily and intrafractional MRI soft tissue imaging for improved target tracking and adaptive radiotherapy. To remedy the low output limitation, the system uses three Co-60 sources at 120° apart, but using all three sources in planning is considerably unintuitive. We automate the beam orientation optimization using column generation, and then solve a novel fluence map optimization (FMO) problem while regularizing the number of MLC segments. Methods: Three patients—1 prostate (PRT), 1 lung (LNG), and 1 head-and-neck boost plan (H&NBoost)—were evaluated. The beamlet dose for 180 equally spaced coplanar beams under 0.35 T magnetic field was calculated using Monte Carlo. The 60 triplets were selected utilizing the column generation algorithm. The FMO problem was formulated using an L2-norm minimization with anisotropic total variation (TV) regularization term, which allows for control over the number of MLC segments. Our Fluence Regularized and Optimized Selection of Triplets (FROST) plans were compared against the clinical treatment plans (CLN) produced by an experienced dosimetrist. Results: The mean PTV D95, D98, and D99 differ by −0.02%, +0.12%, and +0.44% of the prescription dose between planning methods, showing same PTV dose coverage. The mean PTV homogeneity (D95/D5) was at 0.9360 (FROST) and 0.9356 (CLN). R50 decreased by 0.07 with FROST. On average, FROST reduced Dmax and Dmean of OARs by 6.56% and 5.86% of the prescription dose. The manual CLN planning required iterative trial and error runs which is very time consuming, while FROST required minimal human intervention. Conclusions: MRI guided Co-60 therapy needs the output of all sources yet suffers from unintuitive and laborious manual beam selection processes. Automated triplet orientation optimization is shown essential to overcome the difficulty and improves the dosimetry. A novel FMO with regularization provides additional controls over the number of MLC segments

  8. The utility of high-resolution intraoperative MRI in endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary macroadenomas: early experience in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Hasan A.; De Los Reyes, Kenneth; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Litvack, Zachary N.; Bi, Wenya Linda; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Dunn, Ian F.; Laws, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endoscopic skull base surgery has become increasingly popular among the skull base surgery community, with improved illumination and angled visualization potentially improving tumor resection rates. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is used to detect residual disease during the course of the resection. This study is an investigation of the utility of 3-T iMRI in combination with transnasal endoscopy with regard to gross-total resection (GTR) of pituitary macroadenomas. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic transsphenoidal operations performed in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite from November 2011 to December 2014. Inclusion criteria were patients harboring presumed pituitary macroadenomas with optic nerve or chiasmal compression and visual loss, operated on by a single surgeon. Results Of the 27 patients who underwent transsphenoidal resection in the AMIGO suite, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria. The endoscope alone, without the use of iMRI, would have correctly predicted 13 (65%) of 20 cases. Gross-total resection was achieved in 12 patients (60%) prior to MRI. Intraoperative MRI helped convert 1 STR and 4 NTRs to GTRs, increasing the number of GTRs from 12 (60%) to 16 (80%). Conclusions Despite advances in visualization provided by the endoscope, the incidence of residual disease can potentially place the patient at risk for additional surgery. The authors found that iMRI can be useful in detecting unexpected residual tumor. The cost-effectiveness of this tool is yet to be determined. PMID:26926058

  9. MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy of tumours of the head and neck region: First clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G.; Mueller, P.; Philipp, C.; Juergens, M.; Knoebber, D.; Roggan, A.; Wust, P.; Jahnke, V.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    8 patients with recurrent tumours of the head and neck region (squamous cell carcinomas n=6, pleomorphic adenomas n=2) underwent MR-controlled LITT. A 7 French laser applicator was inserted under local anaesthesia into the centre of the recurrent tumour. A Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm was used. Therapy was monitored on-line using special MR thermosequences. Preinterventional contrast-enhanced MRI revealed a recurrent tumour of the head and neck region for all eight patients. All patients tolerated the procedures well under local anaesthesia, with no clinically relevant side effects. The MR thermosequences depicted up to 15 mm diameter areas of less signal near the laser tip. Postinterventional contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypovascularised areas due to the resulting coagulative necrosis. Coagulative necrosis of 4 cc to 28 cc occurred in all patients, and a reduction of clinical symptoms was achieved in five. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Anatomically guided voxel-based partial volume effect correction in brain PET : Impact of MRI segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Assal, Frederic; Allaoua, Mohamed; Ratib, Osman; Loevblad, Karl-Olof; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-01-01

    Partial volume effect is still considered one of the main limitations in brain PET imaging given the limited spatial resolution of current generation PET scanners. The accuracy of anatomically guided partial volume effect correction (PVC) algorithms in brain PET is largely dependent on the

  11. Improve definition of titanium tandems in MR-guided high dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer using proton density weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yanle; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Mutic, Sasa; Richardson, Susan; Gay, Hiram A; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W

    2013-01-01

    For cervical cancer patients treated with MR-guided high dose rate brachytherapy, the accuracy of radiation delivery depends on accurate localization of both tumors and the applicator, e.g. tandem and ovoid. Standard T2-weighted (T2W) MRI has good tumor-tissue contrast. However, it suffers from poor uterus-tandem contrast, which makes the tandem delineation very challenging. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of using proton density weighted (PDW) MRI to improve the definition of titanium tandems. Both T2W and PDW MRI images were obtained from each cervical cancer patient. Imaging parameters were kept the same between the T2W and PDW sequences for each patient except the echo time (90 ms for T2W and 5.5 ms for PDW) and the slice thickness (0.5 cm for T2W and 0.25 cm for PDW). Uterus-tandem contrast was calculated by the equation C = (S u -S t )/S u , where S u and S t represented the average signal in the uterus and the tandem, respectively. The diameter of the tandem was measured 1.5 cm away from the tip of the tandem. The tandem was segmented by the histogram thresholding technique. PDW MRI could significantly improve the uterus-tandem contrast compared to T2W MRI (0.42±0.24 for T2W MRI, 0.77±0.14 for PDW MRI, p=0.0002). The average difference between the measured and physical diameters of the tandem was reduced from 0.20±0.15 cm by using T2W MRI to 0.10±0.11 cm by using PDW MRI (p=0.0003). The tandem segmented from the PDW image looked more uniform and complete compared to that from the T2W image. Compared to the standard T2W MRI, PDW MRI has better uterus-tandem contrast. The information provided by PDW MRI is complementary to those provided by T2W MRI. Therefore, we recommend adding PDW MRI to the simulation protocol to assist tandem delineation process for cervical cancer patients

  12. Modeling of the bony pelvis from MRI using a multi-atlas AE-SDM for registration and tracking in image-guided robotic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qinquan; Chang, Ping-Lin; Rueckert, Daniel; Ali, S Mohammed; Cohen, Daniel; Pratt, Philip; Mayer, Erik; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Edwards, Philip Eddie

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental challenge in the development of image-guided surgical systems is alignment of the preoperative model to the operative view of the patient. This is achieved by finding corresponding structures in the preoperative scans and on the live surgical scene. In robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), the most readily visible structure is the bone of the pelvic rim. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for prostate cancer detection and staging, but extraction of bone from MRI is difficult and very time consuming to achieve manually. We present a robust and fully automated multi-atlas pipeline for bony pelvis segmentation from MRI, using a MRI appearance embedding statistical deformation model (AE-SDM). The statistical deformation model is built using the node positions of deformations obtained from hierarchical registrations of full pelvis CT images. For datasets with corresponding CT and MRI images, we can transform the MRI into CT SDM space. MRI appearance can then be used to improve the combined MRI/CT atlas to MRI registration using SDM constraints. We can use this model to segment the bony pelvis in a new MRI image where there is no CT available. A multi-atlas segmentation algorithm is introduced which incorporates MRI AE-SDMs guidance. We evaluated the method on 19 subjects with corresponding MRI and manually segmented CT datasets by performing a leave-one-out study. Several metrics are used to quantify the overlap between the automatic and manual segmentations. Compared to the manual gold standard segmentations, our robust segmentation method produced an average surface distance 1.24±0.27mm, which outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for MRI bony pelvis segmentation. We also show that the resulting surface can be tracked in the endoscopic view in near real time using dense visual tracking methods. Results are presented on a simulation and a real clinical RALP case. Tracking is accurate to 0.13mm over 700 frames

  13. Markerless laser registration in image-guided oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmulla, Rüdiger; Lüth, Tim; Mühling, Joachim; Hassfeld, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The use of registration markers in computer-assisted surgery is combined with high logistic costs and efforts. Markerless patient registration using laser scan surface registration techniques is a new challenging method. The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical accuracy in finding defined target points within the surgical site after markerless patient registration in image-guided oral and maxillofacial surgery. Twenty consecutive patients with different cranial diseases were scheduled for computer-assisted surgery. Data set alignment between the surgical site and the computed tomography (CT) data set was performed by markerless laser scan surface registration of the patient's face. Intraoral rigidly attached registration markers were used as target points, which had to be detected by an infrared pointer. The Surgical Segment Navigator SSN++ has been used for all procedures. SSN++ is an investigative product based on the SSN system that had previously been developed by the presenting authors with the support of Carl Zeiss (Oberkochen, Germany). SSN++ is connected to a Polaris infrared camera (Northern Digital, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada) and to a Minolta VI 900 3D digitizer (Tokyo, Japan) for high-resolution laser scanning. Minimal differences in shape between the laser scan surface and the surface generated from the CT data set could be detected. Nevertheless, high-resolution laser scan of the skin surface allows for a precise patient registration (mean deviation 1.1 mm, maximum deviation 1.8 mm). Radiation load, logistic costs, and efforts arising from the planning of computer-assisted surgery of the head can be reduced because native (markerless) CT data sets can be used for laser scan-based surface registration.

  14. MRI-guided therapeutic ultrasound: Temperature feedback control for extracorporeal and endoluminal applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomir, Rares

    2005-09-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound is a mini-invasive and promising tool for in situ ablation of non-resectable tumors in uterus, breast, esophagus, kidney, liver, etc. Extracorporeal, endoluminal, and interstitial applicators have been successfully tested to date. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the only available technique providing non-invasive temperature mapping, together with excellent contrast of soft tissue. Coupling of these two technologies offers the advantage of both: (1) on line spatial guidance to the target region, and (2) thermal dose control during the treatment. This talk will provide an overview of the author's experience with automatic, active feedback control of the temperature evolution in tissues, which has been demonstrated with MRI compatible extracorporeal transducers (focused beam) or endoluminal applicators (plane waves). The feedback loop is based on fast switching capabilities of the driving electronics and real time data transfer out of the MR scanner. Precision of temperature control was typically better than 1°C. This approach is expected to improve the efficacy of the treatment (complete tumor ablation) and the thermal security of the critical regions crossed by the acoustic beam. It also permits one to reach an under-lethal heating regime for local drug delivery using thermosensitive liposomes or gene expression control based on hsp promoters.

  15. Oligonodular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, K.; Mack, M.G.; Straub, R.; Engelmann, K.; Zangos, S.; Woitaschek, D.; Vogl, T.J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose. To prospectively evaluate the therapeutic potential of MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in patients with oligonodular hepatocellular carcinoma. Material and methods. 39 patients with 61 intrahepatic lesions were treated with LITT. The Nd:YAG laser fiber was introduced with a percutaneously positioned irrigated laser application system. Qualitative and quantitative MR parameters and clinical data were evaluated. Results. All patients tolerated the procedure well under local anesthesia. All observed complications were minor and no further treatment was necessary. Online MR thermometry allowed exact visualization. Lesions p to 2 cm in diameter could be efficiently treated with a single laser application, larger lesions were treated simultaneous multiapplication. In 97.5% we achieved a complete necrosis of the tumor and a 5 mm safety margin, resulting in a complete destruction of the tumor without local recurrences. Mean survival was 4.4 years (95% Cl: 3.6-5.2 years) after the time of diagnoses of the HCC (Kaplan-Meier-method). Conclusion. In intrahepatic oligonodular involvement of hepatocellular carcinoma LITT appears to be an effective therapeutic procedure with a high tumor contol rate and better survival data. (orig.) [de

  16. Analysis of roll-stamped light guide plate fabricated with laser-ablated stamper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyunjun; Hong, Seokkwan; Kim, Jongsun; Hwang, Jeongho; Joo, Byungyun; Yoon, Kyunghwan; Kang, Jeongjin

    2017-12-01

    LGP (light guide plate) is one of the major components of LCD (liquid crystal display), and it makes surface illumination for LCD backlit. LGP is a transparent plastic plate usually produced by injection molding process. On the back of LGP there are micron size patterns for extraction of light. Recently a roll-stamping process has achieved the high mass productivity of thinner LGPs. In order to fabricate optical patterns on LGPs, a fabricating tool called as a stamper is used. Micro patterns on metallic stampers are made by several micro machining processes such as chemical etching, LIGA-reflow, and laser ablation. In this study, a roll-stamping process by using a laser ablated metallic stamper was dealt with in consideration of the compatibility with the roll-stamping process. LGP fabricating tests were performed using a roll-stamping process with four different roll pressures. Pattern shapes on the stamper fabricated by laser ablation and transcription ratios of the roll-stamping process were analyzed, and LGP luminance was evaluated. Based on the evaluation, optical simulation model for LGP was made and simulation accuracy was evaluated. Simulation results showed good agreements with optical performance of LGPs in the brightness and uniformity. It was also shown that the roll-stamped LGP has the possibility of better optical performance than the conventional injection molded LGP. It was also shown that the roll-stamped LGP with the laser ablated stamper is potential to have better optical performance than the conventional injection molded LGP.

  17. Modeling update for the Thirty Meter Telescope laser guide star dual-conjugate adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Luc; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the modeling efforts undertaken in the past couple of years to derive wavefront error (WFE) performance estimates for the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), which is the facility laser guide star (LGS) dual-conjugate adaptive optics (AO) system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The estimates describe the expected performance of NFIRAOS as a function of seeing on Mauna Kea, zenith angle, and galactic latitude (GL). They have been developed through a combination of integrated AO simulations, side analyses, allocations, lab and lidar experiments.

  18. US-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Analgesia During Endovenous Laser Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Saim; Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Sindel, Timur

    2013-01-01

    Endovenous laser ablation may be associated with significant pain when performed under standard local tumescent anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia during endovenous ablation in patients with lower extremity venous insufficiency. During a 28-month period, ultrasound-guided femoral or sciatic nerve blocks were performed to provide analgesia during endovenous laser ablation in 506 legs and 307 patients. The femoral block (n = 402) was performed at the level of the inguinal ligament, and the sciatic block at the posterior midthigh (n = 124), by injecting a diluted lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance. After the blocks, endovenous laser ablations and other treatments (phlebectomy or foam sclerotherapy) were performed in the standard fashion. After the procedures, a visual analogue pain scale (1–10) was used for pain assessment. After the blocks, pain scores were 0 or 1 (no pain) in 240 legs, 2 or 3 (uncomfortable) in 225 legs, and 4 or 5 (annoying) in 41 legs. Patients never experienced any pain higher than score 5. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the pain scores of the right leg versus the left leg (p = 0.321) and between the pain scores after the femoral versus sciatic block (p = 0.7). Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks may provide considerable reduction of pain during endovenous laser and other treatments, such as ambulatory phlebectomy and foam sclerotherapy. They may make these procedures more comfortable for the patient and easier for the operator.

  19. Clinical outcomes of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis: 6-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Daisuke; Shimizu, Kimiya; Komatsu, Mari; Ito, Misae; Suzuki, Masanobu; Ohno, Koji; Uozato, Hiroshi

    2003-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes 6 months after wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for myopia in Japan. Department of Ophthalmology, Sanno Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. This prospective study comprised 22 eyes of 12 patients treated with wavefront-guided LASIK who were available for evaluation at 6 months. The mean patient age was 31.2 years +/- 8.4 (SD) (range 23 to 50 years), and the mean preoperative spherical equivalent refraction was -7.30 +/- 2.72 diopters (D) (range -2.75 to -11.88 D). In all cases, preoperative wavefront analysis was performed with a Hartmann-Shack aberrometer and the Technolas 217z flying-spot excimer laser system (Bausch & Lomb) was used with 1.0 mm and 2.0 mm spot sizes and an active eye tracker with a 120 Hz tracking rate. The clinical outcomes of wavefront-guided LASIK were evaluated in terms of safety, efficacy, predictability, stability, complications, and preoperative and postoperative aberrations. At 6 months, 10 eyes had no change in best spectacle-correct visual acuity and 10 gained 1 or more lines. The safety index was 1.11 and the efficacy index, 0.82. Slight undercorrections were observed in highly myopic eyes. In all eyes, the postoperative refraction tended slightly toward myopia for 3 months and stabilized after that. No complication such as epithelial ingrowth, diffuse lamellar keratitis, or infection was observed. Comparison of the preoperative and postoperative aberrations showed that 2nd-order aberrations decreased and higher-order aberrations increased. In the 3rd order, aberrations increased in the high-myopia group (-6.0 D or worse) and decreased in the low to moderate-myopia group (better than -6.0 D). Wavefront-guided LASIK was a good option for refractive surgery, although a longer follow-up in a larger study is required.

  20. CT-guided preoperative needle localization of MRI-detected breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giagounidis, Elektra M. E-mail: giagounjdis@online.de; Markus, Ruwe; Josef, Luetzeler; Wemer, Audretsch; Mahdi, Rezai; Bernward, Kurtz

    2001-08-01

    To assess the value of accurate preoperative CT-guided needle localization of occult breast lesions, we reviewed a total of 39 needle-directed biopsies of breast tumors in 24 women. The average age was 52.9 years (range 31-67). All lesions were nonpalpable and mammographically, as well as sonographically occult. They were solely seen on MR-images. After demonstrating the suspicious region on CT scans, a hookwire was inserted. The correct position was confirmed by a control scan. The subsequent histopathological examination showed that 28 of the lesions (71.8%) were benign, among them mastopathy, fibrosis, fibroadenoma, papilloma, intramammary lymph node, liponecrosis and epitheliosis. Eleven lesions (28%) were malignant and showed either lobular, ductal or tubular cancer. Our results endorse that CT guided needle localization is a helpful method that allows a precise surgical excision of the suspect area with the removal of a minimal amount of breast tissue.

  1. Hair sparing does not compromise real-time magnetic resonance imaging guided stereotactic laser fiber placement for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shikha; Kumar, Kevin K; Rabon, Matthew J; Dolce, Dana; Halpern, Casey H

    2018-06-01

    Pre-operative scalp shaving is conventionally thought to simplify postoperative cranial wound care, lower the rate of wound infections, and ease optimal incision localization. Over the past few decades, some neurosurgeons have refrained from scalp shaving in order to improve patient satisfaction with brain surgery. However, this hair-sparing approach has not yet been explored in the growing field of magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT). This study investigated the initial impact of a no-shave technique on post-operative wound infection rate as well as on entry and target accuracy in MRgLITT for mesial temporal epilepsy. Eighteen patients selected by the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Program between November 2015 and August 2017 were included in the study. All patients underwent functional selective amygdalohippocampotomies using MRgLITT entirely within a diagnostic MRI suite. No hair was removed and no additional precautions were taken for hair or scalp care. Otherwise, routine protocols for surgical preparations and wound closure were followed. The study was performed under approval from Stanford University's Internal Review Board (IRB-37830). No post-operative wound infections or erosions occurred for any patient. The mean entry point error was 2.87 ± 1.3 mm and the mean target error was 1.0 ± 0.9 mm. There have been no other complications associated with this hair-sparing approach. The study's results suggest that hair sparing in MRgLITT surgery for temporal epilepsy does not increase the risk of wound complications or compromise accuracy. This preferred cosmetic approach may thus appeal to epilepsy patients considering such interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI-guided attenuation correction in whole-body PET/MR. Assessment of the effect of bone attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbarzadeh, A.; Ay, M.R.; Ahmadian, A.; Riahi Alam, N.; Zaidi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI presents many advantages in comparison with its counterpart PET/CT in terms of improved soft-tissue contrast, decrease in radiation exposure, and truly simultaneous and multi-parametric imaging capabilities. However, the lack of well-established methodology for MR-based attenuation correction is hampering further development and wider acceptance of this technology. We assess the impact of ignoring bone attenuation and using different tissue classes for generation of the attenuation map on the accuracy of attenuation correction of PET data. This work was performed using simulation studies based on the XCAT phantom and clinical input data. For the latter, PET and CT images of patients were used as input for the analytic simulation model using realistic activity distributions where CT-based attenuation correction was utilized as reference for comparison. For both phantom and clinical studies, the reference attenuation map was classified into various numbers of tissue classes to produce three (air, soft tissue and lung), four (air, lungs, soft tissue and cortical bones) and five (air, lungs, soft tissue, cortical bones and spongeous bones) class attenuation maps. The phantom studies demonstrated that ignoring bone increases the relative error by up to 6.8% in the body and up to 31.0% for bony regions. Likewise, the simulated clinical studies showed that the mean relative error reached 15% for lesions located in the body and 30.7% for lesions located in bones, when neglecting bones. These results demonstrate an underestimation of about 30% of tracer uptake when neglecting bone, which in turn imposes substantial loss of quantitative accuracy for PET images produced by hybrid PET/MRI systems. Considering bones in the attenuation map will considerably improve the accuracy of MR-guided attenuation correction in hybrid PET/MR to enable quantitative PET imaging on hybrid PET/MR technologies. (author)

  3. Design of pre-optics for laser guide star wavefront sensor for the ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslimov, Eduard; Dohlen, Kjetil; Neichel, Benoit; Hugot, Emmanuel

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, we consider the optical design of a zoom system for the active refocusing in laser guide star wavefront sensors. The system is designed according to the specifications coming from the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT)-HARMONI instrument, the first-light, integral field spectrograph for the European (E)-ELT. The system must provide a refocusing of the laser guide as a function of telescope pointing and large decentring of the incoming beam. The system considers four moving lens groups, each of them being a doublet with one aspherical surface. The advantages and shortcomings of such a solution in terms of the component displacements and complexity of the surfaces are described in detail. It is shown that the system can provide the median value of the residual wavefront error of 13.8-94.3 nm and the maximum value <206 nm, while the exit pupil distortion is 0.26-0.36% for each of the telescope pointing directions.

  4. Assessment of wall-thinning in carbon steel pipe by using laser-generated guided wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Yong; Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Joon Hyun [Pusan National University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this research is to estimate the crack location and size of a carbon steel pipe by using a laser ultrasound guided wave for the wall thinning evaluation of an elbow. The wall thinning of the carbon steel pipe is one of the most serious problems in nuclear power plants, especially the wall thinning of the carbon steel elbow caused by Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). Therefore, a non-destructive inspection method of elbow is essential for the nuclear power plants to operate safely. The specimens used in this study were carbon steel elbows, which represented the main elements of real nuclear power plants. The shape of the wall thinning was an oval with a width of 120mm, a length of 80mm, and a depth of 5mm. The L(0,1) and L(0,2) modes variation of the ultrasound guided wave signal is obtained from the response of the laser generation/air-coupled detection ultrasonic hybrid system represent the characteristics of the defect. The trends of these characteristics and signal processing were use dto estimate the size and location of wall thinning

  5. CT-guided percutaneous laser disk decompression for cervical and lumbar disk hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kanichiro; Koyama, Tutomu; Harada, Junta; Abe, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous laser disk decompression under X-ray fluoroscopy was first reported in 1987 for minimally invasive therapy of lumbar disk hernia. In patients with disk hernia, laser vaporizes a small portion of the intervertebral disk thereby reducing the volume and pressure of the affected disk. We present the efficacy and safety of this procedure, and analysis of fair or poor response cases. In our study, 226 cases of lumbar disk hernia and 7 cases of cervical disk hernia were treated under CT guided PLDD. Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and Mac-Nab criteria were investigated to evaluate the response to treatment. Improvement ratio based on the JOA score was calculated as follows. Overall success rate was 91.6% in cases lumber disk hernia, and 100% in cases of cervical disk hernia. We experienced two cases with two cases with postoperative complication. Both cases were treated conservatively. The majority of acute cases and post operative cases were reported to be 'good' on Mac-Nab criteria. Cases of fair or poor response on Mac-Nab criteria were lateral type, foraminal stenosis or large disk hernia. CT-guided PLDD is a safe and accurate procedure. The overall success rate can be increased by carefully selecting patients. (author)

  6. Assessment of wall-thinning in carbon steel pipe by using laser-generated guided wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Yong; Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Joon Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research is to estimate the crack location and size of a carbon steel pipe by using a laser ultrasound guided wave for the wall thinning evaluation of an elbow. The wall thinning of the carbon steel pipe is one of the most serious problems in nuclear power plants, especially the wall thinning of the carbon steel elbow caused by Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). Therefore, a non-destructive inspection method of elbow is essential for the nuclear power plants to operate safely. The specimens used in this study were carbon steel elbows, which represented the main elements of real nuclear power plants. The shape of the wall thinning was an oval with a width of 120mm, a length of 80mm, and a depth of 5mm. The L(0,1) and L(0,2) modes variation of the ultrasound guided wave signal is obtained from the response of the laser generation/air-coupled detection ultrasonic hybrid system represent the characteristics of the defect. The trends of these characteristics and signal processing were use dto estimate the size and location of wall thinning

  7. Investigation of the free electron laser with a guide magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The free electron laser with a static guide magnetic field has been investigated theoretically and by computer simulation using a fully relativistic electromagnetic particle code which has one spatial and three velocity dimensions. By passing a relativistic electron beam through a helical magnetic field, high frequency electromagnetic radiation is generated by its coupling to the negative energy electrostatic beam modes through the helical magnetic field. In the regime of strong guide field where Ω/sub c/e/γ>>k 0 v/sub 0z/, the dispersion relation is obtained by using a fluid model for the electron beam and the growth rates are solved for numerically. Reasonable agreement between the theory and the simulations has been obtained. It was found that the growth rate increases linearly with magnetic ripple strength but decreases with the strength of the guide field. In addition, the growth rates also increase slightly with the beam energy. For a reasonably strong guide field (e.g., Ω/sub c/e=6.0ω/sub p/e), the growth rate can be on the order of 0.1ω/sub p/e and the efficiency of radiation production has been found to be as high as 16%. However, the efficiency decreases with the strength of the guide field. A theory for the saturation level is developed which relates the efficiency to the continued growth of the electromagnetic wave after the onset of trapping by the electrostatic field. It is found that the growth continues for about one bounce time and the observed saturation levels are reasonably well explained

  8. TU-AB-202-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration in MRI-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooney, K; Zhao, T; Green, O; Mutic, S; Yang, D; Duan, Y; Zhang, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the performance of the deformable image registration algorithm used for MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy using image feature analysis. Methods: MR images were collected from five patients treated on the MRIdian (ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH), a three head Cobalt-60 therapy machine with an 0.35 T MR system. The images were acquired immediately prior to treatment with a uniform 1.5 mm resolution. Treatment sites were as follows: head/neck, lung, breast, stomach, and bladder. Deformable image registration was performed using the ViewRay software between the first fraction MRI and the final fraction MRI, and the DICE similarity coefficient (DSC) for the skin contours was reported. The SIFT and Harris feature detection and matching algorithms identified point features in each image separately, then found matching features in the other image. The target registration error (TRE) was defined as the vector distance between matched features on the two image sets. Each deformation was evaluated based on comparison of average TRE and DSC. Results: Image feature analysis produced between 2000–9500 points for evaluation on the patient images. The average (± standard deviation) TRE for all patients was 3.3 mm (±3.1 mm), and the passing rate of TRE<3 mm was 60% on the images. The head/neck patient had the best average TRE (1.9 mm±2.3 mm) and the best passing rate (80%). The lung patient had the worst average TRE (4.8 mm±3.3 mm) and the worst passing rate (37.2%). DSC was not significantly correlated with either TRE (p=0.63) or passing rate (p=0.55). Conclusions: Feature matching provides a quantitative assessment of deformable image registration, with a large number of data points for analysis. The TRE of matched features can be used to evaluate the registration of many objects throughout the volume, whereas DSC mainly provides a measure of gross overlap. We have a research agreement with ViewRay Inc.

