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Sample records for mri dgemric method

  1. Delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) can be effectively applied for longitudinal cohort evaluation of articular cartilage regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, J.E.J.; Lambertus, W.B.; Benink, R.J.; Tsuchida, A.I.; Vincken, K.L.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Delayed gadolinium enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) facilitates non-invasive evaluation of the glycosaminoglycan content in articular cartilage. The primary aim of this study was to show that the dGEMRIC technique is able to monitor cartilage repair following regenerative cartilage

  2. Evaluation of focal cartilage lesions of the knee using MRI T2 mapping and delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Årøen, Asbjørn; Brøgger, Helga; Røtterud, Jan Harald; Sivertsen, Einar Andreas; Engebretsen, Lars; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-02-11

    Assessment of degenerative changes of the cartilage is important in knee cartilage repair surgery. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T2 mapping and delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) are able to detect early degenerative changes. The hypothesis of the study was that cartilage surrounding a focal cartilage lesion in the knee does not possess degenerative changes. Twenty-eight consecutive patients included in a randomized controlled trial on cartilage repair were evaluated using MRI T2 mapping and dGEMRIC before cartilage treatment was initiated. Inclusion was based on disabling knee problems (Lysholm score of ≤ 75) due to an arthroscopically verified focal femoral condyle cartilage lesion. Furthermore, no major malalignments or knee ligament injuries were accepted. Mean patient age was 33 ± 9.6 years, and the mean duration of knee symptoms was 49 ± 60 months. The MRI T2 mapping and the dGEMRIC measurements were performed at three standardized regions of interest (ROIs) at the medial and lateral femoral condyle, avoiding the cartilage lesion The MRI T2 mapping of the cartilage did not demonstrate significant differences between condyles with or without cartilage lesions. The dGEMRIC results did not show significantly lower values of the affected condyle compared with the opposite condyle and the contra-lateral knee in any of the ROIs. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of the dGEMRIC readings was 0.882. The MRI T2 mapping and the dGEMRIC confirmed the arthroscopic findings that normal articular cartilage surrounded the cartilage lesion, reflecting normal variation in articular cartilage quality. NCT00885729 , registered April 17 2009.

  3. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC): Intra- and Interobserver Variability in Standardized Drawing of Regions of Interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiderius, C.J.; Tjoernstrand, J.; Aakeson, P.; Soedersten, K.; Dahlberg, L.; Leander, P.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the reproducibility of a standardized region of interest (ROI) drawing procedure in delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC). Material and Methods: A large ROI in lateral and medial femoral weight-bearing cartilage was drawn in images of 12 healthy male volunteers by 6 investigators with different skills in MRI. The procedure was done twice, with a 1-week interval. Calculated T1-values were evaluated for intra- and interobserver variability. Results: The mean interobserver variability for both compartments ranged between 1.3% and 2.3% for the 6 different investigators without correlation to their experience in MRI. Post-contrast intra-observer variability was low in both the lateral and the medial femoral cartilage, 2.6% and 1.5%, respectively. The larger variability in lateral than in medial cartilage was related to slightly longer and thinner ROIs. Conclusion: Intra-observer variability and interobserver variability are both low when a large standardized ROI is used in dGEMRIC. The experience of the investigator does not affect the variability, which further supports a clinical applicability of the method

  4. Comparison of multiple quantitative MRI parameters for characterization of the goat cartilage in an ongoing osteoarthritis: dGEMRIC, T1ρ and sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrauth, Joachim H.X.; Lykowsky, Gunthard; Hemberger, Kathrin; Kreutner, Jakob; Jakob, Peter M.; Weber, Daniel; Haddad, Daniel; Rackwitz, Lars; Noeth, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease leading to cartilage deterioration by loss of matrix, fibrillation, formation of fissures, and ultimately complete loss of the cartilage surface. Here, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, dGEMRIC (delayed Gadolinium enhanced MRI of cartilage; dG 1 = T 1,post ; dG 2 = 1/T 1,post -1/T 1,pre ), T 1ρ , and sodium MRI, are compared in a preclinical in vivo study to evaluate the differences in their potential for cartilage characterization and to establish an examination protocol for a following clinical study. OA was induced in 12 caprine knees (6 control, 6 therapy). Adipose derived stem cells were injected afterwards as a treatment. The animals were examined healthy, 3 and 16 weeks postoperatively with all three MRI methods. Using statistical analysis, the OA development and the degree of correlation between the different MRI methods were determined. A strong correlation was observed between the dGEMRIC indices dG 1 and dG 2 (r=-0.87) which differ only in considering or not considering the T 1 baseline. Moderate correlations were found between T 1ρ and dG 1 (r=0.55), T 1ρ and dG 2 (r=0.47) and at last, sodium and dG 1 (r=0.45). The correlations found in this study match to the biomarkers which the methods are sensitive to. Even though the goat cartilage is significantly thinner than the human cartilage and even more in a degenerated cartilage, all three methods were able to characterize the cartilage over the whole period of time during an ongoing OA.Due to measurement and post processing optimizations, as well as the correlations detected in this work, the overall measurement time in future goat studies can be minimized. Moreover, an examination protocol for characterizing the cartilage in a clinical study was established.

  5. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping at 3T MRI of the wrist: Feasibility and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnitz, Christoph; Klaan, Bastian; Burkholder, Iris; von Stillfried, Falko; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2017-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T 2 mapping for biochemical imaging of the wrist at 3T. Seventeen patients with wrist pain (mean age, 41.4 ± 13.1 years) including a subgroup with chondromalacia (n = 11) and 15 healthy volunteers (26.0 ± 2.2 years) underwent dGEMRIC and T 2 mapping at 3T. For dGEMRIC, the optimum time window after contrast-injection (gadopentetate dimeglumine) was defined as the plateau of the T 1 curve of repeated measurements 15-90 minutes postinjection and assessed in all volunteers. Reference values of healthy-appearing cartilage from all individuals and values in areas of chondromalacia were assessed using region-of-interest analyses. Receiver-operating-characteristic analyses were applied to assess discriminatory ability between damaged and normal cartilage. The optimum time window was 45-90 minutes, and the 60-minute timepoint was subsequently used. In chondromalacia, dGEMRIC values were lower (551 ± 84 msec, P imaging of the wrist. Both techniques allow separation and biochemical assessment of thin opposing cartilage surfaces and can distinguish between healthy and damaged cartilage. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:381-389. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Comparison of multiple quantitative MRI parameters for characterization of the goat cartilage in an ongoing osteoarthritis: dGEMRIC, T{sub 1ρ} and sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrauth, Joachim H.X.; Lykowsky, Gunthard; Hemberger, Kathrin; Kreutner, Jakob; Jakob, Peter M. [MRB Research Center for Magnetic Resonance Bavaria, Wuerzburg (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Experimental Physics 5 (Biophysics); Weber, Daniel; Haddad, Daniel [MRB Research Center for Magnetic Resonance Bavaria, Wuerzburg (Germany); Rackwitz, Lars; Noeth, Ulrich [Orthopedic Center for Musculoskeletal Research, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease leading to cartilage deterioration by loss of matrix, fibrillation, formation of fissures, and ultimately complete loss of the cartilage surface. Here, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, dGEMRIC (delayed Gadolinium enhanced MRI of cartilage; dG{sub 1} = T{sub 1,post}; dG{sub 2} = 1/T{sub 1,post}-1/T{sub 1,pre}), T{sub 1ρ}, and sodium MRI, are compared in a preclinical in vivo study to evaluate the differences in their potential for cartilage characterization and to establish an examination protocol for a following clinical study. OA was induced in 12 caprine knees (6 control, 6 therapy). Adipose derived stem cells were injected afterwards as a treatment. The animals were examined healthy, 3 and 16 weeks postoperatively with all three MRI methods. Using statistical analysis, the OA development and the degree of correlation between the different MRI methods were determined. A strong correlation was observed between the dGEMRIC indices dG{sub 1} and dG{sub 2} (r=-0.87) which differ only in considering or not considering the T{sub 1} baseline. Moderate correlations were found between T{sub 1ρ} and dG{sub 1} (r=0.55), T{sub 1ρ} and dG{sub 2} (r=0.47) and at last, sodium and dG{sub 1} (r=0.45). The correlations found in this study match to the biomarkers which the methods are sensitive to. Even though the goat cartilage is significantly thinner than the human cartilage and even more in a degenerated cartilage, all three methods were able to characterize the cartilage over the whole period of time during an ongoing OA.Due to measurement and post processing optimizations, as well as the correlations detected in this work, the overall measurement time in future goat studies can be minimized. Moreover, an examination protocol for characterizing the cartilage in a clinical study was established.

  7. In vivo transport of Gd-DTPA2- into human meniscus and cartilage assessed with delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired stability is a risk factor in knee osteoarthritis (OA), where the whole joint and not only the joint cartilage is affected. The meniscus provides joint stability and is involved in the early pathological progress of OA. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) has been used to identify pre-radiographic changes in the cartilage in OA, but has been used less commonly to examine the meniscus, and then using only a double dose of the contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to enable improved early OA diagnosis by investigate the temporal contrast agent distribution in the meniscus and femoral cartilage simultaneously, in healthy volunteers, using 3D dGEMRIC at two different doses of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA2-. Methods The right knee in 12 asymptomatic volunteers was examined using a 3D Look-Locker sequence on two occasions after an intravenous injection of a double or triple dose of Gd-DTPA2- (0.2 or 0.3 mmol/kg body weight). The relaxation time (T1) and relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) were measured in the meniscus and femoral cartilage before, and 60, 90, 120 and 180 minutes after injection, and the change in relaxation rate (ΔR1) was calculated. Paired t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical evaluation. Results The triple dose yielded higher concentrations of Gd-DTPA2- in the meniscus and cartilage than the double dose, but provided no additional information. The observed patterns of ΔR1 were similar for double and triple doses of the contrast agent. ΔR1 was higher in the meniscus than in femoral cartilage in the corresponding compartments at all time points after injection. ΔR1 increased until 90-180 minutes in both the cartilage and the meniscus (p meniscus at all time points (p meniscus, than in the avascular central part of the posterior medial meniscus during the first 60 minutes (p meniscus and cartilage simultaneously using dGEMRIC, preferably 90 minutes after the injection of a

  8. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping of talar osteochondral lesions: Indicators of clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnitz, Christoph; Kuni, Benita; Wuennemann, Felix; Chloridis, Dimitrios; Kirwadi, Anand; Burkholder, Iris; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the utility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T 2 mapping in evaluation of type II osteochondral lesions (OCLs) of the talus and define cutoff values for identifying patients with good/poor clinical outcomes. 28 patients (mean age, 42.3 years) underwent T 2 mapping and dGEMRIC at least 1.5 years (mean duration, 3.5 years) after microfracture (n = 12) or conservative (n = 16) treatment for type II OCL. Clinical outcomes were considered good with an American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score ≥80. The T 1 /T 2 -values and indices of repair tissue (RT; cartilage above the OCL) were compared to those of the adjacent normal cartilage (NC) by region-of-interest analysis. The ability of the two methods to discriminate RT from NC was determined by area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) analysis. The Youden index was maximized for T 1 /T 2 measures for identifying cutoff values indicative of good/poor clinical outcomes. Repair tissue exhibited lower dGEMRIC values (629.83 vs. 738.51 msec) and higher T 2 values (62.07 vs. 40.69 msec) than NC (P < 0.001). T 2 mapping exhibited greater AUC than dGEMRIC (0.88 vs. 0.69; P = 0.0398). All T 1 measures exhibited higher maximized Youden indices than the corresponding T 2 measures. The highest maximized Youden index for T 1difference was observed at a cutoff value of 84 msec (sensitivity, 78%; specificity, 83%). While T 2 mapping is superior to dGEMRIC in discriminating RT, the latter better identifies good/poor clinical outcomes in patients with type II talar OCL. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1601-1610. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Assessing the effect of football play on knee articular cartilage using delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenbo; Lambach, Becky; Jia, Guang; Flanigan, David; Chaudhari, Ajit M W; Wei, Lai; Rogers, Alan; Payne, Jason; Siston, Robert A; Knopp, Michael V

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of cartilage lesions is much higher in football athletes than in the general population. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) has been shown to quantify regional variations of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentrations which is an indicator of early cartilage degeneration. The goal of this study is to determine whether dGEMRIC can be used to assess the influence in cartilage GAG concentration due to college level football play. Thirteen collegiate football players with one to four years of collegiate football play experience were recruited and both knee joints were scanned using a dedicated 8-channel phased array knee coil on a 3T MRI system. The contrast concentrations within cartilage were calculated based on the T 1 values from dGEMRIC scans. No substantial differences were found in the contrast concentrations between the pre- and post-season across all the cartilage compartments. One year collegiate football players presented an average contrast concentration at the pre-season of 0.116±0.011mM and post-season of 0.116±0.011mM. In players with multiple years of football play, contrast uptake was elevated to 0.141±0.012mM at the pre-season and 0.139±0.012mM at the post-season. The pre-season 0.023±0.016mM and post-season 0.025±0.016mM increase in contrast concentration within the group with multiple years of experience presented with a >20% increase in contrast uptake. This may indicate the gradual, cumulative damage of football play to the articular cartilage over years, even though the effect may not be noticeable after a season of play. Playing collegiate football for a longer period of time may lead to cartilage microstructural alterations, which may be linked to early knee cartilage degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Motion correction improves image quality of dGEMRIC in finger joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miese, Falk; Kröpil, Patric; Ostendorf, Benedikt; Scherer, Axel; Buchbender, Christian; Quentin, Michael; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Schneider, Matthias; Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph; Jellus, Vladimir; Mamisch, Tallal Ch.; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess motion artifacts in dGEMRIC of finger joints and to evaluate the effectiveness of motion correction. Materials and methods: In 40 subjects (26 patients with finger arthritis and 14 healthy volunteers) dGEMRIC of metacarpophalangeal joint II was performed. Imaging used a dual flip angle approach (TE 3.72 ms, TR 15 ms, flip angles 5° and 26°). Two sets of T1 maps were calculated for dGEMRIC analysis from the imaging data for each subject: one with and one without motion correction. To compare image quality, visual grading analysis and precision of dGEMRIC measurement of both dGEMRIC maps for each case were evaluated. Results: Motion artifacts were present in 82% (33/40) of uncorrected dGEMRIC maps. Motion artifacts were graded as severe or as rendering evaluation impossible in 43% (17/40) of uncorrected dGEMRIC maps. Motion corrected maps showed significantly less motion artifacts (P < 0.001) and were graded as evaluable in 97% (39/40) of cases. Precision was significantly higher in motion corrected images (coefficient of variation (CV = .176 ± .077), compared to uncorrected images (CV .445 ± .347) (P < .001). Motion corrected dGERMIC was different in volunteers and patients (P = .044), whereas uncorrected dGEMRIC was not (P = .234). Conclusion: Motion correction improves image quality, dGEMRIC measurement precision and diagnostic performance in dGEMRIC of finger joints.

  11. Influence of delayed gadolinium enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) protocol on T2-mapping: is it possible to comprehensively assess knee cartilage composition in one post-contrast MR examination at 3 Tesla?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschueren, J; van Tiel, J; Reijman, M; Bron, E E; Klein, S; Verhaar, J A N; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Krestin, G P; Wielopolski, P A; Oei, E H G

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the possibility of assessing knee cartilage with T2-mapping and delayed gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in one post-contrast MR examination at 3 Tesla (T). T2 mapping was performed in 10 healthy volunteers at baseline; directly after baseline; after 10 min of cycling; and after 90 min delay, and in 16 osteoarthritis patients before and after intravenous administration of a double dose gadolinium dimeglumine contrast agent, reflecting key dGEMRIC protocol elements. Differences in T2 relaxation times between each timepoint and baseline were calculated for 6 cartilage regions using paired t tests or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and the smallest detectable change (SDC). After cycling, a significant change in T2 relaxation times was found in the lateral weight-bearing tibial plateau (+1.0 ms, P = 0.04). After 90 min delay, significant changes were found in the lateral weight-bearing femoral condyle (+1.2 ms, P = 0.03) and the lateral weight-bearing tibial plateau (+1.3 ms, P = 0.01). In these regions of interests (ROIs), absolute differences were small and lower than the corresponding SDCs. T2-mapping after contrast administration only showed statistically significantly lower T2 relaxation times in the medial posterior femoral condyle (-2.4 ms, P T2 relaxation times that were not consistent and lower than the SDC in the majority of regions, our results suggest that T2-mapping and dGEMRIC can be performed reliably in a single imaging session to assess cartilage biochemical composition in knee osteoarthritis (OA) at 3 T. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) of Cadaveric Shoulders: Comparison of Contrast Dynamics in Hyaline and Fibrous Cartilage after Intraarticular Gadolinium Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, E. (Dept. of Radiology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)); Hodler, J.; Pfirrmann, C.W.A. (Dept. of Radiology, Orthopedic Univ. Hospital Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a novel method to investigate cartilaginous and fibrocartilaginous structures. Purpose: To investigate the contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage of the glenohumeral joint after intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Material and Methods: Transverse T1 maps were acquired on a 1.5T scanner before and after intraarticular injection of 2.0 mmol/l gadopentetate dimeglumine in five cadaveric shoulders using a dual flip angle three-dimensional gradient echo (3D-GRE) sequence. The acquisition time for the T1 maps was 5 min 5 s for the whole shoulder. Measurements were repeated every 15 min over 2.5 hours. Regions of interest (ROIs) covering the glenoid cartilage and the labrum were drawn to assess the temporal evolution of the relaxation parameters. Results: T1 of unenhanced hyaline cartilage of the glenoid was 568+-34 ms. T1 of unenhanced fibrous cartilage of the labrum was 552+-38 ms. Significant differences (P=0.002 and 0.03) in the relaxation parameters were already measurable after 15 min. After 2 to 2.5 hours, hyaline and fibrous cartilage still demonstrated decreasing relaxation parameters, with a larger range of the T1(Gd) values in fibrous cartilage. T1 and ?R1 values of hyaline and fibrous cartilage after 2.5 hours were 351+-16 ms and 1.1+-0.09/s, and 332+-31 ms and 1.2+-0.1/s, respectively. Conclusion: A significant decrease in T1(Gd) was found 15 min after intraarticular contrast injection. Contrast accumulation was faster in hyaline than in fibrous cartilage. After 2.5 hours, contrast accumulation showed a higher rate of decrease in hyaline cartilage, but neither hyaline nor fibrous cartilage had reached equilibrium

  13. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) of cadaveric shoulders: comparison of contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage after intraarticular gadolinium injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, E; Hodler, J; Pfirrmann, C W A

    2009-01-01

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a novel method to investigate cartilaginous and fibrocartilaginous structures. To investigate the contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage of the glenohumeral joint after intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Transverse T(1) maps were acquired on a 1.5T scanner before and after intraarticular injection of 2.0 mmol/l gadopentetate dimeglumine in five cadaveric shoulders using a dual flip angle three-dimensional gradient echo (3D-GRE) sequence. The acquisition time for the T(1) maps was 5 min 5 s for the whole shoulder. Measurements were repeated every 15 min over 2.5 hours. Regions of interest (ROIs) covering the glenoid cartilage and the labrum were drawn to assess the temporal evolution of the relaxation parameters. T(1) of unenhanced hyaline cartilage of the glenoid was 568+/-34 ms. T(1) of unenhanced fibrous cartilage of the labrum was 552+/-38 ms. Significant differences (P=0.002 and 0.03) in the relaxation parameters were already measurable after 15 min. After 2 to 2.5 hours, hyaline and fibrous cartilage still demonstrated decreasing relaxation parameters, with a larger range of the T(1)(Gd) values in fibrous cartilage. T(1) and triangle Delta R(1) values of hyaline and fibrous cartilage after 2.5 hours were 351+/-16 ms and 1.1+/-0.09 s(-1), and 332+/-31 ms and 1.2+/-0.1 s(-1), respectively. A significant decrease in T(1)(Gd) was found 15 min after intraarticular contrast injection. Contrast accumulation was faster in hyaline than in fibrous cartilage. After 2.5 hours, contrast accumulation showed a higher rate of decrease in hyaline cartilage, but neither hyaline nor fibrous cartilage had reached equilibrium.

  14. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM) in patients with knee osteoarthritis: relation with meniscal degeneration on conventional MRI, reproducibility, and correlation with dGEMRIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiel, Jasper van; Kotek, Gyula; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Oei, Edwin H.G.; Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K.; Verhaar, Jan A.N.; Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan; Weinans, Harrie

    2014-01-01

    To assess (1) whether normal and degenerated menisci exhibit different T1 GD on delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM), (2) the reproducibility of dGEMRIM and (3) the correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. In 17 OA patients who underwent dGEMRIM twice within 7 days, meniscus and cartilage T1 GD was calculated. Meniscus pathology was evaluated on conventional MRI. T1 GD in normal and degenerated menisci were compared using a Student's t-test. Reproducibility was assessed using ICCs. Pearson's correlation was calculated between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD . A trend towards lower T1 GD in degenerated menisci (mean: 402 ms; 95 % CI: 359-444 ms) compared to normal menisci (mean: 448 ms; 95 % CI: 423-473 ms) was observed (p = 0.05). Meniscus T1 GD ICCs were 0.85-0.90. The correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD was moderate in the lateral (r = 0.52-0.75) and strong in the medial compartment (r = 0.78-0.94). Our results show that degenerated menisci have a clear trend towards lower T1 GD compared to normal menisci. Since these results are highly reproducible, meniscus degeneration may be assessed within one delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI simultaneously with cartilage. The strong correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD suggests concomitant degeneration in both tissues in OA, but also suggests that dGEMRIC may not be regarded entirely as sulphated glycosaminoglycan specific. (orig.)

  15. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM) in patients with knee osteoarthritis: relation with meniscal degeneration on conventional MRI, reproducibility, and correlation with dGEMRIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiel, Jasper van [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kotek, Gyula; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Oei, Edwin H.G. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K.; Verhaar, Jan A.N. [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Weinans, Harrie [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To assess (1) whether normal and degenerated menisci exhibit different T1{sub GD} on delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM), (2) the reproducibility of dGEMRIM and (3) the correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. In 17 OA patients who underwent dGEMRIM twice within 7 days, meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} was calculated. Meniscus pathology was evaluated on conventional MRI. T1{sub GD} in normal and degenerated menisci were compared using a Student's t-test. Reproducibility was assessed using ICCs. Pearson's correlation was calculated between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD}. A trend towards lower T1{sub GD} in degenerated menisci (mean: 402 ms; 95 % CI: 359-444 ms) compared to normal menisci (mean: 448 ms; 95 % CI: 423-473 ms) was observed (p = 0.05). Meniscus T1{sub GD} ICCs were 0.85-0.90. The correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} was moderate in the lateral (r = 0.52-0.75) and strong in the medial compartment (r = 0.78-0.94). Our results show that degenerated menisci have a clear trend towards lower T1{sub GD} compared to normal menisci. Since these results are highly reproducible, meniscus degeneration may be assessed within one delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI simultaneously with cartilage. The strong correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} suggests concomitant degeneration in both tissues in OA, but also suggests that dGEMRIC may not be regarded entirely as sulphated glycosaminoglycan specific. (orig.)

  16. Cartilage quality in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC, ΔR1 and value of pre-contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchbender, Christian; Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, Patric; Quentin, Michael; Reichelt, Dorothea C.; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Mathys, Christian; Blondin, Dirk; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk; Koerbl, Birthe; Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph; Hofer, Matthias; Schneider, Matthias; Ostendorf, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate four non-invasive markers of cartilage quality - T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC and ΔR1 - in healthy volunteers and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Cartilage of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints II were imaged in 28 consecutive subjects: 12 healthy volunteers [9 women, mean (SD) age 52.67 (9.75) years, range 30-66] and 16 RA patients with MCP II involvement [12 women, mean (SD) age 58.06 (12.88) years, range 35-76]. Sagittal T2* mapping was performed with a multi-echo gradient-echo on a 3 T MRI scanner. For T1 mapping the dual flip angle method was applied prior to native T1 mapping and 40 min after gadolinium application (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage, dGEMRIC, T1 Gd ). The difference in the longitudinal relaxation rate induced by gadolinium (ΔR1) was calculated. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) was used to test for differentiation of RA patients from healthy volunteers. dGEMRIC (AUC 0.81) and ΔR1 (AUC 0.75) significantly differentiated RA patients from controls. T2* mapping (AUC 0.66) and native T1 mapping (AUC 0.66) were not significantly different in RA patients compared to controls. The data support the use of dGEMRIC for the assessment of MCP joint cartilage quality in RA. T2* and native T1 mapping are of low diagnostic value. Pre-contrast T1 mapping for the calculation of ΔR1 does not increase the diagnostic value of dGEMRIC. (orig.)

  17. Cartilage quality in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC, {delta}R1 and value of pre-contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbender, Christian; Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, Patric; Quentin, Michael; Reichelt, Dorothea C.; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Mathys, Christian; Blondin, Dirk; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk [University Duesseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Koerbl, Birthe [Heinrich-Heine-University, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Rheumatology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University, Leibniz Centre for Diabetes Research, Institute of Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph [Heinrich-Heine-University, Department of Orthopaedics, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hofer, Matthias [Heinrich-Heine-University, Medical Education Group, Medical School, Duesseldorf (Germany); Schneider, Matthias; Ostendorf, Benedikt [Heinrich-Heine-University, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Rheumatology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    To prospectively evaluate four non-invasive markers of cartilage quality - T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC and {delta}R1 - in healthy volunteers and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Cartilage of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints II were imaged in 28 consecutive subjects: 12 healthy volunteers [9 women, mean (SD) age 52.67 (9.75) years, range 30-66] and 16 RA patients with MCP II involvement [12 women, mean (SD) age 58.06 (12.88) years, range 35-76]. Sagittal T2* mapping was performed with a multi-echo gradient-echo on a 3 T MRI scanner. For T1 mapping the dual flip angle method was applied prior to native T1 mapping and 40 min after gadolinium application (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage, dGEMRIC, T1{sub Gd}). The difference in the longitudinal relaxation rate induced by gadolinium ({delta}R1) was calculated. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) was used to test for differentiation of RA patients from healthy volunteers. dGEMRIC (AUC 0.81) and {delta}R1 (AUC 0.75) significantly differentiated RA patients from controls. T2* mapping (AUC 0.66) and native T1 mapping (AUC 0.66) were not significantly different in RA patients compared to controls. The data support the use of dGEMRIC for the assessment of MCP joint cartilage quality in RA. T2* and native T1 mapping are of low diagnostic value. Pre-contrast T1 mapping for the calculation of {delta}R1 does not increase the diagnostic value of dGEMRIC. (orig.)

  18. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and morphologic MRI of cartilage in the long-term follow-up after Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease (LCPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstein, Arne; Zilkens, Christoph; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the detection of cartilage changes versus morphologic imaging in the long-term course of Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease (LCPD). A total of 31 hips in 26 patients (mean age, 30.0 years; range, 18–54 years) who were diagnosed with LCPD in childhood were included. Twenty-one radiographically normal contralateral hips served as controls. dGEMRIC indices of femoral and acetabular cartilage in the weight-bearing zone. Cartilage morphology was classified on radial PD-weighted images according to the modified Outerbridge classification. Mean dGEMRIC values of cartilage were significantly lower in hips after LCPD than in the radiographically normal contralateral hips (513 ± 100 ms vs. 579 ± 103 ms; P = 0.026). In 24 out of 31 LCPD hips and in 4 out of 21 radiographically normal contralateral hips, morphological cartilage changes were noted. Analysis of variance analysis revealed a significant influence of Outerbridge grading on decreased T1-values (P = 0.031). Our results suggest that dGEMRIC at 1.5 T is suitable to assess cartilage quality changes in the long-term follow-up after LCPD. The evaluation of biochemical cartilage quality with dGEMRIC may provide additional information about early cartilage changes occurring without visible alterations of cartilage morphology.

  19. Feasibility of gadoteric acid for delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) at the wrist and knee and comparison with Gd-DTPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnitz, Christoph; Klaan, Bastian; Do, Thuy; Barié, Alexander; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2017-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of gadoteric acid for delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and to compare the dGEMRIC values obtained using gadoteric acid with those obtained by an equimolar dose of Gd-DTPA. At 3T, dGEMRIC of the wrist was performed twice using a T 1 -weighted 3D-volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence in 16 healthy volunteers (10 women; mean age 26.0 years) using gadoteric acid first and Gd-DTPA 3 weeks later. In addition, 24 patients with knee pain were examined using gadoteric acid (n = 12; seven women; mean age 45.8 years) or Gd-DTPA (n = 12; four women; mean age 47.1 years). T 1 values, the relative decrease in T 1 , and the delta R1 were compared using t-tests. Interobserver agreement was assessed using the intraclass correlation (ICC) between two independent readers. At the wrist, there was no significant difference in delta R1 values (0.34 ± 0.10/s, 95% confidence interval [0.30;0.38]/s for gadoteric acid and 0.32 ± 0.09 [0.29;0.35]/s for Gd-DTPA, P = 0.24) or the relative decrease in T 1 (0.25 ± 0.06 [0.29;0.35] msec for gadoteric acid and 0.24 ± 0.05 [0.22;0.27] msec for Gd-DTPA, P = 0.35). High observer agreement was found at precontrast (ICC = 0.87, P DTPA, P = 0.59) or the relative decrease in T 1 (0.30 ± 0.10 [0.26;0.34] msec for gadoteric acid and 0.33 ± 0.05 [0.30;0.35] msec for Gd-DTPA, P = 0.28). High ICCs of 0.96 (P DTPA. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1433-1440. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Differentiating normal hyaline cartilage from post-surgical repair tissue using fast gradient echo imaging in delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI (dGEMRIC) at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Pinker, Katja; Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center-High field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Inselspital Bern, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Bern (Switzerland); Domayer, Stephan [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center-High field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Orthopaedics, Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center-High field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Marlovits, Stefan; Kutscha-Lissberg, Florian [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Traumatology, Center for Joints and Cartilage, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the relative glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of repair tissue in patients after microfracturing (MFX) and matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the knee joint with a dGEMRIC technique based on a newly developed short 3D-GRE sequence with two flip angle excitation pulses. Twenty patients treated with MFX or MACT (ten in each group) were enrolled. For comparability, patients from each group were matched by age (MFX: 37.1 {+-} 16.3 years; MACT: 37.4 {+-} 8.2 years) and postoperative interval (MFX: 33.0 {+-} 17.3 months; MACT: 32.0 {+-} 17.2 months). The {delta} relaxation rate ({delta}R1) for repair tissue and normal hyaline cartilage and the relative {delta}R1 were calculated, and mean values were compared between both groups using an analysis of variance. The mean {delta}R1 for MFX was 1.07 {+-} 0.34 versus 0.32 {+-} 0.20 at the intact control site, and for MACT, 1.90 {+-} 0.49 compared to 0.87 {+-} 0.44, which resulted in a relative {delta}R1 of 3.39 for MFX and 2.18 for MACT. The difference between the cartilage repair groups was statistically significant. The new dGEMRIC technique based on dual flip angle excitation pulses showed higher GAG content in patients after MACT compared to MFX at the same postoperative interval and allowed reducing the data acquisition time to 4 min. (orig.)

  1. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K. E.; Qvistgaard, E.; Danneskiold-Samsoe, B.; Thomsen, C.; Oestergaard, M.; Bliddal, H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. Material and Methods: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58 years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol/l Gd-DTPA solution. Coronal STIR, coronal T1 fat-saturated spin-echo, and a cartilage-sensitive gradient-echo sequence (3D T1 SPGR) in the sagittal plane were applied. Results: Both the post-i.v. and post-i.a. Gd-DTPA images showed significantly higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) in the joint cartilage compared to the non-enhanced images ( P <0.002). I.a. Gd-DTPA provided significantly higher SNR and CNR compared to i.v. Gd-DTPA ( P <0.01). Furthermore, a better delineation of the cartilage in the synovial/cartilage zone and of the chondral/subchondral border was observed. Conclusion: The dGEMRIC MRI method markedly improved delineation of hip joint cartilage compared to non-enhanced MRI. The i.a. Gd-DTPA provided the best cartilage delineation. dGEMRIC is a clinically applicable MRI method that may improve identification of early subtle cartilage damage and the accuracy of volume measurements of hip joint cartilage

  2. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC), after slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilkens, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.Zilkens@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Orthopaedics, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Miese, Falk [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Bittersohl, Bernd; Jaeger, Marcus; Schultz, Johannes [Department of Orthopaedics, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Holstein, Arne [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Kim, Young-jo; Millis, Michael B. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Childrens Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical, School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Inselspital Bern, University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Krauspe, Ruediger [Department of Orthopaedics, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in hip joint cartilage in mature hips with a history of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) using delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC). Methods: 28 young-adult subjects (32 hips) with a mean age of 23.8 {+-} 4.0 years (range: 18.1-30.5 years) who were treated for mild or moderate SCFE in adolescence were included into the study. Hip function and clinical symptoms were evaluated with the Harris hip score (HHS) system at the time of MRI. Plain radiographic evaluation included Tonnis grading, measurement of the minimal joint space width (JSW) and alpha-angle measurement. The alpha-angle values were used to classify three sub-groups: group 1 = subjects with normal femoral head-neck offset (alpha-angle <50{sup o}), group 2 = subjects with mild offset decrease (alpha-angle 50{sup o}-60{sup o}), and group 3 = subjects with severe offset decrease (alpha-angle >60{sup o}). Results: There was statistically significant difference noted for the T1{sub Gd} values, lateral and central, between group 1 and group 3 (p-values = 0.038 and 0.041). The T1{sub Gd} values measured within the lateral portion were slightly lower compared with the T1{sub Gd} values measured within the central portion that was at a statistically significance level (p-value <0.001). HHS, Tonnis grades and JSW revealed no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: By using dGEMRIC in the mid-term follow-up of SCFE we were able to reveal degenerative changes even in the absence of joint space narrowing that seem to be related to the degree of offset pathology. The dGEMRIC technique may be a potential diagnostic modality in the follow-up evaluation of SCFE.

  3. Current knowledge and importance of dGEMRIC techniques in diagnosis of hip joint diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Ruediger; Bittersohl, Bernd [University of Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Tiderius, Carl Johann [Lund University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Accurate assessment of early hip joint cartilage alterations may help optimize patient selection and follow-up of hip joint preservation surgery. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is sensitive to the glycosaminoglycan content in cartilage that is lost early in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Hence, the dGEMRIC technique holds promise for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. However, because of the location of the hip joint deep within the body and due to the fairly thin cartilage layers that require high spatial resolution, the diagnosis of early hip joint cartilage alterations may be problematic. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of dGEMRIC in the assessment of hip joint cartilage. A literature search was performed with PubMed, using the terms ''cartilage, osteoarthritis, hip joint, MRI, and dGEMRIC'', considering all levels of studies. This review revealed that dGEMRIC can be reliably used in the evaluation of early stage cartilage pathology in various hip joint disorders. Modifications in the technique, such as the operation of three-dimensional imaging and dGEMRIC after intra-articular contrast medium administration, have expanded the range of application. Notably, the studies differ considerably in patient selection and technical prerequisites. Furthermore, there is a need for multicenter prospective studies with the required technical conditions in place to establish outcome based dGEMRIC data to obtain, in conjunction with clinical data, reliable threshold values for normal and abnormal cartilage, and for hips that may benefit from conservative or surgical treatment. (orig.)

  4. Current knowledge and importance of dGEMRIC techniques in diagnosis of hip joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Ruediger; Bittersohl, Bernd; Tiderius, Carl Johann

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of early hip joint cartilage alterations may help optimize patient selection and follow-up of hip joint preservation surgery. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is sensitive to the glycosaminoglycan content in cartilage that is lost early in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Hence, the dGEMRIC technique holds promise for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. However, because of the location of the hip joint deep within the body and due to the fairly thin cartilage layers that require high spatial resolution, the diagnosis of early hip joint cartilage alterations may be problematic. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of dGEMRIC in the assessment of hip joint cartilage. A literature search was performed with PubMed, using the terms ''cartilage, osteoarthritis, hip joint, MRI, and dGEMRIC'', considering all levels of studies. This review revealed that dGEMRIC can be reliably used in the evaluation of early stage cartilage pathology in various hip joint disorders. Modifications in the technique, such as the operation of three-dimensional imaging and dGEMRIC after intra-articular contrast medium administration, have expanded the range of application. Notably, the studies differ considerably in patient selection and technical prerequisites. Furthermore, there is a need for multicenter prospective studies with the required technical conditions in place to establish outcome based dGEMRIC data to obtain, in conjunction with clinical data, reliable threshold values for normal and abnormal cartilage, and for hips that may benefit from conservative or surgical treatment. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of pre-operative dGEMRIC imaging with intra-operative findings in femoroacetabular impingement: preliminary findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Apprich, Sebastian; Siebenrock, Klaus A.; Mamisch, Tallal Charles; Hosalkar, Harish S.; Werlen, Stefan A.

    2011-01-01

    To study standard MRI and dGEMRIC in patients with symptomatic FAI undergoing surgical intervention and compare them with intra-operative findings to see if they were corroborative. Sixteen patients with symptomatic FAI that warranted surgical intervention were prospectively studied. All patients underwent plain radiographic series for FAI assessment followed by standard MRI and dGEMRIC. Subsequently, patients were surgically treated with safe dislocation and the joint was evaluated for any macroscopic signs of damaged cartilage. Data were statistically analyzed. A total of 224 zones in 16 patients were evaluated. One hundred and sixteen zones were intra-operatively rated as normal with mean T1 values of 510.1 ms ± 141.2 ms. Eighty zones had evidence of damage with mean T1 values of 453.1 ms ± 113.6 ms. The difference in these T1 values was significant (p = 0.003). Correlation between standard MRI and intra-operative findings was moderate (r = 0.535, p < 0.001). Intra-operative findings revealed more damage than standard MRI. On standard MRI, 68.6% zones were graded normal while 31.4% had evidence of damage. On intra-operative visualization, 56.4% zones were graded normal and 43.6% had evidence of damage. Correlation between dGEMRIC and intra-operative findings turned out to be weak (r = 0.114, p < 0.126). On T1 assessment 31.4% of zones were graded as normal and 68.6% as damaged. dGEMRIC was significantly different between normal and affected cartilage based on intra-operative assessment. The correlation for morphological findings was limited, underestimating defects. By combining morphological with biochemical assessment dGEMRIC may play some role in the future to prognosticate outcomes and facilitate surgical planning and intervention. (orig.)

  6. T2 mapping and dGEMRIC after autologous chondrocyte implantation with a fibrin-based scaffold in the knee: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domayer, S.E.; Welsch, G.H.; Nehrer, S.; Chiari, C.; Dorotka, R.; Szomolanyi, P.; Mamisch, T.C.; Yayon, A.; Trattnig, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess repair tissue (RT) after the implantation of BioCart TM II, an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with a fibrin-hyaluronan polymer as scaffold. T2 mapping and delayed Gadolinium Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) were used to gain first data on the biochemical properties of BioCart TM II RT in vivo. Methods: T2 mapping and dGEMRIC were performed at 3 T in five patients (six knee joints) who had undergone ACI 15-27 months before. T2 maps were obtained using a pixel wise, mono-exponential non-negative least squares fit analysis. For quantitative T1 mapping a dual flip angle 3D GRE sequence was used and T1 maps were calculated pre- and post-contrast using IDL software. Subsequent region of interest analysis was carried out in comparison with morphologic MRI. Results: A spatial variation of T2 values in both hyaline, normal cartilage (NC) and RT was found. Mean RT T2 values and mean NC T2 values did not differ significantly. Relative T2 values were calculated from global RT and NC T2 and showed a small range (0.84-1.07). The relative delta relaxation rates (rΔR1) obtained from the T1 maps had a wider range (0.77-4.91). Conclusion: T2 mapping and dGEMRIC provided complementary information on the biochemical properties of the repair tissue. BioCart TM II apparently can provide RT similar to hyaline articular cartilage and may become a less-invasive alternative to ACI with a periosteal flap.

  7. T2 mapping and dGEMRIC after autologous chondrocyte implantation with a fibrin-based scaffold in the knee: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domayer, S.E. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A 1090 Vienna (Austria); MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: stephan.domayer@meduniwien.ac.at; Welsch, G.H. [MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nehrer, S. [Centre of Regenerative Medicine, Danube University of Krems, Dr.-Karl-Dorrek-Strasse, 30 A-3500 Krems (Austria)], E-mail: stefan.nehrer@donau-uni.ac.at; Chiari, C.; Dorotka, R. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A 1090 Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, P. [MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mamisch, T.C. [Department of Orthopedics, Inselspital, University of Bern, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Yayon, A. [ProChon Biotech Ltd., Weizmann Science Park, Nes Ziona (Israel); Trattnig, S. [MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@meduniwien.ac.at

    2010-03-15

    Objective: To assess repair tissue (RT) after the implantation of BioCart{sup TM}II, an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with a fibrin-hyaluronan polymer as scaffold. T2 mapping and delayed Gadolinium Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) were used to gain first data on the biochemical properties of BioCart{sup TM}II RT in vivo. Methods: T2 mapping and dGEMRIC were performed at 3 T in five patients (six knee joints) who had undergone ACI 15-27 months before. T2 maps were obtained using a pixel wise, mono-exponential non-negative least squares fit analysis. For quantitative T1 mapping a dual flip angle 3D GRE sequence was used and T1 maps were calculated pre- and post-contrast using IDL software. Subsequent region of interest analysis was carried out in comparison with morphologic MRI. Results: A spatial variation of T2 values in both hyaline, normal cartilage (NC) and RT was found. Mean RT T2 values and mean NC T2 values did not differ significantly. Relative T2 values were calculated from global RT and NC T2 and showed a small range (0.84-1.07). The relative delta relaxation rates (r{delta}R1) obtained from the T1 maps had a wider range (0.77-4.91). Conclusion: T2 mapping and dGEMRIC provided complementary information on the biochemical properties of the repair tissue. BioCart{sup TM}II apparently can provide RT similar to hyaline articular cartilage and may become a less-invasive alternative to ACI with a periosteal flap.

  8. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K.E.; Quistgaard, E.

    2006-01-01

    years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol......PURPOSE: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58......) in the joint cartilage compared to the non-enhanced images (P I.a. Gd-DTPA provided significantly higher SNR and CNR compared to i.v. Gd-DTPA (P

  9. Point of no return for improvement of cartilage quality indicated by dGEMRIC before and after weight loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hangaard, Stine; Gudbergsen, Henrik; Skougaard, Marie

    2018-01-01

    Background It has been demonstrated that weight loss improves symptoms in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). A parallel change in cartilage morphology remains to be demonstrated. Purpose To demonstrate a parallel change in cartilage morphology. Material and Methods Obese patients...... with KOA were examined before and after weight loss over 16 weeks. Target knee joints were radiographically assessed by the Kellgren/Lawrence grading (KLG) system. Patients with KLG-1 and 2 changes in the lateral compartment were included. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (d...... in body mass index (BMI) after 16 weeks: 12.8% versus 11.4% ( P = 0.74). In the KLG-1 group, several cases of increased dGEMRIC T1 values were seen and median value decreased significantly less than in KLG-2 group (15 ms versus 41 ms, P = 0.03) after weight loss. Conclusion Improvement of cartilage...

  10. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K.E.; Quistgaard, E.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58...... years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol....../l Gd-DTPA solution. Coronal STIR, coronal T1 fat-saturated spin-echo, and a cartilage-sensitive gradient-echo sequence (3D T1 SPGR) in the sagittal plane were applied. RESULTS Both the post-i.v. and post-i.a. Gd-DTPA images showed significantly higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR...

  11. Utility of T2 mapping and dGEMRIC for evaluation of cartilage repair after allograft chondrocyte implantation in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, J; Watanabe, A; Sasho, T; Yamaguchi, S; Saito, M; Akagi, R; Muramatsu, Y; Mukoyama, S; Katsuragi, J; Akatsu, Y; Fukawa, T; Okubo, T; Osone, F; Takahashi, K

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of quantitative Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating the quality of cartilage repair over time following allograft chondrocyte implantation using a three-dimensional scaffold for osteochondral lesions. Thirty knees from 15 rabbits were analyzed. An osteochondral defect (diameter, 4 mm; depth, 1 mm) was created on the patellar groove of the femur in both legs. The defects were filled with a chondrocyte-seeded scaffold in the right knee and an empty scaffold in the left knee. Five rabbits each were euthanized at 4, 8, and 12 weeks and their knees were examined via macroscopic inspection, histological and biochemical analysis, and quantitative MRI (T2 mapping and dGEMRIC) to assess the state of tissue repair following allograft chondrocyte implantation with a three-dimensional scaffold for osteochondral lesions. Comparatively good regenerative cartilage was observed both macroscopically and histologically. In both chondrocyte-seeded and control knees, the T2 values of repair tissues were highest at 4 weeks and showed a tendency to decrease with time. ΔR1 values of dGEMRIC also tended to decrease with time in both groups, and the mean ΔR1 was significantly lower in the CS-scaffold group than in the control group at all time points. ΔR1 = 1/r (R1post - R1pre), where r is the relaxivity of Gd-DTPA(2-), R1 = 1/T1 (longitudinal relaxation time). T2 mapping and dGEMRIC were both effective for evaluating tissue repair after allograft chondrocyte implantation. ΔR1 values of dGEMRIC represented good correlation with histologically and biochemically even at early stages after the implantation. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MRI Brain Tumor Segmentation Methods- A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gursangeet, Kaur; Jyoti, Rani

    2016-01-01

    Medical image processing and its segmentation is an active and interesting area for researchers. It has reached at the tremendous place in diagnosing tumors after the discovery of CT and MRI. MRI is an useful tool to detect the brain tumor and segmentation is performed to carry out the useful portion from an image. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of different image segmentation methods like watershed algorithm, morphological operations, neutrosophic sets, thresholding, K-...

  13. Quantitative rotating frame relaxometry methods in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Irtiza Ali; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular degeneration and biochemical changes in tissue can be quantified using rotating frame relaxometry in MRI. It has been shown in several studies that the rotating frame longitudinal relaxation rate constant (R1ρ ) and the rotating frame transverse relaxation rate constant (R2ρ ) are sensitive biomarkers of phenomena at the cellular level. In this comprehensive review, existing MRI methods for probing the biophysical mechanisms that affect the rotating frame relaxation rates of the tissue (i.e. R1ρ and R2ρ ) are presented. Long acquisition times and high radiofrequency (RF) energy deposition into tissue during the process of spin-locking in rotating frame relaxometry are the major barriers to the establishment of these relaxation contrasts at high magnetic fields. Therefore, clinical applications of R1ρ and R2ρ MRI using on- or off-resonance RF excitation methods remain challenging. Accordingly, this review describes the theoretical and experimental approaches to the design of hard RF pulse cluster- and adiabatic RF pulse-based excitation schemes for accurate and precise measurements of R1ρ and R2ρ . The merits and drawbacks of different MRI acquisition strategies for quantitative relaxation rate measurement in the rotating frame regime are reviewed. In addition, this review summarizes current clinical applications of rotating frame MRI sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Regional dGEMRIC analysis in patients at risk of osteoarthritis provides additional information about activity related changes in cartilage structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawezi, Z K; Lammentausta, E; Svensson, J

    2016-01-01

    . PURPOSE: To improve the knowledge about exercise effects on cartilage structure by re-analyzing previous images with regional dGEMRIC analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty patients (age range, 38-50 years) with a previous medial meniscus resection were divided into three groups according to self...... the joint, the largest improvement being observed in lateral posterior cartilage, i.e. the load-bearing cartilage in the compartment without a meniscus lesion. The effects of exercise do not seem to vary with cartilage depth....

  15. A Novel Marker Based Method to Teeth Alignment in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukinen, Jean-Marc; Aalto, Daniel; Malinen, Jarmo; Niikuni, Naoko; Saunavaara, Jani; Jääsaari, Päivi; Ojalammi, Antti; Parkkola, Riitta; Soukka, Tero; Happonen, Risto-Pekka

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can precisely capture the anatomy of the vocal tract. However, the crowns of teeth are not visible in standard MRI scans. In this study, a marker-based teeth alignment method is presented and evaluated. Ten patients undergoing orthognathic surgery were enrolled. Supraglottal airways were imaged preoperatively using structural MRI. MRI visible markers were developed, and they were attached to maxillary teeth and corresponding locations on the dental casts. Repeated measurements of intermarker distances in MRI and in a replica model was compared using linear regression analysis. Dental cast MRI and corresponding caliper measurements did not differ significantly. In contrast, the marker locations in vivo differed somewhat from the dental cast measurements likely due to marker placement inaccuracies. The markers were clearly visible in MRI and allowed for dental models to be aligned to head and neck MRI scans.

  16. Analysis and visualization methods for interpretation of diffusion MRI data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion MRI is an imaging technique that is very sensitive to microstructural changes in tissue. Diffusion tensor MRI, the most commonly used method, can estimate the magnitude and anisotropy of diffusion. These tensor-based diffusion parameters have been shown to change in many neuropathological

  17. Statistical Analysis Methods for the fMRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Boyaci

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a safe and non-invasive way to assess brain functions by using signal changes associated with brain activity. The technique has become a ubiquitous tool in basic, clinical and cognitive neuroscience. This method can measure little metabolism changes that occur in active part of the brain. We process the fMRI data to be able to find the parts of brain that are involve in a mechanism, or to determine the changes that occur in brain activities due to a brain lesion. In this study we will have an overview over the methods that are used for the analysis of fMRI data.

