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Sample records for mri cell tracking

  1. Iron Oxide as an MRI Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchinski, Daniel J.; Taha, May; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation. PMID:26483609

  2. Clinically viable magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles for MRI-based cell tracking

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    Granot, Dorit; Nkansah, Michael K.; Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Tang, Kevin S.; Markakis, Eleni A.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To design, fabricate, characterize and in vivo assay clinically viable magnetic particles for MRI-based cell tracking. Methods PLGA encapsulated magnetic nano- and microparticles were fabricated. Multiple biologically relevant experiments were performed to assess cell viability, cellular performance and stem cell differentiation. In vivo MRI experiments were performed to separately test cell transplantation and cell migration paradigms, as well as in vivo biodegradation. Results Highly magnetic nano- (~100 nm) and microparticles (~1–2 μm) were fabricated. Magnetic cell labeling in culture occurred rapidly achieving 3–50 pg Fe/cell at 3 hrs for different particles types, and >100 pg Fe/cell after 10 hours, without the requirement of a transfection agent, and with no effect on cell viability. The capability of magnetically labeled mesenchymal or neural stem cells to differentiate down multiple lineages, or for magnetically labeled immune cells to release cytokines following stimulation, was uncompromised. An in vivo biodegradation study revealed that NPs degraded ~80% over the course of 12 weeks. MRI detected as few as 10 magnetically labeled cells, transplanted into the brains of rats. Also, these particles enabled the in vivo monitoring of endogenous neural progenitor cell migration in rat brains over 2 weeks. Conclusion The robust MRI properties and benign safety profile of these particles make them promising candidates for clinical translation for MRI-based cell tracking. PMID:23568825

  3. Magneto-optical labeling of fetal neural stem cells for in vivo MRI tracking.

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    Flexman, J A; Minoshima, S; Kim, Y; Cross, D J

    2006-01-01

    Neural stem cell therapy for neurological pathologies, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, may delay the onset of symptoms, replace damaged neurons and/or support the survival of endogenous cells. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to track magnetically labeled cells in vivo to observe migration. Prior to transplantation, labeled cells must be characterized to show that they retain their intrinsic properties, such as cell proliferation into neurospheres in a supplemented environment. In vivo images must also be correlated to sensitive, histological markers. In this study, we show that fetus-derived neural stem cells can be co-labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide and PKH26, a fluorescent dye. Labeled cells retain the ability to proliferate into neurospheres in culture, but labeling prevents neurospheres from merging in a non-adherent culture environment. After labeled NSCs were transplantation into the rat brain, their location and subsequent migration along the corpus callosum was detected using MRI. This study demonstrates an imaging paradigm with which to develop an in vivo assay for quantitatively evaluating fetal neural stem cell migration.

  4. Contribution of macrophages in the contrast loss in iron oxide-based MRI cancer cell tracking studies

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    Danhier, Pierre; Deumer, Gladys; Joudiou, Nicolas; Bouzin, Caroline; Levêque, Philippe; Haufroid, Vincent; Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Feron, Olivier; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cell tracking of cancer cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO) allows visualizing metastatic cells in preclinical models. However, previous works showed that the signal void induced by SPIO on T2(*)-weighted images decreased over time. Here, we aim at characterizing the fate of iron oxide nanoparticles used in cell tracking studies and the role of macrophages in SPIO metabolism. In vivo MRI cell tracking of SPIO positive 4T1 breast cancer cells revealed a quick loss of T2* contrast after injection. We next took advantage of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) for characterizing the evolution of superparamagnetic and non-superparamagnetic iron pools in 4T1 breast cancer cells and J774 macrophages after SPIO labeling. These in vitro experiments and histology studies performed on 4T1 tumors highlighted the quick degradation of iron oxides by macrophages in SPIO-based cell tracking experiments. In conclusion, the release of SPIO by dying cancer cells and the subsequent uptake of iron oxides by tumor macrophages are limiting factors in MRI cell tracking experiments that plead for the use of (MR) reporter-gene based imaging methods for the long-term tracking of metastatic cells. PMID:28467814

  5. Managing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation and cellular uptake: a precondition for efficient stem-cell differentiation and MRI tracking.

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    Fayol, Delphine; Luciani, Nathalie; Lartigue, Lenaic; Gazeau, Florence; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-02-01

    The labeling of stem cells with iron oxide nanoparticles is increasingly used to enable MRI cell tracking and magnetic cell manipulation, stimulating the fields of tissue engineering and cell therapy. However, the impact of magnetic labeling on stem-cell differentiation is still controversial. One compromising factor for successful differentiation may arise from early interactions of nanoparticles with cells during the labeling procedure. It is hypothesized that the lack of control over nanoparticle colloidal stability in biological media may lead to undesirable nanoparticle localization, overestimation of cellular uptake, misleading MRI cell tracking, and further impairment of differentiation. Herein a method is described for labeling mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), in which the physical state of citrate-coated nanoparticles (dispersed versus aggregated) can be kinetically tuned through electrostatic and magnetic triggers, as monitored by diffusion light scattering in the extracellular medium and by optical and electronic microscopy in cells. A set of statistical cell-by-cell measurements (flow cytometry, single-cell magnetophoresis, and high-resolution MRI cellular detection) is used to independently quantify the nanoparticle cell uptake and the effects of nanoparticle aggregation. Such aggregation confounds MRI cell detection as well as global iron quantification and has adverse effects on chondrogenetic differentiation. Magnetic labeling conditions with perfectly stable nanoparticles-suitable for obtaining differentiation-capable magnetic stem cells for use in cell therapy-are subsequently identified. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose particles for MRI-based cell tracking

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    Nkansah, Michael K.; Thakral, Durga; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable, superparamagnetic micro- and nanoparticles of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose were designed, fabricated and characterized for magnetic cell labeling. Monodisperse nanocrystals of magnetite were incorporated into micro- and nanoparticles of PLGA and cellulose with high efficiency using an oil-in-water single emulsion technique. Superparamagnetic cores had high magnetization (72.1 emu/g). The resulting polymeric particles had smooth surface morphology and high magnetite content (43.3 wt% for PLGA and 69.6 wt% for cellulose). While PLGA and cellulose nanoparticles displayed highest r2* values per millimole of iron (399 s-1mM-1 for cellulose and 505 s-1mM-1 for PLGA), micron-sized PLGA particles had a much higher r2* per particle than either. After incubation for a month in citrate buffer (pH 5.5), magnetic PLGA particles lost close to 50% of their initial r2* molar relaxivity, while magnetic cellulose particles remained intact, preserving over 85% of their initial r2* molar relaxivity. Lastly, mesenchymal stem cells and human breast adenocarcinoma cells were magnetically labeled using these particles with no detectable cytotoxicity. These particles are ideally suited for non-invasive cell tracking in vivo via MRI and due to their vastly different degradation properties, offer unique potential for dedicated use for either short (PLGA-based particles) or long term (cellulose-based particles) experiments. PMID:21404328

  7. Assessing the efficacy of nano- and micro-sized magnetic particles as contrast agents for MRI cell tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Taylor

    Full Text Available Iron-oxide based contrast agents play an important role in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of labelled cells in vivo. Currently, a wide range of such contrast agents is available with sizes varying from several nanometers up to a few micrometers and consisting of single or multiple magnetic cores. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of these different particles for labelling and imaging stem cells, using a mouse mesenchymal stem cell line to investigate intracellular uptake, retention and processing of nano- and microsized contrast agents. The effect of intracellular confinement on transverse relaxivity was measured by MRI at 7 T and in compliance with the principles of the '3Rs', the suitability of the contrast agents for MR-based cell tracking in vivo was tested using a chick embryo model. We show that for all particles tested, relaxivity was markedly reduced following cellular internalisation, indicating that contrast agent relaxivity in colloidal suspension does not accurately predict performance in MR-based cell tracking studies. Using a bimodal imaging approach comprising fluorescence and MRI, we demonstrate that labelled MSC remain viable following in vivo transplantation and can be tracked effectively using MRI. Importantly, our data suggest that larger particles might confer advantages for longer-term imaging.

  8. Use of trimetasphere metallofullerene MRI contrast agent for the non-invasive longitudinal tracking of stem cells in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean V; Hale, Austin; Reid, Tanya; Olson, John; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Tan, Josh; Zhou, Zhiguo; Jackson, John; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a commonly used, non-invasive imaging technique that provides visualization of soft tissues with high spatial resolution. In both a research and clinical setting, the major challenge has been identifying a non-invasive and safe method for longitudinal tracking of delivered cells in vivo. The labeling and tracking of contrast agent labeled cells using MRI has the potential to fulfill this need. Contrast agents are often used to enhance the image contrast between the tissue of interest and surrounding tissues with MRI. The most commonly used MRI contrast agents contain Gd(III) ions. However, Gd(III) ions are highly toxic in their ionic form, as they tend to accumulate in the liver, spleen, kidney and bones and block calcium channels. Endohedral metallofullerenes such as trimetallic nitride endohedral metallofullerenes (Trimetasphere®) are one unique class of fullerene molecules where a Gd3N cluster is encapsulated inside a C80 carbon cage referred to as Gd3N@C80. These endohedral metallofullerenes have several advantages over small chelated Gd(III) complexes such as increased stability of the Gd(III) ion, minimal toxic effects, high solubility in water and high proton relativity. In this study, we describe the evaluation of gadolinium-based Trimetasphere® positive contrast agent for the ​in vitro labeling and in vivo tracking of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells within lung tissue. In addition, we conducted a 'proof-of-concept' experiment demonstrating that this methodology can be used to track the homing of stem cells to injured lung tissue and provide longitudinal analysis of cell localization over an extended time course. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of hepatocyte transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwayne R Roach

    Full Text Available Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF. The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility.

  10. Iron Oxide as an Mri Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking: Supplementary Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Korchinski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation.

  11. Noninvasive in vivo tracking of mesenchymal stem cells and evaluation of cell therapeutic effects in a murine model using a clinical 3.0 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drey, Florian; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Neef, Klaus; Ewert, Birgit; Tenbrock, Arne; Treskes, Philipp; Bovenschulte, Henning; Liakopoulos, Oliver J; Brenkmann, Meike; Stamm, Christof; Wittwer, Thorsten; Wahlers, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising treatment approach for end-stage heart failure. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms and the fate of the transplanted cells. The objective of the presented work is to determine the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in vivo monitoring after transplantation into infarcted mouse hearts using a clinical 3.0 T MRI device. The labeling procedure of bone marrow-derived MSCs with micron-sized paramagnetic iron oxide particles (MPIOs) did not affect the viability of the cells and their cell type-defining properties when compared to unlabeled cells. Using a clinical 3.0 T MRI scanner equipped with a dedicated small animal solenoid coil, 10(5) labeled MSCs could be detected and localized in the mouse hearts for up to 4 weeks after intramyocardial transplantation. Weekly ECG-gated scans using T1-weighted sequences were performed, and left ventricular function was assessed. Histological analysis of hearts confirmed the survival of labeled MSCs in the target area up to 4 weeks after transplantation. In conclusion, in vivo tracking of labeled MSCs using a clinical 3.0 T MRI scanner is feasible. In combination with assessment of heart function, this technology allows the monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy of regenerative therapies in a small animal model.

  12. Homing and Tracking of Iron Oxide Labelled Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Infusion in Traumatic Brain Injury Mice: a Longitudinal In Vivo MRI Study.

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    Mishra, Sushanta Kumar; Khushu, Subash; Singh, Ajay K; Gangenahalli, Gurudutta

    2018-06-17

    Stem cells transplantation has emerged as a promising alternative therapeutic due to its potency at injury site. The need to monitor and non-invasively track the infused stem cells is a significant challenge in the development of regenerative medicine. Thus, in vivo tracking to monitor infused stem cells is especially vital. In this manuscript, we have described an effective in vitro labelling method of MSCs, a serial in vivo tracking of implanted stem cells at traumatic brain injury (TBI) site through 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Proper homing of infused MSCs was carried out at different time points using histological analysis and Prussian blue staining. Longitudinal in vivo tracking of infused MSCs were performed up to 21 days in different groups through MRI using relaxometry technique. Results demonstrated that MSCs incubated with iron oxide-poly-L-lysine complex (IO-PLL) at a ratio of 50:1.5 μg/ml and a time period of 6 h was optimised to increase labelling efficiency. T2*-weighted images and relaxation study demonstrated a significant signal loss and effective decrease in transverse relaxation time on day-3 at injury site after systemic transplantation, revealed maximum number of stem cells homing to the lesion area. MRI results further correlate with histological and Prussian blue staining in different time periods. Decrease in negative signal and increase in relaxation times were observed after day-14, may indicate damage tissue replacement with healthy tissue. MSCs tracking with synthesized negative contrast agent represent a great advantage during both in vitro and in vivo analysis. The proposed absolute bias correction based relaxometry analysis could be extrapolated for stem cell tracking and therapies in various neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Long-term MRI cell tracking after intraventricular delivery in a patient with global cerebral ischemia and prospects for magnetic navigation of stem cells within the CSF.

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    Miroslaw Janowski

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the long-term clinical tracking of magnetically labeled stem cells after intracerebroventricular transplantation as well as to investigate in vitro feasibility for magnetic guidance of cell therapy within large fluid compartments.After approval by our Institutional Review Board, an 18-month-old patient, diagnosed as being in a vegetative state due to global cerebral ischemia, underwent cell transplantation to the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle, with umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO contrast agent. The patient was followed over 33 months with clinical examinations and MRI. To evaluate the forces governing the distribution of cells within the fluid compartment of the ventricular system in vivo, a gravity-driven sedimentation assay and a magnetic field-driven cell attraction assay were developed in vitro.Twenty-four hours post-transplantation, MR imaging (MRI was able to detect hypointense cells in the occipital horn of the lateral ventricle. The signal gradually decreased over 4 months and became undetectable at 33 months. In vitro, no significant difference in cell sedimentation between SPIO-labeled and unlabeled cells was observed (p = NS. An external magnet was effective in attracting cells over distances comparable to the size of human lateral ventricles.MR imaging of SPIO-labeled cells allows monitoring of cells within lateral ventricles. While the initial biodistribution is governed by gravity-driven sedimentation, an external magnetic field may possibly be applied to further direct the distribution of labeled cells within large fluid compartments such as the ventricular system.

  14. Tracking of Neural Stem Cells in Rats with Intracerebral Hemorrhage by the Use of 3T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Nam Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, Jong Seong

    2008-01-01

    To access the feasibility of clinically available 3T MRI to detect the migration of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a rat model. The ethics committee of our institution approved this study. ICH was induced by the injection of collagenase type IV into the right striatum of ten Sprague-Dawley rats. Human NSCs conjugated with Feridex (superparamagnetic iron oxide: SPIO) were transplanted into the left striatum one week after ICH induction. MRI was performed on a 3T scanner during the first, second, third, fourth, and sixth weeks post-transplantation. MRI was obtained using coronal T2- and T2 * -weighted sequences. Two rats were sacrificed every week after in vivo MRI in order to analyze the histological findings. ICH in the right striatum was detected by MRI one and two weeks after transplantation without migration of the NSCs. There was no migration of the NSCs as seen on the histological findings one week after transplantation. The histological findings two weeks after transplantation showed a small number of NSCs along the corpus callosum. On MRI three weeks after transplantation, there was a hypointense line along the corpus callosum and decreased signal intensity in the right periventricular region. Histological findings three weeks after transplantation confirmed the presence of the hypointense line representing SPIO-labeled NSCs. MRI four and six weeks after transplantation showed a hypointense spot in the right periventricular region. The histological findings four and six weeks after transplantation showed the presence of prominent NSCs in the right periventricular region. 3T MRI can detect the migration of NSCs in rats with ICH along the corpus callosum. Therefore, 3T MRI could be feasible for detecting the migration of NSCs in the clinical setting of stem cell therapy

  15. In-Vivo Detection and Tracking of T Cells in Various Organs in a Melanoma Tumor Model by 19F-Fluorine MRS/MRI.

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    Christine Gonzales

    Full Text Available 19F-MRI and 19F-MRS can identify specific cell types after in-vitro or in-vivo 19F-labeling. Knowledge on the potential to track in-vitro 19F-labeled immune cells in tumor models by 19F-MRI/MRS is scarce.To study 19F-based MR techniques for in-vivo tracking of adoptively transferred immune cells after in-vitro 19F-labeling, i.e. to detect and monitor their migration non-invasively in melanoma-bearing mice.Splenocytes (SP were labeled in-vitro with a perfluorocarbon (PFC and IV-injected into non-tumor bearing mice. In-vitro PFC-labeled ovalbumin (OVA-specific T cells from the T cell receptor-transgenic line OT-1, activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies (Tact or OVA-peptide pulsed antigen presenting cells (TOVA-act, were injected into B16 OVA melanoma-bearing mice. The distribution of the 19F-labelled donor cells was determined in-vivo by 19F-MRI/MRS. In-vivo 19F-MRI/MRS results were confirmed by ex-vivo 19F-NMR and flow cytometry.SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro yielding 3x1011-1.4x1012 19F-atoms/cell in the 3 groups. Adoptively transferred 19F-labeled SP, TOVA-act, and Tact were detected by coil-localized 19F-MRS in the chest, abdomen, and left flank in most animals (corresponding to lungs, livers, and spleens, respectively, with highest signal-to-noise for SP vs TOVA-act and Tact, p<0.009 for both. SP and Tact were successfully imaged by 19F-MRI (n = 3; liver. These in-vivo data were confirmed by ex-vivo high-resolution 19F-NMR-spectroscopy. By flow cytometric analysis, however, TOVA-act tended to be more abundant versus SP and Tact (liver: p = 0.1313; lungs: p = 0.1073; spleen: p = 0.109. Unlike 19F-MRI/MRS, flow cytometry also identified transferred immune cells (SP, Tact, and TOVA-act in the tumors.SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro and detected in-vivo by non-invasive 19F-MRS/MRI in liver, lung, and spleen. The portion of 19F-labeled T cells in the adoptively transferred cell

  16. Advances in using MRI probes and sensors for in vivo cell tracking as applied to regenerative medicine.

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    Srivastava, Amit K; Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Gilad, Assaf A; McMahon, Michael T; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2015-04-01

    The field of molecular and cellular imaging allows molecules and cells to be visualized in vivo non-invasively. It has uses not only as a research tool but in clinical settings as well, for example in monitoring cell-based regenerative therapies, in which cells are transplanted to replace degenerating or damaged tissues, or to restore a physiological function. The success of such cell-based therapies depends on several critical issues, including the route and accuracy of cell transplantation, the fate of cells after transplantation, and the interaction of engrafted cells with the host microenvironment. To assess these issues, it is necessary to monitor transplanted cells non-invasively in real-time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a tool uniquely suited to this task, given its ability to image deep inside tissue with high temporal resolution and sensitivity. Extraordinary efforts have recently been made to improve cellular MRI as applied to regenerative medicine, by developing more advanced contrast agents for use as probes and sensors. These advances enable the non-invasive monitoring of cell fate and, more recently, that of the different cellular functions of living cells, such as their enzymatic activity and gene expression, as well as their time point of cell death. We present here a review of recent advancements in the development of these probes and sensors, and of their functioning, applications and limitations. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Magentic Cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of heptocytes transplantation

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    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this wo...

  18. Long-term MRI tracking of dual-labeled adipose-derived stem cells homing into mouse carotid artery injury

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    Qin JB

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Bao Qin,1,5,* Kang-An Li,2,* Xiang-Xiang Li,1,5 Qing-Song Xie,3 Jia-Ying Lin,4 Kai-Chuang Ye,1,5 Mi-Er Jiang,1,5 Gui-Xiang Zhang,2 Xin-Wu Lu1,51Department of Vascular Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Department of Neurosurgery, Cixi Municipal People's Hospital, Zhejiang Province, China; 4Clinic for Gynecology, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 5Vascular Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China*These two authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Stem cell therapy has shown great promise for regenerative repair of injured or diseased tissues. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs have become increasingly attractive candidates for cellular therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to be effective in tracking magnetic-labeled cells and evaluating their clinical relevance after cell transplantation. This study investigated the feasibility of imaging green fluorescent protein-expressing ADSCs (GFP-ADSCs labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles, and tracked them in vivo with noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging after cell transplantation in a model of mouse carotid artery injury.Methods: GFP-ADSCs were isolated from the adipose tissues of GFP mice and labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. Intracellular stability, proliferation, and viability of the labeled cells were evaluated in vitro. Next, the cells were transplanted into a mouse carotid artery injury model. Clinical 3 T magnetic resonance imaging was performed immediately before and 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 30 days after cell transplantation. Prussian blue staining and histological analysis were performed 7 and 30 days after transplantation.Results: GFP-ADSCs were found to be efficiently labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide

  19. In-Vivo Imaging Of Transplanted Human Hepatic Stem Cells: Negative Contrast Labeling And 7t Micro-MRI Tracking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McClelland, Randall E; Wauthier, Eliane; Reid, Lola; Hsu, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Stem cell therapies have great potential as alternative options to whole organ transplantations in treating dysfunction or failure, and alleviating the chronic shortage of donor availability of organs such as the...

  20. Cell tracking. Principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, Jan; Kircher, Moritz F.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    Cell based therapies such as stem cell therapies or adoptive immunotherapies are currently being explored as a potential treatment for a variety of diseases such as Parkinson's disease, diabetes or cancer. However, quantitative and qualitative evaluation of adoptively transferred cells is indispensable for monitoring the efficiency of the treatment. Current approaches mostly analyze transferred cells from peripheral blood, which cannot assess whether transferred cells actuallyhome to and stay in the targeted tissue. Using cell-labeling methods such as direct labeling or transfection with a marker gene in conjunction with various imaging modalities (MRI, optical or nuclear imaging), labeled cells can be followed in vivo in real-time, and their accumulation as well as function in vivo can be monitored and quantified accurately. This method is usually referred to as ''cell tracking'' or ''cell trafficking'' and is also being applied in basic biological sciences, exemplified in the evaluation of genes contributing to metastasis. This review focuses on principles of this promising methodology and explains various approaches by highlighting recent examples. (orig.) [de

  1. Stem cell tracking using iron oxide nanoparticles

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    Bull E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Bull,1 Seyed Yazdan Madani,1 Roosey Sheth,1 Amelia Seifalian,1 Mark Green,2 Alexander M Seifalian1,31UCL Centre for Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London, 2Department of Physics, King’s College London, Strand Campus, London, UK; 3Royal Free London National Health Service Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs are an exciting advancement in the field of nanotechnology. They expand the possibilities of noninvasive analysis and have many useful properties, making them potential candidates for numerous novel applications. Notably, they have been shown that they can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and are capable of conjugation with various cell types, including stem cells. In-depth research has been undertaken to establish these benefits, so that a deeper level of understanding of stem cell migratory pathways and differentiation, tumor migration, and improved drug delivery can be achieved. Stem cells have the ability to treat and cure many debilitating diseases with limited side effects, but a main problem that arises is in the noninvasive tracking and analysis of these stem cells. Recently, researchers have acknowledged the use of SPIONs for this purpose and have set out to establish suitable protocols for coating and attachment, so as to bring MRI tracking of SPION-labeled stem cells into common practice. This review paper explains the manner in which SPIONs are produced, conjugated, and tracked using MRI, as well as a discussion on their limitations. A concise summary of recently researched magnetic particle coatings is provided, and the effects of SPIONs on stem cells are evaluated, while animal and human studies investigating the role of SPIONs in stem cell tracking will be explored.Keywords: stem cells, nanoparticle, magnetic

  2. Assessment of Myocardial Contractile Function Using Global and Segmental Circumferential Strain following Intracoronary Stem Cell Infusion after Myocardial Infarction: MRI Feature Tracking Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, Sabha; Al-Khalidi, Hussein; Hor, Kan; Hakeem, Abdul; Taylor, Michael; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Oshinski, John; Pecora, Andrew L.; Kereiakes, Dean; Chung, Eugene; Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz; Mazur, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Background. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) strain analysis is a sensitive method to assess myocardial function. Our objective was to define the feasibility of MRI circumferential strain (ε cc ) analysis in assessing subtle changes in myocardial function following stem cell therapy. Methods and Results. Patients in the Amorcyte Phase I trial were randomly assigned to treatment with either autologous bone-marrow-derived stem cells infused into the infarct-related artery 5 to 11 days following primary PCI or control. MRI studies were obtained at baseline, 3, and 6 months. ε cc was measured in the short axis views at the base, mid and apical slices of the left ventricle (LV) for each patient (13 treatments and 10 controls). Mid-anterior LV ε cc improved between baseline −18.5 ± 8.6 and 3 months −22.6 ± 7.0, P = 0.03. There were no significant changes in ε cc at 3 months and 6 months compared to baseline for other segments. There was excellent intraobserver and interobserver agreement for basal and mid circumferential strain. Conclusion. MRI segmental strain analysis is feasible in assessment of regional myocardial function following cell therapy with excellent intra- and inter-observer variability's. Using this method, a modest interval change in segmental ε cc was detected in treatment group

  3. MRI-tracking of transplanted human ASC in a SCID mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegmund, Birte J.; Kasten, Annika [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center (Germany); Kühn, Jens-Peter [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald University Medical Center (Germany); Winter, Karsten [Institute of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig (Germany); Grüttner, Cordula [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Rostock (Germany); Frerich, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.frerich@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Background: Regarding strategies improving the efficacy of stem cell transplantation in adipose tissue engineering, cell tracking might be useful. Here we report the in vivo tracking of adipose tissue derived stem cells (ASC) by means of nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we report the in vivo tracking of adipose tissue derived stromal cells (ASC) by means of nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: Human ASC were amplified and labeled with two types of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), BNF starch and nanomag®-D-spio. Adipose tissue constructs were fabricated by seeding collagen scaffolds with labeled and unlabeled ASCs. Constructs were implanted subcutaneously in the back of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice (n =69, group 1: control with cells w/o label, group 2: BNF starch labeled cells, group 3: nanomag®-D-spio labeled cells). MRI scans were performed at 24 hours, four, twelve and 28 days and four months in a 7.1 T animal device. Explanted constructs were analyzed histomorphometrically. Results: MRI scans showed high contrast of the labeled cells in t2-tse-sequence compared to unlabeled controls. Loss of volume of the implants was observed over time due to partial loss for transplanted cells without significant difference (level of significance p<0.017). Compared to histomorphometry, there was found a positiv correlations in measurement of implant size with a significant at day four (correlation coefficient =0.643; p=0.024) and day twelve (correlation coefficient =0.687; p=0.010). Additional Prussian blue stain showed iron in all implants. Significant differences between the three groups (significance level p<0.017) were found after twelve days between control group and group 3 (p=0.008) and after 28 days between control group and group 2 and 3 (p=0.011). Conclusion: Both MNPs might be suitable for tracking of ASC in vivo and show long term stability over 4 months. - Highlights:

  4. Active MRI tracking for robotic assisted FUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xu; Huang, Zhihong; Melzer, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    MR guided FUS is a noninvasive method producing thermal necrosis at the position of tumors with high accuracy and temperature control. Because the typical size of the ultrasound focus is smaller than the area of interested treatment tissues, focus repositioning become necessary to achieve multiple sonications to cover the whole targeted area. Using MR compatible mechanical actuators could help the ultrasound beam to reach a wider treatment range than using electrical beam steering technique and more flexibility in position the transducer. An active MR tracking technique was combined into the MRgFUS system to help locating the position of the mechanical actuator and the FUS transducer. For this study, a precise agar reference model was designed and fabricated to test the performance of the active tracking technique when it was used on the MR-compatible robotics InnoMotion™ (IBSMM, Engineering spol. s r.o. / Ltd, Czech Republic). The precision, tracking range and positioning speed of the combined robotic FUS system were evaluated in this study. Compared to the existing MR guided HIFU systems, the combined robotic system with active tracking techniques provides a potential that allows the FUS treatment to operate in a larger spatial range and with a faster speed, which is one of the main challenges for organ motion tracking.

  5. Real Time MRI Motion Correction with Markerless Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Claus; Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Wighton, Paul

    Prospective motion correction for MRI neuroimaging has been demonstrated using MR navigators and external tracking systems using markers. The drawbacks of these two motion estimation methods include prolonged scan time plus lack of compatibility with all image acquisitions, and difficulties...... validating marker attachment resulting in uncertain estimation of the brain motion respectively. We have developed a markerless tracking system, and in this work we demonstrate the use of our system for prospective motion correction, and show that despite being computationally demanding, markerless tracking...... can be implemented for real time motion correction....

  6. MRI-guided tumor tracking in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervino, Laura I; Jiang, Steve B [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technology and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, 3960 Health Sciences Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0865 (United States); Du, Jiang, E-mail: lcervino@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, 200 West Arbor Dr., San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Precise tracking of lung tumor motion during treatment delivery still represents a challenge in radiation therapy. Prototypes of MRI-linac hybrid systems are being created which have the potential of ionization-free real-time imaging of the tumor. This study evaluates the performance of lung tumor tracking algorithms in cine-MRI sagittal images from five healthy volunteers. Visible vascular structures were used as targets. Volunteers performed several series of regular and irregular breathing. Two tracking algorithms were implemented and evaluated: a template matching (TM) algorithm in combination with surrogate tracking using the diaphragm (surrogate was used when the maximum correlation between the template and the image in the search window was less than specified), and an artificial neural network (ANN) model based on the principal components of a region of interest that encompasses the target motion. The mean tracking error e and the error at 95% confidence level e{sub 95} were evaluated for each model. The ANN model led to e = 1.5 mm and e{sub 95} = 4.2 mm, while TM led to e = 0.6 mm and e{sub 95} = 1.0 mm. An extra series was considered separately to evaluate the benefit of using surrogate tracking in combination with TM when target out-of-plane motion occurs. For this series, the mean error was 7.2 mm using only TM and 1.7 mm when the surrogate was used in combination with TM. Results show that, as opposed to tracking with other imaging modalities, ANN does not perform well in MR-guided tracking. TM, however, leads to highly accurate tracking. Out-of-plane motion could be addressed by surrogate tracking using the diaphragm, which can be easily identified in the images.

  7. Tracking of stem cells for treatment in cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Won Jun

    2005-01-01

    Various stem cells or progenitor cells are being used to treat cardiovascular disease. In ischemic heart disease, stem cell therapy is expected to regenerate damaged myocardium. To evaluate effects of stem cell treatment, the method to image stem cell location, distribution and differentiation is necessary. Optical imaging, MRI, nuclear imaging methods have been used for tracking stem cells. The methods and problems of each imaging technique are reviewed

  8. TRACKING STEM CELLS IN AN INHERENTLY REGENRATIVE ENVIRONMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Hagensen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    of such therapies. The objective of this study was to non-invasively evaluate regeneration over time in a truly regenerative process, the regeneration of an axolotl limb, employing superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) contrast agents for stem cell tracking in MRI. Materials and Methods: Amputation of one...... in conjugation with the transfection agent poly-L-lysin (PLL) was tested on cultures of axolotl blastema cells from 7 animals in vitro. PicoGreen-DNA quantification following 3 weeks of culturing was performed to quantify cell viability. MRI-tracking of SPIO labelled blastema cells in the regenerating limb of 5....... Results: SPIO labelling with neither VSOP-C200, Resovist nor Resovist/PLL had any significant effect on blastema cell viability in vitro. Labelled tissue was clearly detectable in vivo 49 days after amputation using MRI (Fig. 1) and a significant decline in signal intensity of labelled limbs versus sham...

  9. MRI with fibre tracking in Cogan congenital oculomotor apraxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlini, Laura [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria I. [University Hospital of Geneva, Neuroradiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Haller, Raoul de [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Ophthalmology, Geneva (Switzerland); Rilliet, Benedict [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Neurosurgery, Geneva (Switzerland); Fluss, Joel [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Neurology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    Congenital ocular motor apraxia (COMA) occasionally shares with Joubert syndrome (JS) and related disorders (JSRDs) a peculiar malformation, the 'molar tooth sign' (MTS). In JSRDs, the absence of superior cerebellar peduncles (SCP) decussation is reported. To investigate whether COMA demonstrates similar abnormal axonal pathways. Eight healthy age-matched controls, three children with clinical COMA and one child with clinical JSRD underwent examination with a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), colour-coded fractional anisotropy maps and three-dimensional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography of the cerebellorubral network were analyzed. On DTI cartography, the 'red dot' originally supposed to represent the SCP decussation in the midbrain was present in controls as well in those with COMA but absent in the single case with JS. In none of the subjects including controls was 3-D FT able to depict the SCP decussation. When seeded, the red dot resulted in the ventral tegmental decussation (VTD). It was normal in controls and in patients with COMA but was absent in our single patient with JSRD. MTS was identified in alla patients with COMA and in the patient with JSRD. MTS can be present in both COMA and JSRD but the underlying anatomy depicted by fibre tracking is distinct. The main difference is the integrity of the VTD in COMA. (orig.)

  10. MRI of sickle cell cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Johnson, M.; Grossman, R.I.; Hecht-Leavitt, C.; Gill, F.; Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia

    1987-01-01

    Eleven patients with sickle cell disease and neurological symptoms underwent MRI examination. Cerebral infarcts of two types were found, those in the vascular distribution of the middle cerebral artery and those in the deep white matter. In the patient whose hydration and whose oxygenation of erythrocytes has been treated, MRI offers diagnostic advantages over arteriography and CT. (orig.)

  11. Dual-Tasking Alleviated Sleep Deprivation Disruption in Visuomotor Tracking: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazes, Yunglin; Rakitin, Brian C.; Steffener, Jason; Habeck, Christian; Butterfield, Brady; Basner, Robert C.; Ghez, Claude; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Effects of dual-responding on tracking performance after 49-h of sleep deprivation (SD) were evaluated behaviorally and with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Continuous visuomotor tracking was performed simultaneously with an intermittent color-matching visual detection task in which a pair of color-matched stimuli constituted a…

  12. Imaging transplanted stem cells in real time using an MRI dual-contrast method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngen, Ethel J.; Wang, Lee; Kato, Yoshinori; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Zhu, Wenlian; Gandhi, Nishant; Smith, Barbara; Armour, Michael; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are currently being investigated for the repair of brain injuries. Although exogenous stem cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prior to transplantation provides a means to noninvasively monitor stem cell transplantation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), monitoring cell death is still a challenge. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using an MRI dual-contrast technique to detect cell delivery, cell migration and cell death after stem cell transplantation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were dual labelled with SPIONs and gadolinium-based chelates (GdDTPA). The viability, proliferation rate, and differentiation potential of the labelled cells were then evaluated. The feasibility of this MRI technique to distinguish between live and dead cells was next evaluated using MRI phantoms, and in vivo using both immune-competent and immune-deficient mice, following the induction of brain injury in the mice. All results were validated with bioluminescence imaging. In live cells, a negative (T2/T2*) MRI contrast predominates, and is used to track cell delivery and cell migration. Upon cell death, a diffused positive (T1) MRI contrast is generated in the vicinity of the dead cells, and serves as an imaging marker for cell death. Ultimately, this technique could be used to manage stem cell therapies. PMID:26330231

  13. Three-dimensional liver motion tracking using real-time two-dimensional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Lau; Ringgaard, Steffen; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2014-04-01

    Combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and linear accelerators for radiotherapy (MR-Linacs) are currently under development. MRI is noninvasive and nonionizing and can produce images with high soft tissue contrast. However, new tracking methods are required to obtain fast real-time spatial target localization. This study develops and evaluates a method for tracking three-dimensional (3D) respiratory liver motion in two-dimensional (2D) real-time MRI image series with high temporal and spatial resolution. The proposed method for 3D tracking in 2D real-time MRI series has three steps: (1) Recording of a 3D MRI scan and selection of a blood vessel (or tumor) structure to be tracked in subsequent 2D MRI series. (2) Generation of a library of 2D image templates oriented parallel to the 2D MRI image series by reslicing and resampling the 3D MRI scan. (3) 3D tracking of the selected structure in each real-time 2D image by finding the template and template position that yield the highest normalized cross correlation coefficient with the image. Since the tracked structure has a known 3D position relative to each template, the selection and 2D localization of a specific template translates into quantification of both the through-plane and in-plane position of the structure. As a proof of principle, 3D tracking of liver blood vessel structures was performed in five healthy volunteers in two 5.4 Hz axial, sagittal, and coronal real-time 2D MRI series of 30 s duration. In each 2D MRI series, the 3D localization was carried out twice, using nonoverlapping template libraries, which resulted in a total of 12 estimated 3D trajectories per volunteer. Validation tests carried out to support the tracking algorithm included quantification of the breathing induced 3D liver motion and liver motion directionality for the volunteers, and comparison of 2D MRI estimated positions of a structure in a watermelon with the actual positions. Axial, sagittal, and coronal 2D MRI series

  14. Three-dimensional liver motion tracking using real-time two-dimensional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, Lau, E-mail: lau.brix@stab.rm.dk [Department of Procurement and Clinical Engineering, Region Midt, Olof Palmes Allé 15, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark and MR Research Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Ringgaard, Steffen [MR Research Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Department of Computer Science, Aarhus University, Aabogade 34, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark and Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Poulsen, Per Rugaard [Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark and Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and linear accelerators for radiotherapy (MR-Linacs) are currently under development. MRI is noninvasive and nonionizing and can produce images with high soft tissue contrast. However, new tracking methods are required to obtain fast real-time spatial target localization. This study develops and evaluates a method for tracking three-dimensional (3D) respiratory liver motion in two-dimensional (2D) real-time MRI image series with high temporal and spatial resolution. Methods: The proposed method for 3D tracking in 2D real-time MRI series has three steps: (1) Recording of a 3D MRI scan and selection of a blood vessel (or tumor) structure to be tracked in subsequent 2D MRI series. (2) Generation of a library of 2D image templates oriented parallel to the 2D MRI image series by reslicing and resampling the 3D MRI scan. (3) 3D tracking of the selected structure in each real-time 2D image by finding the template and template position that yield the highest normalized cross correlation coefficient with the image. Since the tracked structure has a known 3D position relative to each template, the selection and 2D localization of a specific template translates into quantification of both the through-plane and in-plane position of the structure. As a proof of principle, 3D tracking of liver blood vessel structures was performed in five healthy volunteers in two 5.4 Hz axial, sagittal, and coronal real-time 2D MRI series of 30 s duration. In each 2D MRI series, the 3D localization was carried out twice, using nonoverlapping template libraries, which resulted in a total of 12 estimated 3D trajectories per volunteer. Validation tests carried out to support the tracking algorithm included quantification of the breathing induced 3D liver motion and liver motion directionality for the volunteers, and comparison of 2D MRI estimated positions of a structure in a watermelon with the actual positions. Results: Axial, sagittal

  15. Three-dimensional liver motion tracking using real-time two-dimensional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, Lau; Ringgaard, Steffen; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and linear accelerators for radiotherapy (MR-Linacs) are currently under development. MRI is noninvasive and nonionizing and can produce images with high soft tissue contrast. However, new tracking methods are required to obtain fast real-time spatial target localization. This study develops and evaluates a method for tracking three-dimensional (3D) respiratory liver motion in two-dimensional (2D) real-time MRI image series with high temporal and spatial resolution. Methods: The proposed method for 3D tracking in 2D real-time MRI series has three steps: (1) Recording of a 3D MRI scan and selection of a blood vessel (or tumor) structure to be tracked in subsequent 2D MRI series. (2) Generation of a library of 2D image templates oriented parallel to the 2D MRI image series by reslicing and resampling the 3D MRI scan. (3) 3D tracking of the selected structure in each real-time 2D image by finding the template and template position that yield the highest normalized cross correlation coefficient with the image. Since the tracked structure has a known 3D position relative to each template, the selection and 2D localization of a specific template translates into quantification of both the through-plane and in-plane position of the structure. As a proof of principle, 3D tracking of liver blood vessel structures was performed in five healthy volunteers in two 5.4 Hz axial, sagittal, and coronal real-time 2D MRI series of 30 s duration. In each 2D MRI series, the 3D localization was carried out twice, using nonoverlapping template libraries, which resulted in a total of 12 estimated 3D trajectories per volunteer. Validation tests carried out to support the tracking algorithm included quantification of the breathing induced 3D liver motion and liver motion directionality for the volunteers, and comparison of 2D MRI estimated positions of a structure in a watermelon with the actual positions. Results: Axial, sagittal

  16. Cell tracking using iron oxide fails to distinguish dead from living transplanted cells in the infarcted heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, E M; Hogers, B; van der Graaf, L M; Gittenberger-de Groot, A C; Poelmann, R E; van der Weerd, L

    2010-03-01

    Recently, debate has arisen about the usefulness of cell tracking using iron oxide-labeled cells. Two important issues in determining the usefulness of cell tracking with MRI are generally overlooked; first, the effect of graft rejection in immunocompetent models, and second, the necessity for careful histological confirmation of the fate of the labeled cells in the presence of iron oxide. Therefore, both iron oxide-labeled living as well as dead epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) were investigated in ischemic myocardium of immunodeficient non-obese diabetic (NOD)/acid: non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/scid) mice with 9.4T MRI until 6 weeks after surgery, at which time immunohistochemical analysis was performed. In both groups, voids on MRI scans were observed that did not change in number, size, or localization over time. Based on MRI, no distinction could be made between living and dead injected cells. Prussian blue staining confirmed that the hypointense spots on MRI corresponded to iron-loaded cells. However, in the dead-EPDC recipients, all iron-positive cells appeared to be macrophages, while the living-EPDC recipients also contained engrafted iron-loaded EPDCs. Iron labeling is inadequate for determining the fate of transplanted cells in the immunodeficient host, since dead cells produce an MRI signal indistinguishable from incorporated living cells. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Stem cell therapy: MRI guidance and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraitchman, Dara L; Gilson, Wesley D; Lorenz, Christine H

    2008-02-01

    With the recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) labeling of cellular therapeutics, it is natural that interventional MRI techniques for targeting would be developed. This review provides an overview of the current methods of stem cell labeling and the challenges that are created with respect to interventional MRI administration. In particular, stem cell therapies will require specialized, MR-compatible devices as well as integration of graphical user interfaces with pulse sequences designed for interactive, real-time delivery in many organs. Specific applications that are being developed will be reviewed as well as strategies for future translation to the clinical realm. (Copyright) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed.

  19. Pipeline for Tracking Neural Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Holm, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Automated methods for neural stem cell lineage construction become increasingly important due to the large amount of data produced from time lapse imagery of in vitro cell growth experiments. Segmentation algorithms with the ability to adapt to the problem at hand and robust tracking methods play...... a key role in constructing these lineages. We present here a tracking pipeline based on learning a dictionary of discriminative image patches for segmentation and a graph formulation of the cell matching problem incorporating topology changes and acknowledging the fact that segmentation errors do occur...

  20. Simultaneous tumor and surrogate motion tracking with dynamic MRI for radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoun; Farah, Rana; Shea, Steven M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hales, Russell; Lee, Junghoon

    2018-01-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is a major obstacle for achieving high-precision radiotherapy of cancers in the thoracic and abdominal regions. Surrogate-based estimation and tracking methods are commonly used in radiotherapy, but with limited understanding of quantified correlation to tumor motion. In this study, we propose a method to simultaneously track the lung tumor and external surrogates to evaluate their spatial correlation in a quantitative way using dynamic MRI, which allows real-time acquisition without ionizing radiation exposure. To capture the lung and whole tumor, four MRI-compatible fiducials are placed on the patient’s chest and upper abdomen. Two different types of acquisitions are performed in the sagittal orientation including multi-slice 2D cine MRIs to reconstruct 4D-MRI and two-slice 2D cine MRIs to simultaneously track the tumor and fiducials. A phase-binned 4D-MRI is first reconstructed from multi-slice MR images using body area as a respiratory surrogate and groupwise registration. The 4D-MRI provides 3D template volumes for different breathing phases. 3D tumor position is calculated by 3D-2D template matching in which 3D tumor templates in the 4D-MRI reconstruction and the 2D cine MRIs from the two-slice tracking dataset are registered. 3D trajectories of the external surrogates are derived via matching a 3D geometrical model of the fiducials to their segmentations on the 2D cine MRIs. We tested our method on ten lung cancer patients. Using a correlation analysis, the 3D tumor trajectory demonstrates a noticeable phase mismatch and significant cycle-to-cycle motion variation, while the external surrogate was not sensitive enough to capture such variations. Additionally, there was significant phase mismatch between surrogate signals obtained from the fiducials at different locations.

  1. Software for precise tracking of cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Hiroshi; Noda, Hisayori; Sugiyama, Mayu; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Fukami, Kiyoko; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We developed software for analyzing cultured cells that divide as well as migrate. ► The active contour model (Snakes) was used as the core algorithm. ► The time backward analysis was also used for efficient detection of cell division. ► With user-interactive correction functions, the software enables precise tracking. ► The software was successfully applied to cells with fluorescently-labeled nuclei. -- Abstract: We have developed a multi-target cell tracking program TADOR, which we applied to a series of fluorescence images. TADOR is based on an active contour model that is modified in order to be free of the problem of locally optimal solutions, and thus is resistant to signal fluctuation and morphological changes. Due to adoption of backward tracing and addition of user-interactive correction functions, TADOR is used in an off-line and semi-automated mode, but enables precise tracking of cell division. By applying TADOR to the analysis of cultured cells whose nuclei had been fluorescently labeled, we tracked cell division and cell-cycle progression on coverslips over an extended period of time.

  2. Tissue-Point Motion Tracking in the Tongue from Cine MRI and Tagged MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Suo, Yuanming; Murano, Emi Z.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate tissue motion tracking within the tongue can help professionals diagnose and treat vocal tract--related disorders, evaluate speech quality before and after surgery, and conduct various scientific studies. The authors compared tissue tracking results from 4 widely used deformable registration (DR) methods applied to cine magnetic…

  3. In vivo quantification of magnetically labelled cells by MRI relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Lajous, Hélène; El Atifi, Michèle; Bidart, Marie; Auboiroux, Vincent; Fries, Pascal Henry; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Cellular MRI, which visualizes magnetically labelled cells (cells*), is an active research field for in vivo cell therapy and tracking. The simultaneous relaxation rate measurements (R 2 *, R 2 , R 1 ) are the basis of a quantitative cellular MRI method proposed here. U937 cells were labelled with Molday ION Rhodamine B, a bi-functional superparamagnetic and fluorescent nanoparticle (U937*). U937* viability and proliferation were not affected in vitro. In vitro relaxometry was performed in a cell concentration range of [2.5 × 10 4 -10 8 ] cells/mL. These measurements show the existence of complementary cell concentration intervals where these rates vary linearly. The juxtaposition of these intervals delineates a wide cell concentration range over which one of the relaxation rates in a voxel of an in vivo image can be converted into an absolute cell concentration. The linear regime was found at high concentrations for R 1 in the range of [10 6 - 2 × 10 8 ] cells/mL, at intermediate concentrations for R 2 in [2.5 × 10 5 - 5 × 10 7 ] cells/mL and at low concentrations for R 2 * in [8 × 10 4 - 5 × 10 6 ] cells/mL. In vivo relaxometry was performed in a longitudinal study, with labelled U937 cells injected into a U87 glioma mouse model. Using in vitro data, maps of in vivo U937* concentrations were obtained by converting one of the in vivo relaxation rates to cell concentration maps. MRI results were compared with the corresponding optical images of the same brains, showing the usefulness of our method to accurately follow therapeutic cell biodistribution in a longitudinal study. Results also demonstrate that the method quantifies a large range of magnetically labelled cells*. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. MRI of intracranial germ-cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, L.; Korogi, Y.; Sugahara, T.; Ikushima, I.; Shigematsu, Y.; Okuda, T.; Takahashi, M.; Kochi, M.; Ushio, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. Our aim was to review the MRI appearances of primary intracranial germ-cell tumours (GCT). We reviewed the MRI studies of 32 patients: 19 with germinomas, five with teratomas, one with an embryonal carcinoma, five with mixed and two with malignant nongerminomatous GCT. Eleven were in the pineal region, 12 suprasellar, five in the both sites, two in the basal ganglia and two in the corpus callosum. Contrast-enhanced images were available for 27 patients. The solid parts of GCT were nearly isointense with grey matter on both T1- and T2-weighted images. In seven patients with nongerminomatous GCT high-signal components were found on T1-weighted images, representing haemorrhage, high-protein fluid or fat. Cystic components were detected in 17 of 27 patients; eight germinomas and all nine nongerminomatous GCT had cysts. The solid components of germinomas enhanced homogeneously in eight cases and heterogeneously in 10, while all nongerminomatous GCT showed heterogeneous enhancement. MRI features tumours can facilitate correct diagnosis of GCT, including histological subtypes. (orig.)

  5. Advanced cell therapies: targeting, tracking and actuation of cells with magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John J; Patrick, P Stephen; Yu, Yichao; Lythgoe, Mark F; Kalber, Tammy L

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine would greatly benefit from a new platform technology that enabled measurable, controllable and targeting of stem cells to a site of disease or injury in the body. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles offer attractive possibilities in biomedicine and can be incorporated into cells, affording a safe and reliable means of tagging. This review describes three current and emerging methods to enhance regenerative medicine using magnetic particles to guide therapeutic cells to a target organ; track the cells using MRI and assess their spatial localization with high precision and influence the behavior of the cell using magnetic actuation. This approach is complementary to the systemic injection of cell therapies, thus expanding the horizon of stem cell therapeutics.

  6. Diagnosis of renal cell cancer by dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Katoh, Katsuya

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic MRI was performed in 15 cases (16 lesions) of renal cell cancer. The enhanced pattern of the tumor was mainly evaluated and findings were compared with these of dynamic CT and renal angiography. Enhanced patterns on dynamic MRI and dynamic CT were similar, but each phase on dynamic MRI tended to be prolonged compared with dynamic CT. Many hypervascular tumors on renal angiography had prominent enhancement in an early phase on dynamic MRI, but there was no prominent enhancement in cases with tumor thrombi in the renal vein or IVC. All hypovascular tumors were enhanced to some degree without exception on dynamic MRI. Dynamic MRI is considered to be useful for the evaluation of the characterization, especially vascularity, of renal cell cancer, but we should pay attention to the differential diagnosis from other tumor in atypical cases because its enhanced patterns are various on dynamic MRI. (author)

  7. A low cost fMRI-compatible tracking system using the Nintendo Wii remote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modroño, Cristián; Rodríguez-Hernández, Antonio F; Marcano, Francisco; Navarrete, Gorka; Burunat, Enrique; Ferrer, Marta; Monserrat, Raquel; González-Mora, José L

    2011-11-15

    It is sometimes necessary during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to capture different movements made by the subjects, e.g. to enable them to control an item or to analyze its kinematics. The aim of this work is to present an inexpensive hand tracking system suitable for use in a high field MRI environment. It works by introducing only one light-emitting diode (LED) in the magnet room, and by receiving its signal with a Nintendo Wii remote (the primary controller for the Nintendo Wii console) placed outside in the control room. Thus, it is possible to take high spatial and temporal resolution registers of a moving point that, in this case, is held by the hand. We tested it using a ball and racket virtual game inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner to demonstrate the usefulness of the system. The results show the involvement of a number of areas (mainly occipital and frontal, but also parietal and temporal) when subjects are trying to stop an object that is approaching from a first person perspective, matching previous studies performed with related visuomotor tasks. The system presented here is easy to implement, easy to operate and does not produce important head movements or artifacts in the acquired images. Given its low cost and ready availability, the method described here is ideal for use in basic and clinical fMRI research to track one or more moving points that can correspond to limbs, fingers or any other object whose position needs to be known. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MRI of intracranial germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, M.; Uozumi, T.; Kiya, K.; Mukada, K.; Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Onda, J.; Satoh, H.; Ikawa, F.; Migita, K.

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in proven intracranial germ cell tumours in 22 cases, 12 of whom received Gd-DTPA. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensity of the tumour parenchyma was moderately low in 19 cases and isointense in 3; on T2-weighted images, it was high in all cases. Regions of different intensity thought to be cysts were found in 17 (77 %): 7 of 12 patients with germinoma (58 %) and in all other cases. Of the 13 patients with pineal lesions T1-weighted sagittal images showed the aqueduct to be obstructed in 5, stenotic in 7 and normal in 1. Strong contrast enhancement was observed in all 12 cases. Of the 14 patients with suprasellar lesions, 5 were found to have an intrasellar extension, and in 3 of these, the normal pituitary gland, which could be distinguished from the tumour, was displaced anteriorly. Ten patients (45 %) had multiple lesions. (orig.)

  9. Radiopharmaceutical Stem Cell Tracking for Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Rosado-de-Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although neurological ailments continue to be some of the main causes of disease burden in the world, current therapies such as pharmacological agents have limited potential in the restoration of neural functions. Cell therapies, firstly applied to treat different hematological diseases, are now being investigated in preclinical and clinical studies for neurological illnesses. However, the potential applications and mechanisms for such treatments are still poorly comprehended and are the focus of permanent research. In this setting, noninvasive in vivo imaging allows better understanding of several aspects of stem cell therapies. Amongst the various methods available, radioisotope cell labeling has become one of the most promising since it permits tracking of cells after injection by different routes to investigate their biodistribution. A significant increase in the number of studies utilizing this method has occurred in the last years. Here, we review the different radiopharmaceuticals, imaging techniques, and findings of the preclinical and clinical reports published up to now. Moreover, we discuss the limitations and future applications of radioisotope cell labeling in the field of cell transplantation for neurological diseases.

  10. PROMO – Real-time Prospective Motion Correction in MRI using Image-based Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nathan; Roddey, Cooper; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Han, Eric; Rettmann, Dan; Santos, Juan; Kuperman, Josh; Dale, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts caused by patient motion during scanning remain a serious problem in most MRI applications. The prospective motion correction technique attempts to address this problem at its source by keeping the measurement coordinate system fixed with respect to the patient throughout the entire scan process. In this study, a new image-based approach for prospective motion correction is described, which utilizes three orthogonal 2D spiral navigator acquisitions (SP-Navs) along with a flexible image-based tracking method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithm for online motion measurement. The SP-Nav/EKF framework offers the advantages of image-domain tracking within patient-specific regions-of-interest and reduced sensitivity to off-resonance-induced corruption of rigid-body motion estimates. The performance of the method was tested using offline computer simulations and online in vivo head motion experiments. In vivo validation results covering a broad range of staged head motions indicate a steady-state error of the SP-Nav/EKF motion estimates of less than 10 % of the motion magnitude, even for large compound motions that included rotations over 15 degrees. A preliminary in vivo application in 3D inversion recovery spoiled gradient echo (IR-SPGR) and 3D fast spin echo (FSE) sequences demonstrates the effectiveness of the SP-Nav/EKF framework for correcting 3D rigid-body head motion artifacts prospectively in high-resolution 3D MRI scans. PMID:20027635

  11. Tracking stem cells in tissue-engineered organs using magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hachani, R.; Lowdell, M.; Birchall, M.; Thanh, N. T.

    2013-01-01

    The use of human stem cells (SCs) in tissue engineering holds promise in revolutionising the treatment of numerous diseases. There is a pressing need to comprehend the distribution, movement and role of SCs once implanted onto scaffolds. Nanotechnology has provided a platform to investigate this through the development of inorganic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs can be used to label and track SCs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since this clinically available imaging modality has hig...

  12. MRI screening before stem cell transplantation - necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, U.; Mentzel, H.J.; Kaiser, W.A.; Wolf, J.; Fuchs, D.; Gruhn, B.; Zintl, F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: in the context of stem cell transplantation (SCT), we often observe neurological complications as a consequence of immune system suppression, conditioning therapy or prophylaxis and treatment of graft-versus-host disease. Furthermore, cerebral lesions in existence prior to transplantation can be found. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to stem cell transplantation. Patients and method: cerebral MR examinations of 116 children and adolescents were performed before SCT. Patients ranged in age from 1.1 to 21.4 years (mean 12.6 years). All MR images were obtained by a 1.5 T System. The predefined short protocol included an axial T1-weighted SE sequence and a coronary T2-weighted TSE sequence. We evaluated existing cerebral lesions, the diameter of the ventricular system, and the paranasal sinuses. In the case of pathological findings, the short examination protocol was expanded. Results: in 5 of 116 children (4.3%) we observed prior to SCT findings requiring immediate treatment although the patients did not show any clinical symptoms (1 x aspergilloma, 1 x hemorrhage of vascular anomaly). An increased risk of bleeding caused by cavernoma or another vascular anomaly without hemorrhage also had to be taken into account. 32 of 116 patients (37.1%) showed atrophic lesions. In 42 children (36.2%), we observed affections of the paranasal sinuses. (orig.)