  9. TU-AB-202-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration in MRI-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mooney, K; Zhao, T; Green, O; Mutic, S; Yang, D [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Duan, Y [University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri (United States); Zhang, M [Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the performance of the deformable image registration algorithm used for MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy using image feature analysis. Methods: MR images were collected from five patients treated on the MRIdian (ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH), a three head Cobalt-60 therapy machine with an 0.35 T MR system. The images were acquired immediately prior to treatment with a uniform 1.5 mm resolution. Treatment sites were as follows: head/neck, lung, breast, stomach, and bladder. Deformable image registration was performed using the ViewRay software between the first fraction MRI and the final fraction MRI, and the DICE similarity coefficient (DSC) for the skin contours was reported. The SIFT and Harris feature detection and matching algorithms identified point features in each image separately, then found matching features in the other image. The target registration error (TRE) was defined as the vector distance between matched features on the two image sets. Each deformation was evaluated based on comparison of average TRE and DSC. Results: Image feature analysis produced between 2000–9500 points for evaluation on the patient images. The average (± standard deviation) TRE for all patients was 3.3 mm (±3.1 mm), and the passing rate of TRE<3 mm was 60% on the images. The head/neck patient had the best average TRE (1.9 mm±2.3 mm) and the best passing rate (80%). The lung patient had the worst average TRE (4.8 mm±3.3 mm) and the worst passing rate (37.2%). DSC was not significantly correlated with either TRE (p=0.63) or passing rate (p=0.55). Conclusions: Feature matching provides a quantitative assessment of deformable image registration, with a large number of data points for analysis. The TRE of matched features can be used to evaluate the registration of many objects throughout the volume, whereas DSC mainly provides a measure of gross overlap. We have a research agreement with ViewRay Inc.

  10. Intraoperative MRI to guide the resection of primary supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme - a quantitative radiological analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jens P.; Rubach, Matthias; Schulz, Thomas; Dietrich, Juergen; Zimmer, Claus; Kahn, Thomas [University of Leipzig, Diagnostic Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Trantakis, Christos; Winkler, Dirk; Renner, Christof [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurosurgery, Leipzig (Germany); Schober, Ralf; Geiger, Kathrin [University of Leipzig, Department of Neuropathology, Leipzig (Germany); Brosteanu, Oana [Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Patients with supratentorial high-grade glioma underwent surgery within a vertically open 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) system to evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative MR guidance in achieving gross-total resection. For 31 patients, preoperative clinical data and MR findings were consistent with the putative diagnosis of a high-grade glioma, in 23 cases in eloquent regions. Tumor resections were carried out within a 0.5-T MR SIGNA SP/i (GE Medical Systems, USA). The resection of the lesion was carried out using fully MR compatible neurosurgical equipment and was stopped at the point when the operation was considered complete by the surgeon viewing the operation field with the microscope. We repeated imaging to determine the residual tumor volume only visible with MRI. Areas of tissue that were abnormal on these images were localized in the bed of resection by using interactive MR guidance. The procedure of resection, imaging control and interactive image guidance was repeated where necessary. Almost all tissue with abnormal characteristics was resected, with the exception of tissue localized in eloquent brain areas. The diagnosis of glioblastoma was confirmed in all 31 cases. When comparing the tumor volume before resection and at the point where the neurosurgeon would otherwise have terminated surgery (''first control''), residual tumor tissue was detectable in 29/31 patients; the mean residual tumor volume was 30.7{+-}24%. After repeated resections under interactive image guidance the mean residual tumor volume was 15.1%. At this step we found tumor remnants only in 20/31 patients. The perioperative morbidity (12.9%) was low. Twenty-seven patients underwent sufficient postoperative radiotherapy. We found a significant difference (log{sub rank}p=0.0037) in the mean survival times of the two groups with complete resection (n=10, median survival time 537 days) and incomplete resection (n=17, median survival time 237 days). The resection of

  11. MRI-Guided Regional Personalized Electrical Stimulation in Multisession and Home Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cancelli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The shape and position of the electrodes is a key factor for the efficacy of transcranial electrical stimulations (tES. We have recently introduced the Regional Personalized Electrode (RePE, a tES electrode fitting the personal cortical folding, that has been able to differentiate the stimulation of close by regions, in particular the primary sensory (S1 and motor (M1 cortices, and to personalize tES onto such an extended cortical district. However, neuronavigation on individual brain was compulsory for the correct montage. Here, we aimed at developing and testing a neuronavigation-free procedure for easy and quick positioning RePE, enabling multisession RePE-tES at home. We used off-line individual MRI to shape RePE via an ad-hoc computerized procedure, while an ad-hoc developed Adjustable Helmet Frame (AHF was used to properly position it in multisession treatments, even at home. We used neuronavigation to test the RePE shape and position obtained by the new computerized procedure and the re-positioning obtained via the AHF. Using Finite Element Method (FEM model, we also estimated the intra-cerebral current distribution induced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS comparing RePE vs. non-RePE with fixed reference. Additionally, we tested, using FEM, various shapes, and positions of the reference electrode taking into account possible small displacements of RePE, to test feasibility of RePE-tES sessions at home. The new RePE neuronavigation-free positioning relies on brain MRI space distances, and produced a mean displacement of 3.5 ± 0.8 mm, and the re-positioning of 4.8 ± 1.1 mm. Higher electric field in S1 than in M1 was best obtained with the occipital reference electrode, a montage that proved to feature low sensitivity to typical RePE millimetric displacements. Additionally, a new tES accessory was developed to enable repositioning the electrodes over the scalp also at home, with a precision which is acceptable according to

  12. Triggering and guiding high-voltage large-scale leader discharges with sub-joule ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepin, H.; Comtois, D.; Vidal, F.; Chien, C.Y.; Desparois, A.; Johnston, T.W.; Kieffer, J.C.; La Fontaine, B.; Martin, F.; Rizk, F.A.M.; Potvin, C.; Couture, P.; Mercure, H.P.; Bondiou-Clergerie, A.; Lalande, P.; Gallimberti, I.

    2001-01-01

    The triggering and guiding of leader discharges using a plasma channel created by a sub-joule ultrashort laser pulse have been studied in a megavolt large-scale electrode configuration (3-7 m rod-plane air gap). By focusing the laser close to the positive rod electrode it has been possible, with a 400 mJ pulse, to trigger and guide leaders over distances of 3 m, to lower the leader inception voltage by 50%, and to increase the leader velocity by a factor of 10. The dynamics of the breakdown discharges with and without the laser pulse have been analyzed by means of a streak camera and of electric field and current probes. Numerical simulations have successfully reproduced many of the experimental results obtained with and without the presence of the laser plasma channel

  13. A detailed examination of the LWFA in the Self-Guided Nonlinear Blowout Regime for 15-100 Joule Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Yu, Peicheng; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank; Mori, Warren; Lu, Wei; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    We examine scaling laws for LWFA in the regime nonlinear, self-guided regime in detail using the quasi-3D version of the particle-in-cell code OSIRIS. We find that the scaling laws continue to work well when we fix the normalized laser amplitude while reducing plasma density. It is further found that the energy gain for fixed laser energy can be improved by shortening the pulse length until self-guiding almost no longer occurs and that the energy gain can be optimized by using lasers with asymmetric longitudinal profiles. We find that when optimized, a 15 J laser may yield particle energies as high as 5.3 GeV without the need of any external guiding. Detailed studies for optimizing energy gains from 30 J and 100 J lasers will also presented which indicate that energies in excess of 10 GeV can be possible in the near term without the need for external guiding. This work is supported by the NSF and DOE.

  14. Evaluation of iris recognition system for wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis for myopic astigmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudipta; Couper, Terry A; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Jhanji, Vishal; Taylor, Hugh R; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the visual and refractive outcomes of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) using an iris recognition system for the correction of myopic astigmatism. Centre for Eye Research Australia, Melbourne Excimer Laser Research Group, and Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. A comparative analysis of wavefront-guided LASIK was performed with an iris recognition system (iris recognition group) and without iris recognition (control group). The main parameters were uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, amount of residual cylinder, manifest spherical equivalent (SE), and the index of success using the Alpins method of astigmatism analysis 1 and 3 months postoperatively. A P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Preoperatively, the mean SE was -4.32 diopters (D) +/- 1.59 (SD) in the iris recognition group (100 eyes) and -4.55 +/- 1.87 D in the control group (98 eyes) (P = .84). At 3 months, the mean SE was -0.05 +/- 0.21 D and -0.20 +/- 0.40 D, respectively (P = .001), and an SE within +/-0.50 D of emmetropia was achieved in 92.0% and 85.7% of eyes, respectively (P = .07). At 3 months, the UCVA was 20/20 or better in 90.0% and 76.5% of eyes, respectively. A statistically significant difference in the amount of astigmatic correction was seen between the 2 groups (P = .00 and P = .01 at 1 and 3 months, respectively). The index of success was 98.0% in the iris recognition group and 81.6% in the control group (P = .03). Iris recognition software may achieve better visual and refractive outcomes in wavefront-guided LASIK for myopic astigmatism.

  15. Self-compression of spatially limited laser pulses in a system of coupled light-guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, A. A.; Litvak, A. G.; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A.

    2018-04-01

    The self-action features of wave packets propagating in a 2D system of equidistantly arranged fibers are studied analytically and numerically on the basis of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Self-consistent equations for the characteristic scales of a Gaussian wave packet are derived on the basis of the variational approach, which are proved numerically for powers P beams become filamented, and their amplitude is limited due to the nonlinear breaking of the interaction between neighboring light-guides. This makes it impossible to collect a powerful wave beam in a single light-guide. Variational analysis shows the possibility of the adiabatic self-compression of soliton-like laser pulses in the process of 3D self-focusing on the central light-guide. However, further increase of the field amplitude during self-compression leads to the development of longitudinal modulation instability and the formation of a set of light bullets in the central fiber. In the regime of hollow wave beams, filamentation instability becomes predominant. As a result, it becomes possible to form a set of light bullets in optical fibers located on the ring.

  16. MO-B-201-03: MRI-Guided Tracking and Gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, O. [Washington University School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The motion management in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a key to success for a SBRT program, and still an on-going challenging task. A major factor is that moving structures behave differently than standing structures when examined by imaging modalities, and thus require special considerations and employments. Understanding the motion effects to these different imaging processes is a prerequisite for a decent motion management program. The commonly used motion control techniques to physically restrict tumor motion, if adopted correctly, effectively increase the conformity and accuracy of hypofractionated treatment. The effective application of such requires one to understand the mechanics of the application and the related physiology especially related to respiration. The image-guided radiation beam control, or tumor tracking, further realized the endeavor for precision-targeting. During tumor tracking, the respiratory motion is often constantly monitored by non-ionizing beam sources using the body surface as its surrogate. This then has to synchronize with the actual internal tumor motion. The latter is often accomplished by stereo X-ray imaging or similar techniques. With these advanced technologies, one may drastically reduce the treated volume and increase the clinicians’ confidence for a high fractional ablative radiation dose. However, the challenges in implementing the motion management may not be trivial and is dependent on each clinic case. This session of presentations is intended to provide an overview of the current techniques used in managing the tumor motion in SBRT, specifically for routine lung SBRT, proton based treatments, and newly-developed MR guided RT. Learning Objectives: Through this presentation, the audience will understand basic roles of commonly used imaging modalities for lung cancer studies; familiarize the major advantages and limitations of each discussed motion control methods; familiarize the major advantages and

  17. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  18. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials

  19. Transverse and polarization effects in index-guided vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, M. S.; Masoller, C.; Mandel, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We study numerically the polarization dynamics of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL's) operating in the fundamental transverse mode. We use an extension of the spin-flip model that not only accounts for the vector nature of the laser field, but also considers spatial transverse effects. The model assumes two orthogonal, linearly polarized fields, which are coupled to two carrier populations, associated with different spin sublevels of the conduction and valence bands in the quantum-well active region. Spatial effects are taken into account by considering transverse profiles for the two polarizations, for the two carrier populations, and for the carrier diffusion. The optical profile is the LP 01 mode, suitable for describing index-guided VCSEL's with cylindrical symmetry emitting on the fundamental transverse mode for both polarizations. We find that in small-active-region VCSEL's, fast carrier diffusion induces self-sustained oscillations of the total laser output, which are not present in larger-area devices or with slow carrier diffusion. These self-pulsations appear close to threshold, and, as the injection current increases, they grow in amplitude; however, there is saturation and the self-pulsations disappear at higher injection levels. The dependence of the oscillation amplitude on various laser parameters is investigated, and the results are found to be in good qualitative agreement with those reported by Van der Sande et al. [Opt. Lett. 29, 53 (2004)], based on a rate-equation model that takes into account transverse inhomogeneities through an intensity-dependent confinement factor

  20. First clinical experience with a dedicated MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound system for breast cancer ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merckel, Laura G.; Knuttel, Floor M.; Peters, Nicky H.G.M.; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, Utrecht (Netherlands); Deckers, Roel; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Bartels, Lambertus W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dalen, Thijs van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schubert, Gerald [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Weits, Teun [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Diest, Paul J. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vaessen, Paul H.H.B. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Anesthesiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gorp, Joost M.H.H. van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To assess the safety and feasibility of MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation in breast cancer patients using a dedicated breast platform. Patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer underwent partial tumour ablation prior to surgical resection. MR-HIFU ablation was performed using proton resonance frequency shift MR thermometry and an MR-HIFU system specifically designed for breast tumour ablation. The presence and extent of tumour necrosis was assessed by histopathological analysis of the surgical specimen. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the relationship between sonication parameters, temperature increase and size of tumour necrosis at histopathology. Ten female patients underwent MR-HIFU treatment. No skin redness or burns were observed in any of the patients. No correlation was found between the applied energy and the temperature increase. In six patients, tumour necrosis was observed with a maximum diameter of 3-11 mm. In these patients, the number of targeted locations was equal to the number of areas with tumour necrosis. A good correlation was found between the applied energy and the size of tumour necrosis at histopathology (Pearson = 0.76, p = 0.002). Our results show that MR-HIFU ablation with the dedicated breast system is safe and results in histopathologically proven tumour necrosis. (orig.)

  1. THE PROPERTIES OF GUIDED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MODES ON THE GaAs-BASED FIBER GLASS AND LASERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa TEMİZ

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available On the lasers or fiber optic communication electromagnetic waves are transmitted by confining and guiding between special layer's or fiber glass respectively. It is desired that electric and magnetic waves are in the active region of the lasers and in the core of the fiber glass. It is obtained by making more larger the of refractive index of the regions. On this work, the behavior and varying of the electric and magnetic waves and the effects on the electromagnetic waves in the fiber glass and lasers are investigated.

  2. Topography-guided treatment of irregular astigmatism with the wavelight excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, Mirko R; Panagopoulou, Sophia I; Tsiklis, Nikolaos S; Hajitanasis, Georgos C; Aslanides, loannis M; Pallikaris, loannis G

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and predictability of correcting high irregular astigmatism in symptomatic eyes with the use of topography-guided photoablation. In a prospective, non-comparative case series, 16 consecutive symptomatic eyes of 11 patients with small hyperopic and myopic excimer laser optical zones, decentered and irregular ablation after corneal graft, and corneal scars were operated. Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), manifest and cycloplegic refraction, and corneal topography, with asphericity and regularity, were analyzed. LASIK (n = 10) and photorefractive keratectomy (n = 6) were performed using the ALLEGRETTO WAVE excimer laser and T-CAT software (Topography-guided Customized Ablation Treatment; WaveLight Laser Technologie AG, Erlangen, Germany). In the LASIK group, UCVA improved from 0.81 +/- 0.68 IogMAR (20/130) (range: 0.2 to 2.0) to 0.29 +/- 0.21 logMAR (20/39) (range: 0.1 to 0.7) at 6 months. In the PRK group, mean UCVA improved from 0.89 +/- 0.87 IogMAR (20/157) (range: 0.1 to 2.0) to 0.42 +/- 0.35 logMAR (20/53) (range: 0.1 to 1.0) at 6 months. Best spectacle-corrected visual acuity did not change significantly in either group. One PRK patient lost one line of BSCVA. Refractive cylinder for the LASIK group improved from -2.53 +/- 1.71 diopters (D) (range: -0.75 to -5.75 D) to -1.28 +/- 0.99 D (range: 0 to -2.50 D) at 6 months. Refractive cylinder in the PRK group improved from -2.21 +/- 2.11 D (range: -0.25 to -5.50 D) to -1.10 +/- 0.42 D (range: -0.50 to -1.50 D). Index of surface irregularity showed a decrease from 60 +/- 12 (range: 46 to 89) to 50 +/- 9 (range: 32 to 63) at 6 months in the LASIK group whereas no significant change was noted in the PRK group. Subjective symptoms, such as glare, halos, ghost images, starbursts, and monocular diplopia, were not present postoperatively. Topography-guided LASIK and PRK resulted in a significant reduction of refractive cylinder and

  3. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  4. Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma adjacent to large blood vessels using 1.5T MRI-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation combined with iodine-125 radioactive seed implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zheng-Yu, E-mail: linsinlan@yahoo.com.cn [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Chen, Jin, E-mail: snow8968851@163.com [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Deng, Xiu-Fen, E-mail: dxf197286@yahoo.com.cn [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: The objective is to study the technology associated with and feasibility of the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) adjacent to large blood vessels using 1.5T MRI-guided radiofrequency ablation combined with iodine-125 (I-125) radioactive seed implantation. Methods: Sixteen patients with a total of 24 HCC lesions (average maximum diameter: 2.35 {+-} 1.03 cm) were pathologically confirmed by biopsy or clinically diagnosed received 1.5T MRI-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment. Each patient had one lesion adjacent to large blood vessels ({>=}3 mm); after the ablation, I-125 radioactive seeds were implanted in the portions of the lesions that were adjacent to the blood vessels. Results: All the ablations and I-125 radioactive seed implantations were successful; a total of 118 seeds were implanted. The ablated lesions exhibited hypointense signals on the T2WI sequence with a thin rim of hyperintense signals; they also exhibited significant hyperintense signals on the T1WI sequence with clear boundaries. The average follow-up period was 11.1 {+-} 6.2 months. There were 23 complete responses and one partial response in the 24 lesions. The alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels of the patients significantly decreased. Conclusion: The 1.5T MRI-guided RFA combined with I-125 radioactive seed implantation for the treatment of HCC adjacent to large blood vessels is an effective technology.

  5. Stable TEM00-mode Nd:YAG solar laser operation by a twisted fused silica light-guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouadjemine, R.; Liang, D.; Almeida, J.; Mehellou, S.; Vistas, C. R.; Kellou, A.; Guillot, E.

    2017-12-01

    To improve the output beam stability of a TEM00-mode solar-pumped laser, a twisted fused silica light-guide was used to achieve uniform pumping along a 3 mm diameter and 50 mm length Nd:YAG rod. The concentrated solar power at the focal spot of a primary parabolic mirror with 1.18 m2 effective collection area was efficiently coupled to the entrance aperture of a 2D-CPC/2V-shaped pump cavity, within which the thin laser rod was pumped. Optimum solar laser design parameters were found through ZEMAX© non-sequential ray-tracing and LASCAD© laser cavity analysis codes. 2.3 W continuous-wave TEM00-mode 1064 nm laser power was measured, corresponding to 1.96 W/m2 collection efficiency and 2.2 W laser beam brightness figure of merit. Excellent TEM00-mode laser beam profile at M2 ≤ 1.05 and very good output power stability of less than 1.6% were achieved. Heliostat orientation error dependent laser power variation was considerably less than previous solar laser pumping schemes.

  6. Guiding of Long-Distance Electric Discharges by Combined Femtosecond and Nanosecond Pulses Emitted by Hybrid KrF Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-30

    laser pulse initiated HV discharge with a time delay of tens nanoseconds – evidently it is developing due to an avalanche -like growth of electron...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0040 Guiding of long-distance electric discharges by combined femtosecond and nanosecond pulses emitted by...and guiding electric discharge , KrF laser, femtosecond pulse , nanosecond pulse , filamentation, plasma channel, lightning control, laser control of

  7. Lower Extremity Injury Patterns in Elite Ballet Dancers: Ultrasound/MRI Imaging Features and an Institutional Overview of Therapeutic Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmani, Razia; Endo, Yoshimi; Bauman, Phillip; Hamilton, William; Potter, Hollis; Adler, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Altered biomechanics from repetitive microtrauma, such as long practice hours in en pointe (tip of the toes) or demi pointe (balls of the feet) predispose ballet dancers to a multitude of musculoskeletal pathologies particularly in the lower extremities. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are radiation-sparing modalities which can be used to confidently evaluate these injuries, with ultrasound (US) offering the added utility of therapeutic intervention at the same time in experienced hands. The purposes of this paper were: (1) to illustrate the US and MRI features of lower extremity injury patterns in ballet dancers, focusing on pathologies commonly encountered at a single orthopedic hospital; (2) to present complementary roles of both ultrasound and MRI in the evaluation of these injuries whenever possible; (3) to review and present our institutional approach towards therapeutic ultrasound-guided interventions by presenting explicit cases. Online searches were performed using the search criteria of "ballet biomechanics" and "ballet injuries." The results were then further narrowed down by limiting articles published in the past 15 years, modality (US and MRI), anatomical region (foot and ankle, hip and knee) and to major radiology, orthopedics, and sports medicine journals. Performing ballet poses major stress to lower extremities and predisposes dancer to several musculoskeletal injuries. These can be adequately evaluated by both US and MRI. US is useful for evaluating superficial structures such as soft tissues, tendons, and ligaments, particularly in the foot and ankle. MRI provides superior resolution of deeper structures such as joints, bone marrow, and cartilage. In addition, US can be used as a therapeutic tool for providing quick symptomatic improvement in these athletes for who "time is money". Performing ballet may cause major stress to the lower extremities, predominantly affecting the foot and ankle, followed by the knee and hip. US

  8. Functional Asymmetries Revealed in Visually Guided Saccades: An fMRI Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, L.; Zago, L.; Vigneau, M.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B.; Mellet, E.; Tzourio-Mazoyer, N. [Centre for Imaging, Neurosciences and Applications to Pathologies, UMR6232 CNRS CEA (France); Mazoyer, B. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Caen (France); Andersson, F. [Institut Federatif de Recherche 135, Imagerie fonctionnelle, Tours (France); Mazoyer, B. [Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Because eye movements are a fundamental tool for spatial exploration, we hypothesized that the neural bases of these movements in humans should be under right cerebral dominance, as already described for spatial attention. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 27 right-handed participants who alternated central fixation with either large or small visually guided saccades (VGS), equally performed in both directions. Hemispheric functional asymmetry was analyzed to identify whether brain regions showing VGS activation elicited hemispheric asymmetries. Hemispheric anatomical asymmetry was also estimated to assess its influence on the VGS functional lateralization. Right asymmetrical activations of a saccadic/attentional system were observed in the lateral frontal eye fields (FEF), the anterior part of the intra-parietal sulcus (aIPS), the posterior third of the superior temporal sulcus (STS), the occipito-temporal junction (MT/V5 area), the middle occipital gyrus, and medially along the calcarine fissure (V1). The present rightward functional asymmetries were not related to differences in gray matter (GM) density/sulci positions between right and left hemispheres in the pre-central, intra-parietal, superior temporal, and extrastriate regions. Only V1 asymmetries were explained for almost 20% of the variance by a difference in the position of the right and left calcarine fissures. Left asymmetrical activations of a saccadic motor system were observed in the medial FEF and in the motor strip eye field along the Rolando sulcus. They were not explained by GM asymmetries. We suggest that the leftward saccadic motor asymmetry is part of a general dominance of the left motor cortex in right-handers, which must include an effect of sighting dominance. Our results demonstrate that, although bilateral by nature, the brain network involved in the execution of VGSs, irrespective of their direction, presented specific right and left asymmetries that were not related to

  9. Functional Asymmetries Revealed in Visually Guided Saccades: An fMRI Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, L.; Zago, L.; Vigneau, M.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B.; Mellet, E.; Tzourio-Mazoyer, N.; Mazoyer, B.; Andersson, F.; Mazoyer, B.