  18. Mathematical methods for diffusion MRI processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenglet, C.; Lenglet, C.; Sapiro, G.; Campbell, J.S.W.; Pike, G.B.; Campbell, J.S.W.; Siddiqi, K.; Descoteaux, M.; Haro, G.; Wassermann, D.; Deriche, R.; Wassermann, D.; Anwander, A.; Thompson, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we review recent mathematical models and computational methods for the processing of diffusion Magnetic Resonance Images, including state-of-the-art reconstruction of diffusion models, cerebral white matter connectivity analysis, and segmentation techniques. We focus on Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) and Q-Ball Images (QBI). (authors)

  19. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Pia M.; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Link, Thomas M.; Li, Xiaojuan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Welsch, Goetz H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair. PMID:24877139

  20. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M. Jungmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  1. Development and Validation of MRI Sacroiliac Joint Scoring Methods for the Semiaxial Scan Plane Corresponding to the Berlin and SPARCC MRI Scoring Methods, and of a New Global MRI Sacroiliac Joint Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hededal, Pernille; Østergaard, Mikkel; Sørensen, Inge Juul

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop semiaxial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring methods for assessment of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) bone marrow edema (BME) in patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and to compare the reliability with equivalent semicoronal scoring methods. METHODS: Two semiaxial SIJ MRI sc...

  2. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  3. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  4. Population based ranking of frameless CT-MRI registration methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opposits, Gabor; Kis, Sandor A.; Tron, Lajos; Emri, Miklos [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Berenyi, Ervin [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biomedical Laboratory and Imaging Science; Takacs, Endre [Rotating Gamma Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); Dobai, Jozsef G.; Bognar, Laszlo [Debrecen Univ., Medical Center (Hungary). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Szuecs, Bernadett [ScanoMed Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    Clinical practice often requires simultaneous information obtained by two different imaging modalities. Registration algorithms are commonly used for this purpose. Automated procedures are very helpful in cases when the same kind of registration has to be performed on images of a high number of subjects. Radiotherapists would prefer to use the best automated method to assist therapy planning, however there are not accepted procedures for ranking the different registration algorithms. We were interested in developing a method to measure the population level performance of CT-MRI registration algorithms by a parameter of values in the [0,1] interval. Pairs of CT and MRI images were collected from 1051 subjects. Results of an automated registration were corrected manually until a radiologist and a neurosurgeon expert both accepted the result as good. This way 1051 registered MRI images were produced by the same pair of experts to be used as gold standards for the evaluation of the performance of other registration algorithms. Pearson correlation coefficient, mutual information, normalized mutual information, Kullback-Leibler divergence, L{sub 1} norm and square L{sub 2} norm (dis)similarity measures were tested for sensitivity to indicate the extent of (dis)similarity of a pair of individual mismatched images. The square Hellinger distance proved suitable to grade the performance of registration algorithms at population level providing the developers with a valuable tool to rank algorithms. The developed procedure provides an objective method to find the registration algorithm performing the best on the population level out of newly constructed or available preselected ones.

  5. [Fusion of MRI, fMRI and intraoperative MRI data. Methods and clinical significance exemplified by neurosurgical interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, M; Busse, H; Dannenberg, C; Schulz, T; Schmitgen, A; Trantakis, C; Winkler, D; Schmidt, F; Kahn, T

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this work was to realize and clinically evaluate an image fusion platform for the integration of preoperative MRI and fMRI data into the intraoperative images of an interventional MRI system with a focus on neurosurgical procedures. A vertically open 0.5 T MRI scanner was equipped with a dedicated navigation system enabling the registration of additional imaging modalities (MRI, fMRI, CT) with the intraoperatively acquired data sets. These merged image data served as the basis for interventional planning and multimodal navigation. So far, the system has been used in 70 neurosurgical interventions (13 of which involved image data fusion--requiring 15 minutes extra time). The augmented navigation system is characterized by a higher frame rate and a higher image quality as compared to the system-integrated navigation based on continuously acquired (near) real time images. Patient movement and tissue shifts can be immediately detected by monitoring the morphological differences between both navigation scenes. The multimodal image fusion allowed a refined navigation planning especially for the resection of deeply seated brain lesions or pathologies close to eloquent areas. Augmented intraoperative orientation and instrument guidance improve the safety and accuracy of neurosurgical interventions.

  6. [MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, G; Bauman, G

    2016-02-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O2-enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies.

  7. MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, G.; Bauman, G.

    2016-01-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O 2 -enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies. (orig.) [de

  8. MRI grading method for active and chronic spinal changes in spondyloarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, K.B.; Jurik, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To describe a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grading method for both active and chronic spondyloarthritis (SpA) changes in the spine, to test its validity, and compare chronic MRI scores with findings obtained by radiography. Material and methods: A total of 91 patients (41 males; 50 females) with back pain fulfilling the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria for SpA were examined using MRI and radiography of the spine. The mean age was 36.7 years (range 16-51 years) and symptom duration was between 3 and 27 years. The MRI images were assessed for signs of disease activity (bone marrow oedema at the vertebral plates and costo-vertebral joints) and chronic structural changes [syndesmophytes/vertebral fusion, erosion, and fatty marrow deposition (FMD)]. The interobserver agreement was analysed based on 37 examinations. Radiographs were assessed for the presence of shiny corners, vertebral squaring, syndesmophytes/fusion, and erosion. Results: The interobserver agreement for the assessed MRI abnormalities was acceptable, with kappa values between 0.62 and 0.77. A total of 56 patients had SpA-related spinal abnormalities as depicted using MRI. The total chronic MRI score was not significantly related to the radiographic score, mainly because syndesmophytes were difficult to detect by MRI and FMD was only visualized by MRI. However, FMD was significantly related to the total radiographic score and vertebral squaring. Conclusion: The described MRI grading method was reliable for assessing both disease activity and chronic changes. MRI is promising for estimating chronic changes, but cervical radiography may still be needed. FMD seems to be an important sign of chronicity.

  9. MRI grading method for active and chronic spinal changes in spondyloarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, K.B. [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus Sygehus (Denmark); Jurik, A.G., E-mail: anne.jurik@aarhus.rm.d [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus Sygehus (Denmark)

    2010-01-15

    Aim: To describe a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grading method for both active and chronic spondyloarthritis (SpA) changes in the spine, to test its validity, and compare chronic MRI scores with findings obtained by radiography. Material and methods: A total of 91 patients (41 males; 50 females) with back pain fulfilling the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria for SpA were examined using MRI and radiography of the spine. The mean age was 36.7 years (range 16-51 years) and symptom duration was between 3 and 27 years. The MRI images were assessed for signs of disease activity (bone marrow oedema at the vertebral plates and costo-vertebral joints) and chronic structural changes [syndesmophytes/vertebral fusion, erosion, and fatty marrow deposition (FMD)]. The interobserver agreement was analysed based on 37 examinations. Radiographs were assessed for the presence of shiny corners, vertebral squaring, syndesmophytes/fusion, and erosion. Results: The interobserver agreement for the assessed MRI abnormalities was acceptable, with kappa values between 0.62 and 0.77. A total of 56 patients had SpA-related spinal abnormalities as depicted using MRI. The total chronic MRI score was not significantly related to the radiographic score, mainly because syndesmophytes were difficult to detect by MRI and FMD was only visualized by MRI. However, FMD was significantly related to the total radiographic score and vertebral squaring. Conclusion: The described MRI grading method was reliable for assessing both disease activity and chronic changes. MRI is promising for estimating chronic changes, but cervical radiography may still be needed. FMD seems to be an important sign of chronicity.

  10. A comparison of exogenous and endogenous CEST MRI methods for evaluating in vivo pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Leila R; Randtke, Edward A; High, Rachel A; Jones, Kyle M; Howison, Christine M; Pagel, Mark D

    2018-05-01

    Extracellular pH (pHe) is an important biomarker for cancer cell metabolism. Acido-chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI uses the contrast agent iopamidol to create spatial maps of pHe. Measurements of amide proton transfer exchange rates (k ex ) from endogenous CEST MRI were compared to pHe measurements by exogenous acido-CEST MRI to determine whether endogenous k ex could be used as a proxy for pHe measurements. Spatial maps of pHe and k ex were obtained using exogenous acidoCEST MRI and an endogenous CEST MRI analyzed with the omega plot method, respectively, to evaluate mouse kidney, a flank tumor model, and a spontaneous lung tumor model. The pHe and k ex results were evaluated using pixelwise comparisons. The k ex values obtained from endogenous CEST measurements did not correlate with the pHe results from exogenous CEST measurements. The k ex measurements were limited to fewer pixels and had a limited dynamic range relative to pHe measurements. Measurements of k ex with endogenous CEST MRI cannot substitute for pHe measurements with acidoCEST MRI. Whereas endogenous CEST MRI may still have good utility for evaluating some specific pathologies, exogenous acido-CEST MRI is more appropriate when evaluating pathologies based on pHe values. Magn Reson Med 79:2766-2772, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. EEG-Informed fMRI: A Review of Data Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Rodolfo; Leal, Alberto; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2018-01-01

    The simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography (EEG) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a very promising non-invasive technique for the study of human brain function. Despite continuous improvements, it remains a challenging technique, and a standard methodology for data analysis is yet to be established. Here we review the methodologies that are currently available to address the challenges at each step of the data analysis pipeline. We start by surveying methods for pre-processing both EEG and fMRI data. On the EEG side, we focus on the correction for several MR-induced artifacts, particularly the gradient and pulse artifacts, as well as other sources of EEG artifacts. On the fMRI side, we consider image artifacts induced by the presence of EEG hardware inside the MR scanner, and the contamination of the fMRI signal by physiological noise of non-neuronal origin, including a review of several approaches to model and remove it. We then provide an overview of the approaches specifically employed for the integration of EEG and fMRI when using EEG to predict the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal, the so-called EEG-informed fMRI integration strategy, the most commonly used strategy in EEG-fMRI research. Finally, we systematically review methods used for the extraction of EEG features reflecting neuronal phenomena of interest. PMID:29467634

  12. EEG-Informed fMRI: A Review of Data Analysis Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Abreu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography (EEG with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a very promising non-invasive technique for the study of human brain function. Despite continuous improvements, it remains a challenging technique, and a standard methodology for data analysis is yet to be established. Here we review the methodologies that are currently available to address the challenges at each step of the data analysis pipeline. We start by surveying methods for pre-processing both EEG and fMRI data. On the EEG side, we focus on the correction for several MR-induced artifacts, particularly the gradient and pulse artifacts, as well as other sources of EEG artifacts. On the fMRI side, we consider image artifacts induced by the presence of EEG hardware inside the MR scanner, and the contamination of the fMRI signal by physiological noise of non-neuronal origin, including a review of several approaches to model and remove it. We then provide an overview of the approaches specifically employed for the integration of EEG and fMRI when using EEG to predict the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD fMRI signal, the so-called EEG-informed fMRI integration strategy, the most commonly used strategy in EEG-fMRI research. Finally, we systematically review methods used for the extraction of EEG features reflecting neuronal phenomena of interest.

  13. An Introduction to Normalization and Calibration Methods in Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Thomas T.; Glover, Gary H.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Brown, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal is often interpreted as a measure of neural activity. However, because the BOLD signal reflects the complex interplay of neural, vascular, and metabolic processes, such an interpretation is not always valid. There is growing evidence that changes…

  14. An iterative reconstruction method of complex images using expectation maximization for radial parallel MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joonsung; Kim, Dongchan; Oh, Changhyun; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2013-01-01

    In MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), signal sampling along a radial k-space trajectory is preferred in certain applications due to its distinct advantages such as robustness to motion, and the radial sampling can be beneficial for reconstruction algorithms such as parallel MRI (pMRI) due to the incoherency. For radial MRI, the image is usually reconstructed from projection data using analytic methods such as filtered back-projection or Fourier reconstruction after gridding. However, the quality of the reconstructed image from these analytic methods can be degraded when the number of acquired projection views is insufficient. In this paper, we propose a novel reconstruction method based on the expectation maximization (EM) method, where the EM algorithm is remodeled for MRI so that complex images can be reconstructed. Then, to optimize the proposed method for radial pMRI, a reconstruction method that uses coil sensitivity information of multichannel RF coils is formulated. Experiment results from synthetic and in vivo data show that the proposed method introduces better reconstructed images than the analytic methods, even from highly subsampled data, and provides monotonic convergence properties compared to the conjugate gradient based reconstruction method. (paper)

  15. [Mechanical Shimming Method and Implementation for Permanent Magnet of MRI System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Tingqiang; Chen, Jinjun

    2015-03-01

    A mechanical shimming method and device for permanent magnet of MRI system has been developed to meet its stringent homogeneity requirement without time-consuming passive shimming on site, installation and adjustment efficiency has been increased.

  16. Principal Feature Analysis: A Multivariate Feature Selection Method for fMRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain decoding with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI requires analysis of complex, multivariate data. Multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA has been widely used in recent years. MVPA treats the activation of multiple voxels from fMRI data as a pattern and decodes brain states using pattern classification methods. Feature selection is a critical procedure of MVPA because it decides which features will be included in the classification analysis of fMRI data, thereby improving the performance of the classifier. Features can be selected by limiting the analysis to specific anatomical regions or by computing univariate (voxel-wise or multivariate statistics. However, these methods either discard some informative features or select features with redundant information. This paper introduces the principal feature analysis as a novel multivariate feature selection method for fMRI data processing. This multivariate approach aims to remove features with redundant information, thereby selecting fewer features, while retaining the most information.

  17. S-MRI score: A simple method for assessing bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Mota, J.; Alfonso, P.; Pocovi, M.; Giraldo, P.

    2007-01-01

    Semi quantitative MRI is a very useful procedure for evaluating the bone marrow burden (BMB) in Gaucher disease (GD). Score systems have been applied to obtain a parameter for evaluating the severity of bone disease. Our purpose was to test a simple, reproducible and accurate score to evaluate bone marrow involvement in GD patients. MRI was performed in spine, pelvis and femora at diagnosis in 54 adult GD1 patients, 61.1% of whom were female. Three MRI patterns and punctuation in each location were defined: normal, 0; non-homogeneous infiltration subtypes reticular, 1; mottled, 2; diffuse, 3; and homogeneous infiltration, 4. This score was called Spanish-MRI (S-MRI). Two independent observers applied the S-MRI and bone marrow burden score and compared the differences using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlation rank test was calculated. In 46 patients (85.2%), bone involvement was observed. Thirty-nine (72.3%) had their spine affected, 35 (64.8%) pelvis and 33 (61.2%) femora. Fourteen patients had bone infarcts, 14 avascular necrosis, 2 vertebral fractures and 2 bone crises. Correlation analysis between S-MRI and BMB was (r 2 = .675; p = .0001). No evidence of correlation was observed between CT activity and S-MRI nor between CT activity and BMB. We have found a relationship between genotype and bone infiltration according to S-MRI site and complications. S-MRI is a simple method that provides useful information to evaluate bone infiltration and detect silent complications. Our results correlated with the BMB score but offer higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for classifying the extent of bone disease

  18. S-MRI score: A simple method for assessing bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Mota, J. [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Medimagen, Barcelona (Spain); Alfonso, P. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Pocovi, M. [Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Zaragoza University (Spain); Giraldo, P. [Haematology Department, Miguel Servet University Hospital, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: pgiraldo@salud.aragon.es

    2007-04-15

    Semi quantitative MRI is a very useful procedure for evaluating the bone marrow burden (BMB) in Gaucher disease (GD). Score systems have been applied to obtain a parameter for evaluating the severity of bone disease. Our purpose was to test a simple, reproducible and accurate score to evaluate bone marrow involvement in GD patients. MRI was performed in spine, pelvis and femora at diagnosis in 54 adult GD1 patients, 61.1% of whom were female. Three MRI patterns and punctuation in each location were defined: normal, 0; non-homogeneous infiltration subtypes reticular, 1; mottled, 2; diffuse, 3; and homogeneous infiltration, 4. This score was called Spanish-MRI (S-MRI). Two independent observers applied the S-MRI and bone marrow burden score and compared the differences using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlation rank test was calculated. In 46 patients (85.2%), bone involvement was observed. Thirty-nine (72.3%) had their spine affected, 35 (64.8%) pelvis and 33 (61.2%) femora. Fourteen patients had bone infarcts, 14 avascular necrosis, 2 vertebral fractures and 2 bone crises. Correlation analysis between S-MRI and BMB was (r {sup 2} = .675; p = .0001). No evidence of correlation was observed between CT activity and S-MRI nor between CT activity and BMB. We have found a relationship between genotype and bone infiltration according to S-MRI site and complications. S-MRI is a simple method that provides useful information to evaluate bone infiltration and detect silent complications. Our results correlated with the BMB score but offer higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for classifying the extent of bone disease.

  19. Comparison of early and late MRI in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using three assessment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charon, Valerie; Proisy, Maia; Bruneau, Bertrand; Treguier, Catherine; Rozel, Celine; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Beuchee, Alain; Chauvel, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    There is no consensus on the optimum timing of MRI in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia. Reliable early imaging assessment might help managing treatment. To assess non-random differences between early and late MRI that might influence intensive-care decisions. This single-center retrospective study included all asphyxiated term neonates eligible for hypothermia treatment November 2009-July 2012. MRI scans were systematically performed at day 4 (early MRI) and day 11 of life as part of routine protocol. Two experienced pediatric radiologists reviewed both scans according to three assessment methods: a pattern classification, a scoring system and a simplified classification. Agreement between early and late imaging findings was assessed using Cohen's kappa coefficients. Thirty-three neonates were included. Interobserver agreement was excellent. Early MRI detected all severe injuries. Agreement between early and late MRI was excellent for the simplified classification (κ = 0.82), good for the pattern classification (κ = 0.64), and good to excellent for 3 scores out of 4 in the scoring system (κ = 0.70-0.89). Early MRI may provide valuable information about brain injury to help parents and neonatologists in intensive-care decisions at the end of hypothermia treatment. (orig.)

  20. Comparison of early and late MRI in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using three assessment methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charon, Valerie; Proisy, Maia; Bruneau, Bertrand; Treguier, Catherine; Rozel, Celine [University Hospital, Department of Imaging, Hopital Sud, Rennes, Cedex 2 (France); Ferre, Jean-Christophe [University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Pontchaillou, Rennes (France); Beuchee, Alain [University Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Hopital Sud, Rennes (France); Chauvel, Jennifer [Saint Brieuc Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Saint-Brieuc (France)

    2015-12-15

    There is no consensus on the optimum timing of MRI in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia. Reliable early imaging assessment might help managing treatment. To assess non-random differences between early and late MRI that might influence intensive-care decisions. This single-center retrospective study included all asphyxiated term neonates eligible for hypothermia treatment November 2009-July 2012. MRI scans were systematically performed at day 4 (early MRI) and day 11 of life as part of routine protocol. Two experienced pediatric radiologists reviewed both scans according to three assessment methods: a pattern classification, a scoring system and a simplified classification. Agreement between early and late imaging findings was assessed using Cohen's kappa coefficients. Thirty-three neonates were included. Interobserver agreement was excellent. Early MRI detected all severe injuries. Agreement between early and late MRI was excellent for the simplified classification (κ = 0.82), good for the pattern classification (κ = 0.64), and good to excellent for 3 scores out of 4 in the scoring system (κ = 0.70-0.89). Early MRI may provide valuable information about brain injury to help parents and neonatologists in intensive-care decisions at the end of hypothermia treatment. (orig.)

  1. PRIM: An Efficient Preconditioning Iterative Reweighted Least Squares Method for Parallel Brain MRI Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yeqing; Zhu, Feiyun; Huang, Junzhou

    2018-02-08

    The most recent history of parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pMRI) has in large part been devoted to finding ways to reduce acquisition time. While joint total variation (JTV) regularized model has been demonstrated as a powerful tool in increasing sampling speed for pMRI, however, the major bottleneck is the inefficiency of the optimization method. While all present state-of-the-art optimizations for the JTV model could only reach a sublinear convergence rate, in this paper, we squeeze the performance by proposing a linear-convergent optimization method for the JTV model. The proposed method is based on the Iterative Reweighted Least Squares algorithm. Due to the complexity of the tangled JTV objective, we design a novel preconditioner to further accelerate the proposed method. Extensive experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for pMRI regarding both accuracy and efficiency compared with state-of-the-art methods.

  2. Graphical programming interface: A development environment for MRI methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Nicholas R; Pipe, James G

    2015-11-01

    To introduce a multiplatform, Python language-based, development environment called graphical programming interface for prototyping MRI techniques. The interface allows developers to interact with their scientific algorithm prototypes visually in an event-driven environment making tasks such as parameterization, algorithm testing, data manipulation, and visualization an integrated part of the work-flow. Algorithm developers extend the built-in functionality through simple code interfaces designed to facilitate rapid implementation. This article shows several examples of algorithms developed in graphical programming interface including the non-Cartesian MR reconstruction algorithms for PROPELLER and spiral as well as spin simulation and trajectory visualization of a FLORET example. The graphical programming interface framework is shown to be a versatile prototyping environment for developing numeric algorithms used in the latest MR techniques. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The registration accuracy analysis of different CT-MRI imaging fusion method in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Shao Qian; Zhang Zicheng; Chen Jinhu; Chen Zhaoqiu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To find an effective CT-MRI image fusion protocol in brain tumor by analyzing the registration accuracy of different methods. Methods: The simulation CT scan and MRI T 1 WI imaging of 10 brain tumor patients obtained with same position were registered by Tris-Axes landmark ,Tris-Axes landmark + manual adjustment, mutual information and mutual information + manual adjustment method. The clinical tumor volume (CTV) were contoured on both CT and MRI images respectively. The accuracy of image fusion was assessed by the mean distance of five bone markers (d 1-5 ), central position of CTV (d CTV ) the percentage of CTV overlap (P CT-MRI ) between CT and MRI images. The difference between different methods was analyzed by Freedman M non-parameter test. Results: The difference of the means d1-5 between the Tris-Axes landmark,Tris-Axes landmark plus manual adjustment,mutual information and mutual information plus manual adjustment methods were 0.28 cm ±0.12 cm, 0.15 cm ±0.02 cm, 0.25 cm± 0.19 cm, 0.10 cm ± 0.06 cm, (M = 14.41, P = 0.002). the means d CTV were 0.59 cm ± 0.28 cm, 0.60 cm± 0.32 cm, 0.58 cm ± 0.39 cm, 0.42 cm± 0.30 cm (M = 9.72, P = 0.021), the means P CT-MRI were 0.69% ±0.18%, 0.68% ±0.16%, 0.66% ±0.17%, 0.74% ±0.14% (M =14.82, P=0.002), respectively. Conclusions: Mutual information plus manual adjustment registration method was the preferable fusion method for brain tumor patients. (authors)

  4. Automatic MRI Quantifying Methods in Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cajanus, Antti; Hall, Anette; Koikkalainen, Juha

    2018-01-01

    genetic status in the differentiation sensitivity. Methods: The MRI scans of 50 patients with bvFTD (17 C9ORF72 expansion carriers) were analyzed using 6 quantification methods as follows: voxel-based morphometry (VBM), tensor-based morphometry, volumetry (VOL), manifold learning, grading, and white...

  5. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Peter C.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Fox, Tim; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dong, Lei; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts

  6. Association between delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and joint space narrowing and osteophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owman, H; Ericsson, Y B; Englund, M

    2014-01-01

    -16 years after surgery) 34 of these subjects (76%) were evaluated by weight-bearing knee radiography, and tibiofemoral joint changes were graded according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International Atlas. RESULTS: Lower T1Gd in the medial compartment was associated with higher grade of medial JSN...

  7. Evidence for Policy Making: Clinical Appropriateness Study of Lumbar Spine MRI Prescriptions Using RAND Appropriateness Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Yousefi Manesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MRI is a new and expensive diagnostic technology, which has been used increasingly all over the world. Low back pain is a worldwide prevalent disorder and MRI technique is one of the several ways to diagnose it. This paper aims to identify the appropriateness of lumbar spine MRI prescriptions in Shiraz teaching hospitals using standardized RAND Appropriateness Method (RAM criteria. Methods This study consisted of two phases. The first phase involved a qualitative enquiry and the second phase had a quantitative cross-sectional nature. In the first phase RAM was used for developing lumbar spine MRI indications and scenarios. In the second phase, the finalized scenarios were compared with the history and physical examination of 300 patients with low back pain. The rate of appropriateness of lumbar spine MRI prescription was then calculated. Results Of 300 cases of lumbar spine MRI prescriptions, approximately 167 (56% were considered inappropriate, 72 (24% were uncertain, and 61 (20% were deemed to be appropriate. The economic burden of inappropriate prescriptions was calculated at 88,009,000 Rials. In addition, the types of expertise and physical examination were considered as related factors to appropriateness of prescriptions. Conclusion In conclusion, a large proportion of lumbar spine MRI prescriptions, which result in financial burden on the insurance companies and the patients alike is unnecessary. This study suggests that policy makers consider this evidence while decision-making. Our findings highlight the imperative role of Health Technology Assessment (HTA and Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs. As a result, developing local clinical guidelines may create the commitment needed in physicians in prescribing appropriate prescriptions within the health sector. The study further recommends that appropriate scenarios should be considered as a criterion for payment and reimbursement.

  8. A SVM-based quantitative fMRI method for resting-state functional network detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaomu; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-09-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) aims to measure baseline neuronal connectivity independent of specific functional tasks and to capture changes in the connectivity due to neurological diseases. Most existing network detection methods rely on a fixed threshold to identify functionally connected voxels under the resting state. Due to fMRI non-stationarity, the threshold cannot adapt to variation of data characteristics across sessions and subjects, and generates unreliable mapping results. In this study, a new method is presented for resting-state fMRI data analysis. Specifically, the resting-state network mapping is formulated as an outlier detection process that is implemented using one-class support vector machine (SVM). The results are refined by using a spatial-feature domain prototype selection method and two-class SVM reclassification. The final decision on each voxel is made by comparing its probabilities of functionally connected and unconnected instead of a threshold. Multiple features for resting-state analysis were extracted and examined using an SVM-based feature selection method, and the most representative features were identified. The proposed method was evaluated using synthetic and experimental fMRI data. A comparison study was also performed with independent component analysis (ICA) and correlation analysis. The experimental results show that the proposed method can provide comparable or better network detection performance than ICA and correlation analysis. The method is potentially applicable to various resting-state quantitative fMRI studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Developing Criteria for Lumbar Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Using RAND Appropriateness Method (RAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshtkaran, Ali; Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Ostovar, Rahim; Salari, Hedayat; Farokhi, Majid Reza; Esfandiari, Atefeh; Yousefimanesh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Studies show that a large proportion of healthcare offered may be inappropriate or unnecessary. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and expensive diagnostic technology which has been increasingly used all over the world. Moreover, this trend has been more rapidly increasing in Iran. Low back pain is a common disorder all over the world and MRI technique is one of the several ways to assess its cause. The present study aims to develop scenarios for lumbar spine MRI. In the present study, the RAND Appropriateness Method (RAM) was used in order to reach consensus regarding developing scenarios for lumbar spine MRI. We generated scenarios from valid clinical guidelines as well as the experts’ opinion. The panel members included nine specialists from various medical specialties that had scored scenarios in two rounds, the first of which was without interaction, while the second one was with interaction. We extracted 97 scenarios for the lumbar spine MRI in the scenario extracting phase of the study and the panel members added 18 scenarios. After implementation of two rounds, the scenarios were categorized into three ranges. Sixty seven (58%) of the scenarios were considered as appropriate, 45 (39%) as uncertain, and three (2.6%) as inappropriate. RAM is useful for identifying stakeholder views in settings with limited resources. Since RAM has precise instructions for consensus developing, a large number of scenarios were considered as uncertain. Therefore, more research has to be conducted on the issue

  10. Regularization of DT-MRI Using 3D Median Filtering Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soondong Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DT-MRI (diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging tractography is a method to determine the architecture of axonal fibers in the central nervous system by computing the direction of the principal eigenvectors obtained from tensor matrix, which is different from the conventional isotropic MRI. Tractography based on DT-MRI is known to need many computations and is highly sensitive to noise. Hence, adequate regularization methods, such as image processing techniques, are in demand. Among many regularization methods we are interested in the median filtering method. In this paper, we extended two-dimensional median filters already developed to three-dimensional median filters. We compared four median filtering methods which are two-dimensional simple median method (SM2D, two-dimensional successive Fermat method (SF2D, three-dimensional simple median method (SM3D, and three-dimensional successive Fermat method (SF3D. Three kinds of synthetic data with different altitude angles from axial slices and one kind of human data from MR scanner are considered for numerical implementation by the four filtering methods.

  11. Sparse PCA, a new method for unsupervised analyses of fMRI data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Lund, Torben E.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2006-01-01

    favorable circumstances, one of more of these signals describe activation patterns, while others model noise and other nuisance factors. This work introduces a competing method for fMRI analysis known as sparse principal component analysis (SPCA). We argue that SPCA is less committed than ICA and show...... that similar results, with better suppression of noise, are obtained....

  12. Application of stereological methods to estimate post-mortem brain surface area using 3T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furlong, Carolyn; García-Fiñana, Marta; Puddephat, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Cavalieri and Vertical Sections methods of design based stereology were applied in combination with 3 tesla (i.e. 3T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to estimate cortical and subcortical volume, area of the pial surface, area of the grey-white matter boundary, and thickness of the cerebral...

  13. Automated lesion detection on MRI scans using combined unsupervised and supervised methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Dazhou; Fridriksson, Julius; Fillmore, Paul; Rorden, Christopher; Yu, Hongkai; Zheng, Kang; Wang, Song

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and precise detection of brain lesions on MR images (MRI) is paramount for accurately relating lesion location to impaired behavior. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically detect brain lesions from a T1-weighted 3D MRI. The proposed method combines the advantages of both unsupervised and supervised methods. First, unsupervised methods perform a unified segmentation normalization to warp images from the native space into a standard space and to generate probability maps for different tissue types, e.g., gray matter, white matter and fluid. This allows us to construct an initial lesion probability map by comparing the normalized MRI to healthy control subjects. Then, we perform non-rigid and reversible atlas-based registration to refine the probability maps of gray matter, white matter, external CSF, ventricle, and lesions. These probability maps are combined with the normalized MRI to construct three types of features, with which we use supervised methods to train three support vector machine (SVM) classifiers for a combined classifier. Finally, the combined classifier is used to accomplish lesion detection. We tested this method using T1-weighted MRIs from 60 in-house stroke patients. Using leave-one-out cross validation, the proposed method can achieve an average Dice coefficient of 73.1 % when compared to lesion maps hand-delineated by trained neurologists. Furthermore, we tested the proposed method on the T1-weighted MRIs in the MICCAI BRATS 2012 dataset. The proposed method can achieve an average Dice coefficient of 66.5 % in comparison to the expert annotated tumor maps provided in MICCAI BRATS 2012 dataset. In addition, on these two test datasets, the proposed method shows competitive performance to three state-of-the-art methods, including Stamatakis et al., Seghier et al., and Sanjuan et al. In this paper, we introduced a novel automated procedure for lesion detection from T1-weighted MRIs by combining both an unsupervised and a

  14. Evaluation of left ventricular volume by MRI using modified Simpson's rule method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Masahiro; Kondo, Takeshi; Anno, Naoko

    1990-01-01

    The conventional contrast left ventriculogrpahy (LVG) has been the gold standard for estimating left ventricular volume (LVV), but it is an invasive technique, and volume overload must be caused by contrast medium. the true left ventricular (LV) long axis may not be obtained by LVG in routine right anterior oblique (RAO) projection. MRI, on the other hand, is noninvasive, does not require contrast medium, and permits to obtain the true LV long axis sections. Thus, MRI seems the ideal technique for estimating LVV. To estimate LVV, we have developed the on-line programs for calculating LVV by single-plane (SMS) or biplane modified Simpson's rule method (BMS), and have applied these programs to the water in the bottle with the elliptic short axis plane, normal volunteer and patients with various heart diseases. In the water phantom, the water volume calculated by the BMS was more accurate than the SMS. In nine normal volunteers, multiple LV short axis sections in each end-systole and end-diastole were obtained by ECG-gated spin echo MRI, LVV as standard was calculated by true Simpson's rule method (TS) on these images. Then both vertical and horizontal LV long axis sections were also obtained by ECG-gated field echo (FE) rephasing cine MRI, LVV was calculated by the BMS or SMS on these images. The BMS or SMS significantly correlated (r=0.974, r=0.927, 0.947) with TS for estimating LVV, respectively. In 20 patients with various heart diseases, both vertical and horizontal LV long axis sections were obtained by FE cine MRI. LVV (r=0.907 and r=0.901) and EF (r=0.822 and r=0.938) calculated by the SMS on the vertical or horizontal LV long axis sections significantly correlated with the conventional RAO-LVG, respectively. In conclusion, the MRI using our on-line programs would be clinically useful for estimating LVV and EF. (author)

  15. Prostate cancer diagnosis: Efficacy of a simple electromagnetic MRI-TRUS fusion method to target biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelidi, Amina; Ohana, Mickael; Labani, Aïssam; Alemann, Guillaume; Lang, Herve; Roy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A very simple electromagnetic device for fusion with MRI examination during TRUS guided biopsies increases the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. • This device has advantages: a short time for the fusion registration, no additional cumbersome material and no intense training to be fluent with. • Low or intermediate suspicious area for prostate carcinoma on mpMRI can be due to benign histological abnormalities or high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. - Abstract: Objective: To assess that transrectal ultrasound guidance (TRUS) targeted biopsies (TB) aimed with an easy to use electronic real-time fusion registration device have a higher rate of prostate cancer (PC) detection than standard biopsies (SB). Material and methods: This prospective study included 130 patients referred for TRUS biopsies after suspicious MRI. They underwent 16-core SB and 2 to 3 cores in each MRI suspicious area, using a fusion software. We noted SB and TB positivity for PC and Gleason score (GS). We used the McNemar test to compare SB and TB, with a statistical significance p < 0.05. Results: Among 130 patients, 68.5% had PC. Additional time due to the fusion registration was 3.3 min. One hundred fifteen patients (88.4%) had pathological findings on the histological analysis (prostate cancer n = 89, others n = 26). TB diagnosed PC in 75 patients with negative SB. Positivity rate for PC was significantly higher for TB than SB (p = 0.03). Among highly suspicious MRI lesions, detection rate of histological abnormalities using SB and TB was 96% with 79.7% of PC. Most PC that TB diagnosed alone were clinically significant (86.3%). Conclusion: TRUS biopsies performed with a simple MRI and US electronic fusion is an unrestrainedly method to increase PC diagnosis.

  16. An optimizing design method for a compact iron shielded superconducting magnet for use in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xin; Zu Donglin; Wang Tao; Han Baohui

    2010-01-01

    A method is developed for designing a special iron shielded superconducting magnet for MRI in this paper. The shield is designed as an integral part of the cryostat and high permeability and high saturated magnetization iron material is adopted. This scheme will result in a compact iron shielded magnet. In the presented design, the finite element (FE) method is adopted to calculate the magnetic field produced by superconducting coils and nonlinear iron material. The FE method is incorporated into the simulated annealing method which is employed for corresponding optimization. Therefore, geometrical configurations of both coils and iron shield can be optimized together. This method can deal with discrete design variables which are defined to describe the cable arrangements of coil cross sections. A detailed algorithm of the present design is described and an example for designing a 1.5 T clinical iron shielded magnet for MRI is shown.

  17. A Total Variation-Based Reconstruction Method for Dynamic MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Landi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, total variation (TV regularization has become a popular and powerful tool for image restoration and enhancement. In this work, we apply TV minimization to improve the quality of dynamic magnetic resonance images. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging is an increasingly popular clinical technique used to monitor spatio-temporal changes in tissue structure. Fast data acquisition is necessary in order to capture the dynamic process. Most commonly, the requirement of high temporal resolution is fulfilled by sacrificing spatial resolution. Therefore, the numerical methods have to address the issue of images reconstruction from limited Fourier data. One of the most successful techniques for dynamic imaging applications is the reduced-encoded imaging by generalized-series reconstruction method of Liang and Lauterbur. However, even if this method utilizes a priori data for optimal image reconstruction, the produced dynamic images are degraded by truncation artifacts, most notably Gibbs ringing, due to the spatial low resolution of the data. We use a TV regularization strategy in order to reduce these truncation artifacts in the dynamic images. The resulting TV minimization problem is solved by the fixed point iteration method of Vogel and Oman. The results of test problems with simulated and real data are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in reducing the truncation artifacts of the reconstructed images.

  18. Comparison between MRI-based attenuation correction methods for brain PET in dementia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabello, Jorge; Lukas, Mathias; Pyka, Thomas; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Rota Kops, Elena; Shah, N. Jon; Ribeiro, Andre; Yakushev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The combination of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in hybrid PET/MRI scanners offers a number of advantages in investigating brain structure and function. A critical step of PET data reconstruction is attenuation correction (AC). Accounting for bone in attenuation maps (μ-map) was shown to be important in brain PET studies. While there are a number of MRI-based AC methods, no systematic comparison between them has been performed so far. The aim of this work was to study the different performance obtained by some of the recent methods presented in the literature. To perform such a comparison, we focused on [ 18 F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/MRI neurodegenerative dementing disorders, which are known to exhibit reduced levels of glucose metabolism in certain brain regions. Four novel methods were used to calculate μ-maps from MRI data of 15 patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD). The methods cover two atlas-based methods, a segmentation method, and a hybrid template/segmentation method. Additionally, the Dixon-based and a UTE-based method, offered by a vendor, were included in the comparison. Performance was assessed at three levels: tissue identification accuracy in the μ-map, quantitative accuracy of reconstructed PET data in specific brain regions, and precision in diagnostic images at identifying hypometabolic areas. Quantitative regional errors of -20-10 % were obtained using the vendor's AC methods, whereas the novel methods produced errors in a margin of ±5 %. The obtained precision at identifying areas with abnormally low levels of glucose uptake, potentially regions affected by AD, were 62.9 and 79.5 % for the two vendor AC methods, the former ignoring bone and the latter including bone information. The precision increased to 87.5-93.3 % in average for the four new methods, exhibiting similar performances. We confirm that the AC methods based on the Dixon and UTE sequences provided by the vendor are inferior

  19. Comparison between MRI-based attenuation correction methods for brain PET in dementia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabello, Jorge; Lukas, Mathias; Pyka, Thomas; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Ziegler, Sibylle I. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Rota Kops, Elena; Shah, N. Jon [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, Medical Imaging Physics, Juelich (Germany); Ribeiro, Andre [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, Medical Imaging Physics, Juelich (Germany); Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Lisbon (Portugal); Yakushev, Igor [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Institute TUM Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The combination of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in hybrid PET/MRI scanners offers a number of advantages in investigating brain structure and function. A critical step of PET data reconstruction is attenuation correction (AC). Accounting for bone in attenuation maps (μ-map) was shown to be important in brain PET studies. While there are a number of MRI-based AC methods, no systematic comparison between them has been performed so far. The aim of this work was to study the different performance obtained by some of the recent methods presented in the literature. To perform such a comparison, we focused on [{sup 18}F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/MRI neurodegenerative dementing disorders, which are known to exhibit reduced levels of glucose metabolism in certain brain regions. Four novel methods were used to calculate μ-maps from MRI data of 15 patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD). The methods cover two atlas-based methods, a segmentation method, and a hybrid template/segmentation method. Additionally, the Dixon-based and a UTE-based method, offered by a vendor, were included in the comparison. Performance was assessed at three levels: tissue identification accuracy in the μ-map, quantitative accuracy of reconstructed PET data in specific brain regions, and precision in diagnostic images at identifying hypometabolic areas. Quantitative regional errors of -20-10 % were obtained using the vendor's AC methods, whereas the novel methods produced errors in a margin of ±5 %. The obtained precision at identifying areas with abnormally low levels of glucose uptake, potentially regions affected by AD, were 62.9 and 79.5 % for the two vendor AC methods, the former ignoring bone and the latter including bone information. The precision increased to 87.5-93.3 % in average for the four new methods, exhibiting similar performances. We confirm that the AC methods based on the Dixon and UTE sequences provided by the vendor are

  20. Application of cine MRI-tagging method to aortic dessection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Kamata, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Kojiro.

    1992-01-01

    For the evaluation of aortic dissection, ECG-gated SE or cine MR imaging has been usually performed. However, detection of slow flow in the false lumen and differentiation between mural thrombus and slow flow are sometimes difficult. Because paradoxical enhancement due to slow blood flow simulates thrombus. We performed cine MR imaging with persaturation tagging, which clearly showed differentiation between thrombus and paradoxical enhancement. We concluded that cine MR imaging with tagging method was useful to evaluate the slow flow and thrombus in the false lumen. (author)

  1. 7 Tesla quantitative hip MRI: T1, T2 and T2* mapping of hip cartilage in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazik, Andrea; Theysohn, Jens M.; Geis, Christina [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Johst, Soeren; Kraff, Oliver [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and applicability of quantitative MR techniques (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T2 mapping, T2* mapping) at 7 T MRI for assessing hip cartilage. Hips of 11 healthy volunteers were examined at 7 T MRI with an 8-channel radiofrequency transmit/receive body coil using multi-echo sequences for T2 and T2* mapping and a dual flip angle gradient-echo sequence before (T1{sub 0}) and after intravenous contrast agent administration (T1{sub Gd}; 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA{sup 2-} followed by 0.5 h of walking and 0.5 h of rest) for dGEMRIC. Relaxation times of cartilage were measured manually in 10 regions of interest. Pearson's correlations between R1{sub delta} = 1/T1{sub Gd} - 1/T1{sub 0} and T1{sub Gd} and between T2 and T2* were calculated. Image quality and the delineation of acetabular and femoral cartilage in the relaxation time maps were evaluated using discrete rating scales. High correlations were found between R1{sub delta} and T1{sub Gd} and between T2 and T2* relaxation times (all p < 0.01). All techniques delivered diagnostic image quality, with best delineation of femoral and acetabular cartilage in the T2* maps (mean 3.2 out of a maximum of 4 points). T1, T2 and T2* mapping of hip cartilage with diagnostic image quality is feasible at 7 T. To perform dGEMRIC at 7 T, pre-contrast T1 mapping can be omitted. (orig.)

  2. An optimized target-field method for MRI transverse biplanar gradient coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Rui; Xu, Jing; Huang, Kefu; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing; Fu, Youyi; Li, Yangjing

    2011-01-01

    Gradient coils are essential components of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. In this paper, we present an optimized target-field method for designing a transverse biplanar gradient coil with high linearity, low inductance and small resistance, which can well satisfy the requirements of permanent-magnet MRI systems. In this new method, the current density is expressed by trigonometric basis functions with unknown coefficients in polar coordinates. Following the standard procedures, we construct an objective function with respect to the total square errors of the magnetic field at all target-field points with the penalty items associated with the stored magnetic energy and the dissipated power. By adjusting the two penalty factors and minimizing the objective function, the appropriate coefficients of the current density are determined. Applying the stream function method to the current density, the specific winding patterns on the planes can be obtained. A novel biplanar gradient coil has been designed using this method to operate in a permanent-magnet MRI system. In order to verify the validity of the proposed approach, the gradient magnetic field generated by the resulted current density has been calculated via the Biot–Savart law. The results have demonstrated the effectiveness and advantage of this proposed method

  3. Automatic MRI Quantifying Methods in Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Cajanus

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: We assessed the value of automated MRI quantification methods in the differential diagnosis of behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD from Alzheimer disease (AD, Lewy body dementia (LBD, and subjective memory complaints (SMC. We also examined the role of the C9ORF72-related genetic status in the differentiation sensitivity. Methods: The MRI scans of 50 patients with bvFTD (17 C9ORF72 expansion carriers were analyzed using 6 quantification methods as follows: voxel-based morphometry (VBM, tensor-based morphometry, volumetry (VOL, manifold learning, grading, and white-matter hyperintensities. Each patient was then individually compared to an independent reference group in order to attain diagnostic suggestions. Results: Only VBM and VOL showed utility in correctly identifying bvFTD from our set of data. The overall classification sensitivity of bvFTD with VOL + VBM achieved a total sensitivity of 60%. Using VOL + VBM, 32% were misclassified as having LBD. There was a trend of higher values for classification sensitivity of the C9ORF72 expansion carriers than noncarriers. Conclusion: VOL, VBM, and their combination are effective in differential diagnostics between bvFTD and AD or SMC. However, MRI atrophy profiles for bvFTD and LBD are too similar for a reliable differentiation with the quantification methods tested in this study.

  4. Automatic segmentation of MRI head images by 3-D region growing method which utilizes edge information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hao; Suzuki, Hidetomo; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a 3-D segmentation method that automatically extracts soft tissue from multi-sliced MRI head images. MRI produces a sequence of two-dimensional (2-D) images which contains three-dimensional (3-D) information of organs. To utilize such information we need effective algorithms to treat 3-D digital images and to extract organs and tissues of interest. We developed a method to extract the brain from MRI images which uses a region growing procedure and integrates information of uniformity of gray levels and information of the presence of edge segments in the local area around the pixel of interest. First we generate a kernel region which is a part of brain tissue by simple thresholding. Then we grow the region by means of a region growing algorithm under the control of 3-D edge existence to obtain the region of the brain. Our method is rather simple because it uses basic 3-D image processing techniques like spatial difference. It is robust for variation of gray levels inside a tissue since it also refers to the edge information in the process of region growing. Therefore, the method is flexible enough to be applicable to the segmentation of other images including soft tissues which have complicated shapes and fluctuation in gray levels. (author)

  5. Multiparametric MRI of the prostate. Method for early detection of prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Current approaches for the early detection of prostate cancer are controversially discussed because the disease is characterized by a high incidence rate with a relatively low morbidity rate, availability of only limited prognostic markers, and continued therapy-related morbidity. Conventional morphological MRI does not play a role in early detection since small tumor foci cannot be delineated. However, if there is clinical suspicion for prostate cancer, multiparametric MRI is currently the most accurate method for detecting and characterizing suspicious lesions in the prostate. The potential to identify the so-called 'index lesion', i.e., the tumor area that is most aggressive and determines treatment, is particularly important. This information can increase the accuracy of prostate biopsy and serve as a biomarker for follow-up during active surveillance. The method may considerably contribute to the urgently required separation of clinically significant from clinically insignificant prostate cancers. (orig.)

  6. Signal to noise comparison of metabolic imaging methods on a clinical 3T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, C. A.; Hansen, Rie Beck; Skinner, J. G.

    MRI with hyperpolarized tracers has enabled new diagnostic applications, e.g. metabolic imaging in cancer research. However, the acquisition of the transient, hyperpolarized signal with spatial and frequency resolution requires dedicated imaging methods. Here, we compare three promising candidate...... for 2D MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI): (i) multi-echo balanced steady-state free precession (me-bSSFP), 1,2 (ii) echo planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) sequence and (iii) phase-encoded, pulseacquisition chemical-shift imaging (CSI)...

  7. Supervised methods for detection and segmentation of tissues in clinical lumbar MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2014-10-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is widely prevalent all over the world and more than 80% of the people suffer from LBP at some point of their lives. Moreover, a shortage of radiologists is the most pressing cause for the need of CAD (computer-aided diagnosis) systems. Automatic localization and labeling of intervertebral discs from lumbar MRI is the first step towards computer-aided diagnosis of lower back ailments. Subsequently, for diagnosis and characterization (quantification and localization) of abnormalities like disc herniation and stenosis, a completely automatic segmentation of intervertebral discs and the dural sac is extremely important. Contribution of this paper towards clinical CAD systems is two-fold. First, we propose a method to automatically detect all visible intervertebral discs in clinical sagittal MRI using heuristics and machine learning techniques. We provide a novel end-to-end framework that outputs a tight bounding box for each disc, instead of simply marking the centroid of discs, as has been the trend in the recent past. Second, we propose a method to simultaneously segment all the tissues (vertebrae, intervertebral disc, dural sac and background) in a lumbar sagittal MRI, using an auto-context approach instead of any explicit shape features or models. Past work tackles the lumbar segmentation problem on a tissue/organ basis, and which tend to perform poorly in clinical scans due to high variability in appearance. We, on the other hand, train a series of robust classifiers (random forests) using image features and sparsely sampled context features, which implicitly represent the shape and configuration of the image. Both these methods have been tested on a huge clinical dataset comprising of 212 cases and show very promising results for both disc detection (98% disc localization accuracy and 2.08mm mean deviation) and sagittal MRI segmentation (dice similarity indices of 0.87 and 0.84 for the dural sac and the inter-vertebral disc, respectively

  8. Corticospinal MRI tractography in space-occupying brain lesions by diffusion tensor and kurtosis imaging methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leote, Joao [epartment of Neurosurgery, Hospital Garcia de Orta, Almada (Portugal); Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, Rita; Cerqueira, Luis; Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-05-18

    Recently, DKI-based tractography has been developed, showing improved crossing-fiber resolution in comparison to deterministic DTI-based tractography in healthy subjects. In this work, DTI and DKI-based tractography methods were compared regarding the assessment of the corticospinal tract in patients presenting space-occupying brain lesions near cortical motor areas. Nine patients (4 males) aged 23 to 62 years old, with space-occupying brain lesions (e.g. tumors) were studied for pre-surgical planning using a 1.5T MRI scanner and a 12-channel head coil. In 5 patients diffusion data was acquired along 64 directions and in 4 patients along 32 directions both with b-values 0, 1000 and 2000 s/mm2. Corticospinal tracts were estimated using deterministic DTI and DKI methods and also using probabilistic DTI. The superior cerebellar peduncles and the motor cortical areas, ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesions, were used as seed regions-of-interest for fiber tracking. Tracts courses and volumes were documented and compared between methods. Results showed that it was possible to estimate fiber tracts using deterministic DTI and DKI methods in 8/9 patients, and using the probabilistic DTI method in all patients. Overall, it was observed that DKI-based tractography showed more voluminous fiber tracts than when using deterministic DTI. The DKI method also showed curvilinear fibers mainly above lesions margins, which were not visible with deterministic DTI in 5 patients. Similar tracts were observed when using probabilistic DTI in 3 of those patients. Results suggest that the DKI method contribute with additional information about the corticospinal tract course in comparison with the DTI method, especially with subcortical lesions and near lesions’ margins. Therefore, this study suggests that DKI-based tractography could be useful in MRI and hybrid PET-MRI pre-surgical planning protocols for improved corticospinal tract evaluation.