  13. Use of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Cell Tracking with Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to develop novel cell-based therapies originated with the first bone marrow transplant on a leukemia patient in 1956. Preclinical and clinical examples of cell-based treatment strategies have shown promising results across many disciplines in medicine, with recent advances in immune cell therapies for cancer producing remarkable response rates, even in patients with multiple treatment failures. However, cell-based therapies suffer from inconsistent outcomes, motivating the search for tools that allow monitoring of cell delivery and behavior in vivo. Noninvasive cell imaging techniques, also known as cell tracking, have been developed to address this issue. These tools can allow real-time, quantitative, and long-term monitoring of transplanted cells in the recipient, providing insight on cell migration, distribution, viability, differentiation, and fate, all of which play crucial roles in treatment efficacy. Understanding these parameters allows the optimization of cell choice, delivery route, and dosage for therapy and advances cell-based therapy for specific clinical uses. To date, most cell tracking work has centered on imaging modalities such as MRI, radionuclide imaging, and optical imaging. However, X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an emerging method for cell tracking that has several strengths such as high spatial and temporal resolution, and excellent quantitative capabilities. The advantages of CT for cell tracking are enhanced by its wide availability and cost effectiveness, allowing CT to become one of the most popular clinical imaging modalities and a key asset in disease diagnosis. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in cell tracking methods using X-ray CT in various applications, in addition to predictions on how the field will progress. PMID:28485976

  14. Accelerating volumetric cine MRI (VC-MRI) using undersampling for real-time 3D target localization/tracking in radiation therapy: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wendy; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wang, Chunhao; Zhang, You; Cai, Jing; Ren, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Purpose. To accelerate volumetric cine MRI (VC-MRI) using undersampled 2D-cine MRI to provide real-time 3D guidance for gating/target tracking in radiotherapy. Methods. 4D-MRI is acquired during patient simulation. One phase of the prior 4D-MRI is selected as the prior images, designated as MRIprior. The on-board VC-MRI at each time-step is considered a deformation of the MRIprior. The deformation field map is represented as a linear combination of the motion components extracted by principal component analysis from the prior 4D-MRI. The weighting coefficients of the motion components are solved by matching the corresponding 2D-slice of the VC-MRI with the on-board undersampled 2D-cine MRI acquired. Undersampled Cartesian and radial k-space acquisition strategies were investigated. The effects of k-space sampling percentage (SP) and distribution, tumor sizes and noise on the VC-MRI estimation were studied. The VC-MRI estimation was evaluated using XCAT simulation of lung cancer patients and data from liver cancer patients. Volume percent difference (VPD) and Center of Mass Shift (COMS) of the tumor volumes and tumor tracking errors were calculated. Results. For XCAT, VPD/COMS were 11.93  ±  2.37%/0.90  ±  0.27 mm and 11.53  ±  1.47%/0.85  ±  0.20 mm among all scenarios with Cartesian sampling (SP  =  10%) and radial sampling (21 spokes, SP  =  5.2%), respectively. When tumor size decreased, higher sampling rate achieved more accurate VC-MRI than lower sampling rate. VC-MRI was robust against noise levels up to SNR  =  20. For patient data, the tumor tracking errors in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior and lateral (LAT) directions were 0.46  ±  0.20 mm, 0.56  ±  0.17 mm and 0.23  ±  0.16 mm, respectively, for Cartesian-based sampling with SP  =  20% and 0.60  ±  0.19 mm, 0.56  ±  0.22 mm and 0.42  ±  0.15 mm, respectively, for

  15. Procedural Learning and Associative Memory Mechanisms Contribute to Contextual Cueing: Evidence from fMRI and Eye-Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manelis, Anna; Reder, Lynne M.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of eye tracking and fMRI in a contextual cueing task, we explored the mechanisms underlying the facilitation of visual search for repeated spatial configurations. When configurations of distractors were repeated, greater activation in the right hippocampus corresponded to greater reductions in the number of saccades to locate…

  16. A benchmark for comparison of cell tracking algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Maška (Martin); V. Ulman (Vladimír); K. Svoboda; P. Matula (Pavel); P. Matula (Petr); C. Ederra (Cristina); A. Urbiola (Ainhoa); T. España (Tomás); R. Venkatesan (Rajkumar); D.M.W. Balak (Deepak); P. Karas (Pavel); T. Bolcková (Tereza); M. Štreitová (Markéta); C. Carthel (Craig); S. Coraluppi (Stefano); N. Harder (Nathalie); K. Rohr (Karl); K.E.G. Magnusson (Klas E.); J. Jaldén (Joakim); H.M. Blau (Helen); O.M. Dzyubachyk (Oleh); P. Křížek (Pavel); G.M. Hagen (Guy); D. Pastor-Escuredo (David); D. Jimenez-Carretero (Daniel); M.J. Ledesma-Carbayo (Maria); A. Muñoz-Barrutia (Arrate); E. Meijering (Erik); M. Kozubek (Michal); C. Ortiz-De-Solorzano (Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMotivation: Automatic tracking of cells in multidimensional time-lapse fluorescence microscopy is an important task in many biomedical applications. A novel framework for objective evaluation of cell tracking algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International

  17. Predictive saccades in children and adults: A combined fMRI and eye tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Lukasova

    Full Text Available Saccades were assessed in 21 adults (age 24 years, SD = 4 and 15 children (age 11 years, SD = 1, using combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and eye-tracking. Subjects visually tracked a point on a horizontal line in four conditions: time and position predictable task (PRED, position predictable (pPRED, time predictable (tPRED and visually guided saccades (SAC. Both groups in the PRED but not in pPRED, tPRED and SAC produced predictive saccades with latency below 80 ms. In task versus group comparisons, children's showed less efficient learning compared to adults for predictive saccades (adults = 48%, children = 34%, p = 0.05. In adults brain activation was found in the frontal and occipital regions in the PRED, in the intraparietal sulcus in pPRED and in the frontal eye field, posterior intraparietal sulcus and medial regions in the tPRED task. Group-task interaction was found in the supplementary eye field and visual cortex in the PRED task, and the frontal cortex including the right frontal eye field and left frontal pole, in the pPRED condition. These results indicate that, the basic visuomotor circuitry is present in both adults and children, but fine-tuning of the activation according to the task temporal and spatial demand mature late in child development.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging with superparamagnetic iron oxide fails to track the long-term fate of mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Cheng, Huaibing; Lu, Minjie; Liu, Qiong; Chen, Xiuyu; Yin, Gang; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Lianfeng; Meng, Xianmin; Tang, Yue; Zhao, Shihua

    2015-03-12

    MRI for in vivo stem cell tracking remains controversial. Here we tested the hypothesis that MRI can track the long-term fate of the superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles labelled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) following intramyocardially injection in AMI rats. MSCs (1 × 10(6)) from male rats doubly labeled with SPIO and DAPI were injected 2 weeks after myocardial infarction. The control group received cell-free media injection. In vivo serial MRI was performed at 24 hours before cell delivery (baseline), 3 days, 1, 2, and 4 weeks after cell delivery, respectively. Serial follow-up MRI demonstrated large persistent intramyocardial signal-voids representing SPIO during the follow-up of 4 weeks, and MSCs did not moderate the left ventricular dysfunction. The TUNEL analysis confirmed that MSCs engrafted underwent apoptosis. The histopathological studies revealed that the site of cell injection was infiltrated by inflammatory cells progressively and the iron-positive cells were macrophages identified by CD68 staining, but very few or no DAPI-positive stem cells at 4 weeks after cells transplantation. The presence of engrafted cells was confirmed by real-time PCR, which showed that the amount of Y-chromosome-specific SRY gene was consistent with the results. MRI may not reliably track the long-term fate of SPIO-labeled MSCs engraftment in heart.

  19. Track structure model of cell damage in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenological track-structure model of cell damage is discussed. A description of the application of the track-structure model with the NASA Langley transport code for laboratory and space radiation is given. Comparisons to experimental results for cell survival during exposure to monoenergetic, heavy-ion beams are made. The model is also applied to predict cell damage rates and relative biological effectiveness for deep-space exposures.

  20. Quantification of global myocardial function by cine MRI deformable registration-based analysis: Comparison with MR feature tracking and speckle-tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamacie, Mariana M; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Hanneman, Kate; Greiser, Andreas; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Ward, Richard; Wintersperger, Bernd J

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate deformable registration algorithms (DRA)-based quantification of cine steady-state free-precession (SSFP) for myocardial strain assessment in comparison with feature-tracking (FT) and speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE). Data sets of 28 patients/10 volunteers, undergoing same-day 1.5T cardiac MRI and echocardiography were included. LV global longitudinal (GLS), circumferential (GCS) and radial (GRS) peak systolic strain were assessed on cine SSFP data using commercially available FT algorithms and prototype DRA-based algorithms. STE was applied as standard of reference for accuracy, precision and intra-/interobserver reproducibility testing. DRA showed narrower limits of agreement compared to STE for GLS (-4.0 [-0.9,-7.9]) and GCS (-5.1 [1.1,-11.2]) than FT (3.2 [11.2,-4.9]; 3.8 [13.9,-6.3], respectively). While both DRA and FT demonstrated significant differences to STE for GLS and GCS (all pcine MRI. • Inverse DRA demonstrated superior reproducibility compared to feature-tracking (FT) methods. • Cine MR DRA and FT analysis demonstrate differences to speckle-tracking echocardiography • DRA demonstrated better correlation with STE than FT for MR-derived global strain data.

  1. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells as an effective vehicle for tracking the GFP gene marker using magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Mascheri, N; Dharmakumar, R; Fan, Z; Paunesku, T; Woloschak, G; Li, D

    2010-01-01

    Background Detection of a gene using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is hindered by the magnetic resonance (MR) targeting gene technique. Therefore it may be advantageous to image gene-expressing cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles by MRI. Methods The GFP-R3230Ac (GFP) cell line was incubated for 24 h using SPIO nanoparticles at a concentration of 20 μg Fe/mL. Cell samples were prepared for iron content analysis and cell function evaluation. The labeled cells were imaged using fluorescent microscopy and MRI. Results SPIO was used to label GFP cells effectively, with no effects on cell function and GFP expression. Iron-loaded GFP cells were successfully imaged with both fluorescent microscopy and T2*-weighted MRI. Prussian blue staining showed intracellular iron accumulation in the cells. All cells were labeled (100% labeling efficiency). The average iron content per cell was 4.75±0.11 pg Fe/cell (P<0.05 versus control). Discussion This study demonstrates that the GFP expression of cells is not altered by the SPIO labeling process. SPIO-labeled GFP cells can be visualized by MRI; therefore, GFP, a gene marker, was tracked indirectly with the SPIO-loaded cells using MRI. The technique holds promise for monitoring the temporal and spatial migration of cells with a gene marker and enhancing the understanding of cell- and gene-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:18956269

  2. Automated Tracking of Cell Migration with Rapid Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuChez, Brian J

    2017-09-01

    Cell migration is essential for many biological processes including development, wound healing, and metastasis. However, studying cell migration often requires the time-consuming and labor-intensive task of manually tracking cells. To accelerate the task of obtaining coordinate positions of migrating cells, we have developed a graphical user interface (GUI) capable of automating the tracking of fluorescently labeled nuclei. This GUI provides an intuitive user interface that makes automated tracking accessible to researchers with no image-processing experience or familiarity with particle-tracking approaches. Using this GUI, users can interactively determine a minimum of four parameters to identify fluorescently labeled cells and automate acquisition of cell trajectories. Additional features allow for batch processing of numerous time-lapse images, curation of unwanted tracks, and subsequent statistical analysis of tracked cells. Statistical outputs allow users to evaluate migratory phenotypes, including cell speed, distance, displacement, and persistence, as well as measures of directional movement, such as forward migration index (FMI) and angular displacement. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. MRI of islet cell tumors of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtomo, Kuni; Itai, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Koki; Kokubo, Taka; Yashiro, Naofumi; Iio, Masahiro; Atomi, Yu

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in five patients with islet cell tumors of the pancreas, using 0.35 T and 1.5 T superconductive magnets. MRI identified tumors in 3 patients. The tumors seen in the 3 patients appeared as areas of higher signal intensity than the liver on spin-echo (SE) images with repetition time of 1,600 msec/echo time of 35 or 70 msec, and as areas of similar or lower intensity on SE 400/35 or 70 images. The tumor imaged by SE techniques with 1,600/35 msec, 400/35 msec, and 1,600/35 or 70 msec in one patient was manifested by prolongation of T1 and T2, as compared with the liver. Tumors in the remaining two patients, which were not detected on MRI, were 15 mm or smaller. MRI remains to be improved in the visualization of small lesions. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. MRI mediated, non-invasive tracking of intratumoral distribution of nanocarriers in rat glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Park, Jaekeun; Agarwal, Abhiruchi; Patel, Vijal; Zhao Fuqiang; Hu Xiaoping; Bellamkonda, Ravi V [Wallace H Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Annapragada, Ananth V [School of Health Information Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center, 7000 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)], E-mail: ravi@gatech.edu

    2008-08-06

    Nanocarrier mediated therapy of gliomas has shown promise. The success of systemic nanocarrier-based chemotherapy is critically dependent on the so-called leaky vasculature to permit drug extravasation across the blood-brain barrier. Yet, the extent of vascular permeability in individual tumors varies widely, resulting in a correspondingly wide range of responses to the therapy. However, there exist no tools currently for rationally determining whether tumor blood vessels are amenable to nanocarrier mediated therapy in an individualized, patient specific manner today. To address this need for brain tumor therapy, we have developed a multifunctional 100 nm scale liposomal agent encapsulating a gadolinium-based contrast agent for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with prolonged blood circulation. Using a 9.4 T MRI system, we were able to track the intratumoral distribution of the gadolinium-loaded nanocarrier in a rat glioma model for a period of three days due to improved magnetic properties of the contrast agent being packaged in a nanocarrier. Such a nanocarrier provides a tool for non-invasively assessing the suitability of tumors for nanocarrier mediated therapy and then optimizing the treatment protocol for each individual tumor. Additionally, the ability to image the tumor in high resolution can potentially constitute a surgical planning tool for tumor resection.

  5. Stem Cell Tracking Technologies for Neurological Regenerative Medicine Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongtao Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing field of stem cell therapy is moving toward clinical trials in a variety of applications, particularly for neurological diseases. However, this translation of cell therapies into humans has prompted a need to create innovative and breakthrough methods for stem cell tracing, to explore the migration routes and its reciprocity with microenvironment targets in the body, to monitor and track the outcome after stem cell transplantation therapy, and to track the distribution and cell viability of transplanted cells noninvasively and longitudinally. Recently, a larger number of cell tracking methods in vivo were developed and applied in animals and humans, including magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging. This review has been intended to summarize the current use of those imaging tools in tracking stem cells, detailing their main features and drawbacks, including image resolution, tissue penetrating depth, and biosafety aspects. Finally, we address that multimodality imaging method will be a more potential tracking tool in the future clinical application.

  6. Clinical feasibility and validation of 3D principal strain analysis from cine MRI: comparison to 2D strain by MRI and 3D speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriano, Alessandro; Heydari, Bobak; Narous, Mariam; Exner, Derek V; Mikami, Yoko; Attwood, Monica M; Tyberg, John V; Lydell, Carmen P; Howarth, Andrew G; Fine, Nowell M; White, James A

    2017-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) strain analysis is constrained by geometry-dependent reference directions of deformation (i.e. radial, circumferential, and longitudinal) following the assumption of cylindrical chamber architecture. Three-dimensional (3D) principal strain analysis may overcome such limitations by referencing intrinsic (i.e. principal) directions of deformation. This study aimed to demonstrate clinical feasibility of 3D principal strain analysis from routine 2D cine MRI with validation to strain from 2D tagged cine analysis and 3D speckle tracking echocardiography. Thirty-one patients undergoing cardiac MRI were studied. 3D strain was measured from routine, multi-planar 2D cine SSFP images using custom software designed to apply 4D deformation fields to 3D cardiac models to derive principal strain. Comparisons of strain estimates versus those by 2D tagged cine, 2D non-tagged cine (feature tracking), and 3D speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) were performed. Mean age was 51 ± 14 (36% female). Mean LV ejection fraction was 66 ± 10% (range 37-80%). 3D principal strain analysis was feasible in all subjects and showed high inter- and intra-observer reproducibility (ICC range 0.83-0.97 and 0.83-0.98, respectively-p analysis is feasible using routine, multi-planar 2D cine MRI and shows high reproducibility with strong correlations to 2D conventional strain analysis and 3D STE-based analysis. Given its independence from geometry-related directions of deformation this technique may offer unique benefit for the detection and prognostication of myocardial disease, and warrants expanded investigation.

  7. Abnormal diffusion-weighted MRI in medulloblastoma: does it reflect small cell histology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsenas, A.L.; Roth, T.C.; Manness, W.K.; Faerber, E.N.

    1999-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with the classic CT and MRI findings of medulloblastoma and the unusual finding of increased signal on diffusion MRI. The small-cell histology of medulloblastoma may account for the increased signal seen on diffusion MRI. Diffusion MRI with echoplanar technique may be useful in evaluation of these tumors and metastatic disease. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of an image-based tracking workflow with Kalman filtering for automatic image plane alignment in interventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, M; Cuvillon, L; Breton, E; de Matheli, M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a workflow for magnetic resonance (MR) image plane alignment based on tracking in real-time MR images was introduced. The workflow is based on a tracking device composed of 2 resonant micro-coils and a passive marker, and allows for tracking of the passive marker in clinical real-time images and automatic (re-)initialization using the microcoils. As the Kalman filter has proven its benefit as an estimator and predictor, it is well suited for use in tracking applications. In this paper, a Kalman filter is integrated in the previously developed workflow in order to predict position and orientation of the tracking device. Measurement noise covariances of the Kalman filter are dynamically changed in order to take into account that, according to the image plane orientation, only a subset of the 3D pose components is available. The improved tracking performance of the Kalman extended workflow could be quantified in simulation results. Also, a first experiment in the MRI scanner was performed but without quantitative results yet.

  9. Detecting and Tracking Nonfluorescent Nanoparticles Probes in Live Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning

    2012-01-17

    Precisely imaging and tracking dynamic biological processes in live cells are crucial for both fundamental research in life sciences and biomedical applications. Nonfluorescent nanoparticles are emerging as important optical probes in live-cell imaging because of their excellent photostability, large optical cross sections, and low cytotoxicity. Here, we provide a review of recent development in optical imaging of nonfluorescent nanoparticle probes and their applications in dynamic tracking and biosensing in live cells. A brief discussion on cytotoxicity of nanoparticle probes is also provided.

  10. Dynamically constrained pipeline for tracking neural progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders; Holm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    . A mitosis detector constructed from empirical observations of cells in a pre-mitotic state interacts with the graph formulation to dynamically allow for cell mitosis when appropriate. Track consistency is ensured by introducing pragmatic constraints and the notion of blob states. We validate the proposed...

  11. Tracking plasma cell differentiation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Katrin; Oehme, Laura; Zehentmeier, Sandra; Zhang, Yang; Niesner, Raluca; Hauser, Anja E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cells play a crucial role for the humoral immune response as they represent the body's factories for antibody production. The differentiation from a B cell into a plasma cell is controlled by a complex transcriptional network and happens within secondary lymphoid organs. Based on their lifetime, two types of antibody secreting cells can be distinguished: Short-lived plasma cells are located in extrafollicular sites of secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph node medullary cords and the splenic red pulp. A fraction of plasmablasts migrate from secondary lymphoid organs to the bone marrow where they can become long-lived plasma cells. Bone marrow plasma cells reside in special microanatomical environments termed survival niches, which provide factors promoting their longevity. Reticular stromal cells producing the chemokine CXCL12, which is known to attract plasmablasts to the bone marrow but also to promote plasma cell survival, play a crucial role in the maintenance of these niches. In addition, hematopoietic cells are contributing to the niches by providing other soluble survival factors. Here, we review the current knowledge on the factors involved in plasma cell differentiation, their localization and migration. We also give an overview on what is known regarding the maintenance of long lived plasma cells in survival niches of the bone marrow. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  12. Synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles for tracking of stem cells and dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Sebastian; Fernandes, Fabiana; Sanroman, Laura; Hodenius, Michael; Lang, Claus; Himmelreich, Uwe; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Schueler, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Accurate delivery of cells to target organs is critical for success of cell-based therapies with stem cells or immune cells such as antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DC). Labeling with contrast agents before implantation provides a powerful means for monitoring cellular migration using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we investigated the uptake of fully synthesized or bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into hematopoietic Flt3 + stem cells and DC from mouse bone marrow. We show that (i) uptake of both synthetic and biogenic nanoparticles into cells endow magnetic activity and (ii) low numbers of MNP-loaded cells are readily detected by MRI.

  13. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  14. Track segment studies with Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Survival curves of near-diploid and near-tetraploid Chinese hamster cell cultures following irradiation by an 241 Am α source indicate different growth rates for the two clones. Possible reasons for the difference are discussed

  15. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 35 D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Grüttner, Cordula [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Warnemünde, D-18115 Rostock (Germany); Kühn, Jens-Peter [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald University Medical Center, D-17475 Greifswald (Germany); Frerich, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.frerich@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 35 D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time. - Highlights: • Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) were labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles influenced the adipogenic differentiation of ASC. • Labeled cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and implanted in SCID mice. • Nanoparticle-labeled cells were visualized in vivo using T2-weighted sequences. • Volume of collagen scaffolds was decreased over time after implantation.

  16. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J.; Grüttner, Cordula; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Frerich, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time. - Highlights: • Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) were labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles influenced the adipogenic differentiation of ASC. • Labeled cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and implanted in SCID mice. • Nanoparticle-labeled cells were visualized in vivo using T2-weighted sequences. • Volume of collagen scaffolds was decreased over time after implantation

  17. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging tracking of human adipose derived stromal cells within three-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lalande

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For bone tissue engineering, human Adipose Derived Stem Cells (hADSCs are proposed to be associated with a scaffold for promoting bone regeneration. After implantation, cellularised scaffolds require a non-invasive method for monitoring their fate in vivo. The purpose of this study was to use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI-based tracking of these cells, labelled with magnetic agents for in vivo longitudinal assessment. hADSCs were isolated from adipose tissue and labelled with USPIO-rhodamine (Ultrasmall SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide. USPIO internalisation, absence of toxicity towards hADSCs, and osteogenic differentiation of the labelled cells were evaluated in standard culture conditions. Labelled cells were then seeded within a 3D porous polysaccharide-based scaffold and imaged in vitro using fluorescence microscopy and MRI. Cellularised scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and MRI analyses were performed from 1 to 28 d after implantation. In vitro, no effect of USPIO labelling on cell viability and osteogenic differentiation was found. USPIO were efficiently internalised by hADSCs and generated a high T2* contrast. In vivo MRI revealed that hADSCs remain detectable until 28 d after implantation and could migrate from the scaffold and colonise the area around it. These data suggested that this scaffold might behave as a cell carrier capable of both holding a cell fraction and delivering cells to the site of implantation. In addition, the present findings evidenced that MRI is a reliable technique to validate cell-seeding procedures in 3D porous scaffolds, and to assess the fate of hADSCs transplanted in vivo.

  19. Advective isotope transport by mixing cell and particle tracking algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezcan, L.; Meric, T.

    1999-01-01

    The 'mixing cell' algorithm of the environmental isotope data evaluation is integrated with the three dimensional finite difference ground water flow model (MODFLOW) to simulate the advective isotope transport and the approach is compared with the 'particle tracking' algorithm of the MOC3D, that simulates three-dimensional solute transport with the method of characteristics technique

  20. Tracking hypoxic signaling within encapsulated cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O

    2011-12-16

    In Diabetes mellitus type 1, autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells results in loss of insulin production and potentially lethal hyperglycemia. As an alternative treatment option to exogenous insulin injection, transplantation of functional pancreatic tissue has been explored. This approach offers the promise of a more natural, long-term restoration of normoglycemia. Protection of the donor tissue from the host's immune system is required to prevent rejection and encapsulation is a method used to help achieve this aim. Biologically-derived materials, such as alginate and agarose, have been the traditional choice for capsule construction but may induce inflammation or fibrotic overgrowth which can impede nutrient and oxygen transport. Alternatively, synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels are non-degrading, easily functionalized, available at high purity, have controllable pore size, and are extremely biocompatible. As an additional benefit, PEG hydrogels may be formed rapidly in a simple photo-crosslinking reaction that does not require application of non-physiological temperatures. Such a procedure is described here. In the crosslinking reaction, UV degradation of the photoinitiator, 1-[4-(2-Hydroxyethoxy)-phenyl]-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-1-propane-1-one (Irgacure 2959), produces free radicals which attack the vinyl carbon-carbon double bonds of dimethacrylated PEG (PEGDM) inducing crosslinking at the chain ends. Crosslinking can be achieved within 10 minutes. PEG hydrogels constructed in such a manner have been shown to favorably support cells, and the low photoinitiator concentration and brief exposure to UV irradiation is not detrimental to viability and function of the encapsulated tissue. While we methacrylate our PEG with the method described below, PEGDM can also be directly purchased from vendors such as Sigma. An inherent consequence of encapsulation is isolation of the cells from a vascular network. Supply of nutrients, notably oxygen

  1. Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells for MRI contrast enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedlund A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anna Hedlund1,2, Maria Ahrén3, Håkan Gustafsson1,2, Natalia Abrikossova3, Marcel Warntjes2,4, Jan-Ingvar Jönsson5, Kajsa Uvdal3, Maria Engström1,21Division of Radiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, 2Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, 3Division of Molecular Surface Physics and Nanoscience, Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, 4Division of Clinical Physiology, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Hematology Unit, Linköping University, Linköping, SwedenAbstract: As the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI broadens, the importance of having specific and efficient contrast agents increases and in recent time there has been a huge development in the fields of molecular imaging and intracellular markers. Previous studies have shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 nanoparticles generate higher relaxivity than currently available Gd chelates: In addition, the Gd2O3 nanoparticles have promising properties for MRI cell tracking. The aim of the present work was to study cell labeling with Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hematopoietic cells and to improve techniques for monitoring hematopoietic stem cell migration by MRI. Particle uptake was studied in two cell lines: the hematopoietic progenitor cell line Ba/F3 and the monocytic cell line THP-1. Cells were incubated with Gd2O3 nanoparticles and it was investigated whether the transfection agent protamine sulfate increased the particle uptake. Treated cells were examined by electron microscopy and MRI, and analyzed for particle content by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. Results showed that particles were intracellular, however, sparsely in Ba/F3. The relaxation times were shortened with increasing particle concentration. Relaxivities, r1 and r2 at 1.5 T and 21°C, for Gd2O3 nanoparticles in different cell samples were 3.6–5.3 s-1 mM-1 and 9.6–17.2 s-1 mM-1

  2. Tracking the Re-organization of Motor Functions After Disconnective Surgery: A Longitudinal fMRI and DTI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rosazza

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mechanisms of motor plasticity are critical to maintain motor functions after cerebral damage. This study explores the mechanisms of motor reorganization occurring before and after surgery in four patients with drug-refractory epilepsy candidate to disconnective surgery.Methods: We studied four patients with early damage, who underwent tailored hemispheric surgery in adulthood, removing the cortical motor areas and disconnecting the corticospinal tract (CST from the affected hemisphere. Motor functions were assessed clinically, with functional MRI (fMRI tasks of arm and leg movement and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI before and after surgery with assessments of up to 3 years. Quantifications of fMRI motor activations and DTI fractional anisotropy (FA color maps were performed to assess the lateralization of motor network. We hypothesized that lateralization of motor circuits assessed preoperatively with fMRI and DTI was useful to evaluate the motor outcome in these patients.Results: In two cases preoperative DTI-tractography did not reconstruct the CST, and FA-maps were strongly asymmetric. In the other two cases, the affected CST appeared reduced compared to the contralateral one, with modest asymmetry in the FA-maps. fMRI showed different degrees of lateralization of the motor network and the SMA of the intact hemisphere was mostly engaged in all cases. After surgery, patients with a strongly lateralized motor network showed a stable performance. By contrast, a patient with a more bilateral pattern showed worsening of the upper limb function. For all cases, fMRI activations shifted to the intact hemisphere. Structural alterations of motor circuits, observed with FA values, continued beyond 1 year after surgery.Conclusion: In our case series fMRI and DTI could track the longitudinal reorganization of motor functions. In these four patients the more the paretic limbs recruited the intact hemisphere in primary motor and associative

  3. Tracking the Re-organization of Motor Functions After Disconnective Surgery: A Longitudinal fMRI and DTI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosazza, Cristina; Deleo, Francesco; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Antelmi, Luigi; Tringali, Giovanni; Didato, Giuseppe; Bruzzone, Maria G; Villani, Flavio; Ghielmetti, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Mechanisms of motor plasticity are critical to maintain motor functions after cerebral damage. This study explores the mechanisms of motor reorganization occurring before and after surgery in four patients with drug-refractory epilepsy candidate to disconnective surgery. Methods: We studied four patients with early damage, who underwent tailored hemispheric surgery in adulthood, removing the cortical motor areas and disconnecting the corticospinal tract (CST) from the affected hemisphere. Motor functions were assessed clinically, with functional MRI (fMRI) tasks of arm and leg movement and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) before and after surgery with assessments of up to 3 years. Quantifications of fMRI motor activations and DTI fractional anisotropy (FA) color maps were performed to assess the lateralization of motor network. We hypothesized that lateralization of motor circuits assessed preoperatively with fMRI and DTI was useful to evaluate the motor outcome in these patients. Results: In two cases preoperative DTI-tractography did not reconstruct the CST, and FA-maps were strongly asymmetric. In the other two cases, the affected CST appeared reduced compared to the contralateral one, with modest asymmetry in the FA-maps. fMRI showed different degrees of lateralization of the motor network and the SMA of the intact hemisphere was mostly engaged in all cases. After surgery, patients with a strongly lateralized motor network showed a stable performance. By contrast, a patient with a more bilateral pattern showed worsening of the upper limb function. For all cases, fMRI activations shifted to the intact hemisphere. Structural alterations of motor circuits, observed with FA values, continued beyond 1 year after surgery. Conclusion: In our case series fMRI and DTI could track the longitudinal reorganization of motor functions. In these four patients the more the paretic limbs recruited the intact hemisphere in primary motor and associative areas, the

  4. Real-Time Correction By Optical Tracking with Integrated Geometric Distortion Correction for Reducing Motion Artifacts in fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, David J.

    Artifacts caused by head motion are a substantial source of error in fMRI that limits its use in neuroscience research and clinical settings. Real-time scan-plane correction by optical tracking has been shown to correct slice misalignment and non-linear spin-history artifacts, however residual artifacts due to dynamic magnetic field non-uniformity may remain in the data. A recently developed correction technique, PLACE, can correct for absolute geometric distortion using the complex image data from two EPI images, with slightly shifted k-space trajectories. We present a correction approach that integrates PLACE into a real-time scan-plane update system by optical tracking, applied to a tissue-equivalent phantom undergoing complex motion and an fMRI finger tapping experiment with overt head motion to induce dynamic field non-uniformity. Experiments suggest that including volume by volume geometric distortion correction by PLACE can suppress dynamic geometric distortion artifacts in a phantom and in vivo and provide more robust activation maps.

  5. Human tumor cell proliferation evaluated using manganese-enhanced MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod D Braun

    Full Text Available Tumor cell proliferation can depend on calcium entry across the cell membrane. As a first step toward the development of a non-invasive test of the extent of tumor cell proliferation in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that tumor cell uptake of a calcium surrogate, Mn(2+ [measured with manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI], is linked to proliferation rate in vitro.Proliferation rates were determined in vitro in three different human tumor cell lines: C918 and OCM-1 human uveal melanomas and PC-3 prostate carcinoma. Cells growing at different average proliferation rates were exposed to 1 mM MnCl(2 for one hour and then thoroughly washed. MEMRI R(1 values (longitudinal relaxation rates, which have a positive linear relationship with Mn(2+ concentration, were then determined from cell pellets. Cell cycle distributions were determined using propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. All three lines showed Mn(2+-induced increases in R(1 compared to cells not exposed to Mn(2+. C918 and PC-3 cells each showed a significant, positive correlation between MEMRI R(1 values and proliferation rate (p≤0.005, while OCM-1 cells showed no significant correlation. Preliminary, general modeling of these positive relationships suggested that pellet R(1 for the PC-3 cells, but not for the C918 cells, could be adequately described by simply accounting for changes in the distribution of the cell cycle-dependent subpopulations in the pellet.These data clearly demonstrate the tumor-cell dependent nature of the relationship between proliferation and calcium influx, and underscore the usefulness of MEMRI as a non-invasive method for investigating this link. MEMRI is applicable to study tumors in vivo, and the present results raise the possibility of evaluating proliferation parameters of some tumor types in vivo using MEMRI.

  6. Modeling of the bony pelvis from MRI using a multi-atlas AE-SDM for registration and tracking in image-guided robotic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qinquan; Chang, Ping-Lin; Rueckert, Daniel; Ali, S Mohammed; Cohen, Daniel; Pratt, Philip; Mayer, Erik; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Edwards, Philip Eddie

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental challenge in the development of image-guided surgical systems is alignment of the preoperative model to the operative view of the patient. This is achieved by finding corresponding structures in the preoperative scans and on the live surgical scene. In robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), the most readily visible structure is the bone of the pelvic rim. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for prostate cancer detection and staging, but extraction of bone from MRI is difficult and very time consuming to achieve manually. We present a robust and fully automated multi-atlas pipeline for bony pelvis segmentation from MRI, using a MRI appearance embedding statistical deformation model (AE-SDM). The statistical deformation model is built using the node positions of deformations obtained from hierarchical registrations of full pelvis CT images. For datasets with corresponding CT and MRI images, we can transform the MRI into CT SDM space. MRI appearance can then be used to improve the combined MRI/CT atlas to MRI registration using SDM constraints. We can use this model to segment the bony pelvis in a new MRI image where there is no CT available. A multi-atlas segmentation algorithm is introduced which incorporates MRI AE-SDMs guidance. We evaluated the method on 19 subjects with corresponding MRI and manually segmented CT datasets by performing a leave-one-out study. Several metrics are used to quantify the overlap between the automatic and manual segmentations. Compared to the manual gold standard segmentations, our robust segmentation method produced an average surface distance 1.24±0.27mm, which outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for MRI bony pelvis segmentation. We also show that the resulting surface can be tracked in the endoscopic view in near real time using dense visual tracking methods. Results are presented on a simulation and a real clinical RALP case. Tracking is accurate to 0.13mm over 700 frames

  7. MRI Findings of Suprasellar Germ Cell Tumors in Two Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laurie; Tensley, Michelle; Drost, Wm Tod; Koivisto, Christopher; Oglesbee, Michael

    A 4 yr old border collie presenting for mydriasis and decreased mentation and a 7 yr old Boston terrier presenting for obtundation, head tilt, and paraparesis were both evaluated using MRI. Findings in both included mass lesions of the thalamus and brainstem that were hypo- to isointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images with regions of hypointensity, and robust contrast enhancement and displacement of adjacent structures. Postmortem histopathology findings, tumor location, and a mixed pattern of epithelial cell differentiation were consistent with germ cell tumor in both cases. Germ cell tumor of the suprasellar region is an infrequently reported neoplasm of dogs and imaging findings in this species have not been well described in the prior literature.

  8. Poly (dopamine) coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocluster for noninvasive labeling, tracking, and targeted delivery of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Naishun; Wu, Ming; Pan, Fan; Lin, Jiumao; Li, Zuanfang; Zhang, Da; Wang, Yingchao; Zheng, Youshi; Peng, Jun; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Tracking and monitoring of cells in vivo after transplantation can provide crucial information for stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with contrast agents is believed to be an effective and non-invasive technique for cell tracking in living bodies. However, commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) applied to label cells suffer from shortages such as potential toxicity, low labeling efficiency, and low contrast enhancing. Herein, the adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were efficiently labeled with SPIONs coated with poly (dopamine) (SPIONs cluster@PDA), without affecting their viability, proliferation, apoptosis, surface marker expression, as well as their self-renew ability and multi-differentiation potential. The labeled cells transplanted into the mice through tail intravenous injection exhibited a negative enhancement of the MRI signal in the damaged liver-induced by carbon tetrachloride, and subsequently these homed ADSCs with SPIONs cluster@PDA labeling exhibited excellent repair effects to the damaged liver. Moreover, the enhanced target-homing to tissue of interest and repair effects of SPIONs cluster@PDA-labeled ADSCs could be achieved by use of external magnetic field in the excisional skin wound mice model. Therefore, we provide a facile, safe, noninvasive and sensitive method for external magnetic field targeted delivery and MRI based tracking of transplanted cells in vivo.

  9. Poly (dopamine) coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocluster for noninvasive labeling, tracking, and targeted delivery of adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Naishun; Wu, Ming; Pan, Fan; Lin, Jiumao; Li, Zuanfang; Zhang, Da; Wang, Yingchao; Zheng, Youshi; Peng, Jun; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-01-05

    Tracking and monitoring of cells in vivo after transplantation can provide crucial information for stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with contrast agents is believed to be an effective and non-invasive technique for cell tracking in living bodies. However, commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) applied to label cells suffer from shortages such as potential toxicity, low labeling efficiency, and low contrast enhancing. Herein, the adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were efficiently labeled with SPIONs coated with poly (dopamine) (SPIONs cluster@PDA), without affecting their viability, proliferation, apoptosis, surface marker expression, as well as their self-renew ability and multi-differentiation potential. The labeled cells transplanted into the mice through tail intravenous injection exhibited a negative enhancement of the MRI signal in the damaged liver-induced by carbon tetrachloride, and subsequently these homed ADSCs with SPIONs cluster@PDA labeling exhibited excellent repair effects to the damaged liver. Moreover, the enhanced target-homing to tissue of interest and repair effects of SPIONs cluster@PDA-labeled ADSCs could be achieved by use of external magnetic field in the excisional skin wound mice model. Therefore, we provide a facile, safe, noninvasive and sensitive method for external magnetic field targeted delivery and MRI based tracking of transplanted cells in vivo.

  10. A track-event theory of cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. In this work a simple model for cell survival which is valid also at high dose is developed from Poisson statistics. An event is defined by two double strand breaks (DSB) on the same or different chromosomes. An event is always lethal due to direct lethal damage or lethal binary misrepair by the formation of chromosome aberrations. Two different mechanisms can produce events: one-track events (OTE) or two-track-events (TTE). The target for an OTE is always a lethal event, the target for an TTE is one DSB. At least two TTEs on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event. Both, the OTE and the TTE are statistically independent. From the stochastic nature of cell kill which is described by the Poisson distribution the cell survival probability was derived. It was shown that a solution based on Poisson statistics exists for cell survival. It exhibits exponential cell survival at high dose and a finite gradient of cell survival at vanishing dose, which is in agreement with experimental cell studies. The model fits the experimental data nearly as well as the three-parameter formula of Hug-Kellerer and is only based on two free parameters. It is shown that the LQ formalism is an approximation of the model derived in this work. It could be also shown that the derived model predicts a fractionated cell survival experiment better than the LQ-model. It was shown that cell survival can be described with a simple analytical formula on the basis of Poisson statistics. This solution represents in the limit of large dose the typical exponential behavior and predicts cell survival after fractionated dose application better than the LQ-model.

  11. A track-event theory of cell survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Physics; Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-01

    When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. In this work a simple model for cell survival which is valid also at high dose is developed from Poisson statistics. An event is defined by two double strand breaks (DSB) on the same or different chromosomes. An event is always lethal due to direct lethal damage or lethal binary misrepair by the formation of chromosome aberrations. Two different mechanisms can produce events: one-track events (OTE) or two-track-events (TTE). The target for an OTE is always a lethal event, the target for an TTE is one DSB. At least two TTEs on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event. Both, the OTE and the TTE are statistically independent. From the stochastic nature of cell kill which is described by the Poisson distribution the cell survival probability was derived. It was shown that a solution based on Poisson statistics exists for cell survival. It exhibits exponential cell survival at high dose and a finite gradient of cell survival at vanishing dose, which is in agreement with experimental cell studies. The model fits the experimental data nearly as well as the three-parameter formula of Hug-Kellerer and is only based on two free parameters. It is shown that the LQ formalism is an approximation of the model derived in this work. It could be also shown that the derived model predicts a fractionated cell survival experiment better than the LQ-model. It was shown that cell survival can be described with a simple analytical formula on the basis of Poisson statistics. This solution represents in the limit of large dose the typical exponential behavior and predicts cell survival after fractionated dose application better than the LQ-model.

  12. Untangling cell tracks: Quantifying cell migration by time lapse image data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Carl-Magnus; Medyukhina, Anna; Belyaev, Ivan; Al-Zaben, Naim; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2018-03-01

    Automated microscopy has given researchers access to great amounts of live cell imaging data from in vitro and in vivo experiments. Much focus has been put on extracting cell tracks from such data using a plethora of segmentation and tracking algorithms, but further analysis is normally required to draw biologically relevant conclusions. Such relevant conclusions may be whether the migration is directed or not, whether the population has homogeneous or heterogeneous migration patterns. This review focuses on the analysis of cell migration data that are extracted from time lapse images. We discuss a range of measures and models used to analyze cell tracks independent of the biological system or the way the tracks were obtained. For single-cell migration, we focus on measures and models giving examples of biological systems where they have been applied, for example, migration of bacteria, fibroblasts, and immune cells. For collective migration, we describe the model systems wound healing, neural crest migration, and Drosophila gastrulation and discuss methods for cell migration within these systems. We also discuss the role of the extracellular matrix and subsequent differences between track analysis in vitro and in vivo. Besides methods and measures, we are putting special focus on the need for openly available data and code, as well as a lack of common vocabulary in cell track analysis. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  13. MRI with DWI for the Detection of Posttreatment Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Why Morphologic MRI Criteria Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailianou, A; Mundada, P; De Perrot, T; Pusztaszieri, M; Poletti, P-A; Becker, M

    2018-04-01

    Although diffusion-weighted imaging combined with morphologic MRI (DWIMRI) is used to detect posttreatment recurrent and second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the diagnostic criteria used so far have not been clarified. We hypothesized that precise MRI criteria based on signal intensity patterns on T2 and contrast-enhanced T1 complement DWI and therefore improve the diagnostic performance of DWIMRI. We analyzed 1.5T MRI examinations of 100 consecutive patients treated with radiation therapy with or without additional surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. MRI examinations included morphologic sequences and DWI ( b =0 and b =1000 s/mm 2 ). Histology and follow-up served as the standard of reference. Two experienced readers, blinded to clinical/histologic/follow-up data, evaluated images according to clearly defined criteria for the diagnosis of recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment, post-radiation therapy inflammatory edema, and late fibrosis. DWI analysis included qualitative (visual) and quantitative evaluation with an ADC threshold. Recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment was present in 36 patients, whereas 64 patients had post-radiation therapy lesions only. The Cohen κ for differentiating tumor from post-radiation therapy lesions with MRI and qualitative DWIMRI was 0.822 and 0.881, respectively. Mean ADCmean in recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment (1.097 ± 0.295 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s) was significantly lower ( P .05). Although ADCs were similar in tumors and late fibrosis, morphologic MRI criteria facilitated distinction between the 2 conditions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios (95% CI) of

  14. Cellular transfer of magnetic nanoparticles via cell microvesicles: impact on cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda K Andriola; Wilhelm, Claire; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence

    2012-05-01

    Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles can be used to monitor the fate of transplanted cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. However, nanoparticles initially internalized in administered cells might end up in other cells of the host organism. We investigated a mechanism of intercellular cross-transfer of magnetic nanoparticles to different types of recipient cells via cell microvesicles released under cellular stress. Three cell types (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial cells and macrophages) were labeled with 8-nm iron oxide nanoparticles. Then cells underwent starvation stress, during which they produced microvesicles that were subsequently transferred to unlabeled recipient cells. The analysis of the magnetophoretic mobility of donor cells indicated that magnetic load was partially lost under cell stress. Microvesicles shed by stressed cells participated in the release of magnetic label. Moreover, such microvesicles were uptaken by naïve cells, resulting in cellular redistribution of nanoparticles. Iron load of recipient cells allowed their detection by MRI. Cell microvesicles released under stress may be disseminated throughout the organism, where they can be uptaken by host cells. The transferred cargo may be sufficient to allow MRI detection of these secondarily labeled cells, leading to misinterpretations of the effectiveness of transplanted cells.

  15. CNR considerations for rapid real-time MRI tumor tracking in radiotherapy hybrid devices: Effects of B0 field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachowicz, K.; De Zanche, N.; Yip, E.; Volotovskyy, V.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work examines the subject of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), specifically between tumor and tissue background, and its dependence on the MRI field strength, B 0 . This examination is motivated by the recent interest and developments in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids where real-time imaging can be used to guide treatment beams. The ability to distinguish a tumor from background tissue is of primary importance in this field, and this work seeks to elucidate the complex relationship between the CNR and B 0 that is too often assumed to be purely linear. Methods: Experimentally based models of B 0 -dependant relaxation for various tumor and normal tissues from the literature were used in conjunction with signal equations for MR sequences suitable for rapid real-time imaging to develop field-dependent predictions for CNR. These CNR models were developed for liver, lung, breast, glioma, and kidney tumors for spoiled gradient-echo, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), and single-shot half-Fourier fast spin echo sequences. Results: Due to the pattern in which the relaxation properties of tissues are found to vary over B 0 field (specifically the T 1 time), there was always an improved CNR at lower fields compared to linear dependency. Further, in some tumor sites, the CNR at lower fields was found to be comparable to, or sometimes higher than those at higher fields (i.e., bSSFP CNR for glioma, kidney, and liver tumors). Conclusions: In terms of CNR, lower B 0 fields have been shown to perform as well or better than higher fields for some tumor sites due to superior T 1 contrast. In other sites this effect was less pronounced, reversing the CNR advantage. This complex relationship between CNR and B 0 reveals both low and high magnetic fields as viable options for tumor tracking in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids.

  16. MDMA ‘ecstasy’ increases cerebral cortical perfusion determined by bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling (btASL) MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouine, J; Gobbo, O L; Campbell, M; Gigliucci, V; Ogden, I; McHugh Smith, K; Duffy, P; Behan, B; Byrne, D; Kelly, M E; Blau, C W; Kerskens, C M; Harkin, A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess cerebral perfusion changes following systemic administration of the recreational drug 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA ‘ecstasy’) to rats. Experimental Approach Cerebral perfusion was quantified using bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling (btASL) MRI. Rats received MDMA (20 mg·kg−1; i.p.) and were assessed 1, 3 or 24 h later. Rats received MDMA (5 or 20 mg·kg−1; i.p.) and were assessed 3 h later. In addition, rats received MDMA (5 or 10 mg·kg−1; i.p.) or saline four times daily over 2 consecutive days and were assessed 8 weeks later. Perfusion-weighted images were generated in a 7 tesla (7T) MRI scanner and experimental data was fitted to a quantitative model of cerebral perfusion to generate mean transit time (MTT), capillary transit time (CTT) and signal amplitude. Key Results MDMA reduces MTT and CTT and increases amplitude in somatosensory and motor cortex 1 and 3 h following administration, indicative of an increase in perfusion. Prior exposure to MDMA provoked a long-term reduction in cortical 5-HT concentration, but did not produce a sustained effect on cerebral cortical perfusion. The response to acute MDMA challenge (20 mg·kg−1; i.p.) was attenuated in these animals indicating adaptation in response to prior MDMA exposure. Conclusions and Implications MDMA provokes changes in cortical perfusion, which are quantifiable by btASL MRI, a neuroimaging tool with translational potential. Future studies are directed towards elucidation of the mechanisms involved and correlating changes in cerebrovascular function with potential behavioural deficits associated with drug use. PMID:23517012

  17. Quantification of global myocardial function by cine MRI deformable registration-based analysis: Comparison with MR feature tracking and speckle-tracking echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamacie, Mariana M.; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Hanneman, Kate; Greiser, Andreas; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Ward, Richard; Wintersperger, Bernd J.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate deformable registration algorithms (DRA)-based quantification of cine steady-state free-precession (SSFP) for myocardial strain assessment in comparison with feature-tracking (FT) and speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE). Data sets of 28 patients/10 volunteers, undergoing same-day 1.5T cardiac MRI and echocardiography were included. LV global longitudinal (GLS), circumferential (GCS) and radial (GRS) peak systolic strain were assessed on cine SSFP data using commercially available FT algorithms and prototype DRA-based algorithms. STE was applied as standard of reference for accuracy, precision and intra-/interobserver reproducibility testing. DRA showed narrower limits of agreement compared to STE for GLS (-4.0 [-0.9,-7.9]) and GCS (-5.1 [1.1,-11.2]) than FT (3.2 [11.2,-4.9]; 3.8 [13.9,-6.3], respectively). While both DRA and FT demonstrated significant differences to STE for GLS and GCS (all p<0.001), only DRA correlated significantly to STE for GLS (r=0.47; p=0.006). However, good correlation was demonstrated between MR techniques (GLS:r=0.74; GCS:r=0.80; GRS:r=0.45, all p<0.05). Comparing DRA with FT, intra-/interobserver coefficient of variance was lower (1.6 %/3.2 % vs. 6.4 %/5.7 %) and intraclass-correlation coefficient was higher. DRA GCS and GRS data presented zero variability for repeated observations. DRA is an automated method that allows myocardial deformation assessment with superior reproducibility compared to FT. (orig.)

  18. Quantification of global myocardial function by cine MRI deformable registration-based analysis: Comparison with MR feature tracking and speckle-tracking echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamacie, Mariana M. [University Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh [University Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hanneman, Kate [University Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany); Jolly, Marie-Pierre [Medical Imaging Technologies, Siemens Healthcare, Princeton, NJ (United States); Ward, Richard [University of Toronto, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wintersperger, Bernd J. [University Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Toronto General Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate deformable registration algorithms (DRA)-based quantification of cine steady-state free-precession (SSFP) for myocardial strain assessment in comparison with feature-tracking (FT) and speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE). Data sets of 28 patients/10 volunteers, undergoing same-day 1.5T cardiac MRI and echocardiography were included. LV global longitudinal (GLS), circumferential (GCS) and radial (GRS) peak systolic strain were assessed on cine SSFP data using commercially available FT algorithms and prototype DRA-based algorithms. STE was applied as standard of reference for accuracy, precision and intra-/interobserver reproducibility testing. DRA showed narrower limits of agreement compared to STE for GLS (-4.0 [-0.9,-7.9]) and GCS (-5.1 [1.1,-11.2]) than FT (3.2 [11.2,-4.9]; 3.8 [13.9,-6.3], respectively). While both DRA and FT demonstrated significant differences to STE for GLS and GCS (all p<0.001), only DRA correlated significantly to STE for GLS (r=0.47; p=0.006). However, good correlation was demonstrated between MR techniques (GLS:r=0.74; GCS:r=0.80; GRS:r=0.45, all p<0.05). Comparing DRA with FT, intra-/interobserver coefficient of variance was lower (1.6 %/3.2 % vs. 6.4 %/5.7 %) and intraclass-correlation coefficient was higher. DRA GCS and GRS data presented zero variability for repeated observations. DRA is an automated method that allows myocardial deformation assessment with superior reproducibility compared to FT. (orig.)

  19. Accurately tracking single-cell movement trajectories in microfluidic cell sorting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jenny; Frohberg, Nicholas J; Zhou, Enlu; Sulchek, Todd; Qiu, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Microfluidics are routinely used to study cellular properties, including the efficient quantification of single-cell biomechanics and label-free cell sorting based on the biomechanical properties, such as elasticity, viscosity, stiffness, and adhesion. Both quantification and sorting applications require optimal design of the microfluidic devices and mathematical modeling of the interactions between cells, fluid, and the channel of the device. As a first step toward building such a mathematical model, we collected video recordings of cells moving through a ridged microfluidic channel designed to compress and redirect cells according to cell biomechanics. We developed an efficient algorithm that automatically and accurately tracked the cell trajectories in the recordings. We tested the algorithm on recordings of cells with different stiffness, and showed the correlation between cell stiffness and the tracked trajectories. Moreover, the tracking algorithm successfully picked up subtle differences of cell motion when passing through consecutive ridges. The algorithm for accurately tracking cell trajectories paves the way for future efforts of modeling the flow, forces, and dynamics of cell properties in microfluidics applications.

  20. Accurately tracking single-cell movement trajectories in microfluidic cell sorting devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Jeong

    Full Text Available Microfluidics are routinely used to study cellular properties, including the efficient quantification of single-cell biomechanics and label-free cell sorting based on the biomechanical properties, such as elasticity, viscosity, stiffness, and adhesion. Both quantification and sorting applications require optimal design of the microfluidic devices and mathematical modeling of the interactions between cells, fluid, and the channel of the device. As a first step toward building such a mathematical model, we collected video recordings of cells moving through a ridged microfluidic channel designed to compress and redirect cells according to cell biomechanics. We developed an efficient algorithm that automatically and accurately tracked the cell trajectories in the recordings. We tested the algorithm on recordings of cells with different stiffness, and showed the correlation between cell stiffness and the tracked trajectories. Moreover, the tracking algorithm successfully picked up subtle differences of cell motion when passing through consecutive ridges. The algorithm for accurately tracking cell trajectories paves the way for future efforts of modeling the flow, forces, and dynamics of cell properties in microfluidics applications.

  1. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  2. The Right Temporoparietal Junction Supports Speech Tracking During Selective Listening: Evidence from Concurrent EEG-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Steinkamp, Simon; Gillich, Imke; Mirkovic, Bojana; Debener, Stefan; Thiel, Christiane M

    2017-11-22

    Listening selectively to one out of several competing speakers in a "cocktail party" situation is a highly demanding task. It relies on a widespread cortical network, including auditory sensory, but also frontal and parietal brain regions involved in controlling auditory attention. Previous work has shown that, during selective listening, ongoing neural activity in auditory sensory areas is dominated by the attended speech stream, whereas competing input is suppressed. The relationship between these attentional modulations in the sensory tracking of the attended speech stream and frontoparietal activity during selective listening is, however, not understood. We studied this question in young, healthy human participants (both sexes) using concurrent EEG-fMRI and a sustained selective listening task, in which one out of two competing speech streams had to be attended selectively. An EEG-based speech envelope reconstruction method was applied to assess the strength of the cortical tracking of the to-be-attended and the to-be-ignored stream during selective listening. Our results show that individual speech envelope reconstruction accuracies obtained for the to-be-attended speech stream were positively correlated with the amplitude of sustained BOLD responses in the right temporoparietal junction, a core region of the ventral attention network. This brain region further showed task-related functional connectivity to secondary auditory cortex and regions of the frontoparietal attention network, including the intraparietal sulcus and the inferior frontal gyrus. This suggests that the right temporoparietal junction is involved in controlling attention during selective listening, allowing for a better cortical tracking of the attended speech stream. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Listening selectively to one out of several simultaneously talking speakers in a "cocktail party" situation is a highly demanding task. It activates a widespread network of auditory sensory and

  3. Large scale tracking of stem cells using sparse coding and coupled graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Holm, Peter

    Stem cell tracking is an inherently large scale problem. The challenge is to identify and track hundreds or thousands of cells over a time period of several weeks. This requires robust methods that can leverage the knowledge of specialists on the field. The tracking pipeline presented here consists...

  4. MRI-guided trephine biopsy and fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of bone lesions in low-field (0.23 T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Klemola, Rauli; Ojala, Risto; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo; Lappi-Blanco, Elisa; Soini, Ylermi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI-guided bone biopsy with optical instrument tracking and evaluate advantage of combined fine-needle aspiration (FNA) with trephine biopsy. Twenty trephine bone biopsies and 13 FNAs were performed under MRI and CT guidance in 14 patients. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The evaluation of diagnostic accuracy was achieved by comparing the histopathological and cytological diagnosis with current or final diagnosis made during 6-month clinical follow-up. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Marconi Medical Systems, Cleveland, Ohio) was used. A surface coil was used. For trephine biopsy MRI-compatible bone biopsy set (Daum medical, Schwerin, Germany) was used. The FNA was performed with MRI compatible 20-G needle (Cook, Bloomington, Ind.). The diagnostic accuracy of MRI-guided trephine biopsy was 95%. The FNA sample diagnosis concurred with the histological in 54%. Our results show that MRI guidance in bone biopsies is accurate and safe. It is comparable to CT-guided or open biopsy. The role of combined FNA with bone biopsies remains controversial. (orig.)

  5. Uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells for cell tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Christiane; Hodenius, Michael; Blendinger, Gitta; Sechi, Antonio; Hieronymus, Thomas; Mueller-Schulte, Detlef; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Zenke, Martin

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for future applications in nanotechnology is the functional integration of nano-sized materials into cellular structures. Here we investigated superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a lipid bilayer for uptake into cells and for targeting subcellular compartments. It was found that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are effectively taken up into cells and make cells acquire magnetic activity. Biotin-conjugated MNPs were further functionalized by binding of the fluorescent tag streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and, following uptake into cells, shown to confer magnetic activity and fluorescence labeling. Such FITC-MNPs were localized in the lysosomal compartment of cells which suggests a receptor-mediated uptake mechanism

  6. Efficient MRI labeling of endothelial progenitor cells: design of thiolated surface stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnaz, Gul; Kremser, Christian; Reinisch, Andreas; Vetter, Anja; Laffleur, Flavia; Rahmat, Deni; Iqbal, Javed; Dünnhaupt, Sarah; Salvenmoser, Willi; Tessadri, Richard; Griesser, Ulrich; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to design thiolated surface stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TSS-SPIONs) for efficient internalization with high MRI sensitivity. TSS-SPIONs were developed by chelation between thiolated chitosan-thioglycolic acid (chitosan-TGA) hydrogel and iron ions (Fe(2+)/Fe(3+)). Likely, unmodified chitosan hydrogel SPIONs (UC-SPIONs) and uncoated SPIONs were used as control. Moreover, TSS-SPIONs were investigated regarding to their iron core size, hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential, iron contents, molar relaxivities (r1 and r2), and cellular internalization. TSS-SPIONs demonstrated an iron oxide core diameter (crystallite size by XRD) of 3.1 ± 0.02 nm, a hydrodynamic diameter of 94 ± 20 nm, a zeta potential of +21 ± 5 mV, and an iron content of 3.6 ± 0.9 mg/mL. In addition, internalization of TSS-SPIONs into human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) from umbilical cord blood was more than threefold and 17-fold higher in contrast to UC-SPIONs and SPIONs, respectively. With twofold lower incubation iron concentration of TSS-SPIONs, more than threefold higher internalization was achieved as compared to Resovist®. Also, cell viability of more than 90% was observed in the presence of TSS-SPIONs after 24h. The molar MR relaxivities (r2) value at 1.5 T was threefold higher than that of Resovist® and demonstrated that TSS-SPIONs have the potential as very effective T2 contrast-enhancement agent. According to these findings, TSS-SPIONs with efficient internalization, lower cytotoxicity, and high MRI sensitivity seem to be promising for cell tracking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Tracking targeted bimodal nanovaccines: immune responses and routing in cells, tissue, and whole organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luis J; Tacken, Paul J; Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; Srinivas, Mangala; Bonetto, Fernando; Weigelin, Bettina; Eich, Christina; de Vries, I Jolanda; Figdor, Carl G

    2014-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs), involved in the induction of immunity and currently exploited for antitumor immunotherapies. An optimized noninvasive imaging modality capable of determining and quantifying DC-targeted nanoparticle (NP) trajectories could provide valuable information regarding therapeutic vaccine outcome. Here, targeted poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs) recognizing DC receptors were equipped with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) or gold nanoparticles with fluorescently labeled antigen. The fluorescent label allowed for rapid analysis and quantification of DC-specific uptake of targeted PLGA NPs in comparison to uptake by other cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that a fraction of the encapsulated antigen reached the lysosomal compartment of DCs, where SPIO and gold were already partially released. However, part of the PLGA NPs localized within the cytoplasm, as confirmed by confocal microscopy. DCs targeted with NPs carrying SPIO or fluorescent antigen were detected within lymph nodes as early as 1 h after injection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Despite the fact that targeting did not markedly affect PLGA NP biodistribution on organism and tissue level, it increased delivery of NPs to DCs residing in peripheral lymph nodes and resulted in enhanced T cell proliferation. In conclusion, two imaging agents within a single carrier allows tracking of targeted PLGA NPs at the subcellular, cellular, and organismal levels, thereby facilitating the rational design of in vivo targeted vaccination strategies.