    2009-01-01

    Because eye movements are a fundamental tool for spatial exploration, we hypothesized that the neural bases of these movements in humans should be under right cerebral dominance, as already described for spatial attention. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 27 right-handed participants who alternated central fixation with either large or small visually guided saccades (VGS), equally performed in both directions. Hemispheric functional asymmetry was analyzed to identify whether brain regions showing VGS activation elicited hemispheric asymmetries. Hemispheric anatomical asymmetry was also estimated to assess its influence on the VGS functional lateralization. Right asymmetrical activations of a saccadic/attentional system were observed in the lateral frontal eye fields (FEF), the anterior part of the intra-parietal sulcus (aIPS), the posterior third of the superior temporal sulcus (STS), the occipito-temporal junction (MT/V5 area), the middle occipital gyrus, and medially along the calcarine fissure (V1). The present rightward functional asymmetries were not related to differences in gray matter (GM) density/sulci positions between right and left hemispheres in the pre-central, intra-parietal, superior temporal, and extrastriate regions. Only V1 asymmetries were explained for almost 20% of the variance by a difference in the position of the right and left calcarine fissures. Left asymmetrical activations of a saccadic motor system were observed in the medial FEF and in the motor strip eye field along the Rolando sulcus. They were not explained by GM asymmetries. We suggest that the leftward saccadic motor asymmetry is part of a general dominance of the left motor cortex in right-handers, which must include an effect of sighting dominance. Our results demonstrate that, although bilateral by nature, the brain network involved in the execution of VGSs, irrespective of their direction, presented specific right and left asymmetries that were not related to

  10. MRI study for CT-guided stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshie; Okada, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Uichi; Nishino, Akiko; Ueno, Shinji; Owada, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with acute hypertensive intracerebral hematomas, diagnosed by computed tomography (CT), underwent CT-guided stereotactic aspiration. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained immediately before aspiration, using T 1 -weighted (TR=500 msec, TE=15 msec) and T 2 -weighted (TR=2500 msec, TE=120 msec) sequences and a 0.5 Tesla MR system. On the basis of the MR images the hematomas were divided into peripheral, central, and core segments. The signal intensities were divided into seven grades based on the comparison with white matter. The sequential changes in each segment on the MR images were evaluated, and the ratio of hematoma removal vs. size of residual hematoma was assessed by preoperative MR imaging and pre-and post-operative CT. The hematomas were located in the putamen in 13 cases, the thalamus in 8, combined in 2, and subcortex in 2. The hematomas, targeted in their centers, were evacuated by the aspiration procedure alone, 1 to 12 days after onset (day 0=day of onset). The results were as follows : 1) The proportion of hematomas removed was high after day 4. 2) Sequential T 1 -weighted images showed that the peripheral segments gradually increased in signal intensity, appearing as high-intensity rings that gradually filled and could be easily aspirated. 3) In those cases in which sequential T 2 -weighted images showed the central segments gradually increasing in signal intensity, the hematomas were easily aspirated if the signal was either iso-intense or hyper-intense. 4) Several hematomas had a core that appeared as a high intensity signal on T1-weighted images and as a low intensity signal on T 2 -weighted images; these hematomas could not be aspirated. (author)

  11. Laser generated guided waves and finite element modeling for the thickness gauging of thin layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, F; Jenot, F; Ouaftouh, M; Duquennoy, M; Ourak, M

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, nondestructive testing has been performed on a thin gold layer deposited on a 2 in. silicon wafer. Guided waves were generated and studied using a laser ultrasonic setup and a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform technique was employed to obtain the dispersion curves. A gold layer thickness of 1.33 microm has been determined with a +/-5% margin of error using the shape of the two first propagating modes, assuming for the substrate and the layer an uncertainty on the elastic parameters of +/-2.5%. A finite element model has been implemented to validate the data post-treatment and the experimental results. A good agreement between the numerical simulation, the analytical modeling and the experimentations has been observed. This method was considered suitable for thickness layer higher than 0.7 microm.

  12. MR imaging-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: Reduction of false-negative biopsies by short-term control MRI 24–48 h after biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrs, S.D.; Hattermann, V.; Preibsch, H.; Hahn, M.; Staebler, A.; Claussen, C.D.; Siegmann-Luz, K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate whether another contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination 24–48 h after MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (MRI-VAB) can reduce the rate of false-negative cases. Materials and methods: The study included 252 patients who underwent MRI-VAB for the clarification of 299 lesions. The success of MRI-VAB was assessed at interventional MRI and another CE MRI 24–48 h after the intervention. In cases of successful MRI-VAB (complete or partial lesion removal) and benign histological results, follow-up breast MRI was performed. In cases of unsuccessful biopsy (unchanged lesion), tissue sampling was repeated. False-negative cases were calculated to assess the diagnostic value of MRI follow-up within 2 days after intervention. Results: Ninety-eight malignant (32.8%) and 201 (67.2%) benign lesions were diagnosed using MRI-VAB. At immediate unenhanced control MRI, all lesions were assessed as successfully biopsied. In 18 benign cases (6%), CE MRI after 24–48 h showed an unsuccessful intervention. Further tissue sampling revealed another 13 cancers in these patients. This results in a false-negative rate of 11.7%. Follow-up MRI of the benign lesions presented no further malignancy. Conclusions: MRI-VAB with immediate unenhanced control offers a success rate of 94%. The rate of false-negative biopsies (11.7%) could be reduced to zero by using short-term follow-up MRI. Therefore, a further CE breast MRI 24–48 h after benign MRI-VAB to eliminate missed cancers is recommended. - Highlights: • Some suspicious breast lesions are only seen on MRI. • They can be biopsied by a MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy system. • Inadequate sampling causes some false-negative biopsies. • We evaluate an additional control MRI 24 to 48 hours after biopsy. • A reduced rate of the false-negative biopsies was found

  13. Selective removal of esthetic composite restorations with spectral guided laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ivana; Chan, Kenneth H.; Tsuji, Grant H.; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Dental composites are used for a wide range of applications such as fillings for cavities, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and closure of gaps (diastemas) between teeth by esthetic bonding. Anterior restorations are used to replace missing, diseased and unsightly tooth structure for both appearance and function. When these restorations must be replaced, they are difficult to remove mechanically without causing excessive removal or damage to enamel because dental composites are color matched to teeth. Previous studies have shown that CO2 lasers have high ablation selectivity and are well suited for removal of composite on occlusal surfaces while minimizing healthy tissue loss. A spectral feedback guidance system may be used to discriminate between dental composite and dental hard tissue for selective ablation of composite material. The removal of composite restorations filling diastemas is more challenging due to the esthetic concern for anterior teeth. The objective of this study is to determine if composite spanning a diastema between anterior teeth can be removed by spectral guided laser ablation at clinically relevant rates with minimal damage to peripheral healthy tissue and with higher selectivity than a high speed dental handpiece.

  14. Automatic Measurement in Large-Scale Space with the Laser Theodolite and Vision Guiding Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The multitheodolite intersection measurement is a traditional approach to the coordinate measurement in large-scale space. However, the procedure of manual labeling and aiming results in the low automation level and the low measuring efficiency, and the measurement accuracy is affected easily by the manual aiming error. Based on the traditional theodolite measuring methods, this paper introduces the mechanism of vision measurement principle and presents a novel automatic measurement method for large-scale space and large workpieces (equipment combined with the laser theodolite measuring and vision guiding technologies. The measuring mark is established on the surface of the measured workpiece by the collimating laser which is coaxial with the sight-axis of theodolite, so the cooperation targets or manual marks are no longer needed. With the theoretical model data and the multiresolution visual imaging and tracking technology, it can realize the automatic, quick, and accurate measurement of large workpieces in large-scale space. Meanwhile, the impact of artificial error is reduced and the measuring efficiency is improved. Therefore, this method has significant ramification for the measurement of large workpieces, such as the geometry appearance characteristics measuring of ships, large aircraft, and spacecraft, and deformation monitoring for large building, dams.

  15. MR-guided percutaneous biopsy of solitary pulmonary lesions using a 1.0-T open high-field MRI scanner with respiratory gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Xu, Yujun; He, Xiangmeng; Lue, Yubo; Liu, Qiang; Li, Chengli [Department of Interventional MRI, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Key Laboratory of Advanced Medical Imaging Technologies and Applications, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, Lei [Qingdao Central Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto [Turku University Hospital, The South Western Finland Imaging Centre, Turku (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety and accuracy of MR-guided percutaneous biopsy of solitary pulmonary lesions using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating. Sixty-five patients with 65 solitary pulmonary lesions underwent MR-guided percutaneous coaxial cutting needle biopsy using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating. Lesions were divided into two groups according to maximum lesion diameters: ≤2.0 cm (n = 31) and >2.0 cm (n = 34). The final diagnosis was established in surgery and subsequent histology. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were compared between the groups using Fisher's exact test. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of MRI-guided percutaneous pulmonary biopsy in diagnosing malignancy were 96.9 %, 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were 96.8 %, 96.3 % and 100 % for lesions 2.0 cm or smaller and 97.1 %, 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively, for lesions larger than 2.0 cm. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Biopsy-induced complications encountered were pneumothorax in 12.3 % (8/65) and haemoptysis in 4.6 % (3/65). There were no serious complications. MRI-guided percutaneous biopsy using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating is an accurate and safe diagnostic technique in evaluation of pulmonary lesions. (orig.)

  16. Wavefront error budget development for the Thirty Meter Telescope laser guide star adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Luc; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the modeling effort undertaken to derive the wavefront error (WFE) budget for the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), which is the facility, laser guide star (LGS), dual-conjugate adaptive optics (AO) system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The budget describes the expected performance of NFIRAOS at zenith, and has been decomposed into (i) first-order turbulence compensation terms (120 nm on-axis), (ii) opto-mechanical implementation errors (84 nm), (iii) AO component errors and higher-order effects (74 nm) and (iv) tip/tilt (TT) wavefront errors at 50% sky coverage at the galactic pole (61 nm) with natural guide star (NGS) tip/tilt/focus/astigmatism (TTFA) sensing in J band. A contingency of about 66 nm now exists to meet the observatory requirement document (ORD) total on-axis wavefront error of 187 nm, mainly on account of reduced TT errors due to updated windshake modeling and a low read-noise NGS wavefront sensor (WFS) detector. A detailed breakdown of each of these top-level terms is presented, together with a discussion on its evaluation using a mix of high-order zonal and low-order modal Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. TU-H-BRA-01: The Physics of High Power Radiofrequency Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the radiofrequency waves emanating from linear accelerator components from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system of an integrated MRI-linac. Methods: An MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. The radiofrequency waves created by the accelerating process would degrade MR image quality, so a method for containing the radiofrequency waves and isolating the MR imager from them was developed. The linear accelerator radiofrequency modulator was placed outside the room, so a filter was designed to eliminate the radiofrequency corresponding to the proton Larmour frequency of 14.7 MHz. Placing the radiofrequency emitting components in a typical Faraday cage would have reduced the radiofrequency emissions, but the design would be susceptible to small gaps in the shield due to the efficiency of the Faraday cage reflecting internal radiofrequency emissions. To reduce internal radiofrequency reflections, the Faraday cage was lined with carbon fiber sheets. Carbon fiber has the property of attenuating the radiofrequency energy so that the overall radiofrequency field inside the Faraday cage is reduced, decreasing any radiofrequency energy emitted from small gaps in the cage walls. Results: Within a 1.2 MHz band centered on the Larmor frequency, the radiofrequency (RF) leakage from the Faraday cage was measured to be −90 dB with no RF on, −40 dB with the RF on and no shield, returning to −90 dB with the RF on and shields in place. The radiofrequency filter attenuated the linear accelerator modulator emissions in the 14.7 MHz band by 70 dB. Conclusions: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of isolating the high power RF system from the MRI, has been solved. The measured radiofrequency emissions are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This research was

  18. TU-H-BRA-01: The Physics of High Power Radiofrequency Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J; Low, D; Mutic, S; Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the radiofrequency waves emanating from linear accelerator components from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system of an integrated MRI-linac. Methods: An MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. The radiofrequency waves created by the accelerating process would degrade MR image quality, so a method for containing the radiofrequency waves and isolating the MR imager from them was developed. The linear accelerator radiofrequency modulator was placed outside the room, so a filter was designed to eliminate the radiofrequency corresponding to the proton Larmour frequency of 14.7 MHz. Placing the radiofrequency emitting components in a typical Faraday cage would have reduced the radiofrequency emissions, but the design would be susceptible to small gaps in the shield due to the efficiency of the Faraday cage reflecting internal radiofrequency emissions. To reduce internal radiofrequency reflections, the Faraday cage was lined with carbon fiber sheets. Carbon fiber has the property of attenuating the radiofrequency energy so that the overall radiofrequency field inside the Faraday cage is reduced, decreasing any radiofrequency energy emitted from small gaps in the cage walls. Results: Within a 1.2 MHz band centered on the Larmor frequency, the radiofrequency (RF) leakage from the Faraday cage was measured to be −90 dB with no RF on, −40 dB with the RF on and no shield, returning to −90 dB with the RF on and shields in place. The radiofrequency filter attenuated the linear accelerator modulator emissions in the 14.7 MHz band by 70 dB. Conclusions: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of isolating the high power RF system from the MRI, has been solved. The measured radiofrequency emissions are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This research was

  19. Time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder side effects after MRI-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, P.; Georg, D.; Poetter, R.; Doerr, W. [Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Medical University Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Comprehensive Cancer Centre; Boni, A.; Ghabuous, A. [Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Goldner, G.; Schmid, M.P. [Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Comprehensive Cancer Centre

    2013-07-15

    Background and purpose: To analyze the time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder complications after brachytherapy for cervical cancer and to compare the incidence- and prevalence rates thereof. Patients and methods: A total of 225 patients were treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy. Late side effects were assessed prospectively using the Late Effects in Normal Tissue - Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic (LENT/SOMA) scale. The parameters analyzed were time to onset, duration, actuarial incidence- (occurrence of new side effects during a defined time period) and prevalence rates (side effects existing at a defined time point). Results: Median follow-up was 44 months. Side effects (grade 1-4) in rectum and bladder were present in 31 and 49 patients, 14 and 27 months (mean time to onset) after treatment, respectively. All rectal and 76 % of bladder side effects occurred within 3 years after radiotherapy. Mean duration of rectal events was 19 months; 81 % resolved within 3 years of their initial diagnosis. Mean duration of bladder side effects was 20 months; 61 % resolved within 3 years. The 3- and 5-year actuarial complication rates were 16 and 19 % in rectum and 18 and 28 % in bladder, respectively. The corresponding prevalence rates were 9 and 2 % (rectum) and 18 and 21 % (bladder), respectively. Conclusion: Late side effects after cervical cancer radiotherapy are partially reversible, but their time course is organ-dependent. The combined presentation of incidence- and prevalence rates provides the most comprehensive information. (orig.)

  20. Time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder side effects after MRI-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, P.; Georg, D.; Poetter, R.; Doerr, W.; Medical University Vienna; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien; Boni, A.; Ghabuous, A.; Goldner, G.; Schmid, M.P.; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder complications after brachytherapy for cervical cancer and to compare the incidence- and prevalence rates thereof. Patients and methods: A total of 225 patients were treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy. Late side effects were assessed prospectively using the Late Effects in Normal Tissue - Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic (LENT/SOMA) scale. The parameters analyzed were time to onset, duration, actuarial incidence- (occurrence of new side effects during a defined time period) and prevalence rates (side effects existing at a defined time point). Results: Median follow-up was 44 months. Side effects (grade 1-4) in rectum and bladder were present in 31 and 49 patients, 14 and 27 months (mean time to onset) after treatment, respectively. All rectal and 76 % of bladder side effects occurred within 3 years after radiotherapy. Mean duration of rectal events was 19 months; 81 % resolved within 3 years of their initial diagnosis. Mean duration of bladder side effects was 20 months; 61 % resolved within 3 years. The 3- and 5-year actuarial complication rates were 16 and 19 % in rectum and 18 and 28 % in bladder, respectively. The corresponding prevalence rates were 9 and 2 % (rectum) and 18 and 21 % (bladder), respectively. Conclusion: Late side effects after cervical cancer radiotherapy are partially reversible, but their time course is organ-dependent. The combined presentation of incidence- and prevalence rates provides the most comprehensive information. (orig.)

  1. Real-time three dimensional CT and MRI to guide interventions for congenital heart disease and acquired pulmonary vein stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharos, Patcharapong; Setser, Randolph M; Bradley-Skelton, Sharon; Prieto, Lourdes R

    2017-10-01

    To validate the feasibility and spatial accuracy of pre-procedural 3D images to 3D rotational fluoroscopy registration to guide interventional procedures in patients with congenital heart disease and acquired pulmonary vein stenosis. Cardiac interventions in patients with congenital and structural heart disease require complex catheter manipulation. Current technology allows registration of the anatomy obtained from 3D CT and/or MRI to be overlaid onto fluoroscopy. Thirty patients scheduled for interventional procedures from 12/2012 to 8/2015 were prospectively recruited. A C-arm CT using a biplane C-arm system (Artis zee, VC14H, Siemens Healthcare) was acquired to enable 3D3D registration with pre-procedural images. Following successful image fusion, the anatomic landmarks marked in pre-procedural images were overlaid on live fluoroscopy. The accuracy of image registration was determined by measuring the distance between overlay markers and a reference point in the image. The clinical utility of the registration was evaluated as either "High", "Medium" or "None". Seventeen patients with congenital heart disease and 13 with acquired pulmonary vein stenosis were enrolled. Accuracy and benefit of registration were not evaluated in two patients due to suboptimal images. The distance between the marker and the actual anatomical location was 0-2 mm in 18 (64%), 2-4 mm in 3 (11%) and >4 mm in 7 (25%) patients. 3D3D registration was highly beneficial in 18 (64%), intermediate in 3 (11%), and not beneficial in 7 (25%) patients. 3D3D registration can facilitate complex congenital and structural interventions. It may reduce procedure time, radiation and contrast dose.

  2. Cost-effectiveness and resource use of implementing MRI-guided NACT in ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancers in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miquel-Cases, Anna; Steuten, Lotte M. G.; Rigter, Lisanne S.; Harten, Wim H. van

    2016-01-01

    Response-guided neoadjuvant chemotherapy (RG-NACT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is effective in treating oestrogen receptor positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (ER-positive/HER2-negative) breast cancer. We estimated the expected cost-effectiveness and resources required for its implementation compared to conventional-NACT. A Markov model compared costs, quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs) and costs/QALY of RG-NACT vs. conventional-NACT, from a hospital perspective over a 5-year time horizon. Health services required for and health outcomes of implementation were estimated via resource modelling analysis, considering a current (4 %) and a full (100 %) implementation scenario. RG-NACT was expected to be more effective and less costly than conventional NACT in both implementation scenarios, with 94 % (current) and 95 % (full) certainty, at a willingness to pay threshold of €20.000/QALY. Fully implementing RG-NACT in the Dutch target population of 6306 patients requires additional 5335 MRI examinations and an (absolute) increase in the number of MRI technologists, by 3.6 fte (full-time equivalent), and of breast radiologists, by 0.4 fte. On the other hand, it prevents 9 additional relapses, 143 cancer deaths, 23 congestive heart failure events and 2 myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukaemia events. Considering cost-effectiveness, RG-NACT is expected to dominate conventional-NACT. While personnel capacity is likely to be sufficient for a full implementation scenario, MRI utilization needs to be intensified

  3. Awake language mapping and 3-Tesla intraoperative MRI-guided volumetric resection for gliomas in language areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junfeng; Wu, Jinsong; Yao, Chengjun; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Qiu, Tianming; Hu, Xiaobing; Zhang, Jie; Gong, Xiu; Liang, Weimin; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2013-09-01

    The use of both awake surgery and intraoperative MRI (iMRI) has been reported to optimize the maximal safe resection of gliomas. However, there has been little research into combining these two demanding procedures. We report our unique experience with, and methodology of, awake surgery in a movable iMRI system, and we quantitatively evaluate the contribution of the combination on the extent of resection (EOR) and functional outcome of patients with gliomas involving language areas. From March 2011 to November 2011, 30 consecutive patients who underwent awake surgery with iMRI guidance were prospectively investigated. The EOR was assessed by volumetric analysis. Language assessment was conducted before surgery and 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after surgery using the Aphasia Battery of Chinese. Awake language mapping integrated with 3.0 Tesla iMRI was safely performed for all patients. An additional resection was conducted in 11 of 30 patients (36.7%) after iMRI. The median EOR significantly increased from 92.5% (range, 75.1-97.0%) to 100% (range, 92.6-100%) as a result of iMRI (p<0.01). Gross total resection was achieved in 18 patients (60.0%), and in seven of those patients (23.3%), the gross total resection could be attributed to iMRI. A total of 12 patients (40.0%) suffered from transient language deficits; however, only one (3.3%) patient developed a permanent deficit. This study demonstrates the potential utility of combining awake craniotomy with iMRI; it is safe and reliable to perform awake surgery using a movable iMRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Laser Cutting of CFRP with a Fibre Guided High Power Nanosecond Laser Source - Influence of the Optical Fibre Diameter on Quality and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, S.; Bastick, S.; Staehr, R.; Jaeschke, P.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    For the development of a robot based laser cutting process of automotive 3D parts consisting of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP), investigations with a newly developed fibre guided nanosecond pulsed laser with an average power of PL = 1.5 kW were conducted. In order to investigate the best combination of quality and process time 2 different optical fibres were used, with diameters of df = 400 μm and df = 600 μm. The main differences between the two setups are the resulting focal diameter and the maximum available pulse energy up to EP = 80 mJ. In a first instance, a comparable investigation was performed with both fibres for a constant pulse overlap. For each fibre the minimum required line energy was investigated and cuts were performed, distributed over the complete parameter range of the laser source. The influences of the fibre diameter on the quality and efficiency of the cutting process are summarized and discussed.

  5. CT-guided percutaneous laser disc decompression with Ceralas D, a diode laser with 980-nm wavelength and 200-μm fiber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevargez, A.; Groenemeyer, D.W.H.; Czerwinski, F.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compact, portable Ceralas-D diode laser (CeramOptec; 980+30 nm wavelength, 200-μm optical fiber) concerning clinical usefulness, handling, and clinical results in the CT-guided treatment of herniated lumbar discs. The positioning of the canula in intradiscal space, the placement of the laser fiber into the disc through the lying canula, and the vaporization itself were carried out under CT-guidance. Due to the thin fiber optic, it was possible to use a thin 23-gauge canula. The laser procedure was performed in 0.1- to 1-s shots with 1-s pulse pause and 4-W power output. A total of 1650-2300 J was applied on each percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Results in 26 patients were established with a visual-analogue scale (VAS). On the follow-up examinations, 46% of the patients were absolutely pain free (>85% VAS) and fully active in everyday life after 4 postoperative weeks. Thirty-one percent of patients were relieved of the leg pain but had occasional back pain without sensorimotor impairment. Fifteen percent sensed a slight alleviation (>50% VAS) of the radiate pain. Eight percent did not experience radicular or pseudo-radicular pain alleviation (<25% VAS). Cerales-D proves to be an efficient tool for CT-guided PLDD on non-sequestered herniated lumbar discs. (orig.)

  6. Development of a Laser-Guided Deep-Hole Internal-Grinding Tool (Series 1) : Grinding Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuki, Akio; Onikura, Hiromichi; Sajima, Takao; Park, Hyunkoo

    2005-01-01

    The laser-guided deep-hole internal grinding tool is developed to bore accurate and straight deep-holes with high surface quality. The tool consists of a grinding head, the front and rear actuators mounted on an actuator holder and a laser diode set in the back end of the holder. The grinding head consists of a diamond or CBN wheel, an air motor, and the piezoelectric actuators for the compensation of tool diameter. The grinding wheel is located eccentrically at the grinding head. The grindin...

  7. Comparison of the corneal biomechanical effects after small-incision lenticule extraction and Q value guided femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:By comparing the changes of biomechanical properties of the cornea after small-incision lenticule extraction(SMILEand those after Q value guided femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis(FSLASIK, to study the stability of biomechanical properties of the cornea after these two kinds of surgery and provide objective data for clinical operation.METHODS: Prospective comparative cases. One hundred and two cases(200 eyeswith myopia and myopic astigmatism were divided into 2 groups, 51 cases(100 eyesfor SMILE, and 51 cases(100 eyesfor Q value guided FS-LASIK. Corneal hysteresis(CHand the corneal resistance factor(CRFwere quantitatively assessed with the Ocular Response Analyzer(ORApreoperatively and 1d, 2wk, 1 and 3mo postoperatively.RESULTS: The decrease in CH and the CRF were statistically significant in both groups(PP>0.05. There were no statistically significant differences between the biomechanical changes in the two groups at any time(P>0.05.CONCLUSION: Both SMILE and Q value guided FS-LASIK can cause biomechanical decreases in the cornea. After 1d postoperatively, the decreases are nearly stable. There are no significant differences between the effect of SMILE and Q value guided FS-LASIK on the biomechanical properties of the cornea.

  8. Wavefront-guided laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy in low myopia, myopic astigmatism and high myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Hashemian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the safety, efficacy, predictability, stability and complications of wavefront-guided laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy(LASEKin low myopia, myopic astigmatism and high myopia correction.METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 416 eyes were assigned to 3 groups: 159 eyes with low myopia(LMand mean refractive spherical equivalent(MRSEof -3.68±1.33 dioptre(D; 161 eyes with myopic astigmatism(MAand MRSE of -5.99±2.24D and mean cylinder of 2.41±1.07D; and 96 eyes with high myopia(HMand MRSE of -7.41±0.80D. After an epithelial flap creation, a wavefront-based excimer laser ablation was performed. Safety, efficacy, predictability and stability were evaluated at day 10, 2, 6 and 12mo postoperatively.RESULTS:At 12mo, the MRSE was -0.36±0.31D in LM group, 0.15±0.41D in MA group and 0.58±0.68D in HM group. The uncorrected visual acuity(UCVAwas 20/20 in 90.60% of patients in LM group, 78.90% in MA group and 67% in HM group. Efficacy indices were 0.98, 1.04 and 0.92 in LM, MA and HM groups, respectively. Safety indices were 1.00, 1.07 and 1.05 in LM, MA and HM respectively. Five eyes(3.1%in the LM group gained 1 line. Forty-four eyes(27.3%in MA gained 1-3 lines and eighteen eyes(19.2%of HM group gained 1-2 lines of BSCVA. Only 2 eyes in LM group developed corneal haze. There were not statistically significant differences in efficacy and safety indices amongst three groups. CONCLUSION: Wavefront-guided LASEK is an effective and safe procedure for the treatment of LM, MA, and HM.although in myopic astigmatism the predictability, efficacy and safety indices had been better.

  9. Capabilities of a Laser Guide Star for a Large Segmented Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James R.; Carlton, Ashley; Douglas, Ewan S.; Males, Jared R.; Lumbres, Jennifer; Feinberg, Lee; Guyon, Olivier; Marlow, Weston; Cahoy, Kerri L.