  9. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  10. MRI with intrathecal MRI gadolinium contrast medium administration: a possible method to assess glymphatic function in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Ringstad, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the “glymphatic system” of the brain has been discovered in rodents, which is a paravascular, transparenchymal route for clearance of excess brain metabolites and distribution of compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid. It has already been demonstrated that intrathecally administered gadolinium (Gd) contrast medium distributes along this route in rats, but so far not in humans. A 27-year-old woman underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intrathecal administration of gadobutrol, which distributed throughout her entire brain after 1 and 4.5 h. MRI with intrathecal Gd may become a tool to study glymphatic function in the human brain

  11. MRI with intrathecal MRI gadolinium contrast medium administration: a possible method to assess glymphatic function in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Ringstad, Geir

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the "glymphatic system" of the brain has been discovered in rodents, which is a paravascular, transparenchymal route for clearance of excess brain metabolites and distribution of compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid. It has already been demonstrated that intrathecally administered gadolinium (Gd) contrast medium distributes along this route in rats, but so far not in humans. A 27-year-old woman underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intrathecal administration of gadobutrol, which distributed throughout her entire brain after 1 and 4.5 h. MRI with intrathecal Gd may become a tool to study glymphatic function in the human brain.

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  13. 3D MRI of the colon: methods and first results of 5 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luboldt, W.; Bauerfeind, P.; Pelkonen, P.; Steiner, P.; Krestin, G.P.; Debatin, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: 'Exoscopic' and endoscopic identification of colorectal pathologies via MRI. Methods: 5 patients (36-88 years), two normal and three with different colorectal pathologies (diverticular disease, polyps and carcinoma of the colon), were examined by MRI after colonoscopy. Subsequent to filling of the colon with a gadolinium-water mixture under MRI-monitoring, 3D-data sets of the colon were acquired in prone and supine positions over a 28 sec breathold interval. Subsequently multiplanar T 1 -weighted 2D-sequences were acquired before and following i.v. administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg BW). All imaging was performed in the coronal orientation. The 3D-data were interactively analysed based on various displays: Maximum intensity projection (MIP), surface shadowed display (SSD), multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), virtual colonoscopy (VC). Results: All of the colorectal pathologies could be interactively diagnosed by MPR. On MIP images some pathologies were missed. VC presented the morphology of colon haustra as well as of all endoluminally growing lesions in a manner similar to endoscopy. The colon masses showed uptake of contrast media and could thus be differentiated from air or faeces. (orig./AJ) [de

  14. Hybrid ICA-Seed-Based Methods for fMRI Functional Connectivity Assessment: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain functional connectivity (FC is often assessed from fMRI data using seed-based methods, such as those of detecting temporal correlation between a predefined region (seed and all other regions in the brain; or using multivariate methods, such as independent component analysis (ICA. ICA is a useful data-driven tool, but reproducibility issues complicate group inferences based on FC maps derived with ICA. These reproducibility issues can be circumvented with hybrid methods that use information from ICA-derived spatial maps as seeds to produce seed-based FC maps. We report results from five experiments to demonstrate the potential advantages of hybrid ICA-seed-based FC methods, comparing results from regressing fMRI data against task-related a priori time courses, with “back-reconstruction” from a group ICA, and with five hybrid ICA-seed-based FC methods: ROI-based with (1 single-voxel, (2 few-voxel, and (3 many-voxel seed; and dual-regression-based with (4 single ICA map and (5 multiple ICA map seed.

  15. Efficient method to design RF pulses for parallel excitation MRI using gridding and conjugate gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuo; Ji, Jim

    2014-04-01

    Parallel excitation (pTx) techniques with multiple transmit channels have been widely used in high field MRI imaging to shorten the RF pulse duration and/or reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR). However, the efficiency of pulse design still needs substantial improvement for practical real-time applications. In this paper, we present a detailed description of a fast pulse design method with Fourier domain gridding and a conjugate gradient method. Simulation results of the proposed method show that the proposed method can design pTx pulses at an efficiency 10 times higher than that of the conventional conjugate-gradient based method, without reducing the accuracy of the desirable excitation patterns.

  16. A brain MRI bias field correction method created in the Gaussian multi-scale space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Qin, Mingxin

    2017-07-01

    A pre-processing step is needed to correct for the bias field signal before submitting corrupted MR images to such image-processing algorithms. This study presents a new bias field correction method. The method creates a Gaussian multi-scale space by the convolution of the inhomogeneous MR image with a two-dimensional Gaussian function. In the multi-Gaussian space, the method retrieves the image details from the differentiation of the original image and convolution image. Then, it obtains an image whose inhomogeneity is eliminated by the weighted sum of image details in each layer in the space. Next, the bias field-corrected MR image is retrieved after the Υ correction, which enhances the contrast and brightness of the inhomogeneity-eliminated MR image. We have tested the approach on T1 MRI and T2 MRI with varying bias field levels and have achieved satisfactory results. Comparison experiments with popular software have demonstrated superior performance of the proposed method in terms of quantitative indices, especially an improvement in subsequent image segmentation.

  17. Using multivariate machine learning methods and structural MRI to classify childhood onset schizophrenia and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna eGreenstein

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multivariate machine learning methods can be used to classify groups of schizophrenia patients and controls using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. However, machine learning methods to date have not been extended beyond classification and contemporaneously applied in a meaningful way to clinical measures. We hypothesized that brain measures would classify groups, and that increased likelihood of being classified as a patient using regional brain measures would be positively related to illness severity, developmental delays and genetic risk. Methods: Using 74 anatomic brain MRI sub regions and Random Forest, we classified 98 COS patients and 99 age, sex, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. We also used Random Forest to determine the likelihood of being classified as a schizophrenia patient based on MRI measures. We then explored relationships between brain-based probability of illness and symptoms, premorbid development, and presence of copy number variation associated with schizophrenia. Results: Brain regions jointly classified COS and control groups with 73.7% accuracy. Greater brain-based probability of illness was associated with worse functioning (p= 0.0004 and fewer developmental delays (p=0.02. Presence of copy number variation (CNV was associated with lower probability of being classified as schizophrenia (p=0.001. The regions that were most important in classifying groups included left temporal lobes, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal regions, and left medial parietal lobes. Conclusions: Schizophrenia and control groups can be well classified using Random Forest and anatomic brain measures, and brain-based probability of illness has a positive relationship with illness severity and a negative relationship with developmental delays/problems and CNV-based risk.

  18. A Hybrid Machine Learning Method for Fusing fMRI and Genetic Data: Combining both Improves Classification of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghui Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a hybrid machine learning method to classify schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data. The method consists of four stages: (1 SNPs with the most discriminating information between the healthy controls and schizophrenia patients are selected to construct a support vector machine ensemble (SNP-SVME. (2 Voxels in the fMRI map contributing to classification are selected to build another SVME (Voxel-SVME. (3 Components of fMRI activation obtained with independent component analysis (ICA are used to construct a single SVM classifier (ICA-SVMC. (4 The above three models are combined into a single module using a majority voting approach to make a final decision (Combined SNP-fMRI. The method was evaluated by a fully-validated leave-one-out method using 40 subjects (20 patients and 20 controls. The classification accuracy was: 0.74 for SNP-SVME, 0.82 for Voxel-SVME, 0.83 for ICA-SVMC, and 0.87 for Combined SNP-fMRI. Experimental results show that better classification accuracy was achieved by combining genetic and fMRI data than using either alone, indicating that genetic and brain function representing different, but partially complementary aspects, of schizophrenia etiopathology. This study suggests an effective way to reassess biological classification of individuals with schizophrenia, which is also potentially useful for identifying diagnostically important markers for the disorder.

  19. TU-AB-BRA-09: A Novel Method of Generating Ultrafast Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Using Prior 4D-MRI and On-Board Phase-Skipped Encoding Acquisition for Radiotherapy Target Localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C; Yin, F; Harris, W; Cai, J; Chang, Z; Ren, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a technique generating ultrafast on-board VC-MRI using prior 4D-MRI and on-board phase-skipped encoding k-space acquisition for real-time 3D target tracking of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-of-expiration (EOE) volume in 4D-MRI acquired during the simulation was selected as the prior volume. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns were extracted through the principal component analysis of the deformation field maps (DFMs) generated between EOE and all other phases. The on-board VC-MRI at each instant was considered as a deformation of the prior volume, and the deformation was modeled as a linear combination of the extracted 3 major deformation patterns. To solve the weighting coefficients of the 3 major patterns, a 2D slice was extracted from VC-MRI volume to match with the 2D on-board sampling data, which was generated by 8-fold phase skipped-encoding k-space acquisition (i.e., sample 1 phase-encoding line out of every 8 lines) to achieve an ultrafast 16–24 volumes/s frame rate. The method was evaluated using XCAT digital phantom to simulate lung cancer patients. The 3D volume of end-ofinhalation (EOI) phase at the treatment day was used as ground-truth onboard VC-MRI with simulated changes in 1) breathing amplitude and 2) breathing amplitude/phase change from the simulation day. A liver cancer patient case was evaluated for in-vivo feasibility demonstration. Results: The comparison between ground truth and estimated on-board VC-MRI shows good agreements. In XCAT study with changed breathing amplitude, the volume-percent-difference(VPD) between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes at EOI was 6.28% and the Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS) was 0.82mm; with changed breathing amplitude and phase, the VPD was 8.50% and the COMS was 0.54mm. The study of liver patient case also demonstrated a promising in vivo feasibility of the proposed method Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest the feasibility to estimate ultrafast VC-MRI for on

  20. TU-AB-BRA-09: A Novel Method of Generating Ultrafast Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Using Prior 4D-MRI and On-Board Phase-Skipped Encoding Acquisition for Radiotherapy Target Localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C; Yin, F; Harris, W; Cai, J; Chang, Z; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique generating ultrafast on-board VC-MRI using prior 4D-MRI and on-board phase-skipped encoding k-space acquisition for real-time 3D target tracking of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-of-expiration (EOE) volume in 4D-MRI acquired during the simulation was selected as the prior volume. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns were extracted through the principal component analysis of the deformation field maps (DFMs) generated between EOE and all other phases. The on-board VC-MRI at each instant was considered as a deformation of the prior volume, and the deformation was modeled as a linear combination of the extracted 3 major deformation patterns. To solve the weighting coefficients of the 3 major patterns, a 2D slice was extracted from VC-MRI volume to match with the 2D on-board sampling data, which was generated by 8-fold phase skipped-encoding k-space acquisition (i.e., sample 1 phase-encoding line out of every 8 lines) to achieve an ultrafast 16–24 volumes/s frame rate. The method was evaluated using XCAT digital phantom to simulate lung cancer patients. The 3D volume of end-ofinhalation (EOI) phase at the treatment day was used as ground-truth onboard VC-MRI with simulated changes in 1) breathing amplitude and 2) breathing amplitude/phase change from the simulation day. A liver cancer patient case was evaluated for in-vivo feasibility demonstration. Results: The comparison between ground truth and estimated on-board VC-MRI shows good agreements. In XCAT study with changed breathing amplitude, the volume-percent-difference(VPD) between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes at EOI was 6.28% and the Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS) was 0.82mm; with changed breathing amplitude and phase, the VPD was 8.50% and the COMS was 0.54mm. The study of liver patient case also demonstrated a promising in vivo feasibility of the proposed method Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest the feasibility to estimate ultrafast VC-MRI for on

  1. Flip-flop method: A new T1-weighted flow-MRI for plants studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buy, Simon; Le Floch, Simon; Tang, Ning; Sidiboulenouar, Rahima; Zanca, Michel; Canadas, Patrick; Nativel, Eric; Cardoso, Maida; Alibert, Eric; Dupont, Guillaume; Ambard, Dominique; Maurel, Christophe; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Bertin, Nadia; Goze-Bac, Christophe; Coillot, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    The climate warming implies an increase of stress of plants (drought and torrential rainfall). The understanding of plant behavior, in this context, takes a major importance and sap flow measurement in plants remains a key issue for plant understanding. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which is well known to be a powerful tool to access water quantity can be used to measure moving water. We describe a novel flow-MRI method which takes advantage of inflow slice sensitivity. The method involves the slice selectivity in the context of multi slice spin echo sequence. Two sequences such as a given slice is consecutively inflow and outflow sensitive are performed, offering the possiblility to perform slow flow sensitive imaging in a quite straigthforward way. The method potential is demonstrated by imaging both a slow flow measurement on a test bench (as low as 10 μm.s-1) and the Poiseuille's profile of xylemian sap flow velocity in the xylematic tissues of a tomato plant stem.

  2. Utility of the 3D GRE method in the female pelvic area with 3T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Hiroki; Terada, Masaki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Anma, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    A high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be obtained in three-Tesla (3T) MRI, and it is possible to use it to shorten imaging time and improve spatial resolution. However, reports of its disadvantages have been increasing. We attempted to describe a high-resolution evaluation image that made the best use of a decrease in specific absorption rate (SAR) and high SNR by using the LAVA (liver acquisition with volume acceleration) method, a kind of three-dimensional GRE (3D gradient echo) method that did not show the above-mentioned disadvantage in obtaining a shadow inspection of the female pelvic area with 3T MRI. A 0.8 mm isovoxel image of excellent SNR could be obtained within about one and one-half minutes by using the LAVA method as a result of the examination. Moreover, a SAR that was problematic with the 3T MR device was able to be decreased, and was useful. (author)

  3. An accurate segmentation method for volumetry of brain tumor in 3D MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiahui; Li, Qiang; Hirai, Toshinori; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    Accurate volumetry of brain tumors in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is important for evaluating the interval changes in tumor volumes during and after treatment, and also for planning of radiation therapy. In this study, an automated volumetry method for brain tumors in MRI was developed by use of a new three-dimensional (3-D) image segmentation technique. First, the central location of a tumor was identified by a radiologist, and then a volume of interest (VOI) was determined automatically. To substantially simplify tumor segmentation, we transformed the 3-D image of the tumor into a two-dimensional (2-D) image by use of a "spiral-scanning" technique, in which a radial line originating from the center of the tumor scanned the 3-D image spirally from the "north pole" to the "south pole". The voxels scanned by the radial line provided a transformed 2-D image. We employed dynamic programming to delineate an "optimal" outline of the tumor in the transformed 2-D image. We then transformed the optimal outline back into 3-D image space to determine the volume of the tumor. The volumetry method was trained and evaluated by use of 16 cases with 35 brain tumors. The agreement between tumor volumes provided by computer and a radiologist was employed as a performance metric. Our method provided relatively accurate results with a mean agreement value of 88%.

  4. Comparative analysis of methods for extracting vessel network on breast MRI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaizer, Bence T.; Vassiou, Katerina G.; Lavdas, Eleftherios; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L.; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V.; Glotsos, Dimitris T.

    2017-11-01

    Digital processing of MRI images aims to provide an automatized diagnostic evaluation of regular health screenings. Cancerous lesions are proven to cause an alteration in the vessel structure of the diseased organ. Currently there are several methods used for extraction of the vessel network in order to quantify its properties. In this work MRI images (Signa HDx 3.0T, GE Healthcare, courtesy of University Hospital of Larissa) of 30 female breasts were subjected to three different vessel extraction algorithms to determine the location of their vascular network. The first method is an experiment to build a graph over known points of the vessel network; the second algorithm aims to determine the direction and diameter of vessels at these points; the third approach is a seed growing algorithm, spreading selection to neighbors of the known vessel pixels. The possibilities shown by the different methods were analyzed, and quantitative measurements were performed. The data provided by these measurements showed no clear correlation with the presence or malignancy of tumors, based on the radiological diagnosis of skilled physicians.

  5. Brain tumor segmentation in MRI by using the fuzzy connectedness method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Hackney, David; Moonis, Gul

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this paper is the precise and accurate quantification of brain tumor via MRI. This is very useful in evaluating disease progression, response to therapy, and the need for changes in treatment plans. We use multiple MRI protocols including FLAIR, T1, and T1 with Gd enhancement to gather information about different aspects of the tumor and its vicinity- edema, active regions, and scar left over due to surgical intervention. We have adapted the fuzzy connectedness framework to segment tumor and to measure its volume. The method requires only limited user interaction in routine clinical MRI. The first step in the process is to apply an intensity normalization method to the images so that the same body region has the same tissue meaning independent of the scanner and patient. Subsequently, a fuzzy connectedness algorithm is utilized to segment the different aspects of the tumor. The system has been tested, for its precision, accuracy, and efficiency, utilizing 40 patient studies. The percent coefficient of variation (% CV) in volume due to operator subjectivity in specifying seeds for fuzzy connectedness segmentation is less than 1%. The mean operator and computer time taken per study is 3 minutes. The package is designed to run under operator supervision. Delineation has been found to agree with the operators' visual inspection most of the time except in some cases when the tumor is close to the boundary of the brain. In the latter case, the scalp is included in the delineation and an operator has to exclude this manually. The methodology is rapid, robust, consistent, yielding highly reproducible measurements, and is likely to become part of the routine evaluation of brain tumor patients in our health system.

  6. A Method for Manufacturing Oncological Phantoms for the Quantification of 18F-FDG PET and DW-MRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gallivanone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a method to manufacture oncological phantoms for quantitation purposes in 18F-FDG PET and DW-MRI studies. Radioactive and diffusion materials were prepared using a mixture of agarose and sucrose radioactive gels. T2 relaxation and diffusion properties of gels at different sucrose concentrations were evaluated. Realistic oncological lesions were created using 3D-printed plastic molds filled with the gel mixture. Once solidified, gels were extracted from molds and immersed in a low-radioactivity gel simulating normal background tissue. A breast cancer phantom was manufactured using the proposed method as an exploratory feasibility study, including several realistic oncological configurations in terms of both radioactivity and diffusion. The phantom was acquired in PET with 18F-FDG, immediately after solidification, and in DW-MRI the following day. Functional volumes characterizing the simulated BC lesions were segmented from PET and DW-MRI images. Measured radioactive uptake and ADC values were compared with gold standards. Phantom preparation was straightforward, and the time schedule was compatible with both PET and MRI measurements. Lesions appeared on 18F-FDG PET and DW-MRI images as expected, without visible artifacts. Lesion functional parameters revealed the phantom’s potential for validating quantification methods, in particular for new generation hybrid PET-MRI systems.

  7. A novel method to assess pial collateralization from stroke perfusion MRI: subdividing Tmax into anatomical compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potreck, Arne; Seker, Fatih; Hoffmann, Angelika; Pfaff, Johannes; Bendszus, Martin; Heiland, Sabine; Pham, Mirko; Nagel, Simon

    2017-01-01

    To develop and validate a quantitative and observer-independent method to evaluate pial collateral circulation by DSC-perfusion MRI and test whether this novel method delivers diagnostic information which is redundant to or independent from conventional penumbra imaging by the mismatch approach. We retrospectively identified 47 patients with M1 occlusion who underwent MR diffusion/perfusion imaging and mechanical thrombectomy at our facility. By automated registration and segmentation, T max delays were attributed specifically to the pial, cortical and parenchymal compartments. The resulting pial volumes at delay were defined as the pial T max map-assessed collateral score (TMACS) and correlated with gold standard digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Mismatch ratio was assessed by conventional penumbra defining MRI criteria. Strong correlation was found between TMACS and angiographically assessed collateral score (Pearson ρ = -0.74, p < 0.001). In multiple logistic regression, both good collaterals according to TMACS [OR 4.3 (1.1-19, p = 0.04)] and mismatch ratio ≥ 3.5 [OR 12.3 (1.88-249, p = 0.03)] were independent predictors of favourable clinical outcome. Perfusion delay in the pial compartment, as evaluated by TMACS, closely reflects the extent of pial collaterals in gold-standard DSA. TMACS and mismatch ratio were found to be complementary predictors of a favourable clinical outcome, each adding independent predictive information. (orig.)

  8. A novel integrative method for analyzing eye and hand behaviour during reaching and grasping in an MRI environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jane M; Abhari, Kamyar; Prime, Steven L; Meek, Benjamin P; Desanghere, Loni; Baugh, Lee A; Marotta, Jonathan J

    2011-06-01

    The development of noninvasive neuroimaging techniques, such as fMRI, has rapidly advanced our understanding of the neural systems underlying the integration of visual and motor information. However, the fMRI experimental design is restricted by several environmental elements, such as the presence of the magnetic field and the restricted view of the participant, making it difficult to monitor and measure behaviour. The present article describes a novel, specialized software package developed in our laboratory called Biometric Integration Recording and Analysis (BIRA). BIRA integrates video with kinematic data derived from the hand and eye, acquired using MRI-compatible equipment. The present article demonstrates the acquisition and analysis of eye and hand data using BIRA in a mock (0 Tesla) scanner. A method for collecting and integrating gaze and kinematic data in fMRI studies on visuomotor behaviour has several advantages: Specifically, it will allow for more sophisticated, behaviourally driven analyses and eliminate potential confounds of gaze or kinematic data.

  9. MRI definition of target volumes using fuzzy logic method for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; Vial, Stephane; Gibon, David; Kulik, Carine; Fournier, Charles; Castelain, Bernard; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Rousseau, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) volume determination is one of the most important problems in conformal radiation therapy. Techniques of volume determination from tomographic medical imaging are usually based on two-dimensional (2D) contour definition with the result dependent on the segmentation method used, as well as on the user's manual procedure. The goal of this work is to describe and evaluate a new method that reduces the inaccuracies generally observed in the 2D contour definition and 3D volume reconstruction process. Methods and Materials: This new method has been developed by integrating the fuzziness in the 3D volume definition. It first defines semiautomatically a minimal 2D contour on each slice that definitely contains the volume and a maximal 2D contour that definitely does not contain the volume. The fuzziness region in between is processed using possibility functions in possibility theory. A volume of voxels, including the membership degree to the target volume, is then created on each slice axis, taking into account the slice position and slice profile. A resulting fuzzy volume is obtained after data fusion between multiorientation slices. Different studies have been designed to evaluate and compare this new method of target volume reconstruction and a classical reconstruction method. First, target definition accuracy and robustness were studied on phantom targets. Second, intra- and interobserver variations were studied on radiosurgery clinical cases. Results: The absolute volume errors are less than or equal to 1.5% for phantom volumes calculated by the fuzzy logic method, whereas the values obtained with the classical method are much larger than the actual volumes (absolute volume errors up to 72%). With increasing MRI slice thickness (1 mm to 8 mm), the phantom volumes calculated by the classical method are increasing exponentially with a maximum absolute error up to 300%. In contrast, the absolute volume errors are less than 12% for phantom

  10. Direct Patlak Reconstruction From Dynamic PET Data Using the Kernel Method With MRI Information Based on Structural Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kuang; Cheng-Liao, Jinxiu; Wang, Guobao; Chen, Kevin T; Catana, Ciprian; Qi, Jinyi

    2018-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a functional imaging modality widely used in oncology, cardiology, and neuroscience. It is highly sensitive, but suffers from relatively poor spatial resolution, as compared with anatomical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With the recent development of combined PET/MR systems, we can improve the PET image quality by incorporating MR information into image reconstruction. Previously, kernel learning has been successfully embedded into static and dynamic PET image reconstruction using either PET temporal or MRI information. Here, we combine both PET temporal and MRI information adaptively to improve the quality of direct Patlak reconstruction. We examined different approaches to combine the PET and MRI information in kernel learning to address the issue of potential mismatches between MRI and PET signals. Computer simulations and hybrid real-patient data acquired on a simultaneous PET/MR scanner were used to evaluate the proposed methods. Results show that the method that combines PET temporal information and MRI spatial information adaptively based on the structure similarity index has the best performance in terms of noise reduction and resolution improvement.

  11. A new integrated dual time-point amyloid PET/MRI data analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchin, Diego; Zucchetta, Pietro; Turco, Paolo; Bui, Franco [University Hospital of Padua, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine - DIMED, Padua (Italy); Barthel, Henryk; Tiepolt, Solveig; Sabri, Osama [Leipzig University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Poggiali, Davide; Cagnin, Annachiara; Gallo, Paolo [University Hospital of Padua, Neurology, Department of Neurosciences (DNS), Padua (Italy); Frigo, Anna Chiara [University Hospital of Padua, Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Public Health Unit, Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, Padua (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    In the initial evaluation of patients with suspected dementia and Alzheimer's disease, there is no consensus on how to perform semiquantification of amyloid in such a way that it: (1) facilitates visual qualitative interpretation, (2) takes the kinetic behaviour of the tracer into consideration particularly with regard to at least partially correcting for blood flow dependence, (3) analyses the amyloid load based on accurate parcellation of cortical and subcortical areas, (4) includes partial volume effect correction (PVEC), (5) includes MRI-derived topographical indexes, (6) enables application to PET/MRI images and PET/CT images with separately acquired MR images, and (7) allows automation. A method with all of these characteristics was retrospectively tested in 86 subjects who underwent amyloid ({sup 18}F-florbetaben) PET/MRI in a clinical setting (using images acquired 90-110 min after injection, 53 were classified visually as amyloid-negative and 33 as amyloid-positive). Early images after tracer administration were acquired between 0 and 10 min after injection, and later images were acquired between 90 and 110 min after injection. PVEC of the PET data was carried out using the geometric transfer matrix method. Parametric images and some regional output parameters, including two innovative ''dual time-point'' indexes, were obtained. Subjects classified visually as amyloid-positive showed a sparse tracer uptake in the primary sensory, motor and visual areas in accordance with the isocortical stage of the topographic distribution of the amyloid plaque (Braak stages V/VI). In patients classified visually as amyloid-negative, the method revealed detectable levels of tracer uptake in the basal portions of the frontal and temporal lobes, areas that are known to be sites of early deposition of amyloid plaques that probably represented early accumulation (Braak stage A) that is typical of normal ageing. There was a strong correlation between

  12. A new integrated dual time-point amyloid PET/MRI data analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchin, Diego; Zucchetta, Pietro; Turco, Paolo; Bui, Franco; Barthel, Henryk; Tiepolt, Solveig; Sabri, Osama; Poggiali, Davide; Cagnin, Annachiara; Gallo, Paolo; Frigo, Anna Chiara

    2017-01-01

    In the initial evaluation of patients with suspected dementia and Alzheimer's disease, there is no consensus on how to perform semiquantification of amyloid in such a way that it: (1) facilitates visual qualitative interpretation, (2) takes the kinetic behaviour of the tracer into consideration particularly with regard to at least partially correcting for blood flow dependence, (3) analyses the amyloid load based on accurate parcellation of cortical and subcortical areas, (4) includes partial volume effect correction (PVEC), (5) includes MRI-derived topographical indexes, (6) enables application to PET/MRI images and PET/CT images with separately acquired MR images, and (7) allows automation. A method with all of these characteristics was retrospectively tested in 86 subjects who underwent amyloid ( 18 F-florbetaben) PET/MRI in a clinical setting (using images acquired 90-110 min after injection, 53 were classified visually as amyloid-negative and 33 as amyloid-positive). Early images after tracer administration were acquired between 0 and 10 min after injection, and later images were acquired between 90 and 110 min after injection. PVEC of the PET data was carried out using the geometric transfer matrix method. Parametric images and some regional output parameters, including two innovative ''dual time-point'' indexes, were obtained. Subjects classified visually as amyloid-positive showed a sparse tracer uptake in the primary sensory, motor and visual areas in accordance with the isocortical stage of the topographic distribution of the amyloid plaque (Braak stages V/VI). In patients classified visually as amyloid-negative, the method revealed detectable levels of tracer uptake in the basal portions of the frontal and temporal lobes, areas that are known to be sites of early deposition of amyloid plaques that probably represented early accumulation (Braak stage A) that is typical of normal ageing. There was a strong correlation between age

  13. Research for correction pre-operative MRI images of brain during operation using particle method simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shino, Ryosaku; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Sakai, Mikio; Ito, Hirotaka; Iseki, Hiroshi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    In the neurosurgical procedures, surgeon formulates a surgery plan based on pre-operative images such as MRI. However, the brain is transformed by removal of the affected area. In this paper, we propose a method for reconstructing pre-operative images involving the deformation with physical simulation. First, the domain of brain is identified in pre-operative images. Second, we create particles for physical simulation. Then, we carry out the linear elastic simulation taking into account the gravity. Finally, we reconstruct pre-operative images with deformation according to movement of the particles. We show the effectiveness of this method by reconstructing the pre-operative image actually taken before surgery. (author)

  14. A method for independent component graph analysis of resting-state fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Paula, Demetrius Ribeiro; Ziegler, Erik; Abeyasinghe, Pubuditha M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Independent component analysis (ICA) has been extensively used for reducing task-free BOLD fMRI recordings into spatial maps and their associated time-courses. The spatially identified independent components can be considered as intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) of non-contiguou......Introduction Independent component analysis (ICA) has been extensively used for reducing task-free BOLD fMRI recordings into spatial maps and their associated time-courses. The spatially identified independent components can be considered as intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) of non......-contiguous regions. To date, the spatial patterns of the networks have been analyzed with techniques developed for volumetric data. Objective Here, we detail a graph building technique that allows these ICNs to be analyzed with graph theory. Methods First, ICA was performed at the single-subject level in 15 healthy...... parcellated regions. Third, between-node functional connectivity was established by building edge weights for each networks. Group-level graph analysis was finally performed for each network and compared to the classical network. Results Network graph comparison between the classically constructed network...

  15. FY1995 report on the novel methods for magnetic resonance imaging; 1995 nendo senshin MRI gazoka shuho no kiso kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop new 2-dimensional ultrafast MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) methods for the Image Guided Cancer Therapy (IGT) and the non-invasive clinical diagnosis. We have developed two MRI methods. They can reconstruct a two dimensional image by only a RF excitation and slow changing of gradient fields. This paper describes theoretically how to apply the RF wave and the gradient in x, y and z direction, respectively. Echo signals are acquired under multi-frequency resonance. The frequency bandwidth of the RF wave adjusts the field of view (FOV) of the imaging plane. Biological effects of the applied RF wave was evaluated by the brain microdialysis. In animal experiments, these was not significant change of neurotransmitters subject to the RF wave. From these theoretical and experimental results, these MRI methods are applicable to IGT and the clinical diagnosis for the cancer and other diseases. (NEDO)

  16. An automated method for mapping human tissue permittivities by MRI in hyperthermia treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Paolo; Antolini, Renzo; Pontalti, Rolando; Cristoforetti, Luca; Scarpa, Marina

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic method to obtain tissue complex permittivity values to be used as input data in the computer modelling for hyperthermia treatment planning. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired and the tissue water content was calculated from the signal intensity of the image pixels. The tissue water content was converted into complex permittivity values by monotonic functions based on mixture theory. To obtain a water content map by MR imaging a gradient-echo pulse sequence was used and an experimental procedure was set up to correct for relaxation and radiofrequency field inhomogeneity effects on signal intensity. Two approaches were followed to assign the permittivity values to fat-rich tissues: (i) fat-rich tissue localization by a segmentation procedure followed by assignment of tabulated permittivity values; (ii) water content evaluation by chemical shift imaging followed by permittivity calculation. Tests were performed on phantoms of known water content to establish the reliability of the proposed method. MRI data were acquired and processed pixel-by-pixel according to the outlined procedure. The signal intensity in the phantom images correlated well with water content. Experiments were performed on volunteers' healthy tissue. In particular two anatomical structures were chosen to calculate permittivity maps: the head and the thigh. The water content and electric permittivity values were obtained from the MRI data and compared to others in the literature. A good agreement was found for muscle, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and white and grey matter. The advantages of the reported method are discussed in the light of possible application in hyperthermia treatment planning. (author)

  17. An automated method for mapping human tissue permittivities by MRI in hyperthermia treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Antolini, Renzo [CMBM-ITC, Centro Materiali e Biofisica Medica, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Pontalti, Rolando; Cristoforetti, Luca [CMBM-ITC, Centro Materiali e Biofisica Medica, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Scarpa, Marina [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy)

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an automatic method to obtain tissue complex permittivity values to be used as input data in the computer modelling for hyperthermia treatment planning. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired and the tissue water content was calculated from the signal intensity of the image pixels. The tissue water content was converted into complex permittivity values by monotonic functions based on mixture theory. To obtain a water content map by MR imaging a gradient-echo pulse sequence was used and an experimental procedure was set up to correct for relaxation and radiofrequency field inhomogeneity effects on signal intensity. Two approaches were followed to assign the permittivity values to fat-rich tissues: (i) fat-rich tissue localization by a segmentation procedure followed by assignment of tabulated permittivity values; (ii) water content evaluation by chemical shift imaging followed by permittivity calculation. Tests were performed on phantoms of known water content to establish the reliability of the proposed method. MRI data were acquired and processed pixel-by-pixel according to the outlined procedure. The signal intensity in the phantom images correlated well with water content. Experiments were performed on volunteers' healthy tissue. In particular two anatomical structures were chosen to calculate permittivity maps: the head and the thigh. The water content and electric permittivity values were obtained from the MRI data and compared to others in the literature. A good agreement was found for muscle, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and white and grey matter. The advantages of the reported method are discussed in the light of possible application in hyperthermia treatment planning. (author)

  18. An automated method for mapping human tissue permittivities by MRI in hyperthermia treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, P; Pontalti, R; Cristoforetti, L; Antolini, R; Scarpa, M

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an automatic method to obtain tissue complex permittivity values to be used as input data in the computer modelling for hyperthermia treatment planning. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired and the tissue water content was calculated from the signal intensity of the image pixels. The tissue water content was converted into complex permittivity values by monotonic functions based on mixture theory. To obtain a water content map by MR imaging a gradient-echo pulse sequence was used and an experimental procedure was set up to correct for relaxation and radiofrequency field inhomogeneity effects on signal intensity. Two approaches were followed to assign the permittivity values to fat-rich tissues: (i) fat-rich tissue localization by a segmentation procedure followed by assignment of tabulated permittivity values; (ii) water content evaluation by chemical shift imaging followed by permittivity calculation. Tests were performed on phantoms of known water content to establish the reliability of the proposed method. MRI data were acquired and processed pixel-by-pixel according to the outlined procedure. The signal intensity in the phantom images correlated well with water content. Experiments were performed on volunteers' healthy tissue. In particular two anatomical structures were chosen to calculate permittivity maps: the head and the thigh. The water content and electric permittivity values were obtained from the MRI data and compared to others in the literature. A good agreement was found for muscle, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and white and grey matter. The advantages of the reported method are discussed in the light of possible application in hyperthermia treatment planning.

  19. An automated method for mapping human tissue permittivities by MRI in hyperthermia treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Antolini, Renzo [CMBM-ITC, Centro Materiali e Biofisica Medica, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Pontalti, Rolando; Cristoforetti, Luca [CMBM-ITC, Centro Materiali e Biofisica Medica, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Scarpa, Marina [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy)

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an automatic method to obtain tissue complex permittivity values to be used as input data in the computer modelling for hyperthermia treatment planning. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired and the tissue water content was calculated from the signal intensity of the image pixels. The tissue water content was converted into complex permittivity values by monotonic functions based on mixture theory. To obtain a water content map by MR imaging a gradient-echo pulse sequence was used and an experimental procedure was set up to correct for relaxation and radiofrequency field inhomogeneity effects on signal intensity. Two approaches were followed to assign the permittivity values to fat-rich tissues: (i) fat-rich tissue localization by a segmentation procedure followed by assignment of tabulated permittivity values; (ii) water content evaluation by chemical shift imaging followed by permittivity calculation. Tests were performed on phantoms of known water content to establish the reliability of the proposed method. MRI data were acquired and processed pixel-by-pixel according to the outlined procedure. The signal intensity in the phantom images correlated well with water content. Experiments were performed on volunteers' healthy tissue. In particular two anatomical structures were chosen to calculate permittivity maps: the head and the thigh. The water content and electric permittivity values were obtained from the MRI data and compared to others in the literature. A good agreement was found for muscle, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and white and grey matter. The advantages of the reported method are discussed in the light of possible application in hyperthermia treatment planning. (author)

  20. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  1. A tale of two methods: combining near-infrared spectroscopy with MRI for studies of brain oxygenation and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jeff F; Nathoo, Nabeela; Yang, Runze

    2014-01-01

    Combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) leads to excellent synergies which can improve the interpretation of either method and can provide novel data with respect to measuring brain oxygenation and metabolism. MRI has good spatial resolution, can detect a range of physiological parameters and is sensitive to changes in deoxyhemoglobin content. NIRS has lower spatial resolution, but can detect, and with specific technologies, quantify, deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin and cytochrome oxidase. This paper reviews the application of both methods, as a multimodal technology, for assessing changes in brain oxygenation that may occur with changes in functional activation state or metabolic rate. Examples of hypoxia and ischemia are shown. Data support the concept of reduced metabolic rate resulting from hypoxia/ischemia and that metabolic rate in brain is not close to oxygen limitation during normoxia. We show that multimodal MRI and NIRS can provide novel information for studies of brain metabolism.

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  3. Optimizing methods for linking cinematic features to fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauttonen, Janne; Hlushchuk, Yevhen; Tikka, Pia

    2015-04-15

    One of the challenges of naturalistic neurosciences using movie-viewing experiments is how to interpret observed brain activations in relation to the multiplicity of time-locked stimulus features. As previous studies have shown less inter-subject synchronization across viewers of random video footage than story-driven films, new methods need to be developed for analysis of less story-driven contents. To optimize the linkage between our fMRI data collected during viewing of a deliberately non-narrative silent film 'At Land' by Maya Deren (1944) and its annotated content, we combined the method of elastic-net regularization with the model-driven linear regression and the well-established data-driven independent component analysis (ICA) and inter-subject correlation (ISC) methods. In the linear regression analysis, both IC and region-of-interest (ROI) time-series were fitted with time-series of a total of 36 binary-valued and one real-valued tactile annotation of film features. The elastic-net regularization and cross-validation were applied in the ordinary least-squares linear regression in order to avoid over-fitting due to the multicollinearity of regressors, the results were compared against both the partial least-squares (PLS) regression and the un-regularized full-model regression. Non-parametric permutation testing scheme was applied to evaluate the statistical significance of regression. We found statistically significant correlation between the annotation model and 9 ICs out of 40 ICs. Regression analysis was also repeated for a large set of cubic ROIs covering the grey matter. Both IC- and ROI-based regression analyses revealed activations in parietal and occipital regions, with additional smaller clusters in the frontal lobe. Furthermore, we found elastic-net based regression more sensitive than PLS and un-regularized regression since it detected a larger number of significant ICs and ROIs. Along with the ISC ranking methods, our regression analysis proved

  4. Quantifying diffusion MRI tractography of the corticospinal tract in brain tumors with deterministic and probabilistic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Monica; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Berman, Jeffrey I; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Nguyen, Christopher; Berger, Mitchel S; Henry, Roland G

    2013-01-01

    sensitivity (79%) as determined from cortical IES compared to deterministic q-ball (50%), probabilistic DTI (36%), and deterministic DTI (10%). The sensitivity using the q-ball algorithm (65%) was significantly higher than using DTI (23%) (p probabilistic algorithms (58%) were more sensitive than deterministic approaches (30%) (p = 0.003). Probabilistic q-ball fiber tracks had the smallest offset to the subcortical stimulation sites. The offsets between diffusion fiber tracks and subcortical IES sites were increased significantly for those cases where the diffusion fiber tracks were visibly thinner than expected. There was perfect concordance between the subcortical IES function (e.g. hand stimulation) and the cortical connection of the nearest diffusion fiber track (e.g. upper extremity cortex). This study highlights the tremendous utility of intraoperative stimulation sites to provide a gold standard from which to evaluate diffusion MRI fiber tracking methods and has provided an object standard for evaluation of different diffusion models and approaches to fiber tracking. The probabilistic q-ball fiber tractography was significantly better than DTI methods in terms of sensitivity and accuracy of the course through the white matter. The commonly used DTI fiber tracking approach was shown to have very poor sensitivity (as low as 10% for deterministic DTI fiber tracking) for delineation of the lateral aspects of the corticospinal tract in our study. Effects of the tumor/edema resulted in significantly larger offsets between the subcortical IES and the preoperative fiber tracks. The provided data show that probabilistic HARDI tractography is the most objective and reproducible analysis but given the small sample and number of stimulation points a generalization about our results should be given with caution. Indeed our results inform the capabilities of preoperative diffusion fiber tracking and indicate that such data should be used carefully when making pre-surgical and

  5. A semi-automatic method for developing an anthropomorphic numerical model of dielectric anatomy by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzurana, M; Sandrini, L; Vaccari, A; Malacarne, C; Cristoforetti, L; Pontalti, R

    2003-01-01

    Complex permittivity values have a dominant role in the overall consideration of interaction between radiofrequency electromagnetic fields and living matter, and in related applications such as electromagnetic dosimetry. There are still some concerns about the accuracy of published data and about their variability due to the heterogeneous nature of biological tissues. The aim of this study is to provide an alternative semi-automatic method by which numerical dielectric human models for dosimetric studies can be obtained. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tomography was used to acquire images. A new technique was employed to correct nonuniformities in the images and frequency-dependent transfer functions to correlate image intensity with complex permittivity were used. The proposed method provides frequency-dependent models in which permittivity and conductivity vary with continuity-even in the same tissue-reflecting the intrinsic realistic spatial dispersion of such parameters. The human model is tested with an FDTD (finite difference time domain) algorithm at different frequencies; the results of layer-averaged and whole-body-averaged SAR (specific absorption rate) are compared with published work, and reasonable agreement has been found. Due to the short time needed to obtain a whole body model, this semi-automatic method may be suitable for efficient study of various conditions that can determine large differences in the SAR distribution, such as body shape, posture, fat-to-muscle ratio, height and weight

  6. Materials and methods for higher performance screen-printed flexible MRI receive coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Joseph R; Lechene, P Balthazar; Lustig, Michael; Arias, Ana C

    2017-08-01

    To develop methods for characterizing materials used in screen-printed MRI coils and improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with new lower-loss materials. An experimental apparatus was created to characterize dielectric properties of plastic substrates used in receive coils. Coils were fabricated by screen printing conductive ink onto several plastic substrates. Unloaded and sample loaded quality factor (Q Unloaded /Q Loaded ) measurements and scans on a 3T scanner were used to characterize coil performance. An experimental method was developed to describe the relationship between a coil's Q Unloaded and the SNR it provides in images of a phantom. In addition, 3T scans of a phantom and the head of a volunteer were obtained with a proof-of-concept printed eight-channel array, and the results were compared with a commercial 12-channel array. Printed coils with optimized substrates exhibited up to 97% of the image SNR when compared with a traditional coil on a loading phantom. Q Unloaded and the SNR of coils were successfully correlated. The printed array resulted in images comparable to the quality given by the commercial array. Using the proposed methods and materials, the SNR of printed coils approached that of commercial coils while using a new fabrication technique that provided more flexibility and close contact with the patient's body. Magn Reson Med 78:775-783, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. A primal–dual hybrid gradient method for nonlinear operators with applications to MRI

    KAUST Repository

    Valkonen, Tuomo

    2014-05-01

    We study the solution of minimax problems min xmax yG(x) + K(x), y - F*(y) in finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces. The functionals G and F* we assume to be convex, but the operator K we allow to be nonlinear. We formulate a natural extension of the modified primal-dual hybrid gradient method, originally for linear K, due to Chambolle and Pock. We prove the local convergence of the method, provided various technical conditions are satisfied. These include in particular the Aubin property of the inverse of a monotone operator at the solution. Of particular interest to us is the case arising from Tikhonov type regularization of inverse problems with nonlinear forward operators. Mainly we are interested in total variation and second-order total generalized variation priors. For such problems, we show that our general local convergence result holds when the noise level of the data f is low, and the regularization parameter α is correspondingly small. We verify the numerical performance of the method by applying it to problems from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chemical engineering and medicine. The specific applications are in diffusion tensor imaging and MR velocity imaging. These numerical studies show very promising performance. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. An update on risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis assessed using MRI-based semiquantitative grading methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizai, Hamza [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Radiology, San Antonio, TX (United States); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Hayashi, Daichi [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Crema, Michel D. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Hospital do Coracao and Teleimagem, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Felson, David T. [Boston University School of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston, MA (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Arthroscopy-based semiquantitative scoring systems such as Outerbridge and Noyes' scores were the first to be developed for the purpose of grading cartilage defects. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available faor evaluation of the osteoarthritic knee joint, these systems were adapted for use with MRI. Later on, grading methods such as the Whole Organ Magnetic Resonance Score, the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score and the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score were designed specifically for performing whole-organ assessment of the knee joint structures, including cartilage. Cartilage grades on MRI obtained with these scoring systems represent optimal outcome measures for longitudinal studies, and are designed to enhance understanding of the knee osteoarthritis disease process. The purpose of this narrative review is to describe cartilage assessment in knee osteoarthritis using currently available MRI-based semiquantitative whole-organ scoring systems, and to provide an update on the risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis as assessed with these scoring systems. (orig.)

  9. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roganovic, Dragana; Djilas, Dragana; Vujnovic, Sasa; Pavic, Dag; Stojanov, Dragan

    2015-11-16

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities. We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. The difference in performance between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography was significant (p tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p=0.20).

  10. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Roganovic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities.  We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. The difference in performance between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography was significant (p < 0.001, while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20. 

  11. An update on risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis assessed using MRI-based semiquantitative grading methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizai, Hamza; Roemer, Frank W.; Hayashi, Daichi; Crema, Michel D.; Felson, David T.; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopy-based semiquantitative scoring systems such as Outerbridge and Noyes' scores were the first to be developed for the purpose of grading cartilage defects. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available faor evaluation of the osteoarthritic knee joint, these systems were adapted for use with MRI. Later on, grading methods such as the Whole Organ Magnetic Resonance Score, the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score and the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score were designed specifically for performing whole-organ assessment of the knee joint structures, including cartilage. Cartilage grades on MRI obtained with these scoring systems represent optimal outcome measures for longitudinal studies, and are designed to enhance understanding of the knee osteoarthritis disease process. The purpose of this narrative review is to describe cartilage assessment in knee osteoarthritis using currently available MRI-based semiquantitative whole-organ scoring systems, and to provide an update on the risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis as assessed with these scoring systems. (orig.)

  12. Morphological imaging and T2 and T2* mapping of hip cartilage at 7 Tesla MRI under the influence of intravenous gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazik-Palm, Andrea; Geis, Christina; Goebel, Juliane; Theysohn, Jens M.; Kraff, Oliver; Johst, Soeren; Ladd, Mark E.; Quick, Harald H.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of intravenous gadolinium on cartilage T2 and T2* relaxation times and on morphological image quality at 7-T hip MRI. Hips of 11 healthy volunteers were examined at 7 T. Multi-echo sequences for T2 and T2* mapping, 3D T1 volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) and double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequences were acquired before and after intravenous application of gadolinium according to a delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) protocol. Cartilage relaxation times were measured in both scans. Morphological sequences were assessed quantitatively using contrast ratios and qualitatively using a 4-point Likert scale. Student's t-test, Pearson's correlation (ρ) and Wilcoxon sign-rank test were used for statistical comparisons. Pre- and post-contrast T2 and T2* values were highly correlated (T2: acetabular: ρ = 0.76, femoral: ρ = 0.77; T2*: acetabular: ρ = 0.80, femoral: ρ = 0.72). Gadolinium enhanced contrasts between cartilage and joint fluid in DESS and T1 VIBE according to the qualitative (p = 0.01) and quantitative (p < 0.001) analysis. The delineation of acetabular and femoral cartilage and the labrum predominantly improved with gadolinium. Gadolinium showed no relevant influence on T2 or T2* relaxation times and improved morphological image quality at 7 T. Therefore, morphological and quantitative sequences including dGEMRIC can be conducted in a one-stop-shop examination. (orig.)