  8. Dynamic MRI of ferumoxide-labeled bone mesenchmal stem cells after transplantation in infarcted myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiong; Zhao Shihua; Lu Minjie; Jiang Shiliang; Yan Chaowu; Zhang Yan; Meng Liang; Tang Yue; Meng Xianmin; Wei Yingjie; Wang Qingzhi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in tracking magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MR-MSCs) in a swine myocardial infarction (MI) model. Methods: Adult Chinese mini-pigs (n=6) were subjected to open-chest experimental MI operation. Their autogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was cultured and doubly labeled with ferumoxides and DAPI. On the 14 th day after MSCs transplantation, the size and location of the myocardial infarction were assessed by using delayed-enhancement MRI (DE-MRI). Then the labeled MSCs were injected intramyocardially into peri-infarct zone and normal myocardium. At 24 hrs and 3 weeks after injection, the contrast and the volume of the MR-MSCs hypointense lesion from the MR images were acquired, and the contrast was determined using the difference in signal intensity between the hypointense and normal myocardium divided by signal intensity of the normal region. After humane euthanasia, the heart was excised and histology corresponding to MRI slices that demonstrated MR-MSCs lesions was performed. Repeated-measures ANOVA and a paired t test were used for comparison of the contrast and the volume of the MR-MSCs hypointense lesion at different time points. Comparisons between independent groups were performed with the standard Student t test. Results: The labeling efficiency of ferumoxides and DAPI was 100%. On the 14 th day after the MI operation, the average percentage of infracted myocardial area was (33.6±8.9)%. Twenty- four hours after MSCs transplantation, MSCs injection sites appeared as ovoid hypointensive lesions with sharp border on T 2 * images. At 24 h after injection, the signal contrast [(67.00±5.48)% vs (61.92±7.76)%,t=1.65, P=0.1158] and the size [(0.56±0.24) cm 2 vs (0.52±0.25) cm 2 , t=0.39, P=0.7044] of the lesions showed no statistical difference between the peri-infarct zone and the normal myocardium. At 3 weeks after injection, the signal contrast

  9. A newly identified frontal path from fornix in septum pellucidum with 7.0T MRI track density imaging (TDI – The septum pellucidum tract (SPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zang-Hee eCho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The high anatomical contrast achieved with the newly emerging MRI tractographic technique of super-resolution track density imaging (TDI encouraged us to search for a new fiber tract in the septum pellucidum. Although this septum pellucidum tract (SPT has been observed previously, its connections were unclear due to ambiguity and limited resolution of conventional MRI images. It is now possible to identify detailed parts of SPT with the increased resolution of TDI, which involves diffusion MRI imaging, whole-brain tractography, and voxel subdivision using the track-count information. Four healthy male subjects were included in the study. The experiment was performed with 7.0T MRI, following the guidelines of the institute’s institutional review board. Data were processed with the super-resolution TDI technique to generate a tractographic map with 0.18 mm isotropic resolution. The SPT was identified in all subjects. Based on additional seed tracking method with inter-axis correlation search, we have succeeded in identifying a new frontal lobe pathway in the SPT. We hypothesize that the tract is connected as a superior dorsal branch of the fornix that leads to the prefrontal cortex.

  10. The impact of preparation and support procedures for children with sickle cell disease undergoing MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cejda, Katherine R.; Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Hansbury, Eileen N.; McCarville, Mary Elizabeth; Helton, Kathleen J.; Hankins, Jane S.

    2012-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) often undergo MRI studies to assess brain injury or to quantify hepatic iron. MRI requires the child to lie motionless for 30-60 min, thus sedation/anesthesia might be used to facilitate successful completion of exams, but this poses additional risks for SCD patients. To improve children's ability to cope with MRI examinations and avoid sedation, our institution established preparation and support procedures (PSP). To investigate the impact of PSP in reducing the need for sedation during MRI exams among children with SCD. Data on successful completion of MRI testing were compared among 5- to 12-year-olds who underwent brain MRI or liver R2*MRI with or without receiving PSP. Seventy-one children with SCD (median age 9.85 years, range 5.57-12.99 years) underwent a brain MRI (n = 60) or liver R2*MRI (n = 11). Children who received PSP were more likely to complete an interpretable MRI exam than those who did not 30 of 33; 91% vs. 27 of 38; 71%, unadjusted OR = 4.1 (P = 0.04) and OR = 8.5 (P < 0.01) when adjusting for age. PSP can help young children with SCD complete clinically interpretable, nonsedated MRI exams, avoiding the risks of sedation/anesthesia. (orig.)

  11. The impact of preparation and support procedures for children with sickle cell disease undergoing MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejda, Katherine R. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Child Life Program, Memphis, TN (United States); Smeltzer, Matthew P. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Hansbury, Eileen N. [Baylor International Hematology Center of Excellence and the Texas Children' s Center for Global Health, Houston, TX (United States); McCarville, Mary Elizabeth; Helton, Kathleen J. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Hankins, Jane S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Hematology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) often undergo MRI studies to assess brain injury or to quantify hepatic iron. MRI requires the child to lie motionless for 30-60 min, thus sedation/anesthesia might be used to facilitate successful completion of exams, but this poses additional risks for SCD patients. To improve children's ability to cope with MRI examinations and avoid sedation, our institution established preparation and support procedures (PSP). To investigate the impact of PSP in reducing the need for sedation during MRI exams among children with SCD. Data on successful completion of MRI testing were compared among 5- to 12-year-olds who underwent brain MRI or liver R2*MRI with or without receiving PSP. Seventy-one children with SCD (median age 9.85 years, range 5.57-12.99 years) underwent a brain MRI (n = 60) or liver R2*MRI (n = 11). Children who received PSP were more likely to complete an interpretable MRI exam than those who did not 30 of 33; 91% vs. 27 of 38; 71%, unadjusted OR = 4.1 (P = 0.04) and OR = 8.5 (P < 0.01) when adjusting for age. PSP can help young children with SCD complete clinically interpretable, nonsedated MRI exams, avoiding the risks of sedation/anesthesia. (orig.)

  12. SU-E-J-240: Development of a Novel 4D MRI Sequence for Real-Time Liver Tumor Tracking During Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, L; Burmeister, J [Department of Oncology, Wayne State Univ School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Ye, Y [Department of Radiology, Wayne State Univ School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a Novel 4D MRI Technique that is feasible for realtime liver tumor tracking during radiotherapy. Methods: A volunteer underwent an abdominal 2D fast EPI coronal scan on a 3.0T MRI scanner (Siemens Inc., Germany). An optimal set of parameters was determined based on image quality and scan time. A total of 23 slices were scanned to cover the whole liver in the test scan. For each scan position, the 2D images were retrospectively sorted into multiple phases based on breathing signal extracted from the images. Consequently the 2D slices with same phase numbers were stacked to form one 3D image. Multiple phases of 3D images formed the 4D MRI sequence representing one breathing cycle. Results: The optimal set of scan parameters were: TR= 57ms, TE= 19ms, FOV read= 320mm and flip angle= 30°, which resulted in a total scan time of 14s for 200 frames (FMs) per slice and image resolution of (2.5mm,2.5mm,5.0mm) in three directions. Ten phases of 3D images were generated, each of which had 23 slices. Based on our test scan, only 100FMs were necessary for the phase sorting process which may lower the scan time to 7s/100FMs/slice. For example, only 5 slices/35s are necessary for a 4D MRI scan to cover liver tumor size ≤ 2cm leading to the possibility of tumor trajectory tracking every 35s during treatment. Conclusion: The novel 4D MRI technique we developed can reconstruct a 4D liver MRI sequence representing one breathing cycle (7s/ slice) without an external monitor. This technique can potentially be used for real-time liver tumor tracking during radiotherapy.

  13. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza de Schellenberger A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angela Ariza de Schellenberger,1 Harald Kratz,1 Tracy D Farr,2,3 Norbert Löwa,4 Ralf Hauptmann,1 Susanne Wagner,1 Matthias Taupitz,1 Jörg Schnorr,1 Eyk A Schellenberger1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Experimental Neurology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Medical School, Nottingham, UK; 4Department of Biomagnetic Signals, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Sensitive cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important tool for the development of cell therapies. However, clinically approved contrast agents that allow single-cell detection are currently not available. Therefore, we compared very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP and new multicore carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (multicore particles, MCP designed by our department for magnetic particle imaging (MPI with discontinued Resovist® regarding their suitability for detection of single mesenchymal stem cells (MSC by MRI. We achieved an average intracellular nanoparticle (NP load of >10 pg Fe per cell without the use of transfection agents. NP loading did not lead to significantly different results in proliferation, colony formation, and multilineage in vitro differentiation assays in comparison to controls. MRI allowed single-cell detection using VSOP, MCP, and Resovist® in conjunction with high-resolution T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T with postprocessing of phase images in agarose cell phantoms and in vivo after delivery of 2,000 NP-labeled MSC into mouse brains via the left carotid artery. With optimized labeling conditions, a detection rate of ~45% was achieved; however, the experiments were limited by nonhomogeneous NP loading of the MSC population. Attempts should be made to achieve better cell separation for homogeneous NP loading and to thus improve NP

  14. MO-B-201-03: MRI-Guided Tracking and Gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, O. [Washington University School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The motion management in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a key to success for a SBRT program, and still an on-going challenging task. A major factor is that moving structures behave differently than standing structures when examined by imaging modalities, and thus require special considerations and employments. Understanding the motion effects to these different imaging processes is a prerequisite for a decent motion management program. The commonly used motion control techniques to physically restrict tumor motion, if adopted correctly, effectively increase the conformity and accuracy of hypofractionated treatment. The effective application of such requires one to understand the mechanics of the application and the related physiology especially related to respiration. The image-guided radiation beam control, or tumor tracking, further realized the endeavor for precision-targeting. During tumor tracking, the respiratory motion is often constantly monitored by non-ionizing beam sources using the body surface as its surrogate. This then has to synchronize with the actual internal tumor motion. The latter is often accomplished by stereo X-ray imaging or similar techniques. With these advanced technologies, one may drastically reduce the treated volume and increase the clinicians’ confidence for a high fractional ablative radiation dose. However, the challenges in implementing the motion management may not be trivial and is dependent on each clinic case. This session of presentations is intended to provide an overview of the current techniques used in managing the tumor motion in SBRT, specifically for routine lung SBRT, proton based treatments, and newly-developed MR guided RT. Learning Objectives: Through this presentation, the audience will understand basic roles of commonly used imaging modalities for lung cancer studies; familiarize the major advantages and limitations of each discussed motion control methods; familiarize the major advantages and

  15. Exploring differences in speech processing among elderly hearing-impaired listeners with or without hearing aid experience: Eye-tracking and fMRI measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habicht, Julia; Behler, Oliver; Kollmeier, Birger

    2018-01-01

    on the cognitive processes underlying speech comprehension. Eye-tracking and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements were carried out with acoustic sentence-in-noise (SIN) stimuli complemented by pairs of pictures that either correctly (target) or incorrectly (competitor) depicted the sentence...... meanings. For the eye-tracking measurements, the time taken by the participants to start fixating the target picture (the ‘processing time’) was measured. For the fMRI measurements, brain activation inferred from blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses following sentence comprehension...... frontal areas for SIN relative to noise-only stimuli in the eHA group compared to the iHA group. Together, these results imply that HA experience leads to faster speech-in-noise processing, possibly related to less recruitment of brain regions outside the core sentence-comprehension network. Follow...

  16. Robust cell tracking in epithelial tissues through identification of maximum common subgraphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursawe, Jochen; Bardenet, Rémi; Zartman, Jeremiah J; Baker, Ruth E; Fletcher, Alexander G

    2016-11-01

    Tracking of cells in live-imaging microscopy videos of epithelial sheets is a powerful tool for investigating fundamental processes in embryonic development. Characterizing cell growth, proliferation, intercalation and apoptosis in epithelia helps us to understand how morphogenetic processes such as tissue invagination and extension are locally regulated and controlled. Accurate cell tracking requires correctly resolving cells entering or leaving the field of view between frames, cell neighbour exchanges, cell removals and cell divisions. However, current tracking methods for epithelial sheets are not robust to large morphogenetic deformations and require significant manual interventions. Here, we present a novel algorithm for epithelial cell tracking, exploiting the graph-theoretic concept of a 'maximum common subgraph' to track cells between frames of a video. Our algorithm does not require the adjustment of tissue-specific parameters, and scales in sub-quadratic time with tissue size. It does not rely on precise positional information, permitting large cell movements between frames and enabling tracking in datasets acquired at low temporal resolution due to experimental constraints such as phototoxicity. To demonstrate the method, we perform tracking on the Drosophila embryonic epidermis and compare cell-cell rearrangements to previous studies in other tissues. Our implementation is open source and generally applicable to epithelial tissues. © 2016 The Authors.

  17. A novel validation algorithm allows for automated cell tracking and the extraction of biologically meaningful parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Rapoport

    Full Text Available Automated microscopy is currently the only method to non-invasively and label-free observe complex multi-cellular processes, such as cell migration, cell cycle, and cell differentiation. Extracting biological information from a time-series of micrographs requires each cell to be recognized and followed through sequential microscopic snapshots. Although recent attempts to automatize this process resulted in ever improving cell detection rates, manual identification of identical cells is still the most reliable technique. However, its tedious and subjective nature prevented tracking from becoming a standardized tool for the investigation of cell cultures. Here, we present a novel method to accomplish automated cell tracking with a reliability comparable to manual tracking. Previously, automated cell tracking could not rival the reliability of manual tracking because, in contrast to the human way of solving this task, none of the algorithms had an independent quality control mechanism; they missed validation. Thus, instead of trying to improve the cell detection or tracking rates, we proceeded from the idea to automatically inspect the tracking results and accept only those of high trustworthiness, while rejecting all other results. This validation algorithm works independently of the quality of cell detection and tracking through a systematic search for tracking errors. It is based only on very general assumptions about the spatiotemporal contiguity of cell paths. While traditional tracking often aims to yield genealogic information about single cells, the natural outcome of a validated cell tracking algorithm turns out to be a set of complete, but often unconnected cell paths, i.e. records of cells from mitosis to mitosis. This is a consequence of the fact that the validation algorithm takes complete paths as the unit of rejection/acceptance. The resulting set of complete paths can be used to automatically extract important biological parameters

  18. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadi, J.; Sangwal, V.; MacNeil, S.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells is continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD), in which the stem cell population is depleted, can lead to blindness. LSCD can be caused by chemical and thermal burns to the eye. A popular treatment, especially in emerging economies such as India, is the transplantation of limbal stem cells onto damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region. Hence regenerating the corneal epithelium. In order to gain insights into the success rates of this treatment, new imaging technologies are needed in order to track the transplanted cells. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images of the retina. A custom OCT system has been built to image the corneal surface, to investigate the fate of transplanted limbal stem cells. We evaluate two methods to label and track transplanted cells: melanin labelling and magneto-labelling. To evaluate melanin labelling, stem cells are loaded with melanin and then transplanted onto a rabbit cornea denuded of its epithelium. The melanin displays strongly enhanced backscatter relative to normal cells. To evaluate magneto-labelling the stem cells are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) and then imaged with a custom-built, magneto-motive OCT system.

  19. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Pack, Chan-Gi [Cellular Informatics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Terajima, Hideki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Kinjo, Masataka [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Dynamics, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Taguchi, Hideki, E-mail: taguchi@bio.titech.ac.jp [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. {yields} We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. {yields} We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  20. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Pack, Chan-Gi; Terajima, Hideki; Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Kinjo, Masataka; Taguchi, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. → We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. → We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  1. Visualisation of axolotl blastema cells and pig endothelial progenitor cells using very small super paramagnetic iron oxide particles in MRI: A technique with applications for non invasive visualisation of regenerative processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Kjær, N.B.; Bek, Maria

    oxide particles (VSOP) in animal cells enable non invasive cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and can prove useful, when visualising regenerative processes. This study examines the possibility of labelling limited numbers of axolotl blastema cells (aBC) and pig endothelial progenitor...... implanted in live axolotl tail and dead porcine heart, respectively. Cellular iron uptake was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Results: T2*-weighted 2D gradient-echo sequences on samples of 10˄5 cells yielded at significant linear correlations between...

  2. Tracking single cells in live animals using a photoconvertible near-infrared cell membrane label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Alicia L; Fujisaki, Joji; Wu, Juwell; Runnels, Judith M; Turcotte, Raphaël; Spencer, Joel A; Celso, Cristina Lo; Scadden, David T; Strom, Terry B; Lin, Charles P

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel photoconversion technique to track individual cells in vivo using a commercial lipophilic membrane dye, DiR. We show that DiR exhibits a permanent fluorescence emission shift (photoconversion) after light exposure and does not reacquire the original color over time. Ratiometric imaging can be used to distinguish photoconverted from non-converted cells with high sensitivity. Combining the use of this photoconvertible dye with intravital microscopy, we tracked the division of individual hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells within the calvarium bone marrow of live mice. We also studied the peripheral differentiation of individual T cells by tracking the gain or loss of FoxP3-GFP expression, a marker of the immune suppressive function of CD4(+) T cells. With the near-infrared photoconvertible membrane dye, the entire visible spectral range is available for simultaneous use with other fluorescent proteins to monitor gene expression or to trace cell lineage commitment in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  3. Observation of the CSF pulsatile flow in the aqueduct using cine MRI with presaturation bolus tracking, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Satoshi

    1992-01-01

    The to-and-fro motion patterns of the CSF flow in the aqueduct in ten normal adults, ten patients with secondary normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), and fourteen patients with idiopathic ventriculomegaly were analyzed using cine MRI with presaturation bolus tracking. The to-and-fro motion patterns of the CSF flow in the aqueduct were thus classified into four types according to their maximum velocity and the relative time duration of their flow in the rostral and caudal directions. The correlation between the clinical symptoms, the CT findings, the RI-cisternography findings, the results of the ICP monitorings, and the CSF pulsatile-flow patterns were then analyzed. In secondary NPH disclosing frequent B waves on ICP monitoring, the maximum velocity of the CSF flow in the aqueduct was over 15 mm/sec, and the duration of the CSF flow was longer in the caudal direction than in the rostral direction. Furthermore, the faster the maximum velocity of the CSF flow, the larger the ventricular size on CT and the more severe the CSF malabsorption on cisternography. In idiopathic ventriculomegaly, only two cases demonstrated the same CSF flow pattern as was shown in secondary NPH; the other cases demonstrated other CSF flow patterns, which were considered to indicate hydrocephalus ex vacuo or arrested hydrocephalus. The CSF pulsatile-flow pattern was assumed to change according to the degree of the CSF circulatory disorder, its compensatory process, and the plasticity of the brain. The investigation of the CSF pulsatile flow gives important information for the evaluation of various hydrocephalic conditions. (author)

  4. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles function as a long-term, multi-modal imaging label for non-invasive tracking of implanted progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A Pacak

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles to function as a long-term tracking label for multi-modal imaging of implanted engineered tissues containing muscle-derived progenitor cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT. SPIO-labeled primary myoblasts were embedded in fibrin sealant and imaged to obtain intensity data by MRI or radio-opacity information by μCT. Each imaging modality displayed a detection gradient that matched increasing SPIO concentrations. Labeled cells were then incorporated in fibrin sealant, injected into the atrioventricular groove of rat hearts, and imaged in vivo and ex vivo for up to 1 year. Transplanted cells were identified in intact animals and isolated hearts using both imaging modalities. MRI was better able to detect minuscule amounts of SPIO nanoparticles, while μCT more precisely identified the location of heavily-labeled cells. Histological analyses confirmed that iron oxide particles were confined to viable, skeletal muscle-derived cells in the implant at the expected location based on MRI and μCT. These analyses showed no evidence of phagocytosis of labeled cells by macrophages or release of nanoparticles from transplanted cells. In conclusion, we established that SPIO nanoparticles function as a sensitive and specific long-term label for MRI and μCT, respectively. Our findings will enable investigators interested in regenerative therapies to non-invasively and serially acquire complementary, high-resolution images of transplanted cells for one year using a single label.

  5. MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy in low-field (0.23-T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Ojala, Risto O.; Klemola, Rauli; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Vaara, Teuvo J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy. Sixty-seven nerve root infiltrations under MRI guidance were done for 61 patients suffering from lumbosacral radicular pain. Informed consent was acquired from all patients. A 0.23-T open-MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Philips Medical Systems, MR Technologies, Finland) was used. A surface coil was used in all cases. Nerve root infiltration was performed with MRI-compatible 20-G needle (Chiba type MReye, Cook, Bloomington, Ind.; or Manan type, MD Tech, Florida). The evaluation of clinical outcome was achieved with 6 months of clinical follow-up and questionnaire. The effect of nerve root infiltration to the radicular pain was graded: 1=good to excellent, i.e., no pain or not disturbing pain allowing normal physical activity at 3 months from the procedure; 2=temporary, i.e., temporary relief of pain; 3=no relief of pain; and 4=worsening of pain. As an adjunct to MRI-guided positioning of the needle the correct needle localization by the nerve root was confirmed with saline injection to nerve root channel and single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) imaging. The MRI guidance allowed adequate needle positioning in all but 1 case (98.5%). This failure was caused by degeneration-induced changes in anatomy. Of patients, 51.5% had good to excellent effect with regard to radicular pain from the procedure, 22.7% had temporary relief, 21.2% had no effect, and in 4.5% the pain worsened. Our results show that MRI guidance is accurate and safe in performing nerve root infiltration at lumbosacral area. The results of radicular pain relief from nerve root infiltration are comparable to CT or fluoroscopy studies on the subject. (orig.)

  6. Prospective assessment of MRI for imaging retroperitoneal metastases from testicular germ cell tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohaib, S.A. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)], E-mail: aslam.sohaib@rmh.nhs.uk; Koh, D.M. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Barbachano, Y. [Department of Computing and Statistics, Royal Marsden Hospital, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Parikh, J.; Husband, J.E.S. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, D.P.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Aim: To determine the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of retroperitoneal lymph nodes in patients with testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT). Methods and materials: A prospective study of 52 patients (mean age 34 years, range 18-54 years) was performed. Imaging of the retroperitoneum was performed using multidetector computed tomography (CT) and 1.5 T MRI systems. The CT and MRI images were read independently by three observers. The number, size, and site of enlarged nodes ({>=}10 mm maximum short axis diameter) were recorded. Retroperitoneal nodal detection on MRI was compared to CT. Results: Twenty-two (42%) of the 52 patients had no retroperitoneal disease; in remaining 30 patients 51 enlarged nodes were identified. On a per patient basis readers 1, 2, and 3 identified nodal disease in 28 of 29, 29 of 30, and 24 of 30 patients, respectively, using MRI compared to CT. Thus for experienced radiologists (readers 1 and 2) MRI is comparable to CT for nodal detection (i.e., this study excludes MRI being inferior to CT with 80% power and 5% type 1 error). Conclusion: MRI offers an alternative method for staging the retroperitoneum in young patients being followed for TGCT and has the major advantage of avoiding exposure to ionizing radiation.

  7. [Study on method of tracking the active cells in image sequences based on EKF-PF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chunming; Liu, Ying

    2013-02-01

    In cell image sequences, due to the nonlinear and nonGaussian motion characteristics of active cells, the accurate prediction and tracking is still an unsolved problem. We applied extended Kalman particle filter (EKF-PF) here in our study, attempting to solve the problem. Firstly we confirmed the existence and positions of the active cells. Then we established a motion model and improved it via adding motion angle estimation. Next we predicted motion parameters, such as displacement, velocity, accelerated velocity and motion angle, in region centers of the cells being tracked. Finally we obtained the motion traces of active cells. There were fourteen active cells in three image sequences which have been tracked. The errors were less than 2.5 pixels when the prediction values were compared with actual values. It showed that the presented algorithm may basically reach the solution of accurate predition and tracking of the active cells.

  8. An integrated model-driven method for in-treatment upper airway motion tracking using cine MRI in head and neck radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Dolly, Steven; Li, Harold; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James; Ruan, Su; Anastasio, Mark; Mazur, Thomas; Gach, Michael; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Rodriguez, Vivian; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-08-01

    For the first time, MRI-guided radiation therapy systems can acquire cine images to dynamically monitor in-treatment internal organ motion. However, the complex head and neck (H&N) structures and low-contrast/resolution of on-board cine MRI images make automatic motion tracking a very challenging task. In this study, the authors proposed an integrated model-driven method to automatically track the in-treatment motion of the H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein internal motion often occurs in an either voluntary or involuntary manner, from cine MRI images for the analysis of H&N motion patterns. Considering the complex H&N structures and ensuring automatic and robust upper airway motion tracking, the authors firstly built a set of linked statistical shapes (including face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) using principal component analysis from clinically approved contours delineated on a set of training data. The linked statistical shapes integrate explicit landmarks and implicit shape representation. Then, a hierarchical model-fitting algorithm was developed to align the linked shapes on the first image frame of a to-be-tracked cine sequence and to localize the upper airway region. Finally, a multifeature level set contour propagation scheme was performed to identify the upper airway shape change, frame-by-frame, on the entire image sequence. The multifeature fitting energy, including the information of intensity variations, edge saliency, curve geometry, and temporal shape continuity, was minimized to capture the details of moving airway boundaries. Sagittal cine MR image sequences acquired from three H&N cancer patients were utilized to demonstrate the performance of the proposed motion tracking method. The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 50 randomly selected cine image frames from each patient. The resulting average dice similarity coefficient (93.28%  ±  1

  9. An integrated model-driven method for in-treatment upper airway motion tracking using cine MRI in head and neck radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Dolly, Steven; Li, Harold; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin; Mazur, Thomas; Gach, Michael; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Rodriguez, Vivian; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Victoria, James; Dempsey, James [ViewRay Incorporated, Inc., Oakwood Village, Ohio 44146 (United States); Ruan, Su [Laboratoire LITIS (EA 4108), Equipe Quantif, University of Rouen, Rouen 76183 (France); Anastasio, Mark [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: For the first time, MRI-guided radiation therapy systems can acquire cine images to dynamically monitor in-treatment internal organ motion. However, the complex head and neck (H&N) structures and low-contrast/resolution of on-board cine MRI images make automatic motion tracking a very challenging task. In this study, the authors proposed an integrated model-driven method to automatically track the in-treatment motion of the H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein internal motion often occurs in an either voluntary or involuntary manner, from cine MRI images for the analysis of H&N motion patterns. Methods: Considering the complex H&N structures and ensuring automatic and robust upper airway motion tracking, the authors firstly built a set of linked statistical shapes (including face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) using principal component analysis from clinically approved contours delineated on a set of training data. The linked statistical shapes integrate explicit landmarks and implicit shape representation. Then, a hierarchical model-fitting algorithm was developed to align the linked shapes on the first image frame of a to-be-tracked cine sequence and to localize the upper airway region. Finally, a multifeature level set contour propagation scheme was performed to identify the upper airway shape change, frame-by-frame, on the entire image sequence. The multifeature fitting energy, including the information of intensity variations, edge saliency, curve geometry, and temporal shape continuity, was minimized to capture the details of moving airway boundaries. Sagittal cine MR image sequences acquired from three H&N cancer patients were utilized to demonstrate the performance of the proposed motion tracking method. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 50 randomly selected cine image frames from each patient. The resulting average dice similarity

  10. An integrated model-driven method for in-treatment upper airway motion tracking using cine MRI in head and neck radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hua; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Dolly, Steven; Li, Harold; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin; Mazur, Thomas; Gach, Michael; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Rodriguez, Vivian; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James; Ruan, Su; Anastasio, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For the first time, MRI-guided radiation therapy systems can acquire cine images to dynamically monitor in-treatment internal organ motion. However, the complex head and neck (H&N) structures and low-contrast/resolution of on-board cine MRI images make automatic motion tracking a very challenging task. In this study, the authors proposed an integrated model-driven method to automatically track the in-treatment motion of the H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein internal motion often occurs in an either voluntary or involuntary manner, from cine MRI images for the analysis of H&N motion patterns. Methods: Considering the complex H&N structures and ensuring automatic and robust upper airway motion tracking, the authors firstly built a set of linked statistical shapes (including face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) using principal component analysis from clinically approved contours delineated on a set of training data. The linked statistical shapes integrate explicit landmarks and implicit shape representation. Then, a hierarchical model-fitting algorithm was developed to align the linked shapes on the first image frame of a to-be-tracked cine sequence and to localize the upper airway region. Finally, a multifeature level set contour propagation scheme was performed to identify the upper airway shape change, frame-by-frame, on the entire image sequence. The multifeature fitting energy, including the information of intensity variations, edge saliency, curve geometry, and temporal shape continuity, was minimized to capture the details of moving airway boundaries. Sagittal cine MR image sequences acquired from three H&N cancer patients were utilized to demonstrate the performance of the proposed motion tracking method. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 50 randomly selected cine image frames from each patient. The resulting average dice similarity

  11. MRI visualization of endogenous neural progenitor cell migration along the RMS in the adult mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vreys, Ruth; Vande Velde, Greetje; Krylychkina, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The adult rodent brain contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs), generated in the subventricular zone (SVZ), which migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) towards the olfactory bulb (OB) where they differentiate into neurons. The aim of this study was to visualize endogenous NPC migration...... by a longitudinal MRI study and validated with histology. Here, we visualized endogenous NPC migration in the mouse brain by in vivo MRI and demonstrated accumulation of MPIO-labeled NPCs in the OB over time with ex vivo MRI. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of in situ injection of MPIOs on adult...

  12. Automated cell tracking and analysis in phase-contrast videos (iTrack4U): development of Java software based on combined mean-shift processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordelières, Fabrice P; Petit, Valérie; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Debeir, Olivier; Letort, Véronique; Gallagher, Stuart J; Larue, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is a key biological process with a role in both physiological and pathological conditions. Locomotion of cells during embryonic development is essential for their correct positioning in the organism; immune cells have to migrate and circulate in response to injury. Failure of cells to migrate or an inappropriate acquisition of migratory capacities can result in severe defects such as altered pigmentation, skull and limb abnormalities during development, and defective wound repair, immunosuppression or tumor dissemination. The ability to accurately analyze and quantify cell migration is important for our understanding of development, homeostasis and disease. In vitro cell tracking experiments, using primary or established cell cultures, are often used to study migration as cells can quickly and easily be genetically or chemically manipulated. Images of the cells are acquired at regular time intervals over several hours using microscopes equipped with CCD camera. The locations (x,y,t) of each cell on the recorded sequence of frames then need to be tracked. Manual computer-assisted tracking is the traditional method for analyzing the migratory behavior of cells. However, this processing is extremely tedious and time-consuming. Most existing tracking algorithms require experience in programming languages that are unfamiliar to most biologists. We therefore developed an automated cell tracking program, written in Java, which uses a mean-shift algorithm and ImageJ as a library. iTrack4U is a user-friendly software. Compared to manual tracking, it saves considerable amount of time to generate and analyze the variables characterizing cell migration, since they are automatically computed with iTrack4U. Another major interest of iTrack4U is the standardization and the lack of inter-experimenter differences. Finally, iTrack4U is adapted for phase contrast and fluorescent cells.

  13. Automated cell tracking and analysis in phase-contrast videos (iTrack4U: development of Java software based on combined mean-shift processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice P Cordelières

    Full Text Available Cell migration is a key biological process with a role in both physiological and pathological conditions. Locomotion of cells during embryonic development is essential for their correct positioning in the organism; immune cells have to migrate and circulate in response to injury. Failure of cells to migrate or an inappropriate acquisition of migratory capacities can result in severe defects such as altered pigmentation, skull and limb abnormalities during development, and defective wound repair, immunosuppression or tumor dissemination. The ability to accurately analyze and quantify cell migration is important for our understanding of development, homeostasis and disease. In vitro cell tracking experiments, using primary or established cell cultures, are often used to study migration as cells can quickly and easily be genetically or chemically manipulated. Images of the cells are acquired at regular time intervals over several hours using microscopes equipped with CCD camera. The locations (x,y,t of each cell on the recorded sequence of frames then need to be tracked. Manual computer-assisted tracking is the traditional method for analyzing the migratory behavior of cells. However, this processing is extremely tedious and time-consuming. Most existing tracking algorithms require experience in programming languages that are unfamiliar to most biologists. We therefore developed an automated cell tracking program, written in Java, which uses a mean-shift algorithm and ImageJ as a library. iTrack4U is a user-friendly software. Compared to manual tracking, it saves considerable amount of time to generate and analyze the variables characterizing cell migration, since they are automatically computed with iTrack4U. Another major interest of iTrack4U is the standardization and the lack of inter-experimenter differences. Finally, iTrack4U is adapted for phase contrast and fluorescent cells.

  14. The use of cell phone network data in traffic data collection and long-haul truckshed (geographic extent) tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzed the potential of cell phone positioning techniques in freight truck data collection and long-haul : truckshed (geographic extent) tracking. Freight truck identification and tracking algorithms were developed by means of : cell pho...

  15. In vivo tracking of magnetically labeled mesenchmal stem cells injected via renal arteries in kidney failure rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Junhui; Teng Gaojun; Ju Shenghong; Ma Zhanlong; Mai Xiaoli; Zhang Yu; Ma Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo depiction and tracking for magnetically labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stern cells (MSCs) in a renal failure rat model injected intravascularly using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Methods: Rat MSCs were isolated, purified, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. Prussian blue stain was employed for identifying intracellular irons. An acute renal failure in rat was induced by intramuscular injection of glycerol and MSCs were injected into renal arteries of 11 recipients (labeled cells in six, unlabeled cells in five). MR images of kidneys were obtained respectively before injection of MSCs, and immediately, 1, 3, 5, and 8 clays after transplantation. MR imaging findings were analyzed, which were correlated with histological findings. Results: Rat MSCs were successfully labeled, and labeling efficiency was almost 100%. Prussian blue staining of Fe 2 O 3 -PLL labeled cells revealed the presence of iron-containing vesicles or endosomes in the cytoplasm. In the renal failure model of rats, the labeled MSCs were demonstrated as signal intensity loss in renal cortex on T 2 * -weighted MR images. The signal intensity decrease was visualized up to days 8 after transplantation. Histological analyses showed that most Prussian blue staining-positive cells were well correlated with the area where a signal intensity loss was observed in MRI. Signal intensity decrease was not detected after transplantation of unlabeled cells. Conclusion: The rat MSCs can be effectively labeled with Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. 1.5-T MR imaging seems to be a good technique to monitor the magnetically labeled MSCs in vivo in renal failure rat model intravascularly administered, which may have much more potential values for studying the engraftment of stem cells in kidneys. (authors)

  16. Changed processing of visual sexual stimuli under GnRH-therapy – a single case study in pedophilia using eye tracking and fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiandrogen therapy (ADT) has been used for 30 years to treat pedophilic patients. The aim of the treatment is a reduction in sexual drive and, in consequence, a reduced risk of recidivism. Yet the therapeutic success of antiandrogens is uncertain especially regarding recidivism. Meta-analyses and reviews report only moderate and often mutually inconsistent effects. Case presentation Based on the case of a 47 year old exclusively pedophilic forensic inpatient, we examined the effectiveness of a new eye tracking method and a new functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-design in regard to the evaluation of ADT in pedophiles. We analyzed the potential of these methods in exploring the impact of ADT on automatic and controlled attentional processes in pedophiles. Eye tracking and fMRI measures were conducted before the initial ADT as well as four months after the onset of ADT. The patient simultaneously viewed an image of a child and an image of an adult while eye movements were measured. During the fMRI-measure the same stimuli were presented subliminally. Eye movements demonstrated that controlled attentional processes change under ADT, whereas automatic processes remained mostly unchanged. We assume that these results reflect either the increased ability of the patient to control his eye movements while viewing prepubertal stimuli or his better ability to manipulate his answer in a socially desirable manner. Unchanged automatic attentional processes could reflect the stable pedophilic preference of the patient. Using fMRI, the subliminal presentation of sexually relevant stimuli led to changed activation patterns under the influence of ADT in occipital and parietal brain regions, the hippocampus, and also in the orbitofrontal cortex. We suggest that even at an unconscious level ADT can lead to changed processing of sexually relevant stimuli, reflecting changes of cognitive and perceptive automatic processes. Conclusion We are convinced that our

  17. MRI findings of small cell neuroendocrime carcinoma of the uterine cervix: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, You Sun; Yi, Boem Ha; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lee, Min Hee; Choi, Seo Youn; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare primary neoplasm, accounting for less than 5% of all uterine cervical cancers. The tumor is known to have an aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. In this article, we present the MRI findings of 5 cases of pathologically-proven small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix, including diffusion-weighted images.

  18. TH-AB-BRA-08: Simulated Tumor Tracking in An MRI Linac for Lung Tumor Lesions Using the Monaco Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ward, S; Kim, A; McCann, C; Ruschin, M; Cheung, P; Sahgal, A; Keller, B [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To simulate tumor tracking in an Elekta MRI-linac (MRL) and to compare this tracking method with our current ITV approach in terms of OAR sparing for lung cancer patients. Methods: Five SABR-NSCLC patients with central lung tumors were selected for reasons of potential enhancement of tumor-tissue delineation using MRI. The Monaco TPS was used to compare the current clinical ITV approach to a simulated, novel tracking method which used a 7MV MRL beam in the presence of an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field (4D-MRL method). In the simulated tracking scenario, achieved using the virtual couch shift (VCS), the PTV was defined using an isotropic 5mm margin applied to the GTV of each phase, as acquired from an 8-phase amplitude-binned 4DCT. These VCS plans were optimized and weighted on each phase. The dose weighting was performed using the patient-specific breathing traces. The doses were accumulated on the inhale phase. The two methods were compared by assessing the OAR DVHs. Results: The 4D-MRL method resulted in a reduced target volume (by an average of 29% over all patients). The benefits of using an MRL tracking system depended on the tumor motion amplitude and the relative OAR motion (ROM) to the target. The reduction in mean doses to parallel organs was up to 3 Gy for the heart and 2.1 Gy for the lung. The reductions in maximum doses to serial organs were up to 9.4 Gy, 5.6 Gy, and 8.7 Gy for the esophagus, spinal cord, and the trachea, respectively. Serial organs benefited from MRL tracking when the ROM was ≥ 0.3 cm despite small tumor motion amplitude in some cases. Conclusions: This work demonstrated the potential benefit for an MRL tracking system to spare OARs in SABR-NSCLC patients with central tumors. The benefits are embodied in the target volume reduction. This project was made possible with the financial support of Elekta.

  19. The development of a 4D treatment planning methodology to simulate the tracking of central lung tumors in an MRI-linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ward, Shahad M; Kim, Anthony; McCann, Claire; Ruschin, Mark; Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun; Keller, Brian M

    2018-01-01

    Targeting and tracking of central lung tumors may be feasible on the Elekta MRI-linac (MRL) due to the soft-tissue visualization capabilities of MRI. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel treatment planning methodology to simulate tracking of central lung tumors with the MRL and to quantify the benefits in OAR sparing compared with the ITV approach. Full 4D-CT datasets for five central lung cancer patients were selected to simulate the condition of having 4D-pseudo-CTs derived from 4D-MRI data available on the MRL with real-time tracking capabilities. We used the MRL treatment planning system to generate two plans: (a) with a set of MLC-defined apertures around the target at each phase of the breathing ("4D-MRL" method); (b) with a fixed set of fields encompassing the maximum inhale and exhale of the breathing cycle ("ITV" method). For both plans, dose accumulation was performed onto a reference phase. To further study the potential benefits of a 4D-MRL method, the results were stratified by tumor motion amplitude, OAR-to-tumor proximity, and the relative OAR motion (ROM). With the 4D-MRL method, the reduction in mean doses was up to 3.0 Gy and 1.9 Gy for the heart and the lung. Moreover, the lung's V12.5 Gy was spared by a maximum of 300 cc. Maximum doses to serial organs were reduced by up to 6.1 Gy, 1.5 Gy, and 9.0 Gy for the esophagus, spinal cord, and the trachea, respectively. OAR dose reduction with our method depended on the tumor motion amplitude and the ROM. Some OARs with large ROMs and in close proximity to the tumor benefited from tracking despite small tumor amplitudes. We developed a novel 4D tracking methodology for the MRL for central lung tumors and quantified the potential dosimetric benefits compared with our current ITV approach. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Gadolinium-DOTA enhanced MRI of painful osseous crises in children with sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnerot, V.; Sebag, G.; Montalembert, M. de; Wioland, M.; Glorion, C.; Girot, R.; Lallemand, D.

    1994-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of gadolinium-DOTA enhanced MRI in the management of painful osseous crises in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), nine children with SCA underwent MRI, bone scans and ultrasonographic studies during 11 osseous crises. Imaging findings were compared with the final diagnosis: three acute osteomyelitis (AO) and 16 acute infarcts (AI). MRI could not differentiate AO from AI. The appearance of severe AI was very misleading and was similar to the usual appearance of AO, including soft tissue changes, periosteal reaction and patterns of enhancement. Gadolinium-DOTA enhanced MRI was useful for determining the anatomic site and extent of AO or AI and for distinguishing between necrotic material, fluid collection and vascularized inflammatory tissue. It can also help to guide the aspiration of intraosseous, subperiosteal and soft tissue fluid collections. (orig.)

  1. High-resolution cellular MRI: gadolinium and iron oxide nanoparticles for in-depth dual-cell imaging of engineered tissue constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Corato, Riccardo; Gazeau, Florence; Le Visage, Catherine; Fayol, Delphine; Levitz, Pierre; Lux, François; Letourneur, Didier; Luciani, Nathalie; Tillement, Olivier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-09-24

    Recent advances in cell therapy and tissue engineering opened new windows for regenerative medicine, but still necessitate innovative noninvasive imaging technologies. We demonstrate that high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows combining cellular-scale resolution with the ability to detect two cell types simultaneously at any tissue depth. Two contrast agents, based on iron oxide and gadolinium oxide rigid nanoplatforms, were used to "tattoo" endothelial cells and stem cells, respectively, with no impact on cell functions, including their capacity for differentiation. The labeled cells' contrast properties were optimized for simultaneous MRI detection: endothelial cells and stem cells seeded together in a polysaccharide-based scaffold material for tissue engineering appeared respectively in black and white and could be tracked, at the cellular level, both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, endothelial cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles could be remotely manipulated by applying a magnetic field, allowing the creation of vessel substitutes with in-depth detection of individual cellular components.

  2. Iron Administration before Stem Cell Harvest Enables MR Imaging Tracking after Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Khurana, Aman; Chapelin, Fanny; Beck, Graham; Lenkov, Olga D.; Donig, Jessica; Nejadnik, Hossein; Messing, Solomon; Derugin, Nikita; Chan, Ray Chun-Fai; Gaur, Amitabh; Sennino, Barbara; McDonald, Donald M.; Kempen, Paul J.; Tikhomirov, Grigory A.; Rao, Jianghong

    2013-01-01

    Transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could be detected and tracked with MR imaging, if the donor is treated with an intravenous injection of the Food and Drug Administration–approved iron supplement ferumoxytol prior to MSC harvesting.

  3. In vitro detection of circulating tumor cells compared by the CytoTrack and CellSearch methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, T.; Horn, P.; Nygaard, Ann-Britt

    2015-01-01

    .23/p = 0.09). Overall, the recovery of CytoTrack and CellSearch was 68.8 +/- 3.9 %/71.1 +/- 2.9 %, respectively (p = 0.58). In spite of different methodologies, CytoTrack and CellSearch found similar number of CTCs, when spiking was performed with the EpCAM and pan cytokeratin-positive cell line MCF-7......Comparison of two methods to detect circulating tumor cells (CTC) CytoTrack and CellSearch through recovery of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, spiked into blood collected from healthy donors. Spiking of a fixed number of EpCAM and pan-cytokeratin positive MCF-7 cells into 7.5 mL donor blood...... was performed by FACSAria flow sorting. The samples were shipped to either CytoTrack or CellSearch research facilities within 48 h, where evaluation of MCF-7 recovery was performed. CytoTrack and CellSearch analyses were performed simultaneously. Recoveries of MCF-7 single cells, cells in clusters, and clusters...

  4. CT and MRI features of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas with pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, M.-Y.; Pan, K.-T.; Chu, S.-Y.; Hung, C.-F.; Wu, R.-C.; Tseng, J.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To document the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas and to correlate them with pathological findings to determine the unique imaging manifestations of this rare subtype tumour of the pancreas. Materials and methods: From January 1986 to August 2008, six patients (five men and one woman, mean age 61.3 years) with histologically proven acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas underwent CT (n = 6) and MRI (n = 4) examinations. The imaging features of each tumour were documented and compared with pathological findings. Results: The tumours were distributed in the head (n = 4), body (n = 1), and tail (n = 1) of the pancreas. Four masses (67%) were uniformly or partially well-defined with thin, enhancing capsules. Central cystic components were found in five tumours (83%). Two tumours (33%) exhibited intratumoural haemorrhage, and one tumour (17%) had amorphous intratumoural calcification. In both CT and MRI, the tumours enhanced less than the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. The signal intensity on MRI was predominantly T1 hypointense and T2 iso- to hyperintense. Conclusion: Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas has distinct imaging features, and both CT and MRI are useful and complementary imaging methods.

  5. Simultaneous cell tracking and image alignment in 3D CLSM imagery of growing arabidopsis thaliana sepals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fick, R.H.J.; Fedorov, D.; Roeder, A.H.K.; Manjunath, B.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this research we propose a combined cell matching and image alignment method for tracking cells based on their nuclear locations in 3D fluorescent Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) image sequences. We then apply it to study the cell division pattern in the developing sepal of the small

  6. Real-time tracking of dissociation of hyperpolarized 89Y-DTPA: a model for degradation of open-chain Gd3+ MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sarah; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Gadolinium (Gd) complexes are widely used relaxation-based clinical contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Gd-based MRI contrast agents with open-chain ligand such as Gd-DTPA, commercially known as magnevist, are less stable compared to Gd complexes with macrocyclic ligands such as GdDOTA (Dotarem). The dissociation of Gd-DPTA into Gd ion and DTPA ligand under certain biological conditions such as high zinc levels can potentially cause kidney damage. Since Gd is paramagnetic, direct NMR detection of the Gd-DTPA dissociation is quite challenging due to ultra-short relaxation times. In this work, we have investigated Y-DTPA as a model for Gd-DPTA dissociation under high zinc content solutions. Using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), the 89Y NMR signal is amplified by several thousand-fold. Due to the the relatively long T1 relaxation time of 89Y which translates to hyperpolarization lifetime of several minutes, the dissociation of Y-DTPA can be tracked in real-time by hyperpolarized 89Y NMR spectroscopy. Dissociation kinetic rates and implications on the degradation of open-chain Gd3+ MRI contrast agents will be discussed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Defense Award Number W81XWH-14-1-0048 and by the Robert A. Welch Foundation research Grant Number AT-1877.

  7. Cell therapy in myocardial infarction: emphasis on the role of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Yuxiang; Bogaert, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Despite tremendous progress in myocardial infarct (MI) treatment, mortality rates remain substantial. Permanent loss of cardiomyocytes after ischemic injury, results in irreversible loss of myocardial contractility, reduction in ventricular performance, and may initiate the development of dilated heart failure. The discovery that pluripotent progenitor cells bear the capacity to differentiate to mature cardiac cells raised the hope of cell-based regenerative medicine. Engraftment of stem cells in the damaged myocardium, repair and functional improvement appeared suddenly a nearby reality. Promising results in animal models, and preliminary studies reporting the feasibility and safety of adult stem cell therapy in MI patients led to the first double-blinded randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The initial great enthusiasm for this paradigm shift in MI treatment has been tempered by the mainly negative or modestly positive study findings. Before new, larger clinical trials can be initiated, a number of critical questions and issues need to be considered starting with a scrutinized analysis of currently available data to extending our knowledge of the mechanism of scarless myocardial regeneration. Cardiac cell therapy necessitates a multidisciplinary approach, whereby imaging, in particular MRI, and the input of the imaging specialist is crucial to the success of cardiac cell regenerative medicine. MRI is an appealing technique for cell trafficking depicting engraftment, differentiation and survival. Endomyocardial cell administration can be achieved safely with MR fluoroscopy and MRI is without any doubt the most accurate and reproducible technique to measure study end-points. (orig.)

  8. Cell Labeling for 19F MRI: New and Improved Approach to Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Williams

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This report describes novel perfluorocarbon (PFC nanoemulsions designed to improve ex vivo cell labeling for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. 19F MRI is a powerful non-invasive technique for monitoring cells of the immune system in vivo, where cells are labeled ex vivo with PFC nanoemulsions in cell culture. The quality of 19F MRI is directly affected by the quality of ex vivo PFC cell labeling. When co-cultured with cells for longer periods of time, nanoemulsions tend to settle due to high specific weight of PFC oils (1.5–2.0 g/mL. This in turn can decrease efficacy of excess nanoemulsion removal and reliability of the cell labeling in vitro. To solve this problem, novel PFC nanoemulsions are reported which demonstrate lack of sedimentation and high stability under cell labeling conditions. They are monodisperse, have small droplet size (~130 nm and low polydispersity (<0.15, show a single peak in the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum at −71.4 ppm and possess high fluorine content. The droplet size and polydispersity remained unchanged after 160 days of follow up at three temperatures (4, 25 and 37 °C. Further, stressors such as elevated temperature in the presence of cells, and centrifugation, did not affect the nanoemulsion droplet size and polydispersity. Detailed synthetic methodology and in vitro testing for these new PFC nanoemulsions is presented.

  9. Daily Tracking of Glioblastoma Resection Cavity, Cerebral Edema, and Tumor Volume with MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shahil; Gajjar, Shefali R; Padgett, Kyle R; Asher, David; Stoyanova, Radka; Ford, John C; Mellon, Eric A

    2018-03-19

    Radiation therapy (RT) plays a critical role in the treatment of glioblastoma. Studies of brain imaging during RT for glioblastoma have demonstrated changes in the brain during RT. However, frequent or daily utilization of standalone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans during RT have limited feasibility. The recent release of the tri-cobalt-60 MRI-guided RT (MR-IGRT) device (ViewRay MRIdian, Cleveland, OH) allows for daily brain MRI for the RT setup. Daily MRI of three postoperative patients undergoing RT and temozolomide for glioblastoma over a six-week course allowed for the identification of changes to the cavity, edema, and visible tumor on a daily basis. The volumes and dimensions of the resection cavities, edema, and T2-hyperintense tumor were measured. A general trend of daily decreases in cavity measurements was observed in all patients. For the one patient with edema, a trend of daily increases followed by a trend of daily decreases were observed. These results suggest that daily MRI could be used for onboard resimulation and adaptive RT for future fluctuations in the sizes of brain tumors, cavities, or cystic components. This could improve tumor targeting and reduce RT of healthy brain tissue.

  10. Central nervous system lesions in adult T-cell leukaemia: MRI and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, M.; Korogi, Y.; Shigematsu, Y.; Liang, L.; Takahashi, M. [Department of Radiology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Matsuoka, M. [Second Division of Internal Medicine, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Department of Pathology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Jhono, M. [Department of Dermatology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Eto, K. [The National Institute for Minamata Disease, Minamata (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is a T-cell lymphoid neoplasm caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Radiological findings in central nervous system (CNS) involvement have not been well characterised. We reviewed the MRI of 18 patients with ATL who developed new neurological symptoms or signs, and pathology specimens from a 53-year-old woman who died of ATL. MRI findings were divided into three categories: definite, probable, and other abnormal. Definite and probable findings were defined as ATL-related. The characteristic findings were multiple parenchymal masses with or without contrast enhancement adjacent to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaced and the deep grey matter of both cerebral hemispheres, plus leptomeningeal lesion. One patient had both cerebral and spinal cord lesions. Other abnormal findings in eight patients included one case of leukoencephalopathy caused by methotrexate. The histology findings consisted of clusters of tumour cells along perivascular spaces, and scattered infiltration of the parenchyma, with nests of tumour cells. Leptomeningeal infiltration by tumour spread into the parenchyma and secondary degeneration of the neuronal tracts was observed. MRI was useful for detecting CNS invasion by ATL and differentiating it from other abnormalities. The MRI findings seemed to correlate well with the histological changes. (orig.)

  11. Central nervous system lesions in adult T-cell leukaemia: MRI and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, M.; Korogi, Y.; Shigematsu, Y.; Liang, L.; Takahashi, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Jhono, M.; Eto, K.

    2002-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is a T-cell lymphoid neoplasm caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Radiological findings in central nervous system (CNS) involvement have not been well characterised. We reviewed the MRI of 18 patients with ATL who developed new neurological symptoms or signs, and pathology specimens from a 53-year-old woman who died of ATL. MRI findings were divided into three categories: definite, probable, and other abnormal. Definite and probable findings were defined as ATL-related. The characteristic findings were multiple parenchymal masses with or without contrast enhancement adjacent to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaced and the deep grey matter of both cerebral hemispheres, plus leptomeningeal lesion. One patient had both cerebral and spinal cord lesions. Other abnormal findings in eight patients included one case of leukoencephalopathy caused by methotrexate. The histology findings consisted of clusters of tumour cells along perivascular spaces, and scattered infiltration of the parenchyma, with nests of tumour cells. Leptomeningeal infiltration by tumour spread into the parenchyma and secondary degeneration of the neuronal tracts was observed. MRI was useful for detecting CNS invasion by ATL and differentiating it from other abnormalities. The MRI findings seemed to correlate well with the histological changes. (orig.)

  12. Influence of MRI contrast media on histamine release from mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Tomasz; Jakubowski, Lucjusz

    2012-07-01

    Mast cells, owing to diversity of secreted mediators, play a crucial role in the regulation of inflammatory response. Together with basophils, mast cells constitute a central pathogenetic element of anaphylactic (IgE-dependent) and anaphylactoid (IgE-independent) reactions. In severe cases, generalized degranulation of mast cells may cause symptoms of anaphylactic shock. The influence of the classical, iodine-based contrast media on mastocyte degranulation has been fully described. Our objective was to determine the influence of the gadolinium-based MRI contrast media on histamine release from mast cells and to compare the activity of ionic and non-ionic preparations of contrast media. To determine the intensity of mast cell degranulation, we used an experimental model based on mastocytes isolated from rat peritoneal fluid. Purified suspensions of mast cells were incubated with various concentrations of Gd-DTPA and Gd-DTPA-BMA, and solutions of PEG 600 which served as a non-toxic osmotic stimulus. The intensity of mast cell activation was presented as mean percentage of histamine released from cells after incubation. The obtained results demonstrate that both ionic and non-ionic preparations of the MRI contrast media are able to induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. It was also proved that the non-ionic MRI contrast media stimulate mast cells markedly more weakly than ionic contrast media at identical concentration. The aforementioned results may suggest a more profitable safety profile of the non-ionic contrast preparations. We may also conclude that triggering of mast cell degranulation after incubation with the solutions of MRI contrast media results from non-specific osmotic stimulation and direct toxicity of free ionic residues.

  13. Influence of MRI contrast media on histamine release from mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Tomasz; Jakubowski, Lucjusz

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells, owing to diversity of secreted mediators, play a crucial role in the regulation of inflammatory response. Together with basophils, mast cells constitute a central pathogenetic element of anaphylactic (IgE-dependent) and anaphylactoid (IgE-independent) reactions. In severe cases, generalized degranulation of mast cells may cause symptoms of anaphylactic shock. The influence of the classical, iodine-based contrast media on mastocyte degranulation has been fully described. Our objective was to determine the influence of the gadolinium-based MRI contrast media on histamine release from mast cells and to compare the activity of ionic and non-ionic preparations of contrast media. To determine the intensity of mast cell degranulation, we used an experimental model based on mastocytes isolated from rat peritoneal fluid. Purified suspensions of mast cells were incubated with various concentrations of Gd-DTPA and Gd-DTPA-BMA, and solutions of PEG 600 which served as a non-toxic osmotic stimulus. The intensity of mast cell activation was presented as mean percentage of histamine released from cells after incubation. The obtained results demonstrate that both ionic and non-ionic preparations of the MRI contrast media are able to induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. It was also proved that the non-ionic MRI contrast media stimulate mast cells markedly more weakly than ionic contrast media at identical concentration. The aforementioned results may suggest a more profitable safety profile of the non-ionic contrast preparations. We may also conclude that triggering of mast cell degranulation after incubation with the solutions of MRI contrast media results from non-specific osmotic stimulation and direct toxicity of free ionic residues

  14. Robust Individual-Cell/Object Tracking via PCANet Deep Network in Biomedicine and Computer Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineng Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracking individual-cell/object over time is important in understanding drug treatment effects on cancer cells and video surveillance. A fundamental problem of individual-cell/object tracking is to simultaneously address the cell/object appearance variations caused by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In this paper, inspired by the architecture of deep learning, we propose a robust feature learning method for constructing discriminative appearance models without large-scale pretraining. Specifically, in the initial frames, an unsupervised method is firstly used to learn the abstract feature of a target by exploiting both classic principal component analysis (PCA algorithms with recent deep learning representation architectures. We use learned PCA eigenvectors as filters and develop a novel algorithm to represent a target by composing of a PCA-based filter bank layer, a nonlinear layer, and a patch-based pooling layer, respectively. Then, based on the feature representation, a neural network with one hidden layer is trained in a supervised mode to construct a discriminative appearance model. Finally, to alleviate the tracker drifting problem, a sample update scheme is carefully designed to keep track of the most representative and diverse samples during tracking. We test the proposed tracking method on two standard individual cell/object tracking benchmarks to show our tracker's state-of-the-art performance.

  15. MRI/MRA evaluation of sickle cell disease of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a major cause of pediatric stroke. Understanding the disease that affects the brain as infarctions, both clinically apparent and silent, requires an understanding of how the blood vessels are affected, the way in which both the brain and the blood vessels are imaged by MRI and MRA and the mechanism of injury. (orig.)