    2018-01-01

    Large segmented mirror telescopes are planned for future space telescope missions such as LUVOIR (Large UV Optical Infrared Surveyor) to enable the improvement in resolution and contrast necessary to directly image Earth-like exoplanets, in addition to making contributions to general astrophysics. The precision surface control of these complex, large optical systems, which may have over a hundred meter-sized segments, is a challenge. Our initial simulations show that imaging a star of 2nd magnitude or brighter with a Zernike wavefront sensor should relax the segment stability requirements by factors between 10 and 50 depending on the wavefront control strategy. Fewer than fifty stars brighter than magnitude 2 can be found in the sky. A laser guide star (LGS) on a companion spacecraft will allow the telescope to target a dimmer science star and achieve wavefront control to the required stability without requiring slew or repointing maneuvers.We present initial results for one possible mission architecture, with a LGS flying at 100,000 km range from the large telescope in an L2 halo orbit, using a laser transmit power of 8 days) for an expenditure of system, it can be accommodated in a 6U CubeSat bus, but may require an extended period of time to transition between targets and match velocities with the telescope (e.g. 6 days to transit 10 degrees). If the LGS uses monopropellant propulsion, it must use at least a 27U bus to achieve the the same delta-V capability, but can transition between targets much more rapidly (flight are being refined. A low-cost prototype mission (e.g. between a small satellite in LEO and an LGS in GEO) to validate the feasibility is in development.

  10. MRI-based 3D pelvic autonomous innervation: a first step towards image-guided pelvic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, M.M. [University Montpellier I, Laboratory of Experimental Anatomy Faculty of Medicine Montpellier-Nimes, Montpellier (France); Macri, F.; Beregi, J.P. [Nimes University Hospital, University Montpellier 1, Radiology Department, Nimes (France); Mazars, R.; Prudhomme, M. [University Montpellier I, Laboratory of Experimental Anatomy Faculty of Medicine Montpellier-Nimes, Montpellier (France); Nimes University Hospital, University Montpellier 1, Digestive Surgery Department, Nimes (France); Droupy, S. [Nimes University Hospital, University Montpellier 1, Urology-Andrology Department, Nimes (France)

    2014-08-15

    To analyse pelvic autonomous innervation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison with anatomical macroscopic dissection on cadavers. Pelvic MRI was performed in eight adult human cadavers (five men and three women) using a total of four sequences each: T1, T1 fat saturation, T2, diffusion weighed. Images were analysed with segmentation software in order to extract nervous tissue. Key height points of the pelvis autonomous innervation were located in every specimen. Standardised pelvis dissections were then performed. Distances between the same key points and the three anatomical references forming a coordinate system were measured on MRIs and dissections. Concordance (Lin's concordance correlation coefficient) between MRI and dissection was calculated. MRI acquisition allowed an adequate visualization of the autonomous innervation. Comparison between 3D MRI images and dissection showed concordant pictures. The statistical analysis showed a mean difference of less than 1 cm between MRI and dissection measures and a correct concordance correlation coefficient on at least two coordinates for each point. Our acquisition and post-processing method demonstrated that MRI is suitable for detection of autonomous pelvic innervations and can offer a preoperative nerve cartography. (orig.)

  11. SU-C-BRA-01: Interactive Auto-Segmentation for Bowel in Online Adaptive MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy by Using a Multi-Region Labeling Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y; Chen, I; Kashani, R; Wan, H; Maughan, N; Muccigrosso, D; Parikh, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In MRI-guided online adaptive radiation therapy, re-contouring of bowel is time-consuming and can impact the overall time of patients on table. The study aims to auto-segment bowel on volumetric MR images by using an interactive multi-region labeling algorithm. Methods: 5 Patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer underwent fractionated radiotherapy (18–25 fractions each, total 118 fractions) on an MRI-guided radiation therapy system with a 0.35 Tesla magnet and three Co-60 sources. At each fraction, a volumetric MR image of the patient was acquired when the patient was in the treatment position. An interactive two-dimensional multi-region labeling technique based on graph cut solver was applied on several typical MRI images to segment the large bowel and small bowel, followed by a shape based contour interpolation for generating entire bowel contours along all image slices. The resulted contours were compared with the physician’s manual contouring by using metrics of Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. Results: Image data sets from the first 5 fractions of each patient were selected (total of 25 image data sets) for the segmentation test. The algorithm segmented the large and small bowel effectively and efficiently. All bowel segments were successfully identified, auto-contoured and matched with manual contours. The time cost by the algorithm for each image slice was within 30 seconds. For large bowel, the calculated Dice coefficients and Hausdorff distances (mean±std) were 0.77±0.07 and 13.13±5.01mm, respectively; for small bowel, the corresponding metrics were 0.73±0.08and 14.15±4.72mm, respectively. Conclusion: The preliminary results demonstrated the potential of the proposed algorithm in auto-segmenting large and small bowel on low field MRI images in MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy. Further work will be focused on improving its segmentation accuracy and lessening human interaction.

  12. SU-C-BRA-01: Interactive Auto-Segmentation for Bowel in Online Adaptive MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy by Using a Multi-Region Labeling Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y; Chen, I; Kashani, R; Wan, H; Maughan, N; Muccigrosso, D; Parikh, P [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-guided online adaptive radiation therapy, re-contouring of bowel is time-consuming and can impact the overall time of patients on table. The study aims to auto-segment bowel on volumetric MR images by using an interactive multi-region labeling algorithm. Methods: 5 Patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer underwent fractionated radiotherapy (18–25 fractions each, total 118 fractions) on an MRI-guided radiation therapy system with a 0.35 Tesla magnet and three Co-60 sources. At each fraction, a volumetric MR image of the patient was acquired when the patient was in the treatment position. An interactive two-dimensional multi-region labeling technique based on graph cut solver was applied on several typical MRI images to segment the large bowel and small bowel, followed by a shape based contour interpolation for generating entire bowel contours along all image slices. The resulted contours were compared with the physician’s manual contouring by using metrics of Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. Results: Image data sets from the first 5 fractions of each patient were selected (total of 25 image data sets) for the segmentation test. The algorithm segmented the large and small bowel effectively and efficiently. All bowel segments were successfully identified, auto-contoured and matched with manual contours. The time cost by the algorithm for each image slice was within 30 seconds. For large bowel, the calculated Dice coefficients and Hausdorff distances (mean±std) were 0.77±0.07 and 13.13±5.01mm, respectively; for small bowel, the corresponding metrics were 0.73±0.08and 14.15±4.72mm, respectively. Conclusion: The preliminary results demonstrated the potential of the proposed algorithm in auto-segmenting large and small bowel on low field MRI images in MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy. Further work will be focused on improving its segmentation accuracy and lessening human interaction.

  13. SU-G-JeP2-03: Automatic Quantification of MLC Positional Accuracy in An MRI Guided Radiotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X; Studenski, M; Yang, F; Dogan, N; Lamichhane, N; Padgett, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI-guided-radiotherapy (MRIGRT) systems lack many features of traditional Linac based RT systems and specialized tests need to be developed to evaluate MLC performance. This work describes automatic tools for the analysis of positional accuracy of an MLC equipped MRIGRT system. Methods: This MLC analysis tool was developed for the MRIdian™ RT system which has three Co-60 equipped treatment heads each with a double focused MLC containing 30 leaf pairs, leaf thickness is 1.05cm defined at isocenter (SAD 105 cm). For MLC positional analysis a picket fence test was performed using a 25.4cm × 25.4cm Gafchromic™ RTQA2 film placed between 5cm solidwater and a 30cm × 30cm × 1cm jigwire phantom with seven embedded parallel metal strips 4cm apart. A plan was generated to deliver 2Gy per field and seven 23.1cm × 2cm fields centered over each wire in the phantom. For each leaf pair the center of the radiation profile was determined by fitting the horizontal profile with a Gaussian model and determining the center of the FWHM. This was compared with the metal strip location to determine any deviation. The following metrics were used to evaluate the deviations per gantry angle including maximum, minimum, mean, Kurtosis, and skewness. Results: The identified maximum/mean leaf deviations are, 1.32/0.55 mm for gantry 0°, 1.59/0.76 mm for gantry 90°, and 1.19/0.39 mm for gantry 270°. The percentage of leaf deviation less than 1mm are 90.0% at 0°, 74.6% at 90°, and 97.0% at 270°. Kurtosis/skewness of the leaf deviation are 2.41/0.14 at 0°, 2.53/0.23 at 90°, 3.33/0.83 at 270°, respectively. Conclusion: This work presents an automatic tool for evaluation of the MLC position accuracy of the MRIdian™ radiotherapy system which can be used to benchmark the performance of the MLC system for each treatment head and track the results longitudinally.

  14. Technical Note: Dose effects of 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on tissue interfaces in MRI-guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xinfeng; Prior, Phil; Chen, Guang-Pei; Schultz, Christopher J.; Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The integration of MRI with a linear accelerator (MR-linac) offers great potential for high-precision delivery of radiation therapy (RT). However, the electron deflection resulting from the presence of a transverse magnetic field (TMF) can affect the dose distribution, particularly the electron return effect (ERE) at tissue interfaces. The purpose of the study is to investigate the dose effects of ERE at air-tissue and lung-tissue interfaces during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. Methods: IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for representative pancreas, lung, breast, and head and neck (HN) cases were generated following commonly used clinical dose volume (DV) criteria. In each case, three types of plans were generated: (1) the original plan generated without a TMF; (2) the reconstructed plan generated by recalculating the original plan with the presence of a TMF of 1.5 T (no optimization); and (3) the optimized plan generated by a full optimization with TMF = 1.5 T. These plans were compared using a variety of DV parameters, including V{sub 100%}, D{sub 95%}, DHI [dose heterogeneity index: (D{sub 20%}–D{sub 80%})/D{sub prescription}], D{sub max}, and D{sub 1cc} in OARs (organs at risk) and tissue interface. All the optimizations and calculations in this work were performed on static data. Results: The dose recalculation under TMF showed the presence of the 1.5 T TMF can slightly reduce V{sub 100%} and D{sub 95%} for PTV, with the differences being less than 4% for all but one lung case studied. The TMF results in considerable increases in D{sub max} and D{sub 1cc} on the skin in all cases, mostly between 10% and 35%. The changes in D{sub max} and D{sub 1cc} on air cavity walls are dependent upon site, geometry, and size, with changes ranging up to 15%. The VMAT plans lead to much smaller dose effects from ERE compared to fixed-beam IMRT in pancreas case. When the TMF is considered in the plan optimization, the

  15. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  16. Incorporation of a laser range scanner into image-guided liver surgery: Surface acquisition, registration, and tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Cash, David M.; Sinha, Tuhin K.; Chapman, William C.; Terawaki, Hiromi; Dawant, Benoit M.; Galloway, Robert L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    As image guided surgical procedures become increasingly diverse, there will be more scenarios where point-based fiducials cannot be accurately localized for registration and rigid body assumptions no longer hold. As a result, procedures will rely more frequently on anatomical surfaces for the basis of image alignment and will require intraoperative geometric data to measure and compensate for tissue deformation in the organ. In this paper we outline methods for which a laser range scanner may...

  17. Prototype of a laser guide star wavefront sensor for the Extremely Large Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, M.; Lombini, M.; Schreiber, L.; Bregoli, G.; Arcidiacono, C.; Cosentino, G.; Diolaiti, E.; Foppiani, I.

    2018-06-01

    The new class of large telescopes, like the future Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), are designed to work with a laser guide star (LGS) tuned to a resonance of atmospheric sodium atoms. This wavefront sensing technique presents complex issues when applied to big telescopes for many reasons, mainly linked to the finite distance of the LGS, the launching angle, tip-tilt indetermination and focus anisoplanatism. The implementation of a laboratory prototype for the LGS wavefront sensor (WFS) at the beginning of the phase study of MAORY (Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics Relay) for ELT first light has been indispensable in investigating specific mitigation strategies for the LGS WFS issues. This paper presents the test results of the LGS WFS prototype under different working conditions. The accuracy within which the LGS images are generated on the Shack-Hartmann WFS has been cross-checked with the MAORY simulation code. The experiments show the effect of noise on centroiding precision, the impact of LGS image truncation on wavefront sensing accuracy as well as the temporal evolution of the sodium density profile and LGS image under-sampling.

  18. GLAS: engineering a common-user Rayleigh laser guide star for adaptive optics on the William Herschel Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Gordon; Abrams, Don Carlos; Apostolakos, Nikolaos; Bassom, Richard; Blackburn, Colin; Blanken, Maarten; Cano Infantes, Diego; Chopping, Alan; Dee, Kevin; Dipper, Nigel; Elswijk, Eddy; Enthoven, Bernard; Gregory, Thomas; ter Horst, Rik; Humphreys, Ron; Idserda, Jan; Jolley, Paul; Kuindersma, Sjouke; McDermid, Richard; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Pico, Sergio; Pragt, Johan; Rees, Simon; Rey, Jürg; Reyes, Marcos; Rutten, René; Schoenmaker, Ton; Skvarc, Jure; Tromp, Niels; Tulloch, Simon; Veninga, Auke

    2006-06-01

    The GLAS (Ground-layer Laser Adaptive-optics System) project is to construct a common-user Rayleigh laser beacon that will work in conjunction with the existing NAOMI adaptive optics system, instruments (near IR imager INGRID, optical integral field spectrograph OASIS, coronagraph OSCA) and infrastructure at the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on La Palma. The laser guide star system will increase sky coverage available to high-order adaptive optics from ~1% to approaching 100% and will be optimized for scientific exploitation of the OASIS integral-field spectrograph at optical wavelengths. Additionally GLAS will be used in on-sky experiments for the application of laser beacons to ELTs. This paper describes the full range of engineering of the project ranging through the laser launch system, wavefront sensors, computer control, mechanisms, diagnostics, CCD detectors and the safety system. GLAS is a fully funded project, with final design completed and all equipment ordered, including the laser. Integration has started on the WHT and first light is expected summer 2006.

  19. Real-time MRI navigated US: Role in diagnosis and guided biopsy of incidental breast lesions and axillary lymph nodes detected on breast MRI but not on second look US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pons, Elena Pastor, E-mail: elenapastorpons@gmail.com; Azcón, Francisco Miras, E-mail: frmiaz00@gmail.com; Casas, María Culiañez, E-mail: mariacc1980@gmail.com; Meca, Salvador Martínez, E-mail: isalvaa@hotmail.com; Espona, José Luis García, E-mail: gespona@hotmail.com

    2014-06-15

    Objectives: To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of real-time ultrasound combined with supine-MRI using volume navigation technique (RtMR-US) in diagnosis and biopsy of incidental breast lesions (ILSM) and axillary lymph nodes (LNSM) suspicious of malignancy on contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Materials and methods: Five hundred and seventy-seven women were examined using breast CE-MRI. Those with incidental breast lesions not identified after second-look ultrasound (US) were recruited for RtMR-US. Biopsy was performed in ILSM. Breast lesions were categorized with BI-RADS system and Fisher’ exact test. Axillary lymph nodes morphology was described. To assess efficacy of RtMR-US, diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, detection rate and Kappa index of conventional-US and RtMR-US were calculated. Results: Forty-three lesions were detected on CE-MRI before navigation. Eighteen were carcinomas and 25 ILSM. Of these, 21 underwent a RtMR-US. Detection rate on RtMR-US (90.7%) was higher than on conventional-US (43%) (p < 0.001). Agreement between both techniques was low (k = 0.138). Twenty ILSM and 2 LNSM were biopsied. Sixty-five percent were benign (100% of BI-RADS3 and 56% of BI-RADS4-5). Diagnostic performance of RtMR-US identifying malignant nodules for overall lesions and for the subgroup of ILSM was respectively: sensitivity 96.3% and 100%, specificity 18.8% and 30.7%, positive predictive value 66.7% and 43.7%, negative predictive value 75% and 100%. In addition RtMR-US enabled biopsy of 2 metastatic lymph nodes. Conclusions: Real time-US with supine-MRI using a volume navigation technique increases the detection of ILSM. RtMR-US may be used to detect occult breast carcinomas and to assess cancer extension, preventing unnecessary MRI-guided biopsies and sentinel lymph node biopsies. Incidental lesions BI-RADS 3 non-detected on conventional-US are probably benign.

  20. SU-E-J-04: Integration of Interstitial High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound Applicators On a Clinical MRI-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment Planning Software Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Partanen, A [Philips Healthcare, Andover, Massachusetts (United States); Ghoshal, G; Burdette, E [Acoustic MedSystems Inc., Savoy, IL (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Interstitial high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) applicators can be used to ablate tissue percutaneously, allowing for minimally-invasive treatment without ionizing radiation [1,2]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usability of combining multielement interstitial HITU applicators with a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound software platform. Methods: The Sonalleve software platform (Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) combines anatomical MRI for target selection and multi-planar MRI thermometry to provide real-time temperature information. The MRI-compatible interstitial US applicators (Acoustic MedSystems, Savoy, IL, USA) had 1–4 cylindrical US elements, each 1 cm long with either 180° or 360° of active surface. Each applicator (4 Fr diameter, enclosed within a 13 Fr flexible catheter) was inserted into a tissue-mimicking agar-silica phantom. Degassed water was circulated around the transducers for cooling and coupling. Based on the location of the applicator, a virtual transducer overlay was added to the software to assist targeting and to allow automatic thermometry slice placement. The phantom was sonicated at 7 MHz for 5 minutes with 6–8 W of acoustic power for each element. MR thermometry data were collected during and after sonication. Results: Preliminary testing indicated that the applicator location could be identified in the planning images and the transducer locations predicted within 1 mm accuracy using the overlay. Ablation zones (thermal dose ≥ 240 CEM43) for 2 active, adjacent US elements ranged from 18 mm × 24 mm (width × length) to 25 mm × 25 mm for the 6 W and 8 W sonications, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of interstitial HITU applicators and this software platform holds promise for novel approaches in minimally-invasive MRI-guided therapy, especially when bony structures or air-filled cavities may preclude extracorporeal HIFU.[1] Diederich et al

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of Robot-Guided, Software Based Transperineal MRI/TRUS Fusion Biopsy of the Prostate in a High Risk Population of Previously Biopsy Negative Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Kroenig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In this study, we compared prostate cancer detection rates between MRI-TRUS fusion targeted and systematic biopsies using a robot-guided, software based transperineal approach. Methods and Patients. 52 patients received a MRIT/TRUS fusion followed by a systematic volume adapted biopsy using the same robot-guided transperineal approach. The primary outcome was the detection rate of clinically significant disease (Gleason grade ≥ 4. Secondary outcomes were detection rate of all cancers, sampling efficiency and utility, and serious adverse event rate. Patients received no antibiotic prophylaxis. Results. From 52 patients, 519 targeted biopsies from 135 lesions and 1561 random biopsies were generated (total n=2080. Overall detection rate of clinically significant PCa was 44.2% (23/52 and 50.0% (26/52 for target and random biopsy, respectively. Sampling efficiency as the median number of cores needed to detect clinically significant prostate cancer was 9 for target (IQR: 6–14.0 and 32 (IQR: 24–32 for random biopsy. The utility as the number of additionally detected clinically significant PCa cases by either strategy was 0% (0/52 for target and 3.9% (2/52 for random biopsy. Conclusions. MRI/TRUS fusion based target biopsy did not show an advantage in the overall detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer.

  2. Safety and tolerability of MRI-guided infusion of AAV2-hAADC into the mid-brain of nonhuman primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldy San Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive neurological disorder caused by mutations in the DDC gene that leads to an inability to synthesize catecholamines and serotonin. As a result, patients suffer compromised development, particularly in motor function. A recent gene replacement clinical trial explored putaminal delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 vector encoding human AADC (AAV2-hAADC in AADC-deficient children. Unfortunately, patients presented only modest amelioration of motor symptoms, which authors acknowledged could be due to insufficient transduction of putamen. We hypothesize that, with the development of a highly accurate MRI-guided cannula placement technology, a more effective approach might be to target the affected mid-brain neurons directly. Transduction of AADC-deficient dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area with locally infused AAV2-hAADC would be expected to lead to restoration of normal dopamine levels in affected children. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term safety and tolerability of bilateral AAV2-hAADC MRI-guided pressurized infusion into the mid-brain of nonhuman primates. Animals received either vehicle, low or high AAV2-hAADC vector dose and were euthanized 1, 3, or 9 months after surgery. Our data indicate that effective mid-brain transduction was achieved without untoward effects.

  3. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, D; Mutic, S; Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount needed for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.

  4. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount needed for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.

  5. Controlling the Laser Guide Star power density distribution at Sodium layer by combining Pre-correction and Beam-shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Wei, Kai; Jin, Kai; Li, Min; Zhang, YuDong

    2018-06-01

    The Sodium laser guide star (LGS) plays a key role in modern astronomical Adaptive Optics Systems (AOSs). The spot size and photon return of the Sodium LGS depend strongly on the laser power density distribution at the Sodium layer and thus affect the performance of the AOS. The power density distribution is degraded by turbulence in the uplink path, launch system aberrations, the beam quality of the laser, and so forth. Even without any aberrations, the TE00 Gaussian type is still not the optimal power density distribution to obtain the best balance between the measurement error and temporal error. To optimize and control the LGS power density distribution at the Sodium layer to an expected distribution type, a method that combines pre-correction and beam-shaping is proposed. A typical result shows that under strong turbulence (Fried parameter (r0) of 5 cm) and for a quasi-continuous wave Sodium laser (power (P) of 15 W), in the best case, our method can effectively optimize the distribution from the Gaussian type to the "top-hat" type and enhance the photon return flux of the Sodium LGS; at the same time, the total error of the AOS is decreased by 36% with our technique for a high power laser and poor seeing.

  6. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  7. Multi-site laser Doppler flowmetry for assessing collateral flow in experimental ischemic stroke: Validation of outcome prediction with acute MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccione, Elisa; Versace, Alessandro; Cho, Tae-Hee; Carone, Davide; Berner, Lise-Prune; Ong, Elodie; Rousseau, David; Cai, Ruiyao; Monza, Laura; Ferrarese, Carlo; Sganzerla, Erik P; Berthezène, Yves; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Wiart, Marlène; Beretta, Simone; Chauveau, Fabien

    2017-06-01

    High variability in infarct size is common in experimental stroke models and affects statistical power and validity of neuroprotection trials. The aim of this study was to explore cerebral collateral flow as a stratification factor for the prediction of ischemic outcome. Transient intraluminal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was induced for 90 min in 18 Wistar rats. Cerebral collateral flow was assessed intra-procedurally using multi-site laser Doppler flowmetry monitoring in both the lateral middle cerebral artery territory and the borderzone territory between middle cerebral artery and anterior cerebral artery. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess acute ischemic lesion (diffusion-weighted imaging, DWI), acute perfusion deficit (time-to-peak, TTP), and final ischemic lesion at 24 h. Infarct volumes and typology at 24 h (large hemispheric versus basal ganglia infarcts) were predicted by both intra-ischemic collateral perfusion and acute DWI lesion volume. Collateral flow assessed by multi-site laser Doppler flowmetry correlated with the corresponding acute perfusion deficit using TTP maps. Multi-site laser Doppler flowmetry monitoring was able to predict ischemic outcome and perfusion deficit in good agreement with acute MRI. Our results support the additional value of cerebral collateral flow monitoring for outcome prediction in experimental ischemic stroke, especially when acute MRI facilities are not available.

  8. SU-G-JeP2-13: Spatial Accuracy Evaluation for Real-Time MR Guided Radiation Therapy Using a Novel Large-Field MRI Distortion Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolak, A; Bayouth, J; Bosca, R; Jackson, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate a large-field MRI phantom for assessment of geometric distortion in whole-body MRI for real-time MR guided radiation therapy. Methods: A prototype CIRS large-field MRI distortion phantom consisting of a PMMA cylinder (33 cm diameter, 30 cm length) containing a 3D-printed orthogonal grid (3 mm diameter rods, 20 mm apart), was filled with 6 mM NiCl_2 and 30 mM NaCl solution. The phantom was scanned at 1.5T and 3.0T on a GE HDxt and Discovery MR750, respectively, and at 0.35T on a ViewRay system. Scans were obtained with and without 3D distortion correction to demonstrate the impact of such corrections. CT images were used as a reference standard for analysis of geometric distortion, as determined by a fully automated gradient-search method developed in Matlab. Results: 1,116 grid points distributed throughout a cylindrical volume 28 cm in diameter and 16 cm in length were identified and analyzed. With 3D distortion correction, average/maximum displacements for the 1.5, 3.0, and 0.35T systems were 0.84/2.91, 1.00/2.97, and 0.95/2.37 mm, respectively. The percentage of points with less than (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mm) total displacement were (73%, 92%, 97%), (54%, 85%, 97%), and (55%, 90%, 99%), respectively. A reduced scan volume of 20 × 20 × 10 cm"3 (representative of a head and neck scan volume) consisting of 420 points was also analyzed. In this volume, the percentage of points with less than (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mm) total displacement were (90%, 99%, 100%), (63%, 95%, 100%), and (75%, 96%, 100%), respectively. Without 3D distortion correction, average/maximum displacements were 1.35/3.67, 1.67/4.46, and 1.51/3.89 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The prototype large-field MRI distortion phantom and developed software provide a thorough assessment of 3D spatial distortions in MRI. The distortions measured were acceptable for RT applications, both for the high field strengths and the system configuration developed by ViewRay.