  13. Comparative study of SVM methods combined with voxel selection for object category classification on fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sutao; Zhan, Zhichao; Long, Zhiying; Zhang, Jiacai; Yao, Li

    2011-02-16

    Support vector machine (SVM) has been widely used as accurate and reliable method to decipher brain patterns from functional MRI (fMRI) data. Previous studies have not found a clear benefit for non-linear (polynomial kernel) SVM versus linear one. Here, a more effective non-linear SVM using radial basis function (RBF) kernel is compared with linear SVM. Different from traditional studies which focused either merely on the evaluation of different types of SVM or the voxel selection methods, we aimed to investigate the overall performance of linear and RBF SVM for fMRI classification together with voxel selection schemes on classification accuracy and time-consuming. Six different voxel selection methods were employed to decide which voxels of fMRI data would be included in SVM classifiers with linear and RBF kernels in classifying 4-category objects. Then the overall performances of voxel selection and classification methods were compared. Results showed that: (1) Voxel selection had an important impact on the classification accuracy of the classifiers: in a relative low dimensional feature space, RBF SVM outperformed linear SVM significantly; in a relative high dimensional space, linear SVM performed better than its counterpart; (2) Considering the classification accuracy and time-consuming holistically, linear SVM with relative more voxels as features and RBF SVM with small set of voxels (after PCA) could achieve the better accuracy and cost shorter time. The present work provides the first empirical result of linear and RBF SVM in classification of fMRI data, combined with voxel selection methods. Based on the findings, if only classification accuracy was concerned, RBF SVM with appropriate small voxels and linear SVM with relative more voxels were two suggested solutions; if users concerned more about the computational time, RBF SVM with relative small set of voxels when part of the principal components were kept as features was a better choice.

  14. A wavelet method for modeling and despiking motion artifacts from resting-state fMRI time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ameera X.; Kundu, Prantik; Rubinov, Mikail; Jones, P. Simon; Vértes, Petra E.; Ersche, Karen D.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of in-scanner head movement on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals has long been established as undesirable. These effects have been traditionally corrected by methods such as linear regression of head movement parameters. However, a number of recent independent studies have demonstrated that these techniques are insufficient to remove motion confounds, and that even small movements can spuriously bias estimates of functional connectivity. Here we propose a new data-driven, spatially-adaptive, wavelet-based method for identifying, modeling, and removing non-stationary events in fMRI time series, caused by head movement, without the need for data scrubbing. This method involves the addition of just one extra step, the Wavelet Despike, in standard pre-processing pipelines. With this method, we demonstrate robust removal of a range of different motion artifacts and motion-related biases including distance-dependent connectivity artifacts, at a group and single-subject level, using a range of previously published and new diagnostic measures. The Wavelet Despike is able to accommodate the substantial spatial and temporal heterogeneity of motion artifacts and can consequently remove a range of high and low frequency artifacts from fMRI time series, that may be linearly or non-linearly related to physical movements. Our methods are demonstrated by the analysis of three cohorts of resting-state fMRI data, including two high-motion datasets: a previously published dataset on children (N = 22) and a new dataset on adults with stimulant drug dependence (N = 40). We conclude that there is a real risk of motion-related bias in connectivity analysis of fMRI data, but that this risk is generally manageable, by effective time series denoising strategies designed to attenuate synchronized signal transients induced by abrupt head movements. The Wavelet Despiking software described in this article is freely available for download at www

  15. A wavelet method for modeling and despiking motion artifacts from resting-state fMRI time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ameera X; Kundu, Prantik; Rubinov, Mikail; Jones, P Simon; Vértes, Petra E; Ersche, Karen D; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T

    2014-07-15

    The impact of in-scanner head movement on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals has long been established as undesirable. These effects have been traditionally corrected by methods such as linear regression of head movement parameters. However, a number of recent independent studies have demonstrated that these techniques are insufficient to remove motion confounds, and that even small movements can spuriously bias estimates of functional connectivity. Here we propose a new data-driven, spatially-adaptive, wavelet-based method for identifying, modeling, and removing non-stationary events in fMRI time series, caused by head movement, without the need for data scrubbing. This method involves the addition of just one extra step, the Wavelet Despike, in standard pre-processing pipelines. With this method, we demonstrate robust removal of a range of different motion artifacts and motion-related biases including distance-dependent connectivity artifacts, at a group and single-subject level, using a range of previously published and new diagnostic measures. The Wavelet Despike is able to accommodate the substantial spatial and temporal heterogeneity of motion artifacts and can consequently remove a range of high and low frequency artifacts from fMRI time series, that may be linearly or non-linearly related to physical movements. Our methods are demonstrated by the analysis of three cohorts of resting-state fMRI data, including two high-motion datasets: a previously published dataset on children (N=22) and a new dataset on adults with stimulant drug dependence (N=40). We conclude that there is a real risk of motion-related bias in connectivity analysis of fMRI data, but that this risk is generally manageable, by effective time series denoising strategies designed to attenuate synchronized signal transients induced by abrupt head movements. The Wavelet Despiking software described in this article is freely available for download at www

  16. A novel anisotropic fast marching method and its application to blood flow computation in phase-contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, M; Hennemuth, A; Fischer, B; Friman, O

    2012-01-01

    Phase-contrast MRI (PC MRI) can be used to assess blood flow dynamics noninvasively inside the human body. The acquired images can be reconstructed into flow vector fields. Traditionally, streamlines can be computed based on the vector fields to visualize flow patterns and particle trajectories. The traditional methods may give a false impression of precision, as they do not consider the measurement uncertainty in the PC MRI images. In our prior work, we incorporated the uncertainty of the measurement into the computation of particle trajectories. As a major part of the contribution, a novel numerical scheme for solving the anisotropic Fast Marching problem is presented. A computing time comparison to state-of-the-art methods is conducted on artificial tensor fields. A visual comparison of healthy to pathological blood flow patterns is given. The comparison shows that the novel anisotropic Fast Marching solver outperforms previous schemes in terms of computing time. The visual comparison of flow patterns directly visualizes large deviations of pathological flow from healthy flow. The novel anisotropic Fast Marching solver efficiently resolves even strongly anisotropic path costs. The visualization method enables the user to assess the uncertainty of particle trajectories derived from PC MRI images.

  17. A method to determine the necessity for global signal regression in resting-state fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Guangyu; Xie, Chunming; Ward, B Douglas; Li, Wenjun; Antuono, Piero; Li, Shi-Jiang

    2012-12-01

    In resting-state functional MRI studies, the global signal (operationally defined as the global average of resting-state functional MRI time courses) is often considered a nuisance effect and commonly removed in preprocessing. This global signal regression method can introduce artifacts, such as false anticorrelated resting-state networks in functional connectivity analyses. Therefore, the efficacy of this technique as a correction tool remains questionable. In this article, we establish that the accuracy of the estimated global signal is determined by the level of global noise (i.e., non-neural noise that has a global effect on the resting-state functional MRI signal). When the global noise level is low, the global signal resembles the resting-state functional MRI time courses of the largest cluster, but not those of the global noise. Using real data, we demonstrate that the global signal is strongly correlated with the default mode network components and has biological significance. These results call into question whether or not global signal regression should be applied. We introduce a method to quantify global noise levels. We show that a criteria for global signal regression can be found based on the method. By using the criteria, one can determine whether to include or exclude the global signal regression in minimizing errors in functional connectivity measures. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Assessment of myocardial perfusion with MRI using a modified dual bolus method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husso, M; Sipola, P; Manninen, H; Vainio, P; Kuittinen, T; Hartikainen, J; Saarakkala, S; Töyräs, J; Kuikka, J

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of regional myocardial blood flow (rMBF) with first-pass magnetic resonance imaging (FP-MRI) requires two contrast agent injections (dual bolus technique), inducing error in the determined rMBF if the injections differ. We hypothesize that using input and residue curves of the same injection would be more reliable. We aim to introduce and evaluate a novel method to correct the high concentration arterial input function (AIF) for determination of rMBF. Sixteen patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were examined before and after chemotherapy. The input function was solved by correcting initial high concentration AIF using the ratio of low and high contrast AIF areas, normalized by corresponding heart rates (modified dual bolus method). For comparison, the scaled low contrast AIF was used as an input function (dual bolus method). Unidirectional transfer coefficient K trans  was calculated using both methods. K trans -values determined with the dual bolus (0.81 ± 0.32 ml g −1  min −1 ) and modified dual bolus (0.77 ± 0.42 ml g −1  min −1 ) methods were in agreement (p = 0.21). Mean K trans -values increased from 0.76 ± 0.43 to 0.89 ± 0.55 ml g −1  min −1  after chemotherapy (p = 0.17). The modified dual bolus technique agrees with the dual bolus technique (R2 = 0.899) when the low and high contrast injections are similar. However, when this is not the case, the modified dual bolus technique may be more reliable. (paper)

  19. A multi-atlas based method for automated anatomical Macaca fascicularis brain MRI segmentation and PET kinetic extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballanger, Bénédicte; Tremblay, Léon; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique; Beaudoin-Gobert, Maude; Lavenne, Franck; Le Bars, Didier; Costes, Nicolas

    2013-08-15

    MRI templates and digital atlases are needed for automated and reproducible quantitative analysis of non-human primate PET studies. Segmenting brain images via multiple atlases outperforms single-atlas labelling in humans. We present a set of atlases manually delineated on brain MRI scans of the monkey Macaca fascicularis. We use this multi-atlas dataset to evaluate two automated methods in terms of accuracy, robustness and reliability in segmenting brain structures on MRI and extracting regional PET measures. Twelve individual Macaca fascicularis high-resolution 3DT1 MR images were acquired. Four individual atlases were created by manually drawing 42 anatomical structures, including cortical and sub-cortical structures, white matter regions, and ventricles. To create the MRI template, we first chose one MRI to define a reference space, and then performed a two-step iterative procedure: affine registration of individual MRIs to the reference MRI, followed by averaging of the twelve resampled MRIs. Automated segmentation in native space was obtained in two ways: 1) Maximum probability atlases were created by decision fusion of two to four individual atlases in the reference space, and transformation back into the individual native space (MAXPROB)(.) 2) One to four individual atlases were registered directly to the individual native space, and combined by decision fusion (PROPAG). Accuracy was evaluated by computing the Dice similarity index and the volume difference. The robustness and reproducibility of PET regional measurements obtained via automated segmentation was evaluated on four co-registered MRI/PET datasets, which included test-retest data. Dice indices were always over 0.7 and reached maximal values of 0.9 for PROPAG with all four individual atlases. There was no significant mean volume bias. The standard deviation of the bias decreased significantly when increasing the number of individual atlases. MAXPROB performed better when increasing the number of

  20. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint--a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-12-01

    To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)(2-), i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (pfibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint – a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Objective To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. Design MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)2-, i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. Results 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (p fibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. PMID:25131629

  2. Evaluation of MRI acquisition workflow with lean six sigma method: case study of liver and knee examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christopher J; Boll, Daniel T; Wall, Lisa K; Merkle, Elmar M

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess workflow for medical imaging studies, specifically comparing liver and knee MRI examinations by use of the Lean Six Sigma methodologic framework. The hypothesis tested was that the Lean Six Sigma framework can be used to quantify MRI workflow and to identify sources of inefficiency to target for sequence and protocol improvement. Audio-video interleave streams representing individual acquisitions were obtained with graphic user interface screen capture software in the examinations of 10 outpatients undergoing MRI of the liver and 10 outpatients undergoing MRI of the knee. With Lean Six Sigma methods, the audio-video streams were dissected into value-added time (true image data acquisition periods), business value-added time (time spent that provides no direct patient benefit but is requisite in the current system), and non-value-added time (scanner inactivity while awaiting manual input). For overall MRI table time, value-added time was 43.5% (range, 39.7-48.3%) of the time for liver examinations and 89.9% (range, 87.4-93.6%) for knee examinations. Business value-added time was 16.3% of the table time for the liver and 4.3% of the table time for the knee examinations. Non-value-added time was 40.2% of the overall table time for the liver and 5.8% for the knee examinations. Liver MRI examinations consume statistically significantly more non-value-added and business value-added times than do knee examinations, primarily because of respiratory command management and contrast administration. Workflow analyses and accepted inefficiency reduction frameworks can be applied with use of a graphic user interface screen capture program.

  3. Fast CSF MRI for brain segmentation; Cross-validation by comparison with 3D T1-based brain segmentation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Kleij, Lisa A.; de Bresser, Jeroen; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    ObjectiveIn previous work we have developed a fast sequence that focusses on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) based on the long T-2 of CSF. By processing the data obtained with this CSF MRI sequence, brain parenchymal volume (BPV) and intracranial volume (ICV) can be automatically obtained. The aim...... of this study was to assess the precision of the BPV and ICV measurements of the CSF MRI sequence and to validate the CSF MRI sequence by comparison with 3D T-1-based brain segmentation methods.Materials and methodsTen healthy volunteers (2 females; median age 28 years) were scanned (3T MRI) twice......cc) and CSF HR (5 +/- 5/4 +/- 2cc) were comparable to FSL HR (9 +/- 11/19 +/- 23cc), FSL LR (7 +/- 4,6 +/- 5cc),FreeSurfer HR (5 +/- 3/14 +/- 8cc), FreeSurfer LR (9 +/- 8,12 +/- 10cc), and SPM HR (5 +/- 3/4 +/- 7cc), and SPM LR (5 +/- 4,5 +/- 3cc). The correlation between the measured volumes...

  4. A multi-atlas based method for automated anatomical rat brain MRI segmentation and extraction of PET activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancelot, Sophie; Roche, Roxane; Slimen, Afifa; Bouillot, Caroline; Levigoureux, Elise; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Zimmer, Luc; Costes, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical in vivo imaging requires precise and reproducible delineation of brain structures. Manual segmentation is time consuming and operator dependent. Automated segmentation as usually performed via single atlas registration fails to account for anatomo-physiological variability. We present, evaluate, and make available a multi-atlas approach for automatically segmenting rat brain MRI and extracting PET activies. High-resolution 7T 2DT2 MR images of 12 Sprague-Dawley rat brains were manually segmented into 27-VOI label volumes using detailed protocols. Automated methods were developed with 7/12 atlas datasets, i.e. the MRIs and their associated label volumes. MRIs were registered to a common space, where an MRI template and a maximum probability atlas were created. Three automated methods were tested: 1/registering individual MRIs to the template, and using a single atlas (SA), 2/using the maximum probability atlas (MP), and 3/registering the MRIs from the multi-atlas dataset to an individual MRI, propagating the label volumes and fusing them in individual MRI space (propagation & fusion, PF). Evaluation was performed on the five remaining rats which additionally underwent [18F]FDG PET. Automated and manual segmentations were compared for morphometric performance (assessed by comparing volume bias and Dice overlap index) and functional performance (evaluated by comparing extracted PET measures). Only the SA method showed volume bias. Dice indices were significantly different between methods (PF>MP>SA). PET regional measures were more accurate with multi-atlas methods than with SA method. Multi-atlas methods outperform SA for automated anatomical brain segmentation and PET measure's extraction. They perform comparably to manual segmentation for FDG-PET quantification. Multi-atlas methods are suitable for rapid reproducible VOI analyses.

  5. Comparison of methods for detecting nondeterministic BOLD fluctuation in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Kantola, Juha-Heikki; Jauhiainen, Jukka; Tervonen, Osmo

    2004-02-01

    Functional MR imaging (fMRI) has been used in detecting neuronal activation and intrinsic blood flow fluctuations in the brain cortex. This article is aimed for comparing the methods for analyzing the nondeterministic flow fluctuations. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT), cross correlation (CC), spatial principal component analysis (sPCA), and independent component analysis (sICA) were compared. 15 subjects were imaged at 1.5 T. Three quantitative measures were compared: (1) The number of subjects with identifiable fluctuation, (2) the volume, and (3) mean correlation coefficient (MCC) of the detected voxels. The focusing on cortical structures and the overall usability were qualitatively assessed. sICA was spatially most accurate but time consuming, robust, and detected voxels with high temporal synchrony. The CC and FFT were fast suiting primary screening. The CC detected highest temporal synchrony but the subjective detection for reference vector produced excess variance of the detected volumes. The FFT and sPCA were not spatially accurate and did not detect adequate temporal synchrony of the voxels.

  6. Imaging transplanted stem cells in real time using an MRI dual-contrast method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngen, Ethel J.; Wang, Lee; Kato, Yoshinori; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Zhu, Wenlian; Gandhi, Nishant; Smith, Barbara; Armour, Michael; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are currently being investigated for the repair of brain injuries. Although exogenous stem cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prior to transplantation provides a means to noninvasively monitor stem cell transplantation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), monitoring cell death is still a challenge. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using an MRI dual-contrast technique to detect cell delivery, cell migration and cell death after stem cell transplantation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were dual labelled with SPIONs and gadolinium-based chelates (GdDTPA). The viability, proliferation rate, and differentiation potential of the labelled cells were then evaluated. The feasibility of this MRI technique to distinguish between live and dead cells was next evaluated using MRI phantoms, and in vivo using both immune-competent and immune-deficient mice, following the induction of brain injury in the mice. All results were validated with bioluminescence imaging. In live cells, a negative (T2/T2*) MRI contrast predominates, and is used to track cell delivery and cell migration. Upon cell death, a diffused positive (T1) MRI contrast is generated in the vicinity of the dead cells, and serves as an imaging marker for cell death. Ultimately, this technique could be used to manage stem cell therapies. PMID:26330231

  7. Predicting response before initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer using new methods for the analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE MRI) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrandchamp, Joseph B.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Abramson, V. G.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI have shown promise as biomarkers for tumor response to therapy. However, standard methods of analyzing DCE MRI data (Tofts model) require high temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the Arterial Input Function (AIF). Such models produce reliable biomarkers of response only when a therapy has a large effect on the parameters. We recently reported a method that solves the limitations, the Linear Reference Region Model (LRRM). Similar to other reference region models, the LRRM needs no AIF. Additionally, the LRRM is more accurate and precise than standard methods at low SNR and slow temporal resolution, suggesting LRRM-derived biomarkers could be better predictors. Here, the LRRM, Non-linear Reference Region Model (NRRM), Linear Tofts model (LTM), and Non-linear Tofts Model (NLTM) were used to estimate the RKtrans between muscle and tumor (or the Ktrans for Tofts) and the tumor kep,TOI for 39 breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). These parameters and the receptor statuses of each patient were used to construct cross-validated predictive models to classify patients as complete pathological responders (pCR) or non-complete pathological responders (non-pCR) to NAC. Model performance was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC). The AUC for receptor status alone was 0.62, while the best performance using predictors from the LRRM, NRRM, LTM, and NLTM were AUCs of 0.79, 0.55, 0.60, and 0.59 respectively. This suggests that the LRRM can be used to predict response to NAC in breast cancer.

  8. Fast CSF MRI for brain segmentation; Cross-validation by comparison with 3D T1-based brain segmentation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kleij, Lisa A; de Bresser, Jeroen; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petersen, Esben T; De Vis, Jill B

    2018-01-01

    In previous work we have developed a fast sequence that focusses on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) based on the long T2 of CSF. By processing the data obtained with this CSF MRI sequence, brain parenchymal volume (BPV) and intracranial volume (ICV) can be automatically obtained. The aim of this study was to assess the precision of the BPV and ICV measurements of the CSF MRI sequence and to validate the CSF MRI sequence by comparison with 3D T1-based brain segmentation methods. Ten healthy volunteers (2 females; median age 28 years) were scanned (3T MRI) twice with repositioning in between. The scan protocol consisted of a low resolution (LR) CSF sequence (0:57min), a high resolution (HR) CSF sequence (3:21min) and a 3D T1-weighted sequence (6:47min). Data of the HR 3D-T1-weighted images were downsampled to obtain LR T1-weighted images (reconstructed imaging time: 1:59 min). Data of the CSF MRI sequences was automatically segmented using in-house software. The 3D T1-weighted images were segmented using FSL (5.0), SPM12 and FreeSurfer (5.3.0). The mean absolute differences for BPV and ICV between the first and second scan for CSF LR (BPV/ICV: 12±9/7±4cc) and CSF HR (5±5/4±2cc) were comparable to FSL HR (9±11/19±23cc), FSL LR (7±4, 6±5cc), FreeSurfer HR (5±3/14±8cc), FreeSurfer LR (9±8, 12±10cc), and SPM HR (5±3/4±7cc), and SPM LR (5±4, 5±3cc). The correlation between the measured volumes of the CSF sequences and that measured by FSL, FreeSurfer and SPM HR and LR was very good (all Pearson's correlation coefficients >0.83, R2 .67-.97). The results from the downsampled data and the high-resolution data were similar. Both CSF MRI sequences have a precision comparable to, and a very good correlation with established 3D T1-based automated segmentations methods for the segmentation of BPV and ICV. However, the short imaging time of the fast CSF MRI sequence is superior to the 3D T1 sequence on which segmentation with established methods is performed.

  9. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  10. Graph cut-based method for segmenting the left ventricle from MRI or echocardiographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Michael; Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Humbert, Olivier; Lalande, Alain

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we present a fast and interactive graph cut method for 3D segmentation of the endocardial wall of the left ventricle (LV) adapted to work on two of the most widely used modalities: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography. Our method accounts for the fundamentally different nature of both modalities: 3D echocardiographic images have a low contrast, a poor signal-to-noise ratio and frequent signal drop, while MR images are more detailed but also cluttered and contain highly anisotropic voxels. The main characteristic of our method is to work in a 3D Bezier coordinate system instead of the original Euclidean space. This comes with several advantages, including an implicit shape prior and a result guarantied not to have any holes in it. The proposed method is made of 4 steps. First, a 3D sampling of the LV cavity is made based on a Bezier coordinate system. This allows to warp the input 3D image to a Bezier space in which a plane corresponds to an anatomically plausible 3D Euclidean bullet shape. Second, a 3D graph is built and an energy term (which is based on the image gradient and a 3D probability map) is assigned to each edge of the graph, some of which being given an infinite energy to ensure the resulting 3D structure passes through key anatomical points. Third, a max-flow min-cut procedure is executed on the energy graph to delineate the endocardial surface. And fourth, the resulting surface is projected back to the Euclidean space where a post-processing convex hull algorithm is applied on every short axis slice to remove local concavities. Results obtained on two datasets reveal that our method takes between 2 and 5s to segment a 3D volume, it has better results overall than most state-of-the-art methods on the CETUS echocardiographic dataset and is statistically as good as a human operator on MR images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A new operational method of functional neurosurgery combining micro-recording and MRI stereotaxy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Tatsuo.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a new operational method for stereotactic functional neurosurgery using MRI stereotaxy combined with microelectrode recording. MRI stereotaxy shows us the individual variations of thalamic configurations. The tentative target points were determined using the MRI stereotaxy assisted software system which revised the distortion of MRI images. Consequently, the accuracy and safety of the microelectrode recording were increased. This, in turn, increased the accuracy and stereotactic thalamotomy while producing encouraging operational outcomes. The effectiveness of stereotactic thalamotomy for Parkinson's disease was confirmed by these excellent operative results. The symptoms improved and the dosage of medications, including L-DOPA, decreased. Furthermore, our results indicate that the distributing area of deep sensory neurons in the thalamus extended more posteriorly and upward than previously expected. Therefore, the functional and anatomical similarity between the human and monkey thalamus was reaffirmed. In this report, based on the above data, we reevaluated the neural mechanism of tremor and the role of stereotactic functional neurosurgery for Parkinson's disease. (author)

  12. A new operational method of functional neurosurgery combining micro-recording and MRI stereotaxy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Hiroyuki [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan); Hirai, Tatsuo

    1993-02-01

    We have developed a new operational method for stereotactic functional neurosurgery using MRI stereotaxy combined with microelectrode recording. MRI stereotaxy shows us the individual variations of thalamic configurations. The tentative target points were determined using the MRI stereotaxy assisted software system which revised the distortion of MRI images. Consequently, the accuracy and safety of the microelectrode recording were increased. This, in turn, increased the accuracy and stereotactic thalamotomy while producing encouraging operational outcomes. The effectiveness of stereotactic thalamotomy for Parkinson's disease was confirmed by these excellent operative results. The symptoms improved and the dosage of medications, including L-DOPA, decreased. Furthermore, our results indicate that the distributing area of deep sensory neurons in the thalamus extended more posteriorly and upward than previously expected. Therefore, the functional and anatomical similarity between the human and monkey thalamus was reaffirmed. In this report, based on the above data, we reevaluated the neural mechanism of tremor and the role of stereotactic functional neurosurgery for Parkinson's disease. (author).

  13. Novel methods and applications of NMR and MRI. Low-power RF excitation and hyperpolarized Xenon-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amor, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Since their discovery in the middle of the last century, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have become an important and very versatile tool in industry, medicine, and basic research. The aim of this work is to explore possible improvements and new applications of NMR methods. First, a recently introduced excitation NMR pulse sequence, termed Frank sequence excitation, which allows for significant reduction of rf-excitation power, is systematically analyzed and compared to conventional NMR in detail. Furthermore, its feasibility for MRI is investigated and advantages as well as drawbacks in comparison to standard MRI are discussed. The second part focuses on new biomedical applications of hyperpolarized (HP) 129 Xe which not only offers a signal enhancement of several orders of magnitude but also provides new contrast mechanisms. A setup for continuous dissolution of HP 129 Xe gas into blood and other fluids is optimized and analyzed quantitatively by NMR and MRI. On the basis of these results, blood-dissolved HP 129 Xe is used to investigate blood-gas dynamics, as well as the rheological behavior of blood.

  14. Novel methods and applications of NMR and MRI. Low-power RF excitation and hyperpolarized Xenon-129

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amor, Nadia

    2012-07-01

    Since their discovery in the middle of the last century, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have become an important and very versatile tool in industry, medicine, and basic research. The aim of this work is to explore possible improvements and new applications of NMR methods. First, a recently introduced excitation NMR pulse sequence, termed Frank sequence excitation, which allows for significant reduction of rf-excitation power, is systematically analyzed and compared to conventional NMR in detail. Furthermore, its feasibility for MRI is investigated and advantages as well as drawbacks in comparison to standard MRI are discussed. The second part focuses on new biomedical applications of hyperpolarized (HP) {sup 129}Xe which not only offers a signal enhancement of several orders of magnitude but also provides new contrast mechanisms. A setup for continuous dissolution of HP {sup 129}Xe gas into blood and other fluids is optimized and analyzed quantitatively by NMR and MRI. On the basis of these results, blood-dissolved HP {sup 129}Xe is used to investigate blood-gas dynamics, as well as the rheological behavior of blood.

  15. MRI: A method to detect minor brain damage following coronary bypass surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik, A.; Brubakk, A.O. (Trondheim Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering); Rinck, P.A. (Trondheim Univ. (Norway). MR Center); Sande, E.; Levang, O.W. (Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway). Dept. of Surgery); Sellevold, O. (Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway). Dept. of Anaesthesiology)

    1991-10-01

    In order to assess the occurrence of minor focal brain lesions after coronary bypass surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used. Nine male patients (age 42-63) with angina pectoris were investigated at 0.5 Tesla. The investigation was performed one to seven weeks prior to the operation and one month after the operation. Before surgery, the images demonstrated more than five high intensity spots in the white matter of the brain in all but two patients. No additional spots were found after operation. This pilot study indicates that it might be difficult to use MRI to detect minor parenchymal lesions after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (orig.).

  16. Initial evaluation of a practical PET respiratory motion correction method in clinical simultaneous PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian; Barnes, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; Arridge, Simon; O’Meara, Celia; Atkinson, David

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion during PET acquisitions can cause image artefacts, with sharpness and tracer quantification adversely affected due to count ‘smearing’. Motion correction by registration of PET gates becomes increasingly difficult with shorter scan times and less counts. The advent of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners allows the use of high spatial resolution MRI to capture motion states during respiration [1, 2]. In this work, we use a respiratory signal derived from the PET list-mode data [3, ], with no requirement for an external device or MR sequence modifications.

  17. Image fusion of MRI and fMRI with intraoperative MRI data: methods and clinical relevance for neurosurgical interventions; Fusion von MRT-, fMRT- und intraoperativen MRT-Daten. Methode und klinische Bedeutung am Beispiel neurochirurgischer Interventionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moche, M.; Busse, H.; Dannenberg, C.; Schulz, T.; Schmidt, F.; Kahn, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Schmitgen, A. [GMD Forschungszentrum Informationstechnik GmbH-FIT, Sankt Augustin (Germany); Trantakis, C.; Winkler, D. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this work was to realize and clinically evaluate an image fusion platform for the integration of preoperative MRI and fMRI data into the intraoperative images of an interventional MRI system with a focus on neurosurgical procedures. A vertically open 0.5 T MRI scanner was equipped with a dedicated navigation system enabling the registration of additional imaging modalities (MRI, fMRI, CT) with the intraoperatively acquired data sets. These merged image data served as the basis for interventional planning and multimodal navigation. So far, the system has been used in 70 neurosurgical interventions (13 of which involved image data fusion - requiring 15 minutes extra time). The augmented navigation system is characterized by a higher frame rate and a higher image quality as compared to the system-integrated navigation based on continuously acquired (near) real time images. Patient movement and tissue shifts can be immediately detected by monitoring the morphological differences between both navigation scenes. The multimodal image fusion allowed a refined navigation planning especially for the resection of deeply seated brain lesions or pathologies close to eloquent areas. Augmented intraoperative orientation and instrument guidance improve the safety and accuracy of neurosurgical interventions. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Arbeit waren die Realisierung und klinische Bewertung einer Bildfusion praeoperativer MRT- und fMRT-Bilder mit intraoperativen Datensaetzen eines interventionellen MRT-Systems am Beispiel neurochirurgischer Eingriffe. Ein vertikal offenes 0,5-T-MRT-System wurde mit einem erweiterten Navigationssystem ausgestattet, welches eine Integration zusaetzlicher Bildinformationen (Hochfeld-MRT, fMRT, CT) in die intraoperativ akquirierten Datensaetze erlaubt. Diese fusionierten Bilddaten wurden zur Interventionsplanung und multimodalen Navigation verwendet. Bisher wurde das System bei insgesamt 70 neurochirurgischen Eingriffen eingesetzt, davon 13

  18. Teaching Dental Students to Understand the Temporomandibular Joint Using MRI: Comparison of Conventional and Digital Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arús, Nádia A; da Silva, Átila M; Duarte, Rogério; da Silveira, Priscila F; Vizzotto, Mariana B; da Silveira, Heraldo L D; da Silveira, Heloisa E D

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate and compare the performance of dental students in interpreting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using two learning methods (conventional and digital interactive learning) and to examine the usability of the digital learning object (DLO). The DLO consisted of tutorials about MRI and anatomic and functional aspects of the TMJ. In 2014, dental students in their final year of study who were enrolled in the elective "MRI Interpretation of the TMJ" course comprised the study sample. After exclusions for nonattendance and other reasons, 29 of the initial 37 students participated in the study, for a participation rate of 78%. The participants were divided into two groups: a digital interactive learning group (n=14) and a conventional learning group (n=15). Both methods were assessed by an objective test applied before and after training and classes. Aspects such as support and training requirements, complexity, and consistency of the DLO were also evaluated using the System Usability Scale (SUS). A significant between-group difference in the posttest results was found, with the conventional learning group scoring better than the DLO group, indicated by mean scores of 9.20 and 8.11, respectively, out of 10. However, when the pretest and posttest results were compared, both groups showed significantly improved performance. The SUS score was 89, which represented a high acceptance of the DLO by the users. The students who used the conventional method of learning showed superior performance in interpreting the TMJ using MRI compared to the group that used digital interactive learning.

  19. A prospective randomized comparison between two MRI studies of the small bowel in Crohn's disease, the oral contrast method and MR enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negaard, Anne; Paulsen, Vemund; Lygren, Idar; Sandvik, Leiv; Berstad, Audun E.; Borthne, Arne; Try, Kirsti; Storaas, Tryggve; Klow, Nils-Einar

    2007-01-01

    The aim was to compare bowel distension and diagnostic properties of magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel with oral contrast (MRI per OS) with magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE). Forty patients with suspected Crohn's disease (CD) were examined with both MRI methods. MRI per OS was performed with a 6% mannitol solution and MRE with nasojejunal intubation and a polyethylenglycol solution. MRI protocol consisted of balanced fast field echo (B-FFE), T2 and T1 sequences with and without gadolinium. Two experienced radiologists individually evaluated bowel distension and pathological findings including wall thickness (BWT), contrast enhancement (BWE), ulcer (BWU), stenosis (BWS) and edema (EDM). The diameter of the small bowel was smaller with MRI per OS than with MRE (difference jejunum: 0.55 cm, p < 0.001; ileum: 0.35 cm, p < 0.001, terminal ileum: 0.09 cm, p = 0.08). However, CD was diagnosed with high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values: MRI per OS 88%, 89%, 89%, 89%; MRE 88%, 84%, 82%, 89%) and inter-observer agreement (MRI per OS k = 0.95; MRE k = 1). In conclusion, bowel distension was inferior in MRI per OS compared to MRE. However, both methods diagnosed CD with a high diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. (orig.)

  20. A non-invasive method of quantifying pancreatic volume in mice using micro-MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Paredes

    Full Text Available In experimental models of pancreatic growth and recovery, changes in pancreatic size are assessed by euthanizing a large cohort of animals at varying time points and measuring organ mass. However, to ascertain this information in clinical practice, patients with pancreatic disorders routinely undergo non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of the pancreas using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or computed tomography (CT. The aim of the current study was to develop a thin-sliced, optimized sequence protocol using a high field MRI to accurately calculate pancreatic volumes in the most common experimental animal, the mouse. Using a 7 Telsa Bruker micro-MRI system, we performed abdominal imaging in whole-fixed mice in three standard planes: axial, sagittal, and coronal. The contour of the pancreas was traced using Vitrea software and then transformed into a 3-dimensional (3D reconstruction, from which volumetric measurements were calculated. Images were optimized using heart perfusion-fixation, T1 sequence analysis, and 0.2 to 0.4 mm thick slices. As proof of principle, increases in pancreatic volume among mice of different ages correlated tightly with increasing body weight. In summary, this is the first study to measure pancreatic volumes in mice, using a high field 7 Tesla micro-MRI and a thin-sliced, optimized sequence protocol. We anticipate that micro-MRI will improve the ability to non-invasively quantify changes in pancreatic size and will dramatically reduce the number of animals required to serially assess pancreatic growth and recovery.

  1. Quantitative chemical shift-encoded MRI is an accurate method to quantify hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Jens-Peter; Hernando, Diego; Mensel, Birger; Krüger, Paul C; Ittermann, Till; Mayerle, Julia; Hosten, Norbert; Reeder, Scott B

    2014-06-01

    To compare the accuracy of liver fat quantification using a three-echo chemical shift-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique without and with correction for confounders with spectroscopy (MRS) as the reference standard. Fifty patients (23 women, mean age 56.6 ± 13.2 years) with fatty liver disease were enrolled. Patients underwent T2-corrected single-voxel MRS and a three-echo chemical shift-encoded gradient echo (GRE) sequence at 3.0T. MRI fat fraction (FF) was calculated without and with T2* and T1 correction and multispectral modeling of fat and compared with MRS-FF using linear regression. The spectroscopic range of liver fat was 0.11%-38.7%. Excellent correlation between MRS-FF and MRI-FF was observed when using T2* correction (R(2)  = 0.96). With use of T2* correction alone, the slope was significantly different from 1 (1.16 ± 0.03, P fat were addressed, the results showed equivalence between fat quantification using MRI and MRS (slope: 1.02 ± 0.03, P = 0.528; intercept: 0.26% ± 0.46%, P = 0.572). Complex three-echo chemical shift-encoded MRI is equivalent to MRS for quantifying liver fat, but only with correction for T2* decay and T1 recovery and use of spectral modeling of fat. This is necessary because T2* decay, T1 recovery, and multispectral complexity of fat are processes which may otherwise bias the measurements. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. SU-D-207A-06: Pediatric Abdominal Organ Motion Quantified Via a Novel 4D MRI Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, J; Krasin, MJ; Lucas, JT; Tinkle, C; Merchant, TE; Hua, C [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 4D MRI method for assessing respiration-induced abdominal organ motion in children receiving radiation therapy. Methods: A 4D MRI using internal image-based respiratory surrogate has been developed and implemented on a clinical scanner (1.5T Siemens Avanto). Ten patients (younger group: N=6, 2–5 years, anesthetized; older group: N=4, 11–15 years) with neuroblastoma, Wilm’s tumor rhabdomyosarcoma, or desmoplastic small round cell tumor received free breathing 4D MRI scans for treatment planning. Coronal image slices of the entire abdomen were retrospectively constructed in 10 respiratory phases. A B-spline deformable registration (Metz et al. 2011) was performed on 4D datasets to automatically derive motion trajectories of selected anatomical landmarks, including the dome and the center of the liver, and the superior edges of kidneys and spleen. The extents of the motion in three dimensions (anteroposterior, AP; mediolateral, ML; superoinferior, SI) and the correlations between organ motion trajectories were quantified. Results: The 4D MRI scans were successfully performed in <20 minutes for all patients without the use of any external device. Organ motion extents were larger in adolescents (kidneys: 3–13 mm SI, liver and spleen: 6–18 mm SI) than in younger children (kidneys:<3mm in all directions; liver and spleen: 1–8 mm SI, 1–5 mm ML and AP). The magnitude of respiratory motion in some adolescents may warrant special motion management. Motion trajectories were not synchronized across selected anatomical landmarks, particularly in the ML and AP directions, indicating inter- and intra-organ variations of the respiratory-induced motion. Conclusion: The developed 4D MRI acquisition and motion analysis methods provide a non-ionizing, non-invasive approach to automatically measure the organ motion trajectory in the pediatric abdomen. It is useful for defining ITV and PRV, monitoring changes in target motion patterns during the

  3. Multi-method analysis of MRI images in early diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Wolz

    Full Text Available The role of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is becoming more and more emphasized in the early diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease (AD. This study aimed to assess the improvement in classification accuracy that can be achieved by combining features from different structural MRI analysis techniques. Automatically estimated MR features used are hippocampal volume, tensor-based morphometry, cortical thickness and a novel technique based on manifold learning. Baseline MRIs acquired from all 834 subjects (231 healthy controls (HC, 238 stable mild cognitive impairment (S-MCI, 167 MCI to AD progressors (P-MCI, 198 AD from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI database were used for evaluation. We compared the classification accuracy achieved with linear discriminant analysis (LDA and support vector machines (SVM. The best results achieved with individual features are 90% sensitivity and 84% specificity (HC/AD classification, 64%/66% (S-MCI/P-MCI and 82%/76% (HC/P-MCI with the LDA classifier. The combination of all features improved these results to 93% sensitivity and 85% specificity (HC/AD, 67%/69% (S-MCI/P-MCI and 86%/82% (HC/P-MCI. Compared with previously published results in the ADNI database using individual MR-based features, the presented results show that a comprehensive analysis of MRI images combining multiple features improves classification accuracy and predictive power in detecting early AD. The most stable and reliable classification was achieved when combining all available features.

  4. A new bias field correction method combining N3 and FCM for improved segmentation of breast density on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Muqing; Chan, Siwa; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chang, Daniel; Nie, Ke; Chen, Shih-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Ju; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Su, Min-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative breast density is known as a strong risk factor associated with the development of breast cancer. Measurement of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide very useful information. One important step for quantitative analysis of breast density on MRI is the correction of field inhomogeneity to allow an accurate segmentation of the fibroglandular tissue (dense tissue). A new bias field correction method by combining the nonparametric nonuniformity normalization (N3) algorithm and fuzzy-C-means (FCM)-based inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed in this work. The analysis is performed on non-fat-sat T1-weighted images acquired using a 1.5 T MRI scanner. A total of 60 breasts from 30 healthy volunteers was analyzed. N3 is known as a robust correction method, but it cannot correct a strong bias field on a large area. FCM-based algorithm can correct the bias field on a large area, but it may change the tissue contrast and affect the segmentation quality. The proposed algorithm applies N3 first, followed by FCM, and then the generated bias field is smoothed using Gaussian kernal and B-spline surface fitting to minimize the problem of mistakenly changed tissue contrast. The segmentation results based on the N3+FCM corrected images were compared to the N3 and FCM alone corrected images and another method, coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC), corrected images. The segmentation quality based on different correction methods were evaluated by a radiologist and ranked. The authors demonstrated that the iterative N3+FCM correction method brightens the signal intensity of fatty tissues and that separates the histogram peaks between the fibroglandular and fatty tissues to allow an accurate segmentation between them. In the first reading session, the radiologist found (N3+FCM > N3 > FCM) ranking in 17 breasts, (N3+FCM > N3 = FCM) ranking in 7 breasts, (N3+FCM = N3 > FCM) in 32 breasts, (N3+FCM = N3 = FCM) in 2 breasts, and (N3 > N3

  5. Evaluation of FSE and FSPGR MRI imaging methods for planning cranial stereotactic irradiation of a metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Masaki; Tanoi, Chiharu

    2003-01-01

    Cranial stereotactic irradiation (STI) of a metastatic brain tumor (BT) was planned by fusing CT images with MRI images using the landmark method of the X-Knife System. The MRI images revealed the BT, the critical optic nerve and brain stem of structures and the eyeball and blood vessels that are landmarks. It was important to improve visibility of the BT with sufficient contrast. Therefore, comparison examinations were performed using the two dimensions fast spin echo (2DFSE), the two dimensions fast spoiled gradient echo (2DFSPGR), and the three dimensions fast spoiled gradient echo (3DFSPGR) methods of T1-weighted imaging with Gd-DTPA contrast. Critical structures and the internal structures of the landmark method were suitable for planning STI when the results of three or more points were combined in visual evaluations. However, the 2DFSE method could showed three or more points. The BT also be visually evaluated using three or less points by the FSPGR method, but had reduced visibility. From detailed contents, the fall of visual evaluation by the small thin and solid BT of the diameter of a BT was characteristic. In the whole signal noise ratio (SNR), the 3DFSPGR method is excellent in images analysis, and the 2DFSE method was excellent in contrast noise ratio (CNR) of a BT. The cystic BT accompanied by dropsy was images with clear and good depiction in all scan parameter. However, the FSPGR method was the boundary not clear in the small solid BT, the FSE method was able to recognize the maximum of the diameter of BT most, and depiction was good. Artifacts of blood flow and motion of the FSE method is a fault. However, the FSE method had the highest useful depiction ability of all BT in the STI plan. (author)

  6. A five-colour colour-coded mapping method for DCE-MRI analysis of head and neck tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, J.; Chow, S.K.K.; Yeung, D.K.W.; King, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To devise a method to convert the time–intensity curves (TICs) of head and neck dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data into a pixel-by-pixel colour-coded map for identifying normal tissues and tumours. Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) underwent DCE-MRI. TIC patterns of primary tumours, metastatic nodes, and normal tissues were assessed and a program was devised to convert the patterns into a classified colour-coded map. The enhancement patterns of tumours and normal tissue structures were evaluated and categorized into nine grades (0–8) based on the predominance of coloured pixels on maps. Results: Five identified TIC patterns were converted into a colour-coded map consisting of red (maximum enhancement), brown (continuous slow rise-up), yellow (rapid wash-in and wash-out), green (rapid wash-in and plateau), and blue (rapid wash-in and rise-up). The colour-coded map distinguished all 21 primary tumours and 15 metastatic nodes from normal structures. Primary tumours and metastatic nodes were colour coded as predominantly yellow (grades 1–2) in 17/21 and 6/15, green (grades 3–5) in 3/21 and 5/15, and blue (grades 6–7) in 1/21 and 4/15, respectively. Vessels were coded red in 46/46 (grade 0) and muscles were coded brown in 23/23 (grade 8). Salivary glands, thyroid glands, and palatine tonsils were coded into predominantly yellow (grade 1) in 46/46 and 10/10 and 18/22, respectively. Conclusion: DCE-MRI derived five-colour-coded mapping provides an objective easy-to-interpret method to assess the dynamic enhancement pattern of head and neck cancers.

  7. Relaxation parameter estimation and comparison of NLS and LLS methods for DCE MRI in the cervix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Christian; Kallehauge, Jesper; Tanderup, Kari

    Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI is a promising tool for tumor treatment planning. However, prior knowledge of the T1 value within each tumor voxel is needed to utilize this technique. Therefore, a T1 relaxation measurement is performed before the DCE experiment to establish a baseline, before...... any injection of contrast agent. This T1 relaxation measurement is often performed using a variable flip angle spoiled gradient recalled echo (SPGR) sequence. T1 can then be estimated using either a linear least squares (LLS) or a non-linear least squares (NLS) fitting algorithm....

  8. An improved cylindrical FDTD method and its application to field-tissue interaction study in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jieru; Liu, Feng; Xia, Ling; Shao, Tingting; Mason, David G; Crozier, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme in cylindrical coordinates with an improved algorithm for accommodating the numerical singularity associated with the polar axis. The regularization of this singularity problem is entirely based on Ampere's law. The proposed algorithm has been detailed and verified against a problem with a known solution obtained from a commercial electromagnetic simulation package. The numerical scheme is also illustrated by modeling high-frequency RF field-human body interactions in MRI. The results demonstrate the accuracy and capability of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Optimal MRI methods for direct stereotactic targeting of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Gorman, Ruth L.; Shmueli, Karin; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Selway, Richard P.; Samuel, Michael; Lythgoe, David J.; Shahidiani, Asal; Wastling, Stephen J.; Footman, Michelle; Jarosz, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Reliable identification of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi) is critical for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of these structures. The purpose of this study was to compare the visibility of the STN and GPi with various MRI techniques and to assess the suitability of each technique for direct stereotactic targeting. MR images were acquired from nine volunteers with T2- and proton density-weighted (PD-W) fast spin echo, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), phase-sensitive inversion recovery and quantitative T1, T2 and T2 * mapping sequences. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for the STN and GPi were calculated for all sequences. Targeting errors on SWI were evaluated on magnetic susceptibility maps. The sequences demonstrating the best conspicuity of DBS target structures (SWI and T2*) were then applied to ten patients with movement disorders, and the CNRs for these techniques were assessed. SWI offers the highest CNR for the STN, but standard PD-W images provide the best CNR for the pallidum. Susceptibility maps indicated that the GPi margins may be shifted slightly on SWI, although no shifts were seen for the STN. SWI may improve the visibility of the STN on pre-operative MRI, potentially improving the accuracy of direct stereotactic targeting. (orig.)

  10. MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound as a New Method of Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thanou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery under the guidance of an imaging modality can improve drug disposition and achieve site-specific drug delivery. The term focal drug delivery has been introduced to describe the focal targeting of drugs in tissues with the help of imaging and focused ultrasound. Focal drug delivery aims to improve the therapeutic profile of drugs by improving their specificity and their permeation in defined areas. Focused-ultrasound- (FUS- mediated drug delivery has been applied with various molecules to improve their local distribution in tissues. FUS is applied with the aid of microbubbles to enhance the permeability of bioactive molecules across BBB and improve drug distribution in the brain. Recently, FUS has been utilised in combination with MRI-labelled liposomes that respond to temperature increase. This strategy aims to “activate” nanoparticles to release their cargo locally when triggered by hyperthermia induced by FUS. MRI-guided FUS drug delivery provides the opportunity to improve drug bioavailability locally and therefore improve the therapeutic profiles of drugs. This drug delivery strategy can be directly translated to clinic as MRg FUS is a promising clinically therapeutic approach. However, more basic research is required to understand the physiological mechanism of FUS-enhanced drug delivery.

  11. A novel method to assess pial collateralization from stroke perfusion MRI: subdividing T{sub max} into anatomical compartments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potreck, Arne; Seker, Fatih; Hoffmann, Angelika; Pfaff, Johannes; Bendszus, Martin; Heiland, Sabine; Pham, Mirko [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Nagel, Simon [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To develop and validate a quantitative and observer-independent method to evaluate pial collateral circulation by DSC-perfusion MRI and test whether this novel method delivers diagnostic information which is redundant to or independent from conventional penumbra imaging by the mismatch approach. We retrospectively identified 47 patients with M1 occlusion who underwent MR diffusion/perfusion imaging and mechanical thrombectomy at our facility. By automated registration and segmentation, T{sub max} delays were attributed specifically to the pial, cortical and parenchymal compartments. The resulting pial volumes at delay were defined as the pial T{sub max} map-assessed collateral score (TMACS) and correlated with gold standard digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Mismatch ratio was assessed by conventional penumbra defining MRI criteria. Strong correlation was found between TMACS and angiographically assessed collateral score (Pearson ρ = -0.74, p < 0.001). In multiple logistic regression, both good collaterals according to TMACS [OR 4.3 (1.1-19, p = 0.04)] and mismatch ratio ≥ 3.5 [OR 12.3 (1.88-249, p = 0.03)] were independent predictors of favourable clinical outcome. Perfusion delay in the pial compartment, as evaluated by TMACS, closely reflects the extent of pial collaterals in gold-standard DSA. TMACS and mismatch ratio were found to be complementary predictors of a favourable clinical outcome, each adding independent predictive information. (orig.)