  16. MRI versus CT for detecting cartilage invasion in patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, Inge; Hooft, Lotty; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Pameijer, Frank A.; de Bree, Remco; Stegeman, Inge

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine and compare the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative conventional MRI and conventional CT for detecting cartilage invasion in patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, who

  17. Cerebral lesions on 7 tesla MRI in patients with sickle cell anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Land, Veronica; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Biemond, Bart J.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Mutsaerts, Henri J. M. M.; Visser, Fredy; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are at a high risk to develop cerebral damage. Most common are silent cerebral infarctions (SCIs), visible as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on MRI in a patient without neurological deficits. The etiology of SCIs remains largely unclear. In addition,

  18. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  19. Quantification of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (SPIO)-labeled Cells Using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Ali M; Arbab, Ali S; Iskander, ASM; Jiang, Quan; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To show the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled cells. Materials and Methods Lymphocytes and 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were labeled with Ferumoxides-Protamine Sulfate complex (FE-PRO). Cells were labeled efficiently (more than 95%) and iron concentration inside each cell was measured by spectrophotometry (4.77-30.21 picograms). Phantom tubes containing different number of labeled or unlabeled cells as well as different concentrations of FE-PRO were made. In addition, labeled and unlabeled cells were injected into fresh and fixed rat brains. Results Cellular viability and proliferation of labeled and unlabeled cells were shown to be similar. T2-weighted images were acquired using 7 T and 3 T MRI systems and R2 maps of the tubes containing cells, free FE-PRO, and brains were made. There was a strong linear correlation between R2 values and labeled cell numbers but the regression lines were different for the lymphocytes and gliosarcoma cells. Similarly, there was strong correlation between R2 values and free iron. However, free iron had higher R2 values than the labeled cells for the same concentration of iron. Conclusion Our data indicated that in vivo quantification of labeled cells can be done by careful consideration of different factors and specific control groups. PMID:17623892

  20. Cell biology, MRI and geometry: insight into a microscopic/macroscopic marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Sérgio Almeida; Gowdak, Luís Henrique W; Buckberg, Gerald; Krieger, José Eduardo

    2006-04-01

    The concept of cell therapy as an adjunctive therapy to myocardial surgical revascularization for patients with severe coronary artery disease is illustrated by two case reports of ischemic cardiac disease that were unsuitable for revascularization by coronary grafting. The potential interaction of cell therapy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of viability, and left ventricle (LV) restoration is described. Each patient had an ejection fraction below 30%, a relatively conical heart, and MRI gadolinium scan showing predominantly viable muscle. Intramyocardial injections of autologous bone marrow-derived cells (BMC) were performed along with either incomplete coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) (to mother regions) or with transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR). An improvement in contractile function was seen at 6-12-month intervals after the procedure. The implications of possible underlying mechanisms of improvement in both myocardial perfusion and contractility suggest the striking importance of both micro- and macroenvironment for any cell-based therapeutic strategy. These observations imply that the interaction of cell biology, viability by MRI and geometry may be important in the future, as geometry can be restored surgically, and the new architectural form may develop enhanced function if it contains viable tissue and cell-based treatment can be delivered.

  1. Convolutional Deep Belief Networks for Single-Cell/Object Tracking in Computational Biology and Computer Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Bineng; Pan, Shengnan; Zhang, Hongbo; Wang, Tian; Du, Jixiang; Chen, Duansheng; Cao, Liujuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose deep architecture to dynamically learn the most discriminative features from data for both single-cell and object tracking in computational biology and computer vision. Firstly, the discriminative features are automatically learned via a convolutional deep belief network (CDBN). Secondly, we design a simple yet effective method to transfer features learned from CDBNs on the source tasks for generic purpose to the object tracking tasks using only limited amount of tra...

  2. Labyrinthitis ossificans in a child with sickle cell disease: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Benjamin P.; Saito, Naoko; Wang, Jimmy J.; Mian, Asim Z.; Sakai, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The association between sensorineural hearing loss and sickle cell disease has been described, and labyrinthine hemorrhage has been reported with sickle cell disease. We report the CT and MRI findings of labyrinthitis ossificans in a child with sickle cell disease who presented with sensorineural hearing loss. Labyrinthitis ossificans is associated with an infectious, inflammatory, or destructive insult to the membranous labyrinth; however, it has not been specifically described with sickle cell disease. Recognition of this condition is important because it affects both management and prognosis of this disease. (orig.)

  3. Cell survival in carbon beams - comparison of amorphous track model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, L.; Greilich, S.; Korcyl, M.

    Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under i....... Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams. 4.Tsuruoka C, Suzuki M, Kanai T, et al. LET and ion species dependence for cell killing in normal human skin fibroblasts. Radiat Res. 2005;163:494-500.......Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under ion....... [2] . In addition, a new approach based on microdosimetric distributions is presented and investigated [3] . Material and methods: A suitable software library embrasing the mentioned amorphous track models including numerous submodels with respect to delta-electron range models, radial dose...

  4. Chondroblastoma and clear cell chondrosarcoma: radiological and MRI characteristics with histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaim, Achim H.; Huegli, Rolf; Bonel, Harald M.; Jundt, Gernot

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze and compare the radiological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of chondroblastoma and clear cell chondrosarcoma with histopathological correlation. Design and patients: Twelve patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma and of another four patients with clear cell chondrosarcoma were investigated by radiographs and MRI (T1-, T2-weighted sequences, intravenous gadolinium application). Additionally, the clinical and radiologic data of seven cases of clear cell chondrosarcoma without available MRI were considered. The localization, calcification of tumor matrix, periosteal reaction, cortical bone and patterns of bone destruction were analyzed according to the Lodwick radiological grading system (LRGS). The signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences, characteristics of contrast enhancement, associated bone marrow edema, soft tissue reaction and joint involvement were evaluated. Histopathological specimens were available in all cases. Results: The age of patients with chondroblastoma (range 15-59 years, mean 22.3 years) was lower than that of those with clear cell chondrosarcoma (range 19-61 years, mean 36.6 years), and the lesions were smaller in the chondroblastoma group (range 1-4 cm, mean 2.3 cm) than in patients with clear cell chondrosarcoma (range 3-7.5 cm, mean 5.2 cm). The chondroblastomas were more confined to the epiphysis (10/12) than the clear cell chondrosarcomas. All chondroblastomas and clear cell chondrosarcomas except one were classified as grade 1A or 1B according to the LRGS; one clear cell chondrosarcoma was judged as grade 2. Signal intensity of the tumors on MRI was very heterogeneous in both groups. High signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images in chondroblastoma mostly corresponded to areas with aneurysmal bone cyst components and in clear cell chondrosarcoma to islands of hyaline cartilage. Contrast enhancement occurred in all tumors and tended to be more intense with clear cell

  5. Chondroblastoma and clear cell chondrosarcoma: radiological and MRI characteristics with histopathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaim, Achim H.; Huegli, Rolf [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Basle (Switzerland); Bonel, Harald M. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital, Munich-Grosshadern (Germany); Jundt, Gernot [Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Basle (Switzerland)

    2002-02-01

    Objective: To analyze and compare the radiological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of chondroblastoma and clear cell chondrosarcoma with histopathological correlation. Design and patients: Twelve patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma and of another four patients with clear cell chondrosarcoma were investigated by radiographs and MRI (T1-, T2-weighted sequences, intravenous gadolinium application). Additionally, the clinical and radiologic data of seven cases of clear cell chondrosarcoma without available MRI were considered. The localization, calcification of tumor matrix, periosteal reaction, cortical bone and patterns of bone destruction were analyzed according to the Lodwick radiological grading system (LRGS). The signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences, characteristics of contrast enhancement, associated bone marrow edema, soft tissue reaction and joint involvement were evaluated. Histopathological specimens were available in all cases. Results: The age of patients with chondroblastoma (range 15-59 years, mean 22.3 years) was lower than that of those with clear cell chondrosarcoma (range 19-61 years, mean 36.6 years), and the lesions were smaller in the chondroblastoma group (range 1-4 cm, mean 2.3 cm) than in patients with clear cell chondrosarcoma (range 3-7.5 cm, mean 5.2 cm). The chondroblastomas were more confined to the epiphysis (10/12) than the clear cell chondrosarcomas. All chondroblastomas and clear cell chondrosarcomas except one were classified as grade 1A or 1B according to the LRGS; one clear cell chondrosarcoma was judged as grade 2. Signal intensity of the tumors on MRI was very heterogeneous in both groups. High signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images in chondroblastoma mostly corresponded to areas with aneurysmal bone cyst components and in clear cell chondrosarcoma to islands of hyaline cartilage. Contrast enhancement occurred in all tumors and tended to be more intense with clear cell

  6. Gadolinium and fluorescent bi-functionally labeling and in vitro MRI of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jun; Zhou Cuiping; Cheng Li'na; Duan Xiaohui; Liang Biling; Fu Yue; Bi Xiaobin; Liu Yu; Deng Yubin

    2008-01-01

    .0 μl bi-functional labeling agent was (0.1884±0.0151), (0.1878±0.0190), (0.1741±0.0160), (0.1135±0.0215), (0.1079±0.0145) and (0.0811±0.0079), respectively. The corresponding optical absorption value of unlabeled MSCs was (0.1940±0.0116). The optical absorption value of labeled cells was not affected in case of less than 30.0 μl of Gd-DTPA (q'=0.2225-0.9458, P>0.05). The apoptosis index for labeled cells and unlabeled cells were 5.08% and 3.86%, respectively. On T 1 WI, the signal intensity and T 1 relaxation time of unlabeled cells and labeled cells were 240.3±24.7 and (2457±56) ms, 336.2±20.7 and (1102±64)ms, respectively, and there were significant statistical difference (t=12.656, 17.889, P 1 WI was 5 x 10 3 . After routine passage, the gadolinium in the cells gradually decreased and could be tracked by MRI until the fifth passage. Conclusions: The gadolinium and fluorescent bi-functionally labeling rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell by using the transfection agent of polyethylenimine is feasible, efficient and safe. The labeled cells could be tracked in vitro on MR imaging. (authors)

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament tracks fMRI correlates of attention at the first attack of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorella, C; Direnzo, V; Taurisano, P; Romano, R; Ruggieri, M; Zoccolella, S; Mastrapasqua, M; Popolizio, T; Blasi, G; Bertolino, A; Trojano, M

    2015-04-01

    Identifying markers of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) is extremely challenging since it means supplying potential biomarkers for neuroprotective therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between fMRI correlates of attention performance and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light chain (NFL) levels in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) suggestive of MS. Twenty-one untreated, cognitively preserved CIS patients underwent BOLD-fMRI while performing the Variable Attentional Control (VAC) task, a cognitive paradigm requiring increasing levels of attentional control processing. CSF NFL was assessed by ELISA technique. SPM8 random-effects models were used for statistical analyses of fMRI data (p<0.05 corrected). Repeated-measures ANOVA on imaging data showed an interaction between attentional control load and NFL levels in the right putamen. At the high level of attentional control demand CIS patients with "low NFL levels" showed greater activity in the putamen compared with subjects with "high NFL levels" (p=0.001). These results are independent of cognitive impairment index. Our findings suggest a relationship between CSF NFL levels and load-dependent failure of putaminal recruitment pattern during sustained attention in CIS and suggest a role of CSF NFL as a marker of subclinical abnormality of cognitive pathway recruitment in CIS. © The Author(s), 2014.

  8. Gold nanoparticles for non-invasive cell tracking with CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Rinat; Betzer, Oshra; Barnoy, Eran; Motiei, Menachem; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2018-02-01

    Cell-based therapies use living cells with therapeutic traits to treat various diseases. This is a beneficial alternative for diseases that existing medicine cannot cure efficiently. However, inconsistent results in clinical trials are preventing the advancement and implementation of cell-based therapy. In order to explain such results, there is a need to discover the fate of the transplanted cells. To answer this need, we developed a technique for noninvasive in vivo cell tracking, which uses gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for CT imaging. Herein, we investigate the design principles of this technique for intramuscular transplantation of therapeutic cells. Longitudinal studies were performed, demonstrating the ability to track cells over long periods of time. As few as 500 cells could be detected and a way to quantify the number of cells visualized by CT was demonstrated. This cell-tracking technology has the potential to become an essential tool in pre-clinical studies as well as in clinical trials and advance cell therapy.

  9. The probabilities of one- and multi-track events for modeling radiation-induced cell kill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Uwe; Vasi, Fabiano; Besserer, Juergen [University of Zuerich, Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Zurich (Switzerland); Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-08-15

    In view of the clinical importance of hypofractionated radiotherapy, track models which are based on multi-hit events are currently reinvestigated. These models are often criticized, because it is believed that the probability of multi-track hits is negligible. In this work, the probabilities for one- and multi-track events are determined for different biological targets. The obtained probabilities can be used with nano-dosimetric cluster size distributions to obtain the parameters of track models. We quantitatively determined the probabilities for one- and multi-track events for 100, 500 and 1000 keV electrons, respectively. It is assumed that the single tracks are statistically independent and follow a Poisson distribution. Three different biological targets were investigated: (1) a DNA strand (2 nm scale); (2) two adjacent chromatin fibers (60 nm); and (3) fiber loops (300 nm). It was shown that the probabilities for one- and multi-track events are increasing with energy, size of the sensitive target structure, and dose. For a 2 x 2 x 2 nm{sup 3} target, one-track events are around 10,000 times more frequent than multi-track events. If the size of the sensitive structure is increased to 100-300 nm, the probabilities for one- and multi-track events are of the same order of magnitude. It was shown that target theories can play a role for describing radiation-induced cell death if the targets are of the size of two adjacent chromatin fibers or fiber loops. The obtained probabilities can be used together with the nano-dosimetric cluster size distributions to determine model parameters for target theories. (orig.)

  10. Using Single-Protein Tracking to Study Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orré, Thomas; Mehidi, Amine; Massou, Sophie; Rossier, Olivier; Giannone, Grégory

    2018-01-01

    To get a complete understanding of cell migration, it is critical to study its orchestration at the molecular level. Since the recent developments in single-molecule imaging, it is now possible to study molecular phenomena at the single-molecule level inside living cells. In this chapter, we describe how such approaches have been and can be used to decipher molecular mechanisms involved in cell migration.

  11. Tracking and Finding Slow-Proliferating/Quiescent Cancer Stem Cells with Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lee, Hsiao-Wen; Lin, Ruey-Jen; Huang, Chih-Wei; Liao, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Fang, Jim-Min; Lee, Te-Chang; Yu, Alice L; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2015-09-09

    Quiescent cancer stem cells (CSCs) have long been considered to be a source of tumor initiation. However, identification and isolation of these cells have been hampered by the fact that commonly used fluorescent markers are not sufficiently stable, both chemically and photophysically, to allow tracking over an extended period of time. Here, it is shown that fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are well suited for this application. Genotoxicity tests of FNDs with comet and micronucleus assays for human fibroblasts and breast cancer cells indicate that the nanoparticles neither cause DNA damage nor impair cell growth. Using AS-B145-1R breast cancer cells as the model cell line for CSC, it is found that the FND labeling outperforms 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) in regards to its long-term tracking capability (>20 d). Moreover, through a quantification of their stem cell activity by measuring mammosphere-forming efficiencies (MFEs) and self-renewal rates, the FND-positive cells are identified to have an MFE twice as high as that of the FND-negative cells isolated from the same dissociated mammospheres. Thus, the nanoparticle-based labeling technique provides an effective new tool for tracking and finding slow-proliferating/quiescent CSCs in cancer research. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma: MRI features and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; Motamedi, Kambiz [UCLA-Santa Monica Medical Center and Orthopedic Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Santa Monica, CA (United States); James, Aaron W. [UCLA-Santa Monica Medical Center and Orthopedic Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Santa Monica, CA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) represents a rare subclassification of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). We present a case of a 21-year-old female who presented with a 1-month history of pain in the left buttock and hip, tender left inguinal lymph nodes, fevers, and night sweats. Percutaneous core needle biopsy was diagnostic for SPTCL with CD8+ cells positive for cytotoxic granules. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of SPTCL with a review of the literature are discussed. (orig.)

  13. CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal sarcoma: Differentiation from squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Baek, Sora; Park, Min Woo; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Rho, Young Soo [Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To evaluate computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) findings for the differentiation of sinonasal sarcoma from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We retrospectively reviewed CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT results in 20 patients with pathologically proven sinonasal sarcoma (n = 7) and SCC (n = 13). Imaging characteristics of tumors, such as the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, local tumor invasion, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were analyzed and compared between sarcoma and SCC. The SUVmax of sarcomas (7.4 ± 2.1) was significantly lower than the SUVmax of the SCCs (14.3 ± 4.5) (p = 0.0013). However, no significant difference in the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, and local tumor invasion was observed between sarcoma and SCC. Although CT and MR imaging features are nonspecific, FDG PET/CT is useful in distinguishing between sinonasal sarcoma and SCC based on the SUVmax value.

  14. CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal sarcoma: Differentiation from squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Baek, Sora; Park, Min Woo; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Rho, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) findings for the differentiation of sinonasal sarcoma from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We retrospectively reviewed CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT results in 20 patients with pathologically proven sinonasal sarcoma (n = 7) and SCC (n = 13). Imaging characteristics of tumors, such as the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, local tumor invasion, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were analyzed and compared between sarcoma and SCC. The SUVmax of sarcomas (7.4 ± 2.1) was significantly lower than the SUVmax of the SCCs (14.3 ± 4.5) (p = 0.0013). However, no significant difference in the shape, size, margin, MRI signal intensity, pattern of enhancement, and local tumor invasion was observed between sarcoma and SCC. Although CT and MR imaging features are nonspecific, FDG PET/CT is useful in distinguishing between sinonasal sarcoma and SCC based on the SUVmax value

  15. Cellular track model of biological damage to mammalian cell cultures from galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment of biological damage from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a current interest for exploratory class space missions where the highly ionizing, high-energy, high-charge ions (HZE) particles are the major concern. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values determined by ground-based experiments with HZE particles are well described by a parametric track theory of cell inactivation. Using the track model and a deterministic GCR transport code, the biological damage to mammalian cell cultures is considered for 1 year in free space at solar minimum for typical spacecraft shielding. Included are the effects of projectile and target fragmentation. The RBE values for the GCR spectrum which are fluence-dependent in the track model are found to be more severe than the quality factors identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 26 and seem to obey a simple scaling law with the duration period in free space.

  16. Cellular track model of biological damage to mammalian cell cultures from galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J.W.; Townsend, L.W.; Nealy, J.E.; Shinn, J.L.

    1991-02-01

    The assessment of biological damage from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a current interest for exploratory class space missions where the highly ionizing, high-energy, high-charge ions (HZE) particles are the major concern. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values determined by ground-based experiments with HZE particles are well described by a parametric track theory of cell inactivation. Using the track model and a deterministic GCR transport code, the biological damage to mammalian cell cultures is considered for 1 year in free space at solar minimum for typical spacecraft shielding. Included are the effects of projectile and target fragmentation. The RBE values for the GCR spectrum which are fluence-dependent in the track model are found to be more severe than the quality factors identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 26 and seem to obey a simple scaling law with the duration period in free space

  17. Tracking the Evolution of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; McGranahan, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Background Among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), data on intratumor heterogeneity and cancer genome evolution have been limited to small retrospective cohorts. We wanted to prospectively investigate intratumor heterogeneity in relation to clinical outcome and to determine...... as a prognostic predictor. (Funded by Cancer Research UK and others; TRACERx ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01888601 .)....

  18. Lightning Jump Algorithm and Relation to Thunderstorm Cell Tracking, GLM Proxy and Other Meteorological Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Cecil, Daniel J.; Bateman, Monte

    2012-01-01

    The lightning jump algorithm has a robust history in correlating upward trends in lightning to severe and hazardous weather occurrence. The algorithm uses the correlation between the physical principles that govern an updraft's ability to produce microphysical and kinematic conditions conducive for electrification and its role in the development of severe weather conditions. Recent work has demonstrated that the lightning jump algorithm concept holds significant promise in the operational realm, aiding in the identification of thunderstorms that have potential to produce severe or hazardous weather. However, a large amount of work still needs to be completed in spite of these positive results. The total lightning jump algorithm is not a stand-alone concept that can be used independent of other meteorological measurements, parameters, and techniques. For example, the algorithm is highly dependent upon thunderstorm tracking to build lightning histories on convective cells. Current tracking methods show that thunderstorm cell tracking is most reliable and cell histories are most accurate when radar information is incorporated with lightning data. In the absence of radar data, the cell tracking is a bit less reliable but the value added by the lightning information is much greater. For optimal application, the algorithm should be integrated with other measurements that assess storm scale properties (e.g., satellite, radar). Therefore, the recent focus of this research effort has been assessing the lightning jump's relation to thunderstorm tracking, meteorological parameters, and its potential uses in operational meteorology. Furthermore, the algorithm must be tailored for the optically-based GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), as what has been observed using Very High Frequency Lightning Mapping Array (VHF LMA) measurements will not exactly translate to what will be observed by GLM due to resolution and other instrument differences. Herein, we present some of

  19. Automatic tracking of red blood cells in micro channels using OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Vânia; Rodrigues, Pedro J.; Pereira, Ana I.; Lima, Rui

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to developan automatic method able to track red blood cells (RBCs) trajectories flowing through a microchannel using the Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV). The developed method is based on optical flux calculation assisted by the maximization of the template-matching product. The experimental results show a good functional performance of this method.

  20. Cancer cell imaging by stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope with resonance tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Park, Doo-Jae; Jeong, Mun-Seok; Choi, Geun-Chang; Lee, Seung-Gol; Byeon, Clare-Chisu; Choi, Soo-Bong

    2014-01-01

    We report on a successful topographical and optical imaging of various cancer cells in liquid and in air by using a stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope that utilizes a resonance tracking method. We observed a clear dehydration which gives rise to a decrease in the cell volume down to 51%. In addition, a micro-ball lens effect due to the round-shaped young cancer cells was observed from near-field imaging, where the refractive index of young cancer cells was deduced.

  1. Cancer cell imaging by stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope with resonance tracking method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Doo-Jae; Jeong, Mun-Seok [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Geun-Chang [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Gol [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Byeon, Clare-Chisu [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo-Bong [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We report on a successful topographical and optical imaging of various cancer cells in liquid and in air by using a stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope that utilizes a resonance tracking method. We observed a clear dehydration which gives rise to a decrease in the cell volume down to 51%. In addition, a micro-ball lens effect due to the round-shaped young cancer cells was observed from near-field imaging, where the refractive index of young cancer cells was deduced.

  2. Attachment and spreadout study of 3T3 cells onto PP track etched films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolko, Eduardo; Mazzei, Ruben; Tadey, Daniel; Lombardo, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Polymer surface modifications are obtained by the application of radiation treatments and other physico-chemical methods: fission fragment (ff) irradiation and etching. The biocompatibility of the surface is then observed by cell seeding and cell adhesion experiments. Approaches to improvement of the cell adhesion are obtained by different methods: for example, in PS, cell adhesion is improved after ion implantation; in PMMA, after bombarding the polymer, the surface is reconditioned with surfactants and proteins and in PVDF, cell adhesion is assayed on nuclear tracks membranes. In this work, we obtained important cell adhesion improvements in PP films by irradiation with swift heavy ions and subsequent etching of the nuclear tracks. We use BOPP (isotactic -25 μm thickness). Irrradiations were performed with a Cf-252 californium ff source. The source has a heavy ff and a light one, with 160-200 MeV energy divided among them corresponding to ff energies between 1 and 2 MeV/amu. A chemical etching procedure consisting of a solution of sulphuric acid and chromium three oxide at 85 deg. C was used. The 3T3 NIH fibroblast cell line was used for the cell adhesion experiment. Here we report for the first time, the results of a series of experiments by varying the ff fluence and the etching time showing that attachment and spreadout of cells are very much improved in this cell line according to the number of pores and the pore size

  3. Guard cell zeaxanthin tracks photosynthetically active radiation and stomatal apertures in Vicia faba leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.; Zeiger, E.

    1995-01-01

    Zeaxanthin, antheraxanthin and violaxanthin concentrations in guard cells from sonicated abaxial epidermal peels of Vicia faba were measured from dawn to dusk, and compared with concentrations in mesophyll tissue of the same leaves. Measured changes in guard cell zeaxanthin and violaxanthin concentrations indicate that guard cells operate the xanthophyll cycle throughout the day. Mesophyll tissue had no detectable zeaxanthin at dawn, whereas guard cells had 30–50 mmol mol −1 chlorophyll a+b. On a chlorophyll basis, maximal zeaxanthin levels were 3–4 fold higher in guard cells than in mesophyll cells. Zeaxanthin concentrations tracked levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in both mesophyll and guard cells. In the mesophyll, most of the zeaxanthin changes occurred in mid-morning and mid-afternoon. In guard cells, zeaxanthin concentrations changed nearly linearly with PAR in the early morning and late afternoon, and closely tracked PAR levels throughout the day. Guard cell zeaxanthin concentrations were also closely correlated with stomatal apertures. The close relationship between zeaxanthin concentrations and PAR levels in guard cells indicates that zeaxanthin is well suited to function as a molecular photosensor in stomatal movements. (author)

  4. Convolutional Deep Belief Networks for Single-Cell/Object Tracking in Computational Biology and Computer Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bineng; Pan, Shengnan; Zhang, Hongbo; Wang, Tian; Du, Jixiang; Chen, Duansheng; Cao, Liujuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose deep architecture to dynamically learn the most discriminative features from data for both single-cell and object tracking in computational biology and computer vision. Firstly, the discriminative features are automatically learned via a convolutional deep belief network (CDBN). Secondly, we design a simple yet effective method to transfer features learned from CDBNs on the source tasks for generic purpose to the object tracking tasks using only limited amount of training data. Finally, to alleviate the tracker drifting problem caused by model updating, we jointly consider three different types of positive samples. Extensive experiments validate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Macrophage phagocytosis alters the MRI signal of ferumoxytol-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells in cartilage defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Lenkov, Olga; Gassert, Florian; Fretwell, Deborah; Lam, Isaac; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2016-05-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising tool for cartilage regeneration in arthritic joints. hMSC labeling with iron oxide nanoparticles enables non-invasive in vivo monitoring of transplanted cells in cartilage defects with MR imaging. Since graft failure leads to macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs show distinct MR signal characteristics before and after phagocytosis by macrophages. We found that apoptotic nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were phagocytosed by macrophages while viable nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were not. Serial MRI scans of hMSC transplants in arthritic joints of recipient rats showed that the iron signal of apoptotic, nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs engulfed by macrophages disappeared faster compared to viable hMSCs. This corresponded to poor cartilage repair outcomes of the apoptotic hMSC transplants. Therefore, rapid decline of iron MRI signal at the transplant site can indicate cell death and predict incomplete defect repair weeks later. Currently, hMSC graft failure can be only diagnosed by lack of cartilage defect repair several months after cell transplantation. The described imaging signs can diagnose hMSC transplant failure more readily, which could enable timely re-interventions and avoid unnecessary follow up studies of lost transplants.

  6. Cell Membrane Tracking in Living Brain Tissue Using Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John; Kolb, Ilya; Forest, Craig R; Rozell, Christopher J

    2018-04-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is widely used for observing unstained biological samples that are otherwise optically transparent. Combining this optical technique with machine vision could enable the automation of many life science experiments; however, identifying relevant features under DIC is challenging. In particular, precise tracking of cell boundaries in a thick ( ) slice of tissue has not previously been accomplished. We present a novel deconvolution algorithm that achieves the state-of-the-art performance at identifying and tracking these membrane locations. Our proposed algorithm is formulated as a regularized least squares optimization that incorporates a filtering mechanism to handle organic tissue interference and a robust edge-sparsity regularizer that integrates dynamic edge tracking capabilities. As a secondary contribution, this paper also describes new community infrastructure in the form of a MATLAB toolbox for accurately simulating DIC microscopy images of in vitro brain slices. Building on existing DIC optics modeling, our simulation framework additionally contributes an accurate representation of interference from organic tissue, neuronal cell-shapes, and tissue motion due to the action of the pipette. This simulator allows us to better understand the image statistics (to improve algorithms), as well as quantitatively test cell segmentation and tracking algorithms in scenarios, where ground truth data is fully known.

  7. An Evaluation of an Automatic Cell Detection and Tracking Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-03

    OUTPUT CENTRCIC 2 N 5 fR %F4 Q 11 Ct, VE L CC. ’ SER Ar MM X R CZL L 2 TRA A1M RNG AV PK V x L A KC IC AV CELL MSK# "T I[ IC AOT. DIV . uL NC OEC K DO8 CE...C go Km EC EP/ ISK.4/ K ,C tC 0 Sk 1 CS 333 164 4? 44 I CoC C.C c 1 2C.2 1. 1.1 ; 5 C C C.CC C.-C C, Yft HMM AREA *FLUX NEAR NEIGMEQR ACT kC NC...InIt Iof It e ru. , ng p I sihbt areas of ailgorjithi breaikdoari. A~n aver-aIe 5V~ ’f the I"u. 11 teo ’ b% 1try toe A Il are tAi(ti ’iti ar)tiet

  8. CNR considerations for rapid real-time MRI tumor tracking in radiotherapy hybrid devices: Effects of B{sub 0} field strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachowicz, K., E-mail: keith.wachowicz@albertahealthservices.ca; De Zanche, N.; Yip, E. [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Volotovskyy, V. [Cross Cancer Institute, Alberta Health Services, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This work examines the subject of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), specifically between tumor and tissue background, and its dependence on the MRI field strength, B{sub 0}. This examination is motivated by the recent interest and developments in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids where real-time imaging can be used to guide treatment beams. The ability to distinguish a tumor from background tissue is of primary importance in this field, and this work seeks to elucidate the complex relationship between the CNR and B{sub 0} that is too often assumed to be purely linear. Methods: Experimentally based models of B{sub 0}-dependant relaxation for various tumor and normal tissues from the literature were used in conjunction with signal equations for MR sequences suitable for rapid real-time imaging to develop field-dependent predictions for CNR. These CNR models were developed for liver, lung, breast, glioma, and kidney tumors for spoiled gradient-echo, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), and single-shot half-Fourier fast spin echo sequences. Results: Due to the pattern in which the relaxation properties of tissues are found to vary over B{sub 0} field (specifically the T{sub 1} time), there was always an improved CNR at lower fields compared to linear dependency. Further, in some tumor sites, the CNR at lower fields was found to be comparable to, or sometimes higher than those at higher fields (i.e., bSSFP CNR for glioma, kidney, and liver tumors). Conclusions: In terms of CNR, lower B{sub 0} fields have been shown to perform as well or better than higher fields for some tumor sites due to superior T{sub 1} contrast. In other sites this effect was less pronounced, reversing the CNR advantage. This complex relationship between CNR and B{sub 0} reveals both low and high magnetic fields as viable options for tumor tracking in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids.

  9. Innovative molecular-based fluorescent nanoparticles for multicolor single particle tracking in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, Jonathan; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Godin, Antoine G; Palayret, Matthieu; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Based on an original molecular-based design, we present bright and photostable fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) showing excellent colloidal stability in various aqueous environments. Complementary near-infrared emitting and green emitting FONs were prepared using a simple, fast and robust protocol. Both types of FONs could be simultaneously imaged at the single-particle level in solution as well as in biological environments using a monochromatic excitation and a dual-color fluorescence microscope. No evidence of acute cytotoxicity was found upon incubation of live cells with mixed solutions of FONs, and both types of nanoparticles were found internalized in the cells where their motion could be simultaneously tracked at video-rate up to minutes. These fluorescent organic nanoparticles open a novel non-toxic alternative to existing nanoparticles for imaging biological structures, compatible with live-cell experiments and specially fitted for multicolor single particle tracking. (paper)

  10. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  11. MRI studies of the hydrodynamics in a USP 4 dissolution testing cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiko, G; Gladden, L F; Sederman, A J; Connolly, P C; Butler, J M

    2011-03-01

    We present a detailed study of hydrodynamics inside the flow-through dissolution apparatus when operated according to USP recommendations. The pulsatile flow inside the flow-through cell was measured quantitatively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a spatial resolution of 234 × 234 μm(2) and slice thickness of 1 mm. We report the experimental protocols developed for in situ MRI studies and the effect that the operating conditions and tablet orientation have on the hydrodynamics inside commercial flow cells. It was found that the flow field inside the dissolution cells was, at most operating conditions, heterogeneous, rather than fully developed laminar flow, and characterised by re-circulation and backward flow. A model tablet was shown to be contacted by a wide distribution of local velocities as a function of position and orientation in the flow cell. The use of 1 mm beads acted as a distributor of the flow but did not suffice to ensure a fully developed laminar flow profile. These results emphasise the necessity to understand the influence of test conditions on dissolution behaviour in defining robust flow-through dissolution methods. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Comparing 3 T and 1.5 T MRI for tracking Alzheimer's disease progression with tensor-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, April J; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Leow, Alex D; Yanovsky, Igor; Gutman, Boris; Dinov, Ivo D; Leporé, Natasha; Stein, Jason L; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Reiman, Eric M; Harvey, Danielle J; Kornak, John; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene E; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-04-01

    A key question in designing MRI-based clinical trials is how the main magnetic field strength of the scanner affects the power to detect disease effects. In 110 subjects scanned longitudinally at both 3.0 and 1.5 T, including 24 patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) [74.8 +/- 9.2 years, MMSE: 22.6 +/- 2.0 at baseline], 51 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) [74.1 +/- 8.0 years, MMSE: 26.6 +/- 2.0], and 35 controls [75.9 +/- 4.6 years, MMSE: 29.3 +/- 0.8], we assessed whether higher-field MR imaging offers higher or lower power to detect longitudinal changes in the brain, using tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to reveal the location of progressive atrophy. As expected, at both field strengths, progressive atrophy was widespread in AD and more spatially restricted in MCI. Power analysis revealed that, to detect a 25% slowing of atrophy (with 80% power), 37 AD and 108 MCI subjects would be needed at 1.5 T versus 49 AD and 166 MCI subjects at 3 T; however, the increased power at 1.5 T was not statistically significant (alpha = 0.05) either for TBM, or for SIENA, a related method for computing volume loss rates. Analysis of cumulative distribution functions and false discovery rates showed that, at both field strengths, temporal lobe atrophy rates were correlated with interval decline in Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), mini-mental status exam (MMSE), and Clinical Dementia Rating sum-of-boxes (CDR-SB) scores. Overall, 1.5 and 3 T scans did not significantly differ in their power to detect neurodegenerative changes over a year. Hum Brain Mapp, 2010. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E Lynch

    Full Text Available Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×. In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates, 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates, were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  14. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS) for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam E; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  15. Low-Cost Motility Tracking System (LOCOMOTIS) for Time-Lapse Microscopy Applications and Cell Visualisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam E.; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81±0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17±0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24±0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21±0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers. PMID:25121722

  16. Interaction vs. observation: distinctive modes of social cognition in human brain and behavior? A combined fMRI and eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylén, Kristian; Allen, Micah; Hunter, Bjørk K; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an "understanding of the other," or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye-tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social cognition. We found that the perception of situations affording social contingent responsiveness (e.g., someone offering or showing you an object) elicited activations in regions of the right posterior temporal sulcus and yielded greater pupil dilation corresponding to a model of coupled dynamics (joint action). In contrast, the social-cognitive perception of someone "privately" manipulating an object elicited activation in medial prefrontal cortex, the right inferior frontal gyrus and right inferior parietal lobus, regions normally associated with Theory of Mind and with the mirror neuron system. Our findings support a distinction in social cognition between social observation and social interaction, and demonstrate that simple ostensive cues may shift participants' experience, behavior, and brain activity between these modes. The identification of a distinct, interactive mode has implications for research on social cognition, both in everyday life and in clinical conditions.

  17. Gain- and Loss-Related Brain Activation Are Associated with Information Search Differences in Risky Gambles: An fMRI and Eye-Tracking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Alexander Niklas; Oroz Artigas, Sergio; Trautner, Peter; Weber, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    People differ in the way they approach and handle choices with unsure outcomes. In this study, we demonstrate that individual differences in the neural processing of gains and losses relates to attentional differences in the way individuals search for information in gambles. Fifty subjects participated in two independent experiments. Participants first completed an fMRI experiment involving financial gains and losses. Subsequently, they performed an eye-tracking experiment on binary choices between risky gambles, each displaying monetary outcomes and their respective probabilities. We find that individual differences in gain and loss processing relate to attention distribution. Individuals with a stronger reaction to gains in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex paid more attention to monetary amounts, while a stronger reaction in the ventral striatum to losses was correlated with an increased attention to probabilities. Reaction in the posterior cingulate cortex to losses was also found to correlate with an increased attention to probabilities. Our data show that individual differences in brain activity and differences in information search processes are closely linked.

  18. Interaction versus Observation: distinctive modes of social cognition in human brain and behavior? A combined fMRI and eye-tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian eTylen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an ‘understanding of the other’, or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social cognition. We found that the perception of situations affording social contingent responsiveness (e.g. someone offering or showing you an object elicited activations in regions of the right posterior temporal sulcus and yielded greater pupil dilation corresponding to a model of coupled dynamics (joint action. In contrast, the social-cognitive perception of someone ‘privately’ manipulating an object elicited activation in medial prefrontal cortex, the right inferior frontal gyrus and right inferior parietal lobus, regions normally associated with Theory of Mind and with the mirror neuron system. Our findings support a distinction in social cognition between social observation and social interaction, and demonstrate that simple ostensive cues may shift participants’ experience, behavior and brain activity between these modes. The identification of a distinct, interactive mode has implications for research on social cognition, both in everyday life and in clinical conditions.

  19. Automatic tracking of cells for video microscopy in patch clamp experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Helton M; Munguba, Hermany; Cruz, Rossana M S; Guerreiro, Ana M G; Leao, Richardson N

    2014-06-20

    Visualisation of neurons labeled with fluorescent proteins or compounds generally require exposure to intense light for a relatively long period of time, often leading to bleaching of the fluorescent probe and photodamage of the tissue. Here we created a technique to drastically shorten light exposure and improve the targeting of fluorescent labeled cells that is specially useful for patch-clamp recordings. We applied image tracking and mask overlay to reduce the time of fluorescence exposure and minimise mistakes when identifying neurons. Neurons are first identified according to visual criteria (e.g. fluorescence protein expression, shape, viability etc.) and a transmission microscopy image Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) or Dodt contrast containing the cell used as a reference for the tracking algorithm. A fluorescence image can also be acquired later to be used as a mask (that can be overlaid on the target during live transmission video). As patch-clamp experiments require translating the microscope stage, we used pattern matching to track reference neurons in order to move the fluorescence mask to match the new position of the objective in relation to the sample. For the image processing we used the Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) library, including the Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) for tracking cells. The dataset of images (n = 720) was analyzed under normal conditions of acquisition and with influence of noise (defocusing and brightness). We validated the method in dissociated neuronal cultures and fresh brain slices expressing Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) or Tandem Dimer Tomato (tdTomato) proteins, which considerably decreased the exposure to fluorescence excitation, thereby minimising photodamage. We also show that the neuron tracking can be used in differential interference contrast or Dodt contrast microscopy. The techniques of digital image processing used in this work are an important addition to the set of microscopy

  20. Three-dimensional single-particle tracking in live cells: news from the third dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, A; Wehnekamp, F; Katayama, Y; Lamb, D C; Gorelashvili, M; Schüller, V; Arcizet, D; Heinrich, D

    2013-01-01

    Single-particle tracking (SPT) is of growing importance in the biophysical community. It is used to investigate processes such as drug and gene delivery, viral uptake, intracellular trafficking or membrane-bound protein mobility. Traditionally, SPT is performed in two dimensions (2D) because of its technical simplicity. However, life occurs in three dimensions (3D) and many methods have been recently developed to track particles in 3D. Now, is the third dimension worth the effort? Here we investigate the differences between the 2D and 3D analyses of intracellular transport with the 3D development of a time-resolved mean square displacement (MSD) analysis introduced previously. The 3D trajectories, and the 2D projections, of fluorescent nanoparticles were obtained with an orbital tracking microscope in two different cell types: in Dictyostelium discoideum ameba and in adherent, more flattened HuH-7 human cells. As expected from the different 3D organization of both cells’ cytoskeletons, a third of the active transport was lost upon projection in the ameba whereas the identification of the active phases was barely affected in the HuH-7 cells. In both cell types, we found intracellular diffusion to be anisotropic and the diffusion coefficient values derived from the 2D analysis were therefore biased. (paper)

  1. Paramagnetic particles carried by cell-penetrating peptide tracking of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, a research in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Guo Youmin; Wu Qifei; Yang Junle; Wang Peng; Wang Sicen; Guo Xiaojuan; Qiang Yongqian; Duan Xiaoyi

    2006-01-01

    The ability to track the distribution and differentiation of stem cells by high-resolution imaging techniques would have significant clinical and research implications. In this study, a model cell-penetrating peptide was used to carry gadolinium particles for magnetic resonance imaging of the mesenchymal stem cells. The mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat bone marrow by Percoll and identified by osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cell-penetrating peptides labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate and gadolinium were synthesized by a solid-phase peptide synthesis method and the relaxivity of cell-penetrating peptide-gadolinium paramagnetic conjugate on 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance was 5.7311 ± 0.0122 mmol -1 s -1 , higher than that of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium (p < 0.05). Fluorescein imaging confirmed that this new peptide could internalize into the cytoplasm and nucleus. Gadolinium was efficiently internalized into mesenchymal stem cells by the peptide in a time- or concentration-dependent fashion, resulting in intercellular T1 relaxation enhancement, which was obviously detected by 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometric analysis showed the intercellular contrast medium incorporation did not affect cell viability and membrane potential gradient. The research in vitro suggests that the newly constructed peptides could be a vector for tracking mesenchymal stem cells

  2. Long-term tracking of budding yeast cells in brightfield microscopy: CellStar and the Evaluation Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versari, Cristian; Stoma, Szymon; Batmanov, Kirill; Llamosi, Artémis; Mroz, Filip; Kaczmarek, Adam; Deyell, Matt; Lhoussaine, Cédric; Hersen, Pascal; Batt, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    With the continuous expansion of single cell biology, the observation of the behaviour of individual cells over extended durations and with high accuracy has become a problem of central importance. Surprisingly, even for yeast cells that have relatively regular shapes, no solution has been proposed that reaches the high quality required for long-term experiments for segmentation and tracking (S&T) based on brightfield images. Here, we present CellStar , a tool chain designed to achieve good performance in long-term experiments. The key features are the use of a new variant of parametrized active rays for segmentation, a neighbourhood-preserving criterion for tracking, and the use of an iterative approach that incrementally improves S&T quality. A graphical user interface enables manual corrections of S&T errors and their use for the automated correction of other, related errors and for parameter learning. We created a benchmark dataset with manually analysed images and compared CellStar with six other tools, showing its high performance, notably in long-term tracking. As a community effort, we set up a website, the Yeast Image Toolkit, with the benchmark and the Evaluation Platform to gather this and additional information provided by others. © 2017 The Authors.

  3. Look into my eyes: Investigating joint attention using interactive eye-tracking and fMRI in a developmental sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberwelland, E; Schilbach, L; Barisic, I; Krall, S C; Vogeley, K; Fink, G R; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Konrad, K; Schulte-Rüther, M

    2016-04-15

    Joint attention, the shared attentional focus of at least two people on a third significant object, is one of the earliest steps in social development and an essential aspect of reciprocal interaction. However, the neural basis of joint attention (JA) in the course of development is completely unknown. The present study made use of an interactive eye-tracking paradigm in order to examine the developmental trajectories of JA and the influence of a familiar interaction partner during the social encounter. Our results show that across children and adolescents JA elicits a similar network of "social brain" areas as well as attention and motor control associated areas as in adults. While other-initiated JA particularly recruited visual, attention and social processing areas, self-initiated JA specifically activated areas related to social cognition, decision-making, emotions and motivational/reward processes highlighting the rewarding character of self-initiated JA. Activation was further enhanced during self-initiated JA with a familiar interaction partner. With respect to developmental effects, activation of the precuneus declined from childhood to adolescence and additionally shifted from a general involvement in JA towards a more specific involvement for self-initiated JA. Similarly, the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) was broadly involved in JA in children and more specialized for self-initiated JA in adolescents. Taken together, this study provides first-time data on the developmental trajectories of JA and the effect of a familiar interaction partner incorporating the interactive character of JA, its reciprocity and motivational aspects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tracking the engraftment and regenerative capabilities of transplanted lung stem cells using fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Jung; Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Chang, Wei-Wei; Cheng, Chi-An; Kuo, Yung; Chien, Chin-Hsiang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Yu, John

    2013-09-01

    Lung stem/progenitor cells are potentially useful for regenerative therapy, for example in repairing damaged or lost lung tissue in patients. Several optical imaging methods and probes have been used to track how stem cells incorporate and regenerate themselves in vivo over time. However, these approaches are limited by photobleaching, toxicity and interference from background tissue autofluorescence. Here we show that fluorescent nanodiamonds, in combination with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and immunostaining, can identify transplanted CD45(-)CD54(+)CD157(+) lung stem/progenitor cells in vivo, and track their engraftment and regenerative capabilities with single-cell resolution. Fluorescent nanodiamond labelling did not eliminate the cells' properties of self-renewal and differentiation into type I and type II pneumocytes. Time-gated fluorescence imaging of tissue sections of naphthalene-injured mice indicates that the fluorescent nanodiamond-labelled lung stem/progenitor cells preferentially reside at terminal bronchioles of the lungs for 7 days after intravenous transplantation.

  5. Single-cell tracking reveals antibiotic-induced changes in mycobacterial energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglica, Željka; Özdemir, Emre; McKinney, John D

    2015-02-17

    ATP is a key molecule of cell physiology, but despite its importance, there are currently no methods for monitoring single-cell ATP fluctuations in live bacteria. This is a major obstacle in studies of bacterial energy metabolism, because there is a growing awareness that bacteria respond to stressors such as antibiotics in a highly individualistic manner. Here, we present a method for long-term single-cell tracking of ATP levels in Mycobacterium smegmatis based on a combination of microfluidics, time-lapse microscopy, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based ATP biosensors. Upon treating cells with antibiotics, we observed that individual cells undergo an abrupt and irreversible switch from high to low intracellular ATP levels. The kinetics and extent of ATP switching clearly discriminate between an inhibitor of ATP synthesis and other classes of antibiotics. Cells that resume growth after 24 h of antibiotic treatment maintain high ATP levels throughout the exposure period. In contrast, antibiotic-treated cells that switch from ATP-high to ATP-low states never resume growth after antibiotic washout. Surprisingly, only a subset of these nongrowing ATP-low cells stains with propidium iodide (PI), a widely used live/dead cell marker. These experiments also reveal a cryptic subset of cells that do not resume growth after antibiotic washout despite remaining ATP high and PI negative. We conclude that ATP tracking is a more dynamic, sensitive, reliable, and discriminating marker of cell viability than staining with PI. This method could be used in studies to evaluate antimicrobial effectiveness and mechanism of action, as well as for high-throughput screening. New antimicrobials are urgently needed to stem the rising tide of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. All antibiotics are expected to affect bacterial energy metabolism, directly or indirectly, yet tools to assess the impact of antibiotics on the ATP content of individual bacterial cells are lacking. The

  6. Utility of MRI versus tumor markers for post-treatment surveillance of marker-positive CNS germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Victoria; Segal, Devorah; Gardner, Sharon L; Zagzag, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H; Allen, Jeffrey C; Karajannis, Matthias A

    2016-09-01

    Patients with marker-positive central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumors are typically monitored for tumor recurrence with both tumor markers (AFP and b-hCG) and MRI. We hypothesize that the recurrence of these tumors will always be accompanied by an elevation in tumor markers, and that surveillance MRI may not be necessary. We retrospectively identified 28 patients with CNS germ cell tumors treated at our institution that presented with an elevated serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tumor marker at the time of diagnosis. We then identified those who had a tumor recurrence after having been in remission and whether each recurrence was detected via MRI changes, elevated tumor markers, or both. Four patients suffered a tumor recurrence. Only one patient had simultaneously elevated tumor markers and MRI evidence of recurrence. Two patients had evidence of recurrence on MRI without corresponding elevations in serum or CSF tumor markers. One patient had abnormal tumor markers with no evidence of recurrence on MRI until 6 months later. We conclude that in patients with marker-positive CNS germ cell tumors who achieve complete remission, continued surveillance imaging in addition to measurement of tumor markers is indicated to detect recurrences.

  7. Quantum dot labeling and tracking of cultured limbal epithelial cell transplants in-vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genicio, Nuria; Paramo, Juan Gallo; Shortt, Alex J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Cultured human limbal epithelial cells (HLEC) have shown promise in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency but little is known about their survival, behaviour and long-term fate post transplantation. The aim of this research was to evaluate, in-vitro, quantum dot (QDot) technology as a tool for tracking transplanted HLEC. METHODS In-vitro cultured HLEC were labeled with Qdot nanocrystals. Toxicity was assessed using live-dead assays. The effect on HLEC function was assessed using colony forming efficiency assays and expression of CK3, P63alpha and ABCG2. Sheets of cultured HLEC labeled with Qdot nanocrystals were transplanted onto decellularised human corneo-scleral rims in an organ culture model and observed to investigate the behaviour of transplanted cells. RESULTS Qdot labeling had no detrimental effect on HLEC viability or function in-vitro. Proliferation resulted in a gradual reduction in Qdot signal but sufficient signal was present to allow tracking of cells through multiple generations. Cells labeled with Qdots could be reliably detected and observed using confocal microscopy for at least 2 weeks post transplantation in our organ culture model. In addition it was possible to label and observe epithelial cells in intact human corneas using the Rostock corneal module adapted for use with the Heidelberg HRA. CONCLUSIONS This work demonstrates that Qdots combined with existing clinical equipment could be used to track HLEC for up to 2 weeks post transplantation, however, our model does not permit the assessment of cell labeling beyond 2 weeks. Further characterisation in in-vivo models are required. PMID:26024089

  8. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagne, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Jullienne, Amandine; Briens, Aurelien; Docagne, Fabian; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric; Macrez, Richard; Defer, Gilles; Raynaud, Jean-Sebastien; Louin, Gaelle; Buisson, Alain; Haelewyn, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuro-inflammation. (authors)

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  10. Magnetic resonance cell-tracking studies: spectrophotometry-based method for the quantification of cellular iron content after loading with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Ingrid

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a user-friendly tool for quantifying the iron content of superparamagnetic labeled cells before cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Iron quantification was evaluated by using Prussian blue staining and spectrophotometry. White blood cells were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. Labeling was confirmed by light microscopy. Subsequently, the cells were embedded in a phantom and scanned on a 3 T magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) whole-body system. Mean peak wavelengths λ(peak) was determined at A(720 nm) (range 719-722 nm). Linearity was proven for the measuring range 0.5 to 10 μg Fe/mL (r  =  .9958; p  =  2.2 × 10(-12)). The limit of detection was 0.01 μg Fe/mL (0.1785 mM), and the limit of quantification was 0.04 μg Fe/mL (0.714 mM). Accuracy was demonstrated by comparison with atomic absorption spectrometry. Precision and robustness were also proven. On T(2)-weighted images, signal intensity varied according to the iron concentration of SPIO-labeled cells. Absorption spectrophotometry is both a highly sensitive and user-friendly technique that is feasible for quantifying the iron content of magnetically labeled cells. The presented data suggest that spectrophotometry is a promising tool for promoting the implementation of magnetic resonance-based cell tracking in routine clinical applications (from bench to bedside).

  11. Magnetic Resonance Cell-Tracking Studies: Spectrophotometry-Based Method for the Quantification of Cellular Iron Content after Loading with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Böhm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present a user-friendly tool for quantifying the iron content of superparamagnetic labeled cells before cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Iron quantification was evaluated by using Prussian blue staining and spectrophotometry. White blood cells were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles. Labeling was confirmed by light microscopy. Subsequently, the cells were embedded in a phantom and scanned on a 3 T magnetic resonance tomography (MRT whole-body system. Mean peak wavelengths Λpeak was determined at A720nm (range 719–722 nm. Linearity was proven for the measuring range 0.5 to 10 μg Fe/mL (r = .9958; p = 2.2 × 10−12. The limit of detection was 0.01 μg Fe/mL (0.1785 mM, and the limit of quantification was 0.04 μg Fe/mL (0.714 mM. Accuracy was demonstrated by comparison with atomic absorption spectrometry. Precision and robustness were also proven. On T2-weighted images, signal intensity varied according to the iron concentration of SPIO-labeled cells. Absorption spectrophotometry is both a highly sensitive and user-friendly technique that is feasible for quantifying the iron content of magnetically labeled cells. The presented data suggest that spectrophotometry is a promising tool for promoting the implementation of magnetic resonance-based cell tracking in routine clinical applications (from bench to bedside.

  12. Fluorescent nanodiamonds enable quantitative tracking of human mesenchymal stem cells in miniature pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Long-Jyun; Wu, Meng-Shiue; Hui, Yuen Yung; Chang, Be-Ming; Pan, Lei; Hsu, Pei-Chen; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Huang, Yen-Hua; Ling, Thai-Yen; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of human diseases. While the first use of cells for therapeutic purposes can be traced to the 19th century, there has been a lack of general and reliable methods to study the biodistribution and associated pharmacokinetics of transplanted cells in various animal models for preclinical evaluation. Here, we present a new platform using albumin-conjugated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as biocompatible and photostable labels for quantitative tracking of human placenta choriodecidual membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pcMSCs) in miniature pigs by magnetic modulation. With this background-free detection technique and time-gated fluorescence imaging, we have been able to precisely determine the numbers as well as positions of the transplanted FND-labeled pcMSCs in organs and tissues of the miniature pigs after intravenous administration. The method is applicable to single-cell imaging and quantitative tracking of human stem/progenitor cells in rodents and other animal models as well.

  13. MRI in giant cell (temporal) arteritis; Magnetresonanztomografie der Arteriitis temporalis Horton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bley, T.A.; Uhl, M.; Frydrychowicz, A.; Langer, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik; Markl, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik - Medizinische Physik

    2007-07-15

    Giant cell (temporal) arteritis is a diagnostic challenge. Blindness is a dreaded complication, especially if high-dose steroid treatment is delayed. With an optimized MR protocol, noninvasive diagnosis of giant cell arteritis is facilitated. Submillimeter in-plane resolution makes it possible to distinguish healthy segments from inflamed segments. The lumen and arterial wall can be depicted in high detail. Post-contrast high-resolution MRI visualizes the superficial cranial arteries bilaterally and simultaneously, allowing assessment of the cranial involvement pattern. In combination with MR angiography of the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the extracranial involvement pattern can be demonstrated in a single comprehensive MR examination assessing the cranial, cervical and thoracic vasculature. Good diagnostic image quality can be achieved at 1.5 Tesla and at 3 Tesla. However, due to higher signal-to-noise ratios, image quality seems to be superior at 3 Tesla. Over the course of successful long-term treatment, MR signs of mural inflammation decrease significantly and eventually vanish entirely. In contrast to color-coded Duplex sonography, which is a comparatively cost-efficient imaging modality, acquisition of high-resolution MRI is almost independent of the investigator's expertise. Compared to positron emission tomography with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, which is a very sensitive whole-body screening tool for detecting extracranial involvement of large vessel vasculitis, MRI allows visualization and assessment of both the superficial cranial arteries in high detail and the extracranial large artery involvement in the same investigation. (orig.)

  14. CT and MRI of germ-cell tumors with metastasis or multi-located tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tazoe, Makoto; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven cases of germ-cell tumors were examined with a CT scan in our clinic. In the 11 cases of metastasis or multi-localized tumors, the CT findings were studied in connection with the MRI findings. There were 6 cases of germ-cell tumors which had broad infiltrating tumors with multiple lesions on first admission. Their tumor sites were different from that in cases of malignant glioma, being frequently localized in the pineal and/or the suprasellar region, on the wall of the third and/or lateral ventricle, and in the region of the basal ganglia. Five of the cases of germ-cell tumors had metastasis with various patterns connected to a remote area - that is, to spinal cords, to the ventricular wall and basal cistern of the brain stem by CSF dissemination, to a lung by hematogeneous metastasis, and to the peritoneal wall or organs by a V-P shunt. The CT findings of germ-cell tumors were correlated mainly with the results of the histological diagnosis; they were found not to differ with the tumor site. The germinoma in the suprasellar region had less calcification than in the pineal region. Cysts, calcification, and an enlargement of the lateral ventricle on the tumor side were frequently seen in the germinoma of the basal ganglia. On the MRI of 5 cases of germinoma, the T 1 -weighted image revealed a slightly low or iso signal intensity, while the T 2 -weighted image showed a high signal intensity. In the case of multiple tumor lesions, some cases demonstrated different CT findings and radiosensitivities for each tumor. The possibility of a multicentric origin for the tumors is thus suggested in some cases of germ-cell tumors. (author)

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma originating in the parotid gland: MRI features with histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Kashiwagi, N.; Chikugo, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Tomita, Y.; Murakami, T.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and corresponding histopathological features of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) originating in the parotid gland. Materials and methods: The MRI images of seven patients with histopathologically proven SCC originating in the parotid gland were reviewed retrospectively, with an emphasis on tumour size, shape, contour definition, extraparotid infiltration, signal characteristics, and the presence of central necrosis. These were correlated with the microscopic findings of the surgical specimens. Results: The tumours ranged in size from 3.9–7 cm (mean 4.7 cm). All tumours had an ill-defined margin with extraparotid infiltration, which seemed to reflect the invasive growth of the tumour cells on histopathological examination. The solid portions of the tumours showed predominantly low to intermediate signal intensities on T2-weighted images, which seemed to reflect the high cellularity, intercellular bridges, and/or keratin pearl formation observed at histopathological examination. Five of the seven tumours had central necrosis. Conclusion: A relatively large tumour with central necrosis is a useful imaging feature of SCCs originating in the parotid gland, in addition to the well-recognized indicators of parotid malignancy, such as an ill-defined margin, extraparotid infiltration, and low to intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted images

  16. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  17. In vivo stem cell tracking with imageable nanoparticles that bind bioorthogonal chemical receptors on the stem cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmin; Yoon, Hwa In; Na, Jin Hee; Jeon, Sangmin; Lim, Seungho; Koo, Heebeom; Han, Sang-Soo; Kang, Sun-Woong; Park, Soon-Jung; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Park, Jae Hyung; Cho, Yong Woo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Sang Kyoon; Lee, Taekwan; Kim, Dongkyu; Lee, Seulki; Pomper, Martin G; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2017-09-01

    It is urgently necessary to develop reliable non-invasive stem cell imaging technology for tracking the in vivo fate of transplanted stem cells in living subjects. Herein, we developed a simple and well controlled stem cell imaging method through a combination of metabolic glycoengineering and bioorthogonal copper-free click chemistry. Firstly, the exogenous chemical receptors containing azide (-N 3 ) groups were generated on the surfaces of stem cells through metabolic glycoengineering using metabolic precursor, tetra-acetylated N-azidoacetyl-d-mannosamine(Ac 4 ManNAz). Next, bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne-modified glycol chitosan nanoparticles (BCN-CNPs) were prepared as imageable nanoparticles to deliver different imaging agents. Cy5.5, iron oxide nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles were conjugated or encapsulated to BCN-CNPs for optical, MR and CT imaging, respectively. These imageable nanoparticles bound chemical receptors on the Ac 4 ManNAz-treated stem cell surface specifically via bioorthogonal copper-free click chemistry. Then they were rapidly taken up by the cell membrane turn-over mechanism resulting in higher endocytic capacity compared non-specific uptake of nanoparticles. During in vivo animal test, BCN-CNP-Cy5.5-labeled stem cells could be continuously tracked by non-invasive optical imaging over 15 days. Furthermore, BCN-CNP-IRON- and BCN-CNP-GOLD-labeled stem cells could be efficiently visualized using in vivo MR and CT imaging demonstrating utility of our stem cell labeling method using chemical receptors. These results conclude that our method based on metabolic glycoengineering and bioorthogonal copper-free click chemistry can stably label stem cells with diverse imageable nanoparticles representing great potential as new stem cell imaging technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MRI evaluation of frequent complications after intra-arterial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namestnikova, D.; Gubskiy, I.; Gabashvili, A.; Sukhinich, K.; Melnikov, P.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Soloveva, A.; Vitushev, E.; Chekhonin, V.; Gubsky, L.; Yarygin, K.