  9. SU-F-J-17: Patient Localization Using MRI-Guided Soft Tissue for Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Indication for Margin Reduction and Its Feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X; Yang, Y; Jack, N; Santhanam, A; Yang, L; Chen, A; Low, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: On-board MRI provides superior soft-tissue contrast, allowing patient alignment using tumor or nearby critical structures. This study aims to study H&N MRI-guided IGRT to analyze inter-fraction patient setup variations using soft-tissue targets and design appropriate CTV-to-PTV margin and clinical implication. Methods: 282 MR images for 10 H&N IMRT patients treated on a ViewRay system were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were immobilized using a thermoplastic mask on a customized headrest fitted in a radiofrequency coil and positioned to soft-tissue targets. The inter-fraction patient displacements were recorded to compute the PTV margins using the recipe: 2.5∑+0.7σ. New IMRT plans optimized on the revised PTVs were generated to evaluate the delivered dose distributions. An in-house dose deformation registration tool was used to assess the resulting dosimetric consequences when margin adaption is performed based on weekly MR images. The cumulative doses were compared to the reduced margin plans for targets and critical structures. Results: The inter-fraction displacements (and standard deviations), ∑ and σ were tabulated for MRI and compared to kVCBCT. The computed CTV-to-PTV margin was 3.5mm for soft-tissue based registration. There were minimal differences between the planned and delivered doses when comparing clinical and the PTV reduced margin plans: the paired t-tests yielded p=0.38 and 0.66 between the planned and delivered doses for the adapted margin plans for the maximum cord and mean parotid dose, respectively. Target V95 received comparable doses as planned for the reduced margin plans. Conclusion: The 0.35T MRI offers acceptable soft-tissue contrast and good spatial resolution for patient alignment and target visualization. Better tumor conspicuity from MRI allows soft-tissue based alignments with potentially improved accuracy, suggesting a benefit of margin reduction for H&N radiotherapy. The reduced margin plans (i.e., 2 mm) resulted

  10. Parametric evaluation of laser ablation and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with ion guide cooling cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Ding; He Jian; Yu Quan; Chen Lizhi; Hang Wei; Huang Benli

    2008-01-01

    A novel laser ablation and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used for direct elemental analysis of alloys. The system was incorporated with an ion guide cooling cell to reduce the kinetic energy distribution for the purpose of better resolution. Parametric studies have been conducted on the system with respect to the buffer gas pressure and the distance from sample to the nozzle to obtain the maximal signal intensities. In order to obtain satisfactory relative sensitivity coefficients (RSC) for different elements, the influence of the laser irradiance, nozzle voltage, rf frequency and voltage of the hexapole were also investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the RSC of different elements were available for direct semi-quantitative analysis. The mass resolving power (FWHM) of the spectrometer was approximately 7000 (m/Δm) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 10 -6 g/g

  11. Management of peripheral polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy with intravitreal bevacizumab and indocyanine green angiography-guided laser photocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pukhraj Rishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old lady presented with complaints of decreased vision in left eye since one month. Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA was 6/18 in that eye. Fundus examination revealed non-central geographic atrophy and soft drusens at macula in both eyes. Temporal periphery of left eye revealed subretinal exudates with altered sub-RPE hemorrhage mimicking peripheral exudative hemorrhagic chorioretinopathy (PEHCR. Fundus Fluorescein Angiogram showed window defects at macula and blocked fluorescence at temporal periphery in left eye. However, Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA revealed active peripheral choroidal polyps. The patient was successfully treated with intravitreal bevacizumab and ICGA-guided laser photocoagulation. 27 months after laser treatment, BCVA improved to 6/9. Rationale of consecutive anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF treatment followed by more definitive laser photocoagulation is that anti-VEGF aids in resolution of subretinal fluid, thus making the polyp more amenable to focal laser photocoagulation which stabilizes the choroidal vasculature and prevents further leakage.

  12. fMRI of pain studies using laser-induced heat on skin with and without the loved one near the subject - a pilot study on 'love hurts'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofina, T.; Kamil, W. A.; Ahmad, A. H.

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study are to image and investigate the areas of brain response to laser-induced heat pain, to analyse for any difference in the brain response when a subject is alone and when her loved one is present next to the MRI gantry. Pain stimuli was delivered using Th-YAG laser to four female subjects. Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD) fMRI experiment was performed using blocked design paradigm with five blocks of painful (P) stimuli and five blocks of non-painful (NP) stimuli arranged in pseudorandom order with an 18 seconds rest (R) between each stimulation phase. Brain images were obtained from 3T Philips Achieva MRI scanner using 32-channel SENSE head coil. A T1-weighted image (TR/TE/slice/FOV = 9ms/4ms/4mm slices/240×240mm) was obtained for verification of brain anatomical structures. An echo-planar-imaging sequence were used for the functional scans (TR/TE/slice/flip/FOV=2000ms/35ms/4mm slices/90°/220×220mm). fMRI data sets were analysed using SPM 8.0 involving preprocessing steps followed by t-contrast analysis for individuals and FFX analysis. In both with and without-loved-one conditions, neuronal responses were seen in the somatosensory gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, thalamus and insula regions, consistent with pain-related areas. FFX analysis showed that the presence of loved one produced more activation in the frontal and supramarginal gyrus during painful and non-painful stimulations compared to absence of a loved one. Brain response to pain is modulated by the presence of a loved one, causing more activation in the cognitive/emotional area i.e. 'love hurts'.

  13. Laser-based linear and nonlinear guided elastic waves at surfaces (2D) and wedges (1D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Peter; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Mayer, Andreas P

    2014-01-01

    The characteristic features and applications of linear and nonlinear guided elastic waves propagating along surfaces (2D) and wedges (1D) are discussed. Laser-based excitation, detection, or contact-free analysis of these guided waves with pump-probe methods are reviewed. Determination of material parameters by broadband surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and other applications in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) are considered. The realization of nonlinear SAWs in the form of solitary waves and as shock waves, used for the determination of the fracture strength, is described. The unique properties of dispersion-free wedge waves (WWs) propagating along homogeneous wedges and of dispersive wedge waves observed in the presence of wedge modifications such as tip truncation or coatings are outlined. Theoretical and experimental results on nonlinear wedge waves in isotropic and anisotropic solids are presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of ultrasound-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation on benign solitary solid cold thyroid nodules - a randomised study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) on thyroid function, nodule size and patient satisfaction in benign solitary solid cold thyroid nodules by comparing one ILP session with no treatment in a prospective randomised study. MATERIALS...... and thyroid function was determined by routine assays before and during follow-up. Pressure and cosmetic complaints before and at 6 months were evaluated on a visual analogue scale. ILP was performed under US guidance and with an output power of 2.5-3.5 W. RESULTS: In the ILP group, the nodule volume...

  15. Dispersion relation and growth in a two-stream free electron laser with helical wiggler and ion channel guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdian, Hassan; Abbasi, Negar

    2008-01-01

    A linear theory of two-stream free electron laser (FEL) with helical wiggler and ion channel guiding is presented. The dispersion relation is obtained with the help of fluid theory and the growth rate is analyzed through the numerical solutions. The considerable enhancement of the growth rate is demonstrated due to the two-stream instability and continuous tuning of peak growth rate ratio, two-stream FEL compared to single-stream FEL, in terms of varying the ion channel frequency is illustrated

  16. Teleoperation System with Hybrid Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Needle Insertion with Haptic Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave tele-operation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. This system consists of a piezoelectrically actuated slave robot for needle placement with integrated fiber optic force sensor utilizing Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle. The sensor flexure is optimized and embedded to the slave robot for measuring needle insertion force. A novel, compact opto-mechanical FPI ...

  17. Modeling of complex melting and solidification behavior in laser-irradiated materials [a description and users guide to the LASER8 computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, G.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1985-11-01

    The conceptual foundation of a computational model and a computer program based on it have been developed for treating various aspects of the complex melting and solidification behavior observed in pulsed laser-irradiated materials. A particularly important feature of the modeling is the capability of allowing melting and solidification to occur at temperatures other than the thermodynamic phase change temperatures. As a result, interfacial undercooling and overheating can be introduced and various types of nucleation events can be simulated. Calculations on silicon with the model have shown a wide variety of behavior, including the formation and propagation of multiple phase fronts. Although originally developed as a tool for studying certain problems arising in the field of laser annealing of semiconductors, the program should be useful in treating many types of systems in which phase changes and nucleation phenomena play important roles. This report describes the underlying physical and mathematical ideas and the basic relations used in LASER8. It also provides enough specific and detailed information on the program to serve as a guide for its use; a listing of one version of the program is given

  18. Technical Note: Dosimetric effects of couch position variability on treatment plan quality with an MRI-guided Co-60 radiation therapy machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Phillip E., E-mail: pechow@mednet.ucla.edu; Thomas, David H.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel A.; Yang, Yingli; Steinberg, Michael L.; Lee, Percy; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance in radiation therapy brings real-time imaging and adaptive planning into the treatment vault where it can account for interfraction and intrafraction movement of soft tissue. The only commercially available MRI-guided radiation therapy device is a three-head {sup 60}Co and MRI system with an integrated treatment planning system (TPS). Couch attenuation of the beam of up to 20% is well modeled in the TPS. Variations in the patient’s day-to-day position introduce discrepancies in the actual couch attenuation as modeled in the treatment plan. For this reason, the authors’ institution avoids plans with beams that pass through or near the couch edges. This study investigates the effects of differential beam attenuation by the couch due to couch shifts in order to determine whether couch edge avoidance restrictions can be lifted. Couch shifts were simulated using a Monte Carlo treatment planning system and ion chamber measurements performed for validation. Methods: A total of 27 plans from 23 patients were investigated. Couch shifts of 1 and 2 cm were introduced in combinations of lateral and vertical directions to simulate patient position variations giving 16 shifted plans per reference plan. The 1 and 2 cm shifts were based on shifts recorded in 320 treatment fractions. Results: Following TG176 recommendations for measurement methods, couch attenuation measurements agreed with TPS modeled attenuation to within 2.1%. Planning target volume D95 changed less than 1% for 1 and 2 cm couch shifts in only the x-direction and less than 3% for all directions. Conclusions: Dosimetry of all plans tested was robust to couch shifts up to ±2 cm. In general, couch shifts resulted in clinically insignificant dosimetric deviations. It is conceivable that in certain cases with large systematic couch shifts and plans that are particularly sensitive to shifts, dosimetric changes might rise to a clinically significant level.

  19. SU-F-J-125: Effects of Couch Position Variability On Dosimetric Accuracy with An MRI-Guided Co-60 Radiation Therapy Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, P; Thomas, D; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Yang, Y; Lamb, J [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance in radiation therapy brings real-time imaging and adaptive planning into the treatment vault where it can account for interfraction and intrafraction movement of soft tissue. The only commercially-available MRI-guided radiation therapy device is a three-head 60Co and MRI system with an integrated treatment planning system (TPS). An up to 20% attenuation of the beam by the couch is well modeled in the TPS. However, variations in the patient’s day-to-day position introduce discrepancies in the actual couch position relative its location as modeled in the treatment plan. For this reason, our institution avoids plans with beams that pass through or near the couch edges. This study looks at plans without restriction on beam angles and investigates the effects of couch shift by simulating shifts of the couch relative to the patient, in order to determine whether couch edge avoidance restrictions can be lifted. Methods: A total of 27 plans from 23 patients were investigated. Couch shifts of 1 and 2 cm were introduced in combinations of lateral and vertical direction to simulate variations in patient positioning on the couch giving 16 shifted plans per reference plan. The shift values of 1 and 2 cm were based on shifts recorded in 320 treatment fractions. Results: Measured couch attenuation versus TPS modeled agreed within 2.1%. Planning Target Volume (PTV) D95 changed less than 1% for 1 and 2 cm couch shifts in only the x-direction and less than 3% for all directions. Conclusion: The dosimetry of all plans with shifts up to ±2 cm was within reasonable clinical tolerances. Robustness of a plan to couch shifts can be tested in the TPS. Inclusion of beams traversing the couch edges should be considered if an improvement in plan quality or delivery time can be achieved.

  20. TU-H-BRA-08: The Design and Characteristics of a Novel Compact Linac-Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy (MR-IGRT) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutic, S; Low, D; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Hernandez, M; Kawrakow, I; Sharma, A; Shvartsman, S; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and characteristics of a novel linac-based MRI guided radiation therapy system that addresses RF and magnetic field interference and that can be housed in conventional radiotherapy vaults. Methods: The MR-IGRT system will provide simultaneous MR imaging combined with both simple (3D) and complex (IMRT, SBRT, SRS) techniques. The system is a combination of a) double-donut split solenoidal superconducting 0.345T MRI; and b) a 90 cm isocenter ring-gantry mounted 6MV, flattening filter-free linac coupled with a stacked doubly-focused multileaf collimator with 4 mm resolution. A novel RF shielding and absorption technology was developed to isolate the beam generating RF emissions from the MR, while a novel magnetic shielding sleeve system was developed to place the magnetic field-sensitive components in low-magnetic field regions. The system design produces high spatial resolution radiation beams with state-of-the art radiation dose characteristics and simultaneous MR imaging. Results: Prototype testing with a spectrum analyzer has demonstrated complete elimination of linac RF inside the treatment room. The magnetic field inside of the magnetic shielding was well below the specification, allowing the linear accelerator to operate normally. A novel on-gantry shimming system maintained < 25 ppm magnetic field homogeneity over a 45 cm spherical field of view for all gantry angles. Conclusion: The system design demonstrates the feasibility coupling a state-of-the art linac system with a 0.345T MRI, enabling highly conformal radiation therapy with simultaneous MR image guidance. S. Mutic’s employer (Washington University) has grant with ViewRay; D. Low is former ViewRay scientific advisory board member (ended October 2015); T. Chmielewski, G. Fought, M. Hernandez, I. Kawrakow, A. Sharma, S. Shvartsman, J. Dempsey are employees of ViewRay with stock options (Dempsey has leadership role and Dempsey/Kawrakow have stock).

  1. TU-H-BRA-08: The Design and Characteristics of a Novel Compact Linac-Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy (MR-IGRT) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Hernandez, M; Kawrakow, I; Sharma, A; Shvartsman, S; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the design and characteristics of a novel linac-based MRI guided radiation therapy system that addresses RF and magnetic field interference and that can be housed in conventional radiotherapy vaults. Methods: The MR-IGRT system will provide simultaneous MR imaging combined with both simple (3D) and complex (IMRT, SBRT, SRS) techniques. The system is a combination of a) double-donut split solenoidal superconducting 0.345T MRI; and b) a 90 cm isocenter ring-gantry mounted 6MV, flattening filter-free linac coupled with a stacked doubly-focused multileaf collimator with 4 mm resolution. A novel RF shielding and absorption technology was developed to isolate the beam generating RF emissions from the MR, while a novel magnetic shielding sleeve system was developed to place the magnetic field-sensitive components in low-magnetic field regions. The system design produces high spatial resolution radiation beams with state-of-the art radiation dose characteristics and simultaneous MR imaging. Results: Prototype testing with a spectrum analyzer has demonstrated complete elimination of linac RF inside the treatment room. The magnetic field inside of the magnetic shielding was well below the specification, allowing the linear accelerator to operate normally. A novel on-gantry shimming system maintained < 25 ppm magnetic field homogeneity over a 45 cm spherical field of view for all gantry angles. Conclusion: The system design demonstrates the feasibility coupling a state-of-the art linac system with a 0.345T MRI, enabling highly conformal radiation therapy with simultaneous MR image guidance. S. Mutic’s employer (Washington University) has grant with ViewRay; D. Low is former ViewRay scientific advisory board member (ended October 2015); T. Chmielewski, G. Fought, M. Hernandez, I. Kawrakow, A. Sharma, S. Shvartsman, J. Dempsey are employees of ViewRay with stock options (Dempsey has leadership role and Dempsey/Kawrakow have stock).

  2. Value of 18F-FDG PET/MRI for the outcome of CT-guided facet block therapy in cervical facet syndrome: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawixki, Lino M.; Schaarscjmidt, Benedikt M.; Heusch, Philipp; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra; Bockisch, Andreas; Umutlu, Lale; Eicker, Sven O.; Floeth, Frank W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging ( 18 F-FDG PET/MRI) to detect PET-positive cervical facet arthropathy and identify patients who benefit from facet block therapy. Ten patients with cervical facet syndrome (mean age: 65 ± 12 years) underwent 18 F-FDG PET/MRI of the neck. Focal 18 F-FDG uptake in PET-positive facet joints served as target for computed tomography (CT)-guided facet blocks. In PET-negative patients, the target joint for facet block therapy was selected by current clinical standards considering the level of maximum facet arthrosis and pain. Neck pain was measured on visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after therapy. Bone marrow signal intensity (SI) ratio on turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) images and maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) was calculated for each facet joint. Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was calculated between bone marrow SI ratios on TIRM and SUVmax. 18 F-FDG PET/MRI detected PET-positive facet arthropathy in six patients. Patients with PET-positive facet arthropathy had significantly less pain compared with the pretreatment pain 3 h (P = 0.002), 4 weeks (P = 0.002) and 3 months (P = 0.026) after facet block therapy. Pain did not change significantly in patients with PET-negative facet arthropathy. TIRM SI ratio was higher in PET-positive facet arthropathy than in PET-negative facet arthropathy (P < 0.001). Correlation was strong between bone marrow SI ratio on TIRM images and SUVmax (r = 0.7; P < 0.001).

  3. MRI-guided percutaneous cervical discectomy and discolysis with oxygen-ozone mixture for treatment of cervical disc herniation: an initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ming; Li Chengli; Lu Yubo; Huang Jie; Song Jiqing; Li Lei; Bao Shougang; Cao Qianqian; Wu Lebin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of MR imaging-guided percutaneous cervical discectomy and discolysis with oxygen-ozone mixture for treatment of cervical disc herniation. Methods: Eight herniated cervical discs in 7 patients were diagnosed by MRI, inclluding 5 discs of lateral protruding type, 2 discs of paramedian protruding type and one disc of central protruding type. All patients underwent MR imaging-guided percutaneous cervical discectomy and discolysis with oxygen-ozone mixture. The procedures were guided by a set of 0.23 T open MR system mounted with iPath 200 optical tracking system. The herniated portion of the disc was punctured with a 14 G MR-comparible needle in the healthy side via anterolateral oblique route. The interventional steps were as follows: firstly, cut herniated part with percutaneous discectomy probe and inject 2ml oxygen-ozone mixture of 60 μg/ml; secondly, retreat the needle to the disc center, resect nucleus pulposus, and inject 2 ml oxygen-ozone mixture of 60 μg/ml; secondly, retreat the needle to the disc center, resect nucleus pulposus, and inject 2 ml oxygen-ozone mixture of 60 μg/ml. All patients were followed up for 6 months, with 4 patients by telephone and 3 patients in outpatient clinic. The effect of treatment was evaluated according to Williams postoperative assessment standard. Results: All procedures were performed successfully. The clinical outcome was evaluated as excellent in 5 cases, good in 1 cases and fair in 1 case. The total ratio of excellent and good was 85.7%. No serious complication occurred expect 1 case with intraoperative paroxysmal pain. Conclusion: MR imaging-guided percutaneous cervical discectomy and discolysis with oxygen-ozone mixture was a safe, effective and minimally invasive method for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. (authors)

  4. Image-guided automatic triggering of a fractional CO2 laser in aesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Koprowski, Robert; Wiernek, Barbara K; Błońska-Fajfrowska, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Laser procedures in dermatology and aesthetic medicine are associated with the need for manual laser triggering. This leads to pulse overlapping and side effects. Automatic laser triggering based on image analysis can provide a secure fit to each successive doses of radiation. A fractional CO2 laser was used in the study. 500 images of the human skin of healthy subjects were acquired. Automatic triggering was initiated by an application together with a camera which tracks and analyses the skin in visible light. The tracking algorithm uses the methods of image analysis to overlap images. After locating the characteristic points in analysed adjacent areas, the correspondence of graphs is found. The point coordinates derived from the images are the vertices of graphs with respect to which isomorphism is sought. When the correspondence of graphs is found, it is possible to overlap the neighbouring parts of the image. The proposed method of laser triggering owing to the automatic image fitting method allows for 100% repeatability. To meet this requirement, there must be at least 13 graph vertices obtained from the image. For this number of vertices, the time of analysis of a single image is less than 0.5s. The proposed method, applied in practice, may help reduce the number of side effects during dermatological laser procedures resulting from laser pulse overlapping. In addition, it reduces treatment time and enables to propose new techniques of treatment through controlled, precise laser pulse overlapping. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dose-volume effect relationships for late rectal morbidity in patients treated with chemoradiation and MRI-guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: Results from the prospective multicenter EMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazeron, Renaud; Fokdal, Lars U; Kirchheiner, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish dose volume–effect relationships predicting late rectal morbidity in cervix cancer patients treated with concomitant chemoradiation and MRI-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IBABT) within the prospective EMBRACE study. Material and method All patients were treated with curative ...

  6. MRI-guided procedures in various regions of the body using a robotic assistance system in a closed-bore scanner: preliminary clinical experience and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Michael; Zajonz, Dirk; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2010-04-01

    To present the clinical setup and workflow of a robotic assistance system for image-guided interventions in a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment and to report our preliminary clinical experience with percutaneous biopsies in various body regions. The MR-compatible, servo-pneumatically driven, robotic device (Innomotion) fits into the 60-cm bore of a standard MR scanner. The needle placement (n = 25) accuracy was estimated by measuring the 3D deviation between needle tip and prescribed target point in a phantom. Percutaneous biopsies in six patients and different body regions were planned by graphically selecting entry and target points on intraoperatively acquired roadmap MR data. For insertion depths between 29 and 95 mm, the average 3D needle deviation was 2.2 +/- 0.7 mm (range 0.9-3.8 mm). Patients with a body mass index of up to approximately 30 kg/m(2) fitted into the bore with the device. Clinical work steps and limitations are reported for the various applications. All biopsies were diagnostic and could be completed without any major complications. Median planning and intervention times were 25 (range 20-36) and 44 (36-68) minutes, respectively. Preliminary clinical results in a standard MRI environment suggest that the presented robotic device provides accurate guidance for percutaneous procedures in various body regions. Shorter procedure times may be achievable by optimizing technical and workflow aspects. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Pre-clinical testing of a phased array ultrasound system for MRI-guided noninvasive surgery of the brain--a primate study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; McDannold, Nathan; Clement, Greg; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Zadicario, Eyal; Killiany, Ron; Moore, Tara; Rosen, Douglas

    2006-08-01

    MRI-guided and monitored focused ultrasound thermal surgery of brain through intact skull was tested in three rhesus monkeys. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of skull heating in an animal model with a head shape similar to that of a human. The ultrasound beam was generated by a 512 channel phased array system (Exablate 3000, InSightec, Haifa, Israel) that was integrated within a 1.5-T MR-scanner. The skin was pre-cooled by degassed temperature controlled water circulating between the array surface and the skin. Skull surface temperature was measured with invasive thermocouple probes. The results showed that by applying surface cooling the skin and skull surface can be protected, and that the brain surface temperature becomes the limiting factor. The MRI thermometry was shown to be useful in detecting the tissue temperature distribution next to the bone, and it should be used to monitor the brain surface temperature. The acoustic intensity values during the 20 s sonications were adequate for thermal ablation in the human brain provided that surface cooling is used.

  8. Early observed transient prostate-specific antigen elevations on a pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and fractionated MRI guided High Dose Rate brachytherapy boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K; Godette, Denise J; Stall, Bronwyn R; Coleman, C Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Ménard, Cynthia; Guion, Peter; Susil, Robert C; Citrin, Deborah E; Ning, Holly; Miller, Robert W; Ullman, Karen; Smith, Sharon; Crouse, Nancy Sears

    2006-01-01

    To report early observation of transient PSA elevations on this pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Eleven patients with intermediate-risk and high-risk localized prostate cancer received MRI guided HDR brachytherapy (10.5 Gy each fraction) before and after a course of external beam radiotherapy (46 Gy). Two patients continued on hormones during follow-up and were censored for this analysis. Four patients discontinued hormone therapy after RT. Five patients did not receive hormones. PSA bounce is defined as a rise in PSA values with a subsequent fall below the nadir value or to below 20% of the maximum PSA level. Six previously published definitions of biochemical failure to distinguish true failure from were tested: definition 1, rise >0.2 ng/mL; definition 2, rise >0.4 ng/mL; definition 3, rise >35% of previous value; definition 4, ASTRO defined guidelines, definition 5 nadir + 2 ng/ml, and definition 6, nadir + 3 ng/ml. Median follow-up was 24 months (range 18–36 mo). During follow-up, the incidence of transient PSA elevation was: 55% for definition 1, 44% for definition 2, 55% for definition 3, 33% for definition 4, 11% for definition 5, and 11% for definition 6. We observed a substantial incidence of transient elevations in PSA following combined external beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Such elevations seem to be self-limited and should not trigger initiation of salvage therapies. No definition of failure was completely predictive

  9. SU-E-J-198: Out-Of-Field Dose and Surface Dose Measurements of MRI-Guided Cobalt-60 Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure quantities of dosimetric interest in an MRI-guided cobalt radiotherapy machine that was recently introduced to clinical use. Methods: Out-of-field dose due to photon scatter and leakage was measured using an ion chamber and solid water slabs mimicking a human body. Surface dose was measured by irradiating stacks of radiochromic film and extrapolating to zero thickness. Electron out-of-field dose was characterized using solid water slabs and radiochromic film. Results: For some phantom geometries, up to 50% of Dmax was observed up to 10 cm laterally from the edge of the beam. The maximum penetration was between 1 and 2 mm in solid water, indicating an electron energy not greater than approximately 0.4 MeV. Out-of-field dose from photon scatter measured at 1 cm depth in solid water was found to fall to less than 10% of Dmax at a distance of 1.2 cm from the edge of a 10.5 × 10.5 cm field, and less that 1% of Dmax at a distance of 10 cm from field edge. Surface dose was measured to be 8% of Dmax. Conclusion: Surface dose and out-of-field dose from the MRIguided cobalt radiotherapy machine was measured and found to be within acceptable limits. Electron out-of-field dose, an effect unique to MRI-guided radiotherapy and presumed to arise from low-energy electrons trapped by the Lorentz force, was quantified. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc

  10. Wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (Lasik) versus wavefront-guided photorefractive keratectomy (Prk): a prospective randomized eye-to-eye comparison (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Edward E; Haw, Weldon W

    2011-12-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) vs photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in a prospective randomized clinical trial. A cohort of 68 eyes of 34 patients with -0.75 to -8.13 diopters (D) of myopia (spherical equivalent) were randomized to receive either wavefront-guided PRK or LASIK in the fellow eye using the VISX CustomVue laser. Patients were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, and months 1, 3, 6, and 12. At 1 month, uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), 5% and 25% contrast sensitivity, induction of higher-order aberrations (HOAs), and subjective symptoms of vision clarity, vision fluctuation, ghosting, and overall self-assessment of vision were worse (PPRK group. By 3 months, these differences had resolved (P>0.05). At 1 year, mean spherical equivalent was reduced 94% to -0.27 ± 0.31 D in the LASIK group and reduced 96% to -0.17 ± 0.41 D in the PRK group. At 1 year, 91% of eyes were within ±0.50 D and 97 % were within ±1.0 D in the PRK group. At 1 year, 88% of eyes were within ±0.50 D and 97% were within ±1.0 D in the LASIK group. At 1 year, 97% of eyes in the PRK group and 94% of eyes in the LASIK group achieved an UCVA of 20/20 or better (P=0.72). Refractive stability was achieved in both PRK and LASIK groups after 1 month. There were no intraoperative or postoperative flap complications in the LASIK group. There were no instances of corneal haze in the PRK group. Wavefront-guided LASIK and PRK are safe and effective at reducing myopia. At 1 month postoperatively, LASIK demonstrates an advantage over PRK in UCVA, BSCVA, low-contrast acuity, induction of total HOAs, and several subjective symptoms. At postoperative month 3, these differences between PRK and LASIK results had resolved.