  12. Quantitative evaluation of polymer concentration profile during swelling of hydrophilic matrix tablets using 1H NMR and MRI methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Sasa; Lahajnar, Gojmir; Sepe, Ana; Kristl, Julijana

    2005-02-01

    Many pharmaceutical tablets are based on hydrophilic polymers, which, after exposure to water, form a gel layer around the tablet that limits the dissolution and diffusion of the drug and provides a mechanism for controlled drug release. Our aim was to determine the thickness of the swollen gel layer of matrix tablets and to develop a method for calculating the polymer concentration profile across the gel layer. MR imaging has been used to investigate the in situ swelling behaviour of cellulose ether matrix tablets and NMR spectroscopy experiments were performed on homogeneous hydrogels with known polymer concentration. The MRI results show that the thickest gel layer was observed for hydroxyethylcellulose tablets, followed by definitely thinner but almost equal gel layer for hydroxypropylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose of both molecular weights. The water proton NMR relaxation parameters were combined with the MRI data to obtain a quantitative description of the swelling process on the basis of the concentrations and mobilities of water and polymer as functions of time and distance. The different concentration profiles observed after the same swelling time are the consequence of the different polymer characteristics. The procedure developed here could be used as a general method for calculating polymer concentration profiles on other similar polymeric systems.

  13. Comparison between modified Dixon MRI techniques, MR spectroscopic relaxometry, and different histologic quantification methods in the assessment of hepatic steatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuk, Guido M.; Block, Wolfgang; Willinek, Winfried A.; Schild, Hans H.; Traeber, Frank [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Hittatiya, Kanishka; Fischer, Hans-Peter [University of Bonn, Department of Pathology, Bonn (Germany); Sprinkart, Alois M. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Ruhr-University, Institute of Medical Engineering, Bochum (Germany); Eggers, Holger [Philips Research Europe, Hamburg (Germany); Gieseke, Juergen [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Moeller, Philipp; Spengler, Ulrich; Trebicka, Jonel [University of Bonn, Department of Internal Medicine I, Bonn (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    To compare systematically quantitative MRI, MR spectroscopy (MRS), and different histological methods for liver fat quantification in order to identify possible incongruities. Fifty-nine consecutive patients with liver disorders were examined on a 3 T MRI system. Quantitative MRI was performed using a dual- and a six-echo variant of the modified Dixon (mDixon) sequence, calculating proton density fat fraction (PDFF) maps, in addition to single-voxel MRS. Histological fat quantification included estimation of the percentage of hepatocytes containing fat vesicles as well as semi-automatic quantification (qHisto) using tissue quantification software. In 33 of 59 patients, the hepatic fat fraction was >5 % as determined by MRS (maximum 45 %, mean 17 %). Dual-echo mDixon yielded systematically lower PDFF values than six-echo mDixon (mean difference 1.0 %; P < 0.001). Six-echo mDixon correlated excellently with MRS, qHisto, and the estimated percentage of hepatocytes containing fat vesicles (R = 0.984, 0.967, 0.941, respectively, all P < 0.001). Mean values obtained by the estimated percentage of hepatocytes containing fat were higher by a factor of 2.5 in comparison to qHisto. Six-echo mDixon and MRS showed the best agreement with values obtained by qHisto. Six-echo mDixon, MRS, and qHisto provide the most robust and congruent results and are therefore most appropriate for reliable quantification of liver fat. (orig.)

  14. A new MRI method for the quantitative evaluation of extraocular muscle size in thyroid ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, K.; Gueven, K.; Sencer, S.; Minareci, O.; Cikim, A.; Guel, N.

    2003-01-01

    In cross section, extraocular muscles are more or less elliptical, with short and long diameters. We studied the ratio (R) of short to long diameter and investigated its use in quantitative assessment of the extraocular muscles in patients with Graves's disease. We measured the diameters on T1-weighted axial and coronal MRI and computed R for each extraocular muscle in 80 patients without and 40 with Graves's disease. We compared the measurements and R of the right and left orbits, and of men and women. The short diameter of all extraocular muscles apart from the superior oblique showed significant differences between men and women, and that of the inferior rectus varied significantly with age. R, however, was unrelated to sex or age. All patients with Graves's disease and an increased short diameter also had an increased R, but 6% of the muscles showed an increase in R, even though their short diameter was within the normal range. (orig.)

  15. Usefulness of 3D-VIBE method in breast dynamic MRI. Imaging parameters and contrasting effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikoshi, Masato; Ueda, Takashi; Nishiki, Shigeo; Satou, Kouichi; Wada, Akihiko; Imaoka, Izumi; Matsuo, Michimasa

    2003-01-01

    MR imaging (MRI) has been reported to be a useful modality to characterize breast tumors and to evaluate disease extent. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI, in particular, allows breast lesions to be characterized with high sensitivity and specificity. Our study was designed to develop three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (3D-VIBE) techniques for the evaluation of breast tumors. First, agarose/Gd-DTPA phantoms with various concentrations of Gd-DTPA were imaged using 3D-VIBE and turbo spin echo (TSE). Second, one of the phantoms was imaged with 3D-VIBE using different flip angles. Finally, water excitation (WE) and a chemical shift-selective (CHESS) pulse were applied to the images. Each image was analyzed for signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio (1.25*Ms/Mb) (SNR), and contrast ratio [(Ms1-Ms2)/{(Ms1+Ms2)/2}]. The results showed that 3D-VIBE provided better contrast ratios with a linear fit than TSE, although 3D-VIBE showed a lower SNR. To reach the best contrast ratio, the optimized flip angle was found to be 30 deg for contrast-enhanced dynamic study. Both WE and CHESS pulses were reliable for obtaining fat- suppressed images. In conclusion, the 3D-VIBE technique can image the entire breast area with high resolution and provide better contrast than TSE. Our phantom study suggests that optimized 3D-VIBE may be useful for the assessment of breast tumors. (author)

  16. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  17. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Melchert, U.H.; Schroeder, C.; Boer, R. de; Spielmann, R.P.; Heller, M.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  18. Comparison between PET template-based method and MRI-based method for cortical quantification of florbetapir (AV-45) uptake in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Aubert, L.; Nemmi, F.; Peran, P. [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Toulouse (France); Barbeau, E.J. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition, France, CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse (France); Service de Neurologie, Pole Neurosciences, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Payoux, P. [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Toulouse (France); Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Pole Imagerie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Chollet, F.; Pariente, J. [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Toulouse (France); Service de Neurologie, Pole Neurosciences, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France)

    2014-05-15

    Florbetapir (AV-45) has been shown to be a reliable tool for assessing in vivo amyloid load in patients with Alzheimer's disease from the early stages. However, nonspecific white matter binding has been reported in healthy subjects as well as in patients with Alzheimer's disease. To avoid this issue, cortical quantification might increase the reliability of AV-45 PET analyses. In this study, we compared two quantification methods for AV-45 binding, a classical method relying on PET template registration (route 1), and a MRI-based method (route 2) for cortical quantification. We recruited 22 patients at the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease and 17 matched controls. AV-45 binding was assessed using both methods, and target-to-cerebellum mean global standard uptake values (SUVr) were obtained for each of them, together with SUVr in specific regions of interest. Quantification using the two routes was compared between the clinical groups (intragroup comparison), and between groups for each route (intergroup comparison). Discriminant analysis was performed. In the intragroup comparison, differences in uptake values were observed between route 1 and route 2 in both groups. In the intergroup comparison, AV-45 uptake was higher in patients than controls in all regions of interest using both methods, but the effect size of this difference was larger using route 2. In the discriminant analysis, route 2 showed a higher specificity (94.1 % versus 70.6 %), despite a lower sensitivity (77.3 % versus 86.4 %), and D-prime values were higher for route 2. These findings suggest that, although both quantification methods enabled patients at early stages of Alzheimer's disease to be well discriminated from controls, PET template-based quantification seems adequate for clinical use, while the MRI-based cortical quantification method led to greater intergroup differences and may be more suitable for use in current clinical research. (orig.)

  19. MRI in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  20. MRI in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  1. Multilevel Thresholding Method Based on Electromagnetism for Accurate Brain MRI Segmentation to Detect White Matter, Gray Matter, and CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sandhya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work explains an advanced and accurate brain MRI segmentation method. MR brain image segmentation is to know the anatomical structure, to identify the abnormalities, and to detect various tissues which help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. This proposed technique is a Multilevel Thresholding (MT method based on the phenomenon of Electromagnetism and it segments the image into three tissues such as White Matter (WM, Gray Matter (GM, and CSF. The approach incorporates skull stripping and filtering using anisotropic diffusion filter in the preprocessing stage. This thresholding method uses the force of attraction-repulsion between the charged particles to increase the population. It is the combination of Electromagnetism-Like optimization algorithm with the Otsu and Kapur objective functions. The results obtained by using the proposed method are compared with the ground-truth images and have given best values for the measures sensitivity, specificity, and segmentation accuracy. The results using 10 MR brain images proved that the proposed method has accurately segmented the three brain tissues compared to the existing segmentation methods such as K-means, fuzzy C-means, OTSU MT, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO, Bacterial Foraging Algorithm (BFA, Genetic Algorithm (GA, and Fuzzy Local Gaussian Mixture Model (FLGMM.

  2. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts

  3. A simple method of measuring tibial tubercle to trochlear groove distance on MRI: description of a novel and reliable technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Christopher L; Heidenreich, Mark J; Dahm, Diane L; Bond, Jeffrey R; Collins, Mark S; Krych, Aaron J

    2016-03-01

    Tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance is a variable that helps guide surgical decision-making in patients with patellar instability. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy and reliability of an MRI TT-TG measuring technique using a simple external alignment method to a previously validated gold standard technique that requires advanced software read by radiologists. TT-TG was calculated by MRI on 59 knees with a clinical diagnosis of patellar instability in a blinded and randomized fashion by two musculoskeletal radiologists using advanced software and by two orthopaedists using the study technique which utilizes measurements taken on a simple electronic imaging platform. Interrater reliability between the two radiologists and the two orthopaedists and intermethods reliability between the two techniques were calculated using interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). ICC and CCC values greater than 0.75 were considered to represent excellent agreement. The mean TT-TG distance was 14.7 mm (Standard Deviation (SD) 4.87 mm) and 15.4 mm (SD 5.41) as measured by the radiologists and orthopaedists, respectively. Excellent interobserver agreement was noted between the radiologists (ICC 0.941; CCC 0.941), the orthopaedists (ICC 0.978; CCC 0.976), and the two techniques (ICC 0.941; CCC 0.933). The simple TT-TG distance measurement technique analysed in this study resulted in excellent agreement and reliability as compared to the gold standard technique. This method can predictably be performed by orthopaedic surgeons without advanced radiologic software. II.

  4. Cine MRI of dissecting aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, Hajime

    1991-01-01

    Cine MRI was performed in 25 cases of aortic dissection and comparative study among cine MRI, spin-echo static MRI, contrast-enhanced CT and intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was made. Cine MRI accurately detected aortic dissection. It was most accurate among various diagnostic methods in demonstration of entry site of dissection. Take-off of renal artery and its relation to true and false channels was also accurately demonstrated by cine MRI. The above results suggest that cine MRI can be an important diagnostic modality with almost equal diagnostic quality to those of conventional angiography. However, further technical improvement to shorten the imaging time seems necessary to replace angiography. (author)

  5. A simple method for detecting tumor in T2-weighted MRI brain images. An image-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Phooi-Yee; Ozawa, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a decision support system which uses a computer-based procedure to detect tumor blocks or lesions in digitized medical images. The authors developed a simple method with a low computation effort to detect tumors on T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain images, focusing on the connection between the spatial pixel value and tumor properties from four different perspectives: cases having minuscule differences between two images using a fixed block-based method, tumor shape and size using the edge and binary images, tumor properties based on texture values using spatial pixel intensity distribution controlled by a global discriminate value, and the occurrence of content-specific tumor pixel for threshold images. Measurements of the following medical datasets were performed: different time interval images, and different brain disease images on single and multiple slice images. Experimental results have revealed that our proposed technique incurred an overall error smaller than those in other proposed methods. In particular, the proposed method allowed decrements of false alarm and missed alarm errors, which demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed technique. In this paper, we also present a prototype system, known as PCB, to evaluate the performance of the proposed methods by actual experiments, comparing the detection accuracy and system performance. (author)

  6. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A; Wilkinson, A G; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I; Boardman, James P

    2016-03-24

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases 'uniformly' distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course.

  7. Patient-adapted reconstruction and acquisition dynamic imaging method (PARADIGM) for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Nitin; Bresler, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a challenging problem because the MR data acquisition is often not fast enough to meet the combined spatial and temporal Nyquist sampling rate requirements. Current approaches to this problem include hardware-based acceleration of the acquisition, and model-based image reconstruction techniques. In this paper we propose an alternative approach, called PARADIGM, which adapts both the acquisition and reconstruction to the spatio-temporal characteristics of the imaged object. The approach is based on time-sequential sampling theory, addressing the problem of acquiring a spatio-temporal signal under the constraint that only a limited amount of data can be acquired at a time instant. PARADIGM identifies a model class for the particular imaged object using a scout MR scan or auxiliary data. This object-adapted model is then used to optimize MR data acquisition, such that the imaging constraints are met, acquisition speed requirements are minimized, essentially perfect reconstruction of any object in the model class is guaranteed, and the inverse problem of reconstructing the dynamic object has a condition number of one. We describe spatio-temporal object models for various dynamic imaging applications including cardiac imaging. We present the theory underlying PARADIGM and analyze its performance theoretically and numerically. We also propose a practical MR imaging scheme for 2D dynamic cardiac imaging based on the theory. For this application, PARADIGM is predicted to provide a 10–25 × acceleration compared to the optimal non-adaptive scheme. Finally we present generalized optimality criteria and extend the scheme to dynamic imaging with three spatial dimensions

  8. MRI in sarcoglycanopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterise the pattern and spectrum of involvement on muscle MRI in a large cohort of patients with sarcoglycanopathies, which are limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2C-2F) caused by mutations in one of the four genes coding for muscle sarcoglycans. METHODS: Lower limb MRI sca...

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structure of an organ and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the ...

  10. Morphological imaging and T2 and T2* mapping of hip cartilage at 7 Tesla MRI under the influence of intravenous gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazik-Palm, Andrea; Geis, Christina; Goebel, Juliane; Theysohn, Jens M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Kraff, Oliver; Johst, Soeren [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High-Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the influence of intravenous gadolinium on cartilage T2 and T2* relaxation times and on morphological image quality at 7-T hip MRI. Hips of 11 healthy volunteers were examined at 7 T. Multi-echo sequences for T2 and T2* mapping, 3D T1 volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) and double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequences were acquired before and after intravenous application of gadolinium according to a delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) protocol. Cartilage relaxation times were measured in both scans. Morphological sequences were assessed quantitatively using contrast ratios and qualitatively using a 4-point Likert scale. Student's t-test, Pearson's correlation (ρ) and Wilcoxon sign-rank test were used for statistical comparisons. Pre- and post-contrast T2 and T2* values were highly correlated (T2: acetabular: ρ = 0.76, femoral: ρ = 0.77; T2*: acetabular: ρ = 0.80, femoral: ρ = 0.72). Gadolinium enhanced contrasts between cartilage and joint fluid in DESS and T1 VIBE according to the qualitative (p = 0.01) and quantitative (p < 0.001) analysis. The delineation of acetabular and femoral cartilage and the labrum predominantly improved with gadolinium. Gadolinium showed no relevant influence on T2 or T2* relaxation times and improved morphological image quality at 7 T. Therefore, morphological and quantitative sequences including dGEMRIC can be conducted in a one-stop-shop examination. (orig.)

  11. ADvanced IMage Algebra (ADIMA): a novel method for depicting multiple sclerosis lesion heterogeneity, as demonstrated by quantitative MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannakas, Marios C; Tozer, Daniel J; Schmierer, Klaus; Chard, Declan T; Anderson, Valerie M; Altmann, Daniel R; Miller, David H; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M

    2013-05-01

    There are modest correlations between multiple sclerosis (MS) disability and white matter lesion (WML) volumes, as measured by T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans (T2-WML). This may partly reflect pathological heterogeneity in WMLs, which is not apparent on T2w scans. To determine if ADvanced IMage Algebra (ADIMA), a novel MRI post-processing method, can reveal WML heterogeneity from proton-density weighted (PDw) and T2w images. We obtained conventional PDw and T2w images from 10 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and ADIMA images were calculated from these. We classified all WML into bright (ADIMA-b) and dark (ADIMA-d) sub-regions, which were segmented. We obtained conventional T2-WML and T1-WML volumes for comparison, as well as the following quantitative magnetic resonance parameters: magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR), T1 and T2. Also, we assessed the reproducibility of the segmentation for ADIMA-b, ADIMA-d and T2-WML. Our study's ADIMA-derived volumes correlated with conventional lesion volumes (p < 0.05). ADIMA-b exhibited higher T1 and T2, and lower MTR than the T2-WML (p < 0.001). Despite the similarity in T1 values between ADIMA-b and T1-WML, these regions were only partly overlapping with each other. ADIMA-d exhibited quantitative characteristics similar to T2-WML; however, they were only partly overlapping. Mean intra- and inter-observer coefficients of variation for ADIMA-b, ADIMA-d and T2-WML volumes were all < 6 % and < 10 %, respectively. ADIMA enabled the simple classification of WML into two groups having different quantitative magnetic resonance properties, which can be reproducibly distinguished.

  12. A fast alignment method for breast MRI follow-up studies using automated breast segmentation and current-prior registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Strehlow, Jan; Rühaak, Jan; Weiler, Florian; Diez, Yago; Gubern-Merida, Albert; Diekmann, Susanne; Laue, Hendrik; Hahn, Horst K.

    2015-03-01

    In breast cancer screening for high-risk women, follow-up magnetic resonance images (MRI) are acquired with a time interval ranging from several months up to a few years. Prior MRI studies may provide additional clinical value when examining the current one and thus have the potential to increase sensitivity and specificity of screening. To build a spatial correlation between suspicious findings in both current and prior studies, a reliable alignment method between follow-up studies is desirable. However, long time interval, different scanners and imaging protocols, and varying breast compression can result in a large deformation, which challenges the registration process. In this work, we present a fast and robust spatial alignment framework, which combines automated breast segmentation and current-prior registration techniques in a multi-level fashion. First, fully automatic breast segmentation is applied to extract the breast masks that are used to obtain an initial affine transform. Then, a non-rigid registration algorithm using normalized gradient fields as similarity measure together with curvature regularization is applied. A total of 29 subjects and 58 breast MR images were collected for performance assessment. To evaluate the global registration accuracy, the volume overlap and boundary surface distance metrics are calculated, resulting in an average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 0.96 and root mean square distance (RMSD) of 1.64 mm. In addition, to measure local registration accuracy, for each subject a radiologist annotated 10 pairs of markers in the current and prior studies representing corresponding anatomical locations. The average distance error of marker pairs dropped from 67.37 mm to 10.86 mm after applying registration.

  13. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grova, C [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Jannin, P [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Biraben, A [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Buvat, I [INSERM U494, CHU Pitie Salpetriere, Paris (France); Benali, H [INSERM U494, CHU Pitie Salpetriere, Paris (France); Bernard, A M [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Eugene Marquis, Rennes (France); Scarabin, J M [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Gibaud, B [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France)

    2003-12-21

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were

  14. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  15. A semi-automatic method to determine electrode positions and labels from gel artifacts in EEG/fMRI-studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, J.C.; van Houdt, P.J.; Verdaasdonk, R.; Ossenblok, P.P.W.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of simultaneous EEG and fMRI data is generally based on the extraction of regressors of interest from the EEG, which are correlated to the fMRI data in a general linear model setting. In more advanced approaches, the spatial information of EEG is also exploited by assuming underlying

  16. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  17. Evaluation of the Usefulness of the MRI Jelly Method for Diagnosing Complete Cul-de-Sac Obliteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwaho Kikuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We conducted a single-center study to evaluate the usefulness of the magnetic resonance (MR imaging jelly method for diagnosing endometriosis-associated adhesions in the Pouch of Douglas. Methods. Thirty women with menstrual pain, dyspareunia, and chronic pelvic pain were enrolled in the study. All had been scheduled for laparoscopic surgery on the basis of pelvic and/or ultrasonographic (US evaluation. All underwent MR imaging both with and without application of US jelly to the vagina and rectum. The images were compared and analyzed postsurgically in a random and blinded fashion by a radiology specialist and a radiology fellow. The radiologists’ interpretations of the images were compared to the surgical findings recorded on DVDs. Results. Adhesions in the Pouch of Douglas were found in 21 patients. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging without jelly administration were 85.7% and 55.6%, respectively, for the specialist and 81.0% and 55.6%, respectively, for the fellow; with jelly administration, values were 95.2% and 88.9% for the specialist and 90.5% and 66.7% for the fellow. Opacity produced by the jelly increased the sensitivity and specificity for both radiologists. Conclusion. The MRI jelly method is a potentially useful, beneficial, and simple approach for diagnosing Pouch of Douglas adhesions.

  18. In vivo noninvasive thermometry for hyperthermia applications using the MRI-based proton-resonance-frequency method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Poorter, J; De Deene, Y; Achten, E [Ghent University (Belgium). Dept. of Magnetic Resonance; De Wagter, C [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Thomsen, C [Hvidovre Univ. (Denmark); Staahlberg, F [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1995-12-01

    The lack of noninvasive temperature monitoring is seriously limiting hyperthermia treatment of deep-seated tumors. MRI methods exploit the temperature dependence of a physical property whose spatial distribution can be visualized. The Proton Resonance Frequency (PRF) as physical property was examined because phantom studies prove the high accuracy that can be obtained using this parameter. Thermal experiments were performed in human lower legs. The results show that in muscle tissue the three-dimensional temperature distribution can be evaluated with a mean spatial distribution of 2 millimetres, a temporal resolution of 2 minutes and an accuracy of about 1 degree Celsius. However, it is not possible to retrieve the temperature distribution in fat tissue using the PRF-method due to the predominance of susceptibility effects in fat. The susceptibility effects are a consequence of the temperature dependence of the susceptibility constants. Experimental data on these dependencies were obtained and the magnitude of these effects was modelled for some specific configurations. The susceptibility effects in muscle tissue can be neglected when precautions are made. The PRF method is an attractive tool to study time-varying temperature changes in muscle tissue.

  19. In vivo noninvasive thermometry for hyperthermia applications using the MRI-based proton-resonance-frequency method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Poorter, J.; De Deene, Y.; Achten, E.; Staahlberg, F.

    1995-01-01

    The lack of noninvasive temperature monitoring is seriously limiting hyperthermia treatment of deep-seated tumors. MRI methods exploit the temperature dependence of a physical property whose spatial distribution can be visualized. The Proton Resonance Frequency (PRF) as physical property was examined because phantom studies prove the high accuracy that can be obtained using this parameter. Thermal experiments were performed in human lower legs. The results show that in muscle tissue the three-dimensional temperature distribution can be evaluated with a mean spatial distribution of 2 millimetres, a temporal resolution of 2 minutes and an accuracy of about 1 degree Celsius. However, it is not possible to retrieve the temperature distribution in fat tissue using the PRF-method due to the predominance of susceptibility effects in fat. The susceptibility effects are a consequence of the temperature dependence of the susceptibility constants. Experimental data on these dependencies were obtained and the magnitude of these effects was modelled for some specific configurations. The susceptibility effects in muscle tissue can be neglected when precautions are made. The PRF method is an attractive tool to study time-varying temperature changes in muscle tissue

  20. Evaluating fMRI methods for assessing hemispheric language dominance in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baciu, Monica; Juphard, Alexandra; Cousin, Emilie; Bas, Jean François Le

    2005-08-01

    We evaluated two methods for quantifying the hemispheric language dominance in healthy subjects, by using a rhyme detection (deciding whether couple of words rhyme) and a word fluency (generating words starting with a given letter) task. One of methods called "flip method" (FM) was based on the direct statistical comparison between hemispheres' activity. The second one, the classical lateralization indices method (LIM), was based on calculating lateralization indices by taking into account the number of activated pixels within hemispheres. The main difference between methods is the statistical assessment of the inter-hemispheric difference: while FM shows if the difference between hemispheres' activity is statistically significant, LIM shows only that if there is a difference between hemispheres. The robustness of LIM and FM was assessed by calculating correlation coefficients between LIs obtained with each of these methods and manual lateralization indices MLI obtained with Edinburgh inventory. Our results showed significant correlation between LIs provided by each method and the MIL, suggesting that both methods are robust for quantifying hemispheric dominance for language in healthy subjects. In the present study we also evaluated the effect of spatial normalization, smoothing and "clustering" (NSC) on the intra-hemispheric location of activated regions and inter-hemispheric asymmetry of the activation. Our results have shown that NSC did not affect the hemispheric specialization but increased the value of the inter-hemispheric difference.

  1. Evaluating fMRI methods for assessing hemispheric language dominance in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baciu, Monica [Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, UMR 5105 CNRS, Universite Pierre Mendes-France, F38040 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)]. E-mail: mbaciu@upmf-grenoble.fr; Juphard, Alexandra [Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, UMR 5105 CNRS, Universite Pierre Mendes-France, F38040 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Cousin, Emilie [Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, UMR 5105 CNRS, Universite Pierre Mendes-France, F38040 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Bas, Jean Francois Le [Unite IRM, CHU Grenoble (France)

    2005-08-01

    We evaluated two methods for quantifying the hemispheric language dominance in healthy subjects, by using a rhyme detection (deciding whether couple of words rhyme) and a word fluency (generating words starting with a given letter) task. One of methods called 'flip method' (FM) was based on the direct statistical comparison between hemispheres' activity. The second one, the classical lateralization indices method (LIM), was based on calculating lateralization indices by taking into account the number of activated pixels within hemispheres. The main difference between methods is the statistical assessment of the inter-hemispheric difference: while FM shows if the difference between hemispheres' activity is statistically significant, LIM shows only that if there is a difference between hemispheres. The robustness of LIM and FM was assessed by calculating correlation coefficients between LIs obtained with each of these methods and manual lateralization indices MLI obtained with Edinburgh inventory. Our results showed significant correlation between LIs provided by each method and the MIL, suggesting that both methods are robust for quantifying hemispheric dominance for language in healthy subjects. In the present study we also evaluated the effect of spatial normalization, smoothing and 'clustering' (NSC) on the intra-hemispheric location of activated regions and inter-hemispheric asymmetry of the activation. Our results have shown that NSC did not affect the hemispheric specialization but increased the value of the inter-hemispheric difference.

  2. Evaluating fMRI methods for assessing hemispheric language dominance in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baciu, Monica; Juphard, Alexandra; Cousin, Emilie; Bas, Jean Francois Le

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated two methods for quantifying the hemispheric language dominance in healthy subjects, by using a rhyme detection (deciding whether couple of words rhyme) and a word fluency (generating words starting with a given letter) task. One of methods called 'flip method' (FM) was based on the direct statistical comparison between hemispheres' activity. The second one, the classical lateralization indices method (LIM), was based on calculating lateralization indices by taking into account the number of activated pixels within hemispheres. The main difference between methods is the statistical assessment of the inter-hemispheric difference: while FM shows if the difference between hemispheres' activity is statistically significant, LIM shows only that if there is a difference between hemispheres. The robustness of LIM and FM was assessed by calculating correlation coefficients between LIs obtained with each of these methods and manual lateralization indices MLI obtained with Edinburgh inventory. Our results showed significant correlation between LIs provided by each method and the MIL, suggesting that both methods are robust for quantifying hemispheric dominance for language in healthy subjects. In the present study we also evaluated the effect of spatial normalization, smoothing and 'clustering' (NSC) on the intra-hemispheric location of activated regions and inter-hemispheric asymmetry of the activation. Our results have shown that NSC did not affect the hemispheric specialization but increased the value of the inter-hemispheric difference

  3. Optimization of the reference region method for dual pharmacokinetic modeling using Gd-DTPA/MRI and (18) F-FDG/PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Éric; Lebel, Réjean; Croteau, Étienne; Blanchette, Marie; Tremblay, Luc; Lecomte, Roger; Bentourkia, M'hamed; Lepage, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The combination of MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) offers new possibilities for the development of novel methodologies. In pharmacokinetic image analysis, the blood concentration of the imaging compound as a function of time, [i.e., the arterial input function (AIF)] is required for MRI and PET. In this study, we tested whether an AIF extracted from a reference region (RR) in MRI can be used as a surrogate for the manually sampled (18) F-FDG AIF for pharmacokinetic modeling. An MRI contrast agent, gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and a radiotracer, (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG), were simultaneously injected in a F98 glioblastoma rat model. A correction to the RR AIF for Gd-DTPA is proposed to adequately represent the manually sampled AIF. A previously published conversion method was applied to convert this AIF into a (18) F-FDG AIF. The tumor metabolic rate of glucose (TMRGlc) calculated with the manually sampled (18) F-FDG AIF, the (18) F-FDG AIF converted from the RR AIF and the (18) F-FDG AIF converted from the corrected RR AIF were found not statistically different (P>0.05). An AIF derived from an RR in MRI can be accurately converted into a (18) F-FDG AIF and used in PET pharmacokinetic modeling. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A comparison of three clustering methods for finding subgroups in MRI, SMS or clinical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Jensen, Rikke K; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-01-01

    ). There is a scarcity of head-to-head comparisons that can inform the choice of which clustering method might be suitable for particular clinical datasets and research questions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform a head-to-head comparison of three commonly available methods (SPSS TwoStep CA, Latent Gold...... LCA and SNOB LCA). METHODS: The performance of these three methods was compared: (i) quantitatively using the number of subgroups detected, the classification probability of individuals into subgroups, the reproducibility of results, and (ii) qualitatively using subjective judgments about each program...... classify individuals into those subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Our subjective judgement was that Latent Gold offered the best balance of sensitivity to subgroups, ease of use and presentation of results with these datasets but we recognise that different clustering methods may suit other types of data...

  5. MRI of hip prostheses using single-point methods : in vitro studies towards the artifact-free imaging of individuals with metal implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos Cabrer, P.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Toorn, van der A.; Nicolaij, K.

    2004-01-01

    Use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in individuals with orthopedic implants is limited because of the large distortions caused by metallic components. As a possible solution for this problem, we suggest the use of single-point imaging (SPI) methods, which are immune to the susceptibility

  6. Investigation on water status and distribution in broccoli and the effects of drying on water status using NMR and MRI methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Fangfang; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2017-01-01

    Many quality attributes of food products are influenced by the water status and the microstructure. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are applied to non-destructively monitor the water status and structure of food. The aim of this study is to

  7. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (I): Theory, method, and phantom experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Jeroen J. N.; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Vos, Frans M.

    2017-01-01

    The arterial input function (AIF) represents the time-dependent arterial contrast agent (CA) concentration that is used in pharmacokinetic modeling. To develop a novel method for estimating the AIF from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data, while compensating for flow enhancement. Signal

  8. Signal-to-noise ratio measurement in parallel MRI with subtraction mapping and consecutive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hiroshi; Miyati, Tosiaki; Ogura, Akio; Doi, Tsukasa; Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Machida, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Kouzou; Kitou, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    When measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of an image the used parallel magnetic resonance imaging, it was confirmed that there was a problem in the application of past SNR measurement. With the method of measuring the noise from the background signal, SNR with parallel imaging was higher than that without parallel imaging. In the subtraction method (NEMA standard), which sets a wide region of interest, the white noise was not evaluated correctly although SNR was close to the theoretical value. We proposed two techniques because SNR in parallel imaging was not uniform according to inhomogeneity of the coil sensitivity distribution and geometry factor. Using the first method (subtraction mapping), two images were scanned with identical parameters. The SNR in each pixel divided the running mean (7 by 7 pixels in neighborhood) by standard deviation/√2 in the same region of interest. Using the second (consecutive) method, more than fifty consecutive scans of the uniform phantom were obtained with identical scan parameters. Then the SNR was calculated from the ratio of mean signal intensity to the standard deviation in each pixel on a series of images. Moreover, geometry factors were calculated from SNRs with and without parallel imaging. The SNR and geometry factor using parallel imaging in the subtraction mapping method agreed with those of the consecutive method. Both methods make it possible to obtain a more detailed determination of SNR in parallel imaging and to calculate the geometry factor. (author)

  9. A Dictionary Learning Method with Total Generalized Variation for MRI Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongyang; Wei, Jingbo; Liu, Qiegen; Wang, Yuhao; Deng, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing images from their noisy and incomplete measurements is always a challenge especially for medical MR image with important details and features. This work proposes a novel dictionary learning model that integrates two sparse regularization methods: the total generalized variation (TGV) approach and adaptive dictionary learning (DL). In the proposed method, the TGV selectively regularizes different image regions at different levels to avoid oil painting artifacts largely. At the same time, the dictionary learning adaptively represents the image features sparsely and effectively recovers details of images. The proposed model is solved by variable splitting technique and the alternating direction method of multiplier. Extensive simulation experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method consistently recovers MR images efficiently and outperforms the current state-of-the-art approaches in terms of higher PSNR and lower HFEN values.

  10. A Dictionary Learning Method with Total Generalized Variation for MRI Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructing images from their noisy and incomplete measurements is always a challenge especially for medical MR image with important details and features. This work proposes a novel dictionary learning model that integrates two sparse regularization methods: the total generalized variation (TGV approach and adaptive dictionary learning (DL. In the proposed method, the TGV selectively regularizes different image regions at different levels to avoid oil painting artifacts largely. At the same time, the dictionary learning adaptively represents the image features sparsely and effectively recovers details of images. The proposed model is solved by variable splitting technique and the alternating direction method of multiplier. Extensive simulation experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method consistently recovers MR images efficiently and outperforms the current state-of-the-art approaches in terms of higher PSNR and lower HFEN values.

  11. Toward implementing an MRI-based PET attenuation-correction method for neurologic studies on the MR-PET brain prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; van der Kouwe, Andre; Benner, Thomas; Michel, Christian J; Hamm, Michael; Fenchel, Matthias; Fischl, Bruce; Rosen, Bruce; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A Gregory

    2010-09-01

    Several factors have to be considered for implementing an accurate attenuation-correction (AC) method in a combined MR-PET scanner. In this work, some of these challenges were investigated, and an AC method based entirely on the MRI data obtained with a single dedicated sequence was developed and used for neurologic studies performed with the MR-PET human brain scanner prototype. The focus was on the problem of bone-air segmentation, selection of the linear attenuation coefficient for bone, and positioning of the radiofrequency coil. The impact of these factors on PET data quantification was studied in simulations and experimental measurements performed on the combined MR-PET scanner. A novel dual-echo ultrashort echo time (DUTE) MRI sequence was proposed for head imaging. Simultaneous MR-PET data were acquired, and the PET images reconstructed using the proposed DUTE MRI-based AC method were compared with the PET images that had been reconstructed using a CT-based AC method. Our data suggest that incorrectly accounting for the bone tissue attenuation can lead to large underestimations (>20%) of the radiotracer concentration in the cortex. Assigning a linear attenuation coefficient of 0.143 or 0.151 cm(-1) to bone tissue appears to give the best trade-off between bias and variability in the resulting images. Not identifying the internal air cavities introduces large overestimations (>20%) in adjacent structures. On the basis of these results, the segmented CT AC method was established as the silver standard for the segmented MRI-based AC method. For an integrated MR-PET scanner, in particular, ignoring the radiofrequency coil attenuation can cause large underestimations (i.e., MRI- and CT-based AC methods compare favorably in most of

  12. Noninvasive MRI thermometry with the proton resonance frequency (PRF) method: in vivo results in human muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Poorter, J; De Wagter, C; De Deene, Y

    1995-01-01

    The noninvasive thermometry method is based on the temperature dependence of the proton resonance frequency (PRF). High-quality temperature images can be obtained from phase information of standard gradient-echo sequences with an accuracy of 0.2 degrees C in phantoms. This work was focused on the...

  13. A primal–dual hybrid gradient method for nonlinear operators with applications to MRI

    KAUST Repository

    Valkonen, Tuomo

    2014-01-01

    generalized variation priors. For such problems, we show that our general local convergence result holds when the noise level of the data f is low, and the regularization parameter α is correspondingly small. We verify the numerical performance of the method

  14. Segmentation of Brain MRI Using SOM-FCM-Based Method and 3D Statistical Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ortiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current medical imaging systems provide excellent spatial resolution, high tissue contrast, and up to 65535 intensity levels. Thus, image processing techniques which aim to exploit the information contained in the images are necessary for using these images in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD systems. Image segmentation may be defined as the process of parcelling the image to delimit different neuroanatomical tissues present on the brain. In this paper we propose a segmentation technique using 3D statistical features extracted from the volume image. In addition, the presented method is based on unsupervised vector quantization and fuzzy clustering techniques and does not use any a priori information. The resulting fuzzy segmentation method addresses the problem of partial volume effect (PVE and has been assessed using real brain images from the Internet Brain Image Repository (IBSR.

  15. Clinical evaluation of pulmonary perfusion MRI using FAIR (flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery)-HASTE (Half-Fourier Single-Shot TurboSE) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togami, Izumi; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsunoda, Masatoshi; Sei, Tetsurou; Sato, Shuhei; Yabuki, Takayuki; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The FAIR-HASTE method is a kind of noninvasive perfusion MR imaging obtained without the use of contrast media. By subtracting a flow-insensitive image from a flow-sensitive image, contrast enhancement of inflowing blood achieved. In the present study, we applied pulmonary perfusion FAIR-HASTE sequence for 23 patients with various pulmonary diseases, and compared the findings with those by pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy and Gadolinium perfusion MRI. Pulmonary perfusion imaging with the FAIR-HASTE method was possible in all clinical cases, and the findings corresponded well to those obtained by perfusion MRI using contrast media or pulmonary scintigraphy. The FAIR-HASTE method is a promising method for the evaluation of pulmonary perfusion. (author)

  16. SU-C-17A-03: Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration Methods Between MRI and CT for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, N; Glide-Hurst, C; Zhong, H; Chin, K; Kumarasiri, A; Liu, C; Liu, M; Siddiqui, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the performance of two commercially available and one open source B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms between T2-weighted MRI and treatment planning CT using the DICE indices. Methods: CT simulation (CT-SIM) and MR simulation (MR-SIM) for four prostate cancer patients were conducted on the same day using the same setup and immobilization devices. CT images (120 kVp, 500 mAs, voxel size = 1.1x1.1x3.0 mm3) were acquired using an open-bore CT scanner. T2-weighted Turbo Spine Echo (T2W-TSE) images (TE/TR/α = 80/4560 ms/90°, voxel size = 0.7×0.7×2.5 mm3) were scanned on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM. Prostates, seminal vesicles, rectum and bladders were delineated on both T2W-TSE and CT images by the attending physician. T2W-TSE images were registered to CT images using three DIR algorithms, SmartAdapt (Varian), Velocity AI (Velocity) and Elastix (Klein et al 2010) and contours were propagated. DIR results were evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively by image comparison and calculating organ DICE indices. Results: Significant differences in the contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were observed between MR and CT. On average, volume changes of the propagated contours were 5%, 2%, 160% and 8% for the prostate, seminal vesicles, bladder and rectum respectively. Corresponding mean DICE indices were 0.7, 0.5, 0.8, and 0.7. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.9 among three algorithms for the Dice indices. Conclusion: Three DIR algorithms for CT/MR registration yielded similar results for organ propagation. Due to the different soft tissue contrasts between MRI and CT, organ delineation of prostate and SVs varied significantly, thus efforts to develop other DIR evaluation metrics are warranted. Conflict of interest: Submitting institution has research agreements with Varian Medical System and Philips Healthcare

  17. SU-C-17A-03: Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration Methods Between MRI and CT for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N; Glide-Hurst, C; Zhong, H; Chin, K; Kumarasiri, A; Liu, C; Liu, M; Siddiqui, S [I Chetty, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We evaluated the performance of two commercially available and one open source B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms between T2-weighted MRI and treatment planning CT using the DICE indices. Methods: CT simulation (CT-SIM) and MR simulation (MR-SIM) for four prostate cancer patients were conducted on the same day using the same setup and immobilization devices. CT images (120 kVp, 500 mAs, voxel size = 1.1x1.1x3.0 mm3) were acquired using an open-bore CT scanner. T2-weighted Turbo Spine Echo (T2W-TSE) images (TE/TR/α = 80/4560 ms/90°, voxel size = 0.7×0.7×2.5 mm3) were scanned on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM. Prostates, seminal vesicles, rectum and bladders were delineated on both T2W-TSE and CT images by the attending physician. T2W-TSE images were registered to CT images using three DIR algorithms, SmartAdapt (Varian), Velocity AI (Velocity) and Elastix (Klein et al 2010) and contours were propagated. DIR results were evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively by image comparison and calculating organ DICE indices. Results: Significant differences in the contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were observed between MR and CT. On average, volume changes of the propagated contours were 5%, 2%, 160% and 8% for the prostate, seminal vesicles, bladder and rectum respectively. Corresponding mean DICE indices were 0.7, 0.5, 0.8, and 0.7. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.9 among three algorithms for the Dice indices. Conclusion: Three DIR algorithms for CT/MR registration yielded similar results for organ propagation. Due to the different soft tissue contrasts between MRI and CT, organ delineation of prostate and SVs varied significantly, thus efforts to develop other DIR evaluation metrics are warranted. Conflict of interest: Submitting institution has research agreements with Varian Medical System and Philips Healthcare.

  18. Optimizing signal intensity correction during evaluation of hepatic parenchymal enhancement on gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI: Comparison of three methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoda, Minori; Hyodo, Tomoko; Murakami, Takamichi; Okada, Masahiro; Uto, Tatsuro; Hori, Masatoshi; Miyati, Tosiaki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Signal intensity is often used to evaluate hepatic enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA in the hepatobiliary phase. •Comparison of uncorrected signal intensity with T 1 value revealed signal intensity instability. •Measurement of uncorrected liver SI or SNR often yields erroneous results on late-phase gadoxetate MRI due to shimming and other optimization techniques. •Signal intensity corrected by scale and rescale slope from DICOM data gave comparable results. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare signal intensity (SI) correction using scale and rescale slopes with SI correction using SIs of spleen and muscle for quantifying multiphase hepatic contrast enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA by assessing their correlation with T 1 values generated from Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequence data (ER-T 1 ). Materials and methods: Thirty patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this prospective clinical study. For each patient, breath-hold T 1 -weighted fat-suppressed three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequences (e-THRIVE) were acquired before and 2 (first phase), 10 (second phase), and 20 min (third phase) after intravenous Gd-EOB-DTPA. Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequences were acquired before and 1.5 (first phase), 8 (second phase), and 18 min (third phase) postcontrast. The liver parenchyma enhancement ratios (ER) of each phase were calculated using the SI from e-THRIVE sequences (ER-SI) and the T 1 values generated from LL-TFE sequence data (ER-T 1 ) respectively. ER-SIs were calculated in three ways: (1) comparing with splenic SI (ER-SI-s), (2) comparing with muscle SI (ER-SI-m), (3) using scale and rescale slopes obtained from DICOM headers (ER-SI-c), to eliminate the effects of receiver gain and scaling. For each of the first, second and third phases, correlation and agreement were assessed between each ER-SI and ER-T 1 . Results: In the first phase, all ER-SIs correlated weakly with ER-T 1 . In the second

  19. Similar judgment method of brain neural pathway using DT-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watashiba, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Naohisa; Sakai, Koji; Koyamada, Koji; Kanazawa, Masanori; Doi, Akio

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, the visualization of brain neural pathway extracted by the tractography technology is thought as a useful effective tool for the detection of involved area and the analysis of sick cause by comparison of difference of normal and patient's nerve fiber configurations and for the support of the surgery planning and the forecast of progress after an operation. So far, for the observation of the brain neural pathway, the method of the user's subjectively judging the 3D shape of them displayed in the image has been used. However, in this kind of subjective observation, verification of the propriety for the diagnostic result is difficult, in addition it cannot obtain sufficient reliability. Therefore, we think that the system to compare the shape based on a quantitative evaluation is necessary. To resolve this problem, we propose the system that enables the shape of the brain neural pathway extracted by the tractography technology to be compared quantitatively. The proposed system realized to calculate similarity between two neural pathways, and to display the difference area according to the similarity. (author)

  20. A novel background field removal method for MRI using projection onto dipole fields (PDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Khalidov, Ildar; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Spincemaille, Pascal; Liu, Jing; Tsiouris, A John; Wang, Yi

    2011-11-01

    For optimal image quality in susceptibility-weighted imaging and accurate quantification of susceptibility, it is necessary to isolate the local field generated by local magnetic sources (such as iron) from the background field that arises from imperfect shimming and variations in magnetic susceptibility of surrounding tissues (including air). Previous background removal techniques have limited effectiveness depending on the accuracy of model assumptions or information input. In this article, we report an observation that the magnetic field for a dipole outside a given region of interest (ROI) is approximately orthogonal to the magnetic field of a dipole inside the ROI. Accordingly, we propose a nonparametric background field removal technique based on projection onto dipole fields (PDF). In this PDF technique, the background field inside an ROI is decomposed into a field originating from dipoles outside the ROI using the projection theorem in Hilbert space. This novel PDF background removal technique was validated on a numerical simulation and a phantom experiment and was applied in human brain imaging, demonstrating substantial improvement in background field removal compared with the commonly used high-pass filtering method. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A probability-based multi-cycle sorting method for 4D-MRI: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Liu, Yilin; Cai, Jing

    2016-12-01

    To develop a novel probability-based sorting method capable of generating multiple breathing cycles of 4D-MRI images and to evaluate performance of this new method by comparing with conventional phase-based methods in terms of image quality and tumor motion measurement. Based on previous findings that breathing motion probability density function (PDF) of a single breathing cycle is dramatically different from true stabilized PDF that resulted from many breathing cycles, it is expected that a probability-based sorting method capable of generating multiple breathing cycles of 4D images may capture breathing variation information missing from conventional single-cycle sorting methods. The overall idea is to identify a few main breathing cycles (and their corresponding weightings) that can best represent the main breathing patterns of the patient and then reconstruct a set of 4D images for each of the identified main breathing cycles. This method is implemented in three steps: (1) The breathing signal is decomposed into individual breathing cycles, characterized by amplitude, and period; (2) individual breathing cycles are grouped based on amplitude and period to determine the main breathing cycles. If a group contains more than 10% of all breathing cycles in a breathing signal, it is determined as a main breathing pattern group and is represented by the average of individual breathing cycles in the group; (3) for each main breathing cycle, a set of 4D images is reconstructed using a result-driven sorting method adapted from our previous study. The probability-based sorting method was first tested on 26 patients' breathing signals to evaluate its feasibility of improving target motion PDF. The new method was subsequently tested for a sequential image acquisition scheme on the 4D digital extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom. Performance of the probability-based and conventional sorting methods was evaluated in terms of target volume precision and accuracy as measured

  2. MRI-determined liver proton density fat fraction, with MRS validation: Comparison of regions of interest sampling methods in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Kim-Nhien; Gilbert, Guillaume; Chalut, Marianne; Chagnon, Miguel; Chartrand, Gabriel; Tang, An

    2016-05-01

    To assess the agreement between published magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based regions of interest (ROI) sampling methods using liver mean proton density fat fraction (PDFF) as the reference standard. This retrospective, internal review board-approved study was conducted in 35 patients with type 2 diabetes. Liver PDFF was measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) using a stimulated-echo acquisition mode sequence and MRI using a multiecho spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequence at 3.0T. ROI sampling methods reported in the literature were reproduced and liver mean PDFF obtained by whole-liver segmentation was used as the reference standard. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Bland-Altman analysis, repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and paired t-tests were performed. ICC between MRS and MRI-PDFF was 0.916. Bland-Altman analysis showed excellent intermethod agreement with a bias of -1.5 ± 2.8%. The repeated-measures ANOVA found no systematic variation of PDFF among the nine liver segments. The correlation between liver mean PDFF and ROI sampling methods was very good to excellent (0.873 to 0.975). Paired t-tests revealed significant differences (P sampling methods that exclusively or predominantly sampled the right lobe. Significant correlations with mean PDFF were found with sampling methods that included higher number of segments, total area equal or larger than 5 cm(2) , or sampled both lobes (P = 0.001, 0.023, and 0.002, respectively). MRI-PDFF quantification methods should sample each liver segment in both lobes and include a total surface area equal or larger than 5 cm(2) to provide a close estimate of the liver mean PDFF. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Whole-body MRI in preoperative diagnostics of breast cancer. A comparison with staging methods according to the S 3 guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Neff, K.W.; Dinter, D.J.; Kern, C.; Schroeder, M.T.; Suetterlin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The German Society of Senology (step-3 guidelines for the early recognition of breast cancer in Germany) recommends whole-body staging including chest X-ray, ultrasound of the liver and bone scintigraphy before systemic therapy in patients with breast cancer. The performance of these three examinations is time-consuming and involves radiation exposure. Whole-body MR imaging (WB-MRI) allows staging in a single examination without radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of WB-MRI with staging according to the guidelines. Materials and Methods: During 04/07 and 06/09, the initial staging in 51 patients (56 ± 12 yrs) with breast cancer (24 patients with lymph node metastases) was performed according to the S 3-guidelines. Additionally, all patients underwent contrast-enhanced WB-MRI (1.5-Tesla-Magnetom Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen). The findings of the different modalities were compared after correlation of the lesions by follow-up. The detection of suspicious findings and the accuracy of prediction of malignancy of the detected lesions were evaluated. Results: Overall, 14 metastases were detected in 4 of 51 patients after completion of the follow-up. By means of WB-MRI, all 14 metastases could be detected, while just 4 of these metastases were identified by the conventional methods. Conclusion: The detection of distant metastases has an important impact on patient management. In this study WB-MRI in breast cancer staging has shown promising results in regard to possible clinical implementation as a matter of routine staging. (orig.)