    2017-08-01

    Intra-arterial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is an effective delivery route for treatment of ischemic brain injury. Despite significant therapeutic effects and targeted cells delivery to the brain infraction, serious adverse events such as cerebral embolism have been reported and may restrict potential clinical applications of this method. In current study, we evaluate potential complications of intra-arterial MSCs administration and determine the optimum parameters for cell transplantation. We injected SPIO-labeled human MSCs via internal carotid artery with different infusion parameters and cell dose in intact rats and in rats with the middle cerebral occlusion stroke model. Cerebrovascular complications and labeled cells were visualized in vivo using MRI. We have shown that the incidence of cerebral embolic events depends on such parameters as cell dose, infusion rate and maintenance of blood flow in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Optimal parameters were considered to be 5×105 hMSC in 1 ml of PBS by syringe pump with velocity 100 μ/min and maintenance of blood flow in the ICA. Obtained data should be considered before planning experiments in rats and, potentially, can help in planning clinical trials in stroke patients.

  19. Study of substrate topographical effects on epithelial cell behavior using etched alpha-particle tracks on PADC films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.K.M.; Poon, W.L.; Li, W.Y.; Cheung, T.; Cheng, S.H.; Yu, K.N.

    2008-01-01

    Micrometer-size pits on the surface of a polymer (polyallyldiglycol carbonate or PADC) substrate created by alpha-particle irradiation and subsequent chemical etching were used to study the topographical effects alone on cell behavior. Vinculin, the cell adhesion and membrane protrusion protein, was used as an indicator of cytoskeletonal reorganization on the substrate and localization of vinculin was used to demonstrate the presence of focal adhesions. In our experiments, vinculin expressed in epithelial HeLa cells cultured on PADC films with track-etch pits, but not in cells cultured on the raw or chemically etched blank films. In other words, vinculin expression was induced by the topography of track-etch pits, while etching of the substrate alone (without alpha-particle irradiation) did not cause up-regulation of vinculin protein expression. HeLa cells cultured on PADC films with track-etch pits also showed changes in cell proliferation, cell area and cell circularity, and were largely contained by the pits. In other words, the cell membrane edges tended to be in contact with the pits. By comparing the correlation between the positions of HeLa cells and the pits, and that between the positions of cells and computer-simulated pits, the tendency for membrane edges of HeLa cells to be in contact with the pits was recognized. This could be explained by inhibition of membrane protrusion at the pits. In conclusion, substrate track-etch pits were an important determinant of epithelial cell behaviors

  20. CT and MRI appearances and radiologic staging of pediatric renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downey, Ryan T. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Dillman, Jonathan R.; Ladino-Torres, Maria F.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); McHugh, Jonathan B. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Pathology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ehrlich, Peter F. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Surgery, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an uncommon but noteworthy primary pediatric renal malignancy. There is a paucity of published data regarding the CT/MRI appearances and accuracy of pretreatment radiologic staging of this form of cancer in children. To review the various CT/MRI appearances of pediatric RCC and assess the accuracy of pretreatment radiologic staging using these imaging modalities. Institutional Departments of Pathology and Radiology records were searched from 1995 through 2010 for children (younger than 18 years of age) with RCC. Available pretreatment contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings were documented by consensus, and correlation was made between radiologic and surgicopathological TNM staging. Pretreatment imaging studies from 10 RCCs in nine children (four girls and five boys; mean age 12.9 years) were reviewed. The mean size of the primary tumor was 6.2 cm (range, 1.5-12.6 cm). Ninety percent of RCCs demonstrated heterogeneous postcontrast enhancement. Fifty percent of masses had associated hemorrhage, while 40% contained internal calcification. Regarding TNM staging, N staging was correct for 10 of 10 tumors, while M staging was correct for 10 of 10 tumors. Imaging correctly staged only 4 of 10 tumors with respect to T stage. Radiologic and surgicopathological overall staging were concordant for 8 of 10 tumors. Pediatric RCCs typically present as large, heterogeneous masses, and they commonly hemorrhage and contain internal calcification. Radiologic and surgicopathological overall TNM staging are frequently concordant, although radiologic T staging is often incorrect. (orig.)

  1. Assessing the Effectiveness of a Far-Red Fluorescent Reporter for Tracking Stem Cells In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Far-red fluorescent reporter genes can be used for tracking cells non-invasively in vivo using fluorescence imaging. Here, we investigate the effectiveness of the far-red fluorescent protein, E2-Crimson (E2C, for tracking mouse embryonic cells (mESCs in vivo following subcutaneous administration into mice. Using a knock-in strategy, we introduced E2C into the Rosa26 locus of an E14-Bra-GFP mESC line, and after confirming that the E2C had no obvious effect on the phenotype of the mESCs, we injected them into mice and imaged them over nine days. The results showed that fluorescence intensity was weak, and cells could only be detected when injected at high densities. Furthermore, intensity peaked on day 4 and then started to decrease, despite the fact that tumour volume continued to increase beyond day 4. Histopathological analysis showed that although E2C fluorescence could barely be detected in vivo at day 9, analysis of frozen sections indicated that all mESCs within the tumours continued to express E2C. We hypothesise that the decrease in fluorescence intensity in vivo was probably due to the fact that the mESC tumours became more vascular with time, thus leading to increased absorbance of E2C fluorescence by haemoglobin. We conclude that the E2C reporter has limited use for tracking cells in vivo, at least when introduced as a single copy into the Rosa26 locus.

  2. Real-time tracking of cell cycle progression during CD8+ effector and memory T-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjyo, Ichiko; Qin, Jim; Tan, Sioh-Yang; Wellard, Cameron J; Mrass, Paulus; Ritchie, William; Doi, Atsushi; Cavanagh, Lois L; Tomura, Michio; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Kanagawa, Osami; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Hodgkin, Philip D; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    The precise pathways of memory T-cell differentiation are incompletely understood. Here we exploit transgenic mice expressing fluorescent cell cycle indicators to longitudinally track the division dynamics of individual CD8(+) T cells. During influenza virus infection in vivo, naive T cells enter a CD62L(intermediate) state of fast proliferation, which continues for at least nine generations. At the peak of the anti-viral immune response, a subpopulation of these cells markedly reduces their cycling speed and acquires a CD62L(hi) central memory cell phenotype. Construction of T-cell family division trees in vitro reveals two patterns of proliferation dynamics. While cells initially divide rapidly with moderate stochastic variations of cycling times after each generation, a slow-cycling subpopulation displaying a CD62L(hi) memory phenotype appears after eight divisions. Phenotype and cell cycle duration are inherited by the progeny of slow cyclers. We propose that memory precursors cell-intrinsically modulate their proliferative activity to diversify differentiation pathways.

  3. Quantitative Cell Cycle Analysis Based on an Endogenous All-in-One Reporter for Cell Tracking and Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zerjatke

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell cycle kinetics are crucial to cell fate decisions. Although live imaging has provided extensive insights into this relationship at the single-cell level, the limited number of fluorescent markers that can be used in a single experiment has hindered efforts to link the dynamics of individual proteins responsible for decision making directly to cell cycle progression. Here, we present fluorescently tagged endogenous proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA as an all-in-one cell cycle reporter that allows simultaneous analysis of cell cycle progression, including the transition into quiescence, and the dynamics of individual fate determinants. We also provide an image analysis pipeline for automated segmentation, tracking, and classification of all cell cycle phases. Combining the all-in-one reporter with labeled endogenous cyclin D1 and p21 as prime examples of cell-cycle-regulated fate determinants, we show how cell cycle and quantitative protein dynamics can be simultaneously extracted to gain insights into G1 phase regulation and responses to perturbations.

  4. Dynamic in vivo imaging and cell tracking using a histone fluorescent protein fusion in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Virginia E

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in optical imaging modalities and the continued evolution of genetically-encoded fluorescent proteins are coming together to facilitate the study of cell behavior at high resolution in living organisms. As a result, imaging using autofluorescent protein reporters is gaining popularity in mouse transgenic and targeted mutagenesis applications. Results We have used embryonic stem cell-mediated transgenesis to label cells at sub-cellular resolution in vivo, and to evaluate fusion of a human histone protein to green fluorescent protein for ubiquitous fluorescent labeling of nucleosomes in mice. To this end we have generated embryonic stem cells and a corresponding strain of mice that is viable and fertile and exhibits widespread chromatin-localized reporter expression. High levels of transgene expression are maintained in a constitutive manner. Viability and fertility of homozygous transgenic animals demonstrates that this reporter is developmentally neutral and does not interfere with mitosis or meiosis. Conclusions Using various optical imaging modalities including wide-field, spinning disc confocal, and laser scanning confocal and multiphoton excitation microscopy, we can identify cells in various stages of the cell cycle. We can identify cells in interphase, cells undergoing mitosis or cell death. We demonstrate that this histone fusion reporter allows the direct visualization of active chromatin in situ. Since this reporter segments three-dimensional space, it permits the visualization of individual cells within a population, and so facilitates tracking cell position over time. It is therefore attractive for use in multidimensional studies of in vivo cell behavior and cell fate.

  5. Polarimetric radar convective cell tracking reveals large sensitivity of cloud precipitation and electrification properties to CCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Zhang, P.; Snyder, J.; Orville, R. E.; Ryzhkov, A.; Zrnic, D.; Williams, E. R.; Zhang, R.

    2017-12-01

    Here we apply the cell tracking methodology, shown in our companion poster, to quantifying factors affecting the vigor and the time-height evolution of hydrometeors and electrification properties of convective cells. Benefitting from the Dual-polarimetric NEXRAD radar network, we composite more than 5000 well-tracked cells among three radars (at Houston, Lubbock and Oklahoma City), stratified by CCN, CAPE and land/sea locations. The analyzed cell properties include Z, ZDR, Kdp, and ρhv, Dm (raindrop diameter) and Nw (raindrop concentration) by the algorithm of Bringi et al. (2003). Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data is also included in the analysis, which provides a 3D structure of lightning occurrence and RF power. The contrasting CCN conditions over marine, land, pristine and polluted areas are identified based on the satellite retrieval technique described in Rosenfeld et al. (2016). The results show that more CCN are associated with: Increased echo top height, manifesting the invigoration effect. Enhanced reflectivities, especially above the freezing level at around 4.5 km. Raindrop sizes at the initial stage increase at the expense of their concentrations, due to the smaller cloud droplets and suppressed coalescence. Larger propensity for hail. Lightning sources increase with greater CCN concentration and is likely due to the delayed warm rain process and enhanced mixed phase process under more CCN condition, when activated CCN into cloud droplets is too high (> 1000 cm-3) the glaciation is delayed too much and leave little ice at lower levels and thus decrease lightning activity. Land pristine clouds have fewer lightning sources than polluted clouds. Marine pristine clouds seldom have lightning Increased CAPE had a similar effect to the effect of added CCN. The cloud tracking and properties are obtained by a new methodology of Multi-Cell Identification and Tracking (MCIT) algorithm (Hu et al, 2017), with details about the algorithm to be found in the author

  6. Cre/lox-assisted non-invasive in vivo tracking of specific cell populations by positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunemann, Martin; Schörg, Barbara F; Feil, Susanne; Lin, Yun; Voelkl, Jakob; Golla, Matthias; Vachaviolos, Angelos; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Olbrich, Marcus; Ehrlichmann, Walter; Reischl, Gerald; Griessinger, Christoph M; Langer, Harald F; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian; Schäfers, Michael; Kneilling, Manfred; Pichler, Bernd J; Feil, Robert

    2017-09-05

    Many pathophysiological processes are associated with proliferation, migration or death of distinct cell populations. Monitoring specific cell types and their progeny in a non-invasive, longitudinal and quantitative manner is still challenging. Here we show a novel cell-tracking system that combines Cre/lox-assisted cell fate mapping with a thymidine kinase (sr39tk) reporter gene for cell detection by positron emission tomography (PET). We generate Rosa26-mT/sr39tk PET reporter mice and induce sr39tk expression in platelets, T lymphocytes or cardiomyocytes. As proof of concept, we demonstrate that our mouse model permits longitudinal PET imaging and quantification of T-cell homing during inflammation and cardiomyocyte viability after myocardial infarction. Moreover, Rosa26-mT/sr39tk mice are useful for whole-body characterization of transgenic Cre mice and to detect previously unknown Cre activity. We anticipate that the Cre-switchable PET reporter mice will be broadly applicable for non-invasive long-term tracking of selected cell populations in vivo.Non-invasive cell tracking is a powerful method to visualize cells in vivo under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here Thunemann et al. generate a mouse model for in vivo tracking and quantification of specific cell types by combining a PET reporter gene with Cre-dependent activation that can be exploited for any cell population for which a Cre mouse line is available.

  7. Whole-body MRI in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis for the evaluation of the skeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinborn, M.; Woertler, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Nathrath, M.; Schoeniger, M.; Hahn, H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: the usefulness of whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) for the detection of skeletal lesions in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis should be documented on the basis of case presentations. Materials and methods: in six patients with histologically proven Langerhans cell histiocytosis, 14 WB-MRI examinations were performed to evaluate the skeletal system within disease staging (6 primary, 8 follow-up examinations). The examinations were performed on a 1.5 Tesla, 32-channel whole-body scanner. The examination protocol consisted of T1-weighted and STIR sequences in coronal and sagittal orientation. For comparison, radiographs of the initial skeletal lesions and those that were additionally detected on WB-MRI were available. Results: in 4 patients no additional skeletal lesions were found on WB-MRI besides the initial lesion leading to the diagnosis of unifocal single system disease. In 2 patients WB-MRI was able to identify additional skeletal lesions. In a 5 1/2 year-old boy with the primary lesion located in the cervical spine, a second lesion was detected in the lumbar spine on the initial scan and in the skull and proximal femur during follow-up examination. In a 12 year-old girl with a primary lesion of the thoracic spine, WB-MRI diagnosed additional lesions in the pelvic bone and the tibia. In both patients the diagnosis of multifocal skeletal involvement led to chemotherapy. During follow-up examination, the healing response under therapy could be demonstrated. Comparison with conventional imaging showed that especially lesions located in the spine or the pelvis were not detectable on radiographs even when knowing the MR results. (orig.)

  8. Intracellular lipid in papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC): T2 weighted (T2W) MRI and pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieda, Nicola; Van der Pol, Christian B.; Moosavi, Bardia; McInnes, Matthew D.F. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Medical Imaging, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Mai, Kien T.; Flood, Trevor A. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate if pRCCs demonstrate intracellular lipid (i-lipid) at chemical-shift (CS) MRI, and assess T2W-MRI and pathologic characteristics. Sixty-two patients with a pRCC diagnosis underwent MRI over 11 years (IRB-approved). Two radiologists independently assessed for presence of i-lipid on CS-MRI and homogeneity on T2W-MRI. Inter-observer agreement was assessed via an intraclass correlation and results were compared using the Chi-square test. Discordant cases were reviewed to establish consensus. T2W SI-ratios (SI.tumor/SI.kidney) and CS-SI index were compared using independent t-tests and Spearman correlation. Two pathologists re-evaluated the histopathology. Nine of the 62 pRCCs (14.5 %) demonstrated i-lipid; agreement was moderate (ICC = 0.63). Pathology review depicted clear cells in four tumours and foamy histiocytes in five tumours. 25.8-35.4 % (ICC = 0.65) of tumours were homogeneous on T2W-MRI. No pRCC with i-lipid was considered homogeneous (p = 0.01-0.04). Overall, T2W SI-ratio and CS-SI index were 0.89 (±0.29) and -3.63 % (-7.27 to 11.42). pRCC with i-lipid had significantly higher T2W SI-ratio (p = 0.003). There was a correlation between the CS-SI index and T2W SI-ratio, (r = 0.44, p < 0.001). Intracellular lipid is uncommonly detected in pRCCs due to clear cell changes and foamy histiocytes. These tumours are associated with heterogeneously-increased SI in T2W-MRI. (orig.)

  9. Blood on the tracks: hematopoietic stem cell-endothelial cell interactions in homing and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Julie R; Sporrij, Audrey; Zon, Leonard I

    2017-08-01

    Cells of the hematopoietic system undergo rapid turnover. Each day, humans require the production of about one hundred billion new blood cells for proper function. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are rare cells that reside in specialized niches and are required throughout life to produce specific progenitor cells that will replenish all blood lineages. There is, however, an incomplete understanding of the molecular and physical properties that regulate HSC migration, homing, engraftment, and maintenance in the niche. Endothelial cells (ECs) are intimately associated with HSCs throughout the life of the stem cell, from the specialized endothelial cells that give rise to HSCs, to the perivascular niche endothelial cells that regulate HSC homeostasis. Recent studies have dissected the unique molecular and physical properties of the endothelial cells in the HSC vascular niche and their role in HSC biology, which may be manipulated to enhance hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapies.

  10. Manganese–gold nanoparticles as an MRI positive contrast agent in mesenchymal stem cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunyadi Murph, Simona E.; Jacobs, Stephanie; Liu Jimei; Hu, Tom C.-C.; Siegfired, Matthew; Serkiz, Steven M.; Hudson, Joan

    2012-01-01

    We report a straightforward approach to prepare multifunctional manganese–gold nanoparticles by attaching Mn(II) ions onto the surface of 20 nm citrate-capped gold nanoparticles. In vitro MRI measurements made in agarose gel phantoms exhibited high relaxivity (18.26 ± 1.04 mmol −1 s −1 ). Controlled incubation of the nanoparticles with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was used to study cellular uptake of these particles and this process appeared to be controlled by the size of the nanoparticle aggregates in the extracellular solution. SEM images of live MSCs showed an increased concentration of particles near the cell membrane and a distribution of the size of particles within the cells. Survivability for MSCs in contact with Mn–Au NPs was greater than 97% over the 3-day period and up to the 1 mM Mn used in this study. The high relaxivity and low cell mortality are suggestive of an enhanced positive contrast agent for in vitro or in vivo applications.

  11. Operationalizing Civilian Protection in Mali: The Case for a Civilian Casualty Tracking, Analysis, and Response Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla B. Keenan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This practice note details an emerging best practice of civilian harm mitigation in armed conflict: namely, the creation of civilian casualty tracking, analysis and response processes by a warring party or peace operation force. It asserts that in Iraq, Afghanistan and soon Somalia, these processes to better understand civilian harm and address consequences have positively shaped mission tactics, training, and overall operations. In both Iraq and Afghanistan, tracking and analysis has lead to a marked decrease in civilian casualties and facilitated the making of amends for any civilian losses. The paper argues that for warring parties to achieve their mission—particularly one with a protection of civilians mandate as with the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA—they must fully understand the impact of their actions on the civilian population, positive or negative. For this reason, a Civilian Casualty Tracking, Analysis, and Response Cell should be created for MINUSMA to improve its ability mitigate risk to civilians as required by its Security Council mandate.

  12. Characterization of functional brain activity and connectivity using EEG and fMRI in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Michelle; Zhang, Huishi; Mundahl, John; Datta, Yvonne; Nelson, Stephen; Gupta, Kalpna; He, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a red blood cell disorder that causes many complications including life-long pain. Treatment of pain remains challenging due to a poor understanding of the mechanisms and limitations to characterize and quantify pain. In the present study, we examined simultaneously recording functional MRI (fMRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG) to better understand neural connectivity as a consequence of chronic pain in SCD patients. We performed independent component analysis and seed-based connectivity on fMRI data. Spontaneous power and microstate analysis was performed on EEG-fMRI data. ICA analysis showed that patients lacked activity in the default mode network (DMN) and executive control network compared to controls. EEG-fMRI data revealed that the insula cortex's role in salience increases with age in patients. EEG microstate analysis showed patients had increased activity in pain processing regions. The cerebellum in patients showed a stronger connection to the periaqueductal gray matter (involved in pain inhibition), and negative connections to pain processing areas. These results suggest that patients have reduced activity of DMN and increased activity in pain processing regions during rest. The present findings suggest resting state connectivity differences between patients and controls can be used as novel biomarkers of SCD pain.

  13. Tracking virus-specific CD4+ T cells during and after acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Lucas

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cell help is critical in maintaining antiviral immune responses and such help has been shown to be sustained in acute resolving hepatitis C. In contrast, in evolving chronic hepatitis C CD4+ T cell helper responses appear to be absent or short-lived, using functional assays.Here we used a novel HLA-DR1 tetramer containing a highly targeted CD4+ T cell epitope from the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 4 to track number and phenotype of hepatitis C virus specific CD4+ T cells in a cohort of seven HLA-DR1 positive patients with acute hepatitis C in comparison to patients with chronic or resolved hepatitis C. We observed peptide-specific T cells in all seven patients with acute hepatitis C regardless of outcome at frequencies up to 0.65% of CD4+ T cells. Among patients who transiently controlled virus replication we observed loss of function, and/or physical deletion of tetramer+ CD4+ T cells before viral recrudescence. In some patients with chronic hepatitis C very low numbers of tetramer+ cells were detectable in peripheral blood, compared to robust responses detected in spontaneous resolvers. Importantly we did not observe escape mutations in this key CD4+ T cell epitope in patients with evolving chronic hepatitis C.During acute hepatitis C a CD4+ T cell response against this epitope is readily induced in most, if not all, HLA-DR1+ patients. This antiviral T cell population becomes functionally impaired or is deleted early in the course of disease in those where viremia persists.

  14. Evolving Identification of Blood Cells Associated with Clinically Isolated Syndrome: Importance of Time since Clinical Presentation and Diagnostic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trend, Stephanie; Jones, Anderson P; Geldenhuys, Sian; Byrne, Scott N; Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J; Nolan, David; Booth, David R; Carroll, William M; Lucas, Robyn M; Kermode, Allan G; Hart, Prue H

    2017-06-15

    It is not clear how the profile of immune cells in peripheral blood differs between patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and healthy controls (HC). This study aimed to identify a CIS peripheral blood signature that may provide clues for potential immunomodulatory approaches early in disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from 18 people with CIS, 19 HC and 13 individuals with other demyelinating conditions (ODC) including multiple sclerosis (MS). Individuals with CIS separated into two groups, namely those with early (≤14 days post-diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); n = 6) and late (≥27 days; n = 12) blood sampling. Transitional B cells were increased in the blood of CIS patients independently of when blood was taken. However, there were two time-dependent effects found in the late CIS group relative to HC, including decreased CD56bright NK cells, which correlated significantly with time since MRI, and increased CD141+ myeloid dendritic cell (mDC2) frequencies. Higher CD1c+ B cells and lower non-classical monocyte frequencies were characteristic of more recent demyelinating disease activity (ODC and early CIS). Analysing cell populations by time since symptoms (subjective) and diagnostic MRI (objective) may contribute to understanding CIS.

  15. Photon and proton therapy planning comparison for malignant glioma based on CT, FDG-PET, DTI-MRI and fiber tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Engelholm, Silke; Ohlhues, Lars; Vogelius, Ivan; Engelholm, Svend Aage (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)), e-mail: per.munck@rh.regionh.dk; Law, Ian (Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare treatment plans generated using fixed beam Intensity Modulated photon Radiation Therapy (IMRT), inversely optimized arc therapy (RapidArc(R), RA) with spot-scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for high-grade glioma patients. Plans were compared with respect to target coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs), with special attention to the possibility of hippocampus sparing. Method. Fifteen consecutive patients diagnosed with grade III and IV glioma were selected for this study. The target and OARs were delineated based on computed tomography (CT), FDG-positron emission tomography (PET) and T1-, T2-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fiber-tracking. In this study, a 6 MV photon beam on a linear accelerator with a multileaf collimator (MLC) with 2.5 mm leaves and a spot-scanning proton therapy machine were used. Two RA fields, using both a coplanar (clinical standard) and a non-coplanar, setup was compared to the IMRT and IMPT techniques. Three and three to four non-coplanar fields where used in the spot-scanned IMPT and IMRT plans, respectively. The same set of planning dose-volume optimizer objective values were used for the four techniques. The highest planning priority was given to the brainstem (maximum 54 Gy) followed by the PTV (prescription 60 Gy); the hippocampi, eyes, inner ears, brain and chiasm were given lower priority. Doses were recorded for the plans to targets and OARs and compared to our clinical standard technique using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Result. The PTV coverage was significantly more conform for IMPT than the coplanar RA technique, while RA plans tended to be more conform than the IMRT plans, as measured by the standard deviation of the PTV dose. In the cases where the tumor was confined in one cerebral hemisphere (eight patients), the non-coplanar RA and IMPT techniques yielded borderline significantly lower doses to the

  16. Through the Looking Glass: Time-lapse Microscopy and Longitudinal Tracking of Single Cells to Study Anti-cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Russell T; Orth, James D

    2016-05-14

    The response of single cells to anti-cancer drugs contributes significantly in determining the population response, and therefore is a major contributing factor in the overall outcome. Immunoblotting, flow cytometry and fixed cell experiments are often used to study how cells respond to anti-cancer drugs. These methods are important, but they have several shortcomings. Variability in drug responses between cancer and normal cells, and between cells of different cancer origin, and transient and rare responses are difficult to understand using population averaging assays and without being able to directly track and analyze them longitudinally. The microscope is particularly well suited to image live cells. Advancements in technology enable us to routinely image cells at a resolution that enables not only cell tracking, but also the observation of a variety of cellular responses. We describe an approach in detail that allows for the continuous time-lapse imaging of cells during the drug response for essentially as long as desired, typically up to 96 hr. Using variations of the approach, cells can be monitored for weeks. With the employment of genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors numerous processes, pathways and responses can be followed. We show examples that include tracking and quantification of cell growth and cell cycle progression, chromosome dynamics, DNA damage, and cell death. We also discuss variations of the technique and its flexibility, and highlight some common pitfalls.

  17. Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    2002-07-25

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05 - 0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (< 0.5 degrees C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins.

  18. Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    2002-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05 - 0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (< 0.5 degrees C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins

  19. Swarming and complex pattern formation in Paenibacillus vortex studied by imaging and tracking cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Eshel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swarming motility allows microorganisms to move rapidly over surfaces. The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits advanced cooperative motility on agar plates resulting in intricate colonial patterns with geometries that are highly sensitive to the environment. The cellular mechanisms that underpin the complex multicellular organization of such a simple organism are not well understood. Results Swarming by P. vortex was studied by real-time light microscopy, by in situ scanning electron microscopy and by tracking the spread of antibiotic-resistant cells within antibiotic-sensitive colonies. When swarming, P. vortex was found to be peritrichously flagellated. Swarming by the curved cells of P. vortex occurred on an extremely wide range of media and agar concentrations (0.3 to 2.2% w/v. At high agar concentrations (> 1% w/v rotating colonies formed that could be detached from the main mass of cells by withdrawal of cells into the latter. On lower percentage agars, cells moved in an extended network composed of interconnected "snakes" with short-term collision avoidance and sensitivity to extracts from swarming cells. P. vortex formed single Petri dish-wide "supercolonies" with a colony-wide exchange of motile cells. Swarming cells were coupled by rapidly forming, reversible and non-rigid connections to form a loose raft, apparently connected via flagella. Inhibitors of swarming (p-Nitrophenylglycerol and Congo Red were identified. Mitomycin C was used to trigger filamentation without inhibiting growth or swarming; this facilitated dissection of the detail of swarming. Mitomycin C treatment resulted in malcoordinated swarming and abortive side branch formation and a strong tendency by a subpopulation of the cells to form minimal rotating aggregates of only a few cells. Conclusion P. vortex creates complex macroscopic colonies within which there is considerable reflux and movement and interaction of cells. Cell

  20. Renal Cell Carcinoma Perfusion before and after Radiofrequency Ablation Measured with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah, Tze Min; Sourbron, Steven; Wilson, Daniel Jonathan; Magee, Derek; Gregory, Walter Martin; Selby, Peter John; Buckley, David L

    2018-01-08

    To investigate if the early treatment effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be detected with dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI and to correlate RCC perfusion with RFA treatment time. 20 patients undergoing RFA of their 21 RCCs were evaluated with DCE-MRI before and at one month after RFA treatment. Perfusion was estimated using the maximum slope technique at two independent sittings. Total RCC blood flow was correlated with total RFA treatment time, tumour location, size and histology. DCE-MRI examinations were successfully evaluated for 21 RCCs (size from 1.3 to 4 cm). Perfusion of the RCCs decreased significantly ( p measuring RCC perfusion before and after RFA. Perfusion significantly decreases in the zone of ablation, suggesting that it may be useful for the assessment of treatment efficacy. Pre-RFA RCC blood flow may be used to predict RFA treatment time.

  1. Comparison of Pyranometers and Reference Cells on Fixed and One-Axis Tracking Surfaces: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Michael R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Vignola, Frank [University of Oregon; Peterson, Josh [University of Oregon; Mavromatakis, Fotis [Technological Educational Institute of Crete; Chiu, Chun-Yu [University of Oregon

    2017-12-19

    A wide variety of sensors are used to monitor the irradiance incident on solar modules to evaluate the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. These instruments range from secondary standard pyranometers to photodiode-based pyranometers to reference cells. Although instruments are mounted in the plane of array of the modules, a wide range of results have been obtained. Some of these difference have been assumed to come from systematic uncertainties associated with the irradiance sensors. This study is an attempt to quantify these differences by comparing the output of selected thermopile pyranometers to photodiode-based pyranometers and reference cells on a horizontal surface, a fixed-tilt surface, and a one-axis tracking surface. This analysis focuses on clear-sky results from two sites with different climatic conditions. Several important features were observed. Photodiode-based pyranometers and reference cells produce widely different results under clear skies, especially at larger angles of incidence, even though both instruments are based on measuring the short-circuit current of solar cells. The difference is caused by the scattering of light as it passes through the glazing of the reference cell or the diffuser lens of the photodioded-base pyranometer. Both instruments are shown to have similar response to the spectral distribution of the irradiance when compared to the thermopile-based pyranometer, which has a response nearly independent of the wavelength of light used by PV modules.

  2. Tracking of plus-ends reveals microtubule functional diversity in different cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaebani, M. Reza; Pasula, Aravind; Ott, Albrecht; Santen, Ludger

    2016-07-01

    Many cellular processes are tightly connected to the dynamics of microtubules (MTs). While in neuronal axons MTs mainly regulate intracellular trafficking, they participate in cytoskeleton reorganization in many other eukaryotic cells, enabling the cell to efficiently adapt to changes in the environment. We show that the functional differences of MTs in different cell types and regions is reflected in the dynamic properties of MT tips. Using plus-end tracking proteins EB1 to monitor growing MT plus-ends, we show that MT dynamics and life cycle in axons of human neurons significantly differ from that of fibroblast cells. The density of plus-ends, as well as the rescue and catastrophe frequencies increase while the growth rate decreases toward the fibroblast cell margin. This results in a rather stable filamentous network structure and maintains the connection between nucleus and membrane. In contrast, plus-ends are uniformly distributed along the axons and exhibit diverse polymerization run times and spatially homogeneous rescue and catastrophe frequencies, leading to MT segments of various lengths. The probability distributions of the excursion length of polymerization and the MT length both follow nearly exponential tails, in agreement with the analytical predictions of a two-state model of MT dynamics.

  3. Tracking Cell Surface GABAB Receptors Using an α-Bungarotoxin Tag*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Megan E.; Li, Xinyan; Smart, Trevor G.

    2008-01-01

    GABAB receptors mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system and are important for synaptic plasticity as well as being implicated in disease. Located at pre- and postsynaptic sites, GABAB receptors will influence cell excitability, but their effectiveness in doing so will be dependent, in part, on their trafficking to, and stability on, the cell surface membrane. To examine the dynamic behavior of GABAB receptors in GIRK cells and neurons, we have devised a method that is based on tagging the receptor with the binding site components for the neurotoxin, α-bungarotoxin. By using the α-bungarotoxin binding site-tagged GABAB R1a subunit (R1aBBS), co-expressed with the R2 subunit, we can track receptor mobility using the small reporter, α-bungarotoxin-conjugated rhodamine. In this way, the rates of internalization and membrane insertion for these receptors could be measured with fixed and live cells. The results indicate that GABAB receptors rapidly turnover in the cell membrane, with the rate of internalization affected by the state of receptor activation. The bungarotoxin-based method of receptor-tagging seems ideally suited to follow the dynamic regulation of other G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:18812318

  4. Tracking cell surface GABAB receptors using an alpha-bungarotoxin tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Megan E; Li, Xinyan; Smart, Trevor G

    2008-12-12

    GABA(B) receptors mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system and are important for synaptic plasticity as well as being implicated in disease. Located at pre- and postsynaptic sites, GABA(B) receptors will influence cell excitability, but their effectiveness in doing so will be dependent, in part, on their trafficking to, and stability on, the cell surface membrane. To examine the dynamic behavior of GABA(B) receptors in GIRK cells and neurons, we have devised a method that is based on tagging the receptor with the binding site components for the neurotoxin, alpha-bungarotoxin. By using the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site-tagged GABA(B) R1a subunit (R1a(BBS)), co-expressed with the R2 subunit, we can track receptor mobility using the small reporter, alpha-bungarotoxin-conjugated rhodamine. In this way, the rates of internalization and membrane insertion for these receptors could be measured with fixed and live cells. The results indicate that GABA(B) receptors rapidly turnover in the cell membrane, with the rate of internalization affected by the state of receptor activation. The bungarotoxin-based method of receptor-tagging seems ideally suited to follow the dynamic regulation of other G-protein-coupled receptors.

  5. Comparison of Pyranometers and Reference Cells on Fixed and One-axis Tracking Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Michael R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Vignola, Frank [University of Oregon; Peterson, Josh [University of Oregon; Mavromatakis, Fotis [Technological Educational Institute of Crete; Chiu, Chun-Yu [University of Oregon

    2017-10-12

    Photovoltaic (PV) system perfomance is monitored by a wide variety of sensors. These instruments range from secondary standard pyranometers to photodiode-based pyranometers to reference cells. Although instruments are mounted in the plane of array of the modules a wide range of results have been obtained. Some of these difference have been assumed to come from systematic uncertainties associated with the irradiance sensors. This study is an attempt to quantify these differences by comparing the output of selected thermopile-based pyranometers to photodiode-based pyranometers and reference cells on a horizontal surface, a fixed-tilt surface, and a one-axis tracking surface. This analysis focuses on clear-sky results from two sites with different climatic conditions. Several important features were observed. Photodiode-based pyranometers and reference cells produce widely different results under clear skies, especially at larger angles-of-incidence even though both instruments are based on measuring the short circuit current of solar cells. The difference is caused by the scattering of light as it passes through the glazing of the reference cell or the diffuser lens of the photodioded- base pyranometer. Both instruments are shown to have similar response to the spectral distribution of the irradiance when compared to the thermopile-based pyranometer that has a response nearly independent of the wavelength of light used by PV modules.

  6. Uncovering homo-and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane using single particle tracking approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is responsible for a myriad of functions that regulate cell physiology and plays a crucial role in a multitude of processes that include adhesion, migration, signaling recognition and cell–cell communication. This is accomplished by specific interactions between different membrane components such as lipids and proteins on the lipid bilayer but also through interactions with the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton on the intracellular side and the glycocalyx matrix in close proximity to the extracellular side. Advanced biophysical techniques, including single particle tracking (SPT) have revealed that the lateral diffusion of molecular components on the plasma membrane represents a landmark manifestation of such interactions. Indeed, by studying changes in the diffusivity of individual membrane molecules, including sub-diffusion, confined diffusion and/or transient arrest of molecules in membrane compartments, it has been possible to gain insight on the nature of molecular interactions and to infer on its functional role for cell response. In this review, we will revise some exciting results where SPT has been crucial to reveal homo- and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane. (paper)

  7. New MRI technologies. Diffusion MRI and its application to functional neuroimaging and analyses of white matter integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Described is the technological aspect of MRI, MR diffusion-weighted imaging (MR-DWI), principles of its measurement and application for imaging the cerebral function and for aiding the quantitative diagnosis of brain diseases. The author explains the principle of MR imaging process; diffusion properties of water molecules, MR-DWI based on them and DW-fMRI of the brain; MR-diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI), its analysis and color acquisition, and tracking of white matter nerve fibers; analysis of white matter lesions by the tracking; and the new tracking method at the chiasm of nerve fascicles. The usual fMRI reflects the blood oxygen level depending (BOLD) signals whereas recently attracted DW-fMRI, the volume changes of nerve cells concomitant to nerve activation accompanying apparent changes of water diffusion coefficients in and out of cells which occur faster than BOLD signs, resulting in higher resolution of time and space. However, DWI requires the higher intensity of static magnetic field like 3T. MR-DTI acquires the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules using MR-DWI technique with application of 6 or more motion probing gradients, thus makes it possible to track the running directions of nerve fibers and capillary vessels, and is proposed to be a useful mean of specific fiber tracking in the white matter when displayed by 3 different colors exhibiting the directions like the right/left (x axis, red), anterior/posterior (y, green) and upper/lower (z, blue) sides of head. Recently, MR-DWI and MR-DTI have been found usable for pathogenic studies of brain diseases such as dementia. Tensor anisotropy is apparently lowered at the chiasm of nerve fascicles, the cause of tracking error, for which authors have developed a new method using the similarity of directional vector, not of tensor, before and behind the chiasm. As exemplified, MRI technology is further advancing even at present. (T.T.)

  8. Characterization of exosomes derived from ovarian cancer cells and normal ovarian epithelial cells by nanoparticle tracking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Peng, Peng; Kuang, Yun; Yang, Jiaxin; Cao, Dongyan; You, Yan; Shen, Keng

    2016-03-01

    Cellular exosomes are involved in many disease processes and have the potential to be used for diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we compared the characteristics of exosomes derived from human ovarian epithelial cells (HOSEPiC) and three epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines (OVCAR3, IGROV1, and ES-2) to investigate the differences between exosomes originating from normal and malignant cells. Two established colloid-chemical methodologies, electron microscopy (EM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), and a relatively new method, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), were used to measure the size and size distribution of exosomes. The concentration and epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression of exosomes were measured by NTA. Quantum dots were conjugated with anti-EpCAM to label exosomes, and the labeled exosomes were detected by NTA in fluorescent mode. The normal-cell-derived exosomes were significantly larger than those derived from malignant cells, and exosomes were successfully labeled using anti-EpCAM-conjugated quantum dots. Exosomes from different cell lines may vary in size, and exosomes might be considered as potential diagnosis biomarkers. NTA can be considered a useful, efficient, and objective method for the study of different exosomes and their unique properties in ovarian cancer.

  9. Tracking fusion of human mesenchymal stem cells after transplantation to the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Brian T; Kouris, Nicholas A; Ogle, Brenda M

    2015-06-01

    Evidence suggests that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can aid recovery of damaged myocardium caused by myocardial infarction. One possible mechanism for MSC-mediated recovery is reprogramming after cell fusion between transplanted MSCs and recipient cardiac cells. We used a Cre/LoxP-based luciferase reporter system coupled to biophotonic imaging to detect fusion of transplanted human pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs to cells of organs of living mice. Human MSCs, with transient expression of a viral fusogen, were delivered to the murine heart via a collagen patch. At 2 days and 1 week later, living mice were probed for bioluminescence indicative of cell fusion. Cell fusion was detected at the site of delivery (heart) and in distal tissues (i.e., stomach, small intestine, liver). Fusion was confirmed at the cellular scale via fluorescence in situ hybridization for human-specific and mouse-specific centromeres. Human cells in organs distal to the heart were typically located near the vasculature, suggesting MSCs and perhaps MSC fusion products have the ability to migrate via the circulatory system to distal organs and engraft with local cells. The present study reveals previously unknown migratory patterns of delivered human MSCs and associated fusion products in the healthy murine heart. The study also sets the stage for follow-on studies to determine the functional effects of cell fusion in a model of myocardial damage or disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are transplanted to the heart, cartilage, and other tissues to recover lost function or at least limit overactive immune responses. Analysis of tissues after MSC transplantation shows evidence of fusion between MSCs and the cells of the recipient. To date, the biologic implications of cell fusion remain unclear. A newly developed in vivo tracking system was used to identify MSC fusion products in living mice. The migratory patterns of fusion products were determined both in the target organ (i

  10. Multiple Convective Cell Identification and Tracking Algorithm for documenting time-height evolution of measured polarimetric radar and lightning properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, D.; Hu, J.; Zhang, P.; Snyder, J.; Orville, R. E.; Ryzhkov, A.; Zrnic, D.; Williams, E.; Zhang, R.

    2017-12-01

    A methodology to track the evolution of the hydrometeors and electrification of convective cells is presented and applied to various convective clouds from warm showers to super-cells. The input radar data are obtained from the polarimetric NEXRAD weather radars, The information on cloud electrification is obtained from Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMA). The development time and height of the hydrometeors and electrification requires tracking the evolution and lifecycle of convective cells. A new methodology for Multi-Cell Identification and Tracking (MCIT) is presented in this study. This new algorithm is applied to time series of radar volume scans. A cell is defined as a local maximum in the Vertical Integrated Liquid (VIL), and the echo area is divided between cells using a watershed algorithm. The tracking of the cells between radar volume scans is done by identifying the two cells in consecutive radar scans that have maximum common VIL. The vertical profile of the polarimetric radar properties are used for constructing the time-height cross section of the cell properties around the peak reflectivity as a function of height. The LMA sources that occur within the cell area are integrated as a function of height as well for each time step, as determined by the radar volume scans. The result of the tracking can provide insights to the evolution of storms, hydrometer types, precipitation initiation and cloud electrification under different thermodynamic, aerosol and geographic conditions. The details of the MCIT algorithm, its products and their performance for different types of storm are described in this poster.

  11. Dual-Modal Nanoprobes for Imaging of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplant by MRI and Fluorescence Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Chang Kyu; Hong, Kyung Ah; Lin, Shun Mei

    2009-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of labeling human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with bifunctional nanoparticles and assessing their potential as imaging probes in the monitoring of hMSC transplantation. The T1 and T2 relaxivities of the nanoparticles (MNP SiO 2 [RITC]-PEG) were measured at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance scanner. Using hMSCs and the nanoparticles, labeling efficiency, toxicity, and proliferation were assessed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to specify the intracellular localization of the endocytosed iron nanoparticles. We also observed in vitro and in vivo visualization of the labeled hMSCs with a 3T MR scanner and optical imaging. MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG showed both superparamagnetic and fluorescent properties. The r 1 and r 2 relaxivity values of the MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG were 0.33 and 398 mM -1 s -1 at 1.5T, respectively, and 0.29 and 453 mM -1 s -1 at 3T, respectively. The effective internalization of MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG into hMSCs was observed by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. The transmission electron microscopy images showed that MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG was internalized into the cells and mainly resided in the cytoplasm. The viability and proliferation of MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG-labeled hMSCs were not significantly different from the control cells. MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG-labeled hMSCs were observed in vitro and in vivo with optical and MR imaging. MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG can be a useful contrast agent for stem cell imaging, which is suitable for a bimodal detection by MRI and optical imaging

  12. Making tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-10-15

    In many modern tracking chambers, the sense wires, rather than being lined up uniformly, are grouped into clusters to facilitate the pattern recognition process. However, with higher energy machines providing collisions richer in secondary particles, event reconstruction becomes more complicated. A Caltech / Illinois / SLAC / Washington group developed an ingenious track finding and fitting approach for the Mark III detector used at the SPEAR electron-positron ring at SLAC (Stanford). This capitalizes on the detector's triggering, which uses programmable logic circuits operating in parallel, each 'knowing' the cell patterns for all tracks passing through a specific portion of the tracker (drift chamber)

  13. Locoregional tumour evaluation of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck area: a comparison between MRI, PET/CT and integrated PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Ruhlmann, Marcus; Ruhlmann, Verena [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Bergmann, Christoph [University Hospital Essen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Essen (Germany); Schlamann, Marc [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Marburg (Germany); Forsting, Michael; Wetter, Axel [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging for locoregional tumour evaluation compared to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MR imaging in initial tumour and recurrence diagnosis in histopathologically confirmed head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging were performed for initial tumour staging or recurrence diagnosis in 25 patients with HNSCC. MR, fused {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and fused {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR images were analysed by two independent readers in separate sessions in random order. In initial tumour staging, T and N staging was performed while individual lesions were analysed in patients with suspected cancer recurrence. In T and N staging, histopathological results after tumour resection served as the reference standard while histopathological sampling as well as cross-sectional and clinical follow-up were accepted in cancer recurrence diagnosis. The diagnostic accuracy of each modality was calculated separately for T and N staging as well as for tumour recurrence, and compared using McNemar's test. Values of p <0.017 were considered statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. In 12 patients undergoing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR for initial tumour staging, T staging was accurate in 50 % with MRI, in 59 % with PET/CT and in 75 % with PET/MR while N staging was accurate in 75 % with MRI, in 77 % with PET/CT and in 71 % with PET/MR in relation to the reference standard. No significant differences were observed in T and N staging among the three modalities (p > 0.017). In 13 patients undergoing hybrid imaging for cancer recurrence diagnosis, diagnostic accuracy was 57 % with MRI and in 72 % with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR, respectively. Again, no significant differences were found among the three modalities (p > 0.017). In this initial study, no significant differences were found among {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR, {sup 18}F

  14. Quantum measurement and orientation tracking of fluorescent nanodiamonds inside living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, L. P.; Yan, Y.; Stacey, A.; Simpson, D. A.; Hall, L. T.; MacLaurin, D.; Prawer, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Wrachtrup, J.; Caruso, F.; Scholten, R. E.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2011-06-01

    Fluorescent particles are routinely used to probe biological processes. The quantum properties of single spins within fluorescent particles have been explored in the field of nanoscale magnetometry, but not yet in biological environments. Here, we demonstrate optically detected magnetic resonance of individual fluorescent nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy centres inside living human HeLa cells, and measure their location, orientation, spin levels and spin coherence times with nanoscale precision. Quantum coherence was measured through Rabi and spin-echo sequences over long (>10 h) periods, and orientation was tracked with effective 1° angular precision over acquisition times of 89 ms. The quantum spin levels served as fingerprints, allowing individual centres with identical fluorescence to be identified and tracked simultaneously. Furthermore, monitoring decoherence rates in response to changes in the local environment may provide new information about intracellular processes. The experiments reported here demonstrate the viability of controlled single spin probes for nanomagnetometry in biological systems, opening up a host of new possibilities for quantum-based imaging in the life sciences.

  15. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  16. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Melchert, U.H.; Schroeder, C.; Boer, R. de; Spielmann, R.P.; Heller, M.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  17. Time-Lapse Monitoring of DNA Damage Colocalized With Particle Tracks in Single Living Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFadden, Conor H. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hallacy, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Flint, David B. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Granville, Dal A. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Asaithamby, Aroumougame [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Akselrod, Mark S. [Crystal Growth Division, Landauer, Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Sawakuchi, Gabriel O., E-mail: gsawakuchi@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Understanding the DNA damage and repair induced by hadron therapy (HT) beams is crucial for developing novel strategies to maximize the use of HT beams to treat cancer patients. However, spatiotemporal studies of DNA damage and repair for beam energies relevant to HT have been challenging. We report a technique that enables spatiotemporal measurement of radiation-induced damage in live cells and colocalization of this damage with charged particle tracks over a broad range of clinically relevant beam energies. The technique uses novel fluorescence nuclear track detectors with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy in the beam line to visualize particle track traversals within the subcellular compartments of live cells within seconds after injury. Methods and Materials: We designed and built a portable fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope for use in the beam path, coated fluorescence nuclear track detectors with fluorescent-tagged live cells (HT1080 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein tagged to XRCC1, a single-strand break repair protein), placed the entire assembly into a proton therapy beam line, and irradiated the cells with a fluence of ∼1 × 10{sup 6} protons/cm{sup 2}. Results: We successfully obtained confocal images of proton tracks and foci of DNA single-strand breaks immediately after irradiation. Conclusions: This technique represents an innovative method for analyzing biological responses in any HT beam line at energies and dose rates relevant to therapy. It allows precise determination of the number of tracks traversing a subcellular compartment and monitoring the cellular damage therein, and has the potential to measure the linear energy transfer of each track from therapeutic beams.

  18. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Christian; Hess, Andreas; Budinsky, Lubos; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM) based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods.

  19. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumour: Dynamic CT, MRI and clinicopathological characteristics—Analysis of 32 cases and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Y.; Zhang, H.; Xiao, E.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the dynamic computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinicopathological characteristics of perivascular epithelioid cell tumours (PEComas), thus improving the diagnosis of the tumour. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was undertaken of the dynamic CT, MRI, and clinicopathological characteristics of 32 PEComas diagnosed at histopathology during the period 1 January 2005 to 1 March 2012 at two hospitals. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 14–80 years (mean 43.3 years). There were more women in this group (19/32). Solitary tumours were identified in kidney (n = 16), liver (n = 7), gynaecological organs (n = 2), retroperitoneal soft tissue (n = 2), lung (n = 2), palate (n = 1), left groin (n = 1). One patient had multiple tumours in the liver, kidney, and retroperitoneal soft tissue. Dynamic CT (32 cases) and MRI (15 cases) demonstrated tumours that were of low density or hypointense on T1-weighted imaging (WI) and hyperintense on T2WI; some were isodense with fat (CT: 10/32; MRI: 6/15). The tumours usually had well-defined borders and were of a regular shape (CT: 26/32; MRI: 12/15). Tumour diameters ranged from 1.5–18 cm (mean 5.1 cm). Most tumours (CT: 21/32, MRI: 10/15) enhanced heterogeneously and significantly on arterial and venous phases. Tumours appeared slightly hypodense on delayed CT imaging, although some (6/32) had delayed enhancement. The expression rate of HMB-45 (human melanoma black monoclonal antibody) was 100% (32/32). Histological classification in 22 cases (22/32) was epithelioid angiomyolipoma (AML), three (3/32) were clear cell “sugar” tumours (CCSTs), two (2/32) were lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), and two (2/32) were clear cell myomelanocytic tumours of the falciform ligament/ligamentum teres (CCMMT). Three tumours did not have a specific classification. Conclusion: Knowledge of dynamic CT, MRI, and clinicopathological characteristics could help improve the diagnosis of

  20. In vivo tracking of neuronal-like cells by magnetic resonance in rabbit models of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Kun; Li, Jianding; Liu, Qiang; Xie, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments have demonstrated that neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate, integrate and help to restore the function and behaviors of spinal cord injury models, and that they may serve as a suitable approach to treating spinal cord injury. However, it is very difficult to track transplanted cells in vivo. In this study, we injected superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled neuronal-like cells into the subarachnoid space in a rabbit model of spinal cord injury. At 7 days after cell transplantation, a small number of dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows were observed in the spinal cord injury region, and at 14 days, the number of these shadows increased on T2-weighted imaging. Perl's Prussian blue staining detected dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows in the spinal cord injury region, indicative of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells. These findings suggest that transplanted neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can migrate to the spinal cord injury region and can be tracked by magnetic resonance in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging represents an efficient noninvasive technique for visually tracking transplanted cells in vivo. PMID:25206659

  1. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  2. Quantitative pancreatic β cell MRI using manganese-enhanced Look-Locker imaging and two-site water exchange analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antkowiak, Patrick F; Vandsburger, Moriel H; Epstein, Frederick H

    2012-06-01

    Pancreatic β-cell imaging would be useful in monitoring the progression of and therapies for diabetes. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate quantitative β-cell MRI using manganese (Mn(2+)) labeling of β cells, T1 mapping, and a two-site water exchange model. Normal, pharmacologically-treated, and severely diabetic mice underwent injection of MnCl(2). Pancreatic water proton T1 relaxation was measured using Look-Locker MRI, and two-site water exchange analysis was used to estimate model parameters including the intracellular water proton relaxation rate constant (R1(ic)) and the intracellular fraction as indicators of β-cell function and mass, respectively. Logarithmic plots of T1 relaxation revealed two distinct proton pools relaxing with different T1s, and the two-site water exchange model fit the measured T1 relaxation data better than a monoexponential model. The intracellular R1(ic) time course revealed the kinetics of β-cell Mn(2+) labeling. Pharmacological treatments with nifedipine, tolbutamide, and diazoxide altered R1(ic), indicating that beta cell function was a determinant of Mn(2+) uptake. Intracellular fraction was significantly higher in mice with normal β cell mass than in diabetic mice (14.9% vs. 14.4%, P exchange analysis of T1 relaxation of the Mn(2+)-enhanced pancreas is a promising method for quantifying β cell volume fraction and function. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Nanohybrids with Magnetic and Persistent Luminescence Properties for Cell Labeling, Tracking, In Vivo Real-Time Imaging, and Magnetic Vectorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teston, Eliott; Maldiney, Thomas; Marangon, Iris; Volatron, Jeanne; Lalatonne, Yoann; Motte, Laurence; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine; Autret, Gwennhael; Clément, Olivier; Scherman, Daniel; Gazeau, Florence; Richard, Cyrille

    2018-04-01

    Once injected into a living organism, cells diffuse or migrate around the initial injection point and become impossible to be visualized and tracked in vivo. The present work concerns the development of a new technique for therapeutic cell labeling and subsequent in vivo visualization and magnetic retention. It is hypothesized and subsequently demonstrated that nanohybrids made of persistent luminescence nanoparticles and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated into a silica matrix can be used as an effective nanoplatform to label therapeutic cells in a nontoxic way in order to dynamically track them in real-time in vitro and in living mice. As a proof-of-concept, it is shown that once injected, these labeled cells can be visualized and attracted in vivo using a magnet. This first step suggests that these nanohybrids represent efficient multifunctional nanoprobes for further imaging guided cell therapies development. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Tracking by flow cytometry antigen-specific follicular helper T cells in wild-type animals after protein vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakarov, Svetoslav; Fazilleau, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a valuable technology used in immunology to characterize and enumerate the different cell subpopulations specific for a nonself-antigen in the context of an ongoing immune response. Among them, follicular helper T cells are the cognate regulators of B cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Thus, tracking them is of high interest especially in the context of protein vaccination. For this purpose, transgenic antigen-receptor mouse models have been largely used. It is now clear that transgenic models are not always the best means to study the dynamics of the immune response since they can modify the response. In this chapter, we describe how to track endogenous antigen-specific follicular helper T cells by flow cytometry after protein vaccination in nonmodified wild-type animals, which ultimately provides a comprehensive way to enumerate, characterize, and isolate these particular cells in vivo.

  5. Correlation of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography with MRI and MRA in the evaluation of sickle cell disease patients with prior stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogutt, M.S.; Goldwag, S.S.; Gupta, K.L.; Kaneko, K.; Humbert, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated a group of patients with sickle cell disease and a clinical history of prior stroke, comparing transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) to both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to determine its efficacy for the detection of flow abnormalities associated with prior cerebral infarction. Using MRI as the standard examination, there was 94 % sensitivity and 30 % specificity, and using MRA as the standard examination, there was 91 % sensitivity and 22 % specificity. We concur with other reports that the transcranial Doppler examination is a highly sensitive study. In our group of sickle cell disease patients with prior stroke, TCD reliably detected flow abnormalities that correlated to areas of prior cerebral infarction. (orig.)

  6. Cell viability and MRI performance of highly efficient polyol-coated magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga-Cardona, Fernando; Gutiérrez-García, Eric; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia; López-Vasquez, Ciro; Brito-Barrera, Yazmín A.; Flores-Tochihuitl, Julia; Angulo-Molina, Aracely; Reyes-Leyva, Julio R.; González-Rodríguez, Roberto; Coffer, Jeffery L.; Pal, Umapada

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed at determining conditions that would allow us to control the size of the NPs and create a system with characteristics apt for biomedical applications. We describe a comprehensive study on the synthesis and physical characterization of two highly sensitive sets of triethylene glycol (TREG) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) to be evaluated for use as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents. The ferrofluids demonstrated excellent colloidal stability in deionized water at pH 7.0 as indicated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) data. The magnetic relaxivities, r_2, were measured on a 1.5 T clinical MRI instrument. Values in the range from 205 to 257 mM"−"1 s"−"1 were obtained, varying proportionally to the SPIONs’ sizes and coating nature. Further in vitro cell viability tests and in vivo biodistribution analyses of the intravenously administered nanoparticles showed that the prepared systems have good biocompatibility and migrate to several organs, mainly the meninges, spleen, and liver. Based on these results, our findings demonstrated the potential utility of these nanosystems as clinical contrast agents for MR imaging.

  7. Cell viability and MRI performance of highly efficient polyol-coated magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteaga-Cardona, Fernando [Universidad de las Américas de Puebla, Departamento de Ciencias Químico-Biológicas (Mexico); Gutiérrez-García, Eric [Instituto Literario, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México (Mexico); Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia, E-mail: shid@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Departamento de Física (Mexico); López-Vasquez, Ciro; Brito-Barrera, Yazmín A. [Universidad de las Américas de Puebla, Departamento de Ciencias Químico-Biológicas (Mexico); Flores-Tochihuitl, Julia [Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Facultad de Estomatología (Mexico); Angulo-Molina, Aracely [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Ciencias Químico-Biológicas (Mexico); Reyes-Leyva, Julio R. [Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Oriente (CIBIOR) (Mexico); González-Rodríguez, Roberto; Coffer, Jeffery L. [Texas Christian University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Pal, Umapada [Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Apdo, Instituto de Física (Mexico); and others

    2016-11-15

    This work aimed at determining conditions that would allow us to control the size of the NPs and create a system with characteristics apt for biomedical applications. We describe a comprehensive study on the synthesis and physical characterization of two highly sensitive sets of triethylene glycol (TREG) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) to be evaluated for use as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents. The ferrofluids demonstrated excellent colloidal stability in deionized water at pH 7.0 as indicated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) data. The magnetic relaxivities, r{sub 2}, were measured on a 1.5 T clinical MRI instrument. Values in the range from 205 to 257 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1} were obtained, varying proportionally to the SPIONs’ sizes and coating nature. Further in vitro cell viability tests and in vivo biodistribution analyses of the intravenously administered nanoparticles showed that the prepared systems have good biocompatibility and migrate to several organs, mainly the meninges, spleen, and liver. Based on these results, our findings demonstrated the potential utility of these nanosystems as clinical contrast agents for MR imaging.