  11. Phased laser diode array permits selective excitation of ultrasonic guided waves in coated bone-mimicking tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Petro; Salmi, Ari; Kilappa, Vantte; Zhao, Zuomin; Timonen, Jussi; Hæggström, Edward

    2017-10-01

    This paper validates simulation predictions, which state that specific modes could be enhanced in quantitative ultrasonic bone testing. Tunable selection of ultrasonic guided wave excitation is useful in non-destructive testing since it permits the mediation of energy into diagnostically useful modes while reducing the energy mediated into disturbing contributions. For instance, it is often challenging to distinguish and extract the useful modes from ultrasound signals measured in bone covered by a soft tissue. We show that a laser diode array can selectively excite ultrasound in bone mimicking phantoms. A fiber-coupled diode array (4 elements) illuminated two solid tubes (2-3 mm wall thickness) embraced by an opaque soft-tissue mimicking elastomer coating (5 mm thick). A predetermined time delay matching the selected mode and frequency was employed between the outputs of the elements. The generated ultrasound was detected by a 215 kHz piezo receiver. Our results suggest that this array reduces the disturbances caused by the elastomer cover and so pave way to permit non-contacting in vivo guided wave ultrasound assessment of human bones. The implementation is small, inexpensive, and robust in comparison with the conventional pulsed lasers.

  12. Ultrashort echo-time MRI versus CT for skull aberration correction in MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound: In vitro comparison on human calvaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G Wilson; Eames, Matthew; Snell, John; Aubry, Jean-François

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) brain treatment systems compensate for skull-induced beam aberrations by adjusting the phase and amplitude of individual ultrasound transducer elements. These corrections are currently calculated based on a preacquired computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient's head. The purpose of the work presented here is to demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrashort echo-time magnetic resonance imaging (UTE MRI) instead of CT to calculate and apply aberration corrections on a clinical TcMRgFUS system. Phantom experiments were performed in three ex-vivo human skulls filled with tissue-mimicking hydrogel. Each skull phantom was imaged with both CT and UTE MRI. The MR images were then segmented into "skull" and "not-skull" pixels using a computationally efficient, threshold-based algorithm, and the resulting 3D binary skull map was converted into a series of 2D virtual CT images. Each skull was mounted in the head transducer of a clinical TcMRgFUS system (ExAblate Neuro, Insightec, Israel), and transcranial sonications were performed using a power setting of approximately 750 acoustic watts at several different target locations within the electronic steering range of the transducer. Each target location was sonicated three times: once using aberration corrections calculated from the actual CT scan, once using corrections calculated from the MRI-derived virtual CT scan, and once without applying any aberration correction. MR thermometry was performed in conjunction with each 10-s sonication, and the highest single-pixel temperature rise and surrounding-pixel mean were recorded for each sonication. The measured temperature rises were ∼ 45% larger for aberration-corrected sonications than for noncorrected sonications. This improvement was highly significant (p skull-induced ultrasound aberration corrections. Their results suggest that UTE MRI could be used instead of CT to implement such corrections on

  13. CT-guided injection of botulinic toxin for percutaneous therapy of piriformis muscle syndrome with preliminary MRI results about denervative process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanucci, E.; Masala, S.; Sodani, G.; Varrucciu, V.; Romagnoli, A.; Squillaci, E.; Simonetti, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Rome (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is a cause of sciatica, leg or buttock pain and disability. The pain is usually increased by muscular contraction, palpation or prolonged sitting. The aim of our paper was to evaluate the feasibility of CT-guided percutaneous botulinic toxin (BTX) injection for the purpose of PMS treatment. Thirty patients suffering from PMS, suspected with clinical and electrophysiological criteria, after imaging examinations excluding other causes of sciatic pain, resulted positive at the lidocaine test and were treated by intramuscular injection of BTX type A under CT guidance. The follow-up (12 months) was performed with clinical examination in all cases and with MR 3 months after the procedure in 9 patients to evaluate the denervative process entity of the treated muscle. In 26 cases relief of symptoms was obtained after 5-7 days. In 4 patients an insufficient relief of pain justified a second percutaneous treatment which was clinically successful. No complications or side effects were recorded after BTX injection. The MR examination showed a signal intensity change of the treated muscle in 7 patients due to the denervative process of PM, whereas in the remaining 2 cases only an atrophy of the treated muscle was detected. Larger series are necessary to confirm these MRI preliminary results. The CT-guided BTX injection in the PMS is an emergent and feasible technique that obtains an excellent local therapeutic effect without risk of imprecise inoculation. (orig.)

  14. Radiological (MRI and Biochemical effects of Low Level LASER therapy in chronic Osteo arthritis in Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Nambi S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is one of the degenerative diseases and Low level laser therapy (LLLT has been prescribed as nonoperative treatment in physiotherapy. But the available evidences of finding the radiological and biochemical effectiveness of LLLT are very few. So, the purpose of this study is to find the radiological and biochemical effect of Low level laser therapy (LLLT in the treatment of Osteoarthritis. 34 subjects who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were divided into two groups (Active Laser group – ALG & Placebo Laser group - PLG with randomized sampling method. ALG was treated with active laser head, whereas PLG treated same like ALG but without emission of energy. Both groups were applied with kinesio tape for 4 weeks. The frequency of the treatment was three times per week for 4 weeks in both groups. Subjects were assessed at baseline, 4th and 8th week. Contact area (mm2 – medial & lateral and cartilage thickness (percentage - medial & lateral was measured by Magnetic resonance image (MRI and CTX-II (μmg/mmol was measured by urine analysis. A statistically significant (p ≤0.05 difference between both groups were noted at the period of 8 week for contact area (lateral and CTX-II and insignificant (p ≥ 0.05 difference in contact area (medial and cartilage thickness (medial & lateral were noted. In conclusion, the low level laser therapy is helpful in modifying the biochemical components and leads to make changes in the cartilage which subsequently improve the quality of life of OA patients.

  15. Waveguides fabricated by femtosecond laser exploiting both depressed cladding and stress-induced guiding core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ming-Ming; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Wu, Zheng-Xiang; Zhang, Yang; Pan, Huai-Hai; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2013-07-01

    We report on the fabrication of stress-induced optical channel waveguides and waveguide splitters with laser-depressed cladding by femtosecond laser. The laser beam was focused into neodymium doped phosphate glass by an objective producing a destructive filament. By moving the sample along an enclosed routine in the horizontal plane followed by a minor descent less than the filament length in the vertical direction, a cylinder with rarified periphery and densified center region was fabricated. Lining up the segments in partially overlapping sequence enabled waveguiding therein. The refractive-index contrast, near- and far-field mode distribution and confocal microscope fluorescence image of the waveguide were obtained. 1-to-2, 1-to-3 and 1-to-4 splitters were also machined with adjustable splitting ratio. Compared with traditional femtosecond laser writing methods, waveguides prepared by this approach showed controllable mode conduction, strong field confinement, large numerical aperture, low propagation loss and intact core region.

  16. Teleoperation System with Hybrid Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Needle Insertion with Haptic Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Fischer, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave tele-operation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. This system consists of a piezoelectrically actuated slave robot for needle placement with integrated fiber optic force sensor utilizing Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle. The sensor flexure is optimized and embedded to the slave robot for measuring needle insertion force. A novel, compact opto-mechanical FPI sensor interface is integrated into an MRI robot control system. By leveraging the complementary features of pneumatic and piezoelectric actuation, a pneumatically actuated haptic master robot is also developed to render force associated with needle placement interventions to the clinician. An aluminum load cell is implemented and calibrated to close the impedance control loop of the master robot. A force-position control algorithm is developed to control the hybrid actuated system. Teleoperated needle insertion is demonstrated under live MR imaging, where the slave robot resides in the scanner bore and the user manipulates the master beside the patient outside the bore. Force and position tracking results of the master-slave robot are demonstrated to validate the tracking performance of the integrated system. It has a position tracking error of 0.318mm and sine wave force tracking error of 2.227N.

  17. An MRI-Guided Telesurgery System Using a Fabry-Perot Interferometry Force Sensor and a Pneumatic Haptic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Li, Gang; Patel, Niravkumar; Fischer, Gregory S

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave teleoperation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The slave robot consists of a piezoelectrically actuated 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot for needle placement with an integrated fiber optic force sensor (1-DOF axial force measurement) using the Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle; it is configured to operate inside the bore of the MRI scanner during imaging. By leveraging the advantages of pneumatic and piezoelectric actuation in force and position control respectively, we have designed a pneumatically actuated master robot (haptic device) with strain gauge based force sensing that is configured to operate the slave from within the scanner room during imaging. The slave robot follows the insertion motion of the haptic device while the haptic device displays the needle insertion force as measured by the FPI sensor. Image interference evaluation demonstrates that the telesurgery system presents a signal to noise ratio reduction of less than 17% and less than 1% geometric distortion during simultaneous robot motion and imaging. Teleoperated needle insertion and rotation experiments were performed to reach 10 targets in a soft tissue-mimicking phantom with 0.70 ± 0.35 mm Cartesian space error.

  18. Teleoperation System with Hybrid Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Needle Insertion with Haptic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave tele-operation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. This system consists of a piezoelectrically actuated slave robot for needle placement with integrated fiber optic force sensor utilizing Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle. The sensor flexure is optimized and embedded to the slave robot for measuring needle insertion force. A novel, compact opto-mechanical FPI sensor interface is integrated into an MRI robot control system. By leveraging the complementary features of pneumatic and piezoelectric actuation, a pneumatically actuated haptic master robot is also developed to render force associated with needle placement interventions to the clinician. An aluminum load cell is implemented and calibrated to close the impedance control loop of the master robot. A force-position control algorithm is developed to control the hybrid actuated system. Teleoperated needle insertion is demonstrated under live MR imaging, where the slave robot resides in the scanner bore and the user manipulates the master beside the patient outside the bore. Force and position tracking results of the master-slave robot are demonstrated to validate the tracking performance of the integrated system. It has a position tracking error of 0.318mm and sine wave force tracking error of 2.227N. PMID:25126446

  19. Optical coherence tomography image-guided smart laser knife for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Nitesh; McElroy, Austin B; Estrada, Arnold D; Milner, Thomas E

    2018-03-01

    Surgical oncology can benefit from specialized tools that enhance imaging and enable precise cutting and removal of tissue without damage to adjacent structures. The combination of high-resolution, fast optical coherence tomography (OCT) co-aligned with a nanosecond pulsed thulium (Tm) laser offers advantages over conventional surgical laser systems. Tm lasers provide superior beam quality, high volumetric tissue removal rates with minimal residual thermal footprint in tissue, enabling a reduction in unwanted damage to delicate adjacent sub-surface structures such as nerves or micro-vessels. We investigated such a combined Tm/OCT system with co-aligned imaging and cutting beams-a configuration we call a "smart laser knife." A blow-off model that considers absorption coefficients and beam delivery systems was utilized to predict Tm cut depth, tissue removal rate and spatial distribution of residual thermal injury. Experiments were performed to verify the volumetric removal rate predicted by the model as a function of average power. A bench-top, combined Tm/OCT system was constructed using a 15W 1940 nm nanosecond pulsed Tm fiber laser (500 μJ pulse energy, 100 ns pulse duration, 30 kHz repetition rate) for removing tissue and a swept source laser (1310 ± 70 nm, 100 kHz sweep rate) for OCT imaging. Tissue phantoms were used to demonstrate precise surgery with blood vessel avoidance. Depth imaging informed cutting/removal of targeted tissue structures by the Tm laser was performed. Laser cutting was accomplished around and above phantom blood vessels while avoiding damage to vessel walls. A tissue removal rate of 5.5 mm 3 /sec was achieved experimentally, in comparison to the model prediction of approximately 6 mm 3 /sec. We describe a system that combines OCT and laser tissue modification with a Tm laser. Simulation results of the tissue removal rate using a simple model, as a function of average power, are in good agreement with experimental

  20. Bone Repair on Fractures Treated with Osteosynthesis, ir Laser, Bone Graft and Guided Bone Regeneration: Histomorfometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Aciole, Jouber Mateus; dos Santos Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu; Soares, Luiz Guilherme Pinheiro; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Santos, Jean Nunes; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, through the analysis of histomorfometric, the repair of complete tibial fracture in rabbits fixed with osteosynthesis, treated or not with infrared laser light (λ780 nm, 50 mW, CW) associated or not to the use of hydroxyapatite and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Surgical fractures were created, under general anesthesia (Ketamina 0,4 ml/Kg IP and Xilazina 0,2 ml/Kg IP), on the dorsum of 15 Oryctolagus rabbits that were divided into 5 groups and maintained on individual cages, at day/night cycle, fed with solid laboratory pelted diet and had water ad libidum. On groups II, III, IV and V the fracture was fixed with wire osteosynthesis. Animals of groups III and V were grafted with hydroxyapatite and GBR technique used. Animals of groups IV and V were irradiated at every other day during two weeks (16 J/cm2, 4×4 J/cm2). Observation time was that of 30 days. After animal death (overdose of general anesthetics) the specimes were routinely processed to wax and underwent histological analysis by light microscopy. The histomorfometric analysis showed an increased bone neoformation, increased collagen deposition, less reabsorption and inflammation when laser was associated to the HATCP. It is concluded that IR laser light was able to accelerate fracture healing and the association with HATCP and GBR resulted on increased deposition of CHA.

  1. Quality inspection guided laser processing of irregular shape objects by stereo vision measurement: application in badminton shuttle manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Li; Wang, Shun; Zhang, Yixin; Sun, Yingying; Zhang, Xuping

    2015-11-01

    The quality inspection process is usually carried out after first processing of the raw materials such as cutting and milling. This is because the parts of the materials to be used are unidentified until they have been trimmed. If the quality of the material is assessed before the laser process, then the energy and efforts wasted on defected materials can be saved. We proposed a new production scheme that can achieve quantitative quality inspection prior to primitive laser cutting by means of three-dimensional (3-D) vision measurement. First, the 3-D model of the object is reconstructed by the stereo cameras, from which the spatial cutting path is derived. Second, collaborating with another rear camera, the 3-D cutting path is reprojected to both the frontal and rear views of the object and thus generates the regions-of-interest (ROIs) for surface defect analysis. An accurate visual guided laser process and reprojection-based ROI segmentation are enabled by a global-optimization-based trinocular calibration method. The prototype system was built and tested with the processing of raw duck feathers for high-quality badminton shuttle manufacture. Incorporating with a two-dimensional wavelet-decomposition-based defect analysis algorithm, both the geometrical and appearance features of the raw feathers are quantified before they are cut into small patches, which result in fully automatic feather cutting and sorting.

  2. Sensitivity of enhanced MRI for the detection of breast cancer: new, multicentric, residual, and recurrent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.L.; McCarty, K.S. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast brings the advantages of high resolution cross-sectional imaging to breast cancer diagnosis, treatment and research: improved cancer detection, staging, selection of therapy, evaluation of therapeutic response in vivo, detection of recurrence, and even the development of new therapies. Until now breast cancer treatment and research has been impeded by the limited means of evaluating the breast cancer in vivo: primarily clinical palpation and mammography of the breast tumor. A review of the initial studies shows that with the use of paramagnetic contrast agents, MRI has a sensitivity of 96 % for detecting breast cancers. MRI detects multicentric disease with a sensitivity of 98 %, superior to any other modality. The ability of MRI to detect recurrent local breast cancer in the conservatively treated breast is nearly 100 %. MRI is capable of monitoring tumor response to chemotherapy and actually guiding therapeutic interventions such as interstitial laser photocoagulation. (orig.)

  3. In-Bore Prostate Transperineal Interventions with an MRI-guided Parallel Manipulator: System Development and Preliminary Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Sohrab; Shang, Weijian; Li, Gang; Patel, Nirav; Fischer, Gregory S.; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2015-01-01

    Background The robot-assisted minimally-invasive surgery is well recognized as a feasible solution for diagnosis and treatment of the prostate cancer in human. Methods In this paper the kinematics of a parallel 4 Degrees-of-Freedom (DOF) surgical manipulator designed for minimally invasive in-bore prostate percutaneous interventions through the patient's perineum. The proposed manipulator takes advantage of 4 sliders actuated by MRI-compatible piezoelectric motors and incremental rotary encoders. Errors, mostly originating from the design and manufacturing process, need to be identified and reduced before the robot is deployed in the clinical trials. Results The manipulator has undergone several experiments to evaluate the repeatability and accuracy of the needle placement which is an essential concern in percutaneous prostate interventions. Conclusion The acquired results endorse the sustainability, precision (about 1 mm in air (in x or y direction) at the needle's reference point) and reliability of the manipulator. PMID:26111458

  4. Visibility and artifacts of gold fiducial markers used for image guided radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurney-Champion, Oliver J.; Lens, Eelco; Horst, Astrid van der; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan; Klaassen, Remy; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer, tumor alignment prior to each treatment fraction is improved when intratumoral gold fiducial markers (from here onwards: markers), which are visible on computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT, are used. Visibility of these markers on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might improve image registration between CT and magnetic resonance (MR) images for tumor delineation purposes. However, concomitant image artifacts induced by markers are undesirable. The extent of visibility and artifact size depend on MRI-sequence parameters. The authors’ goal was to determine for various markers their potential to be visible and to generate artifacts, using measures that are independent of the MRI-sequence parameters. Methods: The authors selected ten different markers suitable for endoscopic placement in the pancreas and placed them into a phantom. The markers varied in diameter (0.28–0.6 mm), shape, and iron content (0%–0.5%). For each marker, the authors calculated T 2 ∗ -maps and ΔB 0 -maps using MRI measurements. A decrease in relaxation time T 2 ∗ can cause signal voids, associated with visibility, while a change in the magnetic field B 0 can cause signal shifts, which are associated with artifacts. These shifts inhibit accurate tumor delineation. As a measure for potential visibility, the authors used the volume of low T 2 ∗ , i.e., the volume for which T 2 ∗ differed from the background by >15 ms. As a measure for potential artifacts, the authors used the volume for which |ΔB 0 | > 9.4 × 10 −8 T (4 Hz). To test whether there is a correlation between visibility and artifact size, the authors calculated the Spearman’s correlation coefficient (R s ) between the volume of low T 2 ∗ and the volume of high |ΔB 0 |. The authors compared the maps with images obtained using a clinical MR-sequence. Finally, for the best visible marker as well as the marker that showed the smallest artifact, the authors

  5. Cooperative Assembly of Magneto-Nanovesicles with Tunable Wall Thickness and Permeability for MRI-Guided Drug Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Kuikun

    2018-03-15

    This article describes the fabrication of nanosized magneto-vesicles (MVs) comprising tunable layers of densely packed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in membranes via cooperative assembly of polymer-tethered SPIONs and free poly(styrene)- b-poly(acrylic acid) (PS- b-PAA). The membrane thickness of MVs could be well controlled from 9.8 to 93.2 nm by varying the weight ratio of PS- b-PAA to SPIONs. The increase in membrane thickness was accompanied by the transition from monolayer MVs, to double-layered MVs and to multilayered MVs (MuMVs). This can be attributed to the variation in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of polymer-grafted SPIONs upon the insertion and binding of PS- b-PAA onto the surface of nanoparticles. Therapeutic agents can be efficiently encapsulated in the hollow cavity of MVs and the release of payload can be tuned by varying the membrane thickness of nanovesicles. Due to the high packing density of SPIONs, the MuMVs showed the highest magnetization and transverse relaxivity rate ( r2) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among these MVs and individual SPIONs. Upon intravenous injection, doxorubicin-loaded MuMVs conjugated with RGD peptides could be effectively enriched at tumor sites due to synergetic effect of magnetic and active targeting. As a result, they exhibited drastically enhanced signal in MRI, improved tumor delivery efficiency of drugs as well as enhanced antitumor efficacy, compared with groups with only magnetic or active targeting strategy. The unique nanoplatform may find applications in effective disease control by delivering imaging and therapy to organs/tissues that are not readily accessible by conventional delivery vehicles.

  6. Cooperative Assembly of Magneto-Nanovesicles with Tunable Wall Thickness and Permeability for MRI-Guided Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuikun; Liu, Yijing; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Qian; Kong, Chuncai; Yi, Chenglin; Zhou, Zijian; Wang, Zhantong; Zhang, Guofeng; Zhang, Yang; Khashab, Niveen M; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Nie, Zhihong

    2018-04-04

    This article describes the fabrication of nanosized magneto-vesicles (MVs) comprising tunable layers of densely packed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in membranes via cooperative assembly of polymer-tethered SPIONs and free poly(styrene)- b-poly(acrylic acid) (PS- b-PAA). The membrane thickness of MVs could be well controlled from 9.8 to 93.2 nm by varying the weight ratio of PS- b-PAA to SPIONs. The increase in membrane thickness was accompanied by the transition from monolayer MVs, to double-layered MVs and to multilayered MVs (MuMVs). This can be attributed to the variation in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of polymer-grafted SPIONs upon the insertion and binding of PS- b-PAA onto the surface of nanoparticles. Therapeutic agents can be efficiently encapsulated in the hollow cavity of MVs and the release of payload can be tuned by varying the membrane thickness of nanovesicles. Due to the high packing density of SPIONs, the MuMVs showed the highest magnetization and transverse relaxivity rate ( r 2 ) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among these MVs and individual SPIONs. Upon intravenous injection, doxorubicin-loaded MuMVs conjugated with RGD peptides could be effectively enriched at tumor sites due to synergetic effect of magnetic and active targeting. As a result, they exhibited drastically enhanced signal in MRI, improved tumor delivery efficiency of drugs as well as enhanced antitumor efficacy, compared with groups with only magnetic or active targeting strategy. The unique nanoplatform may find applications in effective disease control by delivering imaging and therapy to organs/tissues that are not readily accessible by conventional delivery vehicles.

  7. Laser cutting of silicon with the liquid jet guided laser using a chlorine-containing jet media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopman, Sybille; Mayer, Kuno; Fell, Andreas; Mesec, Matthias; Granek, Filip [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    In this paper results for liquid media are presented, which are used the first time as liquid jet for cutting of silicon with laser chemical processing (LCP). The liquids contain a perfluoro-carbon compound as solvent and elemental chlorine as etching agent for silicon. Experiments were performed to investigate its influence on groove form and maximum achieved groove depth. It is shown that with the addition of low-concentration chlorine, the groove depth can already be significantly increased. The groove shape could be changed from a V-profile to a U-profile. Furthermore, an about four times greater groove depth was achieved by applying a saturated chlorine solution compared to groove depths without using chlorine. Finally, a theory is given and discussed to describe the phenomena observed. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of the ESUR PI-RADS scoring system for multiparametric MRI of the prostate with targeted MR/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roethke, M C; Kuru, T H; Schultze, S; Tichy, D; Kopp-Schneider, A; Fenchel, M; Schlemmer, H-P; Hadaschik, B A

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) proposed by the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) for detection of prostate cancer (PCa) by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in a consecutive cohort of patients with magnetic resonance/transrectal ultrasound (MR/TRUS) fusion-guided biopsy. Suspicious lesions on mpMRI at 3.0 T were scored according to the PI-RADS system before MR/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy and correlated to histopathology results. Statistical correlation was obtained by a Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and optimal thresholds were calculated. In 64 patients, 128/445 positive biopsy cores were obtained out of 95 suspicious regions of interest (ROIs). PCa was present in 27/64 (42%) of the patients. ROC results for the aggregated PI-RADS scores exhibited higher areas under the curve compared to those of the Likert score. Sensitivity/Specificity for the following thresholds were calculated: 85 %/73 % and 67 %/92 % for PI-RADS scores of 9 and 10, respectively; 85 %/60 % and 56 %/97 % for Likert scores of 3 and 4, respectively [corrected. The standardised ESUR PI-RADS system is beneficial to indicate the likelihood of PCa of suspicious lesions on mpMRI. It is also valuable to identify locations to be targeted with biopsy. The aggregated PI-RADS score achieved better results compared to the single five-point Likert score. • The ESUR PI-RADS scoring system was evaluated using multiparametric 3.0-T MRI. • To investigate suspicious findings, transperineal MR/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy was used. • PI-RADS can guide biopsy locations and improve detection of clinically significant cancer. • Biopsy procedures can be optimised, reducing unnecessary negative biopsies for patients. • The PI-RADS scoring system may contribute to more effective prostate MRI.

  9. Macular laser photocoagulation guided by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography versus fluorescein angiography for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallego-Pinazo R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Gallego-Pinazo1,2, Ana Marina Suelves-Cogollos1, Rosa Dolz-Marco1, J Fernando Arevalo3, Salvador García-Delpech1, J Luis Mullor4, Manuel Díaz-Llopis1,2,51Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, Valencia, Spain; 3Retina and Vitreous Service, Clinical Ophthalmology Center, Caracas, Venezuela; 4Unit of Experimental Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 5University of Valencia, Faculty of Medicine, Valencia, SpainBackground: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and fluorescein angiography (FA in the guidance of macular laser photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema.Methods: This was a prospective interventional clinical comparative pilot study. Forty eyes from 24 consecutive patients with diabetic macular edema were allocated to receive laser photocoagulation guided by SD-OCT or FA. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, central macular thickness, and retinal volume were assessed at baseline and two months after treatment.Results: Subjects treated using FA-guided laser improved BCVA from the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR 0.52 ± 0.2 to 0.37 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 397.25 ± 139.1 to 333.50 ± 105.7 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.61 ± 1.6 to 10.94 ± 1.4 mm3 (P < 0.001. Subjects treated using SD-OCT guided laser had improved BCVA from 0.48 ± 0.2 to 0.33 ± 0.2 logMAR (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 425.90 ± 149.6 to 353.4 ± 140 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.38 ± 2.1 to 11.53 ± 1.1 mm3 (P < 0.001. No significant differences between the groups were found in two-month BCVA (P = 0.505, two-month central macular thickness (P = 0.660, or two-month retinal volume (P = 0.582.Conclusion: The short-term results of this pilot study

  10. Laser Guidance in C-Arm Cone-Beam CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma Reduces Fluoroscopy Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroes, Maarten W., E-mail: Maarten.Kroes@radboudumc.nl; Busser, Wendy M. H.; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lange, Frank de; Schultze Kool, Leo J. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeTo assess whether laser guidance can reduce fluoroscopy and procedure time of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablations of osteoid osteoma compared to freehand CBCT guidance.Materials and Methods32 RF ablations were retrospectively analyzed, 17 laser-guided and 15 procedures using the freehand technique. Subgroup selection of 18 ablations in the hip–pelvic region with a similar degree of difficulty was used for a direct comparison. Data are presented as median (ranges).ResultsComparison of all 32 ablations resulted in fluoroscopy times of 365 s (193–878 s) for freehand and 186 s (75–587 s) for laser-guided procedures (p = 0.004). Corresponding procedure times were 56 min (35–97 min) and 52 min (30–85 min) (p = 0.355). The subgroup showed comparable target sizes, needle path lengths, and number of scans between groups. Fluoroscopy times were lower for laser-guided procedures, 215 s (75–413 s), compared to 384 s (193–878 s) for freehand (p = 0.012). Procedure times were comparable between groups, 51 min (30–72 min) for laser guidance and 58 min (35–79 min) for freehand (p = 0.172).ConclusionAdding laser guidance to CBCT-guided osteoid osteoma RF ablations significantly reduced fluoroscopy time without increasing procedure time.Level of EvidenceLevel 4, case series.