  4. Studying neuroanatomy using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Jason P; van der Kouwe, André J W; Raznahan, Armin; Paus, Tomáš; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Miller, Karla L; Smith, Stephen M; Fischl, Bruce; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N

    2017-02-23

    The study of neuroanatomy using imaging enables key insights into how our brains function, are shaped by genes and environment, and change with development, aging and disease. Developments in MRI acquisition, image processing and data modeling have been key to these advances. However, MRI provides an indirect measurement of the biological signals we aim to investigate. Thus, artifacts and key questions of correct interpretation can confound the readouts provided by anatomical MRI. In this review we provide an overview of the methods for measuring macro- and mesoscopic structure and for inferring microstructural properties; we also describe key artifacts and confounds that can lead to incorrect conclusions. Ultimately, we believe that, although methods need to improve and caution is required in interpretation, structural MRI continues to have great promise in furthering our understanding of how the brain works.

  5. [Research on K-means clustering segmentation method for MRI brain image based on selecting multi-peaks in gray histogram].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoxue; Yu, Haizhong; Chen, Hao

    2013-12-01

    To solve the problem of traditional K-means clustering in which initial clustering centers are selected randomly, we proposed a new K-means segmentation algorithm based on robustly selecting 'peaks' standing for White Matter, Gray Matter and Cerebrospinal Fluid in multi-peaks gray histogram of MRI brain image. The new algorithm takes gray value of selected histogram 'peaks' as the initial K-means clustering center and can segment the MRI brain image into three parts of tissue more effectively, accurately, steadily and successfully. Massive experiments have proved that the proposed algorithm can overcome many shortcomings caused by traditional K-means clustering method such as low efficiency, veracity, robustness and time consuming. The histogram 'peak' selecting idea of the proposed segmentootion method is of more universal availability.

  6. MRI in diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Ono, Yuko; Kakinoki, Yoshio; Kimura, Humiko; Ebihara, Reiko; Nagayama, Takashi; Okada, Takaharu; Watanabe, Hiromi

    1985-01-01

    64 MRI studies of 57 cases of spinal cord diseases were reviewed, and following results were obtained. (1) MRI is usefull for screening method of spinal cord diseases, as CT in cerebral diseases. (2) MRI might replaces myelography in most of spinal cord disease, and more reliable informations might be obtained by MRI than in myelography in some cases, but (3) in detection of small organic changes, some technological problems are layed regarding to the image resolution of MRI. (author)

  7. MRI in osteochondrosis dissecans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, K.; Heuck, A.; Rodammer, G.; Raff, W.; Haller, W.

    1987-08-01

    The osseous manifestations of osteochondrosis dissecans are well demonstrated by conventional and computerised tomography. Beyond that, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is effective in evaluating the vitality and loosening of an osseous dissecate. Subchondral cavities and cartilaginous defects are detected with high acccuracy. Further, MRI seems to be a useful method in childhood to differentiate a variant irregularity of the osseous articular surface from definite osteochondrosis dissecans.

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of a new MRI method evaluating temporo-mandibular joint disc-condyle relationships: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbelaïd, R; Fleiter, B

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a new method to locate temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) disc using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyze disc-condyle relationships, in asymptomatic subjects and patients with disc displacement. Twenty-nine sagittal MRI of 16 subjects, 8 asymptomatic volunteers and 8 subjects with anterior disc displacement, were carried out during controlled opening from intercuspal position up to a 25 mm opening. Selected sections were analyzed with a graphic computerized system of coordinates. The total surface area (TS) of disc section was separated into anterior surface area (AS) and posterior surface area. Areas were determined by computer. Two trained examiners drew images at random. The reliability of AS/TS ratio index was evaluated in a previous study. AS/TS ratio sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) were calculated closed mouth, 5 mm open and 25 mm open mouth. Best sensitivity (Se=0.63) and specificity (Sp=0.81) were obtained when MRI was realized with closed mouth and 25 mm open mouth. Lower sensitivity was observed when MRI was performed either with closed mouth (Se=0.54) or 25 mm open mouth (Se=0.18). Lower specificity was observed with 5 mm open mouth (Sp=0.68). In conclusion, it was confirmed as well that MRI of anterior disc displacement should be performed with closed mouth and opened mouth. Thus, further studies are required to assess disc displacement and mechanical alterations and to evaluate the risk of direct damage on TMJ tissues.

  9. Evaluation of a direct motion estimation/correction method in respiratory-gated PET/MRI with motion-adjusted attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousse, Alexandre; Manber, Richard; Holman, Beverley F; Atkinson, David; Arridge, Simon; Ourselin, Sébastien; Hutton, Brian F; Thielemans, Kris

    2017-06-01

    Respiratory motion compensation in PET/CT and PET/MRI is essential as motion is a source of image degradation (motion blur, attenuation artifacts). In previous work, we developed a direct method for joint image reconstruction/motion estimation (JRM) for attenuation-corrected (AC) respiratory-gated PET, which uses a single attenuation-map (μ-map). This approach was successfully implemented for respiratory-gated PET/CT, but since it relied on an accurate μ-map for motion estimation, the question of its applicability in PET/MRI is open. The purpose of this work is to investigate the feasibility of JRM in PET/MRI and to assess the robustness of the motion estimation when a degraded μ-map is used. We performed a series of JRM reconstructions from simulated PET data using a range of simulated Dixon MRI sequence derived μ-maps with wrong attenuation values in the lungs, from -100% (no attenuation) to +100% (double attenuation), as well as truncated arms. We compared the estimated motions with the one obtained from JRM in ideal conditions (no noise, true μ-map as an input). We also applied JRM on 4 patient datasets of the chest, 3 of them containing hot lesions. Patient list-mode data were gated using a principal component analysis method. We compared SUV max values of the JRM reconstructed activity images and non motion-corrected images. We also assessed the estimated motion fields by comparing the deformed JRM-reconstructed activity with individually non-AC reconstructed gates. Experiments on simulated data showed that JRM-motion estimation is robust to μ-map degradation in the sense that it produces motion fields similar to the ones obtained when using the true μ-map, regardless of the attenuation errors in the lungs (PET/MRI clinical datasets. It provides a potential alternative to existing methods where the motion fields are pre-estimated from separate MRI measurements. © 2017 University College London (UCL). Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  10. An MRI Method To Map Tumor Hypoxia Using Red Blood Cells Loaded with a pO2-Responsive Gd-Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Enza; Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Gianolio, Eliana; Lanzardo, Stefania; Carrera, Carla; Fedeli, Franco; Aime, Silvio

    2015-08-25

    Hypoxia is a typical hallmark of many solid tumors and often leads to therapy resistance and the development of a more aggressive cancer phenotype. Oxygen content in tissues has been evaluated using numerous different methods for several imaging modalities, but none has yet reached the required standard of spatial and temporal resolution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) appears to be the technique of choice and several pO2-responsive probes have been designed for it over the years. In vivo translation is often hampered in Gd-relaxation agents as it is not possible to separate effects that arise from changes in local concentration from those associated with responsive properties. A novel procedure for the MRI based assessment of hypoxia is reported herein. The method relies on the combined use of Gd-DOTP- and Gd-HPDO3A-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) where the first probe acts as a vascular oxygenation-responsive agent, while the second reports the local labeled RBC concentration in a transplanted breast tumor mouse model. The MRI assessment of oxygenation state has been validated by photoacoustic imaging and ex vivo immunofluorescence. The method refines tumor staging in preclinical models and makes possible an accurate monitoring of the relationship between oxygenation and tumor growth.

  11. MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging; Methoden der MRT zur Ventilations- und Perfusionsbildgebung der Lunge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, G. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Bauman, G. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin - Radiologische Physik, Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O{sub 2}-enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies. (orig.) [German] Die separate Beurteilung von Atemmechanik, Gasaustauschprozessen und Lungenzirkulation ist wesentlich fuer die Diagnose und Therapie von Lungenerkrankungen. Klinische Lungenfunktionstests sind aufgrund ihrer zumeist nur globalen Aussage oft nicht hinreichend spezifisch in der Differenzialdiagnostik oder eingeschraenkt sensitiv bei der

  12. Preliminary experience with a novel method of three-dimensional co-registration of prostate cancer digital histology and in vivo multiparametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orczyk, C; Rusinek, H; Rosenkrantz, A B; Mikheev, A; Deng, F-M; Melamed, J; Taneja, S S

    2013-12-01

    To assess a novel method of three-dimensional (3D) co-registration of prostate cancer digital histology and in-vivo multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) image sets for clinical usefulness. A software platform was developed to achieve 3D co-registration. This software was prospectively applied to three patients who underwent radical prostatectomy. Data comprised in-vivo mpMRI [T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced weighted images (DCE); apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)], ex-vivo T2-weighted imaging, 3D-rebuilt pathological specimen, and digital histology. Internal landmarks from zonal anatomy served as reference points for assessing co-registration accuracy and precision. Applying a method of deformable transformation based on 22 internal landmarks, a 1.6 mm accuracy was reached to align T2-weighted images and the 3D-rebuilt pathological specimen, an improvement over rigid transformation of 32% (p = 0.003). The 22 zonal anatomy landmarks were more accurately mapped using deformable transformation than rigid transformation (p = 0.0008). An automatic method based on mutual information, enabled automation of the process and to include perfusion and diffusion MRI images. Evaluation of co-registration accuracy using the volume overlap index (Dice index) met clinically relevant requirements, ranging from 0.81-0.96 for sequences tested. Ex-vivo images of the specimen did not significantly improve co-registration accuracy. This preliminary analysis suggests that deformable transformation based on zonal anatomy landmarks is accurate in the co-registration of mpMRI and histology. Including diffusion and perfusion sequences in the same 3D space as histology is essential further clinical information. The ability to localize cancer in 3D space may improve targeting for image-guided biopsy, focal therapy, and disease quantification in surveillance protocols. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Task-Related Edge Density (TED)-A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Zuber, Verena; Buschmann, Tilo; Margulies, Daniel; Bartels, Andreas; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach "Task-related Edge Density" (TED). TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function.

  14. Task-Related Edge Density (TED-A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Lohmann

    Full Text Available The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach "Task-related Edge Density" (TED. TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function.

  15. Task-Related Edge Density (TED)—A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Zuber, Verena; Buschmann, Tilo; Margulies, Daniel; Bartels, Andreas; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach “Task-related Edge Density” (TED). TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function. PMID:27341204

  16. Optimizing signal intensity correction during evaluation of hepatic parenchymal enhancement on gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI: Comparison of three methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Minori, E-mail: onoda@radt.med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Kinki University Hospital, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan); Hyodo, Tomoko, E-mail: neneth@m.ehime-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Murakami, Takamichi, E-mail: murakami@med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro, E-mail: okada777@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Uto, Tatsuro, E-mail: chuho@med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Kinki University Hospital, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Hori, Masatoshi, E-mail: mhori@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki, E-mail: ramiyati@mhs.mp.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Signal intensity is often used to evaluate hepatic enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA in the hepatobiliary phase. •Comparison of uncorrected signal intensity with T{sub 1} value revealed signal intensity instability. •Measurement of uncorrected liver SI or SNR often yields erroneous results on late-phase gadoxetate MRI due to shimming and other optimization techniques. •Signal intensity corrected by scale and rescale slope from DICOM data gave comparable results. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare signal intensity (SI) correction using scale and rescale slopes with SI correction using SIs of spleen and muscle for quantifying multiphase hepatic contrast enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA by assessing their correlation with T{sub 1} values generated from Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequence data (ER-T{sub 1}). Materials and methods: Thirty patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this prospective clinical study. For each patient, breath-hold T{sub 1}-weighted fat-suppressed three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequences (e-THRIVE) were acquired before and 2 (first phase), 10 (second phase), and 20 min (third phase) after intravenous Gd-EOB-DTPA. Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequences were acquired before and 1.5 (first phase), 8 (second phase), and 18 min (third phase) postcontrast. The liver parenchyma enhancement ratios (ER) of each phase were calculated using the SI from e-THRIVE sequences (ER-SI) and the T{sub 1} values generated from LL-TFE sequence data (ER-T{sub 1}) respectively. ER-SIs were calculated in three ways: (1) comparing with splenic SI (ER-SI-s), (2) comparing with muscle SI (ER-SI-m), (3) using scale and rescale slopes obtained from DICOM headers (ER-SI-c), to eliminate the effects of receiver gain and scaling. For each of the first, second and third phases, correlation and agreement were assessed between each ER-SI and ER-T{sub 1}. Results: In the first phase, all ER-SIs correlated

  17. MRI features of chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaoguang; Liu Xia; Cheng Kebin; Liu Wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MR imaging features of chondroblastoma. Methods: MRI examinations of 20 patients with histological proven chondmblastoma were reviewed retrospectively. The MRI findings of chondroblastoma including the signal intensity, the shape, the growth patterns, and the surrounding bone marrow edema and the adjacent soft tissue edema, the periosteal reaction, the adjacent joint effusion were analyzed. Results: All 20 cases demonstrated heterogeneous MR signal intensity on T 1 WI and T 2 WI images and showed lobular margins. Sixteen cases demonstrated expansive growth patterns. Surrounding bone marrow edema was found in 18 cases and adjacent soft tissue edema in 14 cases. Periosteal reaction was identified in 6 cases. In 7 cases the tumor extended to adjacent soft tissue. Adjacent joint effusion was visible on MRI in 6 cases. Conclusion: Heterogeneous signal intensity, lobular margins and expansive growth pattern, adjacent bone marrow and soft tissue edema were the common features of chondroblastoma on MRI. (authors)

  18. Fast CSF MRI for brain segmentation; Cross-validation by comparison with 3D T1-based brain segmentation methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, Lisa A; de Bresser, Jeroen; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petersen, Esben T; De Vis, Jill B

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In previous work we have developed a fast sequence that focusses on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) based on the long T2 of CSF. By processing the data obtained with this CSF MRI sequence, brain parenchymal volume (BPV) and intracranial volume (ICV) can be automatically obtained. The aim of

  19. MRI diagnosis of meningovascular neurosyphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shuang; Qian Jianguo; Feng Xiaoyuan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value and limitation of MRI in the diagnosis of meningovascular neurosyphilis. Methods: Five cases of neurosyphilis confirmed by clinical history/laboratory were examined with MRI (3 plain MRI, 2 enhanced MRI). The results of blood and CSF TPPA/RPR were positive and HIV was negative. Results: Abnormal signals were demonstrated in the temporal lobe in 3 cases, and infarction was revealed in the basal ganglion and periventricular white matter in another 2 cases. There was no marked contrast enhancement in the 2 cases. Conclusion: Meningovascular neurosyphilis has no characteristic features on MRI, but MRI is an effective method in delineating the size, range, and characters of neurosyphilis, and it is also an useful modality to follow-up after antibiotic therapy. (authors)

  20. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  1. MO-C-17A-02: A Novel Method for Evaluating Hepatic Stiffness Based On 4D-MRI and Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, T [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Liang, X [Duke Unversity, Durham, NC (United States); Czito, B; Palta, M; Bashir, M; Yin, F; Cai, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of hepatic stiffness has significant potential in radiation therapy, ranging from treatment planning to response assessment. This study aims to develop a novel, noninvasive method to quantify liver stiffness with 3D strains liver maps using 4D-MRI and deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: Five patients with liver cancer were imaged with an institutionally developed 4D-MRI technique under an IRB-approved protocol. Displacement vector fields (DVFs) across the liver were generated via DIR of different phases of 4D-MRI. Strain tensor at each voxel of interest (VOI) was computed from the relative displacements between the VOI and each of the six adjacent voxels. Three principal strains (E{sub 1}, E{sub 2} and E{sub 3}) of the VOI were derived as the eigenvalue of the strain tensor, which represent the magnitudes of the maximum and minimum stretches. Strain tensors for two regions of interest (ROIs) were calculated and compared for each patient, one within the tumor (ROI{sub 1}) and the other in normal liver distant from the heart (ROI{sub 2}). Results: 3D strain maps were successfully generated fort each respiratory phase of 4D-MRI for all patients. Liver deformations induced by both respiration and cardiac motion were observed. Differences in strain values adjacent to the distant from the heart indicate significant deformation caused by cardiac expansion during diastole. The large E{sub 1}/E{sub 2} (∼2) and E{sub 1}/E{sub 2} (∼10) ratios reflect the predominance of liver deformation in the superior-inferior direction. The mean E{sub 1} in ROI{sub 1} (0.12±0.10) was smaller than in ROI{sub 2} (0.15±0.12), reflecting a higher degree of stiffness of the cirrhotic tumor. Conclusion: We have successfully developed a novel method for quantitatively evaluating regional hepatic stiffness based on DIR of 4D-MRI. Our initial findings indicate that liver strain is heterogeneous, and liver tumors may have lower principal strain values

  2. MO-C-17A-02: A Novel Method for Evaluating Hepatic Stiffness Based On 4D-MRI and Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, T; Liang, X; Czito, B; Palta, M; Bashir, M; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of hepatic stiffness has significant potential in radiation therapy, ranging from treatment planning to response assessment. This study aims to develop a novel, noninvasive method to quantify liver stiffness with 3D strains liver maps using 4D-MRI and deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: Five patients with liver cancer were imaged with an institutionally developed 4D-MRI technique under an IRB-approved protocol. Displacement vector fields (DVFs) across the liver were generated via DIR of different phases of 4D-MRI. Strain tensor at each voxel of interest (VOI) was computed from the relative displacements between the VOI and each of the six adjacent voxels. Three principal strains (E 1 , E 2 and E 3 ) of the VOI were derived as the eigenvalue of the strain tensor, which represent the magnitudes of the maximum and minimum stretches. Strain tensors for two regions of interest (ROIs) were calculated and compared for each patient, one within the tumor (ROI 1 ) and the other in normal liver distant from the heart (ROI 2 ). Results: 3D strain maps were successfully generated fort each respiratory phase of 4D-MRI for all patients. Liver deformations induced by both respiration and cardiac motion were observed. Differences in strain values adjacent to the distant from the heart indicate significant deformation caused by cardiac expansion during diastole. The large E 1 /E 2 (∼2) and E 1 /E 2 (∼10) ratios reflect the predominance of liver deformation in the superior-inferior direction. The mean E 1 in ROI 1 (0.12±0.10) was smaller than in ROI 2 (0.15±0.12), reflecting a higher degree of stiffness of the cirrhotic tumor. Conclusion: We have successfully developed a novel method for quantitatively evaluating regional hepatic stiffness based on DIR of 4D-MRI. Our initial findings indicate that liver strain is heterogeneous, and liver tumors may have lower principal strain values than normal liver. Thorough validation of our method is

  3. A new approach combining different MRI methods to provide detailed view on 2 swelling dynamics of xanthan tablets influencing drug release at different pH and 3 ionic strength

    OpenAIRE

    Sepe, Ana; Mikac, Urška; Baumgartner, Saša; Kristl, Julijana

    2015-01-01

    The key element in drug release from hydrophilic matrix tablets is the gel layer that regulates the penetration of water and controls drug dissolution and diffusion. We have selected magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the method of choice for visualizing the dynamic processes occurring during the swelling of xanthan tablets in a variety of media. The aims were (i) to develop a new method using MRI for accurate determination of penetration, swelling and erosion fronts, (ii) to investigate the...

  4. Enhancing the discrimination accuracy between metastases, gliomas and meningiomas on brain MRI by volumetric textural features and ensemble pattern recognition methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Pantelis; Cavouras, Dionisis; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Glotsos, Dimitris; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil; Kostopoulos, Spiros; Sifaki, Koralia; Malamas, Menelaos; Nikiforidis, George; Solomou, Ekaterini

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) texture analysis of volumetric brain magnetic resonance (MR) images has been identified as an important indicator for discriminating among different brain pathologies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of 3D textural features using a pattern recognition system in the task of discriminating benign, malignant and metastatic brain tissues on T1 postcontrast MR imaging (MRI) series. The dataset consisted of 67 brain MRI series obtained from patients with verified and untreated intracranial tumors. The pattern recognition system was designed as an ensemble classification scheme employing a support vector machine classifier, specially modified in order to integrate the least squares features transformation logic in its kernel function. The latter, in conjunction with using 3D textural features, enabled boosting up the performance of the system in discriminating metastatic, malignant and benign brain tumors with 77.14%, 89.19% and 93.33% accuracy, respectively. The method was evaluated using an external cross-validation process; thus, results might be considered indicative of the generalization performance of the system to "unseen" cases. The proposed system might be used as an assisting tool for brain tumor characterization on volumetric MRI series.

  5. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  6. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  7. Automatic cardiac cycle determination directly from EEG-fMRI data by multi-scale peak detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chung-Ki; Luo, Qingfei; Zotev, Vadim; Phillips, Raquel; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2018-03-31

    In simultaneous EEG-fMRI, identification of the period of cardioballistic artifact (BCG) in EEG is required for the artifact removal. Recording the electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform during fMRI is difficult, often causing inaccurate period detection. Since the waveform of the BCG extracted by independent component analysis (ICA) is relatively invariable compared to the ECG waveform, we propose a multiple-scale peak-detection algorithm to determine the BCG cycle directly from the EEG data. The algorithm first extracts the high contrast BCG component from the EEG data by ICA. The BCG cycle is then estimated by band-pass filtering the component around the fundamental frequency identified from its energy spectral density, and the peak of BCG artifact occurrence is selected from each of the estimated cycle. The algorithm is shown to achieve a high accuracy on a large EEG-fMRI dataset. It is also adaptive to various heart rates without the needs of adjusting the threshold parameters. The cycle detection remains accurate with the scan duration reduced to half a minute. Additionally, the algorithm gives a figure of merit to evaluate the reliability of the detection accuracy. The algorithm is shown to give a higher detection accuracy than the commonly used cycle detection algorithm fmrib_qrsdetect implemented in EEGLAB. The achieved high cycle detection accuracy of our algorithm without using the ECG waveforms makes possible to create and automate pipelines for processing large EEG-fMRI datasets, and virtually eliminates the need for ECG recordings for BCG artifact removal. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrating atlas and graph cut methods for right ventricle blood-pool segmentation from cardiac cine MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Shusil; Linte, Cristian A.

    2017-03-01

    Segmentation of right ventricle from cardiac MRI images can be used to build pre-operative anatomical heart models to precisely identify regions of interest during minimally invasive therapy. Furthermore, many functional parameters of right heart such as right ventricular volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and thickness can also be assessed from the segmented images. To obtain an accurate and computationally efficient segmentation of right ventricle from cardiac cine MRI, we propose a segmentation algorithm formulated as an energy minimization problem in a graph. Shape prior obtained by propagating label from an average atlas using affine registration is incorporated into the graph framework to overcome problems in ill-defined image regions. The optimal segmentation corresponding to the labeling with minimum energy configuration of the graph is obtained via graph-cuts and is iteratively refined to produce the final right ventricle blood pool segmentation. We quantitatively compare the segmentation results obtained from our algorithm to the provided gold-standard expert manual segmentation for 16 cine-MRI datasets available through the MICCAI 2012 Cardiac MR Right Ventricle Segmentation Challenge according to several similarity metrics, including Dice coefficient, Jaccard coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and Mean absolute distance error.

  9. Concurrent fNIRS-fMRI measurement to validate a method for separating deep and shallow fNIRS signals by using multidistance optodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funane, Tsukasa; Sato, Hiroki; Yahata, Noriaki; Takizawa, Ryu; Nishimura, Yukika; Kinoshita, Akihide; Katura, Takusige; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Fukuda, Masato; Kasai, Kiyoto; Koizumi, Hideaki; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. It has been reported that a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signal can be contaminated by extracerebral contributions. Many algorithms using multidistance separations to address this issue have been proposed, but their spatial separation performance has rarely been validated with simultaneous measurements of fNIRS and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We previously proposed a method for discriminating between deep and shallow contributions in fNIRS signals, referred to as the multidistance independent component analysis (MD-ICA) method. In this study, to validate the MD-ICA method from the spatial aspect, multidistance fNIRS, fMRI, and laser-Doppler-flowmetry signals were simultaneously obtained for 12 healthy adult males during three tasks. The fNIRS signal was separated into deep and shallow signals by using the MD-ICA method, and the correlation between the waveforms of the separated fNIRS signals and the gray matter blood oxygenation level–dependent signals was analyzed. A three-way analysis of variance (signal depth×Hb kind×task) indicated that the main effect of fNIRS signal depth on the correlation is significant [F(1,1286)=5.34, pdeep and shallow signals, and the accuracy and reliability of the fNIRS signal will be improved with the method. PMID:26157983

  10. MRI of the fetal abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.; Brugger, P.C.; Witzani, L.; Prayer, D.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important diagnostic component for central nervous system and thoracic diseases during fetal development. Although ultrasound remains the method of choice for observing the fetus during pregnancy, fetal MRI is being increasingly used as an additional technique for the accurate diagnosis of abdominal diseases. Recent publications confirm the value of MRI in the diagnosis of fetal gastrointestinal tract and urogenital system diseases. The following report provides an overview of MRI-examination techniques for the most frequent diseases of the abdomen. (orig.) [de

  11. TU-CD-BRA-04: Evaluation of An Atlas-Based Segmentation Method for Prostate and Peripheral Zone Regions On MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, AS; Piper, J; Curry, K; Swallen, A [MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Padgett, K; Pollack, A; Stoyanova, RS [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prostate MRI plays an important role in diagnosis, biopsy guidance, and therapy planning for prostate cancer. Prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image fusion for ultrasound biopsy guidance and delivery of radiation. Our goal in this study is to evaluate an automatic atlas-based segmentation method for generating prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) contours on MRI. Methods: T2-weighted MRIs were acquired on 3T-Discovery MR750 System (GE, Milwaukee). The Volumes of Interest (VOIs): prostate and PZ were outlined by an expert radiation oncologist and used to create an atlas library for atlas-based segmentation. The atlas-segmentation accuracy was evaluated using a leave-one-out analysis. The method involved automatically finding the atlas subject that best matched the test subject followed by a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of the atlas subject to the test subject. The prostate and PZ contours were transformed to the test subject using the same deformation. For each test subject the three best matches were used and the final contour was combined using Majority Vote. The atlas-segmentation process was fully automatic. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean Hausdorff values were used for comparison. Results: VOIs contours were available for 28 subjects. For the prostate, the atlas-based segmentation method resulted in an average DSC of 0.88+/−0.08 and a mean Hausdorff distance of 1.1+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: 0.60–0.69(1), 0.70–0.79(2), 0.80–0.89(13), >0.89(11). For the PZ, the average DSC was 0.72+/−0.17 and average Hausdorff of 0.9+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: <0.60(4), 0.60–0.69(6), 0.70–0.79(7), 0.80–0.89(9), >0.89(1). Conclusion: The MRI atlas-based segmentation method achieved good results for both the whole prostate and PZ compared to expert defined VOIs. The technique is fast, fully automatic, and has the potential

  12. TU-CD-BRA-04: Evaluation of An Atlas-Based Segmentation Method for Prostate and Peripheral Zone Regions On MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, AS; Piper, J; Curry, K; Swallen, A; Padgett, K; Pollack, A; Stoyanova, RS

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate MRI plays an important role in diagnosis, biopsy guidance, and therapy planning for prostate cancer. Prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image fusion for ultrasound biopsy guidance and delivery of radiation. Our goal in this study is to evaluate an automatic atlas-based segmentation method for generating prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) contours on MRI. Methods: T2-weighted MRIs were acquired on 3T-Discovery MR750 System (GE, Milwaukee). The Volumes of Interest (VOIs): prostate and PZ were outlined by an expert radiation oncologist and used to create an atlas library for atlas-based segmentation. The atlas-segmentation accuracy was evaluated using a leave-one-out analysis. The method involved automatically finding the atlas subject that best matched the test subject followed by a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of the atlas subject to the test subject. The prostate and PZ contours were transformed to the test subject using the same deformation. For each test subject the three best matches were used and the final contour was combined using Majority Vote. The atlas-segmentation process was fully automatic. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean Hausdorff values were used for comparison. Results: VOIs contours were available for 28 subjects. For the prostate, the atlas-based segmentation method resulted in an average DSC of 0.88+/−0.08 and a mean Hausdorff distance of 1.1+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: 0.60–0.69(1), 0.70–0.79(2), 0.80–0.89(13), >0.89(11). For the PZ, the average DSC was 0.72+/−0.17 and average Hausdorff of 0.9+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: 0.89(1). Conclusion: The MRI atlas-based segmentation method achieved good results for both the whole prostate and PZ compared to expert defined VOIs. The technique is fast, fully automatic, and has the potential to provide significant time savings for prostate VOI

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of the brain and other cranial structures are clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, ...

  15. Automated fibroglandular tissue segmentation and volumetric density estimation in breast MRI using an atlas-aided fuzzy C-means method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shandong; Weinstein, Susan P.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina, E-mail: despina.kontos@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the clinical management of breast cancer. Studies suggest that the relative amount of fibroglandular (i.e., dense) tissue in the breast as quantified in MR images can be predictive of the risk for developing breast cancer, especially for high-risk women. Automated segmentation of the fibroglandular tissue and volumetric density estimation in breast MRI could therefore be useful for breast cancer risk assessment. Methods: In this work the authors develop and validate a fully automated segmentation algorithm, namely, an atlas-aided fuzzy C-means (FCM-Atlas) method, to estimate the volumetric amount of fibroglandular tissue in breast MRI. The FCM-Atlas is a 2D segmentation method working on a slice-by-slice basis. FCM clustering is first applied to the intensity space of each 2D MR slice to produce an initial voxelwise likelihood map of fibroglandular tissue. Then a prior learned fibroglandular tissue likelihood atlas is incorporated to refine the initial FCM likelihood map to achieve enhanced segmentation, from which the absolute volume of the fibroglandular tissue (|FGT|) and the relative amount (i.e., percentage) of the |FGT| relative to the whole breast volume (FGT%) are computed. The authors' method is evaluated by a representative dataset of 60 3D bilateral breast MRI scans (120 breasts) that span the full breast density range of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The automated segmentation is compared to manual segmentation obtained by two experienced breast imaging radiologists. Segmentation performance is assessed by linear regression, Pearson's correlation coefficients, Student's pairedt-test, and Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC). Results: The inter-reader correlation is 0.97 for FGT% and 0.95 for |FGT|. When compared to the average of the two readers’ manual segmentation, the proposed FCM-Atlas method achieves a

  16. Automated fibroglandular tissue segmentation and volumetric density estimation in breast MRI using an atlas-aided fuzzy C-means method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Shandong; Weinstein, Susan P.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the clinical management of breast cancer. Studies suggest that the relative amount of fibroglandular (i.e., dense) tissue in the breast as quantified in MR images can be predictive of the risk for developing breast cancer, especially for high-risk women. Automated segmentation of the fibroglandular tissue and volumetric density estimation in breast MRI could therefore be useful for breast cancer risk assessment. Methods: In this work the authors develop and validate a fully automated segmentation algorithm, namely, an atlas-aided fuzzy C-means (FCM-Atlas) method, to estimate the volumetric amount of fibroglandular tissue in breast MRI. The FCM-Atlas is a 2D segmentation method working on a slice-by-slice basis. FCM clustering is first applied to the intensity space of each 2D MR slice to produce an initial voxelwise likelihood map of fibroglandular tissue. Then a prior learned fibroglandular tissue likelihood atlas is incorporated to refine the initial FCM likelihood map to achieve enhanced segmentation, from which the absolute volume of the fibroglandular tissue (|FGT|) and the relative amount (i.e., percentage) of the |FGT| relative to the whole breast volume (FGT%) are computed. The authors' method is evaluated by a representative dataset of 60 3D bilateral breast MRI scans (120 breasts) that span the full breast density range of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The automated segmentation is compared to manual segmentation obtained by two experienced breast imaging radiologists. Segmentation performance is assessed by linear regression, Pearson's correlation coefficients, Student's pairedt-test, and Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC). Results: The inter-reader correlation is 0.97 for FGT% and 0.95 for |FGT|. When compared to the average of the two readers’ manual segmentation, the proposed FCM-Atlas method achieves a correlation ofr = 0

  17. SU-F-J-112: Clinical Feasibility Test of An RF Pulse-Based MRI Method for the Quantitative Fat-Water Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, S; Wloch, J; Pirkola, M [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative fat-water segmentation is important not only because of the clinical utility of fat-suppressed MRI images in better detecting lesions of clinical significance (in the midst of bright fat signal) but also because of the possible physical need, in which CT-like images based on the materials’ photon attenuation properties may have to be generated from MR images; particularly, as in the case of MR-only radiation oncology environment to obtain radiation dose calculation or as in the case of hybrid PET/MR modality to obtain attenuation correction map for the quantitative PET reconstruction. The majority of such fat-water quantitative segmentations have been performed by utilizing the Dixon’s method and its variations, which have to enforce the proper settings (often predefined) of echo time (TE) in the pulse sequences. Therefore, such methods have been unable to be directly combined with those ultrashort TE (UTE) sequences that, taking the advantage of very low TE values (∼ 10’s microsecond), might be beneficial to directly detect bones. Recently, an RF pulse-based method (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mri.2015.11.006), termed as PROD pulse method, was introduced as a method of quantitative fat-water segmentation that does not have to depend on predefined TE settings. Here, the clinical feasibility of this method is verified in brain tumor patients by combining the PROD pulse with several sequences. Methods: In a clinical 3T MRI, the PROD pulse was combined with turbo spin echo (e.g. TR=1500, TE=16 or 60, ETL=15) or turbo field echo (e.g. TR=5.6, TE=2.8, ETL=12) sequences without specifying TE values. Results: The fat-water segmentation was possible without having to set specific TE values. Conclusion: The PROD pulse method is clinically feasible. Although not yet combined with UTE sequences in our laboratory, the method is potentially compatible with UTE sequences, and thus, might be useful to directly segment fat, water, bone and air.

  18. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  19. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  20. Evaluation of higher brain function by MRI. Flow measurement in the superior sagittal sinus using phase contrast method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Mototsugu

    1997-01-01

    To assess the higher brain function, flow measurement in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) was performed noninvasively using a phase contrast MRI in 76 patients with suspicious of impaired higher brain function including dementias (senile dementia of Alzheimer type; SDAT and multi-infarct dementia; MID), strokes, and others. Thirty-one normal controls were consisted of 18 healthy volunteers and 13 patients with tension headache whose higher brain function was proved be normal. Mean flow velocity was measured in the distal portion of the SSS adjoining to the occipital lobes and was multiplied by cross-sectional area of the SSS at the measuring point to obtain mean flow volume. For intellectual index, cross-cultural cognitive examination (CCCE) was applied to all cases excluding volunteers. Normal value of SSS flow volume measured by MRI was 6.92±0.66 ml/s. Significant differences in both SSS flow and CCCE score from normal controls were found in SDAT group, MID group, and non-dementia group. No substantial differences between SDAT group and MID group were noted in both CCCE score and SSS flow. In normal controls, there was no correlation between SSS flow and age, whereas, significant inverse correlation of SSS flow with age was found in all cases. Between CCCE score and SSS flow, there were nearly linear relationships in all cases, SDAT group, MID group, and non-dementia group. Significant but relatively poor correlation was found in normals. (K.H.)

  1. Anatomo-clinical overlapping maps (AnaCOM): a new method to create anatomo-functional maps from neuropsychological tests and structural MRI scan of subjects with brain lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkingnehun, Serge R. J.; du Boisgueheneuc, Foucaud; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Zhang, Sandy X.; Levy, Richard; Dubois, Bruno

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a new technique to analyze correlations between brain anatomy and its neurological functions. The technique is based on the anatomic MRI of patients with brain lesions who are administered neuropsychological tests. Brain lesions of the MRI scans are first manually segmented. The MRI volumes are then normalized to a reference map, using the segmented area as a mask. After normalization, the brain lesions of the MRI are segmented again in order to redefine the border of the lesions in the context of the normalized brain. Once the MRI is segmented, the patient's score on the neuropsychological test is assigned to each voxel in the lesioned area, while the rest of the voxels of the image are set to 0. Subsequently, the individual patient's MRI images are superimposed, and each voxel is reassigned the average score of the patients who have a lesion at that voxel. A threshold is applied to remove regions having less than three overlaps. This process leads to an anatomo-functional map that links brain areas to functional loss. Other maps can be created to aid in analyzing the functional maps, such as one that indicates the 95% confidence interval of the averaged scores for each area. This anatomo-clinical overlapping map (AnaCOM) method was used to obtain functional maps from patients with lesions in the superior frontal gyrus. By finding particular subregions more responsible for a particular deficit, this method can generate new hypotheses to be tested by conventional group methods.

  2. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  3. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  4. Performance comparison of deep learning and segmentation-based radiomic methods in the task of distinguishing benign and malignant breast lesions on DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antropova, Natasha; Huynh, Benjamin; Giger, Maryellen

    2017-03-01

    Intuitive segmentation-based CADx/radiomic features, calculated from the lesion segmentations of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRIs) have been utilized in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. Additionally, transfer learning with pre-trained deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) allows for an alternative method of radiomics extraction, where the features are derived directly from the image data. However, the comparison of computer-extracted segmentation-based and CNN features in MRI breast lesion characterization has not yet been conducted. In our study, we used a DCE-MRI database of 640 breast cases - 191 benign and 449 malignant. Thirty-eight segmentation-based features were extracted automatically using our quantitative radiomics workstation. Also, 2D ROIs were selected around each lesion on the DCE-MRIs and directly input into a pre-trained CNN AlexNet, yielding CNN features. Each method was investigated separately and in combination in terms of performance in the task of distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) served as the figure of merit. Both methods yielded promising classification performance with round-robin cross-validated AUC values of 0.88 (se =0.01) and 0.76 (se=0.02) for segmentationbased and deep learning methods, respectively. Combination of the two methods enhanced the performance in malignancy assessment resulting in an AUC value of 0.91 (se=0.01), a statistically significant improvement over the performance of the CNN method alone.

  5. A new approach combining different MRI methods to provide detailed view on swelling dynamics of xanthan tablets influencing drug release at different pH and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikac, Ursa; Sepe, Ana; Kristl, Julijana; Baumgartner, Sasa

    2010-08-03

    The key element in drug release from hydrophilic matrix tablets is the gel layer that regulates the penetration of water and controls drug dissolution and diffusion. We have selected magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the method of choice for visualizing the dynamic processes occurring during the swelling of xanthan tablets in a variety of media. The aims were (i) to develop a new method using MRI for accurate determination of penetration, swelling and erosion fronts, (ii) to investigate the effects of pH and ionic strength on swelling, and (iii) to study the influence of structural changes in xanthan gel on drug release. Two dimensional (2D) MRI and one dimensional single point imaging (SPI) of swollen xanthan tablets were recorded, together with T(2) mapping. The border between dry and hydrated glassy xanthan-the penetration front-was determined from 1D SPI signal intensity profiles. The erosion front was obtained from signal intensity profiles of 2D MR images. The swelling front, where xanthan is transformed from a glassy to a rubbery state (gel formation), was determined from T(2) profiles. Further, the new combination of MRI methods for swelling front determination enables to explain the appearance of the unusual "bright front" observed on 2D MR images in tablets swollen in HCl pH 1.2 media, which represents the position of swelling front. All six media studied, differing in pH and ionic strength, penetrate through the whole tablet in 4h+/-0.3h, but formation of the gel layer is significantly delayed. Unexpectedly, the position of the swelling front was the same, independently of the different xanthan gel structures formed under different conditions of pH and ionic strength. The position of the erosion front, on the other hand, is strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength, as reflected in different thicknesses of the gel layers. The latter are seen to be the consequence of the different hydrodynamic radii of the xanthan molecules, which affect the drug

  6. Reliability of change in lumbar MRI findings over time in patients with and without disc prosthesis - comparing two different image evaluation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Linda; Espeland, Ansgar; Gjertsen, Oeivind; Hellum, Christian; Neckelmann, Gesche; Johnsen, Lars G.; Eide, Geir E.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the reliability of change in lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings evaluated retrospectively by direct comparison of images and by non-comparison. Pre-treatment and 2-year follow-up MRI was performed in 126 patients randomized to disc prosthesis surgery or non-surgical treatment. Two experienced radiologists independently evaluated progress and regress for Modic changes, disc findings, and facet arthropathy (FA) at L3/L4, L4/L5, and L5/S1, both by non-comparison and by comparison of initial and follow-up images. FA was evaluated at all levels, and other findings at non-operated levels. We calculated prevalence- and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) values for interobserver agreement. The impact of an adjacent prosthesis (which causes artefacts) and image evaluation method on PABAK was assessed using generalized estimating equations. Image comparison indicated good interobserver agreement on progress and regress (PABAK 0.63-1.00) for Modic changes, posterior high-intensity zone, disc height, and disc contour at L3-S1 and for nucleus pulposus signal and FA at L3/L4; and moderate interobserver agreement (PABAK 0.46-0.59) on decreasing nucleus signal and increasing FA at L4-S1. Image comparison indicated lower (but fair) interobserver agreement (PABAK 0.29) only for increasing FA at L5/S1 in patients with prosthesis in L4/L5 and/or L5/S1. An adjacent prosthesis had no overall impact on PABAK values (p ≥ 0.22). Comparison yielded higher PABAK values than non-comparison (p < 0.001). Regarding changes in lumbar MRI findings over time, comparison of images can provide moderate or good interobserver agreement, and better agreement than non-comparison. An adjacent prosthesis may not reduce agreement on change for most findings. (orig.)

  7. A novel segmentation approach for implementation of MRAC in head PET/MRI employing Short-TE MRI and 2-point Dixon method in a fuzzy C-means framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khateri, Parisa; Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, Amir Homayoun [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@tums.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-11

    Quantitative PET image reconstruction requires an accurate map of attenuation coefficients of the tissue under investigation at 511 keV (μ-map), and in order to correct the emission data for attenuation. The use of MRI-based attenuation correction (MRAC) has recently received lots of attention in the scientific literature. One of the major difficulties facing MRAC has been observed in the areas where bone and air collide, e.g. ethmoidal sinuses in the head area. Bone is intrinsically not detectable by conventional MRI, making it difficult to distinguish air from bone. Therefore, development of more versatile MR sequences to label the bone structure, e.g. ultra-short echo-time (UTE) sequences, certainly plays a significant role in novel methodological developments. However, long acquisition time and complexity of UTE sequences limit its clinical applications. To overcome this problem, we developed a novel combination of Short-TE (ShTE) pulse sequence to detect bone signal with a 2-point Dixon technique for water–fat discrimination, along with a robust image segmentation method based on fuzzy clustering C-means (FCM) to segment the head area into four classes of air, bone, soft tissue and adipose tissue. The imaging protocol was set on a clinical 3 T Tim Trio and also 1.5 T Avanto (Siemens Medical Solution, Erlangen, Germany) employing a triple echo time pulse sequence in the head area. The acquisition parameters were as follows: TE1/TE2/TE3=0.98/4.925/6.155 ms, TR=8 ms, FA=25 on the 3 T system, and TE1/TE2/TE3=1.1/2.38/4.76 ms, TR=16 ms, FA=18 for the 1.5 T system. The second and third echo-times belonged to the Dixon decomposition to distinguish soft and adipose tissues. To quantify accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the bone segmentation algorithm, resulting classes of MR-based segmented bone were compared with the manual segmented one by our expert neuro-radiologist. Results for both 3 T and 1.5 T systems show that bone segmentation applied in several

  8. A novel segmentation approach for implementation of MRAC in head PET/MRI employing Short-TE MRI and 2-point Dixon method in a fuzzy C-means framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khateri, Parisa; Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh; Jafari, Amir Homayoun; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative PET image reconstruction requires an accurate map of attenuation coefficients of the tissue under investigation at 511 keV (μ-map), and in order to correct the emission data for attenuation. The use of MRI-based attenuation correction (MRAC) has recently received lots of attention in the scientific literature. One of the major difficulties facing MRAC has been observed in the areas where bone and air collide, e.g. ethmoidal sinuses in the head area. Bone is intrinsically not detectable by conventional MRI, making it difficult to distinguish air from bone. Therefore, development of more versatile MR sequences to label the bone structure, e.g. ultra-short echo-time (UTE) sequences, certainly plays a significant role in novel methodological developments. However, long acquisition time and complexity of UTE sequences limit its clinical applications. To overcome this problem, we developed a novel combination of Short-TE (ShTE) pulse sequence to detect bone signal with a 2-point Dixon technique for water-fat discrimination, along with a robust image segmentation method based on fuzzy clustering C-means (FCM) to segment the head area into four classes of air, bone, soft tissue and adipose tissue. The imaging protocol was set on a clinical 3 T Tim Trio and also 1.5 T Avanto (Siemens Medical Solution, Erlangen, Germany) employing a triple echo time pulse sequence in the head area. The acquisition parameters were as follows: TE1/TE2/TE3=0.98/4.925/6.155 ms, TR=8 ms, FA=25 on the 3 T system, and TE1/TE2/TE3=1.1/2.38/4.76 ms, TR=16 ms, FA=18 for the 1.5 T system. The second and third echo-times belonged to the Dixon decomposition to distinguish soft and adipose tissues. To quantify accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the bone segmentation algorithm, resulting classes of MR-based segmented bone were compared with the manual segmented one by our expert neuro-radiologist. Results for both 3 T and 1.5 T systems show that bone segmentation applied in several

  9. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, Ursula; Nemec, Stefan F.; Bettelheim, Dieter; Brugger, Peter C.; Horcher, Ernst; Schöpf, Veronika; Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L.; Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23–37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  10. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Ursula [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nemec, Stefan F., E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Bettelheim, Dieter [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Horcher, Ernst [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L. [Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23-37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  11. An integrated model-driven method for in-treatment upper airway motion tracking using cine MRI in head and neck radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Dolly, Steven; Li, Harold; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin; Mazur, Thomas; Gach, Michael; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Rodriguez, Vivian; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Victoria, James; Dempsey, James [ViewRay Incorporated, Inc., Oakwood Village, Ohio 44146 (United States); Ruan, Su [Laboratoire LITIS (EA 4108), Equipe Quantif, University of Rouen, Rouen 76183 (France); Anastasio, Mark [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: For the first time, MRI-guided radiation therapy systems can acquire cine images to dynamically monitor in-treatment internal organ motion. However, the complex head and neck (H&N) structures and low-contrast/resolution of on-board cine MRI images make automatic motion tracking a very challenging task. In this study, the authors proposed an integrated model-driven method to automatically track the in-treatment motion of the H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein internal motion often occurs in an either voluntary or involuntary manner, from cine MRI images for the analysis of H&N motion patterns. Methods: Considering the complex H&N structures and ensuring automatic and robust upper airway motion tracking, the authors firstly built a set of linked statistical shapes (including face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) using principal component analysis from clinically approved contours delineated on a set of training data. The linked statistical shapes integrate explicit landmarks and implicit shape representation. Then, a hierarchical model-fitting algorithm was developed to align the linked shapes on the first image frame of a to-be-tracked cine sequence and to localize the upper airway region. Finally, a multifeature level set contour propagation scheme was performed to identify the upper airway shape change, frame-by-frame, on the entire image sequence. The multifeature fitting energy, including the information of intensity variations, edge saliency, curve geometry, and temporal shape continuity, was minimized to capture the details of moving airway boundaries. Sagittal cine MR image sequences acquired from three H&N cancer patients were utilized to demonstrate the performance of the proposed motion tracking method. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 50 randomly selected cine image frames from each patient. The resulting average dice similarity

  12. An integrated model-driven method for in-treatment upper airway motion tracking using cine MRI in head and neck radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hua; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Dolly, Steven; Li, Harold; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin; Mazur, Thomas; Gach, Michael; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Rodriguez, Vivian; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James; Ruan, Su; Anastasio, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For the first time, MRI-guided radiation therapy systems can acquire cine images to dynamically monitor in-treatment internal organ motion. However, the complex head and neck (H&N) structures and low-contrast/resolution of on-board cine MRI images make automatic motion tracking a very challenging task. In this study, the authors proposed an integrated model-driven method to automatically track the in-treatment motion of the H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein internal motion often occurs in an either voluntary or involuntary manner, from cine MRI images for the analysis of H&N motion patterns. Methods: Considering the complex H&N structures and ensuring automatic and robust upper airway motion tracking, the authors firstly built a set of linked statistical shapes (including face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) using principal component analysis from clinically approved contours delineated on a set of training data. The linked statistical shapes integrate explicit landmarks and implicit shape representation. Then, a hierarchical model-fitting algorithm was developed to align the linked shapes on the first image frame of a to-be-tracked cine sequence and to localize the upper airway region. Finally, a multifeature level set contour propagation scheme was performed to identify the upper airway shape change, frame-by-frame, on the entire image sequence. The multifeature fitting energy, including the information of intensity variations, edge saliency, curve geometry, and temporal shape continuity, was minimized to capture the details of moving airway boundaries. Sagittal cine MR image sequences acquired from three H&N cancer patients were utilized to demonstrate the performance of the proposed motion tracking method. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 50 randomly selected cine image frames from each patient. The resulting average dice similarity

  13. MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazirolan, T.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease has increased over the last years. Cardiac MRI is the only imaging modality that provides 'one stop shop' assessment. Information about ventricular function, myocardial ischemia and myocardial viability can be obtained in a single cardiac MRI session. Additionally, Cardiac MRI has become a gold standard method in evaluation of myocardial viability and in assessment of ventricular mass and function. As a result, cardiac MRI enable radiologist to comprehensively assess ischemic heart disease. The aim of this presentation is to provide the reader a state-of-the art on how the newest cardiac MRI techniques can be used to study ischemic heart disease patients.