  8. Visualization and correction of automated segmentation, tracking and lineaging from 5-D stem cell image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wait, Eric; Winter, Mark; Bjornsson, Chris; Kokovay, Erzsebet; Wang, Yue; Goderie, Susan; Temple, Sally; Cohen, Andrew R

    2014-10-03

    Neural stem cells are motile and proliferative cells that undergo mitosis, dividing to produce daughter cells and ultimately generating differentiated neurons and glia. Understanding the mechanisms controlling neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation will play a key role in the emerging fields of regenerative medicine and cancer therapeutics. Stem cell studies in vitro from 2-D image data are well established. Visualizing and analyzing large three dimensional images of intact tissue is a challenging task. It becomes more difficult as the dimensionality of the image data increases to include time and additional fluorescence channels. There is a pressing need for 5-D image analysis and visualization tools to study cellular dynamics in the intact niche and to quantify the role that environmental factors play in determining cell fate. We present an application that integrates visualization and quantitative analysis of 5-D (x,y,z,t,channel) and large montage confocal fluorescence microscopy images. The image sequences show stem cells together with blood vessels, enabling quantification of the dynamic behaviors of stem cells in relation to their vascular niche, with applications in developmental and cancer biology. Our application automatically segments, tracks, and lineages the image sequence data and then allows the user to view and edit the results of automated algorithms in a stereoscopic 3-D window while simultaneously viewing the stem cell lineage tree in a 2-D window. Using the GPU to store and render the image sequence data enables a hybrid computational approach. An inference-based approach utilizing user-provided edits to automatically correct related mistakes executes interactively on the system CPU while the GPU handles 3-D visualization tasks. By exploiting commodity computer gaming hardware, we have developed an application that can be run in the laboratory to facilitate rapid iteration through biological experiments. We combine unsupervised image

  9. Moving epithelia: Tracking the fate of mammalian limbal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Nick

    2015-09-01

    Lineage tracing allows the destiny of a stem cell (SC) and its progeny to be followed through time. In order to track their long-term fate, SC must be permanently marked to discern their distribution, division, displacement and differentiation. This information is essential for unravelling the mysteries that govern their replenishing activity while they remain anchored within their niche microenvironment. Modern-day lineage tracing uses inducible genetic recombination to illuminate cells within embryonic, newborn and adult tissues, and the advent of powerful high-resolution microscopy has enabled the behaviour of labelled cells to be monitored in real-time in a living organism. The simple structural organization of the mammalian cornea, including its accessibility and transparency, renders it the ideal tissue to study SC fate using lineage tracing assisted by non-invasive intravital microscopy. Despite more than a century of research devoted to understanding how this tissue is maintained and repaired, many limitations and controversies continue to plague the field, including uncertainties about the specificity of current SC markers, the number of SC within the cornea, their mode of division, their location, and importantly the signals that dictate cell migration. This communication will highlight historical discoveries as well as recent developments in the corneal SC field; more specifically how the progeny of these cells are mobilised to replenish this dynamic tissue during steady-state, disease and transplantation. Also discussed is how insights gleaned from animal studies can be used to advance our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms that govern modelling and remodelling of the human cornea in health and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MRI findings of bilateral juvenile granulosa cell tumor of the testis in a newborn presenting as intraabdominal masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yikilmaz, Ali [Erciyes Medical School, Department of Radiology, Gevher Nesibe Hospital, Kayseri (Turkey); Lee, Edward Y. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Juvenile granulosa cell tumor (JGCT) of the testis is a rare benign tumor that typically presents as a relatively small (<2 cm) unilateral scrotal mass in neonates or infants. Bilateral JGCT of the testes presenting as large intraabdominal masses in the neonate is very rare. Utilizing preoperative MRI findings, we report a rare case of bilateral JGCT of the testes presenting as large multiseptated abdominal masses originating from undescended intraabdominal testes in a neonate. (orig.)

  11. Gadolinium-Hematoporphyrin: new potential MRI contrast agent for detection of breast cancer cell line (MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Shahbazi Gahrouei

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gadolinium-porphyrins have been synthesized and are currently being investigated as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents. This study aimed to synthesize Gd-hematoporphyrin and applicate it for in vitro detection of breast cancer cell line (MCF-7. Methods: The naturally occurring porphyrin (hematoporphyrin was inserted with gadolinium (III nitrate hexahydrate to yield Gd-H. T1 relaxation times and signal enhancement of the contrast agents were presented, and the results were compared. UV spectrophotometer measured the attachment of Gd to the cell membrane of MCF-7. Results: Most of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3 was found in the washing solution, indicate that it didn`t fixed to the breast cell membranes during incubation. Gd-DTPA showed some uptake into the MCF-7 cell membranes with incubation, however, its uptake was significantly lower than Gd-H. Conclusion: Good cell memberan uptake of Gd-porphyrin is comparable to controls, indicating selective delivery it to the breast cell line and considerable potency in diagnostic MR imaging for detection of breast cancer. Key Words: Porphyrin, Contrast agent, MRI, Hematoporphyrin, Breast cancer cell (MCF-7

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma Perfusion before and after Radiofrequency Ablation Measured with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Min Wah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate if the early treatment effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA on renal cell carcinoma (RCC can be detected with dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI and to correlate RCC perfusion with RFA treatment time. Materials and methods: 20 patients undergoing RFA of their 21 RCCs were evaluated with DCE-MRI before and at one month after RFA treatment. Perfusion was estimated using the maximum slope technique at two independent sittings. Total RCC blood flow was correlated with total RFA treatment time, tumour location, size and histology. Results: DCE-MRI examinations were successfully evaluated for 21 RCCs (size from 1.3 to 4 cm. Perfusion of the RCCs decreased significantly (p < 0.0001 from a mean of 203 (±80 mL/min/100 mL before RFA to 8.1 (±3.1 mL/min/100 mL after RFA with low intra-observer variability (r ≥ 0.99, p < 0.0001. There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.95 between time to complete ablation and pre-treatment total RCC blood flow. Tumours with an exophytic location exhibit the lowest mean RFA treatment time. Conclusion: DCE-MRI can detect early treatment effects by measuring RCC perfusion before and after RFA. Perfusion significantly decreases in the zone of ablation, suggesting that it may be useful for the assessment of treatment efficacy. Pre-RFA RCC blood flow may be used to predict RFA treatment time.

  13. SPECT Imaging for in vivo tracking of NIS containing stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Zhenghong

    2013-04-02

    The proposed study contains two groups of imaging experiments: 1) human mesenchymal stem cells supporting in vivo survival of unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cells; 2) gene transduction and selection of mutant MGMT genes on human hematopoietic stem cells conferring resistance to BC+BCNU. There is increasing evidence that adult human tissues harbor stem and progenitor cells that can be used for therapeutic purposes. We had focused on the Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) found in human bone marrow and investigated these cells in the context of autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to a) facilitate rapid hematopoietic engraftment in cancer patients receiving high dose chemotherapy and b) to modulate the graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We have demonstrated that culture-expanded autologous and allogeneic MSCs can be safely infused into humans and the preliminary results showed that MSCs facilitate hematopoietic engraftment and reduce GVHD. On the other hand, studies of gene transfer with drug resistant selection suggest major perturbations to the process of hematopoietic reconstitution and the confounding issue of organ toxicity and recovery that takes place in the host. We have found that limiting numbers of hematopoietic stem cells transduced with MGMT repopulate the bone marrow of primary and secondary recipient mice. We are also particularly interested in the dynamics of engraftment and selection in regions of bones, liver, spleen and lung, where we have previously seen marked evidence of engraftment. All the measurements have required animal sacrifice and single point determinations of engraftment in individual and cohorts of mice. Heretofore it has not been possible to study the dynamics of engraftment and enrichment. In the upcoming application, we propose to develop an imaging method to track intravenously infused stem cells in vivo at preset time points to understand their homing and proliferation. Specifically, we propose to use

  14. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diff...

  15. "Sickle Cell Anemia: Tracking down a Mutation": An Interactive Learning Laboratory That Communicates Basic Principles of Genetics and Cellular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients…

  16. MRI of the transplanted endothelial progenitor cells for prevent atherosclerotic plaque formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhanlong; Teng Gaojun; Mai Xiaoli; Chen Jun; Sun Junhui; Zhang Hongying; Yu Hui; Li Guozhao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system to depict and track in vivo of magnetically labeled endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and to study the possibility for preventing the atherosclerotic plaque formation in New Zealand rabbit model of carotid arterial injury after transplantation. Methods: New Zealand rabbit EPCs were isolated, confirmed, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe 2 O 3 -PLL, Prussian blue stain was performed for showing intracellular irons. The model of carotid arterial injury was performed by 2.5F balloons, the group A of 8 rabbits received magnetically labeled EPCs, group B of 3 rabbits received fluorescent-labeled EPCs and the group C of 5 rabbits were given same volume saline injection after endothelial injury of the carotid artery. MR imaging and histology were performed and compared 4 days later for randomly chosen three rabbit, each from one of the three group; all the other rabbits were fed with high lipid diet and examed using MR imaging and histology after 15 weeks. Results: Epcs labeling efficiency was more than 95% by Prussian blue stain, 4 days after transplantation of EPCs, only in group A, the injured endothelium of carotid artery had signal intensity loss in T 2 * WI, which were correlated well with the area where the most Prussian blue staining positive cells were found in histopathology analyses. The rabbits of group A and B which received EPCs transplantation exhibited fewer plaques formation than those of the group C (P 2 O 3 -PLL. The 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system could depict and monitor the magnetically labeled endothelial progenitor cells homing to the injured endothelium of the artery, and EPCs contribute to preventing atherosclerotic plaque formation in New Zealand rabbit model of atherosclerosis. (authors)

  17. The effect of track structure on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in murine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Cella, L.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Saito, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure chromosome aberrations in C3H 10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts using FISH painting at the first mitosis following exposure to 30 keV/microm hydrogen or neon ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cells in plateau-phase were irradiated with 0.86 MeV protons at the TTT-3 Tandem accelerator in Naples (Italy), or with 400 MeV/n Ne ions at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (Japan). Colcemid-blocked cells were harvested at the first mitosis following exposure, and chromosome spreads were hybridized in situ with a fluorescein-labelled composite mouse DNA probe specific for chromosomes 2 and 8. RESULTS: Protons were more efficient than neon ions at the same LET in the induction of chromosome interchanges and breaks. Yields of complex exchanges were similar for both particles at the same dose, but protons produced mostly insertions, while with Ne exposure non-reciprocal exchanges were the most frequent complex-type exchange. CONCLUSIONS: Charged particles with the same LET produce different yields of chromosome aberrations, and some observed differences can be explained based on the available track-structure models.

  18. Theranostic Niosomes for Efficient siRNA/microRNA Delivery and Activatable Near-Infrared Fluorescent Tracking of Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Chuanxu; Shan, Gao; Song, Ping

    2018-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated gene regulation in stem cells offers great potential in regenerative medicine. In this study, we developed a theranostic platform for efficient delivery of small RNAs (siRNA/miRNA) to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to promote differentiation, and meanwhile...... OFF/ON activatable fluorescence upon cellular internalization, resulting in efficient NIR labeling and the capability to dynamically monitor stem cells in mice. In addition, iSPN/siRNA achieved simultaneous long-term cell tracking and in vivo gene silencing after implantation in mice. These results...

  19. Exploring Transduction Mechanisms of Protein Transduction Domains (PTDs in Living Cells Utilizing Single-Quantum Dot Tracking (SQT Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs, we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT, to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  20. Single charged-particle damage to living cells: a new method based on track-etch detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G.F.; Pugliese, M.; Manti, L.; Nappo, M.; Gialanella, G.

    1994-01-01

    Biological effects of ionizing radiation are usually expressed as a function of the absorbed dose. Low doses of high-LET radiation correspond to one or few particle traversals through the cell. In order to study the biological effectiveness of single charged particles, we have developed a new method based on solid state nuclear track detectors. Cells are seeded on mylar and a LR-115 film is stuck below the mylar base. After irradiation, the LR-115 film is etched and cells observed at a phase contrast microscope connected to a video camera and an image analyzer. In this way, it is possible to measure the number of traversals through the cell nucleus or cytoplasm. Coordinates of each cell on the microscope bench are saved. After incubation for about one week, cells are fixed and stained and the colonies observed at the microscope. The fate of each irradiated cell is therefore correlated to the number of traversals. We have tested this method with two different rodent embryo fibroblast cell lines, C3H 10T1/2 and V79, exposed to 3.2 MeV accelerated α-particles (LET =124 keV/μm). The studied endpoint was cell killing. Preliminary biological results suggest that few α-particle tracks in V79 hamster cells are sufficient to reduce surviving fraction. ((orig.))

  1. Ultrastructural characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells labeled with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles for clinical tracking studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Hansen, Alastair B; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To evaluate survival and engraftment of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in vivo, it is necessary to track implanted cells non-invasively with a method, which does not influence cellular ultrastructure and functional characteristics. Iron-oxide particles have been applied for cell...... sequence of trans-activator of transcription (TAT) (IODEX-TAT) and evaluate the effect of labeling on ultrastructure, viability, phenotype and proliferative capacity of the cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MSCs were labeled with 5 and 10 μg IODEX-TAT/10(5) cells for 2, 6 and 21 hours. IODEX-TAT uptake...... and cellular ultrastructure were determined by electron microscopy. Cell viability was determined by propidium iodide staining and cell proliferation capacity by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Maintenance of stem cell surface markers was determined by flow cytometry. Results. IODEX-TAT labeling...

  2. Combined diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level-dependent, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for characterization and differentiation of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Staehler, Michael; Steiner, Nicole; Schwab, Felix; Sourbron, Steven P; Michaely, Henrik J; Helck, Andreas D; Reiser, Maximilian F; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2013-06-01

    To investigate a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach comprising diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), blood oxygen-dependent (BOLD), and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for characterization and differentiation of primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Fourteen patients with clear-cell carcinoma and four patients with papillary RCC were examined with DWI, BOLD MRI, and DCE MRI at 1.5T. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated with a monoexponential decay. The spin-dephasing rate R2* was derived from parametric R2* maps. DCE-MRI was analyzed using a two-compartment exchange model allowing separation of perfusion (plasma flow [FP] and plasma volume [VP]), permeability (permeability surface area product [PS]), and extravascular extracellular volume (VE). Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Clear-cell RCC showed higher ADC and lower R2* compared to papillary subtypes, but differences were not significant. FP of clear-cell subtypes was significantly higher than in papillary RCC. Perfusion parameters showed moderate but significant inverse correlation with R2*. VE showed moderate inverse correlation with ADC. Fp and Vp showed best sensitivity for histological differentiation. Multiparametric MRI comprising DWI, BOLD, and DCE MRI is feasible for assessment of primary RCC. BOLD moderately correlates to DCE MRI-derived perfusion. ADC shows moderate correlation to the extracellular volume, but does not correlate to tumor oxygenation or perfusion. In this preliminary study DCE-MRI appeared superior to BOLD and DWI for histological differentiation. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differentiation of primary chordoma, giant cell tumor and schwannoma of the sacrum by CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Ming-Jue, E-mail: smjsh@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng-Sheng [Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350001 (China); Ding, Xiao-Yi, E-mail: dingxiaoyi1965@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yuan, Fei, E-mail: yuanfeirj@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Du, Lian-Jun; Lu, Yong [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Wei-Bin [Department of Orthopedics, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate criteria to differentiate sacral chordoma (SC), sacral giant cell tumor (SGCT) and giant sacral schwannoma (GSS) with CT and MRI. Materials and methods: CT and MR images of 22 SCs, 19 SGCTs and 8 GSSs were reviewed. The clinical and imaging features of each tumor were analyzed. Results: The mean ages of SC, SGCT and GSS were 55.1 ± 10.7, 34.3 ± 10.7 and 42.4 ± 15.7 years old. SCs (77.3%) were predominantly located in the midline of lower sacrum, while most SGCTs (73.7%) and GSSs (87.5%) were eccentrically located in upper sacrum. There were significant differences in age, location, eccentricity, morphology of bone residues, intratumoral bleeding and septations. Multiple small cysts were mainly observed in SGCTs (73.7%) with large central cysts in GSSs (87.5%). SGCTs expanded mainly inside sacrum while SCs and GSSs often extended into pelvic cavity (P = 0.0022). Involvement of sacroiliac joints and muscles were also different. Ascending extension within sacral canal was only displayed in SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs showed difference between large and small tumors (P = 0.0002), regardless of tumor type (P = 0.095). No significant difference was displayed in gender (P = 0.234) or tumor size (P = 0.0832) among three groups. Conclusion: Age, epicenter of the lesion (midline vs. eccentric and upper vs. lower sacral vertebra), bone residues, cysts, bleeding, septation, expanding pattern, muscles and sacroiliac joint involvement can be criteria for diagnosis. Fluid–fluid level is specific for SGCTs and ascending extension within the sacral canal for SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs is related to tumor size rather than tumor type.

  4. Lateral motion and bending of microtubules studied with a new single-filament tracking routine in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, Carla; Levi, Valeria; Wetzler, Diana E; Angiolini, Juan F; Benseñor, Lorena; Despósito, Marcelo A; Bruno, Luciana

    2014-06-17

    The cytoskeleton is involved in numerous cellular processes such as migration, division, and contraction and provides the tracks for transport driven by molecular motors. Therefore, it is very important to quantify the mechanical behavior of the cytoskeletal filaments to get a better insight into cell mechanics and organization. It has been demonstrated that relevant mechanical properties of microtubules can be extracted from the analysis of their motion and shape fluctuations. However, tracking individual filaments in living cells is extremely complex due, for example, to the high and heterogeneous background. We introduce a believed new tracking algorithm that allows recovering the coordinates of fluorescent microtubules with ∼9 nm precision in in vitro conditions. To illustrate potential applications of this algorithm, we studied the curvature distributions of fluorescent microtubules in living cells. By performing a Fourier analysis of the microtubule shapes, we found that the curvatures followed a thermal-like distribution as previously reported with an effective persistence length of ∼20 μm, a value significantly smaller than that measured in vitro. We also verified that the microtubule-associated protein XTP or the depolymerization of the actin network do not affect this value; however, the disruption of intermediate filaments decreased the persistence length. Also, we recovered trajectories of microtubule segments in actin or intermediate filament-depleted cells, and observed a significant increase of their motion with respect to untreated cells showing that these filaments contribute to the overall organization of the microtubule network. Moreover, the analysis of trajectories of microtubule segments in untreated cells showed that these filaments presented a slower but more directional motion in the cortex with respect to the perinuclear region, and suggests that the tracking routine would allow mapping the microtubule dynamical organization in cells

  5. MRI and clinical features of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in the pelvis and extremities: can LCH really look like anything?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samet, Jonathan; Weinstein, Joanna; Fayad, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    To assess clinical and MRI features of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the pelvis and extremities. The MRI and clinical features of 21 pathologically proven cases of LCH involving the pelvis and extremities were studied. Multiple characteristics of the lesions were evaluated (location, size, T1/ T2/post-contrast features, perilesional bone and soft tissue signal, endosteal scalloping, periosteal reaction, soft tissue mass, pathologic fracture). Pre-biopsy radiologic diagnoses were collected from the original clinical reports. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), temperature, and white blood cell count (WBC) were collected at the time of diagnosis when available. The locations of the LCH lesions included five humerus, four femur, five ilium, one tibia, one clavicle, and three scapula. Lesional size ranged from 1.8 to 7.1 cm, with a mean of 3.6 cm. All lesions demonstrated perilesional bone marrow edema, periosteal reaction, endosteal scalloping, and post-contrast enhancement. An associated soft tissue mass was present in 15/21 (71.4 %). Clinically, the WBC, ESR, and CRP were elevated in 2/14 (14 %), 8/12 (67 %), and 4/10 (40 %) of cases, respectively. Fever was documented in 1/15 (7 %) patients and pain was reported in 15/15 (100 %). The clinical and radiologic features of LCH in the pelvis and extremities overlap with infection and malignancy, but LCH must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as it routinely presents with aggressive MRI features, including endosteal scalloping, periosteal reaction, perilesional edema, and a soft tissue mass. Furthermore, an unknown skeletal lesion at presentation without aggressive MRI features is unlikely to represent LCH. (orig.)

  6. MRI and clinical features of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in the pelvis and extremities: can LCH really look like anything?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samet, Jonathan [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Weinstein, Joanna [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Departments of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Fayad, Laura M. [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-05-15

    To assess clinical and MRI features of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the pelvis and extremities. The MRI and clinical features of 21 pathologically proven cases of LCH involving the pelvis and extremities were studied. Multiple characteristics of the lesions were evaluated (location, size, T1/ T2/post-contrast features, perilesional bone and soft tissue signal, endosteal scalloping, periosteal reaction, soft tissue mass, pathologic fracture). Pre-biopsy radiologic diagnoses were collected from the original clinical reports. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), temperature, and white blood cell count (WBC) were collected at the time of diagnosis when available. The locations of the LCH lesions included five humerus, four femur, five ilium, one tibia, one clavicle, and three scapula. Lesional size ranged from 1.8 to 7.1 cm, with a mean of 3.6 cm. All lesions demonstrated perilesional bone marrow edema, periosteal reaction, endosteal scalloping, and post-contrast enhancement. An associated soft tissue mass was present in 15/21 (71.4 %). Clinically, the WBC, ESR, and CRP were elevated in 2/14 (14 %), 8/12 (67 %), and 4/10 (40 %) of cases, respectively. Fever was documented in 1/15 (7 %) patients and pain was reported in 15/15 (100 %). The clinical and radiologic features of LCH in the pelvis and extremities overlap with infection and malignancy, but LCH must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as it routinely presents with aggressive MRI features, including endosteal scalloping, periosteal reaction, perilesional edema, and a soft tissue mass. Furthermore, an unknown skeletal lesion at presentation without aggressive MRI features is unlikely to represent LCH. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of an image-based tracking workflow using a passive marker and resonant micro-coil fiducials for automatic image plane alignment in interventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, M; Breton, E; Cuvillon, L; Pan, L; Lorenz, C H; de Mathelin, M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an original workflow is presented for MR image plane alignment based on tracking in real-time MR images. A test device consisting of two resonant micro-coils and a passive marker is proposed for detection using image-based algorithms. Micro-coils allow for automated initialization of the object detection in dedicated low flip angle projection images; then the passive marker is tracked in clinical real-time MR images, with alternation between two oblique orthogonal image planes along the test device axis; in case the passive marker is lost in real-time images, the workflow is reinitialized. The proposed workflow was designed to minimize dedicated acquisition time to a single dedicated acquisition in the ideal case (no reinitialization required). First experiments have shown promising results for test-device tracking precision, with a mean position error of 0.79 mm and a mean orientation error of 0.24°.

  8. A Maximum Power Point Tracking Control Method of a Photovoltaic Power Generator with Consideration of Dynamic Characteristics of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Yoshida, Toshiya; Ohniwa, Katsumi

    This paper discusses a new control strategy for photovoltaic power generation systems with consideration of dynamic characteristics of the photovoltaic cells. The controller estimates internal currents of an equivalent circuit for the cells. This estimated, or the virtual current and the actual voltage of the cells are fed to a conventional Maximum-Power-Point-Tracking (MPPT) controller. Consequently, this MPPT controller still tracks the optimum point even though it is so designed that the seeking speed of the operating point is extremely high. This system may suit for applications, which are installed in rapidly changeable insolation and temperature-conditions e.g. automobiles, trains, and airplanes. The proposed method is verified by experiment with a combination of this estimating function and the modified Boehringer's MPPT algorithm.

  9. Co-visualization of DNA damage and ion traversals in live mammalian cells using a fluorescent nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Satoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa

    2015-01-01

    The geometric locations of ion traversals in mammalian cells constitute important information in the study of heavy ion-induced biological effect. Single ion traversal through a cellular nucleus produces complex and massive DNA damage at a nanometer level, leading to cell inactivation, mutations and transformation. We present a novel approach that uses a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) for the simultaneous detection of the geometrical images of ion traversals and DNA damage in single cells using confocal microscopy. HT1080 or HT1080–53BP1-GFP cells were cultured on the surface of a FNTD and exposed to 5.1-MeV/n neon ions. The positions of the ion traversals were obtained as fluorescent images of a FNTD. Localized DNA damage in cells was identified as fluorescent spots of γ-H2AX or 53BP1-GFP. These track images and images of damaged DNA were obtained in a short time using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The geometrical distribution of DNA damage indicated by fluorescent γ-H2AX spots in fixed cells or fluorescent 53BP1-GFP spots in living cells was found to correlate well with the distribution of the ion traversals. This method will be useful for evaluating the number of ion hits on individual cells, not only for micro-beam but also for random-beam experiments. (author)

  10. WE-H-BRA-08: A Monte Carlo Cell Nucleus Model for Assessing Cell Survival Probability Based On Particle Track Structure Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Wang, C [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate the damage produced by particles of different types and qualities to cell survival on the basis of nanodosimetric analysis and advanced DNA structures in the cell nucleus. Methods: A Monte Carlo code was developed to simulate subnuclear DNA chromatin fibers (CFs) of 30nm utilizing a mean-free-path approach common to radiation transport. The cell nucleus was modeled as a spherical region containing 6000 chromatin-dense domains (CDs) of 400nm diameter, with additional CFs modeled in a sparser interchromatin region. The Geant4-DNA code was utilized to produce a particle track database representing various particles at different energies and dose quantities. These tracks were used to stochastically position the DNA structures based on their mean free path to interaction with CFs. Excitation and ionization events intersecting CFs were analyzed using the DBSCAN clustering algorithm for assessment of the likelihood of producing DSBs. Simulated DSBs were then assessed based on their proximity to one another for a probability of inducing cell death. Results: Variations in energy deposition to chromatin fibers match expectations based on differences in particle track structure. The quality of damage to CFs based on different particle types indicate more severe damage by high-LET radiation than low-LET radiation of identical particles. In addition, the model indicates more severe damage by protons than of alpha particles of same LET, which is consistent with differences in their track structure. Cell survival curves have been produced showing the L-Q behavior of sparsely ionizing radiation. Conclusion: Initial results indicate the feasibility of producing cell survival curves based on the Monte Carlo cell nucleus method. Accurate correlation between simulated DNA damage to cell survival on the basis of nanodosimetric analysis can provide insight into the biological responses to various radiation types. Current efforts are directed at producing cell

  11. A systematic investigation of differential effects of cell culture substrates on the extent of artifacts in single-molecule tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Zanetti-Domingues

    Full Text Available Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required.

  12. In vivo cell tracking imaging of hexadecyl-4-[{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]iodobenzoate labeled adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) in rat heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Kyo Chul [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Monitoring of transplanted stem cells for cardiac repair is important part in regenerative medicine. Direct cell labeling techniques using [{sup 18}F]FDG, [{sup 64}Cu]PTSM and [{sup 99m}Tc]-HMPAO have been developed for in vivo imaging. Especially, {sup 18}F-labeled derivates have been widely used for direct labeling agent. But the {sup 18}F has short half life (T{sub 1/2}={approx}2 h), thus this imaging agent has limitation of in vivo imaging. We used {sup 123}I or {sup 124}I which has relative long half life, to track the transplanted stem cells for a long-term imaging. This study is aimed to track the transplanted adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) in rat heart using hexadecyl-4-[{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]iodobenzoate ([{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo

  13. [{sup 89}Zr]Oxinate{sub 4} for long-term in vivo cell tracking by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoenphun, Putthiporn; Meszaros, Levente K.; Chuamsaamarkkee, Krisanat; Sharif-Paghaleh, Ehsan; Ballinger, James R.; Mullen, Gregory E.D. [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Ferris, Trevor J.; Went, Michael J. [University of Kent, School of Physical Sciences, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Blower, Philip J. [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Chemistry, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-31

    {sup 111}In (typically as [{sup 111}In]oxinate{sub 3}) is a gold standard radiolabel for cell tracking in humans by scintigraphy. A long half-life positron-emitting radiolabel to serve the same purpose using positron emission tomography (PET) has long been sought. We aimed to develop an {sup 89}Zr PET tracer for cell labelling and compare it with [{sup 111}In]oxinate{sub 3} single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [{sup 89}Zr]Oxinate{sub 4} was synthesised and its uptake and efflux were measured in vitro in three cell lines and in human leukocytes. The in vivo biodistribution of eGFP-5T33 murine myeloma cells labelled using [{sup 89}Zr]oxinate{sub 4} or [{sup 111}In]oxinate{sub 3} was monitored for up to 14 days. {sup 89}Zr retention by living radiolabelled eGFP-positive cells in vivo was monitored by FACS sorting of liver, spleen and bone marrow cells followed by gamma counting. Zr labelling was effective in all cell types with yields comparable with {sup 111}In labelling. Retention of {sup 89}Zr in cells in vitro after 24 h was significantly better (range 71 to >90 %) than {sup 111}In (43-52 %). eGFP-5T33 cells in vivo showed the same early biodistribution whether labelled with {sup 111}In or {sup 89}Zr (initial pulmonary accumulation followed by migration to liver, spleen and bone marrow), but later translocation of radioactivity to kidneys was much greater for {sup 111}In. In liver, spleen and bone marrow at least 92 % of {sup 89}Zr remained associated with eGFP-positive cells after 7 days in vivo. [{sup 89}Zr]Oxinate{sub 4} offers a potential solution to the emerging need for a long half-life PET tracer for cell tracking in vivo and deserves further evaluation of its effects on survival and behaviour of different cell types. (orig.)

  14. Tracking of autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histology after intralesional treatment of artificial equine tendon lesions--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geburek, Florian; Mundle, Kathrin; Conrad, Sabine; Hellige, Maren; Walliser, Ulrich; van Schie, Hans T M; van Weeren, René; Skutella, Thomas; Stadler, Peter M

    2016-02-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) are frequently used to treat equine tendinopathies. Up to now, knowledge about the fate of autologous AT-MSCs after intralesional injection into equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) is very limited. The purpose of this study was to monitor the presence of intralesionally injected autologous AT-MSCs labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and green fluorescent protein (GFP) over a staggered period of 3 to 9 weeks with standing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. Four adult warmblood horses received a unilateral injection of 10 × 10(6) autologous AT-MSCs into surgically created front-limb SDFT lesions. Administered AT-MSCs expressed lentivirally transduced reporter genes for GFP and were co-labelled with SPIO particles in three horses. The presence of AT-MSCs in SDFTs was evaluated by repeated examinations with standing low-field MRI in two horses and post-mortem in all horses with Prussian blue staining, fluorescence microscopy and with immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry using anti-GFP antibodies at 3, 5, 7 and 9 weeks after treatment. AT-MSCs labelled with SPIO particles were detectable in treated SDFTs during each MRI in T2*- and T1-weighted sequences until the end of the observation period. Post-mortem examinations revealed that all treated tendons contained high numbers of SPIO- and GFP-labelled cells. Standing low-field MRI has the potential to track SPIO-labelled AT-MSCs successfully. Histology, fluorescence microscopy, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry are efficient tools to detect labelled AT-MSCs after intralesional injection into surgically created equine SDFT lesions. Intralesional injection of 10 × 10(6) AT-MSCs leads to the presence of high numbers of AT-MSCs in and around surgically created tendon lesions for up to 9 weeks. Integration of injected AT-MSCs into healing tendon tissue is an essential pathway after intralesional

  15. Subcellular SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in human glioblastoma cells treated with a gadolinium containing MRI agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Duane R.; Lorey, Daniel R.; Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary radiotherapeutic modality for the treatment of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme. Recently, neutron capture therapy with gadolinium-157 has gained attention, and techniques for studying the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157 are needed. In this preliminary study, we have been able to image the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157, as well as the other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium, with SIMS ion microscopy. T98G human glioblastoma cells were treated for 24 h with 25 mg/ml of the metal ion complex diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid Gd(III) dihydrogen salt hydrate (Gd-DTPA). Gd-DTPA is a contrast enhancing agent used for MRI of brain tumors, blood-brain barrier impairment, diseases of the central nervous system, etc. A highly heterogeneous subcellular distribution was observed for gadolinium-157. The nuclei in each cell were distinctly lower in gadolinium-157 than in the cytoplasm. Even within the cytoplasm the gadolinium-157 was heterogeneously distributed. The other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium were imaged from the same cells and exhibited a subcellular distribution consistent with that observed for gadolinium-157. These observations indicate that SIMS ion microscopy may be a viable approach for subcellular studies of gadolinium containing neutron capture therapy drugs and may even play a major role in the development and validation of new gadolinium contrast enhancing agents for diagnostic MRI applications.

  16. The evaluation of the effect of VAB-6 combination chemotherapy by MRI for a germinal cell tumor originating in the anterior mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomioka, Hiromi; Murayama, Takako; Kurasawa, Takuya; Kuze, Fumiyuki; Chihara, Kouji; Wada, Hiromi; Hitomi, Shigeki; Noma, Satoshi.

    1988-01-01

    A 22-year old man with germinal cell tumor originating in the anterior mediastinum was treated with the VAB-6 chemotherapy. Disappearance of tumor cells and degeneration to fibrous necrotic tissue was revealed by MRI performed after chemotherapy, i.e. change of T 2 weighted image of the tumor from high-intensity to iso-intensity. And this pathological change was confirmed by the histological examination of the resected specimen. MRI was considered to be very useful to evaluate the effect of chemotherapy for germinal cell tumor originating in the anterior mediastinum. (author)

  17. Differences in speech processing among elderly hearing-impaired listeners with or without hearing aid experience: Eye-tracking and fMRI measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habicht, Julia; Behler, Oliver; Kollmeier, Birger

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to the effects of hearing loss, the effects of hearing aid (HA) experience on speech-in-noise (SIN) processing are underexplored. Using an eye-tracking paradigm that allows determining how fast a participant can grasp the meaning of a sentence presented in noise together with two pict...... support the idea that HA experience positively influences the ability to process SIN quickly and that it reduces the recruitment of brain regions outside the core speech-comprehension network....

  18. Non-invasive imaging of transplanted human neural stem cells and ECM scaffold remodeling in the stroke-damaged rat brain by 19F- and diffusion-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Ellen; Dell’Acqua, Flavio; Solanky, Bhavana; Balducci, Anthony; Crapo, Peter; Badylak, Stephen F.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Modo, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) is emerging as a viable treatment for stroke related brain injury. However, intraparenchymal grafts do not regenerate lost tissue, but rather integrate into the host parenchyma without significantly affecting the lesion cavity. Providing a structural support for the delivered cells appears important for cell based therapeutic approaches. The non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic methods would provide valuable information regarding therapeutic strategies but remains a challenge. Labeling transplanted cells with metal-based 1H-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents affects the visualization of the lesion cavity. Herein, we demonstrate that a 19F-MRI contrast agent can adequately monitor the distribution of transplanted cells, whilst allowing an evaluation of the lesion cavity and the formation of new tissue on 1H-MRI scans. Twenty percent of cells labeled with the 19F-agent were of host origin, potentially reflecting the re-uptake of label from dead transplanted cells. Both T2- and diffusion-weighted MRI scans indicated that transplantation of hNSCs suspended in a gel form of a xenogeneic extracellular matrix (ECM) bioscaffold resulted in uniformly distributed cells throughout the lesion cavity. However, diffusion MRI indicated that the injected materials did not yet establish diffusion barriers (i.e. cellular network, fiber tracts) normally found within striatal tissue. The ECM bioscaffold therefore provides an important support to hNSCs for the creation of de novo tissue and multi-nuclei MRI represents an adept method for the visualization of some aspects of this process. However, significant developments of both the transplantation paradigm, as well as regenerative imaging, are required to successfully create new tissue in the lesion cavity and to monitor this process non-invasively. PMID:22244696

  19. Non-invasive imaging of transplanted human neural stem cells and ECM scaffold remodeling in the stroke-damaged rat brain by (19)F- and diffusion-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Ellen; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Solanky, Bhavana; Balducci, Anthony; Crapo, Peter M; Badylak, Stephen F; Ahrens, Eric T; Modo, Michel

    2012-04-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) is emerging as a viable treatment for stroke related brain injury. However, intraparenchymal grafts do not regenerate lost tissue, but rather integrate into the host parenchyma without significantly affecting the lesion cavity. Providing a structural support for the delivered cells appears important for cell based therapeutic approaches. The non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic methods would provide valuable information regarding therapeutic strategies but remains a challenge. Labeling transplanted cells with metal-based (1)H-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents affects the visualization of the lesion cavity. Herein, we demonstrate that a (19)F-MRI contrast agent can adequately monitor the distribution of transplanted cells, whilst allowing an evaluation of the lesion cavity and the formation of new tissue on (1)H-MRI scans. Twenty percent of cells labeled with the (19)F agent were of host origin, potentially reflecting the re-uptake of label from dead transplanted cells. Both T(2)- and diffusion-weighted MRI scans indicated that transplantation of hNSCs suspended in a gel form of a xenogeneic extracellular matrix (ECM) bioscaffold resulted in uniformly distributed cells throughout the lesion cavity. However, diffusion MRI indicated that the injected materials did not yet establish diffusion barriers (i.e. cellular network, fiber tracts) normally found within striatal tissue. The ECM bioscaffold therefore provides an important support to hNSCs for the creation of de novo tissue and multi-nuclei MRI represents an adept method for the visualization of some aspects of this process. However, significant developments of both the transplantation paradigm, as well as regenerative imaging, are required to successfully create new tissue in the lesion cavity and to monitor this process non-invasively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High performance monolithic power management system with dynamic maximum power point tracking for microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbay, Celal; Carreon-Bautista, Salvador; Sanchez-Sinencio, Edgar; Han, Arum

    2014-12-02

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) that can directly generate electricity from organic waste or biomass is a promising renewable and clean technology. However, low power and low voltage output of MFCs typically do not allow directly operating most electrical applications, whether it is supplementing electricity to wastewater treatment plants or for powering autonomous wireless sensor networks. Power management systems (PMSs) can overcome this limitation by boosting the MFC output voltage and managing the power for maximum efficiency. We present a monolithic low-power-consuming PMS integrated circuit (IC) chip capable of dynamic maximum power point tracking (MPPT) to maximize the extracted power from MFCs, regardless of the power and voltage fluctuations from MFCs over time. The proposed PMS continuously detects the maximum power point (MPP) of the MFC and matches the load impedance of the PMS for maximum efficiency. The system also operates autonomously by directly drawing power from the MFC itself without any external power. The overall system efficiency, defined as the ratio between input energy from the MFC and output energy stored into the supercapacitor of the PMS, was 30%. As a demonstration, the PMS connected to a 240 mL two-chamber MFC (generating 0.4 V and 512 μW at MPP) successfully powered a wireless temperature sensor that requires a voltage of 2.5 V and consumes power of 85 mW each time it transmit the sensor data, and successfully transmitted a sensor reading every 7.5 min. The PMS also efficiently managed the power output of a lower-power producing MFC, demonstrating that the PMS works efficiently at various MFC power output level.

  1. In vitro and in vivo imaging and tracking of intestinal organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwang Bo; Lee, Hana; Son, Ye Seul; Lee, Ji Hye; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Mi-Ok; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Jaemin; Kim, Seokho; Jung, Cho-Rok; Kim, Janghwan; Son, Mi-Young

    2018-01-01

    Human intestinal organoids (hIOs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have immense potential as a source of intestines. Therefore, an efficient system is needed for visualizing the stage of intestinal differentiation and further identifying hIOs derived from hPSCs. Here, 2 fluorescent biosensors were developed based on human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) lines that stably expressed fluorescent reporters driven by intestine-specific gene promoters Krüppel-like factor 5 monomeric Cherry (KLF5 mCherry ) and intestine-specific homeobox enhanced green fluorescence protein (ISX eGFP ). Then hIOs were efficiently induced from those transgenic hiPSC lines in which mCherry- or eGFP-expressing cells, which appeared during differentiation, could be identified in intact living cells in real time. Reporter gene expression had no adverse effects on differentiation into hIOs and proliferation. Using our reporter system to screen for hIO differentiation factors, we identified DMH1 as an efficient substitute for Noggin. Transplanted hIOs under the kidney capsule were tracked with fluorescence imaging (FLI) and confirmed histologically. After orthotopic transplantation, the localization of the hIOs in the small intestine could be accurately visualized using FLI. Our study establishes a selective system for monitoring the in vitro differentiation and for tracking the in vivo localization of hIOs and contributes to further improvement of cell-based therapies and preclinical screenings in the intestinal field.-Jung, K. B., Lee, H., Son, Y. S., Lee, J. H., Cho, H.-S., Lee, M.-O., Oh, J.-H., Lee, J., Kim, S., Jung, C.-R., Kim, J., Son, M.-Y. In vitro and in vivo imaging and tracking of intestinal organoids from human induced pluripotent stem cells. © FASEB.

  2. Development of a morphology-based modeling technique for tracking solid-body displacements: examining the reliability of a potential MRI-only approach for joint kinematics assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahato, Niladri K.; Montuelle, Stephane; Cotton, John; Williams, Susan; Thomas, James; Clark, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Single or biplanar video radiography and Roentgen stereophotogrammetry (RSA) techniques used for the assessment of in-vivo joint kinematics involves application of ionizing radiation, which is a limitation for clinical research involving human subjects. To overcome this limitation, our long-term goal is to develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-only, three dimensional (3-D) modeling technique that permits dynamic imaging of joint motion in humans. Here, we present our initial findings, as well as reliability data, for an MRI-only protocol and modeling technique. We developed a morphology-based motion-analysis technique that uses MRI of custom-built solid-body objects to animate and quantify experimental displacements between them. The technique involved four major steps. First, the imaging volume was calibrated using a custom-built grid. Second, 3-D models were segmented from axial scans of two custom-built solid-body cubes. Third, these cubes were positioned at pre-determined relative displacements (translation and rotation) in the magnetic resonance coil and scanned with a T 1 and a fast contrast-enhanced pulse sequences. The digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images were then processed for animation. The fourth step involved importing these processed images into an animation software, where they were displayed as background scenes. In the same step, 3-D models of the cubes were imported into the animation software, where the user manipulated the models to match their outlines in the scene (rotoscoping) and registered the models into an anatomical joint system. Measurements of displacements obtained from two different rotoscoping sessions were tested for reliability using coefficient of variations (CV), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland-Altman plots, and Limits of Agreement analyses. Between-session reliability was high for both the T 1 and the contrast-enhanced sequences. Specifically, the average CVs for translation were 4

  3. Development of a morphology-based modeling technique for tracking solid-body displacements: examining the reliability of a potential MRI-only approach for joint kinematics assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Niladri K; Montuelle, Stephane; Cotton, John; Williams, Susan; Thomas, James; Clark, Brian

    2016-05-18

    Single or biplanar video radiography and Roentgen stereophotogrammetry (RSA) techniques used for the assessment of in-vivo joint kinematics involves application of ionizing radiation, which is a limitation for clinical research involving human subjects. To overcome this limitation, our long-term goal is to develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-only, three dimensional (3-D) modeling technique that permits dynamic imaging of joint motion in humans. Here, we present our initial findings, as well as reliability data, for an MRI-only protocol and modeling technique. We developed a morphology-based motion-analysis technique that uses MRI of custom-built solid-body objects to animate and quantify experimental displacements between them. The technique involved four major steps. First, the imaging volume was calibrated using a custom-built grid. Second, 3-D models were segmented from axial scans of two custom-built solid-body cubes. Third, these cubes were positioned at pre-determined relative displacements (translation and rotation) in the magnetic resonance coil and scanned with a T1 and a fast contrast-enhanced pulse sequences. The digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images were then processed for animation. The fourth step involved importing these processed images into an animation software, where they were displayed as background scenes. In the same step, 3-D models of the cubes were imported into the animation software, where the user manipulated the models to match their outlines in the scene (rotoscoping) and registered the models into an anatomical joint system. Measurements of displacements obtained from two different rotoscoping sessions were tested for reliability using coefficient of variations (CV), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland-Altman plots, and Limits of Agreement analyses. Between-session reliability was high for both the T1 and the contrast-enhanced sequences. Specifically, the average CVs for translation were 4

  4. Application of High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy to Define the Cell Uptake of MRI Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabi, Luisella; Alfieri, Goffredo; Biondi, Luca; De Miranda, Mario; Paleari, Lino; Ghelli, Stefano

    2002-06-01

    A new method, based on proton high-resolution magic-angle spinning ( 1H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, has been employed to study the cell uptake of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI-CAs). The method was tested on human red blood cells (HRBC) and white blood cells (HWBC) by using three gadolinium complexes, widely used in diagnostics, Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, and Gd-DOTA, and the analogous complexes obtained by replacing Gd(III) with Dy(III), Nd(III), and Tb(III) (i.e., complexes isostructural to the ones of gadolinium but acting as shift agents). The method is based on the evaluation of the magnetic effects, line broadening, or induced lanthanide shift (LIS) caused by these complexes on NMR signals of intra- and extracellular water. Since magnetic effects are directly linked to permeability, this method is direct. In all the tests, these magnetic effects were detected for the extracellular water signal only, providing a direct proof that these complexes are not able to cross the cell membrane. Line broadening effects (i.e., the use of gadolinium complexes) only allow qualitative evaluations. On the contrary, LIS effects can be measured with high precision and they can be related to the concentration of the paramagnetic species in the cellular compartments. This is possible because the HR-MAS technique provides the complete elimination of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift and the differentiation of extra- and intracellular water signals. Thus with this method, the rapid quantification of the MRI-CA amount inside and outside the cells is actually feasible.

  5. Explicit tracking of uncertainty increases the power of quantitative rule-of-thumb reasoning in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Iain G; Rickett, Benjamin C; Jones, Nick S

    2014-12-02

    Back-of-the-envelope or rule-of-thumb calculations involving rough estimates of quantities play a central scientific role in developing intuition about the structure and behavior of physical systems, for example in so-called Fermi problems in the physical sciences. Such calculations can be used to powerfully and quantitatively reason about biological systems, particularly at the interface between physics and biology. However, substantial uncertainties are often associated with values in cell biology, and performing calculations without taking this uncertainty into account may limit the extent to which results can be interpreted for a given problem. We present a means to facilitate such calculations where uncertainties are explicitly tracked through the line of reasoning, and introduce a probabilistic calculator called CALADIS, a free web tool, designed to perform this tracking. This approach allows users to perform more statistically robust calculations in cell biology despite having uncertain values, and to identify which quantities need to be measured more precisely to make confident statements, facilitating efficient experimental design. We illustrate the use of our tool for tracking uncertainty in several example biological calculations, showing that the results yield powerful and interpretable statistics on the quantities of interest. We also demonstrate that the outcomes of calculations may differ from point estimates when uncertainty is accurately tracked. An integral link between CALADIS and the BioNumbers repository of biological quantities further facilitates the straightforward location, selection, and use of a wealth of experimental data in cell biological calculations. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A proposal for combined MRI and PET/CT interpretation criteria for preoperative nodal staging in non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoo Na; Yi, Chin A.; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Tae Sung; Chung, Myung Jin; Kwon, O.Jung; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Byung-Tae; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Seon Woo; Han, Joungho; Shim, Young Mog

    2012-01-01

    To determine the positive reading criteria for malignant nodes when interpreting combined MRI and PET/CT images for preoperative nodal staging in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Forty-nine patients with biopsy-proven NSCLC underwent both PET/CT and thoracic MRI [diffusion weighted imaging (DWI)]. Each nodal station was evaluated for the presence of metastasis by applying either inclusive (positive if either one read positive) or exclusive (positive if both read positive) criteria in the combined interpretation of PET/CT and MRI. Nodal stage was confirmed pathologically. The combined diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT and MRI was determined on per-nodal station and per-patient bases and compared with that of PET/CT alone. In 49 patients, 39 (19%) of 206 nodal stations harboured malignant cells. Out of 206 nodal stations, 186 (90%) had concordant readings, while the rest (10%) had discordant readings. Inclusive criteria of combined PET/CT and MRI helped increase sensitivity for detecting nodal metastasis (69%) compared with PET/CT alone (46%; P = 0.003), while specificity was not significantly decreased. Inclusive criteria in combined MRI and PET/CT readings help improve significantly the sensitivity for detecting nodal metastasis compared with PET/CT alone and may decrease unnecessary open thoracotomy. (orig.)

  7. Arterial spin labelling MRI for detecting pseudocapsule defects and predicting renal capsule invasion in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Wu, Y; Xue, W; Zuo, P; Oesingmann, N; Gan, Q; Huang, Z; Wu, M; Hu, F; Kuang, M; Song, B

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate prospectively the performance of combining morphological and arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting pseudocapsule defects in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and to predict renal capsule invasion confirmed histopathologically. Twenty consecutive patients with suspicious renal tumours underwent MRI. Renal ASL imaging was performed and renal blood flow was measured quantitatively. The diagnostic performance of T2-weighted images alone, and a combination of T2-weighted and ASL images for predicting renal capsule invasion were assessed. Twenty renal lesions were evaluated in 20 patients. All lesions were clear cell RCCs (ccRCCs) confirmed at post-surgical histopathology. Fifteen ccRCCs showed pseudocapsule defects on T2-weighted images, of which 12 cases showed existing blood flow in defect areas on perfusion images. To predict renal capsule invasion, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 100%, 71.4%, 86.7%, 100%, respectively, for T2-weighted images alone, and 92.3%, 100%, 100%, 87.5%, respectively, for the combination of T2-weighted and ASL images. ASL images can reflect the perfusion of pseudocapsule defects and as such, the combination of T2-weighted and ASL images produces promising diagnostic accuracy for predicting renal capsule invasion. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of re-distribution and efficacy of stem cell transplantation in different heart status after acute myocardial infarction by MRI: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Minjie; Zhao Shihua; Song Peng

    2011-01-01

    area (MI) before transplantation for group 1-4 were: (6.5±2.1), (6.4±1.9), (6.5±2.5) and (6.4±2.6) cm 2 , and after transplantation for group 1-4 were: (6.4±2.3), (6.2±2.6), (6.3± 2.5) and (6.4±2.8) cm 2 . There were no statistical differences before and after transplantation in these 4 groups [P values of before and after transplantation for LVEDV, LVESV, LVEF, MI were > 0.05 (F= 0.277, 0.066, 0.066, 0.003); and > 0.05 (F=1.137, 0.182, 0.021, 0.008), respectively]. The T 2 value of the infracted myocardium in group 1 decreased more obviously than that in group 2 [(-22.3± 2.2) vs (-17.0±0.8) ms, t=-5.489, P 2 value of the spleen decreased more significantly in group 2 than that in group 1 [(-7.7±0.7) vs (-13.3±1.1) ms, t=9.055, P 2 values of the liver and kidney were no significant differences in group 1 and 2 (liver, / = -0.532, P>0.05 and kidney, t=-0.113, P>0.05). The results of RT-PCR in group 1 and 2 showed significant differences in heart [(150±62) vs (72±4) U/L, P<0.05, t=3.109], spleen [(131±1) vs (233±17) U/L, P<0.01, t=-13.286] and liver [(17±1) vs (9±5) U/L, P<0.01, t= 3.492]. Pathological examination demonstrated that the transplanted stem cells were positive for Prussian blue staining, which had a good correlation with MRI results. Conclusion: MRI can serve as a convenient and efficient imaging method to track the migration of stem cells with SPIO labeled in early stage and evaluate its early re-distribution in vivo. Injection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the arresting heart could favor retaining more cells in the myocardium. (authors)

  9. MRI tracking of SPIO labelled stem cells in a true regenerative environment, the regenerating limb of the axolotl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Hagensen, Mette

    are generally restricted by their limited regenerative potential. Conversely, excellent animal models for regenerative studies exist in lower vertebrates such as the urodele amphibians (salamanders and newts), exemplified in the iconic Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) capable of regenerating whole limbs...

  10. Impact of time and space evolution of ion tracks in nonvolatile memory cells approaching nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Murat, M.; Barak, J.; Akkerman, A.; Harboe-Sorensen, R.; Virtanen, A.; Visconti, A.; Bonanomi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Swift heavy ions impacting on matter lose energy through the creation of dense tracks of charges. The study of the space and time evolution of energy exchange allows understanding the single event effects behavior in advanced microelectronic devices. In particular, the shrinking of minimum feature size of most advanced memory devices makes them very interesting test vehicles to study these effects since the device and the track dimensions are comparable; hence, measured effects are directly correlated with the time and space evolution of the energy release. In this work we are studying the time and space evolution of ion tracks by using advanced non volatile memories and Monte Carlo simulations. Experimental results are very well explained by the theoretical calculations.

  11. Tracking of cell nuclei for assessment of in vitro uptake kinetics in ultrasound-mediated drug delivery using fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derieppe, Marc; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Kuijf, Hugo; Moonen, Chrit; Bos, Clemens

    2014-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the feasibility to monitor ultrasound-mediated uptake of a cell-impermeable model drug in real time with fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy. Here, we present a complete post-processing methodology, which corrects for cell displacements, to improve the accuracy of pharmacokinetic parameter estimation. Nucleus detection was performed based on the radial symmetry transform algorithm. Cell tracking used an iterative closest point approach. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by fitting a two-compartment model to the time-intensity curves of individual cells. Cells were tracked successfully, improving time-intensity curve accuracy and pharmacokinetic parameter estimation. With tracking, 93 % of the 370 nuclei showed a fluorescence signal variation that was well-described by a two-compartment model. In addition, parameter distributions were narrower, thus increasing precision. Dedicated image analysis was implemented and enabled studying ultrasound-mediated model drug uptake kinetics in hundreds of cells per experiment, using fiber-based confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  12. An automated approach for single-cell tracking in epifluorescence microscopy applied to E. coli growth analysis on microfluidics biochips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetita, Catalin; Kirov, Boris; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Lefevre, Christophe

    2012-03-01

    With the accumulation of knowledge for the intimate molecular mechanisms governing the processes inside the living cells in the later years, the ability to characterize the performance of elementary genetic circuits and parts at the single-cell level is becoming of crucial importance. Biological science is arriving to the point where it can develop hypothesis for the action of each molecule participating in the biochemical reactions and need proper techniques to test those hypothesis. Microfluidics is emerging as the technology that combined with high-magnification microscopy will allow for the long-term single-cell level observation of bacterial physiology. In this study we design, build and characterize the gene dynamics of genetic circuits as one of the basic parts governing programmed cell behavior. We use E. coli as model organism and grow it in microfluidics chips, which we observe with epifluorescence microscopy. One of the most invaluable segments of this technology is the consequent image processing, since it allows for the automated analysis of vast amount of single-cell observation and the fast and easy derivation of conclusions based on that data. Specifically, we are interested in promoter activity as function of time. We expect it to be oscillatory and for that we use GFP (green fluorescent protein) as a reporter in our genetic circuits. In this paper, an automated framework for single-cell tracking in phase-contrast microscopy is developed, combining 2D segmentation of cell time frames and graph-based reconstruction of their spatiotemporal evolution with fast tracking of the associated fluorescence signal. The results obtained on the investigated biological database are presented and discussed.

  13. Hail statistic in Western Europe based on a hyrid cell-tracking algorithm combining radar signals with hailstone observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluck, Elody

    2015-04-01

    Hail statistic in Western Europe based on a hybrid cell-tracking algorithm combining radar signals with hailstone observations Elody Fluck¹, Michael Kunz¹ , Peter Geissbühler², Stefan P. Ritz² With hail damage estimated over Billions of Euros for a single event (e.g., hailstorm Andreas on 27/28 July 2013), hail constitute one of the major atmospheric risks in various parts of Europe. The project HAMLET (Hail Model for Europe) in cooperation with the insurance company Tokio Millennium Re aims at estimating hail probability, hail hazard and, combined with vulnerability, hail risk for several European countries (Germany, Switzerland, France, Netherlands, Austria, Belgium and Luxembourg). Hail signals are obtained from radar reflectivity since this proxy is available with a high temporal and spatial resolution using several hail proxies, especially radar data. The focus in the first step is on Germany and France for the periods 2005- 2013 and 1999 - 2013, respectively. In the next step, the methods will be transferred and extended to other regions. A cell-tracking algorithm TRACE2D was adjusted and applied to two dimensional radar reflectivity data from different radars operated by European weather services such as German weather service (DWD) and French weather service (Météo-France). Strong convective cells are detected by considering 3 connected pixels over 45 dBZ (Reflectivity Cores RCs) in a radar scan. Afterwards, the algorithm tries to find the same RCs in the next 5 minute radar scan and, thus, track the RCs centers over time and space. Additional information about hailstone diameters provided by ESWD (European Severe Weather Database) is used to determine hail intensity of the detected hail swaths. Maximum hailstone diameters are interpolated along and close to the individual hail tracks giving an estimation of mean diameters for the detected hail swaths. Furthermore, a stochastic event set is created by randomizing the parameters obtained from the

  14. Enhanced object-based tracking algorithm for convective rain storms and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Carlos; Wang, Li-Pen; Willems, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes a new object-based storm tracking algorithm, based upon TITAN (Thunderstorm Identification, Tracking, Analysis and Nowcasting). TITAN is a widely-used convective storm tracking algorithm but has limitations in handling small-scale yet high-intensity storm entities due to its single-threshold identification approach. It also has difficulties to effectively track fast-moving storms because of the employed matching approach that largely relies on the overlapping areas between successive storm entities. To address these deficiencies, a number of modifications are proposed and tested in this paper. These include a two-stage multi-threshold storm identification, a new formulation for characterizing storm's physical features, and an enhanced matching technique in synergy with an optical-flow storm field tracker, as well as, according to these modifications, a more complex merging and splitting scheme. High-resolution (5-min and 529-m) radar reflectivity data for 18 storm events over Belgium are used to calibrate and evaluate the algorithm. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with that of the original TITAN. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm can better isolate and match convective rainfall entities, as well as to provide more reliable and detailed motion estimates. Furthermore, the improvement is found to be more significant for higher rainfall intensities. The new algorithm has the potential to serve as a basis for further applications, such as storm nowcasting and long-term stochastic spatial and temporal rainfall generation.

  15. Comparison of thallium-201 SPET and CT/MRI in the detection of residual/recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong-Kang; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Huang, Wen-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and conventional imaging, comprising computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in the detection of residual/recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity. Thirty-two patients with clinically suspected recurrent SCC of the oral cavity were recruited. All patients underwent 201 Tl SPET and CT or MRI within 2 weeks. The final diagnoses were based on the histology of the biopsy specimen. 201 Tl SPET and CT/MRI both accurately detected 17 of 18 residual/recurrent tumours. CT/MRI yielded eight false-positive studies, whereas 201 Tl SPET successfully excluded all tumours. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy of 201 Tl SPET for the detection of recurrent oral SCC were 94%, 100%, 100%, 93% and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy of CT/MRI for the detection of recurrent oral SCC were 94%, 43%, 68%, 86% and 72%, respectively. Thallium-201 SPET is more accurate than conventional imaging (CT or MRI) in differentiating residual/recurrent oral SCC from post-therapy changes. (orig.)