  11. A study of MRI-guided diffuse fluorescence molecular tomography for monitoring PDT effects in pancreas cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-06-01

    Over the last several decades little progress has been made in the therapy and treatment monitoring of pancreas adenocarcinoma, a devastating and aggressive form of cancer that has a 5-year patient survival rate of 3%. Currently, investigations for the use of interstitial Verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) are being undertaken in both orthotopic xenograft mouse models and in human clinical trials. In the mouse models, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been used as a measure of surrogate response to Verteporfin PDT; however, MR imaging alone lacks the molecular information required to assess the metabolic function and growth rates of the tumor immediately after treatment. We propose the implementation of MR-guided fluorescence tomography in conjunction with a fluorescently labeled (IR-Dye 800 CW, LI-COR) epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a molecular measure of surrogate response. To demonstrate the effectiveness of MR-guided diffuse fluorescence tomography for molecular imaging, we have used the AsPC-1 (+EGFR) human pancreatic adenocarcinoma in an orthotopic mouse model. EGF IRDye 800CW was injected 48 hours prior to imaging. MR image sequences were collected simultaneously with the fluorescence data using a MR-coupled diffuse optical tomography system. Image reconstruction was performed multiple times with varying abdominal organ segmentation in order to obtain a optimal tomographic image. It is shown that diffuse fluorescence tomography of the orthotopic pancreas model is feasible, with consideration of confounding fluorescence signals from the multiple organs and tissues surrounding the pancreas. MR-guided diffuse fluorescence tomography will be used to monitor EGF response after photodynamic therapy. Additionally, it provide the opportunity to individualize subsequent therapies based on response to PDT as well as to evaluate the success of combination therapies, such as PDT with chemotherapy, antibody therapy or even radiation.

  12. Induced Higher-order aberrations after Laser In Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) Performed with Wavefront-Guided IntraLase Femtosecond Laser in moderate to high Astigmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zeraid, Ferial M; Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L

    2016-03-22

    Wavefront-guided Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is a widespread and effective surgical treatment for myopia and astigmatic correction but whether it induces higher-order aberrations remains controversial. The study was designed to evaluate the changes in higher-order aberrations after wavefront-guided ablation with IntraLase femtosecond laser in moderate to high astigmatism. Twenty-three eyes of 15 patients with moderate to high astigmatism (mean cylinder, -3.22 ± 0.59 dioptres) aged between 19 and 35 years (mean age, 25.6 ± 4.9 years) were included in this prospective study. Subjects with cylinder ≥ 1.5 and ≤2.75 D were classified as moderate astigmatism while high astigmatism was ≥3.00 D. All patients underwent a femtosecond laser-enabled (150-kHz IntraLase iFS; Abbott Medical Optics Inc) wavefront-guided ablation. Uncorrected (UDVA), corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuity in logMAR, keratometry, central corneal thickness (CCT) and higher-order aberrations (HOAs) over a 6 mm pupil, were assessed before and 6 months, postoperatively. The relationship between postoperative change in HOA and preoperative mean spherical equivalent refraction, mean astigmatism, and postoperative CCT were tested. At the last follow-up, the mean UDVA was increased (P < 0.0001) but CDVA remained unchanged (P = 0.48) and no eyes lost ≥2 lines of CDVA. Mean spherical equivalent refraction was reduced (P < 0.0001) and was within ±0.50 D range in 61% of eyes. The average corneal curvature was flatter by 4 D and CCT was reduced by 83 μm (P < 0.0001, for all), postoperatively. Coma aberrations remained unchanged (P = 0.07) while the change in trefoil (P = 0.047) postoperatively, was not clinically significant. The 4th order HOAs (spherical aberration and secondary astigmatism) and the HOA root mean square (RMS) increased from -0.18 ± 0.07 μm, 0.04 ± 0.03 μm and 0.47 ± 0.11 μm, preoperatively, to 0.33 ± 0

  13. Overview of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiino, Akihiko; Matsuda, Masayuki

    2002-01-01

    This review describes usefulness, prospect and present problems of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery. MRI equipments for the surgery have to have a wide, open space and have those magnets of short cylindrical, biplanar (clam shell), dual air core superconducting solenoidal (double doughnut) and targeted FOV (field of view) type. Devices required for the surgery are specific and in author's facility, they are classified into 4 zones depending on the region of their use. Application of the surgery involves biopsy, drainage of cyst and abscess, hematoma evacuation, nerve block, thermotherapy (interstitial laser, RF ablation, focused untrasonic and cryosurgery), local drug therapy, chemoablation, vascular intervention and tumor extraction, of which actual procedures and pictures are presented together with, in particular, MR-guided thermotherapy, ablation therapy of brain tumors, endoscopic surgery and minimally invasive therapy of the spine. A navigation software, 3D SlicerTM system, is introduced for interventional imaging. Safety measures are emphasized for the operation. (K.H.)

  14. Overview of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiino, Akihiko; Matsuda, Masayuki [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This review describes usefulness, prospect and present problems of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery. MRI equipments for the surgery have to have a wide, open space and have those magnets of short cylindrical, biplanar (clam shell), dual air core superconducting solenoidal (double doughnut) and targeted FOV (field of view) type. Devices required for the surgery are specific and in author's facility, they are classified into 4 zones depending on the region of their use. Application of the surgery involves biopsy, drainage of cyst and abscess, hematoma evacuation, nerve block, thermotherapy (interstitial laser, RF ablation, focused untrasonic and cryosurgery), local drug therapy, chemoablation, vascular intervention and tumor extraction, of which actual procedures and pictures are presented together with, in particular, MR-guided thermotherapy, ablation therapy of brain tumors, endoscopic surgery and minimally invasive therapy of the spine. A navigation software, 3D SlicerTM system, is introduced for interventional imaging. Safety measures are emphasized for the operation. (K.H.)

  15. Patient selection guidelines in MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine fibroids: a pictorial guide to relevant findings in screening pelvic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang-Wook; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Chan; Na, Young-Jeong; Jung, Sang-Geun; Kim, Seung-Jo; Cha, Sun Hee; Yu, Jeong-Sik

    2008-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids), the most common benign tumor in women of childbearing age, can cause symptoms including dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, urinary symptoms, pain and infertility. Hysterectomy is a common approach to treating uterine fibroids, and less invasive surgical approaches such as myomectomy and uterine artery embolization also have been shown to alleviate symptoms. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is the only totally non-invasive surgical approved method for treating uterine fibroids. In clinical trials, MRgFUS resulted in significant relief of uterine fibroid symptoms. The safe and effective use of MRgFUS is affected by fibroid type and location, position relative to adjacent anatomical structures and the presence of co-existent pelvic disease. Additionally, successful outcomes with MRgFUS have been correlated with the volume of fibroids ablated during the procedure. Thus, selection of patients in whom sufficient fibroid volumes can be treated safely using the MRgFUS system is critical for successful outcomes. The MR images in this pictorial essay provide examples of uterine fibroids for which MRgFUS should be considered and is designed to facilitate the selection of patients for whom MRgFUS is most likely to provide sustained symptom relief. (orig.)

  16. Patient selection guidelines in MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine fibroids: a pictorial guide to relevant findings in screening pelvic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang-Wook; Kim, Kyoung Ah [Pochon CHA University Bundang CHA General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Gyunggi-do (Korea); Lee, Chan; Na, Young-Jeong; Jung, Sang-Geun; Kim, Seung-Jo [Pochon CHA University Bundang CHA General Hospital, Comprehensive Gynecologic Cancer Center, College of Medicine, Gyunggi-do (Korea); Cha, Sun Hee [Pochon CHA University Bundang CHA General Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, Gyunggi-do (Korea); Yu, Jeong-Sik [YongDong Severance Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-12-15

    Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids), the most common benign tumor in women of childbearing age, can cause symptoms including dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, urinary symptoms, pain and infertility. Hysterectomy is a common approach to treating uterine fibroids, and less invasive surgical approaches such as myomectomy and uterine artery embolization also have been shown to alleviate symptoms. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is the only totally non-invasive surgical approved method for treating uterine fibroids. In clinical trials, MRgFUS resulted in significant relief of uterine fibroid symptoms. The safe and effective use of MRgFUS is affected by fibroid type and location, position relative to adjacent anatomical structures and the presence of co-existent pelvic disease. Additionally, successful outcomes with MRgFUS have been correlated with the volume of fibroids ablated during the procedure. Thus, selection of patients in whom sufficient fibroid volumes can be treated safely using the MRgFUS system is critical for successful outcomes. The MR images in this pictorial essay provide examples of uterine fibroids for which MRgFUS should be considered and is designed to facilitate the selection of patients for whom MRgFUS is most likely to provide sustained symptom relief. (orig.)

  17. Industrial processes control with He-Ne laser devices for aligning and guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.; Ivascu, M.; Vasiliu, V.; Ristici, M.; Gradisteanu, I.; Vilcu, G.; Pelle, V.; Botezatu, I.; Vasnea, V.; Orac, N.; Fernea, V.

    1988-03-01

    A brief presentation of the He-Ne laser devices main application fields in the national economy is given. The utilization of the devices we did in: industrial constructions, metalurgy, hydroelectric arrangements, wood industry, ship's construction, and other is presented. (authors)

  18. Incorporation of a laser range scanner into image-guided liver surgery: Surface acquisition, registration, and tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, David M.; Sinha, Tuhin K.; Chapman, William C.; Terawaki, Hiromi; Dawant, Benoit M.; Galloway, Robert L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    As image guided surgical procedures become increasingly diverse, there will be more scenarios where point-based fiducials cannot be accurately localized for registration and rigid body assumptions no longer hold. As a result, procedures will rely more frequently on anatomical surfaces for the basis of image alignment and will require intraoperative geometric data to measure and compensate for tissue deformation in the organ. In this paper we outline methods for which a laser range scanner may be used to accomplish these tasks intraoperatively. A laser range scanner based on the optical principle of triangulation acquires a dense set of three-dimensional point data in a very rapid, noncontact fashion. Phantom studies were performed to test the ability to link range scan data with traditional modes of image-guided surgery data through localization, registration, and tracking in physical space. The experiments demonstrate that the scanner is capable of localizing point-based fiducials to within 0.2 mm and capable of achieving point and surface based registrations with target registration error of less than 2.0 mm. Tracking points in physical space with the range scanning system yields an error of 1.4±0.8 mm. Surface deformation studies were performed with the range scanner in order to determine if this device was capable of acquiring enough information for compensation algorithms. In the surface deformation studies, the range scanner was able to detect changes in surface shape due to deformation comparable to those detected by tomographic image studies. Use of the range scanner has been approved for clinical trials, and an initial intraoperative range scan experiment is presented. In all of these studies, the primary source of error in range scan data is deterministically related to the position and orientation of the surface within the scanner's field of view. However, this systematic error can be corrected, allowing the range scanner to provide a rapid, robust

  19. Imaging breast adipose and fibroglandular tissue molecular signatures by using hybrid MRI-guided near-infrared spectral tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooksby, Ben; Pogue, Brian W.; Jiang, Shudong; Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Kogel, Christine; Tosteson, Tor D.; Weaver, John; Poplack, Steven P.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided near-infrared spectral tomography was developed and used to image adipose and fibroglandular breast tissue of 11 normal female subjects, recruited under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Images of hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water fraction, and subcellular scattering were reconstructed and show that fibroglandular fractions of both blood and water are higher than in adipose tissue. Variation in adipose and fibroglandular tissue composition between individuals was not significantly different across the scattered and dense breast categories. Combined MR and near-infrared tomography provides fundamental molecular information about these tissue types with resolution governed by MR T1 images. hemoglobin | magnetic resonance imaging | water | fat | oxygen saturation

  20. Early clinical experience with pre-operative MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mueller, P.; Phillip, C.; Roggan, A.; Mack, M.G.; Balzer, J.O.; Eichstaedt, H.; Blumhardt, G.; Lobeck, H.; Felix, R.; Weinhold, N.

    1996-01-01

    Five patients with solitary colorectal liver metastases were treated by means of MR-guided LITT before liver resection. Application time and energy of the Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) and 10-20 minutes and 4.5-8.8 W. MRT monitoring during the LITT was carried out with temperature-sensitive T 1 weighted sequences (FLASH-2-D, turbo FLASH). The extent of the induced necrosis as seen on MR was compared with the unfixed specimen and with the histopathological findings. The extent of necrosis visible by MRT correlated with the histopathological findings with an accuracy of 95.3±4.2%. Following single treatments (three cases) the metastases suffered a reduction of 24%-55% of their original volume. In two patients a second application produced laser-induced necrosis of 78% and 98% of volume. In these two patients a temperature sound was used for measuring regional heating and showed an exact correlation with MR thermometry. (orig./MG) [de

  1. A tip/tilt mirror with large dynamic range for the ESO VLT Four Laser Guide Star Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnveld, N.; Henselmans, R.; Nijland, B.

    2011-09-01

    One of the critical elements in the Four Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) for the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) is the Optical Tube Assembly (OTA), consisting of a stable 20x laser beam expander and an active tip/tilt mirror, the Field Selector Mechanism (FSM). This paper describes the design and performance testing of the FSM. The driving requirement for the FSM is its large stroke of +/-6.1 mrad, in combination with less than 1.5 μrad RMS absolute accuracy. The FSM design consists of a Zerodur mirror, bonded to a membrane spring and strut combination to allow only tip and tilt. Two spindle drives actuate the mirror, using a stiffness based transmission to increase resolution. Absolute accuracy is achieved with two differential inductive sensor pairs. A prototype of the FSM is realized to optimize the control configuration and measure its performance. Friction in the spindle drive is overcome by creating a local velocity control loop between the spindle drives and the shaft encoders. Accuracy is achieved by using a cascaded low bandwidth control loop with feedback from the inductive sensors. The pointing jitter and settling time of the FSM are measured with an autocollimator. The system performance meets the strict requirements, and is ready to be implemented in the first OTA.

  2. Generalized theory of a free-electron laser in a helical wiggler and guide magnetic fields using the kinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, K.D.; Mishra, P.K.

    2002-01-01

    A self-consistent theory of a free-electron laser is developed by the kinetic approach, using the method of characteristics in helical wiggler and guide magnetic fields. The detailed relativistic particle trajectories obtained in wiggler and guide magnetic fields are used in linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations having variations in perpendicular and parallel momenta to obtain the perturbed distribution function in terms of perturbed electric and magnetic fields deviating from the vector potential approach. The perturbed distribution function thus obtained, having variations in perpendicular and parallel momenta for an arbitrary distribution function, is used to obtain current, conductivity and dielectric tensors. The full dispersion relation (FDR) and Compton dispersion relation (CDR) have been obtained. The dispersion diagram has been obtained and the interaction of the negative longitudinal space charge with the electromagnetic wave has been shown. The temporal growth rates obtained from the full dispersion relation and Compton dispersion relation for the tenuous cold relativistic beam in microwave region have been discussed

  3. Self-injection threshold in self-guided laser wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. D. Mangles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser pulse traveling through a plasma can excite large amplitude plasma waves that can be used to accelerate relativistic electron beams in a very short distance—a technique called laser wakefield acceleration. Many wakefield acceleration experiments rely on the process of wave breaking, or self-injection, to inject electrons into the wave, while other injection techniques rely on operation without self-injection. We present an experimental study into the parameters, including the pulse energy, focal spot quality, and pulse power, that determine whether or not a wakefield accelerator will self-inject. By taking into account the processes of self-focusing and pulse compression we are able to extend a previously described theoretical model, where the minimum bubble size k_{p}r_{b} required for trapping is not constant but varies slowly with density and find excellent agreement with this model.

  4. MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis low back pain - case series of an innovative new technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, Evan M.; Platt, Michael W. [St Mary' s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Gedroyc, Wladyslaw [St Mary' s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis pain. Patients with a positive response to facet joint interventions were recruited from Pain and Spinal Clinics. Treatments were performed at the levels of pain according to symptomatology, previous invasive treatment and MRI grading of facet joint osteoarthritis. Both safety and efficacy data were collected. Pain palliation was evaluated using a validated pain numerical rating scale (NRS), Oswestry disability questionnaire (ODQ), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score Eighteen patients were treated. There were no major adverse events. At 6/12 we found a reduction in both the NRS (average/worst) pain scores (60.2 %/51.2 %). This was associated with 45.9 % improvement in the ODQ score and 61.9 % reduction in the BPI interference score. We observed an improvement in the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score based on UK coefficients of +0.379 (0.317 to 0.696). Our phase I observational pilot study has evaluated an innovative new technique that is both non-invasive and radiation free. It is the first description of this procedure in the literature. In all patients the technique was safe, free of complications, effective and well tolerated. (orig.)

  5. Improved survival in rats with glioma using MRI-guided focused ultrasound and microbubbles to disrupt the blood-brain barrier and deliver Doxil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Muna; Zhi Zhang, Yong; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Park, Juyoung; Power, Chanikarn; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-02-01

    Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) limits the transportation of most neuropeptides, proteins (enzymes, antibodies), chemotherapeutic agents, and genes that have therapeutic potential for the treatment of brain diseases. Different methods have been used to overcome this limitation, but they are invasive, non-targeted, or require the development of new drugs. We have developed a method that uses MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with circulating microbubbles to temporarily open BBB in and around brain tumors to deliver chemotherapy agents. Here, we tested whether this noninvasive technique could enhance the effectiveness of a chemotherapy agent (Doxil). Using 690 kHz FUS transducer and microbubble (Definity), we induced BBB disruption in intracranially-implanted 9L glioma tumors in rat's brain in three weekly sessions. Animals who received BBB disruption and Doxil had a median survival time of 34.5 days, which was significantly longer than that found in control animals which is 16, 18.5, 21 days who received no treatment, BBB disruption only and Doxil only respectively This work demonstrates that FUS technique has promise in overcoming barriers to drug delivery, which are particularly stark in the brain due to the BBB.

  6. MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis low back pain - case series of an innovative new technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, Evan M.; Platt, Michael W.; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis pain. Patients with a positive response to facet joint interventions were recruited from Pain and Spinal Clinics. Treatments were performed at the levels of pain according to symptomatology, previous invasive treatment and MRI grading of facet joint osteoarthritis. Both safety and efficacy data were collected. Pain palliation was evaluated using a validated pain numerical rating scale (NRS), Oswestry disability questionnaire (ODQ), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score Eighteen patients were treated. There were no major adverse events. At 6/12 we found a reduction in both the NRS (average/worst) pain scores (60.2 %/51.2 %). This was associated with 45.9 % improvement in the ODQ score and 61.9 % reduction in the BPI interference score. We observed an improvement in the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score based on UK coefficients of +0.379 (0.317 to 0.696). Our phase I observational pilot study has evaluated an innovative new technique that is both non-invasive and radiation free. It is the first description of this procedure in the literature. In all patients the technique was safe, free of complications, effective and well tolerated. (orig.)

  7. Less invasive causal treatment of ejaculatory duct obstruction by balloon dilation: a case report, literature review and suggestion of a CT- or MRI-guided intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Kayser

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Uni- or bilateral ejaculatory duct obstruction (EDO is a rare but correctable cause of infertility, chronic pelvic pain and postejaculatory pain. EDO is a congenital or acquired condition, it is the underlying cause of infertility in approximately 5% of infertile men. If acquired, the etiology often remains unresolved, but prostatitis or urethritis with post-inflammatory adhesion of the duct walls seems to be a common underlying pathomechanism. Although a certain constellation of physicochemical semen parameters may lead to correct diagnosis, EDO often resembles a diagnosis by exclusion. Imaging of acquired EDO remains a challenge and the established surgical therapy, transurethral resection of the ejaculatory ducts (TURED, leads to a low rate of natural conception and a high rate of complications such as reflux of urine and epididymitis. We present a case of a male with suspected EDO who underwent a combined approach to both, semi-invasive diagnosis and therapy by transrectal puncture of the seminal vesicles and antegrade balloon-dilation of the ejaculatory ducts. Possibilities and pitfalls of this procedure are described and the literature is reviewed. Furthermore, we suggest a CT- or MRI-guided, percutaneous intervention for treatment of ejaculatory duct obstruction by balloon dilation and demonstrate initial steps of this procedure with a body donor. We call this new procedure PTED (percutaneous transgluteal ejaculatory ductoplasty.

  8. [Clinical analysis of real-time iris recognition guided LASIK with femtosecond laser flap creation for myopic astigmatism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Li-ming; Wang, Qian; Zheng, Lin

    2013-08-01

    To assess the safety, efficacy, stability and changes in cylindrical degree and axis after real-time iris recognition guided LASIK with femtosecond laser flap creation for the correction of myopic astigmatism. Retrospective case series. This observational case study comprised 136 patients (249 eyes) with myopic astigmatism in a 6-month trial. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the pre-operative cylindrical degree: Group 1, -0.75 to -1.25 D, 106 eyes;Group 2, -1.50 to -2.25 D, 89 eyes and Group 3, -2.50 to -5.00 D, 54 eyes. They were also grouped by pre-operative astigmatism axis:Group A, with the rule astigmatism (WTRA), 156 eyes; Group B, against the rule astigmatism (ATRA), 64 eyes;Group C, oblique axis astigmatism, 29 eyes. After femtosecond laser flap created, real-time iris recognized excimer ablation was performed. The naked visual acuity, the best-corrected visual acuity, the degree and axis of astigmatism were analyzed and compared at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Static iris recognition detected that eye cyclotorsional misalignment was 2.37° ± 2.16°, dynamic iris recognition detected that the intraoperative cyclotorsional misalignment range was 0-4.3°. Six months after operation, the naked visual acuity was 0.5 or better in 100% cases. No eye lost ≥ 1 line of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA). Six months after operation, the naked vision of 227 eyes surpassed the BSCVA, and 87 eyes gained 1 line of BSCVA. The degree of astigmatism decreased from (-1.72 ± 0.77) D (pre-operation) to (-0.29 ± 0.25) D (post-operation). Six months after operation, WTRA from 157 eyes (pre-operation) decreased to 43 eyes (post-operation), ATRA from 63 eyes (pre-operation) decreased to 28 eyes (post-operation), oblique astigmatism increased from 29 eyes to 34 eyes and 144 eyes became non-astigmatism. The real-time iris recognition guided LASIK with femtosecond laser flap creation can compensate deviation from eye cyclotorsion, decrease

  9. Intracranial inertial cavitation threshold and thermal ablation lesion creation using MRI-guided 220-kHz focused ultrasound surgery: preclinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiyuan; Carlson, Carissa; Snell, John; Eames, Matt; Hananel, Arik; Lopes, M Beatriz; Raghavan, Prashant; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Yen, Chun-Po; Schlesinger, David; Kassell, Neal F; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Sheehan, Jason

    2015-01-01

    In biological tissues, it is known that the creation of gas bubbles (cavitation) during ultrasound exposure is more likely to occur at lower rather than higher frequencies. Upon collapsing, such bubbles can induce hemorrhage. Thus, acoustic inertial cavitation secondary to a 220-kHz MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) surgery is a serious safety issue, and animal studies are mandatory for laying the groundwork for the use of low-frequency systems in future clinical trials. The authors investigate here the in vivo potential thresholds of MRgFUS-induced inertial cavitation and MRgFUS-induced thermal coagulation using MRI, acoustic spectroscopy, and histology. Ten female piglets that had undergone a craniectomy were sonicated using a 220-kHz transcranial MRgFUS system over an acoustic energy range of 5600-14,000 J. For each piglet, a long-duration sonication (40-second duration) was performed on the right thalamus, and a short sonication (20-second duration) was performed on the left thalamus. An acoustic power range of 140-300 W was used for long-duration sonications and 300-700 W for short-duration sonications. Signals collected by 2 passive cavitation detectors were stored in memory during each sonication, and any subsequent cavitation activity was integrated within the bandwidth of the detectors. Real-time 2D MR thermometry was performed during the sonications. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, gradient-recalled echo, and diffusion-weighted imaging MRI was performed after treatment to assess the lesions. The piglets were killed immediately after the last series of posttreatment MR images were obtained. Their brains were harvested, and histological examinations were then performed to further evaluate the lesions. Two types of lesions were induced: thermal ablation lesions, as evidenced by an acute ischemic infarction on MRI and histology, and hemorrhagic lesions, associated with inertial cavitation. Passive cavitation signals exhibited 3 main patterns identified as

  10. MO-FG-BRA-09: Quantification of Nanoparticle Heating and Concentration for MR-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLellan, CJ; Melancon, M; Fuentes, D; Stafford, RJ; Salatan, F; Yang, Q; Hwang, KP

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy (npLITT) is a technique that utilizes tumor localized optically activated nanoparticles to increase the conformality of laser ablation procedures. Temperatures in these procedures are dependent on the particle concentration which generally cannot be measured noninvasively prior to therapy. In this work we attempt to quantify particle concentration in vivo by estimating the increase in R2* relaxation induced by bifunctional magnetic resonance (MR)-visible gold-based nanoparticles (SPIO@Au) and relate it to the temperature increase observed during real time MR temperature imaging (MRTI) of laser ablation. Methods: SPIO@Au nanoparticles (90nm) were synthesized containing a silica-iron core (for MR visibility via R2*) and gold shell (for near-infrared absorption). High resolution R2* maps were acquired before and after injecting four different particle concentrations (saline,1e10, 5e10, and 10e10 particles/mL) into HN5 flank xenografts. Tumors were monitored using MRTI during treatment with an interstitial fiber. (1 watt, 808 nm, 3 minutes) Results: The maximum temperature within the tumors increased linearly with concentration of injected particles, reaching 34.0, 37.6, 45.8, and 55.4 "0C for saline, 1e10, 5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively (R2=.994). The highest temperatures occur at the injection site rather than the fiber, confirming that SPIO@Au nanoparticles are the primary absorber. The differences between the median R2* measured at the injection site and the rest of the tumor were −6, 134, 111, 156 s-1 for the saline,1e10,5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively. This R2* change is consistent with the measured relaxivity for the 1e10 particles/mL injection but does not maintain linearity at higher concentrations. Conclusion: Bifunctional SPIO@Au nanoparticles are a promising technology for providing noninvasive estimates of particle concentration via MRI and

  11. Consistent comparison of angle Kappa adjustment between Oculyzer and Topolyzer Vario topography guided LASIK for myopia by EX500 excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Shen; Zhang, Li; Guo, Ning; Song, Yan-Zheng; Zhang, Feng-Ju

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the uniformity of angle Kappa adjustment between Oculyzer and Topolyzer Vario topography guided ablation of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) by EX500 excimer laser for myopia. Totally 145 cases (290 consecutive eyes )with myopia received LASIK with a target of emmetropia. The ablation for 86 cases (172 eyes) was guided manually based on Oculyzer topography (study group), while the ablation for 59 cases (118 eyes) was guided automatically by Topolyzer Vario topography (control group). Measurement of adjustment values included data respectively in horizontal and vertical direction of cornea. Horizontally, synclastic adjustment between manually actual values (dx manu ) and Oculyzer topography guided data (dx ocu ) accounts 35.5% in study group, with mean dx manu /dx ocu of 0.78±0.48; while in control group, synclastic adjustment between automatically actual values (dx auto ) and Oculyzer topography data (dx ocu ) accounts 54.2%, with mean dx auto /dx ocu of 0.79±0.66. Vertically, synclastic adjustment between dy manu and dy ocu accounts 55.2% in study group, with mean dy manu /dy ocu of 0.61±0.42; while in control group, synclastic adjustment between dy auto and dy ocu accounts 66.1%, with mean dy auto /dy ocu of 0.66±0.65. There was no statistically significant difference in ratio of actual values/Oculyzer topography guided data in horizontal and vertical direction between two groups ( P =0.951, 0.621). There is high consistency in angle Kappa adjustment guided manually by Oculyzer and guided automatically by Topolyzer Vario topography during corneal refractive surgery by WaveLight EX500 excimer laser.