  14. Right ventricular volume estimation with cine MRI; A comparative study between Simpson's rule and a new modified area-length method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawachika, Takashi (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-04-01

    To quantitate right ventricular (RV) volumes easily using cine MRI, we developed a new method called 'modified area-length method (MOAL method)'. To validate this method, we compared it to the conventional Simpson's rule. Magnetom H15 (Siemens) was used and 6 normal volunteers and 21 patients with various RV sizes were imaged with ECG triggered gradient echo method (FISP, TR 50 ms, TE 12 ms, slice thickness 9 mm). For Simpson's rule transverse images of 12 sequential views which cover whole heart were acquired. For the MOAL method, two orthogonal views were imaged. One was the sagittal view which includes RV outflow tract and the other was the coronal view defined from the sagittal image to cover the whole RV. From these images the area (As, Ac) of RV and the longest distance between RV apex and pulmonary valve (Lmax) were determined. By correlating RV volumes measured by Simpson's rule to As*Ac/Lmax the RV volume could be estimated as follows: V=0.85*As*Ac/Lmax+4.55. Thus the MOAL method demonstrated excellent accuracy to quantitate RV volume and the acquisition time abbreviated to one fifth compared with Simpson's rule. This should be a highly promising method for routine clinical application. (author).

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ...

  17. MRI T2 Mapping of the Knee Articular Cartilage Using Different Acquisition Sequences and Calculation Methods at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Mokhtar; Bouaziz, Mouna; Tbini, Zeineb; Ladeb, Fethi; Gharbi, Souha

    2018-06-12

    This study aims to determine how Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) acquisition techniques and calculation methods affect T2 values of knee cartilage at 1.5 Tesla and to identify sequences that can be used for high-resolution T2 mapping in short scanning times. This study was performed on phantom and twenty-nine patients who underwent MRI of the knee joint at 1.5 Tesla. The protocol includes T2 mapping sequences based on Single Echo Spin Echo (SESE), Multi-Echo Spin Echo (MESE), Fast Spin Echo (FSE) and Turbo Gradient Spin Echo (TGSE). The T2 relaxation times were quantified and evaluated using three calculation methods (MapIt, Syngo Offline and monoexponential fit). Signal to Noise Ratios (SNR) were measured in all sequences. All statistical analyses were performed using the t-test. The average T2 values in phantom were 41.7 ± 13.8 ms for SESE, 43.2 ± 14.4 ms for MESE, 42.4 ± 14.1 ms for FSE and 44 ± 14.5 ms for TGSE. In the patient study, the mean differences were 6.5 ± 8.2 ms, 7.8 ± 7.6 ms and 8.4 ± 14.2 ms for MESE, FSE and TGSE compared to SESE respectively; these statistical results were not significantly different (p > 0.05). The comparison between the three calculation methods showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). t-Test showed no significant difference between SNR values for all sequences. T2 values depend not only on the sequence type but also on the calculation method. None of the sequences revealed significant differences compared to the SESE reference sequence. TGSE with its short scanning time can be used for high-resolution T2 mapping. ©2018The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. An integrated model-driven method for in-treatment upper airway motion tracking using cine MRI in head and neck radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Dolly, Steven; Li, Harold; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James; Ruan, Su; Anastasio, Mark; Mazur, Thomas; Gach, Michael; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Rodriguez, Vivian; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-08-01

    For the first time, MRI-guided radiation therapy systems can acquire cine images to dynamically monitor in-treatment internal organ motion. However, the complex head and neck (H&N) structures and low-contrast/resolution of on-board cine MRI images make automatic motion tracking a very challenging task. In this study, the authors proposed an integrated model-driven method to automatically track the in-treatment motion of the H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein internal motion often occurs in an either voluntary or involuntary manner, from cine MRI images for the analysis of H&N motion patterns. Considering the complex H&N structures and ensuring automatic and robust upper airway motion tracking, the authors firstly built a set of linked statistical shapes (including face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) using principal component analysis from clinically approved contours delineated on a set of training data. The linked statistical shapes integrate explicit landmarks and implicit shape representation. Then, a hierarchical model-fitting algorithm was developed to align the linked shapes on the first image frame of a to-be-tracked cine sequence and to localize the upper airway region. Finally, a multifeature level set contour propagation scheme was performed to identify the upper airway shape change, frame-by-frame, on the entire image sequence. The multifeature fitting energy, including the information of intensity variations, edge saliency, curve geometry, and temporal shape continuity, was minimized to capture the details of moving airway boundaries. Sagittal cine MR image sequences acquired from three H&N cancer patients were utilized to demonstrate the performance of the proposed motion tracking method. The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 50 randomly selected cine image frames from each patient. The resulting average dice similarity coefficient (93.28%  ±  1

  19. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery de...

  20. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (I): Theory, method, and phantom experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Jeroen J N; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J; Vos, Frans M

    2018-05-01

    The arterial input function (AIF) represents the time-dependent arterial contrast agent (CA) concentration that is used in pharmacokinetic modeling. To develop a novel method for estimating the AIF from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data, while compensating for flow enhancement. Signal simulation and phantom measurements. Time-intensity curves (TICs) were simulated for different numbers of excitation pulses modeling flow effects. A phantom experiment was performed in which a solution (without CA) was passed through a straight tube, at constant flow velocity. Dynamic fast spoiled gradient echo (FSPGRs) at 3T MRI, both in the simulations and in the phantom experiment. TICs were generated for a duration of 373 seconds and sampled at intervals of 1.247 seconds (300 timepoints). The proposed method first estimates the number of pulses that spins have received, and then uses this knowledge to accurately estimate the CA concentration. The difference between the median of the estimated number of pulses and the true value was determined, as well as the interquartile range (IQR) of the estimations. The estimated CA concentrations were evaluated in the same way. The estimated number of pulses was also used to calculate flow velocity. The difference between the median estimated and reference number of pulses varied from -0.005 to -1.371 (corresponding IQRs: 0.853 and 48.377) at true values of 10 and 180 pulses, respectively. The difference between the median estimated CA concentration and the reference value varied from -0.00015 to 0.00306 mmol/L (corresponding IQRs: 0.01989 and 1.51013 mmol/L) at true values of 0.5 and 8.0 mmol/l, respectively, at an intermediate value of 100 pulses. The estimated flow velocities in the phantom were within 10% of the reference value. The proposed method accurately corrects the MRI signal affected by the inflow effect. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:1190-1196. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic

  1. MRI angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  2. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  3. Comparison of manual tracing versus a semiautomatic radial measurement method in temporal lobe MRI volumetry for pharmacoresistant epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Christian-Andreas; Scorzin, Jasmin; Schramm, Johannes [University of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Koenig, Roy; Urbach, Horst [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Zentner, Josef [University of Freiburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Freiburg (Germany); Lehmann, Thomas-Nicolas [Charite-University Medicine Berlin, Department of Neurosurgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    The aim of this study was to test a modified radial semiautomated volumetry technique (radial divider technique, RDT) versus the manual volumetry technique (MVT) for proportionality of temporal subvolumes in 30 patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Included in the study were 30 patients (15 female, 15 male; mean age 39.6 years) with pharmacoresistant epilepsy (mean duration 26.6 years). MRI studies were performed preoperatively on a 1.5-T scanner. All image processing steps and volume measurements were performed using ANALYZE software. The volumes of six subregions were measured bilaterally; these included the superior temporal gyrus (STG), middle + inferior temporal gyrus (MITG), fusiform gyrus (FG), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), amygdala (AM), and hippocampus (HP). Linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between the comparable subvolumes obtained with MVT and RDT. Very high correlations (R {sup 2} >0.95) between RDT and MVT were observed for the STG + MITG and the STG + MITG + FG, but low correlations for the PHG subvolumes and the combined PHG + HP + AM subvolumes. These observations were independent of the side of the pathology and of hemisphere. The two measurement techniques provided highly reliable proportional results. This series in a homogeneous group of TLE patients suggests that the much quicker RDT is suitable for determining the volume of temporolateral and laterobasal temporal lobe compartments, of both the affected and the non-affected side and the right and left hemisphere. (orig.)

  4. New multispectral MRI data fusion technique for white matter lesion segmentation: method and comparison with thresholding in FLAIR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del C Valdes Hernandez, Maria; Ferguson, Karen J.; Chappell, Francesca M.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2010-01-01

    Brain tissue segmentation by conventional threshold-based techniques may have limited accuracy and repeatability in older subjects. We present a new multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) image analysis approach for segmenting normal and abnormal brain tissue, including white matter lesions (WMLs). We modulated two 1.5T MR sequences in the red/green colour space and calculated the tissue volumes using minimum variance quantisation. We tested it on 14 subjects, mean age 73.3 ± 10 years, representing the full range of WMLs and atrophy. We compared the results of WML segmentation with those using FLAIR-derived thresholds, examined the effect of sampling location, WML amount and field inhomogeneities, and tested observer reliability and accuracy. FLAIR-derived thresholds were significantly affected by the location used to derive the threshold (P = 0.0004) and by WML volume (P = 0.0003), and had higher intra-rater variability than the multispectral technique (mean difference ± SD: 759 ± 733 versus 69 ± 326 voxels respectively). The multispectral technique misclassified 16 times fewer WMLs. Initial testing suggests that the multispectral technique is highly reproducible and accurate with the potential to be applied to routinely collected clinical MRI data. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of manual tracing versus a semiautomatic radial measurement method in temporal lobe MRI volumetry for pharmacoresistant epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Christian-Andreas; Scorzin, Jasmin; Schramm, Johannes; Koenig, Roy; Urbach, Horst; Fimmers, Rolf; Zentner, Josef; Lehmann, Thomas-Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test a modified radial semiautomated volumetry technique (radial divider technique, RDT) versus the manual volumetry technique (MVT) for proportionality of temporal subvolumes in 30 patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Included in the study were 30 patients (15 female, 15 male; mean age 39.6 years) with pharmacoresistant epilepsy (mean duration 26.6 years). MRI studies were performed preoperatively on a 1.5-T scanner. All image processing steps and volume measurements were performed using ANALYZE software. The volumes of six subregions were measured bilaterally; these included the superior temporal gyrus (STG), middle + inferior temporal gyrus (MITG), fusiform gyrus (FG), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), amygdala (AM), and hippocampus (HP). Linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between the comparable subvolumes obtained with MVT and RDT. Very high correlations (R 2 >0.95) between RDT and MVT were observed for the STG + MITG and the STG + MITG + FG, but low correlations for the PHG subvolumes and the combined PHG + HP + AM subvolumes. These observations were independent of the side of the pathology and of hemisphere. The two measurement techniques provided highly reliable proportional results. This series in a homogeneous group of TLE patients suggests that the much quicker RDT is suitable for determining the volume of temporolateral and laterobasal temporal lobe compartments, of both the affected and the non-affected side and the right and left hemisphere. (orig.)

  6. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a technique to generate on-board volumetric-cine MRI (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling and on-board 2D-cine MRI. Methods One phase of a 4D-MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4D-MRI based on principal-component-analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2D-cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both XCAT simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from four real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using Volume-Percent-Difference(VPD), Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest(ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was on average 8.43±1.52% and the COMS was on average 0.93±0.58mm across all time-steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against noise levels up to SNR=20. For patient data, average tracking errors were less than 2 mm in all directions for all patients. Conclusions Preliminary studies demonstrated the

  7. Suitability of imaging methods (X-ray, CT, MRI) in the diagnostics of Ewings sarcoma in children - analysis of own material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuleta-Bosak, E.; Machnik-Broncel, J.; Kluczewska, E.; Madziara, W.; Ciupinska-Kajor, M.; Sojka, D.; Rogala, W.; Juszczyk, J.; Wilk, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ewing sarcoma is a malignant, small round cell bone tumor, presenting predominantly in children and adolescents. Ewing sarcoma may develop in every bone; diaphyses of long bones, ribs and flat bones are the main locations. Local and systemic clinical symptoms are nonspecific - pain, swelling, fever or ill-being. The aim of the study was to assess the role of radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the analysis of bone lesions in children and young adults with Ewing sarcoma. Material/Methods: Twenty-seven patients, aged between 1 year and 10 months, and 17 years and 2 months, with histologically verified Ewing sarcoma of the bone, referred to the Radiological Department of University Hospital No 6., John Paul II Upper Silesian Centre for Child Health Katowice, in the period from 1996 to 2007, were included in the study.Plain radiography was performed in every child, CT in 20 and MRI in 12 individuals. Tumour location, extension of the tumour, soft tissue mass, and periosteal reaction were taken into consideration in the evaluation of the lesion. In some cases, pathological features of the MRI and CT were compared. The prevalence of some radiological features was compared to the literature data. Results: The most common site of tumor was: ribs (6 children), femoral bone (6 children), pelvis (4 children) and tibia (3 children). In 2 children, a primary tumor was diagnosed in the spine (multifocal in 1 child). X-rays revealed: periosteal reaction in 17 children (63%), soft tissue involvement in 19 children (70%), permeative component in 16 children (59%), and sclerotic component in 5 children (19%). In 10 children (37%), periosteal reaction was not detected. The examination revealed: soft tissue calcifications in 7 cases (26%), a well-delineated focus of destruction within bones in 3 children (11%), cortical thickening in 4 children (15%), cortical destruction in 4 children (15%), saucerisation in 3 children (11%), bone expansion

  8. Application of 3D documentation and geometric reconstruction methods in traffic accident analysis: with high resolution surface scanning, radiological MSCT/MRI scanning and real data based animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Braun, Marcel; Bolliger, Stephan; Friederich, Hans; Jackowski, Christian; Aghayev, Emin; Christe, Andreas; Vock, Peter; Dirnhofer, Richard; Thali, Michael J

    2007-07-20

    The examination of traffic accidents is daily routine in forensic medicine. An important question in the analysis of the victims of traffic accidents, for example in collisions between motor vehicles and pedestrians or cyclists, is the situation of the impact. Apart from forensic medical examinations (external examination and autopsy), three-dimensional technologies and methods are gaining importance in forensic investigations. Besides the post-mortem multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the documentation and analysis of internal findings, highly precise 3D surface scanning is employed for the documentation of the external body findings and of injury-inflicting instruments. The correlation of injuries of the body to the injury-inflicting object and the accident mechanism are of great importance. The applied methods include documentation of the external and internal body and the involved vehicles and inflicting tools as well as the analysis of the acquired data. The body surface and the accident vehicles with their damages were digitized by 3D surface scanning. For the internal findings of the body, post-mortem MSCT and MRI were used. The analysis included the processing of the obtained data to 3D models, determination of the driving direction of the vehicle, correlation of injuries to the vehicle damages, geometric determination of the impact situation and evaluation of further findings of the accident. In the following article, the benefits of the 3D documentation and computer-assisted, drawn-to-scale 3D comparisons of the relevant injuries with the damages to the vehicle in the analysis of the course of accidents, especially with regard to the impact situation, are shown on two examined cases.

  9. Hippocampal malrotation: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanez, Paulina; Martinez, Adriana; Romero, Carlos; Lopez, Miriam; Zaffaroni, Alejandra; Lopez, Adriana

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the common features of hippocampus malrotation in patients with epilepsy by volumetric and high-resolution MRI. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 5 patients (2 females and 3 males) ages ranged between 6-41 years (average: 25 years), all of them with epilepsy diagnosis. MRI was performed with a 1.5 T (GE Signa). The epilepsy protocol include sagittal T1, axial T1 and T2, coronal FLAIR, coronal T2 (high-resolution) and volumetric 3D SPGR IR 1.5 mm thick sequences. Results: The common features found in all patients were: a) Incomplete inversion and round configuration of the hippocampus; b) Unilateral affectation; c) Variable affectation of the hippocampus; d) Normal signal intensity; e) Modification of the inner structure of the hippocampus; f) Abnormal angularity of the collateral sulcus; g) Abnormal position and size of the fornix; h) Normal size of the temporal lobe; and i) Enlargement of the temporal horn with particular configuration. Conclusion: Hippocampus malrotation is a malformation that should be included in the differential diagnosis of the epilepsy patients. MRI provides accurate information for the diagnosis. (author)

  10. Fetal MRI; Fetales MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, D. [Inst. fuer Diagn. Radiologie, Uniklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany); Turowski, B. [Inst. fuer Diagn. Radiologie, Neuroradiologie, Uniklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany); Schaper, J. [Inst. fuer Diagn. Radiologie, Kinderradiologie, Uniklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Ultrasonography is the method of choice for prenatal malformation screening, but it does not always provide sufficient information for correct diagnosis or adequate abnormality evaluation. Fetal MRI is increasingly being used to complete sonographic findings. It was initially used for evaluation of cerebral abnormalities but is increasingly being applied to other fetal areas. In vivo investigation of fetal brain maturation has been enhanced by MRI. An adequate analysis of fetal chest and abdomen can be achieved with fast T2-, T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The advantages include the great field of view and the excellent soft tissue contrast. This allows correct diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and evaluation of the consequences on pulmonary growth. Other pulmonary malformations, such as cystic adenomatoid malformation, sequestration and brochogenic cysts, can also be easily identified. Renal position can be quickly determined using DWI sequences and renal agenesia can be easily diagnosed with only one sequence. Prenatal MRI is virtually as effective as postnatal examination, dispenses with transport of a potentially very ill newborn, and provides logistic advantages. Therefore, prenatal MRI is useful for adequate postnatal treatment of newborns with malformations. (orig.)

  11. Brain venous pathologies: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatico, Rosana; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Yanez, Paulina; Romero, Carlos; Trejo, Mariano; Lambre, Hector

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe MRI findings of the different brain venous pathologies. Material and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2004, 18 patients were studied 10 males and 8 females between 6 and 63 years old; with different brain venous pathologies. In all cases brain MRI were performed including morphological sequences with and without gadolinium injection and angiographic venous sequences. Results: 10 venous occlusions were found, 6 venous angiomas, and 2 presented varices secondary to arteriovenous dural fistula. Conclusion: Brain venous pathologies can appear in many different clinical contexts, with different prognosis and treatment. In all the cases brain MRI was the best imaging study to disclose typical morphologic abnormalities. (author) [es

  12. Comparison of transient severe motion in gadoxetate disodium and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI. Effect of modified breath-holding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ji Soo; Choi, Eun Jung; Park, Eun Hae; Lee, Ju-Hyung

    2018-01-01

    To compare the occurrence of transient severe motion (TSM) between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI and between gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI scans obtained with and without the application of a modified breath-holding technique. We reviewed 80 patients who underwent two magnetic resonance examinations (gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI) with the application of a modified breath-holding technique (dual group). This group was compared with 100 patients who underwent gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI without the application of the modified breath-holding technique (single group). Patient risk factors and motion scores (1 [none] to 5 [non-diagnostic]) for each dynamic-phase imaging were analysed. In the dual group, mean motion scores did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI (p=0.096-0.807) in any phase. However, in all phases except the late dynamic phase, mean motion scores of the dual group were significantly lower than those in the single group. TSM incidence did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI in the dual group (3.8% vs. 1.3%, p=0.620). With proper application of the modified breath-holding technique, TSM occurrence with gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI was comparable to that associated with gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of transient severe motion in gadoxetate disodium and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI. Effect of modified breath-holding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Soo; Choi, Eun Jung; Park, Eun Hae [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Hyung [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Preventive Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-03-15

    To compare the occurrence of transient severe motion (TSM) between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI and between gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI scans obtained with and without the application of a modified breath-holding technique. We reviewed 80 patients who underwent two magnetic resonance examinations (gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI) with the application of a modified breath-holding technique (dual group). This group was compared with 100 patients who underwent gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI without the application of the modified breath-holding technique (single group). Patient risk factors and motion scores (1 [none] to 5 [non-diagnostic]) for each dynamic-phase imaging were analysed. In the dual group, mean motion scores did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI (p=0.096-0.807) in any phase. However, in all phases except the late dynamic phase, mean motion scores of the dual group were significantly lower than those in the single group. TSM incidence did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI in the dual group (3.8% vs. 1.3%, p=0.620). With proper application of the modified breath-holding technique, TSM occurrence with gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI was comparable to that associated with gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI. (orig.)

  14. Mechanical deformation and glycosaminoglycan content changes in a rabbit annular puncture disc degeneration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Deva D; Khan, Safdar N; Ye, Xiaojing; Curtiss, Shane B; Gupta, Munish C; Klineberg, Eric O; Neu, Corey P

    2011-08-15

    Evaluation of degenerated intervertebral discs from a rabbit annular puncture model by using specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, including displacement encoding with stimulated echoes and a fast-spin echo (DENSE-FSE) acquisition and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC). To evaluate a rabbit disc degeneration model by using various MRI techniques. To determine the displacements and strains, spin-lattice relaxation time (T1), and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) distribution of degenerated discs as compared to normal and adjacent level discs. Annular puncture of the intervertebral disc produces disc degeneration in rabbits. DENSE-FSE has been previously demonstrated in articular cartilage for the measurement of soft tissue displacements and strains. MRI also can measure the T1 of tissue, and dGEMRIC can quantify GAG concentration in cartilage. METHODS.: In eight New Zealand white rabbits, the annulus fibrosis of a lumbar disc was punctured. After 4 weeks, the punctured and cranially adjacent motion segments were isolated for MRI and histology. MRI was used to estimate the disc volume and map T1. DENSE-FSE was used to determine displacements for the estimation of strains. dGEMRIC was then used to determine GAG distributions. Histology and standard MRI indicated degeneration in punctured discs. Disc volume increased significantly at 4 weeks after the puncture. Displacement of the nucleus pulposus was distinct from that of the annulus fibrosis in most untreated discs but not in punctured discs. T1 was significantly higher and GAG concentration significantly lower in punctured discs compared with untreated adjacent level discs. Noninvasive and quantitative MRI techniques can be used to evaluate the mechanical and biochemical changes that occur with animal models of disc degeneration. DENSE-FSE, dGEMRIC, and similar techniques have potential for evaluating the progression of disc degeneration and the efficacy of treatments.

  15. 3D MRI of the colon: methods and first results of 5 patients; 3D-MRT des Kolons: Methodik und erste Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luboldt, W; Bauerfeind, P; Pelkonen, P; Steiner, P; Krestin, G P; Debatin, J F [MRI-Zentrum, Dept. Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsspital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Purpose: `Exoscopic` and endoscopic identification of colorectal pathologies via MRI. Methods: 5 patients (36-88 years), two normal and three with different colorectal pathologies (diverticular disease, polyps and carcinoma of the colon), were examined by MRI after colonoscopy. Subsequent to filling of the colon with a gadolinium-water mixture under MRI-monitoring, 3D-data sets of the colon were acquired in prone and supine positions over a 28 sec breathold interval. Subsequently multiplanar T{sub 1}-weighted 2D-sequences were acquired before and following i.v. administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg BW). All imaging was performed in the coronal orientation. The 3D-data were interactively analysed based on various displays: Maximum intensity projection (MIP), surface shadowed display (SSD), multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), virtual colonoscopy (VC). Results: All of the colorectal pathologies could be interactively diagnosed by MPR. On MIP images some pathologies were missed. VC presented the morphology of colon haustra as well as of all endoluminally growing lesions in a manner similar to endoscopy. The colon masses showed uptake of contrast media and could thus be differentiated from air or faeces. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Externe und endoskopische Identifizierung kolorektaler Pathologien mittels MRT. Material und Methoden: 5 Patienten (36-88 Jahre), zwei mit Normalbefund, drei mit verschiedenen kolorektalen pathologischen Befunden (Divertikulose, Polypen, Karzinom), wurden nach der Kolonoskopie mit der MRT untersucht. Dazu wurde das Kolon unter MR-Sichtkontrolle mit einer Gadolinium-Wasser-Mischung gefuellt und als 3D-Datensatz atemangehalten in Bauch- und Rueckenlage aufgenommen. Anschliessend wurden multiplanare, T{sub 1}-gewichtete 2D-Sequenzen vor und nach i.v. Gd-DTPA-Gabe akquiriert. Die 3D-Datensaetze wurden interaktiv unter Zuhilfenahme verschiedener Darstellungsformen analysiert: Maximale Intensitaetsprojektion (MIP), Oberflaechendarstellung

  16. Toward an MRI-based method to measure non-uniform cartilage deformation: an MRI-cyclic loading apparatus system and steady-state cyclic displacement of articular cartilage under compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, C P; Hull, M L

    2003-04-01

    Recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have shown potential for measuring non-uniform deformations throughout the volume (i.e. three-dimensional (3D) deformations) in small orthopedic tissues such as articular cartilage. However, to analyze cartilage deformation using MRI techniques, a system is required which can construct images from multiple acquisitions of MRI signals from the cartilage in both the underformed and deformed states. The objectives of the work reported in this article were to 1) design an apparatus that could apply highly repeatable cyclic compressive loads of 400 N and operate in the bore of an MRI scanner, 2) demonstrate that the apparatus and MRI scanner can be successfully integrated to observe 3D deformations in a phantom material, 3) use the apparatus to determine the load cycle necessary to achieve a steady-state deformation response in normal bovine articular cartilage samples using a flat-surfaced and nonporous indentor in unconfined compression. Composed of electronic and pneumatic components, the apparatus regulated pressure to a double-acting pneumatic cylinder so that (1) load-controlled compression cycles were applied to cartilage samples immersed in a saline bath, (2) loading and recovery periods within a cycle varied in time duration, and (3) load magnitude varied so that the stress applied to cartilage samples was within typical physiological ranges. In addition the apparatus allowed gating for MR image acquisition, and operation within the bore of an MRI scanner without creating image artifacts. The apparatus demonstrated high repeatability in load application with a standard deviation of 1.8% of the mean 400 N load applied. When the apparatus was integrated with an MRI scanner programmed with appropriate pulse sequences, images of a phantom material in both the underformed and deformed states were constructed by assembling data acquired through multiple signal acquisitions. Additionally, the number of cycles to reach

  17. Cardiac MRI in patients with complex CHD following primary or secondary implantation of MRI-conditional pacemaker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wakeel, Nadya; O h-Ici, Darach; Schmitt, Katharina R; Messroghli, Daniel R; Riesenkampff, Eugénie; Berger, Felix; Kuehne, Titus; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-01

    In patients with CHD, cardiac MRI is often indicated for functional and anatomical assessment. With the recent introduction of MRI-conditional pacemaker systems, cardiac MRI has become accessible for patients with pacemakers. The present clinical study aims to evaluate safety, susceptibility artefacts, and image reading of cardiac MRI in patients with CHD and MRI-conditional pacemaker systems. Material and methods CHD patients with MRI-conditional pacemaker systems and a clinical need for cardiac MRI were examined with a 1.5-T MRI system. Lead function was tested before and after MRI. Artefacts and image readings were evaluated using a four-point grading scale. A total of nine patients with CHD (mean age 34.0 years, range 19.5-53.6 years) received a total of 11 cardiac MRI examinations. Owing to clinical indications, seven patients had previously been converted from conventional to MRI-conditional pacemaker systems. All MRI examinations were completed without adverse effects. Device testing immediately after MRI and at follow-up showed no alteration of pacemaker device and lead function. Clinical questions could be addressed and answered in all patients. Cardiac MRI can be performed safely with high certainty of diagnosis in CHD patients with MRI-conditional pacemaker systems. In case of clinically indicated lead and box changing, CHD patients with non-MRI-conditional pacemaker systems should be considered for complete conversion to MRI-conditional systems.

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  20. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  3. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  4. MRI of plants and foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  5. An MRI-Conditional External Cardiac Defibrillator for Resuscitation Within the MRI Scanner Bore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ehud J.; Watkins, Ronald D.; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Guttman, Michael A.; Wang, Wei; Halperin, Henry A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects undergoing cardiac arrest within an MRI scanner are currently removed from the bore and then from the MRI suite, prior to delivery of CPR and defibrillation, potentially increasing risk of mortality. This precludes many higher-risk (acute-ischemic, acute-stroke) patients from undergoing MRI imaging and MRI-guided intervention. An MRI-conditional cardiac defibrillator should enable scanning with defibrillation pads attached and the generator ON, enabling application of defibrillation within the MRI seconds after a cardiac event. An MRI-conditional external defibrillator may improve patient acceptance for MRI procedures. Methods and Results A commercial external defibrillator was rendered 1.5 Tesla MRI-conditional by addition of novel Radio-Frequency (RF) filters between the generator and commercial disposable surface-pads. The RF filters reduced emission into the MRI scanner, and prevented cable/surface-pad heating during imaging, while preserving all the defibrillator’s monitoring and delivery functions. Human volunteers were imaged using high Specific-Absorption-Rate sequences to validate MRI image quality (IQ) and lack of heating. Swine were electrically fibrillated (N=4) and thereafter defibrillated both outside and inside the MRI bore. MRI IQ was reduced by 0.8 or 1.6 dB, with the generator in monitoring mode and operating on battery or AC power, respectively. Commercial surface-pads did not create artifacts deeper than 6mm below the skin surface. RF heating was within FDA guidelines. Defibrillation was completely successful inside and outside the MRI bore. Conclusions A prototype MRI-conditional defibrillation system successfully defibrillated in the MRI without degrading image quality, or increasing the time needed for defibrillation. It can increase patient acceptance for MRI procedures. PMID:27729363

  6. Development of detection method of early stage nontraumatic osteo-necrosis of the femoral head by dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Fuminori; Ikehira, Hiroo; Kitahara, Hiroshi; Terada, Tomoko; Nakano, Yoshitada; Ishii, Teruyuki; Iida, Tetsu; Ikenouchi, Sumio; Moriya, Hideshige

    1999-01-01

    The early detection methods of nontraumatic osteo-necrosis of the femoral head were demonstrated with the dynamic or static enhancement MR imaging method using gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Even if with these methods we could not detect stage 0 of nontraumatic osteo-necrosis, but these pathological change should be induced at 0 stage in the patients who were medicated high-dose corticosteroids. The authors designed the big ROI (region of interest) dynamic MR imaging method to brake this diagnostic difficulty for 0 stage of femoral, and evaluated the efficacy of this technology with normal and femoral nontraumatic osteo-necrosis patients volunteer. (author)

  7. Situs anomalies on prenatal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, Stefan F.; Brugger, Peter C.; Nemec, Ursula; Bettelheim, Dieter; Kasprian, Gregor; Amann, Gabriele; Rimoin, David L.; Graham, John M.; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Situs anomalies refer to an abnormal organ arrangement, which may be associated with severe errors of development. Due regard being given to prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US), this study sought to demonstrate the in utero visualization of situs anomalies on MRI, compared to US. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 12 fetuses with situs anomalies depicted on fetal MRI using prenatal US as a comparison modality. With an MRI standard protocol, the whole fetus was assessed for anomalies, with regard to the position and morphology of the following structures: heart; venous drainage and aorta; stomach and intestines; liver and gallbladder; and the presence and number of spleens. Results: Situs inversus totalis was found in 3/12 fetuses; situs inversus with levocardia in 1/12 fetuses; situs inversus abdominis in 2/12 fetuses; situs ambiguous with polysplenia in 3/12 fetuses, and with asplenia in 2/12 fetuses; and isolated dextrocardia in 1/12 fetuses. Congenital heart defects (CHDs), vascular anomalies, and intestinal malrotations were the most frequent associated malformations. In 5/12 cases, the US and MRI diagnoses were concordant. Compared to US, in 7/12 cases, additional MRI findings specified the situs anomaly, but CHDs were only partially visualized in six cases. Conclusions: Our initial MRI results demonstrate the visualization of situs anomalies and associated malformations in utero, which may provide important information for perinatal management. Using a standard protocol, MRI may identify additional findings, compared to US, which confirm and specify the situs anomaly, but, with limited MRI visualization of fetal CHDs.

  8. Statistical analysis of MRI-only based dose planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, M. E.; Waring, L. W.; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2012-01-01

    . MRIonly based RT eliminates these errors and reduce the time and costs of a CT scan. The aim of this study is to investigate the dosimetric differences of a treatment plan when the dose calculation is based on MRI as compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Four diagnostic groups are investigated; 12...... as a clinically approved treatment plan. The treatment planning software is Eclipse v.10.0 (Varian Medical Systems). The dose calculation based on MRI data is evaluated in two different ways; a homogeneous density assigned MRI (MRI unit), where the entire body is assigned an HU equal to water and a heterogeneous...... density assigned MRI (MRI bulk) where in addition the CT segmented bone is transferred to the MRI and assigned an age dependent HU based on ICRU report 46. The CT based clinical treatment plan and structure set are registered to the corresponding MRI unit and MRI bulk. The body is outlined on both the MRI...

  9. Two Methods of Automatic Evaluation of Speech Signal Enhancement Recorded in the Open-Air MRI Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Přibil, Jiří; Přibilová, Anna; Frollo, Ivan

    2017-12-01

    The paper focuses on two methods of evaluation of successfulness of speech signal enhancement recorded in the open-air magnetic resonance imager during phonation for the 3D human vocal tract modeling. The first approach enables to obtain a comparison based on statistical analysis by ANOVA and hypothesis tests. The second method is based on classification by Gaussian mixture models (GMM). The performed experiments have confirmed that the proposed ANOVA and GMM classifiers for automatic evaluation of the speech quality are functional and produce fully comparable results with the standard evaluation based on the listening test method.

  10. Type gaucher disease: radiographic and MRI manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yanqing; Li Kuncheng; Wang Yunzhao; Tian Ding

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To enhance the understanding of Gaucher disease (GD) type I bone involvement on imaging findings. Methods: The X-ray plain film and MRI findings of GD type I were reported, and literature reviewed. Results: The X-ray plain film of GD had characteristic change. The extent of bone involvement demonstrated could be depicted in longitudinal direction and the changes of marrow involvement on MRI. Conclusions: MRI is the best way to diagnose the bone involvement of GD

  11. The method of educational assessment affects children's neural processing and performance: behavioural and fMRI Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Steven J.; Burianová, Hana; Calleia, Alysha; Fynes-Clinton, Samuel; Kervin, Lisa; Bokosmaty, Sahar

    2017-08-01

    Standardised educational assessments are now widespread, yet their development has given comparatively more consideration to what to assess than how to optimally assess students' competencies. Existing evidence from behavioural studies with children and neuroscience studies with adults suggest that the method of assessment may affect neural processing and performance, but current evidence remains limited. To investigate the impact of assessment methods on neural processing and performance in young children, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify and quantify the neural correlates during performance across a range of current approaches to standardised spelling assessment. Results indicated that children's test performance declined as the cognitive load of assessment method increased. Activation of neural nodes associated with working memory further suggests that this performance decline may be a consequence of a higher cognitive load, rather than the complexity of the content. These findings provide insights into principles of assessment (re)design, to ensure assessment results are an accurate reflection of students' true levels of competency.

  12. [Recent advances in newborn MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, B; Hornoy, P; Husson, B; Bloch, I; Adamsbaum, C

    2014-07-01

    The accurate morphological exploration of the brain is a major challenge in neonatology that advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now provide. MRI is the gold standard if an hypoxic ischemic pathology is suspected in a full term neonate. In prematures, the specific role of MRI remains to be defined, secondary to US in any case. We present a state of the art of hardware and software technical developments in MRI. The increase in magnetic field strength (3 tesla) and the emergence of new MRI sequences provide access to new information. They both have positive and negative consequences on the daily clinical data acquisition use. The semiology of brain imaging in full term newborns and prematures is more extensive and complex and thereby more difficult to interpret. The segmentation of different brain structures in the newborn, even very premature, is now available. It is now possible to dissociate the cortex and basal ganglia from the cerebral white matter, to calculate the volume of anatomical structures, which improves the morphometric quantification and the understanding of the normal and abnormal brain development. MRI is a powerful tool to analyze the neonatal brain. The relevance of the diagnostic contribution requires an adaptation of the parameters of the sequences to acquire and of the image processing methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Resting state fMRI: A review on methods in resting state connectivity analysis and resting state networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, K A; Akhil Raja, K; Arun, K M; Rajesh, P G; Thomas, Bejoy; Kapilamoorthy, T R; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan

    2017-08-01

    The inquisitiveness about what happens in the brain has been there since the beginning of humankind. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a prominent tool which helps in the non-invasive examination, localisation as well as lateralisation of brain functions such as language, memory, etc. In recent years, there is an apparent shift in the focus of neuroscience research to studies dealing with a brain at 'resting state'. Here the spotlight is on the intrinsic activity within the brain, in the absence of any sensory or cognitive stimulus. The analyses of functional brain connectivity in the state of rest have revealed different resting state networks, which depict specific functions and varied spatial topology. However, different statistical methods have been introduced to study resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity, yet producing consistent results. In this article, we introduce the concept of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in detail, then discuss three most widely used methods for analysis, describe a few of the resting state networks featuring the brain regions, associated cognitive functions and clinical applications of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. This review aims to highlight the utility and importance of studying resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity, underlining its complementary nature to the task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. A comparison of three clustering methods for finding subgroups in MRI, SMS or clinical data: SPSS TwoStep Cluster analysis, Latent Gold and SNOB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Peter; Jensen, Rikke K; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-10-02

    There are various methodological approaches to identifying clinically important subgroups and one method is to identify clusters of characteristics that differentiate people in cross-sectional and/or longitudinal data using Cluster Analysis (CA) or Latent Class Analysis (LCA). There is a scarcity of head-to-head comparisons that can inform the choice of which clustering method might be suitable for particular clinical datasets and research questions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform a head-to-head comparison of three commonly available methods (SPSS TwoStep CA, Latent Gold LCA and SNOB LCA). The performance of these three methods was compared: (i) quantitatively using the number of subgroups detected, the classification probability of individuals into subgroups, the reproducibility of results, and (ii) qualitatively using subjective judgments about each program's ease of use and interpretability of the presentation of results.We analysed five real datasets of varying complexity in a secondary analysis of data from other research projects. Three datasets contained only MRI findings (n = 2,060 to 20,810 vertebral disc levels), one dataset contained only pain intensity data collected for 52 weeks by text (SMS) messaging (n = 1,121 people), and the last dataset contained a range of clinical variables measured in low back pain patients (n = 543 people). Four artificial datasets (n = 1,000 each) containing subgroups of varying complexity were also analysed testing the ability of these clustering methods to detect subgroups and correctly classify individuals when subgroup membership was known. The results from the real clinical datasets indicated that the number of subgroups detected varied, the certainty of classifying individuals into those subgroups varied, the findings had perfect reproducibility, some programs were easier to use and the interpretability of the presentation of their findings also varied. The results from the artificial datasets

  15. Uterus MRI. Normal and pathological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, G.; Bartoli, J.M.; Gaubert, J.Y.; Bayle, O.; Distefano-Louineau, D.; Kasbarian, M.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), a non invasive procedure, is taking a place of growing importance as a means of radiological exploration. Its use in uterine pathologies has shown considerable developments. This requires an excellent knowledge of the normal and pathological aspects of the uterus. In fact it exists a zonal anatomy of the uterus which varies according to hormonal impregnation and this is very well seen by MRI. MRI gives excellent results in the diagnosis and study of different uterine pathologies. The radiological appearance of leiomyomas differs depending on the presence or not of degenerative changes within them. Uterine adenomyosis is also well studied by MRI. Lastly different studies in the literature have shown MRI to be a reliable method of exploration with a high degree of fiability, specificity and sensibility to study the local spread of malignant uterine diseases. The authors report their experience and also that present in the literature concerning the study of the uterus by MRI [fr

  16. MRI as a reliable and accurate method for assessment of posterior hip dislocation in children and adolescents without the risk of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Kestel, Lauryn; Novais, Eduardo N. [Children' s Hospital Colorado and University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Aurora, CO (United States); Stewart, Jaime R.; Fadell, Michael F. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Posterior hip dislocation in children and adolescents may involve the non-ossified posterior acetabular wall. Plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) have been shown to underestimate injury to the unossified acetabulum as well as associated soft-tissue structures. The purpose of this study was to describe findings on radiographs, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after posterior hip dislocation in a series of adolescents and to report the intraoperative findings, which are considered the gold standard. Measurements of the posterior wall length using MRI and CT scans were also performed. After institutional review board approval, 40 patients who sustained a traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip between September 2007 and April 2014 were identified. Inclusion criteria were (1) age younger than 16 years old and (2) availability of MRI obtained following closed reduction of the hip. Eight male patients and one female patient with an average age of 13.2 years (range: 10.1-16.2 years) underwent hip MRI following posterior dislocation. Seven of the nine patients also underwent evaluation by CT. Plain radiographs, CT scans and MRI were evaluated in all patients by a single pediatric radiologist blinded to surgical findings for joint space asymmetry, posterior wall fracture, femoral head fracture, labrum tear, complete or partial ligamentum teres rupture and presence of intra-articular fragments. Six patients underwent surgical treatment and the intraoperative findings were compared with the imaging findings. CT identified all bone injuries but underestimated the involvement of posterior wall fractures. Assessment of the posterior wall size and fracture displacement was possible with MRI. All surgically confirmed soft-tissue injuries, including avulsion of the posterior labrum, were identified preoperatively on MRI. The measurement of posterior wall length was not statistically different using CT and MRI. Intraoperative pathological findings at the time of

  17. MRI diagnosis of eyeball diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Xiaofeng; Shi Zengru; Xiao Xiangsheng; Yu Hong; Wei Ruili

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To review the MR imaging of eyeball mass in 75 patients with the intention to enhance the acknowledgement to eyeball diseases. Methods: Seventy-five patients, 45 males and 30 females, were examined with MRI before treatment. Most MRI studies were performed with head coil and a few with orbit surface coil. Sagittal, coronal, and axial images were attained. Enhanced MRI studies were performed in 37 cases. High magnetic field MRI studies were performed with additional fat saturation technique. Results: Retinoblastoma (20 cases) showed isointensity in 11 and low signal intensity in 9 on T 1 WI, and isointensity in 5 and slight high signal in 15 on T 2 WI. Coats' disease (5 cases) involved single eyeball in all cases without calcification or eyeball enlargement, and presented as slight high signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI. Choroidal angioma (3 cases) showed slight high signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI. Metastasis (20 cases) was located in the posterior wall of the eyeball. Extra-global invasion occurred in 8 cases and intra-global invasion in 20. Marked thickening of the global wall with isointensity (8 cases) or low signal intensity (12 cases) was detected on T 1 WI, and isointensity (6 cases) or slight high signal intensity (14 cases) was demonstrated on T 2 WI. Marked enhancement was revealed in all 15 cases. Melanoma (7 cases) showed high signal intensity (5) and isointensity (2) on T 1 WI, and low signal (7) on T 2 WI. Retinal detachment (19 cases) showed high signal on both T 1 and T 2 WI, etc. In the diagnosis of eyeball diseases with MRI, the total sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 86.7%. Conclusions: MRI imaging is an important examination method to eyeball diseases, and most diagnosis and differential diagnosis of eyeball diseases can be made correctly with MRI

  18. MRI for peripheral artery disease: Introductory physics for vascular physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Trisha L; Forbes, Thomas L; Dueck, Andrew D; Wright, Graham A

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has advanced significantly in the past decade and provides a safe and non-invasive method of evaluating peripheral artery disease (PAD), with and without using exogenous contrast agents. MRI offers a promising alternative for imaging patients but the complexity of MRI can make it less accessible for physicians to understand or use. This article provides a brief introduction to the technical principles of MRI for physicians who manage PAD patients. We discuss the basic principles of how MRI works and tailor the discussion to how MRI can evaluate anatomic characteristics of peripheral arterial lesions.

  19. Monodisperse magnetite (Fe_3O_4) nanoparticles modified with water soluble polymers for the diagnosis of breast cancer by MRI method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Mousavi, Majid; Kheirjou, Somayyeh; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee; Mohammadnejad, Javad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. To enhance the biocompatibility and colloidal stability of the synthesized nanoparticles, they were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. Both modified and unmodified Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior (particle size below 20 nm). The saturation magnetization (Ms) of PEGdiacid-modified Fe_3O_4 was 45 emu/g, which was less than the unmodified Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles (70 emu/g). This difference indicated that PEGdiacid polymer was immobilized on the surface of Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles successfully. To evaluate the efficiency of the resulting nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), different concentration of MNPs and different value of echo time TE were investigated. The results showed that by increasing the concentration of the nanoparticles, transverse relaxation time (T_2) decreased, which subsequently resulted in MR signal enhancement. T_2-weighted MR images of the different concentration of MNPs in different value of echo time TE indicated that MR signal intensity increased with increase in TE value up to 66 and then remained constant. The cytotoxicity effect of the modified and unmodified nanoparticles was evaluated in three different concentrations (12, 60 and 312 mg l"−"1) on MDA-MB-231 cancer cells for 24 and 48 h. In both tested time (24 and 48 h) for all three samples, the modified nanoparticles had long life time than unmodified nanoparticles. Cellular uptake of modified MNPs was 80% and reduced to 9% by the unmodified MNPs. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. • MNPs were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. • Modified and unmodified Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior. • T_2 decrease as MNPs concentration increase, this led to MR signal enhancement. • Modified

  20. Comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI in temporomandibular joint disorder patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Ho; Yun, Kyoung In [Eulji Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Woo; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, Moon Soo [Kangnung National Univ. College of Dentistry, Kangnung (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to elevate comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic (cine) MRI in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder patients. In this investigation, 33 patients with TMJ disorders were examined using both conventional static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI. Multiple spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR) images were obtained when mouth opened and closed. Proton density weighted images were obtained at the closed and open mouth position in static MRI. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists evaluated location of the articular disk, movement of condyle and bony change respectively and the posterior boundary of articular disk was obtained. No statistically significant difference was found in the observation of articular disk position, mandibular condylar movement and posterior boundary of articular disk using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P>0.05). Statistically significant difference was noted in bony changes of condyle using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P<0.05). This study showed that pseudo-dynamic MRI didn't make a difference in diagnosing internal derangement of TMJ in comparison with static MRI. But it was considered as an additional method to be supplemented in observing bony change.

  1. Comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI in temporomandibular joint disorder patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Ho; Yun, Kyoung In; Park, In Woo; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, Moon Soo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elevate comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic (cine) MRI in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder patients. In this investigation, 33 patients with TMJ disorders were examined using both conventional static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI. Multiple spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR) images were obtained when mouth opened and closed. Proton density weighted images were obtained at the closed and open mouth position in static MRI. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists evaluated location of the articular disk, movement of condyle and bony change respectively and the posterior boundary of articular disk was obtained. No statistically significant difference was found in the observation of articular disk position, mandibular condylar movement and posterior boundary of articular disk using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P>0.05). Statistically significant difference was noted in bony changes of condyle using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P<0.05). This study showed that pseudo-dynamic MRI didn't make a difference in diagnosing internal derangement of TMJ in comparison with static MRI. But it was considered as an additional method to be supplemented in observing bony change

  2. Functional MRI of Language Processing and Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Méndez Orellana (Carolina)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ My thesis describe the utility of implementing fMRI to investigate how the language system is reorganized in brain damaged patients. Specifically for aphasia research fMRI allows to show how specific language treatment methods have the potential to enhance language

  3. CT and MRI of hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahir, J.G.; Toms, A.P.; Marshall, T.J.; Wimhurst, J.; Nolan, J.

    2007-01-01

    Plain films are the initial imaging method of choice for evaluation of hip arthroplasty. Recent advances in technology and imaging techniques have largely overcome the problems of beam hardening in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic susceptibility artefact in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT and MRI have now become useful imaging techniques in the assessment of hip arthroplasty

  4. Development and validation of an MRI reference criterion for defining a positive SIJ MRI in spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Ulrich; Zubler, Veronika; Pedersen, Susanne J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate an MRI reference criterion for a positive SIJ MRI based on the level of confidence in classification of spondyloarthritis (SpA) by expert MRI readers. METHODS: Four readers assessed SIJ MRI in two inception cohorts (A/B) of 157 consecutive back pain patients ≤50 years, and ...... using two inception cohorts and comparing clinical and MRI-based classification supports the case for including both erosion and BME to define a positive SIJ MRI for the classification of axial SpA. © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.......OBJECTIVE: To validate an MRI reference criterion for a positive SIJ MRI based on the level of confidence in classification of spondyloarthritis (SpA) by expert MRI readers. METHODS: Four readers assessed SIJ MRI in two inception cohorts (A/B) of 157 consecutive back pain patients ≤50 years......, and in 20 healthy controls. Patients were classified according to clinical examination and pelvic radiography as having non-radiographic axial SpA (n=51), ankylosing spondylitis (n=34), or non-specific back pain (n=72). Readers recorded their level of confidence in the classification of SpA on a 0-10 scale...