  16. Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This 'DfMRI' signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. (authors)

  17. TLM-Tracker: software for cell segmentation, tracking and lineage analysis in time-lapse microscopy movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Johannes; Leupold, Stefan; Biegler, Ilona; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Münch, Richard; Jahn, Dieter

    2012-09-01

    Time-lapse imaging in combination with fluorescence microscopy techniques enable the investigation of gene regulatory circuits and uncovered phenomena like culture heterogeneity. In this context, computational image processing for the analysis of single cell behaviour plays an increasing role in systems biology and mathematical modelling approaches. Consequently, we developed a software package with graphical user interface for the analysis of single bacterial cell behaviour. A new software called TLM-Tracker allows for the flexible and user-friendly interpretation for the segmentation, tracking and lineage analysis of microbial cells in time-lapse movies. The software package, including manual, tutorial video and examples, is available as Matlab code or executable binaries at http://www.tlmtracker.tu-bs.de.

  18. Simulation of DNA Damage in Human Cells from Space Radiation Using a Physical Model of Stochastic Particle Tracks and Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a recently developed model, in which chromosomes simulated by NASARTI (NASA Radiation Tracks Image) is combined with nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) in a voxelized space. The model produces the number of DSBs, as a function of dose for high-energy iron, oxygen, and carbon ions, and He ions. The combined model calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The merged computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The merged model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation.

  19. Physical activity measured using global positioning system tracking in non-small cell lung cancer: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Catherine L; Denehy, Linda; McDonald, Christine F; Irving, Louis; Clark, Ross A

    2014-11-01

    Increasingly physical activity (PA) is being recognized as an important outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated PA using novel global positioning system (GPS) tracking individuals with NSCLC and a group of similar-aged healthy individuals. A prospective cross-sectional multicenter study. Fifty individuals with NSCLC from 3 Australian tertiary hospitals and 35 similar-aged healthy individuals without cancer were included. Individuals with NSCLC were assessed pretreatment. Primary measures were triaxial accelerometery (steps/day) and GPS tracking (outdoor PA behavior). Secondary measures were questionnaires assessing depression, motivation to exercise, and environmental barriers to PA. Between-group comparisons were analyzed using analysis of covariance. Individuals with NSCLC engaged in significantly less PA than similar-aged healthy individuals (mean difference 2363 steps/day, P = .007) and had higher levels of depression (P = .027) and lower motivation to exercise (P = .001). Daily outdoor walking time (P = .874) and distance travelled away from home (P = .883) were not different between groups. Individuals with NSCLC spent less time outdoors in their local neighborhood area (P system tracking appears to be a feasible methodology for adult cancer patients and holds promise for use in future studies investigating PA and or lifestyle behaviors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Cellular size as a means of tracking mTOR activity and cell fate of CD4+ T cells upon antigen recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Pollizzi

    Full Text Available mTOR is a central integrator of metabolic and immunological stimuli, dictating immune cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that within a clonal population of activated T cells, there exist both mTORhi and mTORlo cells exhibiting highly divergent metabolic and immunologic functions. By taking advantage of the role of mTOR activation in controlling cellular size, we demonstrate that upon antigen recognition, mTORhi CD4+ T cells are destined to become highly glycolytic effector cells. Conversely, mTORlo T cells preferentially develop into long-lived cells that express high levels of Bcl-2, CD25, and CD62L. Furthermore, mTORlo T cells have a greater propensity to differentiate into suppressive Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, and this paradigm was also observed in human CD4+ T cells. Overall, these studies provide the opportunity to track the development of effector and memory T cells from naïve precursors, as well as facilitate the interrogation of immunologic and metabolic programs that inform these fates.

  1. SU-E-T-494: Influence of Proton Track-Cell Nucleus Incidence Angle On Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, P; Backstrom, G; Enger, S; Seuntjens, J; El Naqa, I [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Villegas, F; Ahnesjo, A [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explain a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation artifact whereby differences in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the induction of initial double strand breaks are observed as a function of the proton track incidence angles in a geometric cell nucleus model. Secondly, to offer an alternative isotropic irradiation procedure to mitigate this effect. Methods: MC tracks of 1 MeV protons were generated in an event-by-event mode. They were overlaid on a cylindrical model of a cell nucleus containing 6×109 nucleotide base pairs. The tracks incidence angle θ with respect to the cell nucleus’s axis was varied in 10 degrees intervals, each time generating one hundred fractions of ∼2 Gy. Strand breaks were scored in the modeled DNA sugar-phosphate groups and further sub-classified into single or double strand breaks (ssbs or dsbs). For each angle, an RBE for the induction of initial dsbs with reference to Co-60 was calculated. Results: Our results show significant angular dependencies of RBE, with maximum values for incidence angles parallel to the nucleus central axis. Further examination shows that the higher cross-sections for the creation of dsbs is due to the preferential alignment of tracks with geometrical sub-parts of the cell nucleus model, especially the nucleosomes containing the sugar-phosphate groups. To alleviate the impact of this simulation artifact, an average RBE was calculated with a procedure based on a weighted sampling of the angular data. Conclusion: This work demonstrates a possible numerical artifact in estimated RBE if the influence of the particle incidence angle is not correctly taken into account. A correction procedure is presented to better conform the simulations to real-life experimental conditions. We would like to acknowledge support from the Fonds de recherche du Quebec Sante (FRQS), from the CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network grant (number 432290) of NSERC, support from NSERC under grants RGPIN 397711-11 and

  2. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein CLASP2 Is Required for Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Drabek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian CLASPs are microtubule plus-end tracking proteins whose essential function as regulators of microtubule behavior has been studied mainly in cultured cells. We show here that absence of murine CLASP2 in vivo results in thrombocytopenia, progressive anemia, and pancytopenia, due to defects in megakaryopoiesis, in erythropoiesis, and in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell activity. Furthermore, microtubule stability and organization are affected upon attachment of Clasp2 knockout hematopoietic stem-cell-enriched populations, and these cells do not home efficiently toward their bone marrow niche. Strikingly, CLASP2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells contain severely reduced mRNA levels of c-Mpl, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, an essential factor for megakaryopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Our data suggest that thrombopoietin signaling is impaired in Clasp2 knockout mice. We propose that the CLASP2-mediated stabilization of microtubules is required for proper attachment, homing, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and that this is necessary to sustain c-Mpl transcription.

  3. Infrared fluorescent protein 1.4 genetic labeling tracks engrafted cardiac progenitor cells in mouse ischemic hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Chen

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has a potential for regenerating damaged myocardium. However, a key obstacle to cell therapy's success is the loss of engrafted cells due to apoptosis or necrosis in the ischemic myocardium. While many strategies have been developed to improve engrafted cell survival, tools to evaluate cell efficacy within the body are limited. Traditional genetic labeling tools, such as GFP-like fluorescent proteins (eGFP, DsRed, mCherry, have limited penetration depths in vivo due to tissue scattering and absorption. To circumvent these limitations, a near-infrared fluorescent mutant of the DrBphP bacteriophytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans, IFP1.4, was developed for in vivo imaging, but it has yet to be used for in vivo stem/progenitor cell tracking. In this study, we incorporated IFP1.4 into mouse cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs by a lentiviral vector. Live IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were imaged by their near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF using an Odyssey scanner following overnight incubation with biliverdin. A significant linear correlation was observed between the amount of cells and NIRF signal intensity in in vitro studies. Lentiviral mediated IFP1.4 gene labeling is stable, and does not impact the apoptosis and cardiac differentiation of CPC. To assess efficacy of our model for engrafted cells in vivo, IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were intramyocardially injected into infarcted hearts. NIRF signals were collected at 1-day, 7-days, and 14-days post-injection using the Kodak in vivo multispectral imaging system. Strong NIRF signals from engrafted cells were imaged 1 day after injection. At 1 week after injection, 70% of the NIRF signal was lost when compared to the intensity of the day 1 signal. The data collected 2 weeks following transplantation showed an 88% decrease when compared to day 1. Our studies have shown that IFP1.4 gene labeling can be used to track the viability of transplanted cells in vivo.

  4. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen; Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pichler, Bernd; Heinzmann, Ulrich; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 10 6 -3 x 10 8 labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 10 6 cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells. (orig.)

  5. WE-G-BRD-04: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): An Integrated Model-Based Intrafractional Organ Motion Tracking Approach with Dynamic MRI in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Dolly, S; Anastasio, M; Li, H; Wooten, H; Gay, H; Mutic, S; Thorstad, W; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Victoria, J; Dempsey, J [ViewRay incorporated, Oakwood Village, Ohio (United States); Ruan, S [University of Rouen, QuantIF - EA 4108 LITIS, Rouen (France); Low, D [Deparment of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In-treatment dynamic cine images, provided by the first commercially available MRI-guided radiotherapy system, allow physicians to observe intrafractional motion of head and neck (H&N) internal structures. Nevertheless, high anatomical complexity and relatively poor cine image contrast/resolution have complicated automatic intrafractional motion evaluation. We proposed an integrated model-based approach to automatically delineate and analyze moving structures from on-board cine images. Methods: The H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein severe internal motion often occurs, was selected as the target-to-be-tracked. To reliably capture its motion, a hierarchical structure model containing three statistical shapes (face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) was first built from a set of manually delineated shapes using principal component analysis. An integrated model-fitting algorithm was then employed to align the statistical shapes to the first to-be-detected cine frame, and multi-feature level-set contour propagation was performed to identify the airway shape change in the remaining frames. Ninety sagittal cine MR image sets, acquired from three H&N cancer patients, were utilized to demonstrate this approach. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 20 randomly selected images from each patient. The resulting dice similarity coefficient (93.28+/−1.46 %) and margin error (0.49+/−0.12 mm) showed good agreement with the manual results. Intrafractional displacements of anterior, posterior, inferior, and superior airway boundaries were observed, with values of 2.62+/−2.92, 1.78+/−1.43, 3.51+/−3.99, and 0.68+/−0.89 mm, respectively. The H&N airway motion was found to vary across directions, fractions, and patients, and highly correlated with patients’ respiratory frequency. Conclusion: We proposed the integrated computational approach, which for the first

  6. WE-G-BRD-04: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): An Integrated Model-Based Intrafractional Organ Motion Tracking Approach with Dynamic MRI in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H; Dolly, S; Anastasio, M; Li, H; Wooten, H; Gay, H; Mutic, S; Thorstad, W; Li, H; Victoria, J; Dempsey, J; Ruan, S; Low, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In-treatment dynamic cine images, provided by the first commercially available MRI-guided radiotherapy system, allow physicians to observe intrafractional motion of head and neck (H&N) internal structures. Nevertheless, high anatomical complexity and relatively poor cine image contrast/resolution have complicated automatic intrafractional motion evaluation. We proposed an integrated model-based approach to automatically delineate and analyze moving structures from on-board cine images. Methods: The H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein severe internal motion often occurs, was selected as the target-to-be-tracked. To reliably capture its motion, a hierarchical structure model containing three statistical shapes (face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) was first built from a set of manually delineated shapes using principal component analysis. An integrated model-fitting algorithm was then employed to align the statistical shapes to the first to-be-detected cine frame, and multi-feature level-set contour propagation was performed to identify the airway shape change in the remaining frames. Ninety sagittal cine MR image sets, acquired from three H&N cancer patients, were utilized to demonstrate this approach. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 20 randomly selected images from each patient. The resulting dice similarity coefficient (93.28+/−1.46 %) and margin error (0.49+/−0.12 mm) showed good agreement with the manual results. Intrafractional displacements of anterior, posterior, inferior, and superior airway boundaries were observed, with values of 2.62+/−2.92, 1.78+/−1.43, 3.51+/−3.99, and 0.68+/−0.89 mm, respectively. The H&N airway motion was found to vary across directions, fractions, and patients, and highly correlated with patients’ respiratory frequency. Conclusion: We proposed the integrated computational approach, which for the first

  7. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  8. Development of Adaptive Tilt Tracker that Utilizes QUAD-cell Detector to Track Extended Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-17

    tracked low Earth orbit (LEO) object and atmospheric seeing govern spot characteristics. Unlike static natural or laser guide stars, a LEO object’s...image spot characteristics .......................................................... 101 56. Response for non-adaptive tilt tracker with α equal to...applications toward natural and laser guide stars. The system was innovative and is a relevant forerunner to the tracker proposed in this research. The

  9. Monofunctional stealth nanoparticle for unbiased single molecule tracking inside living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Domenik; Richter, Christian P; Drees, Christoph; Birkholz, Oliver; You, Changjiang; Rampazzo, Enrico; Piehler, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of a protein cage scaffold, we have systematically explored intracellular application of nanoparticles for single molecule studies and discovered that recognition by the autophagy machinery plays a key role for rapid metabolism in the cytosol. Intracellular stealth nanoparticles were achieved by heavy surface PEGylation. By combination with a generic approach for nanoparticle monofunctionalization, efficient labeling of intracellular proteins with high fidelity was accomplished, allowing unbiased long-term tracking of proteins in the outer mitochondrial membrane.

  10. Track structure model for damage to mammalian cell cultures during solar proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Katz, R.

    1992-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) occur infrequently and unpredictably, thus representing a potential hazard to interplanetary space missions. Biological damage from SPEs will be produced principally through secondary electron production in tissue, including important contributions due to delta rays from nuclear reaction products. We review methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of SPEs using a high energy proton model and the parametric cellular track model. Results of the model are presented for several of the historically largest flares using typical levels and body shielding.

  11. Interacting active elastic dimers: Two cells moving on a rigid track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Moumita; Mayett, David; Schwarz, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration in morphogenesis and cancer metastasis typically involves an interplay between different cell types. The rules governing such interplay remain largely unknown, however, a recent experiment studying the interaction between neural crest (NC) cells and placodal cells reveals an example of such rules. The study found that NC cells chase the placodal cells by chemotaxis, while placodal cells run away from NC cells when contacted by them. Motivated by this observation, we construct and study a minimal one-dimensional cell-cell model comprised of two cells with each cell represented by two-beads-connected-by-an-active spring. The active spring for each moving cell models the stress fibers with their myosin-driven contractility (and alpha-actinin extendability), while the friction coefficients of the beads describe the catch/slip bond behavior of the integrins in focal adhesions. We also include a dynamic contact interaction between the two cells, as well as a chemotactic potential, to decipher the chase-and-run dynamics observed in the experiment. We then use our modeling to further generalize the rules governing the interplay between different cell types during collective cell migration.

  12. Tracking Traction Force Changes of Single Cells on the Liquid Crystal Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Fhong Soon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration is a key contributor to wound repair. This study presents findings indicating that the liquid crystal based cell traction force transducer (LCTFT system can be used in conjunction with a bespoke cell traction force mapping (CTFM software to monitor cell/surface traction forces from quiescent state in real time. In this study, time-lapse photo microscopy allowed cell induced deformations in liquid crystal coated substrates to be monitored and analyzed. The results indicated that the system could be used to monitor the generation of cell/surface forces in an initially quiescent cell, as it migrated over the culture substrate, via multiple points of contact between the cell and the surface. Future application of this system is the real-time assaying of the pharmacological effects of cytokines on the mechanics of cell migration.

  13. Rabbit model of intervertebral disc degeneration by external compression device characterized by X-ray, MRI, histology, and cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ismail

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate experimental animal models, which mimic the degenerative process occurring in human intervertebral disc (IVD breakdown and can be used for new treatment studies such as tissue engineering or disc distraction are lacking. We studied the external compression device that used by Kroeber et al to create intervertebral disc degeneration in rabbit model characterized by X-ray, MRI, Histology, and Cell Viability. Ten NZW rabbit were randomly assigned to one of five groups. Intervertebral disc VL4-L5 are compressed using an external loading device, 1.9 MPa. First group rabbit are loaded for 14 days, second loaded for 28 days, thirth group are loaded for 14 days, and unloaded for 14 days, fourth group loaded for 28 days and unloaded for 28 days. The fifth group, rabbits underwent a sham operation. Additional, rabbits were used as sample for cell viability study. In disc height : sample in group one have biggest decreasing of disc height, that is 23.9 unit. In MRI assessment, the worst grade is grade 3. In histological score, the worst group is group three (58.69, and the best is group 4 (45.69. Group one have the largest dead cell, that are 403.5, and the smallest is group four (124.75. Trypan blue staining showed that group four have better viable cell (91.1 compare than group three (86.4. The study conclude disc degeneration can be created by external axial loading for 14 days in rabbit intervertebral disc. Duration of 28 days unloading gave better result for cells to recover. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:199-207  Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Keywords: Rabbit model –intervertebral disc degeneration- external compression device-X-ray, MRI, Histology, and Cell viabilty /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso

  14. Quantitative tracking of tumor cells in phase-contrast microscopy exploiting halo artifact pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Tumor cell morphology is closely related to its invasiveness characteristics and migratory behaviors. An invasive tumor cell has a highly irregular shape, whereas a spherical cell is non-metastatic. Thus, quantitative analysis of cell features is crucial to determine tumor malignancy or to test the efficacy of anticancer treatment. We use phase-contrast microscopy to analyze single cell morphology and to monitor its change because it enables observation of long-term activity of living cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity, which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. Despite this advantage, there are image-level drawbacks to phase-contrast microscopy, such as local light effect and contrast interference ring, among others. Thus, we first applied a local filter to compensate for non-uniform illumination. Then, we used intensity distribution information to detect the cell boundary. In phase-contrast microscopy images, the cell normally appears as a dark region surrounded by a bright halo. As the halo artifact around the cell body is minimal and has an asymmetric diffusion pattern, we calculated the cross-sectional plane that intersected the center of each cell and was orthogonal to the first principal axis. Then, we extracted the dark cell region by level set. However, a dense population of cultured cells still rendered single-cell analysis difficult. Finally, we measured roundness and size to classify tumor cells into malignant and benign groups. We validated segmentation accuracy by comparing our findings with manually obtained results.

  15. SuperSegger: robust image segmentation, analysis and lineage tracking of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianidou, Stella; Brennan, Connor; Nissen, Silas B; Kuwada, Nathan J; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-11-01

    Many quantitative cell biology questions require fast yet reliable automated image segmentation to identify and link cells from frame-to-frame, and characterize the cell morphology and fluorescence. We present SuperSegger, an automated MATLAB-based image processing package well-suited to quantitative analysis of high-throughput live-cell fluorescence microscopy of bacterial cells. SuperSegger incorporates machine-learning algorithms to optimize cellular boundaries and automated error resolution to reliably link cells from frame-to-frame. Unlike existing packages, it can reliably segment microcolonies with many cells, facilitating the analysis of cell-cycle dynamics in bacteria as well as cell-contact mediated phenomena. This package has a range of built-in capabilities for characterizing bacterial cells, including the identification of cell division events, mother, daughter and neighbouring cells, and computing statistics on cellular fluorescence, the location and intensity of fluorescent foci. SuperSegger provides a variety of postprocessing data visualization tools for single cell and population level analysis, such as histograms, kymographs, frame mosaics, movies and consensus images. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the package by analyzing lag phase growth with single cell resolution. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Park, John [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Urology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  17. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael; Park, John

    2010-01-01

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  18. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  19. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  20. Tracking neuronal marker expression inside living differentiating cells using molecular beacons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilieva, Mirolyuba; Della Vedova, Paolo; Hansen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNAs were expressed 2 and 3 days post induction of differentiation, respectively. Oct 4 was not detected with MB in these cells and signal was not increased over time suggesting that MB are generally stable inside the cells. The gene expression changes measured using MBs were...... confirmed using qRT-PCR. These results suggest that MBs are simple to use sensors inside living cell, and particularly useful for studying dynamic gene expression in heterogeneous cell populations....

  1. CD24 tracks divergent pluripotent states in mouse and human cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shakiba, Nika; White, Carl A; Lipsitz, Yonatan Y; Yachie-Kinoshita, Ayako; Tonge, Peter D; Hussein, Samer M I; Puri, Mira C; Elbaz, Judith; Morrissey-Scoot, James; Li, Mira; Munoz Peralta, Javier; Benevento, Marco; Rogers, Ian M; Hanna, Jacob H; Heck, Albert J R; Wollscheid, Bernd; Nagy, Andras; Zandstra, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming is a dynamic process that can result in multiple pluripotent cell types emerging from divergent paths. Cell surface protein expression is a particularly desirable tool to categorize reprogramming and pluripotency as it enables robust quantification and enrichment of live cells. Here we

  2. Quantitative Label-Free Cell Proliferation Tracking with a Versatile Electrochemical Impedance Detection Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Carminati, M; Heiskanen, Arto

    2012-01-01

    optimal detection strategies. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to monitor and compare adhesion of different cell lines. HeLa cells and 3T3 fibroblasts have been cultured for 12 hours on interdigitated electrode arrays integrated into a tailor-made cell culture platform. Both......Since the use of impedance measurements for label-free monitoring of cells has become widespread but still the choice of sensing configuration is not unique though crucial for a quantitative interpretation of data, we demonstrate the application of a novel custom multipotentiostat platform to study...... vertical and coplanar interdigitated sensing configuration approaches have been used and compared on the same cell populations....

  3. SU-G-BRA-04: Simulation of Errors in Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP)-Based Lung Tumor Internal Target Volumes (ITV) Using Real-Time 2D MRI and Deformable Image Registration Based Lung Tumor Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D; Kishan, A; Santhanam, A; Min, Y; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Agazaryan, N; Yang, Y; Lee, P; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Ca (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the first frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric

  4. SU-G-BRA-04: Simulation of Errors in Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP)-Based Lung Tumor Internal Target Volumes (ITV) Using Real-Time 2D MRI and Deformable Image Registration Based Lung Tumor Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D; Kishan, A; Santhanam, A; Min, Y; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Agazaryan, N; Yang, Y; Lee, P; Low, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the first frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric

  5. On the track of transfer cell formation by specialized plant-parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodiuc, Natalia; Vieira, Paulo; Banora, Mohamed Youssef; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Transfer cells are ubiquitous plant cells that play an important role in plant development as well as in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. They are highly specialized and differentiated cells playing a central role in the acquisition, distribution and exchange of nutrients. Their unique structural traits are characterized by augmented ingrowths of invaginated secondary wall material, unsheathed by an amplified area of plasma membrane enriched in a suite of solute transporters. Similar morphological features can be perceived in vascular root feeding cells induced by sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes, such as root-knot and cyst nematodes, in a wide range of plant hosts. Despite their close phylogenetic relationship, these obligatory biotrophic plant pathogens engage different approaches when reprogramming root cells into giant cells or syncytia, respectively. Both nematode feeding-cells types will serve as the main source of nutrients until the end of the nematode life cycle. In both cases, these nematodes are able to remarkably maneuver and reprogram plant host cells. In this review we will discuss the structure, function and formation of these specialized multinucleate cells that act as nutrient transfer cells accumulating and synthesizing components needed for survival and successful offspring of plant-parasitic nematodes. Plant cells with transfer-like functions are also a renowned subject of interest involving still poorly understood molecular and cellular transport processes.

  6. On the track of transfer cells formation by specialized plant-parasitic nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia eRodiuc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transfer cells are ubiquitous plant cells that play an important role in plant development as well as in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. They are highly specialized and differentiated cells playing a central role in the acquisition, distribution and exchange of nutrients. Their unique structural traits are characterized by augmented ingrowths of invaginated secondary wall material, unsheathed by an amplified area of plasma membrane enriched in a suite of solute transporters. Similar morphological features can be perceived in vascular root feeding cells induced by sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes, such as root-knot and cyst nematodes, in a wide range of plant hosts. Despite their close phylogenetic relationship, these obligatory biotrophic plant pathogens engage different approaches when reprogramming root cells into giant cells or syncytia, respectively. Both nematode feeding-cells types will serve as the main source of nutrients until the end of the nematode life cycle. In both cases, these nematodes are able to remarkably maneuver and reprogram plant host cells. In this review we will discuss the structural, functional and morphogenetic characteristics function and formation of these specialized multinucleate cells that act as nutrient transfer cells to accumulate and synthesize components needed for survival and successful offspring of plant-parasitic nematodes. Plant cells with transfer-like functions are also a renowned subject of interest involving still poorly understood molecular and cellular transport processes.

  7. Relationship between pretreatment FDG-PET and diffusion-weighted MRI biomarkers in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Antoinette; Kwee, Thomas C; de Klerk, John MH; Adam, Judit A; de Keizer, Bart; Fijnheer, Rob; Kersten, Marie José; Ludwig, Inge; Jauw, Yvonne WS; Zijlstra, Josée M; den Bos, Indra C Pieters - Van; Stoker, Jaap; Hoekstra, Otto S; Nievelstein, Rutger AJ

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between the 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) standardized uptake value (SUV) and the diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Pretreatment FDG-PET and diffusion-weighted MRI of 21 patients with histologically proven DLBCL were prospectively analyzed. In each patient, maximum, mean and peak standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured in the lesion with visually highest FDG uptake and in the largest lesion. Mean ADC (ADCmean, calculated with b-values of 0 and 1000 s/mm2) was measured in the same lesions. Correlations between FDG-PET metrics (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak) and ADCmean were assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. In the lesions with visually highest FDG uptake, no significant correlations were found between the SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak and the ADCmean (P=0.498, P=0.609 and P=0.595, respectively). In the largest lesions, there were no significant correlations either between the SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak and the ADCmean (P=0.992, P=0.843 and P=0.894, respectively). The results of this study indicate that the glycolytic rate as measured by FDG-PET and changes in water compartmentalization and water diffusion as measured by the ADC are independent biological phenomena in newly diagnosed DLBCL. Further studies are warranted to assess the complementary roles of these different imaging biomarkers in the evaluation and follow-up of DLBCL. PMID:24795837

  8. In vivo tracking of 111In-oxine labeled mesenchymal stem cells following infusion in patients with advanced cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Mirpour, Sahar; Bagheri, Mohammad; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Abdolahzadeh, Leila; Saghari, Mohsen; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several animal and few human studies suggest the beneficial role of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in liver cirrhosis. However, little is known about the fate of MSCs after infusion in cirrhotic patients. We evaluated stem cell biodistribution after peripheral infusion of MSCs in four cirrhotic patients. Methods: After three passages of MSCs, the patients received a total of 250-400x10 6 cells, of which only 50% of the cells were labeled. Specific activities of 0.21-0.67 MBq/10 6 cells were maintained for the injected labeled MSCs. Planar whole-body acquisitions (anterior/posterior projections) were acquired immediately following infusion as well as at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, 7th and 10th days after cell infusion. Results: After intravenous infusion, the radioactivity was first observed to accumulate in the lungs. During the following hours to days, the radioactivity gradually increased in the liver and spleen, with spleen uptake exceeding that in the liver in all patients. Region-of-interest analysis showed that the percentage of cells homing to the liver (following decay and background corrections and geometric mean calculation) increased from 0.0%-2.8% at immediately post-infusion images to 13.0-17.4% in 10th-day post-infusion. Similarly, the residual activities in the spleen increased from 2.0%-10.2% at immediately post-infusion images to 30.1%-42.2% in 10th-day post-infusion. During the same period, the residual activities in the lungs decreased from 27.0-33.5% to 2.0-5.4%. Conclusion: The infusion of MSCs labeled with 111 In-oxine through a peripheral vein is safe in cirrhosis. Cell labeling with 111 In-oxine is a suitable method for tracking MSC distribution after infusion.

  9. In vivo tracking of {sup 111}In-oxine labeled mesenchymal stem cells following infusion in patients with advanced cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholamrezanezhad, Ali, E-mail: agholam1@jhmi.edu [Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirpour, Sahar [Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Mohammad; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi [Digestive Disease Research Center. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alimoghaddam, Kamran [Hematology and BMT Research Center. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolahzadeh, Leila [Digestive Disease Research Center. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saghari, Mohsen [Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malekzadeh, Reza [Digestive Disease Research Center. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Background: Several animal and few human studies suggest the beneficial role of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in liver cirrhosis. However, little is known about the fate of MSCs after infusion in cirrhotic patients. We evaluated stem cell biodistribution after peripheral infusion of MSCs in four cirrhotic patients. Methods: After three passages of MSCs, the patients received a total of 250-400x10{sup 6} cells, of which only 50% of the cells were labeled. Specific activities of 0.21-0.67 MBq/10{sup 6} cells were maintained for the injected labeled MSCs. Planar whole-body acquisitions (anterior/posterior projections) were acquired immediately following infusion as well as at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, 7th and 10th days after cell infusion. Results: After intravenous infusion, the radioactivity was first observed to accumulate in the lungs. During the following hours to days, the radioactivity gradually increased in the liver and spleen, with spleen uptake exceeding that in the liver in all patients. Region-of-interest analysis showed that the percentage of cells homing to the liver (following decay and background corrections and geometric mean calculation) increased from 0.0%-2.8% at immediately post-infusion images to 13.0-17.4% in 10th-day post-infusion. Similarly, the residual activities in the spleen increased from 2.0%-10.2% at immediately post-infusion images to 30.1%-42.2% in 10th-day post-infusion. During the same period, the residual activities in the lungs decreased from 27.0-33.5% to 2.0-5.4%. Conclusion: The infusion of MSCs labeled with {sup 111}In-oxine through a peripheral vein is safe in cirrhosis. Cell labeling with {sup 111}In-oxine is a suitable method for tracking MSC distribution after infusion.

  10. Tracking of [{sup 18}F]FDG-labeled natural killer cells to HER2/neu-positive tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Reinhard [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco (United States)], E-mail: reinhardt.meier@gmail.com; Piert, Morand [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Michigan (United States); Piontek, Guido; Rudelius, Martina [Institute of Pathology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A. [3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Henning, Tobias D. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco (United States); Wels, Winfried S.; Uherek, Christoph [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to label the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with [{sup 18}F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) for subsequent in vivo tracking to HER2/neu-positive tumors. Methods: NK-92 cells were genetically modified to NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, which express a chimeric antigen receptor that is specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen. NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were labeled with [{sup 18}F]FDG by simple incubation at different settings. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by a gamma counter. Subsequently, [{sup 18}F]FDG-labeled parental NK-92 or NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were intravenously injected into mice with implanted HER2/neu-positive NIH/3T3 tumors. Radioactivity in tumors was quantified by digital autoradiography and correlated with histopathology. Results: The NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be efficiently labeled with [{sup 18}F]FDG by simple incubation. Optimal labeling efficiencies (80%) were achieved using an incubation period of 60 min and additional insulin (10 IU/ml). After injection of 5x10{sup 6} [{sup 18}F]FDG-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, digital autoradiography showed an increased uptake of radioactivity in HER2/neu-positive tumors at 60 min postinjection. Conversely, injection of 5x10{sup 6} NK-92 cells not directed against HER2/neu receptors did not result in increased uptake of radioactivity in the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, but not the parental NK cells, in tumor tissues. Conclusion: The human NK cell line NK-92 can be directed against HER2/neu antigens by genetic modification. The genetically modified NK cells can be efficiently labeled with [{sup 18}F]FDG, and the accumulation of these labeled NK cells in HER2/neu-positive tumors can be monitored with autoradiography.

  11. Tracking of [18F]FDG-labeled natural killer cells to HER2/neu-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Reinhard; Piert, Morand; Piontek, Guido; Rudelius, Martina; Oostendorp, Robert A.; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Henning, Tobias D.; Wels, Winfried S.; Uherek, Christoph; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to label the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with [ 18 F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) for subsequent in vivo tracking to HER2/neu-positive tumors. Methods: NK-92 cells were genetically modified to NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, which express a chimeric antigen receptor that is specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen. NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were labeled with [ 18 F]FDG by simple incubation at different settings. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by a gamma counter. Subsequently, [ 18 F]FDG-labeled parental NK-92 or NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were intravenously injected into mice with implanted HER2/neu-positive NIH/3T3 tumors. Radioactivity in tumors was quantified by digital autoradiography and correlated with histopathology. Results: The NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be efficiently labeled with [ 18 F]FDG by simple incubation. Optimal labeling efficiencies (80%) were achieved using an incubation period of 60 min and additional insulin (10 IU/ml). After injection of 5x10 6 [ 18 F]FDG-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, digital autoradiography showed an increased uptake of radioactivity in HER2/neu-positive tumors at 60 min postinjection. Conversely, injection of 5x10 6 NK-92 cells not directed against HER2/neu receptors did not result in increased uptake of radioactivity in the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, but not the parental NK cells, in tumor tissues. Conclusion: The human NK cell line NK-92 can be directed against HER2/neu antigens by genetic modification. The genetically modified NK cells can be efficiently labeled with [ 18 F]FDG, and the accumulation of these labeled NK cells in HER2/neu-positive tumors can be monitored with autoradiography

  12. Molecular beacon nanosensors for live cell detection and tracking differentiation and reprogramming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilieva, Mirolyuba

    2013-01-01

    open to closed state within living cells. Using MBs targeting pluripotent stem cell markers we demonstrated reverse into a more immature state of LUHMES induced by neurosphere-like growth conditions. Moreover, we have been able to trace localisation of this particular population during differentiation...... in separation of fluorophore from quencher and thereby emission of a fluorescent signal that can be detected. In this project the usability and applicability of MBs for live cell detection and tracing of gene expression was demonstrated. MBs library targeting gene markers for pluripotent stem cells as well...... and thus demonstrate the usability of MBs for monitoring cell behaviour within 3D clusters. Finally, MBs detection of expression of human pluripotent markers after reprograming of adult somatic cells with plasmid codding for mouse transcription factors was demonstrated. In conclusion, the method of using...

  13. MRI screening before stem cell transplantation - necessary?; MRT-Untersuchung des Neurokraniums vor Stammzelltransplantation - notwendig oder ueberfluessig?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, U.; Mentzel, H.J.; Kaiser, W.A. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische u. Interventionelle Radiologie, Friedr.-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany); Wolf, J.; Fuchs, D.; Gruhn, B. [Kinderklinik, Georgius-Agricola-Krankenhaus, Zeitz (Germany); Zintl, F. [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Friedr.-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: in the context of stem cell transplantation (SCT), we often observe neurological complications as a consequence of immune system suppression, conditioning therapy or prophylaxis and treatment of graft-versus-host disease. Furthermore, cerebral lesions in existence prior to transplantation can be found. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to stem cell transplantation. Patients and method: cerebral MR examinations of 116 children and adolescents were performed before SCT. Patients ranged in age from 1.1 to 21.4 years (mean 12.6 years). All MR images were obtained by a 1.5 T System. The predefined short protocol included an axial T1-weighted SE sequence and a coronary T2-weighted TSE sequence. We evaluated existing cerebral lesions, the diameter of the ventricular system, and the paranasal sinuses. In the case of pathological findings, the short examination protocol was expanded. Results: in 5 of 116 children (4.3%) we observed prior to SCT findings requiring immediate treatment although the patients did not show any clinical symptoms (1 x aspergilloma, 1 x hemorrhage of vascular anomaly). An increased risk of bleeding caused by cavernoma or another vascular anomaly without hemorrhage also had to be taken into account. 32 of 116 patients (37.1%) showed atrophic lesions. In 42 children (36.2%), we observed affections of the paranasal sinuses. (orig.)

  14. Detecting carbon uptake and cellular allocation by individual algae in multispecies assemblages: Tracking carbon into single algal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdock, Justin N. [USDA Agricultural Research Service, National Sedimentation Laboratory, Oxford Mississippi; Department of Biology, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville Tennessee

    2015-11-03

    Algal species vary in carbon (C) need and uptake rates. Understanding differences in C uptake and cellular allocation among species from natural communities will bring new insight into many ecosystem process questions including how species changes will alter energy availability and C sequestration in aquatic ecosystems. A major limitation of current methods that measure algal C incorporation is the inability to separate the response of individual species from mixed-species assemblages. I used Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy to qualitatively measure inorganic 13C isotope incorporation into individual algal cells in single species, two species, and natural phytoplankton assemblages. Lateral shifts in spectral peaks from 13C treatments were observed in all species. Comparison of peaks associated with carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids allowed for the detection of which individuals took in C, and which macromolecules the C was used to make. For example, shifts in Spirogyra spectral peaks showed substantial C incorporation in carbohydrates. Further, shifts in peaks at 1160 cm-1, 1108 cm-1, 1080 cm-1, 1048 cm-1, and 1030 cm-1 suggested C was being allocated into cellulose. The natural phytoplankton assemblage demonstrated how C could be tracked into co-occurring species. A diatom had large shifts in protein and carbohydrate peaks, while a green alga and euglenoid had only a few shifts in protein related peaks. Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy is an established, label free method for measuring the chemical composition of algal cells. However, adding a label such as 13C isotope can greatly expand the technique's capabilities by qualitatively tracking C movement between inorganic and organic states within single cells.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Tracking of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Labeled with Alkyl-Polyethylenimine 2 kDa/Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide in a Mouse Lung Carcinoma Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in novel anticancer therapy and the repair of vascular injury has been increasingly recognized. In the present study, EPCs were labeled with N-alkyl-polyethylenimine 2 kDa (PEI2k-stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of EPCs in a mouse lung carcinoma xenograft model. EPCs derived from human peripheral blood were labeled with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO. The viability and activity of labeled cells were evaluated using proliferation, migration, and tubulogenesis assays. Alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO-labeled EPCs were injected intravenously (group 1 or mixed and injected together with A549 cells subcutaneously (group 2 into groups of six mice with severe combined immunodeficiency. The labeling efficiency with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO at 7 mg Fe/mL concentration was approximately 100%. Quantitative analysis of cellular iron was 6.062 ± 0.050 pg/cell. No significant effects on EPC proliferation, migration, or tubulogenesis were seen after labeling. Seventesla micro-MRI showed the presence of schistic or linear hypointense regions at the tumor margins starting from days 7 to 8 after EPC administration. This gradually extended into the inner tumor layers in group 1. In group 2, tumor growth was accompanied by dispersion of low-signal intensity regions inside the tumor. Iron-positive cells identified by Prussian blue dye were seen at the sites identified using MRI. Human CD31-positive cells and mouse CD31-positive cells were present in both groups. Labeling EPCs with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO allows noninvasive magnetic resonance investigation of EPC involvement in tumor neovasculature and is associated with excellent biocompatibility and MRI sensitivity.

  16. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells: Tracking Survival, Biodistribution, Tumorigenicity, and Immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Gu, Wen-Yi Chen, Jay Gu, Paul Burridge, Joseph C. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Being able to self-renew and differentiate into virtually all cell types, both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have exciting therapeutic implications for myocardial infarction, neurodegenerative disease, diabetes, and other disorders involving irreversible cell loss. However, stem cell biology remains incompletely understood despite significant advances in the field. Inefficient stem cell differentiation, difficulty in verifying successful delivery to the target organ, and problems with engraftment all hamper the transition from laboratory animal studies to human clinical trials. Although traditional histopathological techniques have been the primary approach for ex vivo analysis of stem cell behavior, these postmortem examinations are unable to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms in real time and in vivo. Fortunately, the advent of molecular imaging has led to unprecedented progress in understanding the fundamental behavior of stem cells, including their survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity in the targeted tissues of interest. This review summarizes various molecular imaging technologies and how they have advanced the current understanding of stem cell survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity.

  17. MRI of soft tissue abnormalities: a primary cause of sickle cell crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, F.; Zwass, A.; Staron, R.B.; Haramati, N.

    1993-01-01

    The early manifestations of sickle cell crisis in soft tissues are important to recognize, though rarely manifest on radiographs and difficult to evaluate on computed tomography and bone scans. Documentation is critical, however, if appropriate judgments as to emergency treatment versus conservative measures are to be made. Seventeen adults seen in the emergency room or hospitalized in presumed sickle cells crisis underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 24-72 h of presentation. Results indicate that magnetic resonance imaging is a sensitive modality for documenting early soft tissue pathology which may be the predominant or sole cause of sickle cell crisis. (orig.)

  18. In vivo human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell tracking after intra-articular delivery in a rat osteoarthritis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs have shown efficacy in treating osteoarthritis (OA both preclinically and clinically via intra-articular (IA injection. However, understanding the mode of action of the cell therapy has been limited by cell tracking capability and correlation between the pharmacokinetics of the injected cells and the intended pharmacodynamics effect. This study aims to explore methodology and to understand in vivo biodistribution of clinical-grade haMSCs labeled with fluorescent dye and injected into an immunocompetent OA rat model. Methods haMSCs labeled with fluorescent dye were investigated for their proliferation and differentiation capabilities. Labeled cells were used to establish detection threshold of a noninvasive biofluorescent imaging system before the cells (2.5 × 106 were injected into a conventional rat OA model induced by medial meniscectomy for 8 weeks. We attempted to reveal the existence of labeled cells in vivo by imaging and a molecular biomarker approach, and to correlate with the in vivo efficacy and physical presence over a follow-up period up to 10 weeks. Results In vitro proliferation and differentiation of haMSCs were not affected by the labeling of DiD dye. Detection thresholds of the labeled cells in vitro and in vivo were determined to be 104 and 105 cells, respectively. When 2.5 × 106 haMSCs were injected into the joints of a rat OA model, fluorescent signals (or >105 cells lasted for about 10 weeks in the surgical knee joint at the same time as efficacy was observed. Signals in nonsurgical rats only lasted for 4 weeks. The human MSCs were shown to engraft to the rat joint tissues and were proliferative. Human FOXP2 gene was only detected in the knee joint tissue, suggesting limited biodistribution locally to the joints. Conclusions The current study represents the first attempt to correlate cell therapy efficacy on OA with the physical presence

  19. Tracking Solid Oxide Cell Microstructure Evolution by High Resolution 3D Nano-Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Angelis, Salvatore

    . The degradation processes are mainly attributed to morphological changes occurring within the electrodes microstructure. Therefore, precise tracking of 3D microstructural evolution during operation is considered crucial to understanding the complex relationship between microstructure and performance. In this work......, X-ray ptychographic tomography is applied to SOC materials, demonstrating unprecedented spatial resolution and data quality. The eect of a complete redox cycle on the same Ni-YSZ microstructure is visualized ex-situ in 3D, showing major rearrangement of the nickel network after reduction......, the formation of cracks in the YSZ, and void formation in nickel oxide after oxidation. Capitalizing on the high resolution of ptychography, the eect of nickel coarsening on the Ni-YSZ microstructure evolution is studied ex-situ in three dimensions, while the sample is repeatedly scanned and treated at high...

  20. Monitoring Cell Death in Regorafenib-Treated Experimental Colon Carcinomas Using Annexin-Based Optical Fluorescence Imaging Validated by Perfusion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp M Kazmierczak

    Full Text Available To investigate annexin-based optical fluorescence imaging (OI for monitoring regorafenib-induced early cell death in experimental colon carcinomas in rats, validated by perfusion MRI and multiparametric immunohistochemistry.Subcutaneous human colon carcinomas (HT-29 in athymic rats (n = 16 were imaged before and after a one-week therapy with regorafenib (n = 8 or placebo (n = 8 using annexin-based OI and perfusion MRI at 3 Tesla. Optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and MRI tumor perfusion parameters (plasma flow PF, mL/100mL/min; plasma volume PV, % were assessed. On day 7, tumors underwent immunohistochemical analysis for tumor cell apoptosis (TUNEL, proliferation (Ki-67, and microvascular density (CD31.Apoptosis-targeted OI demonstrated a tumor-specific probe accumulation with a significant increase of tumor SNR under therapy (mean Δ +7.78±2.95, control: -0.80±2.48, p = 0.021. MRI detected a significant reduction of tumor perfusion in the therapy group (mean ΔPF -8.17±2.32 mL/100 mL/min, control -0.11±3.36 mL/100 mL/min, p = 0.036. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly more apoptosis (TUNEL; 11392±1486 vs. 2921±334, p = 0.001, significantly less proliferation (Ki-67; 1754±184 vs. 2883±323, p = 0.012, and significantly lower microvascular density (CD31; 107±10 vs. 182±22, p = 0.006 in the therapy group.Annexin-based OI allowed for the non-invasive monitoring of regorafenib-induced early cell death in experimental colon carcinomas, validated by perfusion MRI and multiparametric immunohistochemistry.

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy with real-time tumor tracking for non-small cell lung cancer: Clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Prevost, Jean-Briac; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Praag, John; Holt, Bronno van der; Levendag, Peter C.; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Pattynama, Peter; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of treatment using real-time tumor tracking for 70 patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: Seventy inoperable patients with peripherally located early-stage NSCLC were treated with 45 or 60 Gy in three fractions using CyberKnife. Pathology was available in 51% of patients. Thirty-nine patients had a T1-tumor and 31 had a T2-tumor. Markers were placed using the vascular, percutaneous intra-, or extra-pulmonary approach, depending on the risk of pneumothorax. Results: The actuarial 2-year local control rate for patients treated with 60 Gy was 96%, compared to 78% for patients treated with a total dose of 45 Gy (p = 0.197). All local recurrences (n = 4) occurred in patients with T2-tumors. Overall survival for the whole group at two years was 62% and the cause specific survival was 85%. The median follow-up was 15 months. Grade 3 toxicity occurred in two patients (3%) after marker placement. Treatment-related late grade 3 toxicity occurred in 7 patients (10%). No grade ≥4 toxicity occurred. Conclusion: Excellent local control of 96% at 1- and 2-years was achieved using 60 Gy in three fractions for NSCLC patients treated with the real-time tumor tracking. Toxicity was low.

  2. New robust algorithm for tracking cells in videos of Drosophila morphogenesis based on finding an ideal path in segmented spatio-temporal cellular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, Yohanns; Bosveld, Floris; Graner, François; Mikula, Karol; Remesíková, Mariana; Smísek, Michal

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel algorithm for tracking cells in time lapse confocal microscopy movie of a Drosophila epithelial tissue during pupal morphogenesis. We consider a 2D + time video as a 3D static image, where frames are stacked atop each other, and using a spatio-temporal segmentation algorithm we obtain information about spatio-temporal 3D tubes representing evolutions of cells. The main idea for tracking is the usage of two distance functions--first one from the cells in the initial frame and second one from segmented boundaries. We track the cells backwards in time. The first distance function attracts the subsequently constructed cell trajectories to the cells in the initial frame and the second one forces them to be close to centerlines of the segmented tubular structures. This makes our tracking algorithm robust against noise and missing spatio-temporal boundaries. This approach can be generalized to a 3D + time video analysis, where spatio-temporal tubes are 4D objects.

  3. Concentration-dependent fluorescence live-cell imaging and tracking of intracellular nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Hye; Joo, Sang-Woo [Department of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Keunchang [Logos Biosystems, Incorporated, Anyang 431-070 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So Yeong, E-mail: leeso@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-10

    Using live-cell imaging techniques we investigated concentration-dependent intracellular movements of fluorescence nanoparticles (NPs) in real-time after their entry into HeLa cells via incubation. Intracellular particle traces appeared to be a mixture of both random and fairly unidirectional movements of the particles. At rather low concentrations of NPs, a majority of the non-random intracellular particle trajectories are assumed to mostly go along microtubule networks after endocytosis, as evidenced from the inhibition test with nocodazole. On the other hand, as the concentrations of NPs increased, random motions were more frequently observed inside the cells.

  4. Concentration-dependent fluorescence live-cell imaging and tracking of intracellular nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Ji Hye; Joo, Sang-Woo; Cho, Keunchang; Lee, So Yeong

    2011-01-01

    Using live-cell imaging techniques we investigated concentration-dependent intracellular movements of fluorescence nanoparticles (NPs) in real-time after their entry into HeLa cells via incubation. Intracellular particle traces appeared to be a mixture of both random and fairly unidirectional movements of the particles. At rather low concentrations of NPs, a majority of the non-random intracellular particle trajectories are assumed to mostly go along microtubule networks after endocytosis, as evidenced from the inhibition test with nocodazole. On the other hand, as the concentrations of NPs increased, random motions were more frequently observed inside the cells.

  5. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Jin; Song, Eun Hye; Kim, Seol Hwa; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyun [Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, Heongsung (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  6. Hierarchical Load Tracking Control of a Grid-connected Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Maximum Electrical Efficiency Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yonghui; Wu, Qiuwei; Zhu, Haiyu

    2015-01-01

    efficiency operation obtained at different active power output levels, a hierarchical load tracking control scheme for the grid-connected SOFC was proposed to realize the maximum electrical efficiency operation with the stack temperature bounded. The hierarchical control scheme consists of a fast active...... power control and a slower stack temperature control. The active power control was developed by using a decentralized control method. The efficiency of the proposed hierarchical control scheme was demonstrated by case studies using the benchmark SOFC dynamic model......Based on the benchmark solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) dynamic model for power system studies and the analysis of the SOFC operating conditions, the nonlinear programming (NLP) optimization method was used to determine the maximum electrical efficiency of the grid-connected SOFC subject...

  7. Fluorescent Nanodiamond: A Versatile Tool for Long-Term Cell Tracking, Super-Resolution Imaging, and Nanoscale Temperature Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Wesley Wei-Wen; Hui, Yuen Yung; Tsai, Pei-Chang; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) has recently played a central role in fueling new discoveries in interdisciplinary fields spanning biology, chemistry, physics, and materials sciences. The nanoparticle is unique in that it contains a high density ensemble of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) centers as built-in fluorophores. The center possesses a number of outstanding optical and magnetic properties. First, NV(-) has an absorption maximum at ∼550 nm, and when exposed to green-orange light, it emits bright fluorescence at ∼700 nm with a lifetime of longer than 10 ns. These spectroscopic properties are little affected by surface modification but are distinctly different from those of cell autofluorescence and thus enable background-free imaging of FNDs in tissue sections. Such characteristics together with its excellent biocompatibility render FND ideal for long-term cell tracking applications, particularly in stem cell research. Next, as an artificial atom in the solid state, the NV(-) center is perfectly photostable, without photobleaching and blinking. Therefore, the NV-containing FND is suitable as a contrast agent for super-resolution imaging by stimulated emission depletion (STED). An improvement of the spatial resolution by 20-fold is readily achievable by using a high-power STED laser to deplete the NV(-) fluorescence. Such improvement is crucial in revealing the detailed structures of biological complexes and assemblies, including cellular organelles and subcellular compartments. Further enhancement of the resolution for live cell imaging is possible by manipulating the charge states of the NV centers. As the "brightest" member of the nanocarbon family, FND holds great promise and potential for bioimaging with unprecedented resolution and precision. Lastly, the NV(-) center in diamond is an atom-like quantum system with a total electron spin of 1. The ground states of the spins show a crystal field splitting of 2.87 GHz, separating the ms = 0 and

  8. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a technique to generate on-board volumetric-cine MRI (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling and on-board 2D-cine MRI. Methods One phase of a 4D-MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4D-MRI based on principal-component-analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2D-cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both XCAT simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from four real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using Volume-Percent-Difference(VPD), Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest(ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was on average 8.43±1.52% and the COMS was on average 0.93±0.58mm across all time-steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against noise levels up to SNR=20. For patient data, average tracking errors were less than 2 mm in all directions for all patients. Conclusions Preliminary studies demonstrated the

  9. Bilateral renal cell carcinoma in a horseshoe kidney: preoperative assessment with MRI and digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, R.A.; Soeldner, J.; Kaiser, W.A.; Steiner, T.; Schubert, J.

    1998-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma in a horseshoe kidney is an unusual entity. To our knowledge, only 123 cases have been published to date. We report the first bilateral case of two clear-cell carcinomas in an asymmetrically fused kidney. Optimum preservation of renal function after radical tumor removal requires accurate preoperative imaging. Since the vascular supply in fusion anomalies is extremely variable, angiography is mandatory. Magnetic resonance imaging was most suitable to predict the tumor extent and localization, because it simultaneously gave the most comprehensive anatomical overview of the malformation. (orig.)

  10. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibov, Tatiana T; Pavon, Lorena F; Miyaki, Liza A; Mamani, Javier B; Nucci, Leopoldo P; Alvarim, Larissa T; Silveira, Paulo H; Marti, Luciana C; Gamarra, LF

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh), their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC) with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson’s disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 105 cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model. PMID:24531365

  11. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibov, Tatiana T; Pavon, Lorena F; Miyaki, Liza A; Mamani, Javier B; Nucci, Leopoldo P; Alvarim, Larissa T; Silveira, Paulo H; Marti, Luciana C; Gamarra, Lf

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh), their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC) with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson's disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 10(5) cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model.

  12. Molecular Tracking of Proteolysis During Breast Cancer Cell Extravasation: Blockage by Therapeutic Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khokha, Rama

    2004-01-01

    ... (metastatic MDA- MB231 and non-metastatic MCF-7) transendothelial migration (TEM). Modulation of individual molecules demonstrates the functional cooperation of furin, cell surface adhesion molecules (alpha(sub v)Beta(sub3), CD44...

  13. MR tracking of stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic nanoparticles in ischemic brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Růžičková, Kateřina; Urdzíková, Lucia; Kroupová, Jana; Herynek, V.; Dvořák, Petr; Hájek, M.; Syková, Eva

    č. 2 (2003), s. 35 ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glia l Cell Function in Health and Disease /6./. Berlín, 03.09.2003-06.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA ČR GA304/03/1189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 111300004 Keywords : Stem cells * Nanoparticles Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.677, year: 2003

  14. Comparison of three fluorescence labeling and tracking methods of endothelial progenitor cells in laser-injured retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare three kinds of fluorescent probes for in vitro labeling and in vivo tracking of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in a mouse model of laser-induced retinal injury. METHODS: EPCs were isolated from human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and labeled with three different fluorescent probes: 5-(and-6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE, 1,1′-dilinoleyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindo-carbocyanine perchlorate linked acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-AcLDL, and green fluorescent protein (GFP. The fluorescent intensity of EPCs was examined by confocal microscopy. Survival rate of labeled EPCs was calculated with trypan blue staining, and their adhesive capability was assessed. A mouse model of retinal injury was induced by laser, and EPCs were injected into the vitreous cavity. Frozen section and fluorescein angiography on flat-mounted retinal samples was employed to track the labeled EPCs in vivo. RESULTS: EPCs labeled with CFSE and DiI-AcLDL exhibited an intense green and red fluorescence at the beginning; the fluorescence intensity decreased gradually to 20.23% and 49.99% respectively, after 28d. On the contrary, the florescent intensity of GFP-labeled EPCs increased in a time-dependent manner. All labeled EPCs showed normal morphology and no significant change in survival and adhesive capability. In the mouse model, transplantation of EPCs showed a protective effect against retinal injury. EPCs labeled with CFSE and DiI-AcLDL were successfully tracked in mice during the development of retinal injury and repair; however, GFP-labeled EPCs were not detected in the laser-injured mouse retina. CONCLUSION: The three fluorescent markers used in this study have their own set of advantages and disadvantages. CFSE and DiI-AcLDL are suitable for short-term EPC-labeling, while GFP should be used for long-term labeling. The choice of fluorescent markers should be guided by the purpose of the study.

  15. Chimeric Mouse model to track the migration of bone marrow derived cells in glioblastoma following anti-angiogenic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achyut, B R; Shankar, Adarsh; Iskander, A S M; Ara, Roxan; Knight, Robert A; Scicli, Alfonso G; Arbab, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) have been shown to contribute in the tumor development. In vivo animal models to investigate the role of BMDCs in tumor development are poorly explored. We established a novel chimeric mouse model using as low as 5 × 10(6) GFP+ BM cells in athymic nude mice, which resulted in >70% engraftment within 14 d. In addition, chimera was established in NOD-SCID mice, which displayed >70% with in 28 d. Since anti-angiogenic therapies (AAT) were used as an adjuvant against VEGF-VEGFR pathway to normalize blood vessels in glioblastoma (GBM), which resulted into marked hypoxia and recruited BMDCs to the tumor microenvironment (TME). We exploited chimeric mice in athymic nude background to develop orthotopic U251 tumor and tested receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and CXCR4 antagonist against GBM. We were able to track GFP+ BMDCs in the tumor brain using highly sensitive multispectral optical imaging instrument. Increased tumor growth associated with the infiltration of GFP+ BMDCs acquiring suppressive myeloid and endothelial phenotypes was seen in TME following treatments. Immunofluorescence study showed GFP+ cells accumulated at the site of VEGF, SDF1 and PDGF expression, and at the periphery of the tumors following treatments. In conclusion, we developed a preclinical chimeric model of GBM and phenotypes of tumor infiltrated BMDCs were investigated in context of AATs. Chimeric mouse model could be used to study detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms of interaction of BMDCs and TME in cancer.

  16. "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation": an interactive learning laboratory that communicates basic principles of genetics and cellular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J Michael

    2016-03-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients have the sickle cell genotype/phenotype using DNA and blood samples from wild-type and transgenic mice that carry a sickle cell mutation. The inquiry-based, problem-solving approach facilitates the students' understanding of the basic concepts of genetics and cellular and molecular biology and provides experience with contemporary tools of biotechnology. It also leads to students' appreciation of the causes and consequences of this genetic disease, which is relatively common in individuals of African descent, and increases their understanding of the first principles of genetics. This protocol provides optimal learning when led by well-trained facilitators (including the classroom teacher) and carried out in small groups (6:1 student-to-teacher ratio). This high-quality experience can be offered to a large number of students at a relatively low cost, and it is especially effective in collaboration with a local science museum and/or university. Over the past 15 yr, >12,000 students have completed this inquiry-based learning experience and demonstrated a consistent, substantial increase in their understanding of the disease and genetics in general. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  17. A study of V79 cell survival after for proton and carbon ion beams as represented by the parameters of Katz' track structure model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, Leszek; Waligórski, M. P. R.; Bassler, Niels

    different sets of data obtained for the same cell line and different ions, measured at different laboratories, we have fitted model parameters to a set of carbon-irradiated V79 cells, published by Furusawa et al. (2), and to a set of proton-irradiated V79 cells, published by Wouters et al. (3), separately....... We found that values of model parameters best fitted to the carbon data of Furusawa et al. yielded predictions of V79 survival after proton irradiation which did not match the V79 proton data of Wouters et al. Fitting parameters to both sets combined did not improve the accuracy of model predictions...... carbon irradiation. 1. Katz, R., Track structure in radiobiology and in radiation detection. Nuclear Track Detection 2: 1-28 (1978). 2. Furusawa Y. et al. Inactivation of aerobic and hypoxic cells from three different cell lines by accelerated 3He-, 12C- and 20Ne beams. Radiat Res. 2012 Jan; 177...