  12. MRI-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated sitting pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Dharmdev H.; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Fritz, Jan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Del Grande, Filippo [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Servizio di Radiologia, Lugano, Ticino (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    Neuropathy of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve may manifest as pain and paresthesia in the skin over the inferior buttocks, posterior thigh, and popliteal region. Current treatment options include physical and oral pain therapy, perineural injections, and surgical neurectomy. Perineural steroid injections may provide short-term pain relief; however, to our knowledge, there is currently no minimally invasive denervation procedure for sustained pain relief that could serve as an alternative to surgical neurectomy. Percutaneous cryoablation of nerves is a minimally invasive technique that induces a sustained nerve conduction block through temporary freezing of the neural layers. It can result in long-lasting pain relief, but has not been described for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated PFCN pain. We report a technique of MR-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve resulting in successful treatment of PFCN-mediated sitting pain. Cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve seems a promising, minimally invasive treatment option that deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  13. MRI-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated sitting pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Dharmdev H.; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Fritz, Jan; Del Grande, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathy of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve may manifest as pain and paresthesia in the skin over the inferior buttocks, posterior thigh, and popliteal region. Current treatment options include physical and oral pain therapy, perineural injections, and surgical neurectomy. Perineural steroid injections may provide short-term pain relief; however, to our knowledge, there is currently no minimally invasive denervation procedure for sustained pain relief that could serve as an alternative to surgical neurectomy. Percutaneous cryoablation of nerves is a minimally invasive technique that induces a sustained nerve conduction block through temporary freezing of the neural layers. It can result in long-lasting pain relief, but has not been described for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated PFCN pain. We report a technique of MR-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve resulting in successful treatment of PFCN-mediated sitting pain. Cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve seems a promising, minimally invasive treatment option that deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  14. Carbon fibre and nitinol needles for MRI-guided interventions: First in vitro and in vivo application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.thomas@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Wojtczyk, Hanne [Section of Experimental Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Rempp, Hansjoerg; Clasen, Stephan; Horger, Marius [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Lassberg, Christoph von [Department of Sports Medicine, University of Tuebingen, Silcherstrasse 5, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Fritz, Jan [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Claussen, Claus D. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Pereira, Philippe L. [Department of Radiology, Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclearmedicine, SLK-Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Am Gesundbrunnen 20-26, 74078 Heilbronn (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: To assess the artefact properties of a MR-compatible carbon fibre needle with a nitinol mandrin in vitro and to report first clinical experiences. Materials and methods: In vitro, the carbon fibre/nitinol needle was imaged at different angles against the main magnetic field (1.5 T open bore magnet). A gradient echo MR fluoroscopy sequence (GRE: TR 9.3 ms, TE 3.12 ms, bandwidth 200 Hz/pixel, flip-angle 12{sup o}) and a fast turbo spin echo sequence (FSE: TR 412 ms, TE 9.7 ms, bandwidth 200 Hz/pixel, flip-angle 150{sup o}) were used. Artefact width, needle intensity contrast and needle tip location errors were assessed. In vivo, lumbar periradicular corticosteroid injections and one sclerotherapy were performed with carbon fibre needles (10 procedures) and with titanium alloy needles (2 procedures). The artefact sizes and contrasts were measured. Results: In vitro, artefact diameters of the carbon fibre needle ranged from 3.3 to 4.6 mm, contrasts from 0.11 to 0.52, with larger artefact contrasts and widths with the GRE sequence. Needle tip location errors of -2.1 to -2.8 mm were observed. Decreasing angles to the main field lead to smaller artefacts. In vivo, the carbon fibre/nitinol needle produced smaller artefacts (mean width FSE/GRE: 2.8 mm/4.6 mm) with lower contrast (0.30-0.42) than the titanium alloy needle (mean width FSE/GRE: 4.1 mm/7.5 mm, contrast 0.60-0.73). Conclusions: The carbon fibre/nitinol needle is useful for performing MR-guided interventions at 1.5 T, producing more subtle artefacts than a titanium alloy needle, but with an incomplete depiction and thus inaccurate localization of the needle tip.

  15. Microsurgery guided by sequential preoperative lymphography using {sup 68}Ga-NEB PET and MRI in patients with lower-limb lymphedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Xiao; Gao, Chao; Yang, Elan [Peking Union Medical College Hospital Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Plastic Surgery, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jingjing [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Beijing (China); National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine LOMIN, Bethesda, MD (United States); Zhang, Daming; Xue, Huadan [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chi, Chongwei [Institute of Automation Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing, Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Lang, Lixin; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine LOMIN, Bethesda, MD (United States); Zhu, Zhaohui; Li, Fang [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    The popularity of contemporary microsurgical techniques in treatment of lower-limb lymphedema calls for better visualization of the lymphatic system, both preoperatively and intra-operatively. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the feasibility of a novel combination of {sup 68}Ga-NEB positron emission tomography (PET) with magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) in evaluating lymphedema and guiding surgical intervention. A total of 11 patients (F 9, M 2, age range 29-69 y) with lower-limb lymphedema classified into stage I to III were recruited. PET acquisition was performed at 30, 60 and 90 min after subcutaneous injection of the albumin-binding radiotracer {sup 68}Ga-NEB into the bilateral first web spaces of the feet. All the patients were also subjected to {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid (SC) lymphoscintigraphy for comparison. Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed using sequences specialized for lymphatic vessel scans. All the patients underwent surgical interventions within a week. The surgical approach includes the use of a linear marker for edema localization and indocyanine green (ICG) lymphography with a near-infrared surgical navigation system intra-operatively. Lymph transport in lymphatic channels was clearly observed by visualization of {sup 68}Ga-NEB activity in the lymphatic vessels and within lymph nodes for all 11 patients as well as the visualization of the edema section plane with dermal backflow (DB), abnormally increased and disconnected uptake along the lymphatic channels. Preoperative {sup 68}Ga-NEB PET combined with MRL provides advantageous three-dimensional images, higher temporal resolution, significantly shorter time lapse before image acquisition after tracer injection and more accurate pathological lymphatic vessel distribution than {sup 99m}Tc-SC lymphoscintigraphy combined with MRI. This study documented an effective imaging pattern to combine {sup 68}Ga-NEB PET and MRL in patients with lower

  16. SU-F-J-145: MRI-Guided Interventional Boost Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Investigating the Feasibility of Adapting the Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleijnen, J J E; Couwenberg, A M; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J J W; Intven, M; Raaymakers, B W [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The recent development of an MRI-linac allows adaptation of treatments to the anatomy of the moment. This anatomy, in turn, could be altered into a more favorable situation for radiotherapy purposes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential dosimetric benefits of manipulating rectal anatomy in MRI-guided interventional external-beam radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: For this retrospective analysis, four patients (1M/3F) diagnosed with rectal cancer were included. These underwent MR-imaging using sonography transmission gel as endorectal contrast at time of diagnosis and standard, non-contrast, MR-imaging prior to radiotherapy planning. In the contrast scan, the rectum is inflated by the inserted contrast gel, thereby potentially increasing the distance between tumor and the organs-at-risk (OAR). Both anatomies were delineated and 7- beam IMRT-plans were calculated for both situations (RT-standard and RT-inflated), using in-house developed treatment planning software. Each plan was aimed to deliver 15Gy to the planning target volume (PTV; tumor+3mm margin) with a D99>95% and Dmax<120% of the planned dose. The D2cc dose to the OAR were then compared for both situations. Results: At equal (or better) target coverage, we found a mean reduction in D2cc of 4.1Gy/237% [range 2.6Gy–6.3Gy/70%–621%] for the bladder and of 2.0Gy/145% [range −0.7Gy–7.9Gy/−73%–442%] for the small-bowel, for the RT-inflated compared to the RT-standard plans. For the three female patients, a reduction in D2cc of 5.2Gy/191% [range 3.2Gy–9.2Gy/44%–475%] for the gynecological organs was found. We found all D2cc doses to be better for the RT-inflated plans, except for one patient for whom the bladder D2cc dose was slightly increased. Conclusion: Reduction of OAR dose by manipulation of anatomy is feasible. Inflation of the rectum results in more distance between OAR and PTV. This leads to a substantial reduction in dose to OAR at equal or better target

  17. Practitioner's guide to laser pulse propagation models and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couairon, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Brambilla, E.; Corti, T. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Insubria, via Vallegio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Majus, D. [Department of Quantum Electronics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Avenue 9, Bldg. 3, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Ramirez-Congora, O. de [Departamento de Ciencias Naturales y Matematicas, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Cali, Avenida Canas Gordas no 118-250 Cali (Colombia); Kolesik, M. [College of Optical Sciences, Tucson 85721 AZ (United States); Department of Physics, Constantine the Philosopher Uninversity, Nitra (Slovakia)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this article is to provide practical introduction into numerical modeling of ultrashort optical pulses in extreme nonlinear regimes. The theoretic background section covers derivation of modern pulse propagation models starting from Maxwell's equations, and includes both envelope-based models and carrier-resolving propagation equations. We then continue with a detailed description of implementation in software of Nonlinear Envelope Equations as an example of a mixed approach which combines finite-difference and spectral techniques. Fully spectral numerical solution methods for the Unidirectional Pulse Propagation Equation are discussed next. The modeling part of this guide concludes with a brief introduction into efficient implementations of nonlinear medium responses. Finally, we include several worked-out simulation examples. These are mini-projects designed to highlight numerical and modeling issues, and to teach numerical-experiment practices. They are also meant to illustrate, first and foremost for a non-specialist, how tools discussed in this guide can be applied in practical numerical modeling. (authors)

  18. Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Milonni, Peter W

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to the operating principles and applications of lasers. Explains basic principles, including the necessary elements of classical and quantum physics. Provides concise discussions of various laser types including gas, solid state, semiconductor, and free electron lasers, as well as of laser resonators, diffraction, optical coherence, and many applications including holography, phase conjugation, wave mixing, and nonlinear optics. Incorporates many intuitive explanations and practical examples. Discussions are self-contained in a consistent notation and in a style that should appeal to physicists, chemists, optical scientists and engineers.

  19. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellens, N; Farahani, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  20. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  1. Tip-tilt compensation: Resolution limits for ground-based telescopes using laser guide star adaptive optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.; Gavel, D.T.; Brase, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The angular resolution of long-exposure images from ground-based telescopes equipped with laser guide star adaptive optics systems is fundamentally limited by the the accuracy with which the tip-tilt aberrations introduced by the atmosphere can be corrected. Assuming that a natural star is used as the tilt reference, the residual error due to tilt anisoplanatism can significantly degrade the long-exposure resolution even if the tilt reference star is separated from the object being imaged by a small angle. Given the observed distribution of stars in the sky, the need to find a tilt reference star quite close to the object restricts the fraction of the sky over which long-exposure images with diffraction limited resolution can be obtained. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive performance analysis of tip-tilt compensation systems that use a natural star as a tilt reference, taking into account properties of the atmosphere and of the Galactic stellar populations, and optimizing over the system operating parameters to determine the fundamental limits to the long-exposure resolution. Their results show that for a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea, if the image of the tilt reference star is uncorrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 60 milli-arc-seconds (mas), while if the image of the tilt reference star is fully corrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 16 mas. Furthermore, V band images long-exposure resolution of less than 16 mas may be obtained with a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea for unresolved objects brighter than magnitude 22 that are fully corrected by a laser guide star adaptive optics system. This level of resolution represents about 70% of the diffraction limit of a ten meter telescope in the V band and is more than a factor of 45 better than the median seeing in the V band on Mauna Kea

  2. Focusing peculiarities of ion-channel guiding on a relativistic electron beam in a free-electron laser with a three-dimensional wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Zhang, Shi-Chang

    2014-01-01

    In a free-electron laser the ‘natural focusing’ effect of a three-dimensional wiggler is too weak to confine the transport of a relativistic electron beam when the beam has a high current and consequently an external focusing system is often needed. In this paper we study the focusing peculiarities of an ion-channel guide field on an electron beam. Nonlinear simulations of an electron beam transport show that, compared to an axial guide magnetic field, the ion-channel guide field results in smaller velocity–space and configuration–space spreads. The intrinsic mechanism of this physical phenomenon is that the ion-channel guide field confines the trajectory of the electron motion resulting in a smaller instantaneous curvature radius and a slighter curvature-center excursion than an axial guide magnetic field does. It is also found that, unlike with an axial guide magnetic field, over-focusing may occur if the ion-channel guide field is too strong. (paper)

  3. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assenholt, Marianne S.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Nielsen, Soeren K.; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Material and methods. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gyx25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gyx4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Results. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. Conclusion. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy

  4. Investigating the Causal Role of rOFA in Holistic Detection of Mooney Faces and Objects: An fMRI-guided TMS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Silvia; Cattaneo, Zaira; Silvanto, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The right occipital face area (rOFA) is known to be involved in face discrimination based on local featural information. Whether this region is also involved in global, holistic stimulus processing is not known. We used fMRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate whether rOFA is causally implicated in stimulus detection based on holistic processing, by the use of Mooney stimuli. Two studies were carried out: In Experiment 1, participants performed a detection task involving Mooney faces and Mooney objects; Mooney stimuli lack distinguishable local features and can be detected solely via holistic processing (i.e. at a global level) with top-down guidance from previously stored representations. Experiment 2 required participants to detect shapes which are recognized via bottom-up integration of local (collinear) Gabor elements and was performed to control for specificity of rOFA's implication in holistic detection. In Experiment 1, TMS over rOFA and rLO impaired detection of all stimulus categories, with no category-specific effect. In Experiment 2, shape detection was impaired when TMS was applied over rLO but not over rOFA. Our results demonstrate that rOFA is causally implicated in the type of top-down holistic detection required by Mooney stimuli and that such role is not face-selective. In contrast, rOFA does not appear to play a causal role in detection of shapes based on bottom-up integration of local components, demonstrating that its involvement in processing non-face stimuli is specific for holistic processing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A quantum dynamics study of the benzopyran ring opening guided by laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Mohamad; Doriol, Loïc Joubert; Lasorne, Benjamin; Guérin, Stéphane; Gatti, Fabien

    2014-10-01

    The ring-opening photoisomerization of benzopyran, which occurs via a photochemical route involving a conical intersection, has been studied with quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method (MCTDH). We introduce a mechanistic strategy to control the conversion of benzopyran to merocyanine with laser pulses. We use a six-dimensional model developed in a previous work for the potential energy surfaces (PES) based on an extension of the vibronic-coupling Hamiltonian model (diabatization method by ansatz), which depends on the most active degrees of freedom. The main objective of these quantum dynamics simulations is to provide a set of strategies that could help experimentalists to control the photoreactivity vs. photostability ratio (selectivity). In this work we present: (i) a pump-dump technique used to control the photostability, (ii) a two-step strategy to enhance the reactivity of the system: first, a pure vibrational excitation in the electronic ground state that prepares the system and, second, an ultraviolet excitation that brings the system to the first adiabatic electronic state; (iii) finally the effect of a non-resonant pulse (Stark effect) on the dynamics.

  6. Large-area irradiated low-level laser effect in a biodegradable nerve guide conduit on neural regeneration of peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2011-08-01

    This study used a biodegradable composite containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin annexed with β-tricalcium phosphate ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-tricalcium phosphate, GGT), developed in a previous study, as a nerve guide conduit. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a large-area irradiated aluminium-gallium-indium phosphide (AlGaInP) diode laser (660 nm) on the neural regeneration of the transected sciatic nerve after bridging the GGT nerve guide conduit in rats. The animals were divided into two groups: group 1 comprised sham-irradiated controls and group 2 rats underwent low-level laser (LLL) therapy. A compact multi-cluster laser system with 20 AlGaInP laser diodes (output power, 50mW) was applied transcutaneously to the injured peripheral nerve immediately after closing the wound, which was repeated daily for 5 min for 21 consecutive days. Eight weeks after implantation, walking track analysis showed a significantly higher sciatic function index (SFI) score (Pguide conduit in rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope (FM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a single set-up. The region of interest in the specimen is labeled or tagged with a fluorescent probe and can easily be identified within a large field of view with the FM. Next, this same area is retraced in the TEM and can be studied at high resolution. The iLEM demands samples that can be imaged with both FM and TEM. Biological specimen, typically composed of light elements, generate low image contrast in the TEM. Therefore, these samples are often ‘contrasted’ with heavy metal stains. FM, on the other hand, images fluorescent samples. Sample preparation for correlative microscopy, and iLEM in particular, is complicated by the fact that the heavy metals stains employed for TEM quench the fluorescent signal of the probe that is imaged with FM. The first part of this thesis outlines preparation procedures for biological material yielding specimen that can be imaged with the iLEM. Here, approaches for the contrasting of thin sections of cells and tissue are introduced that do not affect the fluorescence signal of the probe that marks the region of interest. Furthermore, two novel procedures, VIS2FIXH and VIS2FIX­FS are described that allow for the chemical fixation of thin sections of cryo-immobilized material. These procedures greatly expedite the sample preparation process, and open up novel possibilities for the immuno-labeling of difficult antigens, eg. proteins and lipids that are challenging to preserve. The second part of this thesis describes applications of iLEM in research in the field of life and material science. The iLEM was employed in the study of UVC induced apoptosis (programmed cell death) of

  8. TH-CD-202-11: Implications for Online Adaptive and Non-Adaptive Radiotherapy of Gastic and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancers Using MRI-Guided Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittauer, K; Geurts, M; Toya, R; Bassetti, M; Harari, P; Paliwal, B; Bayouth, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) tumors commonly requires large margins due to deformation, motion and variable changes of the stomach anatomy, at the risk of increased normal tissue toxicities. This work quantifies the interfraction variation of stomach deformation from daily MRI-guided radiotherapy to allow for a more targeted determination of margin expansion in the treatment of gastric and GEJ tumors. Methods: Five patients treated for gastric (n=3) and gastroesophageal junction (n=2) cancers with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy underwent daily MR imaging on a clinical MR-IGRT system. Treatment planning and contours were performed based on the MR simulation. The stomach was re-contoured on each daily volumetric setup MR. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) of the daily stomach were computed to evaluate the stomach interfraction deformation. To evaluate the stomach margin, the maximum Hausdorff distance (HD) between the initial and fractional stomach surface was measured for each fraction. The margin expansion, needed to encompass all fractions, was evaluated from the union of all fractional stomachs. Results: In total, 94 fractions with daily stomach contours were evaluated. For the interfraction stomach differences, the average DSC was 0.67±0.1 for gastric and 0.62±0.1 for GEJ cases. The maximum HD of each fraction was 3.5±2.0cm (n=94) with mean HD of 0.8±0.4cm (across all surface voxels for all fractions). The margin expansion required to encompass all individual fractions (averaged across 5 patients) was 1.4 cm(superior), 2.3 cm(inferior), 2.5 cm(right), 3.2 cm(left), 3.7 cm(anterior), 3.4 cm(posterior). Maximum observed difference for margin expansion was 8.7cm(posterior) among one patient. Conclusion: We observed a notable interfractional change in daily stomach shape (i.e., mean DSC of 0.67, p<0.0001) in both gastric and GEJ patients, for which adaptive radiotherapy is indicated. A minimum PTV margin of 3

  9. TU-AB-BRA-11: Indications for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy Based On Dosimetric Consequences of Interfractional Pancreas-To-Duodenum Motion in MRI-Guided Pancreatic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittauer, K; Rosenberg, S; Geurts, M; Bassetti, M; Wojcieszynski, A; Harari, P; Labby, Z; Hill, P; Paliwal, B; Bayouth, J; Chen, I; Henke, L; Kashani, R; Parikh, P; Olsen, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dose limiting structures, such as the duodenum, render the treatment of pancreatic cancer challenging. In this multi-institutional study, we assess dosimetric differences caused by interfraction pancreas-to-duodenum motion using MR-IGRT to determine the potential impact of adaptive replanning. Methods: Ten patients from two institutions undergoing MRI-guided radiotherapy with conventional fractionation (n=5) or SBRT (n=5) for pancreatic cancer were included. Initial plans were limited by duodenal dose constraints of 50 Gy (0.5 cc)/31 Gy (0.1 cc) for conventional/SBRT with prescriptions of 30 Gy/5 fractions (SBRT) and 40–50 Gy/25 fractions (conventional). Daily volumetric MR images were acquired under treatment conditions on a clinical MR-IGRT system. The correlation was assessed between interfractional GTV-to-duodenum positional variation and daily recalculations of duodenal dose metrics. Positional variation was quantified as the interfraction difference in Hausdorff distance from simulation baseline (ΔHD) between the GTV and proximal duodenal surface, or volume overlap between GTV and duodenum for cases with HD_0=0 (GTV abutting duodenum). Adaptation was considered indicated when daily positional variations enabled dose escalation to the target while maintaining duodenal constraints. Results: For fractions with ΔHD>0 (n=14, SBRT only), the mean interfraction duodenum dose decrease from simulation to treatment was 44±53 cGy (maximum 136 cGy). A correlation was found between ΔHD and dosimetric difference (R"2=0.82). No correlation was found between volume of overlap and dosimetric difference (R"2=0.31). For 89% of fractions, the duodenum remained overlapped with the target and the duodenal dose difference was negligible. The maximum observed indication for adaptation was for interfraction ΔHD=11.6 mm with potential for adaptive dose escalation of 136 cGy. Conclusion: This assessment showed that Hausdorff distance was a reasonable metric to use to

  10. WE-G-BRB-08: TG-51 Calibration of First Commercial MRI-Guided IMRT System in the Presence of 0.35 Tesla Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddu, S; Green, O Pechenaya; Mutic, S

    2012-06-01

    The first real-time-MRI-guided radiotherapy system has been installed in a clinic and it is being evaluated. Presence of magnetic field (MF) during radiation output calibration may have implications on ionization measurements and there is a possibility that standard calibration protocols may not be suitable for dose measurements for such devices. In this study, we evaluated whether a standard calibration protocol (AAPM- TG-51) is appropriate for absolute dose measurement in presence of MF. Treatment delivery of the ViewRay (VR) system is via three 15,000Ci Cobalt-60 heads positioned 120-degrees apart and all calibration measurements were done in the presence of 0.35T MF. Two ADCL- calibrated ionization-chambers (Exradin A12, A16) were used for TG-51 calibration. Chambers were positioned at 5-cm depth, (SSD=105cm: VR's isocenter), and the MLC leaves were shaped to a 10.5cm × 10.5 cm field size. Percent-depth-dose (PDD) measurements were performed for 5 and 10 cm depths. Individual output of each head was measured using the AAPM- TG51 protocol. Calibration accuracy for each head was subsequently verified by Radiological Physics Center (RPC) TLD measurements. Measured ion-recombination (Pion) and polarity (Ppol) correction factors were less-than 1.002 and 1.006, respectively. Measured PDDs agreed with BJR-25 within ±0.2%. Maximum dose rates for the reference field size at VR's isocenter for heads 1, 2 and 3 were 1.445±0.005, 1.446±0.107, 1.431±0.006 Gy/minute, respectively. Our calibrations agreed with RPC- TLD measurements within ±1.3%, ±2.6% and ±2.0% for treatment-heads 1, 2 and 3, respectively. At the time of calibration, mean activity of the Co-60 sources was 10,800Ci±0.1%. This study shows that the TG- 51 calibration is feasible in the presence of 0.35T MF and the measurement agreement is within the range of results obtainable for conventional treatment machines. Drs. Green, Goddu, and Mutic served as scientific consultants for ViewRay, Inc. Dr. Mutic

  11. TH-CD-BRA-11: Implementation and Evaluation of a New 3D Dosimetry Protocol for Validating MRI Guided Radiation Therapy Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mein, S; Rankine, L; Adamovics, J; Li, H; Oldham, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop, evaluate and apply a novel high-resolution 3D remote dosimetry protocol for validation of MRI guided radiation therapy treatments (MRIdian by ViewRay™). We demonstrate the first application of the protocol (including two small but required new correction terms) utilizing radiochromic 3D plastic PRESAGE™ with optical-CT readout. Methods: A detailed study of PRE