  5. Cardiac MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Masaki; Kato, Shingo; Sakuma, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cine MRI is recognized as the most accurate method for evaluating ventricular function. Late gadolinium-enhanced MRI can clearly delineate subendocardial infarction, and the assessment of transmural extent of infarction on MRI is widely useful for predicting myocardial viability. Stress myocardial perfusion MRI allows for detection of subendocardial myocardial ischemia, and the diagnostic accuracy of stress perfusion MRI is superior to stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). In recent years, image quality, volume coverage, acquisition speed and arterial contrast of 3-dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have been substantially improved with use of steady-state free precession sequences and parallel imaging techniques, permitting the acquisition of high-quality, whole-heart coronary MRA within a reasonably short imaging time. It is now widely recognized that cardiac MRI has tremendous potential for the evaluation of ischemic heart disease. However, cardiac MRI is technically complicated and its use in clinical practice is relatively limited. With further improvements in education and training, as well as standardization of appropriate study protocols, cardiac MRI will play a central role in managing patients with CAD. (author)

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  7. MRI to determine the chronological age of Ghanaian footballers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of fusion of the distal radius on magentic resonance imaging (MRI) and comparing it with the Fédération Internationale de Football. Association (FIFA) MRI grading. Methods. MRI scans of the left wrists of 86 players aspiring to play for the national U17 football team were recruited for the study during a. 'justify your inclusion ...

  8. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... will have very few or no clinical symptoms, or it could be due to compensatory mechanisms in the visual pathway or the visual cortex. In order to understand the pathophysiology and recovery processes in ON it is essential to have sensitive methods to asses both structure and function. These methods...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...

  9. PET/MRI for neurologic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Drzezga, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Rosen, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    PET and MRI provide complementary information in the study of the human brain. Simultaneous PET/MRI data acquisition allows the spatial and temporal correlation of the measured signals, creating opportunities impossible to realize using stand-alone instruments. This paper reviews the methodologic improvements and potential neurologic and psychiatric applications of this novel technology. We first present methods for improving the performance and information content of each modality by using the information provided by the other technique. On the PET side, we discuss methods that use the simultaneously acquired MRI data to improve the PET data quantification. On the MRI side, we present how improved PET quantification can be used to validate several MRI techniques. Finally, we describe promising research, translational, and clinical applications that can benefit from these advanced tools.

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... important to assess the health and function of these structures (heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of ... room. In addition to affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  10. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, C.; Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M.; Mullaney, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  11. MRI in ischemic brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrich, W.; Friedmann, G.; Pawlik, G.; Boecher-Schwarz, H.G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The results of MRI and CT in 55 patients with brain infarcts were compared; in 26 of these cases an additional PET examination was obtained in order to study the regional glucose utilisation. MRI was superior to CT, demonstrating 11% more of the infarcts, particularly during the first 24 hours, in small lesions confined to the grey or subcortical white matter and in infratentorial ischemic lesion. On the other hand, only CT was able to show fresh hemorrhage, although MRI was the method of choice to demonstrate old blood collections. To characterise the follow up of an infarct, CT and MRI were similar, except the marginal contrast enhancement sometimes demonstrated by CT studies between the 2nd and 4th week after stroke event. PET was inferior to show details because of its poorer spatial resolution, but anyhow had a high sensitivity and provided additional informations concerning secondary inactivations of brain areas not directly damaged. Additionally PET was able to demonstrate areas of anaerobic glycolysis and lesions of diminished glucose utilisation in TIAs. Small areas of gliosis in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres were frequently found in patients with cerebro-vascular diseases; they were best shown by MRI, but do not correlate with the extent of vascular stenoses or occlusions, shown by angiography. (orig) [de

  12. Computational Diffusion MRI : MICCAI Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Grussu, Francesco; Ning, Lipeng; Tax, Chantal; Veraart, Jelle

    2018-01-01

    This volume presents the latest developments in the highly active and rapidly growing field of diffusion MRI. The reader will find numerous contributions covering a broad range of topics, from the mathematical foundations of the diffusion process and signal generation, to new computational methods and estimation techniques for the in-vivo recovery of microstructural and connectivity features, as well as frontline applications in neuroscience research and clinical practice. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the 2017 MICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI (CDMRI’17) held in Québec, Canada on September 10, 2017, sharing new perspectives on the most recent research challenges for those currently working in the field, but also offering a valuable starting point for anyone interested in learning computational techniques in diffusion MRI. This book includes rigorous mathematical derivations, a large number of rich, full-colour visualisations and clinically relevant results. As such, it wil...

  13. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  14. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornreich, L.; Dagan, O.; Grunebaum, M.

    1996-01-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig

  15. MRI finding of hemangioblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Cheol; Oh, Min Cheol; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Seol, Hye Young; Lee, Nam Joon; Kim, Jung Hyuk

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of posterior fossa hemanangioblastoma and usefulness of contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA. Seven patients with posterior fossa hemangioblastoma were studied with both pre- and post-enhanced MRI. The MR images were reviewed regarding the location, size, signal intensities of cysts and mural nodules, and their contrast enhancement pattern. Five tumors were located in cerebellar hemisphere, one in vermis, and one in posterior part of medulla. One patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease had a medullary hemangioblastoma with multiple pancreatic cysts. In 6 cases, the major portion of the tumor was cysts and had small mulkal nodules. The solid portion was relatively lange in one cases, cemprising half of the tumor cysts were oval shaped and their sized were 3-6.7 cm in diameter. In five cases(71%), septations were noted within the cysts. Cysts were isointense or slightly hyperintense on T1-weighted image and hyperintense on T2- weighted image compared with cerebrospinal fluid. Mural nodules were oval or rounded radiotherapy had better prognosis than those treated with radiotherapy alwas 0.5-2.5 cm in diameter. Mural nodules were isointense to gray matter. They were detected in five cases on T1-weighted images and one case on T2-weighted images. In two cases, vascular signal void area was noted in mural nodules. On contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, all mural nodules were intensely enhanced. MRI provide to be a good diagnostic method to detect and characterize posterior fossa hemangioblastoma. The most common finding is Cystic posterior fossa lesion with enhancing mural nodule. Contrast enhancement is essential for specific diagnosis

  16. Comparison of MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetric analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Hayashi, Shinya; Matsuo, Masayuki; Sakurai, Kota; Nakano, Masahiro; Maeda, Sunaho; Kajita, Kimihiro R.T.; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and computed tomography (CT)/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry methods in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and March 2006, a total of 52 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were treated by brachytherapy, and postimplant dosimetry was performed using CT/MRI fusion. The accuracy and reproducibility were prospectively compared between MRI-based dosimetry and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters as recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society. Results: The prostate volume was 15.97 ± 6.17 cc (mean ± SD) in MRI-based dosimetry, and 15.97 ± 6.02 cc in CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry without statistical difference. The prostate V100 was 94.5% and 93.0% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). The prostate D90 was 119.4% and 114.4% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Our current results suggested that, as with fusion images, MR images allowed accurate contouring of the organs, but they tended to overestimate the analysis of postimplant dosimetry in comparison to CT/MRI fusion images. Although this MRI-based dosimetric discrepancy was negligible, MRI-based dosimetry was acceptable and reproducible in comparison to CT-based dosimetry, because the difference between MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results was smaller than that between CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results as previously reported

  17. Monodisperse magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles modified with water soluble polymers for the diagnosis of breast cancer by MRI method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezayan, Ali Hossein, E-mail: ahrezayan@ut.ac.ir [Department of Life Science Engineering, Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mousavi, Majid [Department of Life Science Engineering, Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kheirjou, Somayyeh [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amoabediny, Ghasem [School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee [Department of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadnejad, Javad [Department of Life Science Engineering, Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. To enhance the biocompatibility and colloidal stability of the synthesized nanoparticles, they were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. Both modified and unmodified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior (particle size below 20 nm). The saturation magnetization (Ms) of PEGdiacid-modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was 45 emu/g, which was less than the unmodified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (70 emu/g). This difference indicated that PEGdiacid polymer was immobilized on the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles successfully. To evaluate the efficiency of the resulting nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), different concentration of MNPs and different value of echo time TE were investigated. The results showed that by increasing the concentration of the nanoparticles, transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) decreased, which subsequently resulted in MR signal enhancement. T{sub 2}-weighted MR images of the different concentration of MNPs in different value of echo time TE indicated that MR signal intensity increased with increase in TE value up to 66 and then remained constant. The cytotoxicity effect of the modified and unmodified nanoparticles was evaluated in three different concentrations (12, 60 and 312 mg l{sup −1}) on MDA-MB-231 cancer cells for 24 and 48 h. In both tested time (24 and 48 h) for all three samples, the modified nanoparticles had long life time than unmodified nanoparticles. Cellular uptake of modified MNPs was 80% and reduced to 9% by the unmodified MNPs. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. • MNPs were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. • Modified and unmodified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior. • T{sub 2} decrease as MNPs

  18. WE-B-BRD-00: MRI for Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The use of MRI in radiation therapy is rapidly increasing. Applications vary from the MRI simulator, to the MRI fused with CT, and to the integrated MRI+RT system. Compared with the standard MRI QA, a broader scope of QA features has to be defined in order to maximize the benefits of using MRI in radiation therapy. These QA features include geometric fidelity, image registration, motion management, cross-system alignment, and hardware interference. Advanced MRI techniques require a specific type of QA, as they are being widely used in radiation therapy planning, dose calculations, post-implant dosimetry, and prognoses. A vigorous and adaptive QA program is crucial to defining the responsibility of the entire radiation therapy group and detecting deviations from the performance of high-quality treatment. As a drastic departure from CT simulation, MRI simulation requires changes in the work flow of treatment planning and image guidance. MRI guided radiotherapy platforms are being developed and commercialized to take the advantage of the advance in knowledge, technology and clinical experience. This symposium will from an educational perspective discuss the scope and specific issues related to MRI guided radiotherapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the difference between a standard and a radiotherapy-specific MRI QA program. Understand the effects of MRI artifacts (geometric distortion and motion) on radiotherapy. Understand advanced MRI techniques (ultrashort echo, fast MRI including dynamic MRI and 4DMRI, diffusion, perfusion, and MRS) and related QA. Understand the methods to prepare MRI for treatment planning (electron density assignment, multimodality image registration, segmentation and motion management). Current status of MRI guided treatment platforms. Dr. Jihong Wang has a research grant with Elekta-MRL project. Dr. Ke Sheng receives research grants from Varian Medical systems.

  19. MRI in patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Krüger; Manniche, Claus; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    MRI in LBP patients: good or bad? Background: The routine use of radiology is presently discouraged in patients with low back pain (LBP). MRI provides clinicians and patients with detailed knowledge of the spinal structures and has no known physical side effects. It is possible that detailed...... of MRI (the "old" group). As a new approach, all patients with certain criteria are now referred to MRI before the clinical examination (the "new" group).   Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate if the two different MRI approaches, the "old" and "new", resulted in differences in relation...... to: 1) duration of treatment, 2) number of contacts with clinicians and participation in group exercise, and 3) admission to primary care or another hospital department.   Design: Retrospective inspection of patient files. Method: Files were retrieved from consecutive patients from the "old" and "new...

  20. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter

    2010-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa. From very basic experiments, fMRI has evolved into a clinical application for daily routine brain imaging. There have been various improvements in both the imaging technique as such as well as in the statistical analysis. In this volume, experts in the field share their knowledge and point out possible technical barriers and problems explaining how to solve them. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, presurgical applications, and special issues in various clinical fields. Other modalities for brain mapping such as PET, TMS, and MEG are also compared with fMRI. This book is intended to give a state-of-the-art overview and to serve as a reference and guide for clinical applications of fMRI. (orig.)

  1. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  2. MRI in acute phase of whiplash injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Bjoernebrink, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pettersson, K. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Hildingsson, C. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1995-11-01

    A prospective MRI study of 39 whiplash patients was performed and the results were compared with the clinical findings within 15 days after trauma. The MRI parameters included disc bulging either with impingement on the anterior epidural space or with medullary compression, foraminal stenosis, dorsal ligament thickening, osteophyte extension and intramedullary or paravertebral soft tissue injury. All changes were graded visually on a four-point scale (no, some, moderate or extensive changes). After the MRI evaluation was made the clinical findings were analysed by two orthopaedic surgeons using a specially designed protocol. With MRI 29 patients (74 %) showed no or only slight changes, and were thus regarded as normal variations. Of these, 10 of 29 patients (34 %) had as the only symptom pain in the head or in the neck, 19 of 29 patients (66 %) showed neurological changes, either paresthesias, sensory deficits or weakness of upper extremities. In 10 (26 %) patients with moderate or extensive MRI changes, 3 of 10 (33 %) had only head or neck pain, or both, and 7 of 10 (66 %) had neurological changes. Use of MRI in whiplash injury is helpful, but it is not the first-choice radiological examination method. Despite neurological changes, the frequency of true traumatic lesions is low. There is no clear correlation between the patients` subjective symptoms or clinical signs and the findings with MRI. However, MRI can be used to find patients with disk herniation that can be treated surgically. (orig.)

  3. MRI in acute phase of whiplash injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagerlund, M.; Bjoernebrink, J.; Pettersson, K.; Hildingsson, C.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective MRI study of 39 whiplash patients was performed and the results were compared with the clinical findings within 15 days after trauma. The MRI parameters included disc bulging either with impingement on the anterior epidural space or with medullary compression, foraminal stenosis, dorsal ligament thickening, osteophyte extension and intramedullary or paravertebral soft tissue injury. All changes were graded visually on a four-point scale (no, some, moderate or extensive changes). After the MRI evaluation was made the clinical findings were analysed by two orthopaedic surgeons using a specially designed protocol. With MRI 29 patients (74 %) showed no or only slight changes, and were thus regarded as normal variations. Of these, 10 of 29 patients (34 %) had as the only symptom pain in the head or in the neck, 19 of 29 patients (66 %) showed neurological changes, either paresthesias, sensory deficits or weakness of upper extremities. In 10 (26 %) patients with moderate or extensive MRI changes, 3 of 10 (33 %) had only head or neck pain, or both, and 7 of 10 (66 %) had neurological changes. Use of MRI in whiplash injury is helpful, but it is not the first-choice radiological examination method. Despite neurological changes, the frequency of true traumatic lesions is low. There is no clear correlation between the patients' subjective symptoms or clinical signs and the findings with MRI. However, MRI can be used to find patients with disk herniation that can be treated surgically. (orig.)

  4. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ewan; Andronikou, Savvas; Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties.

  5. Complex Wavelet transform for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, P.; Janney, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There is a perpetual compromise encountered in magnetic resonance (MRl) image reconstruction, between the traditional elements of image quality (noise, spatial resolution and contrast). Additional factors exacerbating this trade-off include various artifacts, computational (and hence time-dependent) overhead, and financial expense. This paper outlines a new approach to the problem of minimizing MRI image acquisition and reconstruction time without compromising resolution and noise reduction. The standard approaches for reconstructing magnetic resonance (MRI) images from raw data (which rely on relatively conventional signal processing) have matured but there are a number of challenges which limit their use. A major one is the 'intrinsic' signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image that depends on the strength of the main field. A typical clinical MRI almost invariably uses a super-cooled magnet in order to achieve a high field strength. The ongoing running cost of these super-cooled magnets prompts consideration of alternative magnet systems for use in MRIs for developing countries and in some remote regional installations. The decrease in image quality from using lower field strength magnets can be addressed by improvements in signal processing strategies. Conversely, improved signal processing will obviously benefit the current conventional field strength MRI machines. Moreover, the 'waiting time' experienced in many MR sequences (due to the relaxation time delays) can be exploited by more rigorous processing of the MR signals. Acquisition often needs to be repeated so that coherent averaging may partially redress the shortfall in SNR, at the expense of further delay. Wavelet transforms have been used in MRI as an alternative for encoding and denoising for over a decade. These have not supplanted the traditional Fourier transform methods that have long been the mainstay of MRI reconstruction, but have some inflexibility. The dual

  6. Imaging tools to study pharmacology: functional MRI on small rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eJonckers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI, stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI, and pharmacological MRI (phMRI. Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimulation and/or a pharmacological challenge. The first part of this review describes the physiological basis of BOLD fMRI and the hemodynamic response on which the MRI contrast is based. Specific emphasis goes to possible effects of anaesthesia and the animal’s physiological conditions on neural activity and the hemodynamic response. The second part of this review describes applications of the aforementioned techniques in pharmacologically-induced, as well as in traumatic and transgenic disease models and illustrates how multiple fMRI methods can be applied successfully to evaluate different aspects of a specific disorder. For example, fMRI techniques can be used to pinpoint the neural substrate of a disease beyond previously defined hypothesis-driven regions-of-interest (ROIs. In addition, fMRI techniques allow one to dissect how specific modifications (e.g. treatment, lesion etc. modulate the functioning of specific brain areas (st-fMRI, phMRI and how functional connectivity (rsfMRI between several brain regions is affected, both in acute and extended time frames. Furthermore, fMRI techniques can be used to assess/explore the efficacy of novel treatments in depth, both in fundamental research as well as in preclinical settings. In conclusion, by describing several exemplary studies, we aim to highlight the advantages of functional MRI in exploring the acute and long-term effects of pharmacological substances and/or pathology on brain functioning along with

  7. Possibilities of whole-body MRI for investigating musculoskeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenk, S.; Claussen, C.D.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Fischer, S.; Koetter, I.

    2004-01-01

    This contribution outlines possibilities and limitations of whole-body MRI for investigating musculoskeletal diseases. Benefits and drawbacks of the novel whole-body MRI technology are discussed and a possible whole-body MRI sequence protocol for musculoskeletal examinations is proposed. Muscle, joint and bone diseases are discussed in which the application of whole-body MRI may be of advantage. Particularly, polymyositis, muscledystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, spondylitis ancylosans, multiple trauma, skeletal metastases, multiple myeloma and malignant lymphoma are mentioned. Whole-body MRI opens new advantages for the examination of multifocal musculoskeletal diseases. The clinical benefit of this method for particular diseases has to be evaluated in further studies, however. (orig.) [de

  8. Comparison of conventional DCE-MRI and a novel golden-angle radial multicoil compressed sensing method for the evaluation of breast lesion conspicuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heacock, Laura; Gao, Yiming; Heller, Samantha L; Melsaether, Amy N; Babb, James S; Block, Tobias K; Otazo, Ricardo; Kim, Sungheon G; Moy, Linda

    2017-06-01

    To compare a novel multicoil compressed sensing technique with flexible temporal resolution, golden-angle radial sparse parallel (GRASP), to conventional fat-suppressed spoiled three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination, VIBE) MRI in evaluating the conspicuity of benign and malignant breast lesions. Between March and August 2015, 121 women (24-84 years; mean, 49.7 years) with 180 biopsy-proven benign and malignant lesions were imaged consecutively at 3.0 Tesla in a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI exam using sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed 3D VIBE in this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, retrospective study. Subjects underwent MRI-guided breast biopsy (mean, 13 days [1-95 days]) using GRASP DCE-MRI, a fat-suppressed radial "stack-of-stars" 3D FLASH sequence with golden-angle ordering. Three readers independently evaluated breast lesions on both sequences. Statistical analysis included mixed models with generalized estimating equations, kappa-weighted coefficients and Fisher's exact test. All lesions demonstrated good conspicuity on VIBE and GRASP sequences (4.28 ± 0.81 versus 3.65 ± 1.22), with no significant difference in lesion detection (P = 0.248). VIBE had slightly higher lesion conspicuity than GRASP for all lesions, with VIBE 12.6% (0.63/5.0) more conspicuous (P < 0.001). Masses and nonmass enhancement (NME) were more conspicuous on VIBE (P < 0.001), with a larger difference for NME (14.2% versus 9.4% more conspicuous). Malignant lesions were more conspicuous than benign lesions (P < 0.001) on both sequences. GRASP DCE-MRI, a multicoil compressed sensing technique with high spatial resolution and flexible temporal resolution, has near-comparable performance to conventional VIBE imaging for breast lesion evaluation. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1746-1752. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. MRI in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulert, Christoph; Shenton, Martha E.

    2014-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  10. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  11. Superconductive MRI system, FLEXARTTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Nishikawa, Mineki; Goro, Takehiko

    1994-01-01

    Since the establishment of TAMI (Toshiba America MRI Inc.) in 1989, it has been jointly working with Toshiba on developing a new infrastructure for computer and software technologies to be applied to new MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) systems. As a result of these efforts, the first product of a new series of MRI systems has been introduced on the market. Known as FLEXART TM (a newly created word combining FLEXible and ART), this MRI system incorporates a new 32-bit RISC computer and a new controller for pulse sequences and data acquisition. The product concepts of FLEXART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, and ease of use, all of which are necessary features for an MRI system in the premium mid-field MRI market segment. (author)

  12. MRI of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kaji, Mitumasa

    1988-01-01

    MRI has gained a prominent position in the diagnosis of brain tumors. We examined 30 cases of meningiomas and distinguished their subtype according to the criteria of Rubinic histology. We discussed the MRI findings and compared then with X-CT findings so to their intensity, delination of tumors, whether accompanied by peripheral edema, and T 1 values. MRI delinated the tumors as well as CE-CT. No remarkable difference was found between the subtypes. (author)

  13. CT and MRI of the epigastrium - is the MRI competitive?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B. von

    1993-01-01

    The conclusion drawn in this article is: - CT will continue to rank first as a method for diagnostic evaluation of the entire abdomen. - MRI now offers advantages over CT for diagnostic identification of focal liver lesions, both with regard to detection as such and to a differential diagnosis of liver tumors. - CT continues to be the modality of first choice for diagnostic evaluation of acute pancreatitis. - CT offers advantages for the diagnostic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract (as e.g. in case of complications in the course of inflammatory intestinal affection). - Interventional measures such as biopsies or abscess drainage will still be best controlled by CT, and MRI is not likely to become a really competitive method for such tasks in the foreseeable future. (orig.) [de

  14. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Usage, cost and efficacy data from the MRI Assessment Program to 30 March 1988 is presented, as a continuation of an earlier analysis. Analysis has been performed on data from 8565 examinations relating to 7997 patients at 4 hospitals. MRI was used mainly for examination of the head and spine. Some details of the follow up studies being conducted on selected patients and disease categories are given. A consensus statement is included which summaries the view of the Technical Committee on the potential applications of MRI in Australia. The MRI unit quench incident at Royal Adelaide Hospital is described. Refs., 10 figs., tabs

  15. Advances in PET-MRI technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiang; Zhao Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    Multimodality imaging is the general trend of clinical imaging. PET-CT is one of the most classic and mature multimodality imaging methods and is widely used today. MRI is another kind of conventional imaging method, in contrast to CT, MRI can not only yield images with higher soft-tissue contrast and better spatial resolution resolution but also provide some functional information by special imaging techniques such as MRS. The combination of PET and MRI for simultaneous data acquisition should have far-reaching consequences for clinical and scientific study. This review describes the progress to date and talks about the problems met in the development of PET-MRI and look forward to its potential application. (authors)

  16. 2015 MICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Aurobrata; Kaden, Enrico; Rathi, Yogesh; Reisert, Marco

    2016-01-01

    These Proceedings of the 2015 MICCAI Workshop “Computational Diffusion MRI” offer a snapshot of the current state of the art on a broad range of topics within the highly active and growing field of diffusion MRI. The topics vary from fundamental theoretical work on mathematical modeling, to the development and evaluation of robust algorithms, new computational methods applied to diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data, and applications in neuroscientific studies and clinical practice. Over the last decade interest in diffusion MRI has exploded. The technique provides unique insights into the microstructure of living tissue and enables in-vivo connectivity mapping of the brain. Computational techniques are key to the continued success and development of diffusion MRI and to its widespread transfer into clinical practice. New processing methods are essential for addressing issues at each stage of the diffusion MRI pipeline: acquisition, reconstruction, modeling and model fitting, image processing, fiber t...

  17. The cerebral network’s reconstruction by MRI methods and the hemodynamics study of small laboratory animal in type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akulov, A.; Cherevko, A.; Parshin, D.; Tur, D.; Yankova, G.

    2017-08-01

    The blood realizes the transport of substances, which are necessary for livelihoods, throughout the body. The assumption about the relationship some disease and structure of vasculature (in particular of brain) is natural. In the paper we consider models of Willis’ circle for two groups of laboratory mice - one control group and another with diabetes. Vascular net obtained as a result of preprocessing MRI data. The purpose of the work is to determine the effect of type 1 diabetes on the properties of the laboratory mice vasculature.

  18. CT and MRI characteristics of vertebral tuberculosis (34 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wenbing; Liao Qinghou; Wu Shiqiang; Huang Tao; Deng Yufang; Liu Jianming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore CT and MRI characteristics of vertebral tuberculosis. Methods: 34 patients with vertebral tuberculosis proved by clinic or pathology were analyzed retrospectively. Of these patients, 20 were performed with CT examination and 24 with MRI, 10 with both CT and MRI. The results were compared mutually. Results: The CT features of vertebral tuberculosis were bone destruction, paraspinal abscess, spinal canal involvement. The MRI features of vertebral tuberculosis were bone destruction, intervertebral disc destruction, paraspinal abscess, spinal canal involvement, sub-ligamental spread. Conclusion: Vertebral tuberculosis showed multiple characteristics on CT and MRI. CT is useful in showing sequester and calcification, and MRI is useful in showing sub-ligamental spread, epidural and spinal cord involvement. Combining CT with and MRI is helpful for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of vertebral tuberculosis. (authors)

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  3. Methodological principles for optimising functional MRI experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuestenberg, T.; Giesel, F.L.; Strasburger, H.

    2005-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the most common methods for localising neuronal activity in the brain. Even though the sensitivity of fMRI is comparatively low, the optimisation of certain experimental parameters allows obtaining reliable results. In this article, approaches for optimising the experimental design, imaging parameters and analytic strategies will be discussed. Clinical neuroscientists and interested physicians will receive practical rules of thumb for improving the efficiency of brain imaging experiments. (orig.) [de

  4. MRI findings in acute Hendra virus meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakka, P.; Amos, G.J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia); Saad, N., E-mail: nivena100@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia); Jeavons, S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia)

    2012-05-15

    Aim: To describe serial changes in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute human infection from two outbreaks of Hendra virus (HeV), relate these changes to disease prognosis, and compare HeV encephalitis to reported cases of Nipah virus encephalitis. Materials and methods: The MRI images of three human cases (two of which were fatal) of acute HeV meningoencephalitis were reviewed. Results: Cortical selectivity early in the disease is evident in all three patients, while deep white matter involvement appears to be a late and possibly premorbid finding. This apparent early grey matter selectivity may be related to viral biology or ribavirin pharmacokinetics. Neuronal loss is evident at MRI, and the rate of progression of MRI abnormalities can predict the outcome of the infection. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in the MRI picture mirrored the clinical course. Conclusion: This is the first comprehensive report of serial MRI findings in acute human cerebral HeV infection from two outbreaks. The cortical selectivity appears to be an early finding while deep white matter involvement a late, and possibly premorbid, finding. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in MRI mirrored the clinical course.

  5. MRI findings in acute Hendra virus meningoencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakka, P.; Amos, G.J.; Saad, N.; Jeavons, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To describe serial changes in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute human infection from two outbreaks of Hendra virus (HeV), relate these changes to disease prognosis, and compare HeV encephalitis to reported cases of Nipah virus encephalitis. Materials and methods: The MRI images of three human cases (two of which were fatal) of acute HeV meningoencephalitis were reviewed. Results: Cortical selectivity early in the disease is evident in all three patients, while deep white matter involvement appears to be a late and possibly premorbid finding. This apparent early grey matter selectivity may be related to viral biology or ribavirin pharmacokinetics. Neuronal loss is evident at MRI, and the rate of progression of MRI abnormalities can predict the outcome of the infection. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in the MRI picture mirrored the clinical course. Conclusion: This is the first comprehensive report of serial MRI findings in acute human cerebral HeV infection from two outbreaks. The cortical selectivity appears to be an early finding while deep white matter involvement a late, and possibly premorbid, finding. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in MRI mirrored the clinical course.

  6. Clinical and MRI evaluation of tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Chunjing; Shu Jiner; Chen Jian; Sheng Sanlan; Lu Jinhua; Cai Xiaoxiao; Li Huimin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and to improve the understanding of TBM. Methods: The clinical and MRI findings in 42 patients with confirmed TBM were analyzed retrospectively. MRI examination was performed using a 1 Tesla system, including SE T 1 WI and T 2 WI. Intravenous contrast was injected in 29 patients, and follow-up scans were performed on 17 patients. Results: Of 24 patients with early TBM, MRI was abnormal in 5(21%) with slight Tl-hypointense meningeal (4) or ependymal thickening (1). MRI on 33/35 (94%) patients with late stage TBM was abnormal with T 1 hypointensity and T 2 hyperintensity including meningeal thickening (19), mild surrounding brain edema (10), nodules (11), tuberculoma (5) and abscess (2). There was significant plaque-like, nodular or rim enhancement with surrounding brain edema. Conclusion: Tuberculous meningitis has minimal clinical and MRI findings in the early phase and significant clinical and MRI findings in the late phase. The enhanced scan may help to detect the abnormality. (authors)

  7. Mandarin functional MRI Language paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Ci, He; van Graan, Andre; Gonz?lvez, Gloria; Thompson, Pamela; Hill, Andrea; Duncan, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective The objective of this study was to implement convenient, fast, and accurate Mandarin task paradigms for functional MRI, and to locate the Chinese language functional areas in frontal and temporal lobes. Materials and Methods Nineteen healthy Chinese volunteers participated in this study, which utilized a block design with four language tasks: auditory naming (AN), picture naming (PN), verbal fluency?character (VFC), and verbal fluency?letter (VFL). All functional images wer...

  8. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frohwein, Lynn J., E-mail: frohwein@uni-muenster.de; Schäfers, Klaus P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany); Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital of Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  9. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frohwein, Lynn J.; Schäfers, Klaus P.; Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  10. Fully automated processing of fMRI data in SPM: from MRI scanner to PACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldjian, Joseph A; Baer, Aaron H; Kraft, Robert A; Laurienti, Paul J; Burdette, Jonathan H

    2009-01-01

    Here we describe the Wake Forest University Pipeline, a fully automated method for the processing of fMRI data using SPM. The method includes fully automated data transfer and archiving from the point of acquisition, real-time batch script generation, distributed grid processing, interface to SPM in MATLAB, error recovery and data provenance, DICOM conversion and PACS insertion. It has been used for automated processing of fMRI experiments, as well as for the clinical implementation of fMRI and spin-tag perfusion imaging. The pipeline requires no manual intervention, and can be extended to any studies requiring offline processing.

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  16. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue abnormalities of the chest. MRI is also useful ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  1. A comparison of the value of MRI and CT in patients with Nelson syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersjes, W.; Allmendinger, S.; Christ, F.; Stiebler, H.; Bockisch, A.; Klingmueller, D.

    1992-01-01

    The hypophyses of 13 patients with Nelson syndrome following bilateral adrenalectomy were examined by MRI and CT. Diffuse enlargement of the hypophysis was demonstrated in 8 patients by CT and in 9 by MRI. Compared with CT, MRI provides better demonstration of tumour development, such as abnormal convexity of the cranial margin of the hypophysis (MRI 4/13, CT 1/13), displacement of the infundibulum (MRI 4/13, CT 0/13) or optic chiasm (MRI 2/13, CT 0/13). MRI also provides diagnostically important differentiation between scar tissue and recurrence of tumour following hypophysectomy (MRI 1/3, CT 0/3) and more accurate demonstration of infiltration of the cavernous sinus (MRI 4/13, CT 2/13). CT is superior only in showing the floor of the sella. MRI is the method of choice for imaging in cases of Nelson syndrome. (orig.) [de

  2. Corroboration of in utero MRI using post-mortem MRI and autopsy in foetuses with CNS abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitby, E.H.; Variend, S.; Rutter, S.; Paley, M.N.J.; Wilkinson, I.D.; Davies, N.P.; Sparey, C.; Griffiths, P.D.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To corroborate the findings of in utero magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with autopsy and post-mortem MRI in cases of known or suspected central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities on ultrasound and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of ante-natal ultrasound and in utero MRI. METHODS: Twelve pregnant women, whose foetuses had suspected central nervous system abnormalities underwent in utero MRI. The foetuses were imaged using MRi before autopsy. The data were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of in utero MRI when compared with a reference standard of autopsy and post-mortem MRI in 10 cases and post-mortem MRI alone in two cases. RESULTS: The diagnostic accuracy of antenatal ultrasound and in utero MRI in correctly characterizing brain and spine abnormalities were 42 and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: In utero MRI provides a useful adjuvant to antenatal ultrasound when assessing CNS abnormalities by providing more accurate anatomical information. Post-mortem MRI assists the diagnosis of macroscopic structural abnormalities

  3. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markl, M.; Schnell, S.; Wu, C.; Bollache, E.; Jarvis, K.; Barker, A.J.; Robinson, J.D.; Rigsby, C.K.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented.

  4. MRI in mucoviscidosis (cystic fibrosis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichinger, M.; Puderbach, M.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Heussel, C.-P.

    2006-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease with major impact on the lungs. Pulmonary manifestation is crucial for the prognosis and life expectancy of patients. Imaging modalities and lung function tests reflect the pulmonary status in these patients. The standard imaging modality for diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary changes is chest x-ray. The gold standard for the detection of parenchymal lung changes remains high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), but this is not used routinely for CF-patients due to radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used to be of no importance in monitoring cystic fibrosis lung disease, as shown in studies from the 1980s and early 1990s. The continuing improvement of MRI techniques, however, has allowed for an adequate application of this non-radiation method in diagnosing the major pulmonary findings in CF, in addition to the assessment of lung function. (orig.) [de

  5. [MRI semiotics features of experimental acute intracerebral hematomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Gubskiĭ, L V; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of revealing intracerebral hematomas (ICH), using MRI, within the first hours after onset and to determine their MRI semiotics features. Thirty animals with experimental ICH were studied. A method of two-stage introduction of autologous blood was used to develop ICH as human spontaneous intracranial hematomas. Within 3-5h after blood introduction to the rat brain. The control MRI was performed in the 3rd and 7th days after blood injections. ICH were definitely identified in the first MRI scans. The MRI semiotics features of acute ICH and their transformations were assessed. The high sensitivity of MRI to ICH as well as the uniform manifestations in all animals were shown. In conclusion, the method has high specificity for acute ICH detection.

  6. [Determination of joint contact area using MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji

    2009-10-20

    Elevated contact stress on the articular joints has been hypothesized to contribute to articular cartilage wear and joint pain. However, given the limitations of using contact stress and areas from human cadaver specimens to estimate articular joint stress, there is need for an in vivo method to obtain such data. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a valid method of quantifying the human joint contact area, indicating the potential for in vivo assessment. The purpose of this study was to describe a method of quantifying the tibiofemoral joint contact area using MRI. The validity of this technique was established in porcine cadaver specimens by comparing the contact area obtained from MRI with the contact area obtained using pressure-sensitive film (PSF). In particular, we assessed the actual condition of contact by using the ratio of signal intensity of MR images of cartilage surfaces. Two fresh porcine cadaver knees were used. A custom loading apparatus was designed to apply a compressive load to the tibiofemoral joint. We measured the contact area by using MRI and PSF methods. When the ratio of signal intensity of the cartilage surface was 0.9, the error of the contact area between the MR image and PSF was about 6%. These results suggest that this MRI method may be a valuable tool in quantifying joint contact area in vivo.

  7. Determination of joint contact area using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    Elevated contact stress on the articular joints has been hypothesized to contribute to articular cartilage wear and joint pain. However, given the limitations of using contact stress and areas from human cadaver specimens to estimate articular joint stress, there is need for an in vivo method to obtain such data. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a valid method of quantifying the human joint contact area, indicating the potential for in vivo assessment. The purpose of this study was to describe a method of quantifying the tibiofemoral joint contact area using MRI. The validity of this technique was established in porcine cadaver specimens by comparing the contact area obtained from MRI with the contact area obtained using pressure-sensitive film (PSF). In particular, we assessed the actual condition of contact by using the ratio of signal intensity of MR images of cartilage surfaces. Two fresh porcine cadaver knees were used. A custom loading apparatus was designed to apply a compressive load to the tibiofemoral joint. We measured the contact area by using MRI and PSF methods. When the ratio of signal intensity of the cartilage surface was 0.9, the error of the contact area between the MR image and PSF was about 6%. These results suggest that this MRI method may be a valuable tool in quantifying joint contact area in vivo. (author)

  8. Indications for body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujardin, M. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: martine.dujardin@gmail.com; Vandenbroucke, F. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederik.vandenbroucke@az.vub.ac.be; Boulet, C. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: cedric.boulet@az.vub.ac.be; Op de Beeck, B. [Department of Radiology, UZA and Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: bart.op.de.beeck@uza.be; Mey, J. de [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: johan.demey@az.vub.ac.be

    2008-02-15

    The lack of ionizing radiation use in MRI makes the high spatial resolution technique very appealing. Also, the easy access to multiplanar imaging and the fact that gadolinium-DTPA is well tolerated and not nephrotoxic makes MRI a robust alternative in the healthy as well as the renal compromised patient. Furthermore, MRI adds advanced possibility for tissue characterization and pathology detection and dynamic imaging can be performed. Specific contrast agents specific to the hepatobiliary or the reticuloendothelial system can help with additional information in problem cases. The role of MRI for different organs is discussed and a review of the literature is given. We concluded that MRI is considered a useful and non-invasive diagnostic tool for the detection of hepatic iron concentration, to correct misdiagnosis (pseudolesions) from US and CT in focal steatosis and to help with focal lesion detection and characterization, in the healthy and especially in the cirrhotic liver, where MRI is superior to CT. Moreover, MRCP is excellent for identifying the presence and the level of biliary obstruction in malignant invasion and is considered in the literature as a non-invasive screening tool for common bile duct stones, appropriately selecting candidates for preoperative ERCP and sparing others the need for an endoscopic procedure with its associated complications. MRI is the first choice modality for adrenal evaluation in contemporary medical imaging. It is a useful examination in renal as well as splenic pathology and best assesses loco-regional staging, i.e. arterial involvement in pancreatic cancer.

  9. Explaining MRI examinations DVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Komeda, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    When conducting MRI examinations, there are various things to be careful of. There is often stress related to the MRI examinations, so in order to perform an examination safely and smoothly, sufficient explanation must be given. An explanation of what to do and what not to do during an examination should be outlined in a brochure given to patients before the examination. There may be many patients who have misgivings about their MRI examinations, so to reduce their anxiousness and deepen their understanding of MRI examinations and to improve the safety and effiency of MRI examinations,; we created a DVD about MRI examinations. We gathered MRI-related safety information and instructions, and assessed the effect that the information might have on patients. We started a workgroup for a project to plan and record a video according to the Storyboard. When editing, we reviewed the length of each segment, the amount of information on screen, and the overall length of the DVD. We discussed the issue within the workgroup and had hospital approval. It was possible for us to complete it without depending on the supplier and the cost was kept to a minimum. Finally, we decided on a viewing location. We asked a hospital volunteers to see a complete DVD and we evaluated their responses by questionnaires. As the result, their understanding and anxieties related to MRI examinations were alleviated, as expected. Their anxiety seemed to be eased. Patients also seemed to have a deeper understanding of MRI examinations having seen an examination being conducted. (author)

  10. MRI of 'brain death'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shigeki; Itoh, Takahiko; Tuchida, Shohei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken for two patients who suffered from severe cerebrovascular diseases and were clinically brain dead. The MRI system we used was Resona (Yokogawa Medical Systems, superconductive system 0.5 T) and the CT apparatus was Toshiba TCT-300. Initial CT and MRI were undertaken as soon as possible after admission, and repeated sequentially. After diagnosis of brain death, we performed angiography to determine cerebral circulatory arrest, and MRI obtained at the same time was compared with the angiogram and CT. Case 1 was a 77-year-old man who was admitted in an unconscious state. CT and MRI on the second day after hospitalization revealed cerebellar infarction. He was diagnosed as brain dead on day 4. Case 2 was a 35-year-old man. When he was transferred to our hospital, he was in cardiorespiratory arrested. Cardiac resuscitation was successful but no spontaneous respiration appeared. CT and MRI on admission revealed right intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed cessation of contrast medium in intracranial vessels in both of the patients. We found no 'flow signal void sign' in the bilateral internal carotid and basilar arteries on MRI images in both cases after brain death. MRI, showing us the anatomical changes of the brain, clearly revealed brain herniations, even though only nuclear findings of 'brain tamponade' were seen on CT. But in Case 1, we could not see the infarct lesions in the cerebellum on MR images obtained after brain death. This phenomenon was caused by the whole brain ischemia masking the initial ischemic lesions. We concluded that MRI was useful not only the anatomical display of lesions and brain herniation with high contrast resolution but for obtaining information on cerebral circulation of brain death. (author)

  11. Noninvasive MRI-based liver iron quantification. Methodic approaches, practical applicability and significance; Nicht invasive MRT-basierte Bestimmung des Leber-Eisen-Gehalts. Methodische Ansaetze, Anwendbarkeit in der Praxis und Aussagekraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, A.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Section for Experimental Radiology; Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Cario, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Dept. of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine; Juchems, M.S. [Konstanz Hospital (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Beer, M.; Schmidt, S.A. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-11-15

    Due to the dependence of transverse relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* on tissue iron content, MRI offers different options for the determination of iron concentration. These are the time-consuming spin-echo sequence as well as the gradient-echo sequence. For the latter, several data analysis approaches have been proposed, with different requirements for acquisition and post-processing: the mathematically challenging R{sub 2}* analysis and the signal-intensity ratio method with its high demand on the signal homogeneity of MR images. Furthermore, special procedures currently under evaluation are presented as future prospects: quantitative susceptibility imaging, as a third approach for analyzing gradient echo data, and multi-contrast spin-echo using repeated refocusing pulses. MR theory, as far as needed for understanding the methods, is briefly depicted.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  14. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, Martin [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lang, Philipp [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Wagner, Ulli [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Moeller, Frank [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Deimling, Urs van [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Genant, H K [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Schild, Hans H [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures.

  15. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, Martin; Lang, Philipp; Wagner, Ulli; Moeller, Frank; Deimling, Urs van; Genant, H.K.; Schild, Hans H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T 1 -weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T 2 *-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures

  16. MRI diagnosis of pigmented villonodular synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhongpu; Sui Zhengyan; Xue Jianrong; Song Cuizhi; Liu Yuekui; Li Jinwang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the MRI characteristics of pigmented villonodular synovitis. Methods: MRI and clinic data of 14 patients with pigmented villonodular synovitis proved by pathology were reviewed retrospectively. Results: MRI showed diffusible lesions in all 14 cases. 12 cases were located in knee joint, 2 in hip. MRI revealed nodules and masses formed by villis hyperplasia in the joints. MRI demonstrated the nodules with slightly low signal intensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI in 13 cases, the destruction of the cartilage in 8 cases, the destruction of the ligament in 5 cases, and the hydropsy in joint cavity in 10 cases, the destruction of the meniscus in 2 cases. Conclusion: The typical features of pigmented villonodular synovitis on MRI revealed the nodules formed by villis hyperplasia in the joint. Hemosiderin in the nodules demonstrated slightly low signal intensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI, with the presence of typical features like 'foam rubber cushion' sign and 'lichen' sign. (authors)

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) ... center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information ...

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    Full Text Available ... told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI ... pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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  5. MRI of the Chest

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  15. MRI of the Chest

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  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

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  19. MRI of the Breast

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    ... in evaluating women at high risk for breast cancer. MRI can successfully image the dense breast tissue common in younger women, and it can successfully image breast implants. Both of these are difficult to image using ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you ... has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will be removed. MRI exams generally include multiple runs (sequences), some of which may last several minutes. ... top of page Who interprets the results and how do I get them? A radiologist, a physician ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ...

  4. Arm MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  5. Sinus MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  6. Leg MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  7. Knee MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you should let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of ... for a mild sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary ... is loose-fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Most MRI exams are painless. However, some patients find it uncomfortable to remain still during MR imaging. ... anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed on outpatients or inpatients. You will be positioned on the ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... injection. If you do not require sedation, no recovery period is necessary. You may resume your usual ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI exam, a physician, nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter, also known as an ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional ( ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam ... soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x- ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. ... outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help you pass the time. In some cases, intravenous injection of contrast material ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a ... traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as a ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete ...

  4. VISARTTM superconducting MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Yoshiyuki; Goro, Takehiko; Yamagata, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed VISART TM , a 1.5 T high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system based on technology developed for both the FLEXART TM (0.5T) and MRT-200/GP (1.5T) systems as the first and second products, respectively, of a new series of MRI systems. VISART TM is a newly coined word combining VISion and state-of-the-ART. A higher power gradient system and new high-speed imaging techniques have been developed to meet the market demand for higher resolution images and shorter scan times. The product concepts of VISART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, flexible clinical application, and ease of use, all of which are essential features for an MRI system in the high-field MRI market segment. (author)

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be ... Jewelry and other accessories should be left at home, if possible, or removed prior to the MRI ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... there is any question of their presence, an x-ray may be taken to detect and identify ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  10. Towards MRI microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrew; Mundell, Victoria J; Blanco-Andujar, Cristina; Bencsik, Martin; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Cave, Gareth W V

    2010-04-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanometre scale particles have been utilised as contrast agents to image staked target binding oligonucleotide arrays using MRI to correlate the signal intensity and T(2)* relaxation times in different NMR fluids.

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with ... exam and bring it to your exam in case the radiologist or technologist has any questions. Some ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... contrast material in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast for an MRI. If you ... can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ...

  19. MRI EVALUATION OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sama Surya Sravani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Neuralgia is the set of symptoms associated with nerve dysfunction. The most common of these symptoms is pain, which can occur intermittently in one area of the body or can radiate along the length of a damaged nerve. The most common type of neuralgia is trigeminal neuralgia. This study focuses on the effectiveness of MRI in visualising the entire course of trigeminal nerve and to diagnose the exact location, aetiology responsible for trigeminal neuralgia and possible pretreatment evaluation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Clinical records and imaging studies of 30 patients between the ages of 18-60 years who presented to the Department of Radiodiagnosis, KIMS, for brain magnetic resonance imaging with (Philips 1.5T machine during June 2015 to December 2016 were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS  The entire course of trigeminal nerve is evaluated in these patients.  There are different causes of trigeminal neuralgia, but in our study, most frequent cause is mechanical irritation of nerve is due to neurovascular contact (24 cases. The other causes identified are cerebellopontine angle lesions, brainstem tumours, demyelinating disease involving brainstem.  The cisternal portion of the nerve is the most common site of involvement. CONCLUSION Trigeminal nerve is the largest cranial nerve. MRI is unique as it produces images of entire course of the nerve. Of the many causes of trigeminal neuralgia, neurovascular conflict is the most common cause. The exact location and degree of neurovascular compression is graded on MRI.

  20. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T2 mapping for evaluation of reparative cartilage-like tissue after autologous chondrocyte implantation associated with Atelocollagen-based scaffold in the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadenuma, Taku; Uchio, Yuji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Iwasa, Junji [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Izumo-shi, Shimane-ken (Japan); Fukuba, Eiji; Kitagaki, Hajime [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane-ken (Japan); Ochi, Mitsuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Integrated Health Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    To elucidate the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage after an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with Atelocollagen gel as a scaffold in the knee in the short- to midterm postoperatively, we assessed delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping and clarified the relationship between T1 and T2 values and clinical results. In this cross-sectional study, T1 and T2 mapping were performed on 11 knees of 8 patients (mean age at ACI, 37.2 years) with a 3.0-T MRI scanner. T1{sub implant} and T2{sub implant} values were compared with those of the control cartilage region (T1{sub control} and T2{sub control}). Lysholm scores were also assessed for clinical evaluation. The relationships between the T1 and T2 values and the clinical Lysholm score were also assessed. There were no significant differences in the T1 values between the T1{sub implant} (386.64 ± 101.78 ms) and T1{sub control} (375.82 ± 62.89 ms) at the final follow-up. The implants showed significantly longer T2 values compared to the control cartilage (53.83 ± 13.89 vs. 38.21 ± 4.43 ms). The postoperative Lysholm scores were significantly higher than the preoperative scores. A significant correlation was observed between T1{sub implant} and clinical outcomes, but not between T2{sub implant} and clinical outcomes. Third-generation ACI implants might have obtained an almost equivalent glycosaminoglycan concentration compared to the normal cartilage, but they had lower collagen density at least 3 years after transplantation. The T1{sub implant} value, but not the T2 value, might be a predictor of clinical outcome after ACI. (orig.)