  18. Intrasplenic masses of ''preserved'' functioning splenic tissue in sickle cell disease: correlation of imaging findings (CT, ultrasound, MRI, and nuclear scintigraphy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, T.L.; Berdon, W.E.; Haller, J.O.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Hurlet-Jenson, A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose. We studied six patients with sickle cell disease (SSD), five homozygous for sickle cell anemia and one with sickle beta-thalassemia, in whom rounded intrasplenic masses proved to be preserved functioning splenic tissue. Materials and methods. Available images including computed tomography, ultrasonography, bone scans (Tc-99m MDP), liver spleen scans (Tc-99m sulfur colloid), and MRI were evaluated. Results. The masses were low density on CT (in an otherwise calcified spleen), hypoechoic relative to the echogenic spleen on US, and had the imaging characteristics of normal spleen on MRI. They failed to accumulate Tc-99m MDP but did demonstrate uptake of Tc-99m sulfur colloid. Conclusion. In a patient with SSD and intrasplenic masses, proper correlation of multiple imaging modalities will establish the diagnosis of functioning splenic tissue and avoid mistaken diagnosis of splenic abscess or infarction. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Intrasplenic masses of ``preserved`` functioning splenic tissue in sickle cell disease: correlation of imaging findings (CT, ultrasound, MRI, and nuclear scintigraphy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, T.L. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, 3959 Broadway, BHN 3-318, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Berdon, W.E. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, 3959 Broadway, BHN 3-318, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Haller, J.O. [Department of Radiology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, 3959 Broadway, BHN 3-318, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Hurlet-Jenson, A. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, New York (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Purpose. We studied six patients with sickle cell disease (SSD), five homozygous for sickle cell anemia and one with sickle beta-thalassemia, in whom rounded intrasplenic masses proved to be preserved functioning splenic tissue. Materials and methods. Available images including computed tomography, ultrasonography, bone scans (Tc-99m MDP), liver spleen scans (Tc-99m sulfur colloid), and MRI were evaluated. Results. The masses were low density on CT (in an otherwise calcified spleen), hypoechoic relative to the echogenic spleen on US, and had the imaging characteristics of normal spleen on MRI. They failed to accumulate Tc-99m MDP but did demonstrate uptake of Tc-99m sulfur colloid. Conclusion. In a patient with SSD and intrasplenic masses, proper correlation of multiple imaging modalities will establish the diagnosis of functioning splenic tissue and avoid mistaken diagnosis of splenic abscess or infarction. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Sensitivity of whole-body CT and MRI versus projection radiography in the detection of osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Maya B., E-mail: m.mueller-wolf@dkfz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Murray, Fritz, E-mail: fritz.murray@hotmail.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Kilk, Kerstin, E-mail: k_fechtner@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Hillengass, Jens, E-mail: jens.hillengass@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan, E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heiss, Christiane, E-mail: c.heiss@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Neben, Kai, E-mail: k.neben@klinikum-mittelbaden.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut, E-mail: hartmut.goldschmidt@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Tumour Diseases, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare sensitivity of whole-body Computed Tomography (wb-CT) and whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (wb-MRI) with Projection Radiography (PR) regarding each method's ability to detect osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease. Patients and methods: The bone status of 171 patients was evaluated. All patients presented with multiple myeloma (MM) of all stages, monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) or solitary plasmacytoma. Two groups were formed. Group A consisted of 52 patients (26 females, 26 males) with an average age of 62 years (range, 45–89 years) who received, both, PR and wb-CT as part of their diagnostic work-up. Group B comprised 119 patients (58 females, 61 males) averaging 57 years of age (range, 20–80 years) who received, both, PR and wb-MRI. Two experienced radiologists were blinded regarding the disease status and assessed the number and location of osteolyses in consensus. A distinction was made between axial and extra-axial lesions. Results: In group A, wb-CT revealed osteolyses in 12 patients (23%) that were not detected in PR. CT was superior in detecting lesions in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Compared with PR, wb-CT was significantly more sensitive in detecting osteolyses than PR (p < 0.001). This was particularly true for axial lesions. Additionally, CT revealed clinically relevant incidental findings in 33 patients (63%). In group B, wb-MRI revealed lesions in 19 patients (16%) that were not detected in PR. All lesions detected by PR were also detected by wb-MRI and wb-CT. Wb-MRI and wb-CT are each superior to PR in detecting axial lesions. Conclusion: Wb-CT can detect 23% more focal lesions than PR, especially in the axial skeleton. Therefore, this imaging method should be preferred over PR in the diagnostic work-up and staging of patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease.

  1. Thyroid cell irradiation by radioiodines: a new Monte Carlo electron track-structure code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, Christophe; Elbast, Mouhamad; Colas-Linhart, Nicole; Ting-Di Wu

    2007-01-01

    The most significant impact of the Chernobyl accident is the increased incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were exposed to short-lived radioiodines and 131-iodine. In order to accurately estimate the radiation dose provided by these radioiodines, it is necessary to know where iodine is incorporated. To do that, the distribution at the cellular level of newly organified iodine in the immature rat thyroid was performed using secondary ion mass microscopy (NanoSIMS 50 ). Actual dosimetric models take only into account the averaged energy and range of beta particles of the radio-elements and may, therefore, imperfectly describe the real distribution of dose deposit at the microscopic level around the point sources. Our approach is radically different since based on a track-structure Monte Carlo code allowing following-up of electrons down to low energies (∼= 10 eV) what permits a nanometric description of the irradiation physics. The numerical simulations were then performed by modelling the complete disintegrations of the short-lived iodine isotopes as well as of 131 I in new born rat thyroids in order to take into account accurate histological and biological data for the thyroid gland. (author)

  2. Using Sunlight and Cell Networks to Bring Fleeting Tracking to Small Scale Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garren, M.; Selbie, H.; Suchomel, D.; McDonald, W.; Solomon, D.

    2016-12-01

    Traditionally, the efforts of small scale fisheries have not been easily incorporated into the global picture of fishing effort and activity. That means that the activities of the vast majority ( 90%) of fishing vessels in the world have remained unquantified and largely opaque. With newly developed technology that harnesses solar power and cost-effective cellular networks to transmit data, it is becoming possible to provide vessel tracking systems on a large scale for vessels of all sizes. Furthermore, capitalizing on the relatively inexpensive cellular networks to transfer the data enables data of much higher granularity to be captured. By recording a vessel's position every few seconds, instead of minutes to hours as is typical of most satellite-based systems, we are able to resolve a diverse array of behaviors happening at sea including when and where fishing occurred and what type of fishing gear was used. This high granularity data is both incredibly useful and also a challenge to manage and mine. New approaches for handling and processing this continuous data stream of vessel positions are being developed to extract the most informative and actionable pieces of information for a variety of audiences including governing agencies, industry supply chains seeking transparency, non-profit organizations supporting conservation efforts, academic researchers and the fishers and boat owners.

  3. Germline Transgenic Methods for Tracking Cells and Testing Gene Function during Regeneration in the Axolotl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Shahryar; Schuez, Maritta; Richter, Tobias; Knapp, Dunja; Haigo, Saori L.; Sandoval-Guzmán, Tatiana; Hradlikova, Kristyna; Duemmler, Annett; Kerney, Ryan; Tanaka, Elly M.

    2013-01-01

    The salamander is the only tetrapod that regenerates complex body structures throughout life. Deciphering the underlying molecular processes of regeneration is fundamental for regenerative medicine and developmental biology, but the model organism had limited tools for molecular analysis. We describe a comprehensive set of germline transgenic strains in the laboratory-bred salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (axolotl) that open up the cellular and molecular genetic dissection of regeneration. We demonstrate tissue-dependent control of gene expression in nerve, Schwann cells, oligodendrocytes, muscle, epidermis, and cartilage. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of tamoxifen-induced Cre/loxP-mediated recombination to indelibly mark different cell types. Finally, we inducibly overexpress the cell-cycle inhibitor p16INK4a, which negatively regulates spinal cord regeneration. These tissue-specific germline axolotl lines and tightly inducible Cre drivers and LoxP reporter lines render this classical regeneration model molecularly accessible. PMID:24052945

  4. Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells: Physics and technology by alternative tracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea

    things: i) alternative solar absorbers (notably, Cu2SnS3) that are chemically related to CZTS and that have similar selling points; ii) other materials included in the device stack of CZTS solar cells. Here I list what I believe the main highlights of my work are. First, we achieve the highest reported...... power conversion eciency (5.2%) for a CZTS solar cell using pulsed laser deposition as a fabrication method for CZTS precursors. This is thanks to to joint work of PhD student Andrea Cazzaniga, PhD student Chang Yan (University of New South Wales, Australia) and myself. Perhaps more importantly, we...... finally understand, albeit very roughly, the "rules of the game" for successful pulsed laser deposition of high-quality chalcogenide precursors for solar cells. This kind of understanding is not evident in the existing literature and is mostly the result of the work of PhD student Andrea Cazzaniga. Second...

  5. Primary cerebral non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis: MRI and differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernemann, U.; Skalej, M.; Voigt, K. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Hermisson, M.; Platten, M. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Jaffe, R. [Pathology Department, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, 3705 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2002-09-01

    We report a young woman with primary cerebral non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the juvenile xanthogranuloma family. The clinical course was complicated by extensive infiltration of cranial nerves and meninges and epi- and intramedullary spinal dissemination. Whereas the cutaneous form of juvenile xanthogranuloma is usually benign and self-limited, central nervous system involvement is associated with high morbidity and mortality and might therefore be considered a separate clinical entity. (orig.)

  6. CT, MRI, and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings of abdominopelvic desmoplastic small round cell tumors: Correlation with histopathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weidong; Li Chuanxing; Liu Qingyu; Hu Yingying; Cao Yun; Huang Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of abdominopelvic desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) and to improve the diagnostic efficacy of these techniques for the detection of such tumor. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 7 cases of abdominopelvic DSRCT confirmed by histopathologic analysis. Among the 7 patients, 5 patients had undergone CT scanning, 2 of which were also examined with FDG-PET/CT imaging, and 2 had undergone MRI. Unenhanced and contrast-enhanced examinations were performed in all patients, and 2 patients had also undergone dynamic CT contrast-enhanced examinations. Image characteristics, such as shape, size, number, edge, attenuation, and intensity of each lesion before and after contrast enhancement were analyzed and compared with the pathomorphology of the tumors. Results: Multiple large masses in the abdominopelvis were detected in 6 cases, and a large mass in the pelvis was detected in 1 case. Six cases showed largest mass in pelvis, and 1 case in mesentery. None of the masses had a definite organ origin. CT showed soft tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense areas. MR T1-weighted images revealed lesions with mild hypointense areas and patchy hypointense areas in 2 cases and lesions with patchy hyperintense areas in 1 case. T2-weighted images showed lesions with mixed isointense and hyperintense areas in 1 case and lesions with mixed hypointense, isointense, and hyperintense areas in another. Contrast-enhanced CT and T1-weighted images showed mildly heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other associated findings included peritoneal seeding (n = 3), peritoneal effusions (n = 3), hepatic metastasis (n = 2), bone metastasis (n = 1), and mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n = 4). FDG-PET/CT showed multiple nodular foci of increased metabolic activity in the abdominopelvic masses, in the hepatic and

  7. Histogram analysis parameters identify multiple associations between DWI and DCE MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hans Jonas; Leifels, Leonard; Schob, Stefan; Garnov, Nikita; Surov, Alexey

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, multiparametric investigations of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are established. These approaches can better characterize tumor biology and behavior. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) can by means of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantitatively characterize different tissue compartments. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) reflects perfusion and vascularization of tissues. Recently, a novel approach of data acquisition, namely histogram analysis of different images is a novel diagnostic approach, which can provide more information of tissue heterogeneity. The purpose of this study was to analyze possible associations between DWI, and DCE parameters derived from histogram analysis in patients with HNSCC. Overall, 34 patients, 9 women and 25 men, mean age, 56.7±10.2years, with different HNSCC were involved in the study. DWI was obtained by using of an axial echo planar imaging sequence with b-values of 0 and 800s/mm 2 . Dynamic T1w DCE sequence after intravenous application of contrast medium was performed for estimation of the following perfusion parameters: volume transfer constant (K trans ), volume of the extravascular extracellular leakage space (Ve), and diffusion of contrast medium from the extravascular extracellular leakage space back to the plasma (Kep). Both ADC and perfusion parameters maps were processed offline in DICOM format with custom-made Matlab-based application. Thereafter, polygonal ROIs were manually drawn on the transferred maps on each slice. For every parameter, mean, maximal, minimal, and median values, as well percentiles 10th, 25th, 75th, 90th, kurtosis, skewness, and entropy were estimated. Сorrelation analysis identified multiple statistically significant correlations between the investigated parameters. Ve related parameters correlated well with different ADC values. Especially, percentiles 10 and 75, mode, and median values showed stronger correlations in comparison to other

  8. Engineered core-shell magnetic nanoparticle for MR dual-modal tracking and safe magnetic manipulation of ependymal cells in live rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yung-Kang; Lui, Cathy N. P.; Chen, Yu-Wei; Chou, Shang-Wei; Chou, Pi-Tai; Yung, Ken K. L.; Edman Tsang, S. C.

    2018-01-01

    Tagging recognition group(s) on superparamagnetic iron oxide is known to aid localisation (imaging), stimulation and separation of biological entities using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic agitation/separation (MAS) techniques. Despite the wide applicability of iron oxide nanoparticles in T 2-weighted MRI and MAS, the quality of the images and safe manipulation of the exceptionally delicate neural cells in a live brain are currently the key challenges. Here, we demonstrate the engineered manganese oxide clusters-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticle as an MR dual-modal contrast agent for neural stem cells (NSCs) imaging and magnetic manipulation in live rodents. As a result, using this engineered nanoparticle and associated technologies, identification, stimulation and transportation of labelled potentially multipotent NSCs from a specific location of a live brain to another by magnetic means for self-healing therapy can therefore be made possible.

  9. Cell tracking in cardiac repair: What to image and how to image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ruggiero (Alessandro); D.L.J. Thorek (Daniel L.J.); J. Guenoun (Jamal); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); M.R. Bernsen (Monique)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractStem cell therapies hold the great promise and interest for cardiac regeneration among scientists, clinicians and patients. However, advancement and distillation of a standard treatment regimen are not yet finalised. Into this breach step recent developments in the imaging biosciences.

  10. Labeling human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes for tracking with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, Rosalinda T.; Daldrup-Link, Heike [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford School of Medicine, Pediatric Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Boddington, Sophie; Wendland, Mike; Mandrussow, Lydia [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Henning, Tobias D. [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Cologne (Germany); Liu, Siyuan [National Institutes of Health, Language Section, Voice, Speech and Language Branch, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can generate cardiomyocytes (CM), which offer promising treatments for cardiomyopathies in children. However, challenges for clinical translation result from loss of transplanted cell from target sites and high cell death. An imaging technique that noninvasively and repetitively monitors transplanted hESC-CM could guide improvements in transplantation techniques and advance therapies. To develop a clinically applicable labeling technique for hESC-CM with FDA-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) by examining labeling before and after CM differentiation. Triplicates of hESC were labeled by simple incubation with 50 {mu}g/ml of ferumoxides before or after differentiation into CM, then imaged on a 7T MR scanner using a T2-weighted multi-echo spin-echo sequence. Viability, iron uptake and T2-relaxation times were compared between groups using t-tests. hESC-CM labeled before differentiation demonstrated significant MR effects, iron uptake and preserved function. hESC-CM labeled after differentiation showed no significant iron uptake or change in MR signal (P < 0.05). Morphology, differentiation and viability were consistent between experimental groups. hESC-CM should be labeled prior to CM differentiation to achieve a significant MR signal. This technique permits monitoring delivery and engraftment of hESC-CM for potential advancements of stem cell-based therapies in the reconstitution of damaged myocardium. (orig.)

  11. Genome-wide tracking of unmethylated DNA Alu repeats in normal and cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Jairo; Vives, Laura; Jordà, Mireia

    2008-01-01

    Methylation of the cytosine is the most frequent epigenetic modification of DNA in mammalian cells. In humans, most of the methylated cytosines are found in CpG-rich sequences within tandem and interspersed repeats that make up to 45% of the human genome, being Alu repeats the most common family....

  12. Labeling human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes for tracking with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, Rosalinda T.; Daldrup-Link, Heike; Boddington, Sophie; Wendland, Mike; Mandrussow, Lydia; Henning, Tobias D.; Liu, Siyuan

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can generate cardiomyocytes (CM), which offer promising treatments for cardiomyopathies in children. However, challenges for clinical translation result from loss of transplanted cell from target sites and high cell death. An imaging technique that noninvasively and repetitively monitors transplanted hESC-CM could guide improvements in transplantation techniques and advance therapies. To develop a clinically applicable labeling technique for hESC-CM with FDA-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) by examining labeling before and after CM differentiation. Triplicates of hESC were labeled by simple incubation with 50 μg/ml of ferumoxides before or after differentiation into CM, then imaged on a 7T MR scanner using a T2-weighted multi-echo spin-echo sequence. Viability, iron uptake and T2-relaxation times were compared between groups using t-tests. hESC-CM labeled before differentiation demonstrated significant MR effects, iron uptake and preserved function. hESC-CM labeled after differentiation showed no significant iron uptake or change in MR signal (P < 0.05). Morphology, differentiation and viability were consistent between experimental groups. hESC-CM should be labeled prior to CM differentiation to achieve a significant MR signal. This technique permits monitoring delivery and engraftment of hESC-CM for potential advancements of stem cell-based therapies in the reconstitution of damaged myocardium. (orig.)

  13. The Impact of the Geometrical Structure of the DNA on Parameters of the Track-Event Theory for Radiation Induced Cell Kill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Schneider

    Full Text Available When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. An alternative to the LQ-model is the track-event theory which is based on the probabilities for one- and two two-track events. A one-track-event (OTE is always represented by at least two simultaneous double strand breaks. A two-track-event (TTE results in one double strand break. Therefore at least two two-track-events on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event which leads to cell sterilization. It is obvious that the probabilities of OTEs and TTEs must somehow depend on the geometrical structure of the chromatin. In terms of the track-event theory the ratio ε of the probabilities of OTEs and TTEs includes the geometrical dependence and is obtained in this work by simple Monte Carlo simulations.For this work it was assumed that the anchors of loop forming chromatin are most sensitive to radiation induced cell deaths. Therefore two adjacent tetranucleosomes representing the loop anchors were digitized. The probability ratio ε of OTEs and TTEs was factorized into a radiation quality dependent part and a geometrical part: ε = εion ∙ εgeo. εgeo was obtained for two situations, by applying Monte Carlo simulation for DNA on the tetranucleosomes itself and for linker DNA. Low energy electrons were represented by randomly distributed ionizations and high energy electrons by ionizations which were simulated on rays. εion was determined for electrons by using results from nanodosimetric measurements. The calculated ε was compared to the ε obtained from fits of the track event model to 42 sets of experimental human cell survival data.When the two tetranucleosomes are in direct contact and the hits are randomly distributed εgeo and ε are 0.12 and 0.85, respectively. When the hits are simulated on rays

  14. Suture Granuloma Mimicking Renal Cell Carcinoma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Pathologic Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim İlker Öz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Solid renal masses are generally distinguished with contrast enhancement and intratumoral fatty foci by radiological examinations. The present of enhancement is most important criteria for diagnosis of malignant lesions. Generally, a contrast enhanced solid mass in kidney is accepted as a neoplasm. Foreign body granuloma is an extraordinary cause of enhanced solid renal mass. This case of a renal suture granuloma demonstrated peripheral enhanced exophytic renal mass mimic renal cell carcinoma, and underwent surgery. At the solid renal mass with different radiological features, biopsy is an option to determining the necessity of surgery as well as the surgical approach.

  15. Nanoparticle Labeling of Bone Marrow-Derived Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Their Use in Differentiation and Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Akhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are promising candidates for cellular therapies due to their ability to migrate to damaged tissue without inducing immune reaction. Many techniques have been developed to trace MSCs and their differentiation efficacy; however, all of these methods have limitations. Conjugated polymer based water-dispersible nanoparticles (CPN represent a new class of probes because they offer high brightness, improved photostability, high fluorescent quantum yield, and noncytotoxicity comparing to conventional dyes and quantum dots. We aimed to use this tool for tracing MSCs’ fate in vitro and in vivo. MSC marker expression, survival, and differentiation capacity were assessed upon CPN treatment. Our results showed that after CPN labeling, MSC markers did not change and significant number of cells were found to be viable as revealed by MTT. Fluorescent signals were retained for 3 weeks after they were differentiated into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. We also showed that the labeled MSCs migrated to the site of injury and retained their labels in an in vivo liver regeneration model. The utilization of nanoparticle could be a promising tool for the tracking of MSCs in vivo and in vitro and therefore can be a useful tool to understand differentiation and homing mechanisms of MSCs.

  16. Tracking the Oxygen Status in the Cell Nucleus with a Hoechst-Tagged Phosphorescent Ruthenium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Daiki; Umehara, Yui; Son, Aoi; Asahi, Wataru; Misu, Sotaro; Kurihara, Ryohsuke; Kondo, Teruyuki; Tanabe, Kazuhito

    2018-05-04

    Molecular oxygen in living cells is distributed and consumed inhomogeneously, depending on the activity of each organelle. Therefore, tractable methods that can be used to monitor the oxygen status in each organelle are needed to understand cellular function. Here we report the design of a new oxygen-sensing probe for use in the cell nucleus. We prepared "Ru-Hoechsts", each consisting of a phosphorescent ruthenium complex linked to a Hoechst 33258 moiety, and characterized their properties as oxygen sensors. The Hoechst unit shows strong DNA-binding properties in the nucleus, and the ruthenium complex shows oxygen-dependent phosphorescence. Thus, Ru-Hoechsts accumulated in the cell nucleus and showed oxygen-dependent signals that could be monitored. Of the Ru-Hoechsts prepared in this study, Ru-Hoechst b, in which the ruthenium complex and the Hoechst unit were linked through a hexyl chain, showed the most suitable properties for monitoring the oxygen status. Ru-Hoechsts are probes with high potential for visualizing oxygen fluctuations in the nucleus. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Tracking cell surface mobility of GPCRs using α-bungarotoxin-linked fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Saad; Wilkins, Megan E; Thomas, Philip; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-01-01

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Cell surface mobility of GABA(B) receptors is a key determinant of the efficacy of slow and prolonged synaptic inhibition initiated by GABA. Therefore, experimentally monitoring receptor mobility and how this can be regulated is of primary importance for understanding the roles of GABA(B) receptors in the brain, and how they may be therapeutically exploited. Unusually for a GPCR, heterodimerization between the R1 and R2 subunits is required for the cell surface expression and signaling by prototypical GABA(B) receptors. Here, we describe a minimal epitope-tagging method, based on the incorporation of an α-bungarotoxin binding site (BBS) into the GABA(B) receptor, to study receptor internalization in live cells using a range of imaging approaches. We demonstrate how this technique can be adapted by modifying the BBS to monitor the simultaneous movement of both R1 and R2 subunits, revealing that GABA(B) receptors are internalized as heteromers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. SU-D-210-04: Using Radiotherapy Biomaterials to Brand and Track Deadly Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altundal, Y; Sajo, E [Univ Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Ngwa, W [Univ Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Metastasis accounts for over 90% of all cancer associated suffering and death and arguably presents the most formidable challenges in cancer management. The detection of metastatic or rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood or lymph nodes remains a formidable technological challenge. In this study, we investigated the time needed to label each cancer cell in-situ (right at the source tumor) with sufficient number of GNPs that will allow enhanced non-invasive detection via photoacoustic imaging in the lymph nodes. Such in-situ labeling can be achieved via sustained release of the GNPs from Radiotherapy (RT) biomaterials (e.g. fiducials, spacers) coated/loaded with the GNP. Methods: The minimum concentration (1000 GNPs/cell for 50nm GNPs) to detect GNPs with photoacoustic imaging method was experimentally measured by Mallidi et al. and fixed at the tumor sub-volume periphery. In this work, the GNPs were assumed to diffuse from a point source, placed in the middle of a 2–3cm tumor, with an initial concentration of 7–30 mg/g. The time required to label the cells with GNPs was calculated by solving the three dimensional diffusion-reaction equation analytically. The diffusion coefficient of 10nm GNPs was experimentally determined previously. Stokes-Einstein equation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for other sizes (2–50nm) of GNPs. The cellular uptake rate constants for several sizes of GNPs were experimentally measured by Jin et al. Results: The time required to label the cells was found 0.635–15.91 days for 2–50nm GNPs with an initial concentration of 7 mg/g GNPs in a 2 cm tumor; 1.379–34.633 days for 2–50nm GNPs with an initial concentration of 30 mg/g GNPs in a 3cm tumor. Conclusion: Our results highlight new potential for labeling CTCs with GNPs released from smart RT biomaterials (i.e. fiducials or spacers loaded with the GNP) towards enhanced non-invasive imaging/detection via photoacoustic imaging.

  19. SU-D-210-04: Using Radiotherapy Biomaterials to Brand and Track Deadly Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altundal, Y; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Metastasis accounts for over 90% of all cancer associated suffering and death and arguably presents the most formidable challenges in cancer management. The detection of metastatic or rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood or lymph nodes remains a formidable technological challenge. In this study, we investigated the time needed to label each cancer cell in-situ (right at the source tumor) with sufficient number of GNPs that will allow enhanced non-invasive detection via photoacoustic imaging in the lymph nodes. Such in-situ labeling can be achieved via sustained release of the GNPs from Radiotherapy (RT) biomaterials (e.g. fiducials, spacers) coated/loaded with the GNP. Methods: The minimum concentration (1000 GNPs/cell for 50nm GNPs) to detect GNPs with photoacoustic imaging method was experimentally measured by Mallidi et al. and fixed at the tumor sub-volume periphery. In this work, the GNPs were assumed to diffuse from a point source, placed in the middle of a 2–3cm tumor, with an initial concentration of 7–30 mg/g. The time required to label the cells with GNPs was calculated by solving the three dimensional diffusion-reaction equation analytically. The diffusion coefficient of 10nm GNPs was experimentally determined previously. Stokes-Einstein equation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for other sizes (2–50nm) of GNPs. The cellular uptake rate constants for several sizes of GNPs were experimentally measured by Jin et al. Results: The time required to label the cells was found 0.635–15.91 days for 2–50nm GNPs with an initial concentration of 7 mg/g GNPs in a 2 cm tumor; 1.379–34.633 days for 2–50nm GNPs with an initial concentration of 30 mg/g GNPs in a 3cm tumor. Conclusion: Our results highlight new potential for labeling CTCs with GNPs released from smart RT biomaterials (i.e. fiducials or spacers loaded with the GNP) towards enhanced non-invasive imaging/detection via photoacoustic imaging

  20. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibov TT

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tatiana T Sibov,1,2 Lorena F Pavon,1 Liza A Miyaki,1 Javier B Mamani,1 Leopoldo P Nucci,1,2 Larissa T Alvarim,1,3 Paulo H Silveira,1 Luciana C Marti,1 LF Gamarra1–31Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Departamento de Neurologia e Neurociências, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh, their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson's disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 105 cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles, Rhodamine, magnetic resonance imaging, Parkinson's disease

  1. Cell tracking and therapy evaluation of bone marrow monocytes and stromal cells using SPECT and CMR in a canine model of myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrifield Peter

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical application of stem cell therapy for myocardial infarction will require the development of methods to monitor treatment and pre-clinical assessment in a large animal model, to determine its effectiveness and the optimum cell population, route of delivery, timing, and flow milieu. Objectives To establish a model for a in vivo tracking to monitor cell engraftment after autologous transplantation and b concurrent measurement of infarct evolution and remodeling. Methods We evaluated 22 dogs (8 sham controls, 7 treated with autologous bone marrow monocytes, and 7 with stromal cells using both imaging of 111Indium-tropolone labeled cells and late gadolinium enhancement CMR for up to12 weeks after a 3 hour coronary occlusion. Hearts were also examined using immunohistochemistry for capillary density and presence of PKH26 labeled cells. Results In vivo Indium imaging demonstrated an effective biological clearance half-life from the injection site of ~5 days. CMR demonstrated a pattern of progressive infarct shrinkage over 12 weeks, ranging from 67–88% of baseline values with monocytes producing a significant treatment effect. Relative infarct shrinkage was similar through to 6 weeks in all groups, following which the treatment effect was manifest. There was a trend towards an increase in capillary density with cell treatment. Conclusion This multi-modality approach will allow determination of the success and persistence of engraftment, and a correlation of this with infarct size shrinkage, regional function, and left ventricular remodeling. There were overall no major treatment effects with this particular model of transplantation immediately post-infarct.

  2. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  3. Local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after radio(chemo)therapy: Diagnostic performance of FDG-PET/MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Minerva; Varoquaux, Arthur D; Combescure, Christophe; Rager, Olivier; Pusztaszeri, Marc; Burkhardt, Karim; Delattre, Bénédicte M A; Dulguerov, Pavel; Dulguerov, Nicolas; Katirtzidou, Eirini; Caparrotti, Francesca; Ratib, Osman; Zaidi, Habib; Becker, Christoph D

    2018-02-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET/MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging (FDG-PET/DWIMRI) for detection and local staging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after radio(chemo)therapy. This was a prospective study that included 74 consecutive patients with previous radio(chemo)therapy for HNSCC and in whom tumour recurrence or radiation-induced complications were suspected clinically. The patients underwent hybrid PET/MRI examinations with morphological MRI, DWI and FDG-PET. Experienced readers blinded to clinical/histopathological data evaluated images according to established diagnostic criteria taking into account the complementarity of multiparametric information. The standard of reference was histopathology with whole-organ sections and follow-up ≥24 months. Statistical analysis considered data clustering. The proof of diagnosis was histology in 46/74 (62.2%) patients and follow-up (mean ± SD = 34 ± 8 months) in 28/74 (37.8%). Thirty-eight patients had 43 HNSCCs and 46 patients (10 with and 36 without tumours) had 62 benign lesions/complications. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of PET/DWIMRI were 97.4%, 91.7%, 92.5% and 97.1% per patient, and 93.0%, 93.5%, 90.9%, and 95.1% per lesion, respectively. Agreement between imaging-based and pathological T-stage was excellent (kappa = 0.84, p recurrence. • Prospective one-centre study showed excellent agreement between imaging-based and pathological T-stage. • 97.5% of positive concordant MRI, DWI and FDG-PET results correspond to recurrence. • 87% of discordant MRI, DWI and FDG-PET results correspond to benign lesions. • Multiparametric FDG-PET/DWIMRI facilitates planning of salvage surgery in the irradiated neck.

  4. Simultaneous Multi-Species Tracking in Live Cells with Quantum Dot Conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. P.; Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Ballou, B.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum dots are available in a range of spectrally separated emission colors and with a range of water-stabilizing surface coatings that offers great flexibility for enabling bio-specificity. In this study, we have taken advantage of this flexibility to demonstrate that it is possible to perform...... a simultaneous investigation of the lateral dynamics in the plasma membrane of i) the transmembrane epidermal growth factor receptor, ii) the glucosylphospatidylinositol-anchored protein CD59, and iii) ganglioside G(M1)-cholera toxin subunit B clusters in a single cell. We show that a large number...

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Eight-logic memory cell based on multiferroic junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Zhou, Y. C.; Tang, M. H.; Liu, Fen; Ma, Ying; Zheng, X. J.; Zhao, W. F.; Xu, H. Y.; Sun, Z. H.

    2009-04-01

    A model is proposed for a device combining a multiferroic tunnel junction with a magnetoelectric (ME) film in which the magnetic configuration is controlled by the electric field. Calculations embodying the Green's function approach show that the magnetic polarization can be switched on and off by an electric field in the ME film due to the effect of elastic coupling interaction. Using a model including the spin-filter effect and screening of polarization charges, we have produced eight logic states of tunnelling resistance in the tunnel junction and have obtained corresponding laws that control them. The results provide some insights into the realization of an eight-logic memory cell.

  6. Thyroid cell irradiation by radioiodines: a new Monte Carlo electron track-structure code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Champion

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The most significant impact of the Chernobyl accident is the increased incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were exposed to short-lived radioiodines and 131-iodine. In order to accurately estimate the radiation dose provided by these radioiodines, it is necessary to know where iodine is incorporated. To do that, the distribution at the cellular level of newly organified iodine in the immature rat thyroid was performed using secondary ion mass microscopy (NanoSIMS50. Actual dosimetric models take only into account the averaged energy and range of beta particles of the radio-elements and may, therefore, imperfectly describe the real distribution of dose deposit at the microscopic level around the point sources. Our approach is radically different since based on a track-structure Monte Carlo code allowing following-up of electrons down to low energies (~ 10eV what permits a nanometric description of the irradiation physics. The numerical simulations were then performed by modelling the complete disintegrations of the short-lived iodine isotopes as well as of 131I in new born rat thyroids in order to take into account accurate histological and biological data for the thyroid gland.O impacto mais significante do acidente de Chernobyl é o crescimento da incidência de câncer de tireóide em crianças que foram expostas a radioiodos de vida curta e ao Iodo-131. Na estimativa precisa da dose de radiação fornecida por esses radioiodos, é necessário conhecer onde o iodo está incorporado. Para obtermos esse resultado, a distribuição em nível celular de iodo recentemente organificado na tireóde de ratos imaturos foi realizada usando microscopia de massa iônica secundária (NanoSIMS50. Modelos dosimétricos atuais consideram apenas a energia média das partículas beta dos radioelementos e pode, imperfeitamente descrever a distribuição real de dose ao nível microscópico em torno dos pontos pesquisados. Nossa abordagem

  7. Click chemistry-based tracking reveals putative cell wall-located auxin binding sites in expanding cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mravec, J.; Kračun, S. K.; Zemlyanskaya, E.; Rydahl, M. G.; Guo, X.; Pičmanová, M.; Sørensen, K.; Růžička, Kamil; Willats, W.G.T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, NOV 22 (2017), č. článku 15988. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : MEMBRANE H+-ATPASE * BIOLOGICAL-ACTIVITY * AZIDO AUXINS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  8. Visualization of transverse diffusion paths across fiber cells of the ocular lens by small animal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaghefi, Ehsan; Hunter, Peter J; Jacobs, Marc D; Pontre, Beau; Donaldson, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    The sense of vision requires that light penetrate through the ocular lens. Experiments, performed and published by many research groups, have suggested that the lens, which has no blood vessels, relies on internally directed ion and water fluxes for its circulation, survival and transparency. We investigated the internal diffusive pathways of the lens in order to better understand the constraints that may be operating on directional lens fluxes. Small animal magnetic resonance imaging, including T2-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging, was used to measure tissue properties and diffusivity throughout cultured bovine lenses. A range of concentric regions of signal intensity was distinguished inside the lens, by both T2-weighted signal and mean diffusivity. Diffusivity mapping of the lens revealed novel anisotropic polar and equatorial zones of pronounced diffusivity directed transverse to the fiber cells. In contrast, an inner zone including the lens nucleus showed isotropic and weak diffusivity. Our results lend support to models of internally directed lens micro-circulation, by placing non-structural diffusive constraints on global patterns of fluid circulation

  9. Detection of Local Tumor Recurrence After Definitive Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Histogram Analysis of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced T1-Weighted Perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Young Jun; Park, Ji Eun; Sung, Yu Sub; Kim, Namkug; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the added value of histogram analysis of the ratio of initial to final 90-second time-signal intensity AUC (AUCR) for differentiating local tumor recurrence from contrast-enhancing scar on follow-up dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI of patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AUCR histogram parameters were assessed among tumor recurrence (n = 19) and contrast-enhancing scar (n = 27) at primary sites and compared using the t test. ROC analysis was used to determine the best differentiating parameters. The added value of AUCR histogram parameters was assessed when they were added to inconclusive conventional MRI results. Histogram analysis showed statistically significant differences in the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of the AUCR values between the two groups (p Histogram analysis of AUCR can improve the diagnostic yield for local tumor recurrence during surveillance after treatment for HNSCC.

  10. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  11. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  12. Image to physical space registration of supine breast MRI for image guided breast surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Rebekah H.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a desirable option for many women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and involves a lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy. However, approximately 50% of eligible women will elect for mastectomy over BCT despite equal survival benefit (provided margins of excised tissue are cancer free) due to uncertainty in outcome with regards to complete excision of cancerous cells, risk of local recurrence, and cosmesis. Determining surgical margins intraoperatively is difficult and achieving negative margins is not as robust as it needs to be, resulting in high re-operation rates and often mastectomy. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) can provide detailed information about tumor margin extents, however diagnostic images are acquired in a fundamentally different patient presentation than that used in surgery. Therefore, the high quality diagnostic MRIs taken in the prone position with pendant breast are not optimal for use in surgical planning/guidance due to the drastic shape change between preoperative images and the common supine surgical position. This work proposes to investigate the value of supine MRI in an effort to localize tumors intraoperatively using image-guidance. Mock intraoperative setups (realistic patient positioning in non-sterile environment) and preoperative imaging data were collected from a patient scheduled for a lumpectomy. The mock intraoperative data included a tracked laser range scan of the patient's breast surface, tracked center points of MR visible fiducials on the patient's breast, and tracked B-mode ultrasound and strain images. The preoperative data included a supine MRI with visible fiducial markers. Fiducial markers localized in the MRI were rigidly registered to their mock intraoperative counterparts using an optically tracked stylus. The root mean square (RMS) fiducial registration error using the tracked markers was 3.4mm. Following registration, the average closest point distance between the MR

  13. 2D ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor for tracking of cells proliferation and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Ding, Changqin; Zhou, Jie; Tian, Yang

    2015-08-15

    Extracellular pH plays a vital role no matter in physiological or pathological studies. In this work, a hydrogel, CD@Nile-FITC@Gel (Gel sensor), entrapping the ratiometric fluorescent probe CD@Nile-FITC was developed. The Gel sensor was successfully used for real-time extracellular pH monitoring. In the case of CD@Nile-FITC, pH-sensitive fluorescent dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was chosen as the response signal for H(+) and Nile blue chloride (Nile) as the reference signal. The developed fluorescent probe exhibited high selectivity for pH over other metal ions and amino acids. Meanwhile, the carbon-dots-based inorganic-organic probe demonstrated excellent photostability against long-term light illumination. In order to study the extracellular pH change in processes of cell proliferation and metabolism, CD@Nile-FITC probe was entrapped in sodium alginate gel and consequently formed CD@Nile-FITC@Gel. The MTT assay showed low cytotoxicity of the Gel and the pH titration indicated that it could monitor the pH fluctuations linearly and rapidly within the pH range of 6.0-9.0, which is valuable for physiological pH determination. As expected, the real-time bioimaging of the probe was successfully achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. T cell-based tracking of multidrug resistant tuberculosis infection after brief exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richeldi, Luca; Ewer, Katie; Losi, Monica; Bergamini, Barbara M; Roversi, Pietro; Deeks, Jonathan; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Lalvani, Ajit

    2004-08-01

    Molecular epidemiology indicates significant transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after casual contact with infectious tuberculosis cases. We investigated M. tuberculosis transmission after brief exposure using a T cell-based assay, the enzyme-linked-immunospot (ELISPOT) for IFN-gamma. After childbirth, a mother was diagnosed with sputum smear-positive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Forty-one neonates and 47 adults were present during her admission on the maternity unit; 11 weeks later, all underwent tuberculin skin testing (TST) and ELISPOT. We correlated test results with markers of exposure to the index case. The participants, who were asymptomatic and predominantly had no prior tuberculosis exposure, had 6.05 hours mean exposure (range: 0-65 hours) to the index case. Seventeen individuals, including two newborns, were ELISPOT-positive, and ELISPOT results correlated significantly with three of four predefined measures of tuberculosis exposure. For each hour sharing room air with the index case, the odds of a positive ELISPOT result increased by 1.05 (95% CI: 1.02-1.09, p = 0.003). Only four adults were TST-positive and TST results did not correlate with exposure. Thus, ELISPOT, but not TST, suggested quite extensive nosocomial transmission of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis after brief exposure. These results help to explain the apparent importance of casual contact for tuberculosis transmission, and may have implications for prevention.

  15. Implementation of a new blood cooler insert and tracking technology with educational initiatives and its effect on reducing red blood cell wastage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Emery, Wanda; Simmons, Julie H; Jones, Mary Rose; Pomper, Gregory J

    2017-10-01

    The objective was to report a successful implementation of a blood cooler insert and tracking technology with educational initiatives and its effect on reducing red blood cell (RBC) wastage. The blood bank database was used to quantify and categorize total RBC units issued in blood coolers from January 2010 to December 2015 with and without the new inserts throughout the hospital. Radiofrequency identification tags were used with special software to monitor blood cooler tracking. An educational policy on how to handle the coolers was initiated. Data were gathered from the software that provided a real-time location monitoring of the blood coolers with inserts throughout the institution. The implementation of the blood cooler with inserts and tracking device reduced mean yearly RBC wastage by fourfold from 0.64% to 0.17% between 2010 and 2015. The conserved RBCs corresponded to a total cost savings of $167,844 during the 3-year postimplementation period. The implementation of new blood cooler inserts, tracking system, and educational initiatives substantially reduced the mean annual total RBC wastage. The cost to implement this initiative may be small if there is an existing institutional infrastructure to monitor and track hospital equipment into which the blood bank intervention can be adapted when compared to the cost of blood wastage. © 2017 AABB.

  16. Hierarchical Load Tracking Control of a Grid-Connected Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Maximum Electrical Efficiency Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the benchmark solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC dynamic model for power system studies and the analysis of the SOFC operating conditions, the nonlinear programming (NLP optimization method was used to determine the maximum electrical efficiency of the grid-connected SOFC subject to the constraints of fuel utilization factor, stack temperature and output active power. The optimal operating conditions of the grid-connected SOFC were obtained by solving the NLP problem considering the power consumed by the air compressor. With the optimal operating conditions of the SOFC for the maximum efficiency operation obtained at different active power output levels, a hierarchical load tracking control scheme for the grid-connected SOFC was proposed to realize the maximum electrical efficiency operation with the stack temperature bounded. The hierarchical control scheme consists of a fast active power control and a slower stack temperature control. The active power control was developed by using a decentralized control method. The efficiency of the proposed hierarchical control scheme was demonstrated by case studies using the benchmark SOFC dynamic model.

  17. Nanomaterials and MRI molecular probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Toshiro

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the current state and future prospect of enhancing probes in MRI which enable to image specific cells and molecules mainly from the aspect of cell trafficking. Although MRI requires such probes for specific imaging, it has an advantage that anatomical images are simultaneously available even during surgical operation without radiation exposure, differing from X-CT, -transillumination and positron emission tomography (PET). In the development of novel MRI molecular probes, the recent topic concerns the cell trafficking biology where cells related with transplantation and immunological therapy can be traced. Although superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) has been used as a commercially available enhancer, this nanoparticle has problems like a difficulty to penetrate cell, cytotoxicity and others. For these, authors have developed the nanoparticle SPIO covered with silica shell, which can be chemically modified, e.g., by binding fluorescent pigments to possibly allow MR bimodal molecular imaging. For penetration of particles in cells, envelop of Sendai virus is used. PET-CT has been more popular these days; however, MRI is superior to CT for imaging soft tissues, and development of PET-MRI is actively under progress aiming the multi-modal imaging. At present, molecular probes for MRI are certainly not so many as those for PET and cooperative efforts to develop the probes are required in medical, technological and pharmaceutical fields. (R.T.)

  18. Dual-wavelength OR-PAM with compressed sensing for cell tracking in a 3D cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rou-Xuan; Fu, Ying; Liu, Wang; Ma, Yu-Ting; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Chen, Shu-Ching; Sun, Mingjian; Li, Pai-Chi

    2018-02-01

    Monitoring dynamic interactions of T cells migrating toward tumor is beneficial to understand how cancer immunotherapy works. Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope (OR-PAM) can provide not only high spatial resolution but also deeper penetration than conventional optical microscopy. With the aid of exogenous contrast agents, the dual-wavelength OR-PAM can be applied to map the distribution of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) with gold nanospheres (AuNS) under 523nm laser irradiation and Hepta1-6 tumor spheres with indocyanine green (ICG) under 800nm irradiation. However, at 1K laser PRF, it takes approximately 20 minutes to obtain a full sample volume of 160 × 160 × 150 μm3 . To increase the imaging rate, we propose a random non-uniform sparse sampling mechanism to achieve fast sparse photoacoustic data acquisition. The image recovery process is formulated as a low-rank matrix recovery (LRMR) based on compressed sensing (CS) theory. We show that it could be stably recovered via nuclear-norm minimization optimization problem to maintain image quality from a significantly fewer measurement. In this study, we use the dual-wavelength OR-PAM with CS to visualize T cell trafficking in a 3D culture system with higher temporal resolution. Data acquisition time is reduced by 40% in such sample volume where sampling density is 0.5. The imaging system reveals the potential to understand the dynamic cellular process for preclinical screening of anti-cancer drugs.

  19. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerholm, B Christoffer; Eggeling, Christian; Andrade, Débora M; Clausen, Mathias P

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy. However, a major disparity in interpretation of data from SPT and STED-FCS remains, namely the proposed existence of a very fast (unhindered) lateral diffusion coefficient, ⩾5 µ m 2 s −1 , in the plasma membrane of live cells at very short length scales, ≈⩽ 100 nm, and time scales, ≈1–10 ms. This fast diffusion coefficient has been advocated in several high-speed SPT studies, for lipids and membrane proteins alike, but the equivalent has not been detected in STED-FCS measurements. Resolving this ambiguity is important because the assessment of membrane dynamics currently relies heavily on SPT for the determination of heterogeneous diffusion. A possible systematic error in this approach would thus have vast implications in this field. To address this, we have re-visited the analysis procedure for SPT data with an emphasis on the measurement errors and the effect that these errors have on the measurement outputs. We subsequently demonstrate that STED-FCS and SPT data, following careful consideration of the experimental errors of the SPT data, converge to a common interpretation which for the case of a diffusing phospholipid analogue in the plasma membrane of live mouse embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of  ≈0.7–1.0 µ m 2 s −1 , and a compartment size of about 100–150 nm. (topical review)

  20. Labeling Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Gold Nanocages for in vitro and in vivo Tracking by Two-Photon Microscopy and Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Wang, Yu; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Yucai; Cai, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell tracking is a highly important subject. Current techniques based on nanoparticle-labeling, such as magnetic resonance imaging, fluorescence microscopy, and micro-computed tomography, are plagued by limitations including relatively low sensitivity or penetration depth, involvement of ionizing irradiation, and potential cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles. Here we introduce a new class of contrast agents based on gold nanocages (AuNCs) with hollow interiors and porous walls to label human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for both in vitro and in vivo tracking using two-photon microscopy and photoacoustic microscopy. As demonstrated by the viability assay, the AuNCs showed negligible cytotoxicity under a reasonable dose, and did not alter the differentiation potential of the hMSCs into desired lineages. We were able to image the cells labeled with AuNCs in vitro for at least 28 days in culture, as well as to track the cells that homed to the tumor region in nude mice in vivo. PMID:23946820

  1. An MRI Method To Map Tumor Hypoxia Using Red Blood Cells Loaded with a pO2-Responsive Gd-Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Enza; Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Gianolio, Eliana; Lanzardo, Stefania; Carrera, Carla; Fedeli, Franco; Aime, Silvio

    2015-08-25

    Hypoxia is a typical hallmark of many solid tumors and often leads to therapy resistance and the development of a more aggressive cancer phenotype. Oxygen content in tissues has been evaluated using numerous different methods for several imaging modalities, but none has yet reached the required standard of spatial and temporal resolution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) appears to be the technique of choice and several pO2-responsive probes have been designed for it over the years. In vivo translation is often hampered in Gd-relaxation agents as it is not possible to separate effects that arise from changes in local concentration from those associated with responsive properties. A novel procedure for the MRI based assessment of hypoxia is reported herein. The method relies on the combined use of Gd-DOTP- and Gd-HPDO3A-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) where the first probe acts as a vascular oxygenation-responsive agent, while the second reports the local labeled RBC concentration in a transplanted breast tumor mouse model. The MRI assessment of oxygenation state has been validated by photoacoustic imaging and ex vivo immunofluorescence. The method refines tumor staging in preclinical models and makes possible an accurate monitoring of the relationship between oxygenation and tumor growth.

  2. The impact of MRI sequence on tumour staging and gross tumour volume delineation in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prezzi, Davide; Mandegaran, Ramin; Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Owczarczyk, Katarzyna; Gaya, Andrew; Glynne-Jones, Robert; Goh, Vicky

    2018-01-01

    To compare maximum tumour diameter (MTD) and gross tumour volume (GTV) measurements between T 2 -weighted (T 2 -w) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA) and assess sequence impact on tumour (T) staging. Second, to evaluate interobserver agreement and reader delineation confidence. The staging MRI scans of 45 SCCA patients (25 females) were assessed retrospectively by two independent radiologists (0 and 5 years' experience of anal cancer MRI). MTD and GTV were delineated on both T 2 -w and high-b-value DWI images and compared between sequences; T staging was derived from MTD. Interobserver agreement was assessed and delineation confidence scored (1 to 5) by each observer. GTV and MTD were significantly and systematically lower on DWI versus T 2 -w sequences by 14.80%/9.98% (MTD) and 29.70%/12.25% (GTV) for each reader, respectively, causing T staging discordances in approximately a quarter of cases. Bland-Altman limits of agreement were narrower and intraclass correlation coefficients higher for DWI. Delineation confidence was greater on DWI: 40/42 cases were scored confidently (4 or 5) by each reader, respectively, versus 31/36 cases based on T 2 -w images. Sequence selection affects SCCA measurements and T stage. DWI yields higher interobserver agreement and greater tumour delineation confidence. (orig.)

  3. Human Papillomavirus and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Correlation With Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Park, Mina; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Koh, Yoon Woo; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kim, Jinna

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) parameters on the basis of the status of human papillomavirus (HPV) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarkers in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and oropharynx by use of histogram analysis. A total of 22 consecutive patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC underwent DCE-MRI before receiving treatment. DCE parameter maps of the volume transfer constant (K(trans)), the flux rate constant (kep), and the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve) were obtained. The histogram parameters were calculated using the entire enhancing tumor volume and were compared between the patient subgroups on the basis of HPV and EGFR biomarker statuses. The cumulative histogram parameters of K(trans) and kep showed lower values in the HPV-negative and EFGR-overexpression group than in the HPV-positive EGFR-negative group. These differences were statistically significant for the mean (p = 0.009), 25th, 50th, and 75th percentile values of K(trans) and for the 25th percentile value of kep when correlated with HPV status in addition to the mean K(trans) value (p = 0.047) and kep value (p = 0.004) when correlated with EGFR status. No statistically significant difference in ve was found on the basis of HPV and EGFR status. DCE-MRI is useful for the assessment of the tumor microenvironment associated with HPV and EGFR biomarkers before treatment of patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC.

  4. Evaluation of a BGO-Based PET System for Single-Cell Tracking Performance by Simulation and Phantom Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ouyang PhD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A recent method based on positron emission was reported for tracking moving point sources using the Inveon PET system. However, the effect of scanner background noise was not further explored. Here, we evaluate tracking with the Genisys4, a bismuth germanate-based PET system, which has no significant intrinsic background and may be better suited to tracking lower and/or faster activity sources. Position-dependent sensitivity of the Genisys4 was simulated in Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE using a static 18F point source. Trajectories of helically moving point sources with varying activity and rotation speed were reconstructed from list-mode data as described previously. Simulations showed that the Inveon’s ability to track sources within 2 mm of localization error is limited to objects with a velocity-to-activity ratio < 0.13 mm/decay, compared to < 0.29 mm/decay for the Genisys4. Tracking with the Genisys4 was then validated using a physical phantom of helically moving [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-in-oil droplets (< 0.24 mm diameter, 139-296 Bq, yielding < 1 mm localization error under the tested conditions, with good agreement between simulated sensitivity and measured activity (Pearson correlation R = .64, P << .05 in a representative example. We have investigated the tracking performance with the Genisys4, and results suggest the feasibility of tracking low activity, point source-like objects with this system.

  5. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  6. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  7. Particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mais, H.; Ripken, G.; Wrulich, A.; Schmidt, F.

    1986-02-01

    After a brief description of typical applications of particle tracking in storage rings and after a short discussion of some limitations and problems related with tracking we summarize some concepts and methods developed in the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. We show how these concepts can be applied to the proton ring HERA. (orig.)

  8. Timber tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düdder, Boris; Ross, Omry

    2017-01-01

    Managing and verifying forest products in a value chain is often reliant on easily manipulated document or digital tracking methods - Chain of Custody Systems. We aim to create a new means of tracking timber by developing a tamper proof digital system based on Blockchain technology. Blockchain...

  9. Functional and molecular imaging with MRI: potential applications in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.

    2011-01-01

    MRI is a very versatile tool for noninvasive imaging and it is particularly attractive as an imaging technique in paediatric patients given the absence of ionizing radiation. Recent advances in the field of MRI have enabled tissue function to be probed noninvasively, and increasingly MRI is being used to assess cellular and molecular processes. For example, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI has been used to assess tissue vascularity, diffusion-weighted imaging can quantify molecular movements of water in tissue compartments and MR spectroscopy provides a quantitative assessment of metabolite levels. A number of targeted contrast agents have been developed that bind specifically to receptors on the vascular endothelium or cell surface and there are several MR methods for labelling cells and tracking cellular movements. Hyperpolarization techniques have the capability of massively increasing the sensitivity of MRI and these have been used to image tissue pH, successful response to drug treatment as well as imaging the microstructure of the lungs. Although there are many challenges to be overcome before these techniques can be translated into routine paediatric imaging, they could potentially be used to aid diagnosis, predict disease outcome, target biopsies and determine treatment response noninvasively. (orig.)

  10. Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation (PCI) versus Active MRI Surveillance for Small Cell Lung Cancer: The Case for Equipoise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusthoven, Chad G; Kavanagh, Brian D

    2017-12-01

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) for SCLC offers a consistent reduction in the incidence of brain metastases at the cost of measurable toxicity to neurocognitive function and quality of life, in the setting of characteristic pathologic changes to the brain. The sequelae of PCI have historically been justified by the perception of an overall survival advantage specific to SCLC. This rationale has now been challenged by a randomized trial in extensive-stage SCLC demonstrating equivalent progression-free survival and a trend toward improved overall survival with PCI omission in the context of modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging and surveillance. In this article, we critically examine the randomized trials of PCI in extensive-stage SCLC and discuss their implications on the historical data supporting PCI for limited-stage SCLC from the pre-MRI era. Further, we review the toxicity of moderate doses of radiation to the entire brain that underlie the growing interest in active MRI surveillance and PCI omission. Finally, the evidence supporting prospective investigation of radiosurgery for limited brain metastases in SCLC is reviewed. Overall, our aim is to provide an evidence-based assessment of the debate over PCI versus active MRI surveillance and to highlight the need for contemporary trials evaluating optimal central nervous system management in SCLC. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  12. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  13. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  14. Intact plant MRI for the study of cell water relations, membrane permeability, cell-to-cell and long distance water transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.

    2007-01-01

    Water content and hydraulic conductivity, including transport within cells, over membranes, cell-to-cell, and long-distance xylem and phloem transport, are strongly affected by plant water stress. By being able to measure these transport processes non-invasely in the intact plant situation in

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the prediction of survival in oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung University, Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Fan, Kang-Hsing [Chang Gung University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung University, Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Yu-Chun [Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Ko, Sheung-Fat [Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Lan-Yan [Chang Gung University, Biostatistics and Informatics Unit, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Jiun-Jie [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Neuroscience Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keelung (China); Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Medical Imaging Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    We prospectively investigated the roles of pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET)/CT for predicting survival of oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC) patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with histologically proven OHSCC and neck nodal metastases scheduled for chemoradiation were eligible. Clinical variables as well as DCE-MRI-, DWI- and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT-derived parameters of the primary tumours and metastatic neck nodes were analysed in relation to 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. Eighty-six patients were available for analysis. Multivariate analysis identified the efflux rate constant (K{sub ep})-tumour < 3.79 min{sup -1} (P = 0.001), relative volume of extracellular extravascular space (V{sub e})-node < 0.23 (P = 0.004) and SUV{sub max}-tumour > 19.44 (P = 0.025) as independent risk factors for both PFS and OS. A scoring system based upon the sum of each of the three imaging parameters allowed stratification of our patients into three groups (patients with 0/1 factor, patients with 2 factors and patients with 3 factors, respectively) with distinct PFS (3-year rates = 72 %, 38 % and 0 %, P < 0.0001) and OS (3-year rates = 81 %, 46 % and 20 %, P < 0.0001). K{sub ep}-tumour, V{sub e}-node and SUV{sub max}-tumour were independent prognosticators for OHSCC treated with chemoradiation. Their combination helped survival stratification. (orig.)

  16. Extracellular NGFR Spacers Allow Efficient Tracking and Enrichment of Fully Functional CAR-T Cells Co-Expressing a Suicide Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casucci, Monica; Falcone, Laura; Camisa, Barbara; Norelli, Margherita; Porcellini, Simona; Stornaiuolo, Anna; Ciceri, Fabio; Traversari, Catia; Bordignon, Claudio; Bonini, Chiara; Bondanza, Attilio

    2018-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell immunotherapy is at the forefront of innovative cancer therapeutics. However, lack of standardization of cellular products within the same clinical trial and lack of harmonization between different trials have hindered the clear identification of efficacy and safety determinants that should be unveiled in order to advance the field. With the aim of facilitating the isolation and in vivo tracking of CAR-T cells, we here propose the inclusion within the CAR molecule of a novel extracellular spacer based on the low-affinity nerve-growth-factor receptor (NGFR). We screened four different spacer designs using as target antigen the CD44 isoform variant 6 (CD44v6). We successfully generated NGFR-spaced CD44v6 CAR-T cells that could be efficiently enriched with clinical-grade immuno-magnetic beads without negative consequences on subsequent expansion, immuno-phenotype, in vitro antitumor reactivity, and conditional ablation when co-expressing a suicide gene. Most importantly, these cells could be tracked with anti-NGFR monoclonal antibodies in NSG mice, where they expanded, persisted, and exerted potent antitumor effects against both high leukemia and myeloma burdens. Similar results were obtained with NGFR-enriched CAR-T cells specific for CD19 or CEA, suggesting the universality of this strategy. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the incorporation of the NGFR marker gene within the CAR sequence allows for a single molecule to simultaneously work as a therapeutic and selection/tracking gene. Looking ahead, NGFR spacer enrichment might allow good manufacturing procedures-manufacturing of standardized CAR-T cell products with high therapeutic potential, which could be harmonized in different clinical trials and used in combination with a suicide gene for future application in the allogeneic setting.

  17. Extracellular NGFR Space